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Embargoed until

6:00PM, April 4, 2019

CULTURAL PLAN
ABOUT
THIS
PLAN
The Cultural Plan was initiated by the DC Council
through the Cultural Plan for the District Act of 2015,
which directed the DC Office of Planning to develop
the Plan in consultation with the DC Commission on
the Arts and Humanities and the DC Office of Cable
Television, Film, Music and Entertainment with support
from an interdisciplinary consulting team. Throughout
the planning process, more than 1,500 community
members and cultural stakeholders provided input that
informed the Plan’s strategies and recommendations.
The Cultural Plan establishes a framework to inclusively
grow the District’s cultural community informed by
the Office of Planning’s experience in community
development, land use, systems planning, public
facilities and infrastructure. This Plan’s implementation
will be guided by the multi-sector Implementation
Steering Committee required by the Cultural Plan
for the District Act of 2015. The Mayor will work in
collaboration with the Steering Committee to develop
partnerships and initiatives to realize the Plan’s vision
for building cultural equity.

DC Office of Planning 2
LETTER FROM
O U R M AY O R
Dear Washingtonians,

As Mayor of Washington DC, I am pleased to share with you our first-ever Cultural Plan,
highlighting our many investments with an acute focus on arts, heritage, and innovation.
Individually, these areas are all important to the overall health of our nation’s capital, but
collectively, they are critical to our work to create a fair shot for all Washingtonians.

Our cultural economy today supports more than 150,000 jobs across all eight wards generating
$12.4 billion in wages. And today, ranging from programs to facilities and infrastructure, DC
makes some of the nation’s largest per capita public sector cultural investments. This Plan’s
recommendations will take this further, by maximizing the impact from these investments
and forging stronger connections between artists and existing programs such as affordable
housing and small and local business development.

My Administration has worked to ensure that DC’s local economy remains one of the
strongest in the nation. Washington, DC has changed in many ways since I grew up in
North Michigan Park, but one thing that has not changed is the creativity of our residents!
From go-go and street art to murals and jazz, we know that DC has always been – and will
always be – a leader in the arts.

As part of our strategy surrounding arts and our cultural economy, we formed 202Creates,
a citywide effort showcasing Washington, DC’s diverse and vibrant creative community.
Through a month-long array of events each September, 202Creates promotes the artists,
tastemakers, and entrepreneurs who contribute to our thriving creative industries throughout
the year. 202Creates also features important conversations with innovators, residents, and
businesses with the goal of furthering engagement between government and the creative
community.

Shaped by conversations with more than fifteen-hundred residents, cultural creators and
consumers, our Cultural Plan lays out a vision and recommendations on how the government
and its partners can build upon, strengthen, and invest in the people, places, communities,
and ideas that define culture within DC. It also reinforces our position as a national cultural
policy leader among cities such as New York and Chicago.

Throughout the strategy development process of this Plan, we asked not only what the DC
government could do to advance culture here, but what we can do together – government,
artists and cultural entrepreneurs, residents, and community institutions to further that goal
as well. And we did this through an innovative engagement approach that emphasized
public dialogue between stakeholders and decision-makers.

I want to thank the many individuals, community leaders and organizations who shared their
expertise and ideas to help create this Cultural Plan. Together, we will strengthen DC culture
and the ongoing discussions in our communities to provide a path forward for inclusive
cultural innovation.

I am #DCProud to state that the future of DC’s culture is bright!

3 DC Cultural Plan
TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

06 44 164

E X E C U T I V E S U M M A RY THE PLAN APPENDIX


Plan Development and Themes......  12 Cultural Creators......................... 104 Recommendations.............. 168
.
Strategic Approach.........................  20 Cultural Spaces........................... 114 Tables................................. 180
Looking Ahead................................  31 Cultural Consumers..................... 128 Engagement....................... 194
Cultural Investment Framework... 145 Cultural Programs............... 202
Convergence............................... 156

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................... 6 CULTURAL SPACES ...................................... 114


Plan Development and Themes.................................... 12 Existing Conditions For Cultural Spaces .........115
Strategic Approach................................................... 20 Cultural Space Strategy .............................120
Looking Ahead ........................................................ 31 Cultural Spaces Recommendations .............. 122

OVERVIEW .................................................................. 42 CULTURAL CONSUMERS ................................ 128


Looking Back .......................................................... 48 Existing Conditions For Consumers ...............129
Responding to Change ............................................. 58 Cultural Consumer Strategy ........................ 136
Cultural Consumers Recommendations ......... 137
THE DISTRICT’S CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT .......................... 66
Cultural Assets ........................................................ 68 CULTURAL INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK ............. 142
District Cultural Programs .......................................... 80 Recommended Cultural Investments ............ 150
The Cultural Economy ............................................... 89
CONVERGENCE ........................................... 156
ENGAGEMENT ............................................................. 94 Convergence Recommendations.................. 160

COLLECTIVE ACTION FOR SUSTAINABLE CULTURE .............. 102 APPENDIX OF RECOMMENDATIONS.................. 168

CULTURAL CREATORS .................................................. 104 APPENDIX OF TABLES .................................. 180


Existing Conditions For Cultural Creators ....................... 105
Cultural Creator Strategy ........................................... 109 APPENDIX OF ENGAGEMENT .......................... 194
Cultural Creator Recommendations .............................. 110
APPENDIX OF CULTURAL PROGRAMS ...............202

DC Office of Planning 4
EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

CULTURE BRINGS
US TOGETHER
" [The Culture Plan] lays out a vision and recommendations
on how the government and its partners can build upon,
strengthen, and invest in the people, places, communities,
and ideas that define culture within DC."
- Mayor Muriel Bowser

The District’s culture is the city’s collective soul – it reflects individuality, heritage, interests
and aspirations. It is what makes us different and brings us together. The composition of
cultural practices from all residents and cultural organizations is Washington, DC culture.

DC's culture is go-go and the Smithsonian; thrive in a growing and increasingly high-value
marching bands and gospel choirs; visual city. It strengthens the cultural community by
arts and language arts; heritage and counter creating new resources and programs to help
culture. Over the past decade, the District has build cultural organizations that succeed with
experienced profound changes that have altered new funding models that reach more consumers.
the city’s cultural geography and practice. This It also supports and expands social, informal
Plan is a guide for culture to grow diversely, and formal cultural space across the city. The
inclusively and accessibly with firm foundations Plan lays out programmatic alignments that
in heritage. better connect and integrate support resources
for cultural organizations in the short-term,
The Cultural Plan strengthens arts, humanities,
while introducing innovative programs that will
culture and heritage in neighborhoods across
help cultural creators transition to new business
the city by increasing cultural participation,
models in the mid-term.
supporting artistic skill development, stimulating
cultural production and informing decision- Washington, DC has evolved from a low-value
making. It lays out a vision and recommendations to a high-value real estate market, altering
on how the government and its partners can cultural geography and cultural business
build upon, strengthen and invest in the people, models in the process. Cultural geography is the
places, communities and ideas that define distribution of cultural facilities serving cultural
culture within the nation’s capital. activities throughout the city. Business models
are the revenue and customer relationships
This Plan introduces innovative models built on
that define the shape and function of each
emerging best practices to empower creators
cultural organization. These changes have
and cultural organizations with approaches to

7 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

INVESTING IN
SOCIAL INNOVATION
"...my Administration remains focused on preserving our history and culture, ensuring
we remain diverse and inclusive, and giving more Washingtonians the opportunity to
participate in our city’s prosperity. "
-Mayor Muriel Bowser

increased the costs for cultural creators Although many stakeholders already
and organizations, including the need for contribute, this Plan helps focus and
higher wages that keep up with the cost grow cultural investments by building
of living and increased costs for space new partnerships and leveraging new
in the competitive real estate market. resources.
Cultural equity has been impacted as
many creators and organizations have The District government has invested
difficulty securing sufficient funding from billions of dollars in public facilities with
limited sources. cultural uses including schools, libraries
and recreation centers. Additionally,
This Plan builds on the District annual programmatic funding for technical
government’s experience catalyzing assistance, grants and promotion
innovation in fields, such as affordable supports a wide range of creators,
housing, environmental protection and spaces and consumers. Furthermore,
public facilities. The Plan has a three-part on a case by case basis, the District has
catalytic framework that includes: shared also provided seed funding that helped
stewardship, organizational innovation renovate and establish cultural spaces
and leveraged funding that will enable across the city including THEARC and
cultural organizations to evolve and thrive Lincoln Theatre. All of these investments
as the District continues growing. These are supported by equity building
approaches support sustainable cultural programs, including affordable housing,
practices that reflect the city’s diversity by healthcare and business development
transforming access to cultural financing; that empower all residents within the
increasing access to cultural production cultural sector and beyond.
and presentation spaces; and increasing
connections to cultural consumers. Nongovernmental cultural stakeholders
have provided free and low-cost
This is an aspirational plan that will inform space in addition to financial support.
agency work, partnership approaches Residents share their commitment to
and foundational legal documents, such creators through a wide range of events
as the Comprehensive Plan. including the Anacostia River Festival. By
expanding cultural stewardship, the city’s
Shared Stewardship—all residents and cultural practices will become increasingly
cultural stakeholders will collaboratively representative of all Washingtonians,
support the city’s culture with regular their heritage and traditions.
investments of time and resources.

DC Office of Planning 8
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

The private sector has also contributed to shared in the growing city.
stewardship of the city's culture through support
Leveraged Funding—helps all types of cultural
including space and financial assistance for cultural
organizations develop a base to thrive by making
institutions, such as the Woolly Mammoth Theatre.
more efficient use of existing funding to access new
There are numerous opportunities for the private sector
resources from foundations and impact investors.
to partner with other cultural stakeholders to achieve
Impact investing is an emerging practice that directs
win-win solutions.
large amounts of value and mission-oriented funding
Shared stewardship will elevate the city’s cultural from pensions, foundations, and private individuals to
traditions that celebrate who Washingtonians are and achieve publicly beneficial impacts. The District will be
who we have been while providing fertile ground to a leader in developing innovative approaches to cultural
develop who we will become. funding focused on partnership and impact. These
techniques will help the city and its partners to meet
Organizational Innovation—the city and its demand for increased financial support, cultural space
foundation partners will help cultural organizations and organizational development while freeing critical
refine their business models to be more sustainable resources to support increased cultural programming.
through strategic planning, partnership and stronger
connections to cultural consumers. These refined This catalytic framework supports cultural organizations
business models fill market segments with a high- and creators across the city with funding to thrive in a
opportunity for growth between traditional charitable changing environment. The framework is designed to
nonprofits and commercial for-profits. To maximize the equitably maintain, create and activate social, informal
opportunities of these segments, the District will help and formal cultural spaces that enable communities to
nonprofit and for-profit organizations adapt for success better reflect residents’ cultures.

DC Office of Planning 10
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

DC CULTURAL
PLAN PRINCIPLES
The Plan will be implemented by
a multi-sector, interdisciplinary
Steering Committee that will use the
following eight principles to shape the
investments, programs and initiatives
recommended in this Plan.

AFFIRM 
that existing cultural practices, heritage
and organizations are important to the
District.

ALIGN 
and expand programs that support
creators.

DEPLOY 
grant funding strategically to incubate
creators.

CREATE brush
programs that support innovation in
cultural funding.

FORM 
stronger linkages between real estate
development and cultural space
production.

PROMOTE unpackarchive
the District’s cultural opportunities to
local, regional, national and international
audiences through partnerships.

BUILD 
partnerships with local and federal
cultural organizations that increase
cultural access for District residents.

INVEST speed
time and resources collectively through
shared stewardship with every resident
and stakeholder to support and lift-up
cultural expressions.

11 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

PLAN DEVELOPMENT
AND THEMES

The Office of Planning (OP) collaborated with the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities
(CAH) and the Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment (OCTFME) with
support from an interdisciplinary consulting team to develop this Plan.

Per the Cultural Plan for the District Act of It means that culture on the sidewalk is just as
2015, the DC Council directed OP to develop important as culture in the theater. It means that
a comprehensive Cultural Plan for the we all have the freedom to express ourselves
District to better understand the city's cultural and connect with others. Through this approach,
needs and guide cultural investments. The the Cultural Plan will help build a broader, more
Council’s legislation also calls for a multi- equitable base to support diverse and inclusive
sector implementation committee to develop culture that provides increased opportunities for
partnerships and initiatives that build on this District residents including professional creators
Plan’s recommendations to achieve lasting of all types.
results.
This Plan was grounded by a review and
The planning team analyzed the District’s analysis of economic and cultural organization
cultural resources, programs and economy. data. The planning team’s research shows
The team then hosted a series of community constrained  cultural funding, increasing
conversations called INTERMISSION DC where costs, and changes to cultural practice in the
all District residents and cultural stakeholders District. An economic impact analysis found
were invited to take a break from cultural that the cultural economy is an important part
practice and share their experiences, concerns of the District’s economy employing more than
and perspectives. Based on the research 150,000 people, contributing more than $30
and input, the planning team developed three billion annually in spending and more than a $1.1
mutually reinforcing strategies for cultural billion in taxes. The cultural economy includes
creators, space and consumers that converge people and organizations that produce cultural
with a funding roadmap for both existing and works directly, businesses that provide goods
potential programs. and services to those organizations, and jobs
distributed throughout the broader economy
The team developed this Plan with the premise generated by spending from those individuals
that all infrastructure is a stage and every and businesses in the first two categories.
resident is a performer. This approach
recognizes that every resident has cultural This Plan has been shaped by a new engagement
practices that take place in social, informal and approach called ‘flat’ engagement designed to
formal spaces across the city. It is a broadly give each stakeholder unstructured open-ended
inclusive notion designed to push beyond opportunities to discuss their perspectives with
conventional ideas of culture by providing decision-makers. ‘Flat’ engagement infuses this
platforms that empower creators to express Plan with rich, cross-cutting input from 1,500
themselves. Linking infrastructure to cultural stakeholders that shaped its recommendations.
space is a core aspect of this Plan. It means
that culture is for everyone, and it is everywhere. During the engagement process, many creators

DC Office of Planning 12
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

"...the District has been inspired to incorporate culture as our fourth


sustainability pillar joining social, economic, and environmental
sustainability. "

DC Office of Planning 14
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

conveyed their constant struggle to find space for both These discussions highlighted that the District is home to
production and presentation, while others shared broader some of the world’s leading cultural organizations including
issues with higher costs of housing and transportation. the Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery of Art and
However, the concerns reached far beyond transactional Library of Congress. Each of these organizations engage
issues, with a palpable concern that the District’s culture, District residents; some, including the Kennedy Center,
particularly Black culture, is being lost to growth. are undertaking innovative new approaches that bring their
practices into communities while remixing traditional forms
Throughout these conversations, stakeholders shared a of culture with popular culture to increase connection points
wealth of perspectives on the strengths of District culture for cultural consumers.
and opportunities to build on. They identified the District’s
heritage as a national cultural epicenter, and particularly Balancing cultural and economic needs is one of the most
as a historic center of Black culture. Many suggested challenging issues of our time. Cities around the world are
emphasizing locally rooted practices such as jazz, go-go, food working to strengthen cultural systems as they experience
and fashion. The value of youth engagement and education intense growth pressures. To build on the experiences
were also emphasized, including opportunities for increased from peer cities, the District has joined the United Cities
programming and partnership with schools, libraries and and Local Governments Culture 21 initiative, a global
recreation centers. Other attendees highlighted the District’s network of cities working collaboratively to lift-up culture as
colleges and universities as critical cultural anchors that a core value. Culture 21 builds on Agenda 21 for Culture,
could facilitate partnerships with both cultural creators and a document that guides cultural development worldwide
consumers. with a commitment to human rights, cultural diversity,
sustainability, participatory democracy and peace. By
Stakeholders prioritized both public space and facilities joining Culture 21, the District is tapping into a wealth of
for many different types of cultural practices because they experience from cities around the world that have introduced
are affordable and accessible. Many people highlighted culture as a core pillar of sustainable development.
opportunities to streamline the application and permitting
processes for using these facilities. There was also broad Through Culture 21, the District has been inspired to
interest in building on innovative models, such as Monroe incorporate culture as its fourth sustainability pillar joining
Street Market and the Brookland Artspace Lofts, to create social, economic, and environmental sustainability. This
cross-subsidized cultural space in new real estate development approach means the District will develop strategies that
projects. Some participants encouraged the Plan to support harness opportunities that align all four pillars to maximize
more incubators and cooperatives that help cultural creators the benefits and sustainability of economic development.
develop and refine their cultural practices to become viable Actively maintaining and growing the District’s cultural
businesses. fabric will help the city grow inclusively by creating new
cultural opportunities while reinforcing connections to the
Throughout the planning process the team held dozens of city’s heritage. These solutions take a little more effort to
focus groups with stakeholders including cultural funders, develop, but they produce particularly durable results.
leading federal institutions, local institutions, individual artists,
youth and community leaders. These conversations provided This Plan marks a pivotal moment in District culture. For
deep insight that informed the Plan’s strategic approach. decades, culture has filled underutilized spaces and
anchored community reinvestment. Now it is time to evolve
toward a new model of “culture everywhere” facilitated by
shared stewardship, implemented through organizational
innovation, and driven by funding innovation. This
approach will help maximize the cultural opportunities the
District has by creating fluid relationships between cultural
infrastructure and the city’s growth.

15 DC Cultural Plan
VISION

For Cultural Equity

Culture in the District embodies the city’s


heritage, diversity and opportunity. It is an
inclusive reflection of the District, celebrating
and interweaving diverse subcultures and
counterculture with symbols of democracy.
All stakeholders will help create spaces, tools
and support for every resident to aspire, test
and scale their ideas. All residents will have
opportunities to develop and share cultural
practices by using public spaces and facilities
as platforms for creativity. The Plan increases
social, informal and formal cultural spaces,
facilitating cycles of creation and consumption
that inspire and empower every resident to find
their cultural voice and share it. Through this
Plan, the District will build upon foundations
of heritage and diversity to foster thriving and
equitable culture.
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

GOALS
The Cultural Plan lays out a series of strategies and tools to achieve twelve goals. These aspirational
goals are the leverage points that the Plan will change to make DC culture more sustainable and
inclusive and equitable.

01 C U LT U R A L C R E AT O R S

• Cultural Creators will develop their practice with the support of aligned
educational and technical assistance resources.
• Cultural Creators will have increased access to affordable housing.
• Cultural Creators will have increased access to affordable production space.
• Cultural Creators will be empowered to build careers as creators.

02 C U LT U R A L S PA C E S

• Cultural Space in the public realm and in public facilities will be platforms for
expression.
• Cultural Space will be more accessible.
• Cultural Space will be increased and maintained as community anchors.
• Cultural Space creation will be linked to the city’s growth.

03 C U LT U R A L C O N S U M E R S

• Cultural Consumers will have more information about cultural events in the city.
• Cultural Consumers will have access to a broader and more diverse range of
cultural practices.
• Cultural Consumers will have inclusive access to cultural spaces and practices.
• Cultural Consumers will experience culture in every community.

17 DC Cultural Plan
A S P I R AT I O N F O R C H A N G E

INPUTS
THEORY OF CHANGE

People Programs

Leveraged Organizational Shared


Funding Innovation Stewardship

OUTCO M E S

The Cultural Plan provides a framework to build cultural equity by


leveraging the city’s prosperity. The framework affirms the value of
diverse and equitable culture by reflecting on the city’s history and
looking ahead to its opportunities. The framework builds on this core
value by aligning the people, programs and places that support culture
across the city to solidify the city’s foundation for cultural growth. From
this foundation, the Cultural Plan’s recommendations facilitate three
types of catalytic actions: shared stewardship, organizational innovation,
and leveraged funding. These actions are operationalized through the
Plan’s strategies for Cultural Creators, Cultural Spaces and Cultural
Consumers, which are linked by recommendations for Convergence.
Through Convergence, the Cultural Plan’s framework facilitates culture
that is equitable and sustainable in a growing city.

DC Office of Planning 18
"Build Cultural Equity by Leveraging the City's Prosperity"

Places CUTURAL LOGIC MODELS

AC TIONS
AFFIRM
CULTURAL STREAMLINE
STRENGTHEN SPACE PROCESSES
WORKFORCE ENHANCE THE
DEVELOPMENT CULTURAL SUPPORT CULTURAL
CREATORS SYSTEM SPACES

PARTNER
TO CREATE
FACILITATE CULTURE
CULTURAL
EVERYWHERE
EXPAND YOUTH SPACE
PROGRAMMING
Cultural
Convergance

EXPAND
COMMUNITY
INCREASE
ORIENTED
PROGRAMMING CULTURAL
CULTURAL
CONSUMERS EXPOSURE

PROMOTE CULTURAL
OPPORTUNITIES

19 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

Kristina Noell

STRATEGIC
APPROACH
DC Office of Planning 20
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

The District will leverage new partnerships to create opportunities for more cultural space in communities across

the city. Over time, leveraging new funding sources will enable the District to dedicate more of its cultural funding

for programming, which will increase support for diverse cultural practices unique to the city. This Plan establishes

a framework for growing District culture to be equitable and sustainable by partnering and increasing the efficiency

of the District’s investments. The Cultural Plan achieves its goals with three interlocking strategies for cultural

creators, cultural spaces and cultural consumers that provide mutually reinforcing recommendations that are tied

together by convergence recommendations. This approach increases outlets for cultural producers, entrepreneurs

and organizations while creating more opportunities for cultural participation among residents and visitors.

21 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

CULTURAL CREATORS
Cultural creators are the people and organizations that produce cultural expressions. Creators are students in school,
hobbyists, artists, cultural entrepreneurs and anyone who creates. The Plan offers opportunities for creators ranging
from individuals to large organizations. The strategy aligns and expands opportunities for cultural expressions with
a series of pathways for creators to develop their practice. [See 'Appendix of Recommendations' for more information]

CULTURAL CREATORS
Recommendations
Launch a Center for Cultural Opportunities Support local cultural identity and traditions
• Align cultural creators with small business programs • Continue supporting culture through historic preservation

Increase access to affordable housing Support innovation in local culture


• Produce a Cultural Creators Affordable Housing Toolkit • Reinforce The Labs at DC Public Library
• Produce a Cultural Tenants' Toolkit • Continue to implement and refine DC Commission on
the Arts and Humanities grant programs

Increase youth programming • Develop innovative operating models for cultural

• Continue strengthening Pre-K-12 arts and culture incubators and collective production space

programs
• Leverage the Any Given Child and Turnaround Arts
Programs
• Increase out-of-school cultural programming for youth

DC Office of Planning 22
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

CULTURAL SPACES
Cultural spaces are the social, informal and formal places where creators engage consumers. Spaces include libraries,
recreation centers, school auditoriums, theaters, galleries, bars, coffee shops, parks, street festivals and block parties.
The Plan introduces strategies that leverage public and private sector resources to sustain cultural spaces and create
new ones. These tools form a continuum of cultural space by maximizing public space and facilities, while generating
private space through linkages to real estate development and creating opportunities for cultural organizations to
purchase spaces or secure long-term leases. [See 'Appendix of Recommendations' for more information]

CULTURAL SPACES
Recommendations
Affirm civic identity and community heritage Maximize Access to Public Facilities for Cultural
through space Presentation
Use innovative tools to daylight cultural heritage • Increase evening and weekend access to cultural spaces
• Continue incorporating culture into community planning • Create a standardized price schedule for public facilities
• Deploy experimental strategies for infusing culture in public and services
space • Reduce insurance and security costs for cultural events
• Increase options for cultural expression in public space Streamline permitting for cultural uses
• Conduct a review of the city’s noise ordinances Encourage affordable ground floor space for
• Conduct educational outreach to public space presenters cultural organizations
• Align Comprehensive Plan Policies • Support low-cost, long-term cultural space leases
• Leverage the Capital Budgeting Process through • Develop cultural space purchase assistance programs
partnerships • Encourage temporary cultural use in vacant commercial
Promote a range of cultural spaces throughout space
the city • Encourage cultural space in Planned Unit Developments
• Implement a Festival Streets program
• Leverage District assets to create affordable cultural Create a portfolio of cultural incubators and
collective production spaces
space
• Pursue public-private-partnership opportunities to create
• Develop partnerships for behind the scenes cultural
cultural space
spaces
• Establish a cultural space consortium
• Partner with banks to target Community Reinvestment
Act (CRA) investments

23 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

CULTURAL CONSUMERS
Cultural consumers are the District’s residents and visitors. The strategy offers new ways to promote the city’s cultural
assets and programming to local and regional residents as well as visitors. These promotions will increase support
for creators and cultural space in communities citywide while strengthening the District as a national and international
cultural destination. [See 'Appendix of Recommendations' for more information]

CULTURAL CONSUMERS
Recommendations
Promote cultural events to residents Increase cultural awareness through a permanent
• Utilize inclusive outreach strategies oral history program
• Work with community-facing partners to promote culture • Highlight community heritage
• Collect feedback from cultural consumers

Build stronger connections between local cultural


Market local cultural events to regional residents
creators and consumers in federal cultural space
and national visitors

Launch a targeted international campaign Strengthen youth exposure to culture


promoting the District’s local culture
Support art in transit
• Partner with embassy public diplomacy programs

Expand community-oriented cultural


programming
• Expand cultural programming in public facilities to serve
diverse consumers
• Leverage universities as cultural anchors

DC Office of Planning 24
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

CONVERGENCE
The cultural creators, spaces and consumers strategies converge as a system that empowers individuals and
organizations. These strategies form synergies to grow the city’s cultural community by aligning, leveraging and
promoting District culture and creativity to increase equity, diversity and innovation. The convergence recommendations
establish links that connect the cultural creators, spaces and consumers strategies to form a cohesive cultural strategy
for the entire city. [See 'Appendix of Recommendations' for more information]

CONVERGENCE
Recommendations
Promote a comprehensive, inclusive and healthy Form bridges to new cultural models
cultural community • Advance a collective contribution-shared stewardship
• Strengthen the nexus between traditional culture and model
nontraditional culture • Transform capacity-building
• Strengthen culturally underserved communities • Develop a heritage business program
• Support residents’ ability to use public space for cultural • Leverage the District’s Public Space Stewardship Guide
activity
• Consolidate mural programs Nurture the link between culture and equitable
• Encourage shared parking agreements for cultural development
spaces • Partner with Culture 21
• Establish an arts & culture planning position • Customize Culture 21 to local context
• Strengthen Boards of Directors • Institutionalize culture across the city

25 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

CULTURAL INVESTMENT
FRAMEWORK
Currently, the city’s cultural organizations reflect its many communities creating a stronger
are constrained by funding availability. By sense of place in the process. Ultimately, these
implementing this Plan, the District is poised approaches will increase growth and exposure
to lead the way toward new organizational for cultural practices and cultural communities
and funding approaches that will significantly that have been historically under-resourced.
increase opportunities for cultural growth by
The Plan’s investment framework identifies
adapting innovative approaches from fields
catalytic opportunities where the District can use
such as housing, environmental protection and
its resources to create cultural opportunities that
public facilities. These approaches incorporate
extend beyond existing markets and programs.
emerging international best practices to develop
The investment framework maximizes unique
new cultural funding models that will enable
roles the public sector can take as a major
more cultural creators and organizations to thrive
property owner and multi-sector investor while
as the District continues to grow. These funding
establishing key alignments with other funders
models will help organizations secure spaces
and cultural stakeholders. This framework will
that better meet their needs and offer increased
help create cultural space, increase creator
revenue opportunities. Most importantly, they
capacity, support cultural programing and
move cultural space within reach for more cultural
facilitate cultural resilience.
creators, increasing the equity and diversity of
the District’s culture. These models will infuse
communities across the city with spaces that

The investment framework systematically expands cultural creation with four approaches:

Targeting investment in public Creating a Cultural Facilities


facilities to increase access to Fund to help cultural
space for cultural production, organizations secure facilities
presentation and consumption. through purchase, renovation
and long-term leases.

Implementing new organizational Creating a Cultural Innovation


capacity grants funded by and Entrepreneurship
multi-sector partnerships to help Revolving Loan Fund to help
both nonprofit and for-profit cultural organizations develop
organizations build capacity for new practices and scale-up
adopting new cultural funding proven concepts.
models.

DC Office of Planning 26
SOCIAL
I M PAC T
INVESTING

Social impact investing is investment


in organizations and funds to generate
measurable and beneficial social impact
alongside a financial return. Social Impact
Investment is a funding model that offers
scalable financial resources to nonprofit
and for-profit companies that produce
measurable social impact while utilizing
high standards of financial planning and
management.
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

"...all infrastructure is a stage and


every resident is a performer..."

This Plan strengthens cultural uses of the city’s The Cultural Innovation and Entrepreneurship
community facilities with targeted investments Revolving Loan Fund will help cultural creators
and partnerships to increase their utilization grow by providing smaller short-term loans that
for cultural activities. The District’s networks of support innovation and growth opportunities.
libraries, recreation centers and schools reach For example, the fund can help a cooperative
every community across the city. These facilities grow its business by financing the purchase of
have dance studios, arts spaces, kitchens, new equipment. In other cases, the loans can
computer labs and presentation space. Some be used to finance merchandise that generates
facilities go even further by offering recording profit for touring musicians. The revolving fund
studios, woodworking, glass making, and will offer lines of credit that enable cultural
pottery facilities. The District will continue organizations to sustainably absorb costs
investing in these spaces and seek programming including payroll during slow periods. Providing
partnerships to support a greater breadth of affordable short-term financing will increase
cultural opportunities. Additionally, when new capacity and resilience for nonprofit and for-
facilities are constructed or existing facilities are profit cultural organizations in the District.
renovated, the city will work to ensure that the
The Cultural Facilities Fund will help sustain,
opportunities for cultural space are maximized.
modernize and increase the District’s cultural
A new series of capacity building grants will infrastructure as the city continues to grow.
help existing nonprofit and for-profit cultural For example, it can help establish a portfolio of
organizations build capacity to adopt new cultural incubators that provide bridges to cultural
funding models. These grants will help cultural innovation and growth. The Cultural Facilities
organizations adopt updated business models Fund will provide tools for organizations to secure
through strategic and financial planning long-term spaces through lease or purchase as
assistance. well as financing for modernizations.

This investment framework has the potential The investment framework removes many of
to increase cultural funding by using public the constraints that restrict cultural growth.
investments as leverage for larger private There are substantial resources available
investments to increase and improve cultural that can increase cultural equity and capacity
space. These models use the District’s funding by ensuring that viable organizations are
for cultural space and innovation more efficiently supported. The District government will work to
to achieve greater impact while enabling more better coordinate technical assistance, support
public cultural funding to eventually shift toward programs, grant programs and regulatory
programmatic investments that will benefit processes. These approaches will form stronger
creators and consumers. connections between creators and consumers
that will grow the cultural support base enabling
The District will build on its experience with more people and more communities to contribute
public-private-partnerships to create both a to the District’s culture.
Cultural Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Revolving Loan Fund and a Cultural Facilities
Fund. These funds will help cultural creators
unlock social impact funding.

29 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

RECOMMENDED
INVESTMENTS

check Expand capacity building grants


through partnerships

check Create a Cultural Innovation and


Entrepreneurship Revolving Loan
Fund

check Create a Cultural Facilities Fund

check Institute a Cultural Space Tax


Credit Program

check Create a Cultural Navigator


Position for the Center for Cultural
Opportunity

o Create an online storefront


through the Made in DC Brand
o Create a web-based Center for
Cultural Opportunity platform

check Create a Community Event Security


Fund

check Expand The Labs at DCPL

check Invest in marketing


E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

LOOKING
AHEAD
Culture is important. It reflects who we are and where The Plan’s success will be measured by increased
we have come from. cultural production and participation by residents as
well as utilization of the city’s cultural infrastructure.
This Plan is a roadmap for sustainable and inclusive
This means more residents will be engaged in the
culture in the District that harnesses the forces
production of cultural works; more people of all ages will
changing the city. It is a new approach that recognizes
partake in arts and cultural learning. Theaters and other
cultural investments and organizations will need to
performance venues will only go dark for maintenance;
evolve through shared stewardship, organizational
libraries and recreation centers will be widely used as
innovation and leveraged funding. This Plan will help
community cultural centers; cultural expressions will be
the District to infuse the city with culture everywhere by
common in public and private spaces. Simply put, this
creating accessible opportunities for cultural creators,
Plan will be successful if culture is everywhere and it is
spaces and consumers.
representative of Washington, DC’s residents and the
city’s heritage.

31 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

HOW THE PLAN WORKS


Culture is multifaceted, which is why this Plan is designed to support a wide range of people and organizations.
The following are a few examples of how the Plan’s strategies will converge to support a range of cultural
stakeholders.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

An aspiring graphic designer learns design techniques designer’s income is less than 80% of the Area Median
and skills at the DC Public Library Studio Lab and Income and encourages the designer to apply to the
hones their techniques using library computers and Department of Housing and Community Development’s
software. Once they refine their skills, the designer (DHCD) Affordable Dwelling Unit programs. It takes
develops a logo for a friend who refers them to another. a few tries, but eventually the aspiring designer is
As the aspiring designer starts to earn money for selected for an affordable apartment with rent that will
their work, they seek options to grow their business remain affordable indefinitely. Securing this apartment
by visiting the Center for Cultural Opportunity. The ensures that the designer’s cost of living will remain
Center connects the designer with a mentor to help manageable.
develop a business plan. In addition to working with
a mentor, the designer enrolls in classes to learn With secure housing and some savings built up, the
about business finance and organization. After a few designer starts working full-time from home. As their
mentoring sessions, the designer has a business plan business grows, they join a coworking facility where
and forms a Limited Liability Company (LLC). The they have meeting space and office support facilities.
designer joins a networking group through the Center Eventually, the designer builds relationships with a
where they exchange techniques, experiences and few other designers from the coworking space and the
build professional relationships with other creative networking group, and together they form a graphic
professionals. design firm.

Initially, the designer has a day job while doing design They return to the Center for Cultural Opportunity
work in off-hours, but their business plan is designed where they develop a new business plan with guidance
to grow the graphic design business into a full-time from a mentor. They form a new LLC and acquire office
occupation that will serve as their primary income. space and grow their business. The business grows,
However, the designer is concerned that their income and they decide to expand by hiring additional staff.
will not be enough to cover their apartment’s increasing They take out a short-term low interest loan from the
rent. The Center for Cultural Opportunity notices that the Cultural Facilities Fund to support their expansion.

DC Office of Planning 32
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

A DESIGNER’S
JOURNEY
TO BUILDING
A BUSINESS
LEARN SKILLS VISION
Accesses computer software Takes freelance jobs to Visits the Center for
& training at the refine design skills and Cultural Opportunity,
DC Public Library Studio Lab. earns money for the work. which helps the designer
develop a business plan through
a mentorship program.

MOMENTUM

... While working full time job ...


and freelancing during off-ours
HOUSING FORM
Applies for an Affordable Dwelling Unit Incorporates the business
through DHCD, which provides as an LLC based on guidance
manageable and predictable housing costs. from the Center for Cultural Opportunity.

Builds savings to start


working in the business full time

...
CO WORKING PARTNER EXPAND
Joins a co-working facility for access to Develops Expands by leveraging the firm’s
meeting and production facilities. a new joint business working capital to make strategic
At the co-working facility the designer plan with partners and investments for growth with a
builds a partnership with other designers. then they merge their businesses low-interest loan from the
to form a larger firm under a new LLC. Innovation & Entrepreneurship
Revolving Loan Fund.

33 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

I N DI V I DUA L A RT I ST

An individual artist starts creating pieces at home while Cultural Opportunity, where the artist learns business
working a day job. The artist begins selling their work in finance skills and forms a LLC. These tools and
gallery shows and art festivals. As the artist’s practice techniques enable the artist to better manage expenses
begins to grow, they seek dedicated studio space and reduce their tax burden.
where they can produce more ambitious work with
the aspiration of becoming a full-time artist. The artist However, a few years later, the cooperative’s
networks with other visual artists and finds an artist building owner seeks to sell the building, threatening
cooperative with an opening for a small studio space. the continued existence of the cooperative. The
The artist applies and is accepted for the studio space cooperative uses the online cultural space tool to
where they successfully grow their practice. identify an available cultural space. The space was set
aside by the developer of a mixed-use planned unit
Through the cooperative, the artist reduces costs by development. The cooperative applies for and receives
purchasing supplies in bulk and gains inspiration and a credit guarantee from the Cultural Facilities Fund
mentorship from other members. Established artists to secure a ten-year lease with two five-year options,
at the cooperative recommend visiting the Center for which provides the cooperative long-term stability.

MOMENTUM
AN ARTIST’S
JOURNEY
TO BUILDING
A BUSINESS ... While working full time job ...
and freelancing during off hours
CREATE SELL
Creates pieces Sells pieces at galleries
from home while and art festivals
working a day job

Builds savings to start


working in the business full time

FORM VISION GROW


Establishes a business Visits the Center for Cultural Joins cooperative with a small
by forming an LLC Opportunities and studio space
receives mentoring sessions to
creates a business plan

...
ONLINE TOOLS EXPAND
Uses the online cultural Invests in expansion with a low-interest, short-term loan
space tool to itentify from the Innovation and Entrepreneurship
suitable spaces Revolving Loan Fund to finance
the new equipment

DC Office of Planning 34
T H E AT E R

An established theater needs a major renovation. It business plan. Following a large gift, the development
relies on a base of philanthropic and donor support director is able to raise the remaining funds over the
to supplement a significant gap between ticket following year. With funding from the capital campaign,
sales and operating costs. Their donor base might the theater applies to the Cultural Facilities Fund for
be capable of fully funding the renovation, but the a long-term, low-interest loan to finance the remaining
development director received feedback that a larger costs that are paid for by the organization's increased
capital campaign would diminish regular fundraising for earned revenue over time.
operations support.
The theater undertakes the renovation and continues
To address this challenge, the theater updates its to bring higher levels of revenue. The theater repaid
business plan to generate more revenue with their the renovation loan in ten years while setting aside
facility by renting it to outside presenters and events. small surpluses in a reserve fund. After the loan is
Additionally, the theater increases programming before repaid, the theater continues to save half the loan
and after events to increase revenue from food and payment in a reserve fund and invests the other half in
beverage sales. Building on the increased revenue new programming. In ten more years when the theater
generated from the updated business plan, the needs new renovations, it has a strong reserve that
theater plans a capital campaign for the renovation. enables it to cover 80% of that renovation with capital
The campaign is designed to raise half of the funding contributions and reserves, reducing its loan payments
needed for the renovation upfront and finance the and increasing the portion of its resources that can be
remaining half with revenue produced by the revised invested into the facility.

A THEATRE’S
JOURNEY
THROUGH
RENOVATION
Repairs REVENUE CAMPAIGN
Needs a Increases operating revenue to prepare Launches
major renovation to modernize for the renovation by renting a capital campaign
and rehabilitate the facility. the theatre for to support
outside events as well as the renovation.
increasing emphasis on food
and beverage sales.

REPAID & RESERVE RENOVATE FINANCING


Repays the loan in 10 years, Undertakes Secures a low-interest rennovation loan
while setting aside a portion of the renovation, which from the Cultural Facilities Fund
surplus revenue in a increases attendence and to finance a portion of the
reserve fund. revenue. rennovation costs.

...
REINVEST
Uses the reserve fund to refresh
the facility 10 years after the initial renovation.

35 DC Cultural Plan
I N C U B AT O R

A cultural entrepreneur wants to develop an incubator for Given the nature of the entrepreneur’s business, the
artists specializing in metal work. The entrepreneur has Center for Cultural Opportunities recommends forming
$250,000 available for an initial investment. The Center a S Corporation, which has significant tax advantages
for Cultural Opportunity connects the entrepreneur with in addition to being attractive to investors. However,
an experienced advisor to help refine the incubator’s the Center advises that this type of business requires
business plan. The business plan is based on artists more complex accounting and business administration.
paying fees to access specialized tools, workspaces The entrepreneur forms a S Corporation and recruits
and a retail storefront. The entrepreneur will earn a investors to fund the incubator. The entrepreneur applies
share of the profits from each product sold through the for, and receives, a low-interest loan from the Cultural
storefront. The entrepreneur will also host workshops Facilities Fund to purchase and fit-out the incubator
for aspiring artisans for a small fee and offer a business facility. The low-interest loan enables the entrepreneur
accelerator opportunities for members. Through the to invest in more equipment and marketing. Ultimately,
business accelerator program, the entrepreneur will the incubator proves to be a successful venture
become a business partner with selected members launching numerous cultural enterprises.
to develop their businesses and secure investment
capital.

AN ENTREPRENEUR’S
JOURNEY TO
STARTING AN
INCUBATOR
DEVELOP CAPITAL PLAN
Develops a pitch for an arts incubator. Assembles $250,000 Develops a business plan with
for startup costs. advice from the
Center for Cultural Opportunities

LAUNCH FORM
Launches the Establishes a
incubator with a business model S Corporation and develop a plan
that charges artists a fee to access to recruit investors.
production facilities and a share
of profits earned throughthrough
the incubator’s retail storefront.

...
ACCELERATOR GROWTH
Expands the incubator to offer a Expands with financing from the
business accelerator program, Innovation and Entrepreneurship
where participants are selected Revolving Loan Fund.
on a competitive basis to earn
an equity investment and
business coaching from
the entrepreneur.

DC Office of Planning 36
10
INTERMISSION
70
FOCUS GROUPS AND
PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT PROCESS DC EVENTS PARTNER EVENTS

40
PEOPLE ATTENDED
OCTOBER 4, 2016
SE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION
ANACOSTIA
45
PEOPLE ATTENDED
OCTOBER 11, 2016
SW COMMUNITY CONVERSATION
SW WATERFRONT

R E S E A R C H & D ATA P H A S E
110 OCTOBER 18, 2016
NW COMMUNITY CONVERSATION
PEOPLE ATTENDED COLUMBIA HEIGHTS
90
PEOPLE ATTENDED
OCTOBER 25, 2016
NE COMMUNITY CONVERSATION
ANACOSTIA

245
PEOPLE ATTENDED
OCTOBER 2016 — JANUARY 2017
PRACTITIONER FOCUS GROUPS

100
DEVELOPMENT
DRAFT PLAN

PEOPLE
ATTENDED
REFINEMENT
FINAL PLAN

DC Office of Planning 38
Cultural
Plan Kickoff 500
PEOPLE ATTENDED
JULY 20, 2016
MLK CENTRAL LIBRARY

Community Conversations

150 90
MARCH 9, 2017
NOVEMBER 14, 2016 INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS &
ARTS ACTION ORGANIZATION CULTURAL PRODUCERS
PEOPLE ATTENDED ARENA STAGE PEOPLE ATTENDED HAMILTONIAN GALLERY

Focused Engagement

55 DECEMBER 15, 2016


YOUTH & EDUCATORS
75 MAY 8, 2017
DEAF & HARD OF HEARING

2800
PEOPLE ATTENDED IVY CITY SMOKEHOUSE
PEOPLE ATTENDED KENNEDY CENTER

DRAFT
D.C.
Cultural
Plan
COMMENTS

DRAFT Plan Feedback


JANUARY THROUGH FEBRUARY 2017

700
FEBRUARY 20, 2018
DRAFT PLAN OPEN HOUSE
441 4TH STREET NW

COMMENTS

FINAL
D.C.
Cultural
Plan
3,500
TOTAL CUMULATIVE
ENGAGEMENT
1,500
TOTAL CUMULATIVE
ENGAGEMENT
COMMENTS PARTICIPANTS

39 DC Cultural Plan
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

Kick Off Event Arts Action NE Community Conversation

DC Office of Planning 40
E X E C U T I V E S U M M A R Y

NW Community Conversation SE Community Conversation SW Community Conversation

41 DC Cultural Plan
CULTURAL PLAN
OVERVIEW
O V E R V I E W

The
District’s Cultural Plan
This is a plan to expand Washington, DC’s cultural sector by empowering creators while
introducing innovative approaches to cultural space and advancing equitable opportunities
for cultural consumers. The Plan strengthens arts, humanities, culture and heritage in all
communities across the city by increasing cultural participation, supporting creators, stimulating
cultural production and informing decision-making.

Most importantly, this Plan introduces new stakeholders shared their experiences and
approaches that link cultural development provided suggestions for the Plan.
with the District’s growth by aligning support
The planning team examined how the District
programs with new cultural funding models and
government invests in cultural infrastructure
increasing cultural promotion.
and programs including: grants, facilities, parks
The Plan is a framework for the District’s and public space. Then the team examined
cultural stakeholders to collectively invest privately-held cultural assets, such as galleries,
time and resources to increase the equity and night clubs, theaters and concert halls.
sustainability of the city’s culture. This Plan
The cultural investment analysis also found that
lays out a vision and recommendations for the
the District has invested billions of dollars in
government and its partners to build upon that
cultural programming and infrastructure since
strengthens culture by investing in the people,
2010. These investments include new libraries,
places and ideas that form culture in the District.
schools, and recreation centers, along with
The recommendations include an array of short-
programmatic funding for the DC Commission
term improvements to strengthen the cultural
on the Arts and Humanities and the Office of
community while setting the stage for innovative
Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment
funding models that will enable culture to thrive
(OCTFME). Additionally, the District provided
as the District continues to grow.
significant support to privately-owned cultural
This Plan was developed with an inclusive facilities with tax increment financing initiatives
approach to culture that encompasses arts, and Industrial Revenue Bonds.
humanities, heritage and beyond with the
These are major investments, but the full extent
notion that “all infrastructure is a stage and
of cultural sector investment extends far beyond
every resident is a performer.” One of the most
government investment. Some of the District’s
important components of the inclusive approach
best-known cultural spaces, including the 9:30
was a new engagement model called ‘flat’
Club and LongView Gallery, have been privately
engagement that emphasized all stakeholders’
financed, while foundations and other donors
ability to engage decision-makers directly.
support numerous leading organizations, such
Engagement was conducted through a variety
as the Kreeger Museum and Phillips Collection.
of channels including a dedicated engagement-
Though it was not possible to determine how
oriented project website, ten public meetings
much has been invested by private investors,
and dozens of focus groups. Throughout
foundations and other stakeholders, the scale
the engagement process, more than 1,500

43 DC Cultural Plan
O V E R V I E W

CULTURAL EXPRESSION
"Increasing opportunities that are accessible for all residents to experience art,
fashion, music and theaters will make the city more equitable and dynamic. "

of these investments is evidenced by their economic conditions because people who work in many
impact. The economic impact analysis for this Plan common cultural industries have significantly lower
found cultural activities support about $30 billion average incomes than employees in many of the
in annual spending and $1.1 billion in tax revenue city’s largest industries.
related to more than 150,000 jobs. The cultural
These patterns of urban economic and population
economy includes people and organizations that
growth are part of broader change reverberating
produce cultural works directly, businesses that
through the nation. This change is systemic, driven
provide goods and services to those organizations,
by the new technologies and economies reshaping
and jobs distributed throughout the broader economy
American life. The DC Cultural Plan offers a new
generated by spending from those individuals and
way to reinforce the city’s heritage while growing
businesses in the first two categories.
culture in the District by leveraging its strengths and
Still, throughout the engagement process, many successes. This Plan explicitly affirms the culture
creators shared challenges finding affordable space that is here today, which includes cultural nonprofits,
and sufficient funding. The research phase of the professional artists and the creative economy. It
Plan corroborated these accounts with findings that also recognizes that they city’s cultural funders are
showed the District’s cultural organizations typically not able to keep pace with increasing demands on
have high rates of spending on space exacerbated their resources. In response, the plan emphasizes
by limited opportunities for additional funding. growth opportunities for cultural nonprofit and for-
profit organizations based on new models that use a
These financial stressors are part of broad national three-part catalytic framework of shared stewardship,
trends that are particularly pronounced in the organizational innovation and funding innovation.
District, which has experienced high population, Through this approach, the Plan increases cultural
economic and real estate value growth rates over creation and consumption opportunities for all
the past twenty years that have enabled the city stakeholders including the youngest residents and
to recover from the financial crisis that led to the the oldest institutions.
Control Board. However, the consequences of the
rapid and sustained growth have included changes This Plan will strengthen cultural connections
in the location and types of cultural space as well between District residents, regional neighbors and
as changes to the practices themselves. Growth visitors. It supports incubators that invest in creators
has been focused on parts of the city that were and empowers them to thrive. It also outlines a
underutilized such as NoMa, Capitol Riverfront and robust financing system that fully leverages existing
Mount Vernon Triangle. resources to unlock new funding that will maintain
existing cultural space and create new space for
Unfortunately, many cultural organizations were diverse cultural expression. This approach includes
leasing low-cost space in these underutilized areas working with the Deputy Mayor for Planning and
and as their buildings were redeveloped, some Economic Development to focus District investments
organizations closed and others relocated. Analysis in communities with high levels of unemployment.
for this Plan also demonstrates that creators are Together, these strategies will increase residents’
particularly vulnerable to changing real estate expression of, and exposure to, culture.

DC Office of Planning 44
Vision for Cultural Equity
Culture in the District embodies the city’s heritage, diversity and opportunity. It is an inclusive reflection
of the District, celebrating and interweaving diverse subcultures and counterculture with symbols of
democracy. All stakeholders will help create spaces, tools and support for every resident to aspire, test
and scale their ideas. All residents will have opportunities to develop and share cultural practices by
using public spaces and facilities as platforms for creativity. The Plan increases social, informal and
formal cultural spaces, facilitating cycles of creation and consumption that inspire and empower every
resident to find their cultural voice and share it. Through this Plan, the District will build upon foundations
of heritage and diversity to foster thriving and equitable culture.
C U LT U R A L P L A N G OA L S

The Cultural Plan lays out a series of strategies and tools to achieve twelve goals.
These aspirational goals are the leverage points that the Plan will change to make
culture more sustainable and inclusive across the District.

Cultural Cultural
Creators Spaces
• Cultural Creators will • Cultural Space in the
develop their practice with public realm and in public
the support of aligned facilities will be platforms
educational and technical for expression.
assistance resources. • Cultural Space will be
• Cultural Creators will CONVERGENCE more accessible.
have increased access to of • Cultural Space will be
affordable housing. Cultural increased and maintained
• Cultural Creators will Strategies as community anchors.
have increased access to • Cultural Space creation
affordable production space. will be linked to the city’s
• Cultural Creators will be growth.
empowered to build careers
as creators.

Cultural
Consumers
• Cultural Consumers will have more
information about cultural events in the
city.
• Cultural Consumers will have access
to a broader and more diverse range of
cultural practices.
• Cultural Consumers will have inclusive
access to cultural spaces and
practices.
• Cultural Consumers will experience
culture in every community.

47 DC Cultural Plan
O V E R V I E W

LOOKING BACK
A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE ON DISTRICT CULTURE •

The District’s culture is its soul. The city’s history has the city experiences a new wave of population growth
formed a uniquely rich local culture shaped by its role driven by residents seeking opportunities in the city’s
as: the nation’s capital; one of the first places to abolish growing economy.
slavery; home to jazz, go-go and punk music; the civil
DC is a global city with more than two centuries of
rights movement; and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual,
experience hosting the international community. Today,
Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) movement.
170 nations are represented in the District, along with
The city’s culture reflects the stories and traditions
international institutions such as the World Bank. The
from generations of people who migrated from other
District has welcomed immigrants and refugees from
states and countries. After the Civil War, many former
many nations. Over time, the culture has been infused
slaves migrated north, viewing the District as a beacon
with cultural traditions from nations around the world.
of hope. The people who came brought traditions
These influences have helped the District become a
including food and music that have left indelible marks.
more diverse and inclusive international community.
Both World Wars brought huge population influxes that
transformed the District into a large city. Most recently
the District’s culture has undergone further evolution as

DC CULTURAL PLAN PRINCIPLES


The Cultural Plan will be implemented a by multi-sector, interdisciplinary Steering Committee that will use the following
eight principles to shape the investments, programs and initiatives that will implement this Plan.

AFFIRM  ALIGN brush DEPLOY  CREATE 


that existing cultural
grant funding programs that support
practices, heritage and expand programs
strategically to incubate innovation in cultural
and organizations are that support creators.
creators. funding.
important to the District.

FORM  PROMOTE unpackarchive BUILD  INVEST speed


time and resources
the District’s cultural partnerships with local
stronger linkages collectively through shared
opportunities to local, and federal cultural
between real estate stewardship with every
regional, national and organizations that
development and cultural resident and stakeholder to
international audiences increase cultural access
space production. support and lift-up cultural
through partnerships. for District residents.
expressions.

DC Office of Planning 48
O V E R V I E W

"DC is a global city with more than two centuries of experience


hosting the international community. "

The District’s community identity is city with its ethic of inclusivity and
inextricable from its distinction as the diversity.
nation’s capital. Still, many District
Comparing the paths of the
residents feel friction with the federal
Smithsonian  National  Museum
government. They know hosting
of Natural History and the Tivoli
the nation’s capital is an honor. It
Theater illustrates the different paths
is fundamentally part of the city’s
federal and locally-oriented cultural
identity and its economy. However, at
organizations have taken. Both were
times District residents feel their lives
constructed as the District and the
and perspectives are overwhelmed by
nation grew in the early 20th Century.
federal symbolism.
The Natural History Museum is
Federal cultural organizations are centrally located along the National
among the most robust in the world, Mall while the Tivoli Theater is located
benefiting from nearly continuous at the heart of Columbia Heights. The
investment for more than a century. Natural History Museum was originally
The District’s locally-oriented cultural founded as the National Museum,
organizations reflect its complex housing the Smithsonian Institution’s
history as a city of power, opportunity art, culture, history and natural history
and oppression. The District grew as collections. The Tivoli Theatre was
a center of influence while serving one of the District’s most elegant
as a refuge for the oppressed. but segregated theaters celebrating
Historically, the city was affluent popular culture and a golden era of
and segregated; home to one of movies.
the nation’s preeminent historically
Change came in the turbulent
Black universities but oppressed
1960s when a vast expansion of the
by prejudiced congressional
federal government was contrasted
representatives.
by mounting social, economic and
Cultural organizations, like the racial tensions in the District. During
rest of the city, were profoundly this period, the Smithsonian National
impacted by decades of increased Museum subdivided its collections and
turmoil, population loss and deferred expanded along the National Mall. In
investments that started after World contrast, life in the District grew more
War II and intensified in the 1960s. difficult—streetcar service stopped
During this period, housing in many in 1962; Dr. King’s assassination in
parts of the District was inexpensive 1968 sparked uprisings across the
compared to the booming suburbs. city; the Tivoli was rocked by both
Despite the period’s challenges, jobs events. The uprisings devastated
remained plentiful in the District, which numerous communities including
provided a foundation for many low- Columbia Heights.
income and immigrant residents to
The Tivoli Theatre closed in 1976
build thriving communities. With time,
after a long decline of patronage and
these communities helped endow the

DC Office of Planning 50
O V E R V I E W

revenues coinciding with prolonged


population loss and rapid growth in
the metropolitan region outside of
the city.

In the 1970s, the planned route for


Metro’s Green Line was realigned
to locate stops along 7th, U, and
14th Streets as part of a strategy
to invigorate redevelopment
of corridors heavily damaged
by the uprisings. Thirty years
after the uprisings ended, the
Columbia Heights Metro station
opened, catalyzing redevelopment
throughout the community including
the Tivoli Theatre. The theater
was renovated as a mixed-use
facility, housing the GALA Hispanic
Theatre partially within the original
Tivoli Theatre space. Over the
same period, federal cultural space
continued to expand, including the
National Museum of the American
Indian, and most recently, the
National Museum of African
American History and Culture.

Many iterations of this pattern


unfolded across the District. For
example, U Street is defined by
its history as Black Broadway with
theaters from the heyday of jazz
including the Howard Theatre, 9:30
Club and Lincoln Theatre.

The U Street corridor, scarred by


the 1968 uprising, was revitalized
through coordinated public policy
and investments.

The 1968 uprising started with a


broken drug store window at the
intersection of 14th and U Streets
NW. In the 1980s, the District
constructed the Reeves Center on
the site where the riots began as

51 DC Cultural Plan
O V E R V I E W

an anchor for reinvestment. Then in 1991, the U


Street Metro Station opened and over the past
decade the U Street corridor has begun teeming
again with music and entertainment. In many

CULTURAL ORIGINS ways, U Street shows its Black Broadway roots


through refurbished and reused venues while
reflecting the city’s changing demographics,
social geography and culture. Today, U Street is
still a cultural epicenter, but it is a very different
place than it was at the height of its time as Black
Broadway. However, through cultural memory and
touchstones, the corridor’s heritage continues as
an invaluable part of Washington, DC culture.

Another lens for the city’s cultural heritage is


through houses of worship, which have been
the most accessible cultural spaces for many
residents—particularly in the District’s Black
community where religious freedom provided a
stage for liberty. Houses of worship take a wide
variety of forms and serve a range of functions.
Many of the District’s houses of worship have
been hubs of social movements, ranging from
abolition to Black Lives Matter. Additionally, some
religious organizations created nationally focused
places of worship, such as the Washington

DC Office of Planning 52
O V E R V I E W

National Cathedral and Basilica of and cultural epicenter by using storied just east of Capitol Hill at RFK stadium
the National Shrine of Immaculate venues such as Ford’s Theatre, the and the DC Armory. These large
Conception that serve as national Warner Theatre and National Theatre specialized venues host events that
common ground. These institutions as anchors. Cultural organizations attract thousands of people. Today,
have extensive cultural programs were able to build on the area’s central large events are predominately held at
and presentation spaces. Most are location, extensive transportation, the Capital One Arena, Nationals Park,
community-oriented while some reach large worker population and throngs Audi Field and the Entertainment and
regional and national audiences. Today, of visitors to build one of the nation’s Sports Arena at St Elizabeths.
there are new opportunities for houses leading theater and entertainment
areas. Downtown’s culturally anchored The District’s deeply layered and
of worship to serve as platforms to
revitalization provided a strong base continually evolving cultural geography
bring new residents and longstanding
and template for subsequent efforts needs all of these types of cultural
communities together.
across the city. space. The shared experiences and
Cultural space and identity have traditions that form in communities are
been fundamental parts of the city’s The most widely shared cultural important and will continue to guide
resurgence. Beginning in the 1980s, touchstones are large popular events the District’s cultural stakeholders as
cultural uses anchored revitalization of targeting regional audiences—including we move forward. This Plan values
the downtown central employment area. concerts, football, baseball, soccer, heritage as a vital element that must
The revitalization built on the area’s boxing and roller derby. For many be preserved and incorporated into
long history as the city’s economic years, these events have been held new expressions as the city evolves.

53 DC Cultural Plan
BLACK CULTURE
District culture and Black culture are deeply intertwined.
In the early 19th century, the District extended
progressive but limited liberties to Black people that set
the District apart as a leader in the abolition movement.
These liberties enabled people who were previously
counted as property and their descendants to
Almost since the District’s inception, Black residents
participate in local government, acquire land, establish
fought to gain freedoms and privilege through education
businesses, and form aid organizations.
and entrepreneurship. Prior to racial integration in
the mid-20th century, the District had numerous
As the District’s lands transformed from rural to urban
predominately Black thriving communities representing
communities, residents celebrated milestones including
both working and professional families. They enjoyed
the founding of Dunbar High School, the nation’s first
cultural playgrounds including Black Broadway
public high school for Black students. Dunbar became
on U Street NW, a home to musical innovation for
a national center of educational achievement, laying a
generations. Black Broadway was a center of jazz
foundation for generations of Black leaders.
and later it was premiere stop on the Chitlin’ Circuit.
The circuit was comprised of places predominately in
the south where it was safe for Black musicians and
entertainers to perform during the Jim Crow era. Many
Black artists gained voices and success from the
circuit’s live performances at venues predominantly
serving Black audiences. These performances and
surrounding cultural practices infused the District with
poetry, literature and music. The city’s leading role in
national Black culture is particularly evident through
its musical heritage including Duke Ellington, Marvin
Gaye, Chuck Brown and Wale.

The combination of increased liberty, educational and


economic opportunities firmly established the District
as Chocolate City. While the Civil Rights Movement
grew in the 1960s and 1970s, the city became
unapologetically Black. For many, the “Chocolate
City” moniker refers to the District as a center of Black

DC Office of Planning 54
culture, government, space and life. For decades, most
communities beyond Capitol Hill, Georgetown and
Upper Northwest were primarily home to Black families.
Being part of a majority-minority community was and
still is important for many people of color who had
experienced rampant racism and discrimination. For
many people, Chocolate City meant freedom, power
and opportunity strengthened by increased political
autonomy from District Home Rule in 1976.

The culture of Black people in the District has left a


lasting impact on the city, nation and world. Whether
it is the monuments produced at the hands of Black
artisans or the sounds of R&B, go-go and pop music
that evolved in racially inclusive clubs that speckled U
Street, it would be impossible to ignore the significant
cultural contributions from numerous Black people—
past and present—who call or have called our nation’s
capital home. These traditions and accomplishments
are fundamental parts of the city, and they will continue
to inspire future generations of Black leaders.

Over the past twenty-years, the District has been


growing and changing. The city is more diverse
but no longer majority Black. It has been a period
of opportunity and change. However, there is also
widespread concern, particularly among long-time
residents and native Washingtonians, that places,
traditions and communities built in Chocolate City
could be lost to change. Black culture is important to
the city, and this Plan offers tools and resources to both
preserve traditions and inspire new practices.

55 DC Cultural Plan
O V E R V I E W

RESPONDING
TO CHANGE

This is a pivotal time for culture in the District. The city has transitioned from a low-value real estate
market to a high-value real estate market. It is difficult to overstate the magnitude of this shift to
cultural creators and organizations.

For generations, most cultural organization As the District has become more affluent, the
business models relied on low-cost space and costs of living have increased, offsetting or
widely available, market rate affordable housing. even outpacing the income gains for many
During the mid-to late 20th century, growing lower income residents. Frequently, this means
suburbs, new highways and changing retail the cost of housing is becoming increasingly
models produced cities with surplus housing, burdensome. Most extremely low-income
retail space and industrial space but limited households spend more than 50% of their
demand to support reinvestment. income on housing, greatly exceeding the
national benchmark for housing affordability
Cultural creators leveraged these surplus where households that spend more than 30% of
spaces as opportunities for creative freedom. their income on housing costs are considered
Eventually, cities collaborated with creators to burdened. Housing affordability is a challenge
spark reinvestment. In DC, several reinvestment for many District residents; even those
plans sought to rekindle the rich cultural heritage approaching median income make increasingly
that resonated throughout the city. The city difficult budget decisions due to the rising cost
provided incentives, funding and support while of housing. The financial strain translates into
creators rehabilitated and adapted spaces. reduced capacity to invest in personal and
For a time, several areas throughout the city, professional growth.
such as Dupont, Gallery Place and U Street
formed dense cultural clusters; however most The District is a national leader in housing
have thinned as real estate values have risen. programs that help residents secure quality
Still, these efforts preserved the city’s cultural homes they can afford. For example, the
landscape by restoring historic cultural space as Affordable Housing Production Trust Fund is
new anchors for future cultural uses. the nation’s best funded affordable housing
gap financing program on a per capita basis.
Now, the District’s population and economy More recently, the city has built on this model
are both growing rapidly. Twenty years ago, to establish the Housing Preservation Fund. The
the city’s population began growing for the first Fund helps the city ensure that new affordable
time since 1950 and it is on pace to return to housing adds capacity by preserving the existing
peak population in about a decade. Incomes base of affordable housing as federal subsidies
have grown faster than inflation for all income expire that were used to finance much of the
brackets—though wealthier households have city's existing affordable housing.
seen the greatest increases. As the city grows,
its neighborhoods will continue to undergo
dynamic changes as widespread reinvestment
introduces many new faces to long standing,
deeply rooted communities.

DC Office of Planning 58
O V E R V I E W

Additionally, the city also makes leading investments In the short-term, the District will work with partners to
in programs, such as the Local Rent Supplement strengthen and support existing cultural organizations
Program and the Home Purchase Assistance Program while building on best practices from leading fields
that increase housing choice and reduce cost burdens beyond the cultural sector and emerging international
for many residents. These programs and investments best practices to support new cultural models that
represent critical steps towards economic equity, but organizations can adopt to thrive in the growing city.
there is still more to be done. Over the next five years, the District will work with
foundations to build partnerships that leverage its
Despite numerous challenges, the city’s growth has unique funding position and facilitate more equitable
also created vast new opportunities. There is more growth of cultural practices in the city. Cultural
capacity to leverage higher real estate values to cross- organizations will work strategically to develop business
subsidize affordable housing and new cultural spaces. plans and strategic plans that increase cultural equity
The District’s real estate portfolio has more value that and resilience.
can be leveraged through public-private partnerships.
There are more people to attend cultural events, and The cultural sector is currently composed of two
more of those people will provide financial support to separate clusters of organizations, nonprofit and
cultural creators. Additionally, new funding models are for-profit. This structure is primed for evolution. The
emerging based on social impact investing that can modern nonprofit organizations emerged in the 1960s
provide dramatic expansions in financing for cultural to represent the broader array of public interest
space and organizations. organizations with operations extending beyond
traditional charities. Over the past fifty years, the
The District has already leveraged its real estate District has been a hub of innovation in the nonprofit
portfolio to increase affordable housing, jobs and the sector. Now it is time for the District to lead the way
tax base. In the future, it will help scale new cultural toward a new framework maximizing the middle ground
organization models that increase the equity and between nonprofit and for-profit by embracing two
diversity of cultural practice in the District. These models important emerging types of organizations, which are
use shared stewardship, organizational innovation and social impact organizations and social enterprises.
leveraged funding to enable cultural creators to dream, These emerging organizational categories will join
test and scale their ideas. charitable organizations and commercial enterprises

DC Office of Planning 60
O V E R V I E W

to form a continuum of organizational models that


subdivides the nonprofit and for-profit spheres in a way
that generates new opportunities for meaningful growth
in the type, scale and diversity of the District’s cultural
organizations.

Each type of organization has an important place in


the cultural sector; in particular, the Plan recognizes
the need for unwavering support of charitable
organizations that provide important services. However,
it is important that cultural stakeholders begin building
both capacity and infrastructure to support adaptation
Advancing these new organizational models is a
to social impact organizations and social enterprises.
critical step that will enable the District to both build
The financial resources available from the District and
cultural equity and sustain its existing base of cultural
the region’s foundation community must be combined
institutions.
with higher levels of revenue, financial planning and
strategic investment to fulfill the city’s cultural potential. To take these steps, cultural organizations will need
Simply put, there is dramatically more demand for to establish stronger relationships with broader
financial support than resources available despite the bases of cultural consumers through resident-
District’s nation leading funding for art and culture on a focused programming. Additionally, nonprofit cultural
per capita basis. organizations are encouraged to focus on building
relationships with individual donors to diversify their
funder base and become more representative of the
communities they serve. These alignments will help
ensure that organizations' work is culturally relevant to
consumers by better engaging and collecting feedback
from stakeholders.

The District’s cultural sector has reached a critical


juncture. Established organizations require higher
levels of support to sustain the cultural capacity
currently in place. However, emerging and historically
marginalized communities are seeking support to
form and grow cultural organizations that reflect their
traditions, experiences and perspectives. Increasing
costs and ongoing constraints to federal cultural funding
are combining with dramatically expanding needs for
massive public investments in the core facilities and
services needed to support social, economic and
racial equity. These conditions necessitate this Plan’s
approach to structural evolution of the cultural sector.

61 DC Cultural Plan
Building cultural capacity by undertaking structural education will take place in many different venues
adjustments to the cultural sector will facilitate many including schools, recreation centers and libraries
important outcomes. For example, individual artists will through District and partner programs. As a result,
have more access to cultural spaces, incubators and children will have more access and exposure to the
technical assistance. There will be increased support phenomenal cultural organizations that the District has
for artists who form cooperatives and collaboratives to to offer.
gain access to production and presentation space in
The District’s Cultural Plan is intentionally ambitious.
public space and private facilities.
It presents a structural approach to equitably connect
The District will form closer relationships with federal the opportunities from the thriving economy with the
organizations, such as the Smithsonian Institution. city’s heritage. Most importantly, this Plan presents
These organizations offer unparalleled opportunities an outline to guide collective action by the District’s
for cultural experiences. Several federal cultural cultural stakeholders.
organizations already partner with local creators to
The Plan’s success will be measured by increased
develop innovative programs that increase engagement
cultural production and participation by residents as
among District residents. Going forward, the District
well as use of the city’s cultural infrastructure. This
will forge stronger mutually reinforcing relationships
means more residents will be engaged in the production
with federal cultural organizations to increase resident
of cultural works; more people of all ages will partake
interaction while encouraging increased opportunities
in arts and cultural learning. Theaters and other
targeted to their host city.
performance venues will only go dark for maintenance;
Through this Plan, the District will partner with cultural libraries and recreation centers will be widely used as
organizations to create larger audiences for cultural community cultural centers; cultural expressions will be
practice in the District by increasing promotion. The common in public and private spaces. Simply put, this
city will also invest in diverse and varied cultural Plan will be successful if culture is everywhere and it is
programming for youth that increase youth exposure representative of Washington, DC’s residents and the
to cultural techniques and expressions. Youth cultural city’s heritage.

DC Office of Planning 62
63 DC Cultural Plan
Current Distribution of
Cultural Organizations
C O N T I N U U M O F C U LT U R A L

NONPROFIT
BUSINESS MODELS

FOR-PROFIT

This Plan’s recommendations are designed to help the District’s

cultural economy evolve from clusters of nonprofit and for-profit

organizations to a continuum of organizations spanning charitable

organizations, social impact organizations, social enterprises and

commercial enterprises. This approach takes advantage of growth

and funding opportunities that have emerged between traditional

nonprofit and for-profit cultural business models. Unlocking this

growth capacity will reduce barriers for cultural growth and increase

opportunities to build cultural equity.

DC Office of Planning 64
Anticipated Future Distribution
of Cultural Organizations
Charitable Organizations

Nonprofit organizations with a business model


CHARITY that predominately utilizes endowments and/
or contributed revenue to fulfill a benevolent
public purpose.

Social Impact Organizations

SOCIAL Nonprofit organizations with business


models that leverage endowments and/or
IMPACT contributed income to build organizational
capacity, enabling the organization to make
ORGANIZATION measurable progress toward fulfilling its
mission by funding most operational expenses
with earned revenue.

SOCIAL Social Enterprises

ENTERPRISES For-profit organizations formally designed


to fulfill both financial and socially beneficial
purposes.

COMMERCIAL Commercial Enterprises

ENTERPRISES For-profit organizations designed to fulfill a


financially beneficial purpose for its owners.

65 DC Cultural Plan
THE DISTRICT’S
CULTURAL
ENVIRONMENT
DC Office of Planning 66
This chapter explores the District’s cultural assets, programs and economy. Together, these three components reflect

the structure and function of the city’s cultural community. Assets depict the city’s cultural geography, through the

concentration and distribution of cultural facilities. Programs indicate how the city’s initiatives connect with cultural

creators, spaces and consumers. Lastly, an assessment of the size and structure of the District’s cultural economy

describes the types of cultural organizations and economic impact culture generates in the District.

67 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

CULTURAL ASSETS

The District’s cultural assets range from national The Dupont Circle area still reflects its enduring but
museums to concert halls and recreation centers. The changing role as a center of gravity in the region’s
asset types and locations are shaped by the integration visual arts community. The H Street NE Corridor is
of the city’s land use pattern and transportation remerging as a cultural center emanating from the Atlas
infrastructure both historically and today. Over the Performing Arts Center and bolstered by the Rock and
past thirty years, the city has worked to both preserve Roll Hotel and Fringe Theatre. Anacostia also stands
historic cultural areas while seeding economic out as a unique kind of cultural cluster that combines
revitalization through cultural anchors. Today, the city grassroots and institutional investment with a fantastic
is economically thriving, and cultural practices are array of cultural anchors including the Anacostia Arts
more broadly distributed than ever. Going forward, Center, We Act Radio, the Anacostia Playhouse,
the planning team anticipates that cultural assets will the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum.
be increasingly distributed throughout the city, more Additionally, the Town Hall Education Arts Recreation
accurately reflecting the city’s cultural communities. Campus known as THEARC located nearby offers high-
quality presentation and practice facilities that incubate
One defining part of DC’s cultural geography is the creators. There are also communities where cultural
National Mall, which is lined by national museums hotspots that have emerged more recently including
and flanked by the Library of Congress and Kennedy Brookland and Ivy City where former industrial sites
Center. This area is an epicenter of national culture have been repurposed for new uses.
that has shaped the District’s cultural landscape.
District residents have a complex relationship with the To better understand how different types of cultural
institutions that present cultural expressions oriented assets were distributed across the city, the planning
to a national audience. The Smithsonian Institution has team grouped the city’s cultural assets into one of
set an unprecedented benchmark for accessible culture five categories: heritage, commercial revitalization,
with high-quality exhibitions from extensive collections education, production and presentation. The following
accessible to all, free of charge. However, there is section describes the function of each asset group.
additional demand for cultural spaces that support
cultural works focused on and reflecting the District.

Beyond the Mall, there are hotspots in cultural epicenters,


such as the U Street NW corridor and downtown, where
the performing arts have been historically clustered.

DC Office of Planning 68
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

Heritage
Historic District, Landmarks and Heritage
Organizations

The physical artifacts of the city’s cultural heritage are Through a combination of District and Federal historic
the foundations of its culture today. Cultural assets preservation laws, the DC Historic Preservation Office
such as historic theaters and heritage sites provide runs two important programs, the DC Inventory of
both venues for ongoing creativity and touchstones for Historic Sites and DC Historic Districts. Together, these
intergenerational knowledge sharing. In the District, programs catalog and preserve cultural heritage by
there are many different layers of cultural heritage preserving landmarks and contextual settings as the
that extend back to the city’s founding with historic city changes.
sites, such as the Old Stone House and long-standing
anchors including the Howard Theatre. These spaces
provide windows into the city’s past while providing
venues to share new creations.

LEGEND

Historic District

Historic Landmark

DC Office of Planning 70
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

Education
Schools, Universities, Libraries and
Recreation Centers
up to age 14. Duke Ellington School of the Arts is a
The city’s education infrastructure provides a broad competitive high school with a curriculum including both
spectrum of cultural education and creative skill a professional arts and college preparatory classes.
development. Most importantly, the District Government These schools present unparalleled opportunities for
owns and operates networks of schools, libraries and District students to become cultural creators.
recreation centers that serve every community across
the city. DC Public Libraries (DCPL) and the Department of
Parks and Recreation (DPR) operate citywide networks
DC Public Schools (DCPS) and public charter schools of multi-generational cultural space accessible to all
provide platforms for learning that reach from Pre-K residents. The agencies offer combinations of facilities
through adult education. It is important to distinguish and programming that support both independent and
that all DCPS facilities are owned and operated by the collective learning for youth and adults. These facilities
city while charter schools are independently operated in are key components in the out-of-school educational
a combination of publicly and privately-owned facilities. system.

DCPS operates 112 facilities with an enrollment of The library system has a network of 25 neighborhood
over 48,000 students. Each facility includes cultural libraries anchored by a central library offering the
resources, such as theaters, multi-purpose rooms and highest level of programming and specialized facilities.
art studios. These spaces support cultural development Additionally, the city has a network of 76 recreation
for students. Many of these facilities have some capacity centers with facilities ranging in size and breadth of
to serve as venues for other community cultural uses. programming that offer a host of cultural facilities
However, DCPS's primary mission is providing preK-12 including recording studios, art studios, kitchens and
education services to students across the District; any performance space.
additional uses must not detract from the educational
mission. The District also hosts eight traditional universities that
serve as cultural anchors and provide a combination
DCPS has two dedicated arts facilities: the Filmore of institutionally-oriented education and community-
Arts Center and Duke Ellington School of the Arts. The serving events. Universities are particularly important to
Fillmore Arts Center offers arts classes to students the District’s cultural community because they incubate
across the city in grades K-5 and programs for children generations of cultural creators and institutional
leaders.

71 DC Cultural Plan
PUBLIC SCHOOLS

LEGEND
Neighborhoord Clusters
with Public Schools

DC Public Schools Facility

LIBRARIES

LEGEND
Neighborhood Clusters
with DC Libraries

DC Public Libraries Facility

DC Office of Planning 72
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

CHARTER SCHOOLS

LEGEND
Neighborhood Clusters
with Charter Schools

Public Charter School Facility

RECREATION CENTERS

LEGEND
Neighborhoord Clusters
with Recreation Centers

DPR Recreation Center

73 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

Commercial Revitalization
The District has three major forms of place-based rooms serving visitors. DC’s BIDs produce year-round
economic development: Great Streets, Business arts and cultural events that shape life in the city. In 2016,
Improvement Districts and DC Main Streets. BIDs hosted 622 events attended by 786,000 people. Most
of these events were informal and social including film
Great Streets is the District's leading commercial screenings, concerts and public art installations.
revitalization initiative led by the Office of the Deputy
Mayor for Planning and Economic Development. The DC Main Street organizations support economic vitality,
program is designed to support existing small businesses, urban design, promotion and community organization in
attract new businesses, increase the District's tax base, emerging and neighborhood commercial areas. In 2018 the
create new job opportunities, and transform emerging District has sixteen official DC Main Streets representing
corridors into thriving neighborhood centers. all eight wards of the city. DC Main Street organizations
are leading community partners for cultural events and
Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) support installations. These organizations collaborate with creators
most commercial areas in or near downtown. These to build and daylight community identity through public art
organizations play a key role in maintaining the and cultural events.
commercial environment and public space in commercial
areas across the city. BIDs collect additional taxes Art All Night is a leading example of how the city partners
or fees within specified geographic boundaries to with DC Main Streets to elevate place-based cultural
support business improvement measures including presentation. In 2018, Art All Night was a free
marketing, tenanting, business support and overnight arts festival that took place in six DC Main
public space improvements. Streets highlighting visual and performing arts
including painting, photography, sculpture,
DC currently has ten BIDs that collectively crafts, fashion, music, dance, theater, film
spend approximately $27 million and poetry. These events are leading
per year to help manage and examples of how DC Main Streets
enhance communities across lead partnerships to connect
the city that are home to events in public space with
over 189,000 DC residents co-located events in
and nearly 16,000 hotel private space.

LEGEND

Great Streets Corridors

Business Improvement
Districts

DC Main Street
Corridors

DC Office of Planning 74
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

Presentation
Museums, Performance Theaters, Concert
Halls, Galleries, Movie Theaters and Sporting
Arenas

Presentation spaces are one of the most important In addition to traditional cultural spaces, large
parts of cultural infrastructure. They are the places sporting venues such as the Capital One Center,
where cultural expressions and ideas are exchanged Nationals Stadium, Audi Field and the St. Elizabeths
between cultural creators and consumers. Presentation Entertainment Sports Arena are multi-use facilities
spaces can be large facilities, such as the Smithsonian that host some of the largest cultural events in the
Institution’s museums that attract millions of visitors District. These events typically have popular appeal to
annually, or a small art gallery that attracts a few residents across the region.
dozen people a week. There is an enormous diversity
Smaller presentation venues such as galleries, night
of presentation spaces that support the cultural
clubs and black box theaters are spaces that support
community. These spaces span a use spectrum that
experimentation and curation. These facilities are
extends from the social to the informal through formal.
widely dispersed throughout the city’s commercial
The city has a large number of museums including areas.
national museums but also local institutions, such as
Culture is also practiced in public open spaces. These
the Phillips Collection. These spaces offer enormous
include the public rights of way, parks and plazas.
opportunities for cultural education and exchange.
Public space is inherently democratic cultural space
Additionally, many museums also house facilities
where all people have the right to express themselves.
such as lecture halls and theaters that can facilitate
Some public spaces, such as Yards Park, are designed
collaboration.
to host public events while others, such as H Street
Traditional presentation venues including performance NE, are converted into temporary festival spaces. In
theaters, concert halls and movie theaters are recent years, community festivals such as the H Street
prominent parts of the city’s cultural landscape. Festival, Funk Parade and Broccoli City Festival
Performance theaters are concentrated downtown have become increasingly popular. These events
and at the Kennedy Center with additional facilities are enhanced by public resources, such as the DPR
distributed across the city. Most theaters house at least mobile stage, that enables event organizers to more
one performance company, such as the Shakespeare easily host events in public cultural spaces.
Theatre Company or the National Symphony Orchestra
Lastly, some of the most accessible cultural spaces are
in addition to a host of traveling performances.
in places of worship, which are dispersed throughout
Concert halls form several clusters including along U neighborhoods across the city. Places of worship are
Street and 14th Street NW, H Street NE, Georgetown, often community-oriented and in the District, there is
Downtown and Ivy City. The size, audience configuration a rich legacy of these organizations hosting cultural
and primary genres vary across concert halls. presentation, ranging from music at the 6th and I
Synagogue to performances for the Capital Fringe
Movie theaters are more dispersed than other Festival. As the city continues growing, places of
traditional cultural venues. Most theaters are located in worship are likely to offer some of the most important
downtown and commercial areas in areas west of Rock common ground where changing communities can
Creek Park. There are a range of heaters that present experience culture and build trust.
different types of films ranging from independent to
mass-market.

75 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

Production
Collectives, Studios and Practice Spaces

Culture is produced in a wide-range of spaces in These spaces are fundamentally important to the city’s
preparation for public presentation. Typically, these cultural landscape because they host the creative
spaces offer facilities out of public view where creators process. The unseen experimentation and collaboration
can develop new types of cultural expression. Some feeds the city’s cultural evolution.
are simple studio spaces, others are collective
production spaces. Production spaces are needed by
all disciplines where some spaces are informal, such
as part of a home while others are dedicated facilities.

Cultural Production &


Presentation Spaces

LEGEND
Census Block
Groups with Cultural
Presentation Facilities

Cultural Presentation
Buildings

Census Block Groups


with Cultural Production
Facilities
Cultural Production
Buildings

DC Office of Planning 76
ENTERTAINMENT

ENTERTAINMENT LEGEND
Census Block Groups
with Entertainment
Facilities

Entertainment Buildings
or Night Clubs

77 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

PLACES OF WORSHIP

LEGEND
Census Block Groups
with Places of Worship

Places of Worship

DC Office of Planning 78
CULTURAL ASSETS & ACCESS MAP
The map below articulates how the nine preceding maps The city’s transportation system provides affordable
fit together to reflect the District’s cultural landscape. access to these areas, which presents all District
In this map, the city’s networks of schools, libraries, residents with access to cultural opportunities far
recreation centers, parks and places of worship provide beyond what most Americans experience. Additionally,
a cultural foundation that serves every community communities that are adjacent to and interconnected
across the city. Institutions and groups of cultural with these facilities have an added level of cultural
organizations form clusters of cultural production, access that presents unique cultural opportunities.
presentation and consumption opportunities. These
clusters include performance theaters downtown,
museums along the mall, universities, and large
entertainment venues.

16

40
10 17

LEGEND 41
19
11
18
Typical Cultural Access: 12
These are parts of the city with 20
typical cultural access for the
District of Columbia.
14 15
13 2 24
22
21
Institutionally Adjacent 42
1
Communities: 3
These are communities in
4 7 46 29
close proximity to major 6 23
cultural institutions such as
Universities. 5 8 30 31
25

High Cultural Access


Communities: 26 32 33
These areas depict parts
of the city with exceptional 9 27
34
access to major cultural
institutions.
45 28
37 35
Citywide Cluster: 36
These are areas where 43
cultural institutions 38
and organizations that
predominately serve the
citywide and regional 44 39
cultural community are
concentrated.

Major Institutional Cluster:


These are areas
predominantly anchored by
federal institutions such as
the Smithsonian.

79 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

DISTRICT CULTURAL
PROGRAMS

The cultural community is supported by more than a dozen District agencies that provide space and support
for cultural creators, organizations and consumers. These agencies offer a wide range of cultural programs and
resources. Agencies support the cultural community through facilities, capital investments and programs such as
affordable housing and transportation.

Many District agency programs provide a base of acquisition and maintenance. Additionally, CAH offers
support for all residents including cultural creators. dedicated grants for educational programming and
Additional provide programs such as DC Commission artwork in Wards 7 and 8.
on the Arts and Humanities (CAH) grant programs are
OCTFME leads the 202 Creates initiative while
directly targeted toward creators.
administering three broad groups of services, including
Each agency’s cultural programming represents its public television, cable television regulation and film
missions, facilities and resources. CAH and the Office industry support. 202 Creates promotes and amplifies
of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment the District’s creative economy by connecting creators
(OCTFME) are the two leading cultural support with government support and resources to build a
organizations. CAH focuses on providing grants, stronger cultural community. OCTFME also offers
programs and educational activities that encourage workforce development, technical assistance in
diverse artistic expressions and learning opportunities. addition to financial support for film makers, musicians
OCTFME supports the creative economy though and media professionals.
technical assistance, economic development,
The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and
workforce development and promotion.
Economic Development (DMPED) leads the District’s
On a per capita basis, CAH is one of the nation’s best economic development programs in partnerships with
resourced state arts agencies, granting an average the OCTFME, the Department of Small and Local
of more than $10 million dollars per year through two Business Development (DSLBD), the Department of
broad categories of grants, one for individuals, and a Housing and Community Development (DHCD), and
second for organizations. And, most grant programs the Office of Planning (OP). These agencies offer
are available to both individuals and organizations. three categories of programs: economic development,
community development and housing.
Grants for both individuals and District nonprofits
support public art, events, festivals, international DSLBD supports the development, growth and
cultural exchanges and acquisitions for the Art Bank retention of District based businesses. DSLBD’s Made
Washingtoniana Collection. in DC program supports and promotes businesses
that design, make, produce, and/or assemble products
The Commission also offers a fellowship to both in the District of Columbia. Made in DC is a citywide
established and emerging artists with practices such campaign and platform to increase opportunities for
as dance, design, folk and traditional arts, literature, maker businesses. The program brings businesses
media arts, music, theater, visual arts; as well as together for technical assistance and collaboration
multi-disciplinary media, emerging and experimental through initiatives that strengthen connections between
fields. CAH also provides funding to support facility creators and District Government. The program also

DC Office of Planning 80
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

offers capacity building workshops, networking and heritage through its preservation grant program.
promotion to members. In addition to Made in DC,
As discussed in the preceding assets section, several
DSLBD also offers a host of business development and
District agencies operate networks of facilities and
community revitalizations programs that can support
deliver programming. These agencies include the DC
creators.
Public Schools (DCPS), DC Public Libraries (DCPL)
DHCD produces and preserves affordable housing while and the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR).
supporting revitalization in underserved communities to Their services enrich and empower residents while
increase economic opportunities for District residents. their facilities provide the principal community cultural
The Department has a cutting-edge suite of programs infrastructure.
that preserve the city’s existing base of affordable
The DCPS Arts curriculum—the Framework for Arts
housing while facilitating production of new units to
Learning—sets a vision for arts education in DCPS.
keep pace with demand from the growing city.
This vision includes creating a forum to discuss
In 2015, Mayor Bowser convened a Housing Production arts education across disciplines with space for
Strike Force led by DHCD. The Strike Force developed exploring and investigating universal human themes.
a plan to preserve more than 13,000 housing units The Framework for Arts Learning establishes clear
with subsidies set to expire by 2020. This plan and the expectations for the student experience in an art
resulting programs are currently being implemented, learning environment by defining the role of the teacher
solidifying the city’s base of affordable housing. as facilitator and the students as creators. Student
experiences in DCPS Arts include opportunities for
Additionally, DHCD administers the District’s Affordable critical thinking and building digital literacy at early
Housing Production Trust Fund that provides at ages that extends through a variety of arts instruction
least $100 million every year in gap funding that has across all grades. Throughout their education, students
helped produce thousands of affordable housing units have the opportunity to create, perform, respond and
through public-private partnerships. DHCD’s housing connect to works in a range of arts disciplines.
and community development programs provide
critical infrastructure and support the city’s inclusive
communities and economy including the cultural sector.

OP guides the District’s real estate and economic


development through land use policy including
preservation and revitalization of the city’s distinctive
neighborhoods. OP develops and manages the city’s
Comprehensive Plan, which includes an Arts and
Culture Element that encapsulates many of the city’s
cultural policies as law governing the city’s growth
and development. Small Area Plans typically include
cultural recommendations as part of targeted policy
guidance for communities where land use change is
anticipated or desired.

Additionally, OP has developed a creative placemaking


program that leverages foundation grant funding
for cultural interventions to test community building
and economic development strategies that help
achieve community objectives. In addition to creative
placemaking, the DC Historic Preservation Office
housed in Office of Planning supports community

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T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

DC Historic Preservation
Office Heritage Initiatives

100 Stories
The Office of Planning is harnessing
the products from more than 10 years
of grants to create a new resource that
highlights over 100 stories previously
recorded through the DC Community
Heritage Project (DCCHP). 100 Stories
has a dedicated website accompanied by
a series of public events where residents
can reconnect with these perspectives,
and specially target a few of the stories
from the past where the narrative
continues to unfold today. The stories
will touch on the heritage of Barry Farm,
Ivy City, Petworth and Congress Heights
among other communities.

LGBTQ Historical Context Study


The Historic Preservation Office (HPO)
received a grant from the National
Park Service for "Underrepresented
Communities." The grant will be used to
conduct a LGBTQ historic context study to
support four potential nominations for DC
and National Historic sites connected with
LGBTQ heritage in DC.

African American Civil Rights Trail


HPO received an additional grant from
the National Park Service to identify thirty
sites that are significant to the 20th century
African American civil rights movement.
HPO will produce an online resource and
printed map.

83 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

DCPL hosts the Washingtoniana Collection, These agencies include the Office on African
one of the most robust resources for District Affairs; Office on African American Affairs;
culture and heritage. Recently, the libraries Office on Asian Pacific Islander Affairs; Office on
began innovating with new programs, including Latino Affairs; Office of Religious Affairs; and the
The Labs at DC Public Library that offer District Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender
residents training, tools and dedicated space and Questioning Affairs. These Offices provide
to learn and practice graphic design, audio support, outreach and grant programs that
recording, video production, publishing and support and uplift communities across the
fabrication using emerging and computer District.
assisted technologies coupled with maker tools.
The District government is dedicated to
The final group of agencies work with special supporting culture throughout the city through
communities to provide conduits to government partnership and collaboration among agencies
and celebrate unique facets of District culture. and with community partners.

HOUSING STRIKE
FORCE RECOMMENDATIONS
The trike force identified six recommendations to preserve the city’s existing assisted and
“naturally occurring” affordable housing.

Establish a preservation Unit to do three things. Preserve existing assisted affordable


housing. Identify opportunities to preserve “naturally occurring” affordable housing through
covenants or other mechanisms. Collect and maintain comprehensive data on all affordable
housing in the city.

Establish a public-private preservation fund to facilitate early investments while leveraging


greater amounts of private capital to preserve affordable housing.

Develop a small properties preservation and affordability program to assist with repairs and
renovations to properties with 5 to 50 units.

Implement the District Opportunity to Purchase Act that will allow the District to transfer
ownership of properties at risk of losing affordable apartments to pre-qualified developers
committed to preserving affordability.

Improve preservation under the Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act by providing financial
incentives for preservation in TOPA transactions.

Establish programs that facilitate low-income seniors aging in place. Examples include tenant-
based vouchers or other rental assistance to seniors on fixed incomes or funds for renovation
of buildings and individual apartments and single family homes to create appropriate housing
options for seniors to age in place.

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T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

ANY
GIVEN
CHILD

In 2017, Washington, DC was chosen as the 25th

site for Ensuring the Arts for Any Given Child, a

national collective impact initiative of the John

F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Any

Given Child fosters community change to improve

student outcomes by leveraging the power of

strategic, coordinated arts education. Any Given

Child DC is led by: the DC Arts and Humanities

Education Collaborative in partnership with

Mayor Bowser and The Council of the District of

Columbia with support from District government

agencies including: DC Public Schools; DC

Commission on the Arts and Humanities; DC

Office of Planning; and the Office of Cable, Film,

Television and Music Entertainment. Additional

partners include local arts organizations,

community organizations, philanthropic and

for-profit stakeholders. Through this program,

the Kennedy Center is facilitating a multi-year

process to ensure all DC public and public

charter school students receive a meaningful,

relevant and impactful arts education experience

from kindergarten through twelfth grade.


DC COMMISSION
ON THE ARTS AND
HUMANITIES (CAH)
GRANT PROGRAMS
General Operating Support
Arts and Humanities Fellowship Set
Offers general operating support to nonprofit arts,
humanities and arts education organizations whose Supports individual artists, teaching artists and
primary focus is in one or more of the following areas: humanities professionals who significantly contribute
dance, design, folk and traditional arts, literature, to the arts and humanities and substantially impact the
media arts, music, theater, visual arts or any of the lives of DC residents through excellence in the arts and
other disciplines, such that its total activities and/or humanities.
services are concentrated on and devoted to the arts
and humanities and/or arts education. Arts and Humanities Education Projects

General Operating Support (Service Organization Supports in-school and out-of-school-time arts and
Cohort) humanities programs for children and youth in pre-
school through high school settings. The grant also
Offers general operating support to nonprofit arts, supports professional development opportunities in the
humanities, and arts education service organizations arts and humanities for classroom educators.
whose primary mission is to provide specialized
services which can include professional development, East of the River
technical assistance, networking opportunities,
The East of the River grant provides access to high-
shared operational services, printed materials, and/or
quality arts and humanities experiences for DC residents
research to Washington, DC-based arts and humanities
who live east of the Anacostia River. Activities may be
organizations.
programs or projects that include, but are not limited
Public Art Building Communities to, dance, design, folk and traditional arts, literature,
media arts, music, theater and visual arts. Funding
Supports the creation and installation of permanent may be used to support operational and programmatic
or temporary public artwork that enhances District costs directly related to the East of the River activities
neighborhoods. described in the application.

DC Office of Planning 86
Projects, Events or Festivals LiftOff

Supports projects, events and festivals to promote arts The LiftOff program is a capacity building program
and humanities activities to DC residents. for organizations with less than $250,000 in annual
expenses. The program provides funding for a capacity
Sister Cities Grant building project and peer coaching with a grantee
Supports arts and humanities projects that foster cohort.
cultural exchange and diplomacy between the District Field Trip Experiences
of Columbia and its Sister Cities.
Supports arts and humanities organizations to offer
UPSTART comprehensive field trip experiences for students in
The UPSTART Program is a capacity building program the District’s public schools. The scope of the grant
that assists established DC-based arts and humanities includes the cost of field trip tickets and associated
nonprofit organizations with significant programmatic transportation costs, professional development
functions that face operational and infrastructure opportunities for classroom educators and the provision
challenges and financial limitations that prevent of pre-and post-field trip workshops for students.
organizational and programmatic sustainability. This Facilities and Buildings
program is for organizations with annual expenses
above $250,000. Supports projects related to the improvement or
purchase of facilities operated by nonprofit arts and
humanities organizations.

Art Bank

Supports visual artists and art galleries in the


Washington metropolitan area by acquiring fine
artwork for the District’s Art Bank Collection, a growing
collection of moveable works funded through the Art
in Public Places Program. Works in this collection are
owned by CAH and loaned to other District government
agencies for display in public areas within government
buildings.

Curatorial Grant

The Curatorial Grant Program aims to provide a greater


opportunity for the development and public presentation
of visual art exhibitions by District resident curators.
Through grant support and access to a contemporary
exhibition space, CAH intends to serve the District’s
residents by presenting compelling exhibition concepts
of resident curators.

87 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

THE CULTURAL
ECONOMY

In addition to serving as vital connective fiber, culture generates significant benefits throughout the
District’s economy. To gain a better understanding of these benefits, the planning team examined economic
activity and economic impact associated with the cultural sector.

Cultural economic impact is assessed using measured with an economic impact analysis. This
traditional factors including employment, spending analysis measures direct impact by assessing
on cultural activity, local spending related to employment, employment income and tax revenue
cultural employment wages, local tax revenue from from businesses within the cultural economy.
employment and sales. The economic impact of Indirect impact is assessed by employment,
culture extends beyond traditional and quantifiable employment income and tax revenue from
factors. Culture reinforces community heritage and businesses that supply the industries within
the District’s brand, distinguishing communities as the cultural economy. Lastly, induced impact
unique parts of the national landscape. measures the employment, employment income
and tax revenues generated by the household
The District’s cultural economy supports a total of spending earned from businesses that are directly
156,000 jobs across the city. This figure indicates or indirectly part of the cultural economy.
that culture is an important part of the District’s
economy. The economic impact analysis found that in 2016,
112,390 people worked directly in the cultural
Culture is related to many high-employment economy in addition to 43,800 indirect and induced
sectors including the culinary arts, information and jobs related to the this sector. The analysis also
technology and professional services. However, found that the cultural economy generated $12.4
many cultural creators are primarily employed in billion in wages and $1.1 billion in tax revenue in
non-cultural occupations, which means they are 2016.
not well represented by these data.
Furthermore, cultural activity produces a range
This Plan also recognizes that it is common for of other benefits that strengthen the District’s
people to participate in the cultural economy in economic opportunities. The presence of artists
less formal ways that are not well represented in and cultural activity gives the city a competitive
the data sources needed for economic analysis. edge in a wide-range of industries. Research
Interpretation of the data in this section is informed has consistently demonstrated the importance of
by the anecdotal insights on cultural practice quality of life in business location decision-making.
gathered during the engagement process. Of the fastest growing companies, twenty percent
The cultural economy generates benefits of leaders named quality of life factors, such as
throughout the District’s economy that are parks or local cultural attractions, as key criteria in
choosing where to launch their companies.

89 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

Culture is integral to the quality of life in the District. The


presence of cultural assets in communities has been
correlated with decreases in stress, social exclusion and
crime. Studies from the RAND Corporation and Turnaround
Arts have found links between arts education and higher
performance in core subjects including math and reading.
These studies and others attribute improvements to
increased student interest and participation, as well as
the development of creative processes and thinking. This
research indicates that arts education, both in and out of
school, has extended impacts on personal development
that lasts a lifetime.

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202 CREATES
In 2016, the District launched 202Creates to amplify the creative culture in all eight Wards. Through,
and celebrate DC's creative culture. The initiative 2018, 202Creates supported roughly 8,600 events
started as a one-month celebration and rapidly grew and generated more than 150 million social media
into a movement fueled by the creative community’s impressions. Additionally, more than 845 creative
passions and enthusiasm from the District’s residents. entrepreneurs have participated in co-working events
that were hosted with support from 213 public and
202Creates does three important things: it promotes
private sector partners.
and amplifies the District's creative economy
through digital media marketing, original television This initiative is a multifaceted program that helps
programming, and paid performance opportunities build relationships between government, creators
for the city's creative residents; it connects District and consumers that provides support and technical
residents with government resources and space to assistance in conjunction with a brand and marketing
support their artistic work as well as their creative campaign that resonates with District residents. This
businesses; and it builds a cultural community by program is a template for future partnerships that
connecting creative District residents with each other support cultural practice in the District by connecting
through the 202Creates creative conversation series, creators with support and promotions while helping
networking events and roundtables. more District creators earn a living within their practice.
202 Creates is a Mayoral initiative led by OCTFME with
202Creates is a platform that showcases the District’s
support from DMPED and CAH and other agencies.
diversity of artists, makers and entrepreneurs by
engaging residents through activities and conversations
curated by the District’s innovators and building

91 DC Cultural Plan
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS
IN THE DISTRICT
Most cultural organizations are small, with budgets
under $250,000 and focus on a community, discipline,
or issue. Many of these small but focused organizations
represent specific cultural practices and heritage groups.
Small organizations play an important role in capturing
District heritage: almost 60 organizations celebrate
ethnic diversity, approximately 50 organizations are
historical societies, and 15 organizations are focused
on the humanities are dedicated to local sites or topics.
These include organizations, such as Archaeology in
the Community and the Washington Area Performing
Arts Video Archive.

The District has approximately one mid-sized


organization for every four small organizations. Mid-
sized organizations, with budgets between $250,000
and $1 million, employ professional staff that make Large organizations represent about 10% of the
larger scale expressions possible. These organizations District’s cultural organizations, 70% have national-
also create crossover opportunities where cultural facing missions. Typically, large organizations have
professionals can build on their creative skills in budgets exceeding $1 million, supporting larger
professions that offer more financial stability. Mid-sized professional staffs and more ambitious programs.
organizations include leading local organizations, such Among large organizations, only 2% have budgets
as the Capital Fringe, Washington Project for the Arts over $5 million and 1% have budgets over $25 million.
and Transformer. Mid-sized organizations also include
arts and humanities education organizations, such Many organizations are experiencing challenges
as the DC Youth Orchestra and Young Playwright’s associated with funding and operational changes.
Theater. These organizations provide valuable arts For example, many small and mid-size cultural
and humanities education services to youth across the organizations are experiencing financial pressure
city. Many of the city’s live theater venues fall within from higher commercial real estate prices across the
this group including the Irish-themed Andrew Keegan city. Among cultural organizations that serve District
Theater Company, the historic National Theatre and consumers, small organizations spend the largest share
Spooky Action. of their resources on their space, 31% on average.
Large organizations spend 23% or less. Higher costs

Washington, D.C. 2.0% Change in government funding,


Pittsburgh -2.1% 2012 – 2017
Phoenix 0.6% (All City, County, State, Federal)
Philadelphia -1.8%
New York -3.7% Chart 1.0
Los Angeles 0.2% Change in Aggregate Government Funding
Cleveland -0.3% (across the City, County, State, and Federal
Chicago -6.4% levels) for Cultural Nonprofit Organizations
Boston -0.7% by City, between 2012 – 2017; Data Arts
Bay Area 0.6% analysis of data provided by participating
-7.0% -6.0% -5.0% -4.0% -3.0% -2.0% -1.0% 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% members.

DC Office of Planning 92
T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

for space can leave small to medium organizations periods of economic recession and recovery. For
with diminished budgets for staff, programming and example, from 2009 through 2012 government funding
reserves. For comparison, large organizations spend declined significantly in all comparable regions. While
between 42-52% of their total expenses on staff, while in metropolitan Washington, government funding
small organizations spend 24% on average. declined by nearly 30% and foundation funding was
down nearly 50%. This dramatic volatility presents a
Cultural nonprofits have historically had a lower systemic risk for the cultural sector where a significant
proportion of earned revenue relative to contributed portion of cultural organizations rely on annual grant
revenue when compared to the broader nonprofit funding to sustain their operations.
sector. A growing emphasis on impact from funders has
pressed many nonprofit organizations to adjust their One notable bright spot has been the growth of
business models to account for higher space costs individual giving, which can be a democratizing and
through increasing earned revenue generated from resilient source of funding that is often a source of
ticket sales, workshop fees and other rental fees. unrestricted funds. However, because the amount
of support provided by a typical individual donor
The economic analysis assessed cultural funding is significantly smaller than funding provided by
by source across select metropolitan regions to foundations, these funds cost more to raise and have
comparably measure cultural funding volume. The often have diminishing returns on investment for the
analysis found that the metropolitan Washington region organization to grow beyond a certain level.
had one of the highest levels of combined funding from
government, foundations, corporations, and individuals The District is home to several organizations that are
at $30 per capita in 2017. Metropolitan Washington’s demonstrating that new cultural models can and do
total is comparable to Metropolitan New York City, work in DC. A leading example is the Halcyon Stage
where cultural funding totaled $34 per capita in 2017. and Arts Lab, which has adapted a model established
Breaking the analysis down further, metropolitan by Halcyon’s preceding social enterprise incubator.
Washington had some of the greatest cultural funding Halcyon Stage partnered with Union Market to launch
growth nationally on a percentage basis between 2012 an innovative performance series at Dock 5. The series
and 2017 from government, foundations and individual leveraged Union Market’s event space to produce
donors. Overall, in 2017 metropolitan Washington has exposure for both the stage and market. Additionally,
one of the nation’s strongest cultural funding bases. organizations such as Dupont Underground are
utilizing innovative spaces, partnerships and funding
However, looking back to how cultural funding changed approaches that are indicators of new opportunities for
following the 2008 recession indicates that cultural cultural creators and organizations.
funding levels are susceptible to significant cuts during

1.9%
Washington, D.C. 0.1%
5.2%
-0.1%
Los Angeles -0.5% % Change Giving by Metro Area
9.9%
2.6% 2012 - 2017
Phoenix 0.2%
7.2%
-5.4%
Pittsburgh 1.0% Chart 2.0
0.5%
1.0% Change in Philanthropic Giving to Cultural
Philadelphia -0.7%
-4.8% Nonprofit Organizations (across the City,
-0.2%
New York -0.7% County, State, and Federal levels) for
1.0%
-4.2% Cultural Nonprofit Organizations by City,
Cleveland -0.3%
-3.3% between 2012 – 2017; Data Arts analysis of
3.2%
Chicago -1.5% data provided by participating members
1.4%
-6.4%
Boston -0.1%
1.6%
-3.3%
Bay Area -0.3%
-11.8%

-15.0% -10.0% -5.0% 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0%


Foundation Giving Corporate Giving Individual Giving

93 DC Cultural Plan
ENGAGEMENT
E N G A G E M E N T

CULTURE IS
INTERSECTIONAL
The District’s culture is the collection of practices and traditions that are important to residents and
stakeholders. It builds on the city’s heritage with infusions from diverse cultural stakeholders, who
bring practices from all corners of the world while introducing their own innovations.

Culture is intersectional, meaning that each encouraging cultural creators and consumers
of us have our own composition of identities to take an intermission from cultural activity to
connecting us to cultural communities collaboratively discuss their cultural practice,
that produce unique cultural experiences, aspiration and needs. Throughout the planning
aspirations and needs. Cultural intersectionality process, more than 1,500 people provided input
is an affirmation that the city’s culture is complex at ten INTERMISSION DC events. At each event,
with interwoven and ever-changing relationships the planning team and directors from the OP,
between power and experience extending from CAH and OCTFME held thematic conversations
the individual to the collective. Despite individual with stakeholders that were recorded by
differences, shared cultural touchstones connect teams of notetakers. Together, stakeholders
residents from diverse backgrounds through provided more than 3,500 comments across
shared experiences. the INTERMISSION DC events. (A detailed
summary of each INTERMISSION DC event is
With intersectional culture in mind, the planning provided in the Engagement Appendix.)
team approached engagement differently to
ground the Cultural Plan in the diversity of the Across the INTERMISSION DC events,
city’s cultural practices. To meet this challenge, residents and stakeholders shared their
the team developed a new type of engagement interests, passions, frustrations and concerns.
called ‘flat’ engagement focused on unstructured The breadth and diversity of cultural practitioners
conversational input. This approach enabled who participated in the planning process was a
cultural stakeholders to frame conversations dramatic testament to the creative energy in the
based on their needs and experiences. It also District.
encouraged cross-cutting input that connected
Stakeholders shared concerns that rapid
ideas and experiences with rich detail.
growth is adversely impacting culture. Most
The team gathered input through a citywide acutely, stakeholders were troubled that the
series of community meetings called District’s Black culture is being diminished.
INTERMISSION DC and contextualized the Stakeholders also shared broad concerns that
input through partner events and more than cultural organizations, creators and consumers
70 focus groups. INTERMISSION DC brought are all struggling to maintain their footing as
diverse cultural stakeholders together by costs continue to increase for housing and

95 DC Cultural Plan
E N G A G E M E N T

space across the city. Beyond the thematic issues, open-ended event with the largest attendance
stakeholders highlighted many of the same stumbling representing the broadest cross-section of the city.
blocks, including the structures and processes for The conversations had different focuses across the
allocating public cultural funding, access to DCPS quadrant’s based on localized points of emphasis.
facilities, high costs of living, limited production and The targeted events were attended by geographically
presentation space, long and complex processes to diverse residents who shared common interests, which
use National Park Service (NPS) property, challenges ultimately fostered more focused conversations.
navigating the Mayor’s Special Events Task Group,
Throughout the planning process, input from the
and the need for better access to accurate information
INTERMISSION DC events along with the partner
about funding, partnership and space opportunities.
events and focus groups helped this Plan reflected the
The conversations were solution-focused with a wide- District's many different cultural facets. This diversity
range of ideas presented by participants. Among the of input will help align existing programs and create
proposed solutions, several participants offered similar new platforms to enable cultural creators, spaces and
suggestions, including: streamlined permitting, clear consumers to thrive.
procedures for using DCPS space, increased funding
OP also attended partner events to collect input
for cultural partnerships, one-stop facilities for cultural
from existing cultural gatherings to ensure the Plan’s
information and permitting, dedicated artist housing,
engagement was representative of broader discussions.
and a well maintained online resource to connect
At these events, members of the planning team
cultural creators with resources and opportunities.
provided an overview of the Cultural Plan and engaged
The first INTERMISSION DC event was a citywide attendees in discussions that helped illuminate more
kick-off held at MLK Central Library followed by four nuanced insight into the needs and opportunities in
community conversations, one in each quadrant. the cultural community. Several organizations such as
Based on input from those conversations, the planning Nerds in NoMa, Humanities DC, Listen Local First and
team held four additional INTERMISSIONS DC events Cultural DC featured panel conversations on culture that
targeting key segments of the cultural community, offered opportunities for dynamic exchanges between
including arts organizations, youth and educators, people and organizations with differing viewpoints and
individual artists/cultural creators and the Deaf experiences. These conversations helped the planning
community. team further refine the Plan’s concepts.

Each INTERMISSION DC had different points of To gain additional perspective from the INTERMISSION
emphasis influenced by the scope of the meeting, DC conversations, the planning team offered an open
location and participants. The kick-off was the most invitation for any cultural stakeholder to have a focus

DC Office of Planning 96
E N G A G E M E N T

group. These conversations helped the planning team


gain deeper insight into the issues and opportunities
raised through the INTERMISSION DC conversations.
Through deep dive focus group conversations, the
planning team discussed financing, fundraising, growth
plans, organizational constraints and programming
strategies. These conversations offered powerful
perspectives that helped the team better interpret the
input received through the public INTERMISSION DC
discussions.

financial institutions (CDFIs) to learn about innovative


approaches to cultural funding. These conversations
helped the planning team develop a ground-breaking
approach to cultural funding to meet the cultural
community’s potential.

The engagement process focused on the four themes


of cultural identity, cultural space, cultural partnerships
and cultural entrepreneurship. The planning team used
the input participants provided on these four themes to
craft this Plan’s three-part strategic approach: cultural
creators, cultural spaces and cultural consumers.

Following the first nine input-oriented INTERMISSION


DC events the planning team held a final feedback-
Throug the focus groups, the planning team learned oriented event coinciding with the public review period
that many cultural organizations were experiencing for the Plan. Numerous cultural stakeholders attended
severe financial stress. These needs were widespread the open house event and shared feedback on the
and likely exceeding what the District could fund recommendations they found most helpful. During the
alone. Subsequently, the planning team convened a event they also raised concerns that the Plan would
focus group with local and regional cultural funders. benefit from a stronger action plan, reduced emphasis
The discussion revealed that the existing cultural on large institutions and additional consideration of
funding system led by foundations and private donors, the immediate needs in the creative community. The
with support from the District and other government planning team took the feedback and combined it with
funding, had limited capacity to meet the many extensive comments received through the Plan’s public
needs that cultural organizations had shared. Based review period to make significant revisions and produce
on these findings the planning team reached out to the final Cultural Plan.
national foundations and community development

97 DC Cultural Plan
DEAF AND HARD
OF HEARING
COMMUNITY
OP's engagement found a strong need to remove
The Deaf and hard of hearing community has been an
linguistic barriers, promote language diversity (i.e.,
integral part of the District of Columbia’s cultural identity
sign language) and normalize ASL citywide to reduce
for more than 150 years. Home to Gallaudet University,
barriers between the hearing and Deaf communities.
the leading U.S. institution for the Deaf and hard-of-
Accommodations and opportunities that promote
hearing, the District is one of the most Deaf-friendly cities
cultural inclusivity and language diversity coupled with
in the U.S.
increased access to Deaf cultural experiences citywide
Through small group interviews with Gallaudet University were frequent responses to the question – How can
personnel, interviews with deaf and hard-of-hearing the District better support cultural entrepreneurship?
individuals outside the university and community Another common desire shared by members of the Deaf
engagement conducted at a large-scale Deaf community and hard-of-hearing community was to create a support
social event, the OP began a process to better understand system for Deaf entrepreneurship including expansion
how the Deaf and hard-of-hearing community interact with of opportunities for Deaf-friendly offerings and events.
culture in the city and how the District government and its
To more fully embrace the opportunities identified through
partners can better support Deaf cultural entrepreneurship.
this outreach, the District government and its partners
The Deaf and hard-of-hearing community is a major are exploring new ways to connect the Deaf experience
influencer of the District’s cultural identity and the to the city at large. These include finding creative ways
community contributes to the city's diversity. Members of and spaces to increase chance encounters, which
the Deaf and hard-of-hearing community shared that the are encounters that provide opportunities for hearing
H Street NE corridor, NoMA, Union Market and Eastern individuals to witness, immerse and navigate their way
Market areas are the most common locations where they through Deaf experiences; establish a Deaf-friendly
engage cultural experiences in the District. These areas arts and cultural entrepreneurship support system to
are host to several popular Deaf and hard-of-hearing assist with small business development; and creating
social events and include some business establishments citywide policies that encourage Deaf-friendly design
with staff trained in ASL to assist patrons. Neighborhoods and physical space improvement of District-owned
including Adams Morgan, Columbia Heights, U Street and properties as well as public spaces.
Ivy City were also identified as places where members of
As the city continues to grow, there is an opportunity
the District’s Deaf and hard-of-hearing community go to
to facilitate communication solutions that bring together
enjoy cultural experiences in the city.
the Deaf, hard of hearing and hearing communities.

DC Office of Planning 98
E N G A G E M E N T

FOCUS GROUPS AND


PARTNER CONVERSATIONS

Arts Action DC
DC Public Charter School Board
Mayor’s Office of Community Affairs
Duke Ellington School of the Arts
The Kennedy Center
National Building Museum
Gallaudet University
DC Public Library
Alcoholic Beverage Control Board
Transformer DC
National Capital Planning Commission
Theatre Washington
Cultural DC
Hamiltonian Gallery
Listen Local First
Smithsonian Institution
Capital Fringe
S & R Foundation
DC Department of Small and Local Business
Howard University
Development
I.M.P.
Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and
Economic Development Reinvestment Fund
Turnaround Arts Consortium of Universities of the Washington
Metropolitan Area
DC Ideas Festival
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
National Museum of Women in the Arts
Authority
U.S. Capitol Visitor Center
Union Arts
Sheldon For DC
DC Improv Theater
The Historical Society of Washington, DC
Tribe Fest DC
National Theatre
Anacostia Community Museum
Humanities DC
The Kresge Foundation
DC Education Collaborative
Crossing the Street Curators
The Greater Washington Community Foundation
Gehl Institute
Arabella Advisors
Van Alen Institute
Polinger Foundation
The Pink Line Project
The Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation
Young Playwrights’ Theater
Prince Charitable Trust
Ciudad Emergente
National Endowment for Arts
Washington Area Bicyclist Association
Logan Family Foundation & Street Plans
Inter-American Development Bank Funk Parade
DC Business Improvement District Council Pleasant Plains Workshop
DC Main Streets Building Community Workshop
202 Arts Festival Guerilla Arts
Nerds in NoMA Step Afrika!
United Cities and Local Governments No Kings Collective
Washington Performing Arts Ward 8 Arts and Culture Council
Deputy Mayor for Education
DC Public Schools

99 DC Cultural Plan
COLLECTIVE
ACTION FOR
SUSTAINABLE
CULTURE
C O L L E C T I V E A C T I O N F O R S U S T A I N A B L E C U L T U R E

CULTURAL CREATORS, SPACES


AND CONSUMERS
The Cultural Plan uses three interlocking strategies—creators, spaces and consumers—
that offer mutually reinforcing recommendations to strengthen the cultural community.
This approach enables the cultural community to grow and diversify by increasing outlets
for cultural creators and organizations, while also creating more opportunities for cultural
participation among residents and visitors.

Each component is detailed in subsequent generating private space through linkages to real
chapters that discuss how existing resources estate development, and creating opportunities
and new recommendations will connect with for cultural organizations to purchase spaces.
strategic opportunities.
The third ‘strategy’ chapter is for consumers
The first ‘strategy’ chapter is for cultural creators, who are the District’s residents and visitors. The
the people and organizations that produce strategy offers new ways to promote the city’s
cultural expressions. Creators are students, cultural community to local, regional and visitor
artists, cultural entrepreneurs and anyone else audiences by forming stronger connections
who creates. The strategy aligns and expands between unique local cultures and national
opportunities for cultural expressions through a culture. These connections will increase support
series of pathways for creators to develop their for creators and cultural space, strengthening
practice and entrepreneurship skills. the District as a national and international
cultural destination by leveraging the federal
The second ‘strategy’ chapter is for cultural cultural organizations.
spaces, the social, informal and formal spaces
where cultural creators engage cultural These strategies converge as a system that
consumers. Spaces include libraries, recreation empowers cultural creators, supports space
centers, school auditoriums, theaters, galleries, for cultural production and presentation, and
bars, coffee shops, parks, street festivals and enriches cultural consumers with perspective
block parties. The Plan introduces strategies and experiences. These strategies form
that leverage public and private sector resources synergies to grow the cultural community by
to sustain cultural spaces and create new ones. aligning, leveraging and promoting culture and
These tools form a continuum of cultural space creativity to make the District more inclusive,
by maximizing public space and facilities, diverse, innovative and engaging.

103 DC Cultural Plan


CULTURAL
CREATORS
GOALS

• Cultural Creators will develop their


practice with the support of aligned
educational and technical assistance
resources.
• Cultural Creators will have increased
access to affordable housing.
• Cultural Creators will have increased
access to affordable production
space.
• Cultural Creators will be empowered
to build careers as creators.

CULTURAL
CREATORS
C O L L E C T I V E A C T I O N F O R S U S T A I N A B L E C U L T U R E

[CULTURAL CREATORS]
This chapter is a roadmap to empower the District’s creators. The roadmap starts with
cultural education—schools have enormous potential to inspire youth beginning in early
childhood and progressing through pre-professional programs. It goes on to support creators
seeking to develop cultural professions and those who create for pleasure. For those who are
or want to become cultural professionals, it provides pathways including technical assistance,
higher education, networking and mentorship. This chapter’s strategies align and expand the
resources and opportunities for all cultural creators.

EXISTING CONDITIONS
FOR PERFORMERS
For many people, the journey to become like to experience more arts and humanities
a cultural creator starts in school where in their schools, such as music, art, drama,
students are inspired by arts, culture and languages and debate. These findings were
heritage programs. Part of the learning echoed by participants in the youth and
process is inherently creative. Students sing, educators INTERMISSION DC. (See the
learn to play instruments, perform, create art Engagement Appendix for more information)
and write. As students progress through the
Throughout their time in DCPS, students
education system, there are opportunities for
have opportunities to not only build
more intensive cultural participation through
their skills across arts disciplines, but
bands, drama programs, elective humanities
to experience art as an essential part of
education and extracurricular activities.
individual and collective cultures. Students
Nearly all the District’s 96,000 students, learn to use the creative process to explain
(96%) receive arts and humanities education and engage with new ideas and experiences.
in schools that provides a lifelong cultural DCPS Arts benefits from the arts-rich
foundation. Over the past decade, cultural city. They embrace partnerships with arts
exposure for students has increased, but there organizations whose work intersects with
are still more opportunities for growth. The DC DCPS. DCPS partners with stakeholders
Public School (DCPS) user satisfaction survey who impact students’ creative growth and
indicates that 93% of students experience arts development as part of the Framework for
education in the form of one cultural field trip Arts Learning. The Framework was designed
per year. Among DCPS students, 47% would as a platform and a forum for building cultural

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partnerships related to arts and creative education. to each charter school’s educational model. In addition to
DCPS Arts actively presents its work and progress to charter schools, the District has a growing home school
the arts education community while building strategic community where many parents emphasize minority
partnerships in classrooms, schools and across the cultural practices, including those from the African
District, moving DCPS toward increasingly integrated American and African diaspora communities. One
arts resources and services. common theme between DCPS, charter schools and the
home school community is that many use field trips to the
Recently, DCPS developed new academic courses city’s many cultural institutions as important elements of
that teach all elementary students art, music, physical cultural education.
education, health and world language with an invested
of $10 million to hire 100 new teachers. This investment Today, there are a wide range of out-of-school cultural
provides a stronger cultural education for thousands experiences available to students including Washington
of DCPS students, many of whom may be inspired to Performing Arts education programs, Humanities DC
become cultural creators. Soul for the City program, Kennedy Center Youth
Ambassadors, the DC Youth Orchestra, Young
DCPS has two dedicated arts schools providing high- Playwrights Theatre and DC Collaborative’s Arts and
quality educational programming. The Fillmore Arts Humanities for Every Student (AHFES) program.
Center offers dance, music, theater, visual arts and
digital arts instruction for approximately 1,600 students The District’s universities, including the University of the
across five schools in grades K-5. The Duke Ellington District of Columbia (UDC), offer arts, humanities and
School for the Arts is an award-winning high school that cultural programs that can inspire students’ creativity
combines a full college-preparatory curriculum with an while preparing them for a career as a cultural creator.
intensive pre-professional arts curriculum. Enrollment The Consortium of Universities connects these programs
is based on competitive auditions for a range of cultural by offering students a wide range of educational
disciplines including dance, instrumental music, theater, opportunities. Universities also offer opportunities for
literary media and communication, museum studies, community members to experience performances and
visual arts, technical design and production and vocal exhibitions.
music. These two schools offer unique and valuable
opportunities for the District’s students to develop and The District has rich community histories that are
thrive as creators. recorded by numerous groups and organizations
including the DC Historic Preservation Office, Humanities
The District's many public charter schools also utilize DC, DC Preservation League and the Historical Society
different approaches to cultural programming tailored of Washington DC. The DC Historic Preservation Office

112,000 people employed


in cultural economy*

*Direct employment spanning a range of occupations and industries

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1 IN 27 CULTURAL CREATORS IN THE NUMBER OF INDIVIDUAL CULTURAL CREATORS BY SELECT OCCUPATIONS


DISTRICT IS SELF-EMPLOYED

330 WRITERS AND AUTHORS

300 PHOTOGRAPHERS

310 MUSICIANS

160 FINE ARTISTS

80 CRAFT ARTISTS

170 ART DIRECTORS

110 MULTIMEDIA ARTISTS

(HPO) housed within OP, identifies and designates 330 writers and authors, as well as 300 photographers.
historic districts and landmarks across the city. Through These figures only represent primary occupations—
its work, the HPO captures the city’s heritage with many more residents have secondary cultural
resources, such as the DC Historic Preservation Plan employment.
and Ward Heritage Guides. The HPO also provides
Individual artists and creators add vibrancy to
grant funding for others to develop projects such as
communities across the District. However, they are
DC Oral History Collaborative and the DC Community
also more likely to be vulnerable to the pressures of a
Heritage project.
growing city than other professionals due to irregular
Individual cultural creators are another important revenue streams and a higher sensitivity toward
dimension of cultural creation. The a cultural increasing costs for production, presentation and
employment analysis identified approximately 4,110 living space. Collective production spaces, such as O
individual cultural creators in the District. The analysis Street Studios and Hamiltonian Artists are important
specifically analyzed cultural self-employment. production facilities that are in short supply relative to
However, the data are likely incomplete due to limited demand.
self-employment reporting requirements. Despite this
Additionally, District fine artists are more likely to be
significant limitation, the analysis identified 160 fine
housing-burdened than many other residents, spending
artists, 80 craft artists, 70 art directors, 310 musicians,
on average 39% of their income on rent for housing.

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Being housing burdened exacerbates challenges while the number of all cultural businesses including
finding production space that is affordable in addition nonprofits increased by 2% during the same period.
to investing in materials by cutting into a creator’s These figures indicate that the cultural economy
discretionary budget. is experiencing a major shift from nonprofit toward
cultural entrepreneurship.
The cultural employment analysis also revealed the
number of individual artists grew by 20% across the The District empowers creators with a range of
metropolitan region over the last decade, while the programs that form a support system. The District’s
District’s share of individual artists remained essentially creators have access to many different programs
flat. This trend is particularly notable because the and resources from numerous District Government
District’s total population grew rapidly relative to the agencies and private organizations to meet a wide
metropolitan region over this period. These trends range of personal and professional needs.
capture complex changes marked by creators seeking
lower cost housing and production space outside the In addition to the District Government, numerous
District, shown by declines in some cultural disciplines private organizations offer programs that support
with historic concentrations in the District. district residents. Some provide legal services while
others connect residents to cultural opportunities.
In 2016, establishments spanning a range of industries These organizations form valuable bridges among
in the cultural economy employed 112,000 people in organizations and sectors. Together, government
the District. Between 2009 and 2012, the number and its partners will align existing programs to create
of cultural nonprofit organizations declined by 32% a stronger support network for creators.

STRENGTHEN WORKFORCE ENHANCE THE SUPPORT


DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM
· Funding
· Incubation
· Revenue
· Mentorship
CULTURAL · Housing
· Training CREATORS
· Production Space

EXPAND YOUTH PROGRAMMING

· Development

· Exposure

DC Office of Planning 108


109 DC Cultural Plan
PARTNERSHIP FRAMEWORK
Partnerships are an important technique for many organizations can make catalytic investments given
cultural creators. They provide opportunities to reach high degrees of trust between partners and long lead
new audiences of cultural consumers and potentially times, while smaller organizations can be nimble and
unlock new funding or revenue sources. They also offer seize the moment.
important forums to experiment and innovate. However,
One important consideration for smaller organizations
partnerships are often challenging because similar
is that larger organizations might have relatively
organizations often share funders and patrons, while
large budgets, but they also have large fixed costs
organizations with less in common can have difficulty
that constrain flexibility to undertake new initiatives.
identifying common ground.
Conversely, when large organizations work with smaller
This framework offers a conceptual approach to forming organizations, some technical assistance is often
successful partnerships followed by a discussion of required to build capacity for interoperable financial
keys to success for working with common partners. management practices, documentation and insurance.
This information is drawn from the OP’s experience Additionally, when large organizations partner with
developing numerous partnerships with many different small organizations, they should be aware that many
types of organizations across the city. small organizations have limited ability to absorb cost
overruns or delayed payments.
The Role of Partnerships
Agree on criteria for success. It is particularly
Partnerships are tools for organizational innovation and important to identify each partner’s criteria for success.
growth that cross-pollinate cultural organizations and This will help ensure that the final product will evolve in
cultural consumers with new ideas and experiences. alignment with each partner to increase the likelihood
They bring two or more organizations together by of a positive outcome that can build trust for future
creating shared benefits through a balance of risk and partnerships that can achieve greater impact.
trust.
Keys to Success with Common Partners
Elements for Successful Partnership
National Park Service. Partnership requires significant
Be interesting. Successful partnerships necessitate full lead time and trust building. Partners should take
buy-in from all parties. An exciting partnership proposal the lead in developing proposals with awareness of
is more likely to break through organizational inertia applicable laws and regulations guiding use of NPS
and convince decision-makers that the associated time facilities.
and investments needed to establish and sustain the
partnership are worthwhile. Smithsonian Museums. Each museum operates
with a high degree of autonomy from the broader
Understand the timing. There is a large degree of institution’s administrative body. Some museums such
variation in planning time for events and initiatives as the Anacostia Community Museum, American Art
across cultural organizations. Small organizations Museum and the National African Art Museum have
typically launch initiatives in weeks and months while missions and initiatives that are closely aligned with
larger organizations often require a year or more. the District. Other museums have aligned educational
missions and facilities that can support partnership
Understand the money. Partnerships often require
initiatives with more limited scopes.
some degree of financial investment from each
party. Larger organizations typically employ detailed, Diplomatic Cultural Affairs Offices. The District
long-range financial planning. Small organizations hosts numerous international diplomatic organizations,
often engage in less rigid, shorter-term financial such as embassies. Many of these organizations
planning. In practice, overcoming these differences in have cultural diplomacy programs that can support
financial management present opportunities. Larger partnerships. Partnerships between public diplomacy

DC Office of Planning 110


programs and local cultural organizations are often most DPR facilities, which provide athletic and out-of-school
effective when intermediaries including District Government enrichment programming. DPR seeks and strongly
agencies or well established cultural organizations, such as considers community input on the design and programming
DC Jazz Festival help form partnerships. of its facilities.

Business Improvement Districts. Business Improvement DC Public Libraries. DC Public Libraries are an
Districts (BIDs) are interested in supporting office and retail independent government agency. Neighborhood Libraries
uses within their boundaries. Partnership opportunities with typically have meeting rooms and other facilities that can
these organizations include initiatives pertaining to branding, host noncommercial activities. These facilities can be
placemaking and activation. BIDs are governed by boards booked through a centralized reservation system on a first-
of directors comprised of property owners from the district. come, first-served basis.
As a result, the organizations have close relationships with
DC Public Schools. Facility programming within each
major commercial property owners that can help catalyze
DC Public School is managed by each school’s principal.
partnerships.
Demands on these facilities from the school community
Universities. All of the District’s universities have community can be extensive, limiting opportunities for third party
affairs offices that present key points for engagement. It partnerships. Additionally, principals are very conscious
is often helpful to consider that Universities typically have about support staff capacity and the costs that can be
organizational structures focused on their academic programs incurred by security and janitorial staff supporting third-
and student population. Deeper partnerships can be built party events. These facilities have a unique ability to
with departments, such as theater and fine arts departments support larger community-based events, but it is most
when partnerships can deliver shared benefits that include the effective to partner with a school-based organization such
educational program and student population. Typically, these as a Parent Teacher Organization.
partnerships must be both financially and programmatically
beneficial to the department.

DC Department of Parks and Recreation. The Department


of Parks and Recreations (DPR) operates a host of parks and
recreation centers across the city. Typically, there are fewer
regulatory constraints on DPR facilities than comparable
National Park Service facilities. There are opportunities
for cultural organizations to participate in programming

CULTURE 21
Culture 21 is an initiative by an international organization called United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) to implement
Agenda 21 for culture. The Agenda 21 for culture is the first document with a worldwide mission that advocates for cities
and local governments to undertake coordinated cultural development. Culture 21 offers tools and resources for local
governments seeking to develop culture as a pillar of their sustainable development practices including guidance for
developing cultural strategies and impact assessments. Culture 21 advances five themes: culture as human rights; culture
and governance; culture, sustainability and territory; culture and social inclusion; and culture and economy.

The District joined Culture 21 to gain tools and insights from peer cities around the world who have developed programs and
policies to support cultural development. The District has completed an initial assessment and begun using the feedback
to sustain the city’s successes and target improvement in other areas. This partnership will help the District align and
strengthen its cultural tools and policies to create a stronger symbiotic relationship between growth and culture.

111 DC Cultural Plan


Take a Design Thinking Approach to Partnership
Partnerships are often challenging but high-value growth opportunities.
Applying a design thinking approach to partnership building can increase
the efficacy of partnerships and build trust for continued collaboration. Using
this approach to partnership building helps forge impactful approaches that
build trust for continued collaboration.

Does this solution meet each partner’s


needs? Has it improved how they Who are my partners?
feel, think, or do their tasks?’ What matters to them?

The goal is to ensure that your solution is The goal is to develop a deep
materialized and touches the lives of understanding of a partner to empathize
your end users. with their perspectives.

6 1
IMPLEMENT
Put the vision into effect.
EMPATHIZE
Ensure that your solution Conduct research to
is materialized and develop an understanding
touches the lives of your of your partners and their
end users. environments.

What works? 5 DESIGN 2


What does not work? TEST DEFINE What do they need?
Return to your Combine all your
The goal is to verify that your partners for THINKING research and The goal is to organize all
prototype achieves each partner’s feedback. Put your observe where
your understanding and
prototype in front of your partners’
goals. real consumers and PROCESS problems exist. draw parallels across your
verify that it achieves partners’ current
your goals.
experiences. Identify unmet
user needs.

4 3
PROTOTYPE IDEATE
Build representations for Brainstorm a range of
a subset of your ideas. crazy, creative ideas that
Weigh the impact vs. address the unmet needs
feasibility of your ideas identified in the define
through feedback. phase.

Share ideas, remixing by


How can I show my idea? building on other’s ideas

The goal of this phase is to understand The goal is to develop many different
what components of your ideas work, ideas. Give your team total freedom; no
and which do not. idea is too farfetched and quantity
supersedes quality.

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CULTURAL CREATORS
STRATEGY
Creators will be empowered by a progressive series For residents seeking to work primarily as cultural
of programs and resources that support lifelong creators, the District Government will partner with
personal and professional development. Stronger philanthropic foundations, universities and others
cultural foundations will be built by increasing in- to align and enhance existing programs to create a
school arts, music and humanities programs that Center for Cultural Opportunities that helps creators
inspire many people to become cultural creators and develop a business plan, learn business management,
cultural entrepreneurs. To build on these foundations, financial literacy, and launch their business. The Center
the Implementation Steering Committee will work for Cultural Opportunities will include an online platform
with schools and creative partners to implement pre- that provides creators with targeted toolkits along with
professional programs for youth interested in careers promotion, mentoring, and networking opportunities.
as cultural entrepreneurs. These programs will teach
Individual artists and creators are encouraged to
skills including creative practice development, business
form larger organizations such as partnerships and
planning, financial planning and marketing.
cooperatives that consolidate resources to reach new
For older residents, cultural expression is part of opportunities. The District will leverage public-private-
lifelong personal growth. The Implementation Steering partnerships by working with financing partners to
Committee will work with CAH, OCTFME among other support a network of incubators that will create vehicles
partners to create an online central clearinghouse for for cultural organizations to launch and mature.
networking, mentorship, professional development and
Taken together, these programs provide creators with
partnership opportunities. The District government will
opportunities for lifelong practice that is fulfilling and
align programs that help individual artists and cultural
sustainable. This approach is driven by the support of
creators access programs to launch, cultivate and grow
every resident, every business and every organization.
small businesses. The Steering Committee will also
The District’s cultural stakeholders will collaborate to
work with nonprofit partners to increase programming
create opportunities for creators to express themselves.
in public space and facilities that create accessible
opportunities for residents to create and connect with
consumers.

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CULTURAL CREATORS
RECOMMENDATIONS
Timeframes include short-term, mid-term, long-term and ongoing. Short term recommendations can be completed within two years;
mid-term recommendations can be completed within 5 years; long-term recommendations can be completed within 10 years. Ongoing
recommendations are for currently occurring activities that are encouraged to continue. Note: Recommendations include agency and
organization acronyms. The glossary of terms on page 171 includes a definition of each acronym used in this report.

Launch a Center for Cultural Opportunities


1.0
Form a Center for Cultural Opportunities within the District's Small Business Resource Center that
offers cultural creators the tools they need to launch and/or grow careers and businesses. The Center
will have both a physical and digital presence. Resources will include comprehensive training programs
that offer guidance on small business planning and development; business management and financing,
including guidance on accessing traditional and non-traditional financing; as well as grant application
and management. Through the Center, residents will learn how to navigate District, federal and private
programs that can support their personal and professional development. The District will work with
partners to align and expand existing programs that target the needs of cultural creators.
[Implementation Lead: DSLBD with DCRA, CAH, OCTFME; Timeframe: Short-term]

Align cultural creators with small business programs


1.1 Align programs that help individual cultural creators, such as artists, access programs to launch,
cultivate and grow small businesses. Highlight the Certified Business Enterprise (CBE) program as a
platform for catalyzing small business development through a preferred status in District procurement
opportunities. The preferred status enables the District to leverage its procurement needs to expand
opportunities for local businesses. Additionally, increased cultural creator participation in the CBE
program would enable the District to provide the list to the private sector as a resource for identifying
local creative firms for business-to-business purchasing.
[Implementation Lead: DSLBD with CAH and OCTFME; Timeframe: Short-term]

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2.0 Increase access to affordable housing


Work with the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) and the Housing Finance
Agency (DCHFA) to increase access to affordable housing programs for cultural producers and individual
artists. Approaches include working with cultural creators to help them qualify for existing programs and
developing financing tools to increase housing options for District residents with non-traditional income.
The agencies should investigate tools and techniques for co-locating cultural space with affordable
housing.
[Implementation Lead: DHCD and DCHFA; Timeframe: Mid-term]

2.1 Produce a cultural creator's affordable housing toolkit


Develop a toolkit that provides creators with consolidated information about the District and
its nonprofit partners’ housing programs, including rent supplement, affordable dwelling units,
inclusionary housing and home purchase assistance as well as homelessness assistance.
[Implementation Lead: OP and DHCD; Timeframe: Short-term]

2.2 Produce a cultural tenants' toolkit


Develop a toolkit that provides information to cultural creators on resources for commercial tenants
and the programs available to support them.
[Implementation Lead: WDCEP; Timeframe: Short-term]

3.0 Increase youth programming


Develop additional youth programming and partnerships that offer mentorship and pre-professional
education to youth, allowing them to build creative foundations, develop creative skills and enabling
them to thrive as cultural creators. These programs will be developed in partnership with organizations
including the Kennedy Center, DC Education Collaborative, DPR, DCPL, Humanities DC and cultural
organizations.
[Implementation Lead: DME and CAH; Timeframe: Mid-term]

3.1 Continue strengthening Pre-K-12 arts and culture programs


Continue strengthening Pre-K-12 arts programs, resources and coordination to advance DCPS’
Framework for Arts Learning. This approach will provide enhanced opportunities to students at all
grade levels by leveraging partnerships that build on existing programs including the Fillmore Arts
Center and the Duke Ellington School of the Arts.
[Implementation Lead: DME and DCPS; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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Leverage the Any Given Child and Turnaround Arts Programs


3.2 Through the Any Given Child program, DCPS and the DC Collaborative will assess the DCPS Arts
education programs for students, Pre-K-12 to identify key gaps and implement targeted programs
that improve arts education for all students. The Any Given Child program will build on the targeted
arts education support provided to four DCPS schools through the Turnaround Arts Program.
[Implementation Lead: DCPS; Timeframe: Short-term]

Increase out-of-school cultural programming for youth


3.3 Build partnerships between District agencies that operate out-of-school educational facilities
including DCPL, DPR and DCPS and community-based cultural organizations to increase out-of-
school cultural programming for youth.
[Implementation Lead: DCPS, DPR and DCPL; Timeframe: Ongoing]

4.0 Support local cultural identity and traditions


Continue to invest in cultural and local history initiatives and expand access to resources that support
the cultivation and expression of cultural identity and locally significant traditions including music, food,
fashion and art. Leverage existing programs offered through CAH, OCTFME, HPO, Humanities DC and
the Historical Society of Washington DC.
[Implementation Lead: CAH, OCTFME and HPO; Timeframe: Ongoing]

Continue supporting culture through historic preservation


4.1 HPO will continue supporting the Preservation Grants program and seeking additional opportunities to
support heritage and culture including Civil Rights heritage, oral history and LGBTQ heritage. HPO’s
Preservation Grants offer support for a wide range of programs including preservation planning,
research, outreach and education, and construction. New programs will use a partnership approach
to leverage the existing grants to increase funding from additional stakeholders.
[Implementation Lead: HPO; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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5.0 Support innovation in local culture


Support existing programs while developing new programs enabling innovation in local culture. These
efforts should build on existing programs, including 202 Creates, The Labs at DCPL and CAH grants,
while launching new platforms.
[Implementation Lead: CAH and OCTFME; Timeframe: Mid-term]

5.1 Reinforce The Labs at DC Public Library


Continue to support and reinforce The Labs at DC Public Library as a platform for residents to create
and exchange cultural expressions in shared space. Strengthen the links between support provided
at The Labs and entrepreneurship, enabling residents to use The Labs as a pathway to cultural
careers and businesses. Consider expanding and tailoring The Labs to neighborhood libraries to
increase cultural production resources in communities across the District.
[Implementation Lead: DCPL; Timeframe: Mid-term]

5.2 Continue to implement and refine CAH grant programs


Continue to implement and refine CAH's complement of grant programs that support both individual
cultural creators and nonprofit cultural organizations. Refinement should be focused on increasing
impact, programmatic alignment, grantee diversity and geographic diversity.
[Implementation Lead: CAH; Timeframe: Ongoing]

Develop innovative operating models for cultural incubators and collective production
5.3 space
Develop innovative operating models for incubators and shared space that include public-private
partnerships. Consider seed/catalyst funding from the District as well as performance-based multi-
year operating support funding. Approaches should be inclusive and target all types of cultural
producers.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED; Timeframe: Mid-term]

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CULTURAL
S PAC E S
GOALS

• Cultural Space in the public realm


and in public facilities will be
platforms for expression.
• Cultural Space will be more
accessible.
• Cultural Space will be increased and
maintained as community anchors.
• Cultural Space creation will be linked
to the city’s growth.

CULTURAL
SPACES
C O L L E C T I V E A C T I O N F O R S U S T A I N A B L E C U L T U R E

[CULTURAL SPACES]
This chapter establishes a strategy to strengthen the continuum of cultural spaces. It reinforces
the connections between cultural communities supporting mutually beneficial growth. Expanding
cultural space will increase the range of career paths for creators while making cultural expression
more accessible for consumers.

Cultural spaces are social, informal and formal places where creators and consumers come together.
They provide the cultural economy’s structure through their location, size and design. Together these
spaces form a continuum that facilitates cultural growth and development with spaces to dream, test
and scale.

Culture is shared and exchanged by people; it is a living practice that manifests in spaces. Social
cultural spaces such as parks, coffee shops and bars are places to exchange cultural ideas that blend
practices. Informal cultural spaces including libraries, night clubs and festivals form common ground
for democratic cultural experience. Formal spaces such as museums, theaters and galleries are
dedicated spaces that elevate a practice.

The cultural space strategy harnesses opportunities for new kinds of partnerships to address these
challenges by systemically strengthening organizations. The strategy leverages public space and the
value of real estate to create and maintain accessible cultural spaces that grow with the city.

EXISTING CONDITIONS
FOR CULTURAL SPACES
The District has many different types of cultural From a land use perspective, the city has three
space including large national museums, music legacy redevelopment-oriented Arts Districts: 1)
venues, galleries and public spaces that provide downtown on 7th and E Streets, 2) the Uptown
backdrops for street festivals. Some spaces are Arts District along 14th and U Streets NW and
thriving while others struggle with adjusting to 3) H Street Northeast. These districts have been
changes in the economy. Over the past decade, supported with a combination of zoning and
the District experienced rapid population financing incentives that fueled redevelopment.
and economic growth. The growth revived In each area, cultural spaces were created or
diminished commercial areas particularly east of preserved including the Howard, Atlas and
16th street NW, put vacant property back to use Woolly Mammoth theatres. The Arts Districts
and supported broad economic growth. helped the city create new cultural space while

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encouraging reinvestment in underutilized commercial has been higher real estate values across the city, which
corridors. However, more than a decade of experience have created a mix of pressures and opportunities.
has also shown the limitations of Arts Districts. Many people and organizations have experienced
Balancing cultural development with community financial stress as the city’s growing population and
aspirations, financing, and market demand is difficult to economy increase demand for all types of space. On
achieve. Today, the Arts Districts are nightlife-focused, the other hand, higher property values have been
which presents challenges for continued growth of leveraged to create more affordable housing, public
cultural spaces in the districts because there is high- benefits and public-private-partnerships that support
demand among bars and restaurants for most available culture.
spaces.
For many cultural organizations—particularly those
Building on these initiatives, the District developed an that do not own their space—the widespread increase
arts cluster approach in Brookland with a 2009 small in property values has been a major challenge. Most
area plan. The small area plan established community cultural uses cannot come close to matching rental rates
priorities that were implemented through cross- that traditional retail, restaurant and office tenants pay
subsidization and leveraging the value of development for space. Historically, many cultural organizations have
flexibility to produce a range of community oriented sought underutilized spaces that were not attractive to
cultural spaces. typical commercial tenants and as a result could be
leased at very low rates. This model was the bedrock
As the District has grown over the past decade, many for District cultural space for decades. Going forward
cultural businesses have had difficulty maintaining very low-cost market rate cultural space is not likely
their footing in the city’s rapidly changing real estate to remain a viable model as the city continues to grow.
markets and entertainment patterns. There is a lot of
anecdotal evidence that these shifts have contributed Industry research for this Plan showed that small to
to the closures or relocations of several high-profile mid-sized cultural organizations are experiencing
venues, such as Bohemian Caverns, HR-57 and the H stress tied to real estate prices. Higher space costs
Street Playhouse. are resulting in lower compensation for staff and lower
levels of programmatic investment. These trends
Additionally, art galleries have been one of the types indicate that the business models used by cultural
of cultural space most impacted by the city's economic organizations are becoming unsustainable. It is time to
growth. For example, more than 70 art galleries closed refine and scale new models for cultural space that will
since 2005 and though there have been some new remain financially viable as the city continues to grow.
galleries that have opened the growth has not kept
pace with the closures. A large portion of the District’s cultural activity occurs
in the public realm, which includes spaces such as
Following more than twenty years of growth, the District sidewalks, rights of way, and the transit system. The
is financially healthy and making leading investments significance of these spaces in the city’s changing
in schools, housing and transit that provide a base of cultural landscape is emphasized by a 30% increase in
support for culture. However, one effect of the growth District-issued special events licenses for events that

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AFFIRM CULTURAL STREAMLINE


SPACE PROCESSES
· Traditional · Permits

· Non-traditional · Partnership

· Licenses

CULTURAL
SPACES

PARTNER TO CREATE FACILITATE CULTURE


CULTURAL SPACE EVERYWHERE

· Incubators · Public Facilities


· Temporary Uses · Private Facilities
· Long-Term Uses · Public Space
· Collaborations · Private Space

took place in the city’s streets and parks between 2013 It is the applicant’s responsibility to coordinate across
and 2015. agencies, which can be cumbersome and confusing.
Applications, documentation and submission points are
However, temporary activations and special events scattered across multiple websites and physical offices.
require extensive lead times for permitting. Depending The basic process is well documented by DCRA; however,
on the location, size, activities and frequency of the subsequent agency policies often add unexpected
event, permits may need to be acquired through a requirements to the process. A more challenging
combination of approvals provided by the Department of circumstance is a “special event,” which is “a parade, walk,
Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, Department of Parks run, bike ride, procession, or festival requiring interagency
and Recreation, the Homeland Security and Emergency coordination for the temporary use of public roadways.”
Management Agency, Metropolitan Police Department, Special events require more than six months of planning
Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department, and coordination with over six different District agencies.
District Department of Transportation, Office of Tax There is growing demand for this type of event, but many
and Revenue, the Alcoholic Beverage Regulation stakeholders have reported being deterred by the lengthy
Administration and Department of Health. process and high costs. Furthermore, a growing threat of
terror attacks on these events is driving significant security
cost increases and constraining event locations.

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Across the street, the Edgewood Arts Center is a


modern performance space created as a community
amenity through the Monroe Street Market PUD. This
facility provides a flexible multi-use space with wiring

BROOKLAND for performance lighting and multi-media. Community


groups and private organizations rent this space on a
short-term basis to host events and exhibitions.

SMALL AREA A few blocks south, the Brookland Artspace Lofts is a


leading example of work-live space where 39 affordable

PLAN housing units, classrooms, studios and a gallery were


combined in a mixed-use building. The housing and
studio spaces are affordable because the developer
maximized efficiencies from layering different types of
The Brookland community prioritized a cluster of
financing and support including Low Income Housing
new cultural spaces to build on existing community
Tax Credits, foundation grants and District investments
and Catholic University of American (CUA) programs
to create an innovative building that requires much
through the 2009 Brookland CUA Station Area Small
less revenue to operate than a conventionally financed
Area Plan. The Small Area Plan was designed to
building.
harness the Planned Unit Development (PUD) process
where increased development potential could leverage The building was built by Artspace, a national nonprofit
a package of public benefits and amenities in a process that develops cultural space, in partnership with Dance
administered by the Zoning Commission. Ultimately, Place, a local organization that has been located in
the Small Area Plan established a collective vision Brookland for decades. The project helped Dance
and roadmap for a community-oriented arts cluster Place create a new facility that enabled their program
supported by higher density development. Today, PUDs to grow while creating housing and performance space
have produced three cultural spaces in Brookland: The that supports creators.
Arts Walk, Edgewood Arts Center and the Artspace
Lofts. Together, these spaces have drawn out Brookland’s
artistic character with high quality sustainable cultural
The Brookland Arts Walk is part of a mixed-use space that will help the community continue building its
development where most ground floor commercial cultural identity. Approaches from these projects serve
space is dedicated to low cost studio space. The studio as models for other developments across the city,
space is subsidized by market rate housing above such as the Atlantic Plumbing building in Shaw, which
which leverages the Arts Walk, proximity to transit, incorporates affordable ground floor cultural space
Catholic University and neighborhood amenities to subsidized by high value residential space. Going
command premium rent, offsetting an agreement to forward, refining and broadly deploying these models
preserve below market rents for the ground floor studio will increase the supply of cultural space citywide.
spaces.

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CULTURAL SPACES
STRATEGY
Cultural space takes many different forms, often this Plan emphasizes strategies that maximizes their
serving a wide and fluid range of cultural practices. This impact. The city will develop programs that help reduce
Plan emphasizes three broad categories of cultural costs and permitting requirements for community
space: production, presentation and administrative. members using these spaces. Additionally, when
Production spaces are where cultural work is developed; facilities are constructed or renovated, the city will seek
presentation spaces are where cultural creators and opportunities to bolster the cultural amenities within
consumers come together; and administrative spaces them, such as theaters, art studios and fabrication
facilitate operations of individual cultural organizations facilities to increase the city’s capacity for cultural
and support organizations. The District already has a production and presentation.
wealth of cultural space, but there is a need to maintain
Public spaces including sidewalks, roads, plazas
existing spaces and further diversify the composition
and parks are some of the most important cultural
and location of cultural space.
spaces. The District will implement proven effective
This strategy will use tools that build on existing practices to reduce barriers and increase cultural uses
techniques to fully integrate cultural spaces into of public space. For example, the District will build
community and economic development practices. It will on the successful block party program to create new
create more prominent and accessible cultural spaces programs, such as Festival Streets. Festival Streets
that daylight and incubate an increased diversity of are designated areas served by a management
cultural practices affirming the District’s numerous organization, such as a Main Street, BID or community
communities and heritages. association that receive a certification that significantly
streamlines and expedites the planning process for
Public spaces and facilities are critical cultural individual events.
infrastructure that reaches every District resident.
They are schools, libraries, recreation centers, parks Creative placemaking uses art and culture to illuminate
and public spaces. Together, these networks of spaces physical, social and economic opportunities. Both
form the foundation of the cultural community, and public and privately owned outdoor spaces are ideal

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canvases for these expressions. The District will Presentation spaces can be incorporated into larger
continue deploying creative placemaking programs, mixed-use buildings as a magnet to expand typical
such as OP’s Crossing the Street initiative, to showcase pedestrian travel patterns, increasing opportunities
new opportunities and techniques that use public space for complementary retail uses. Presentation spaces
as a venue to build stronger communities by bringing also benefit mixed-use office buildings by attracting
residents together in new ways that celebrate culture. evening patrons, who provide expanded opportunities
for adjoining retailers. These locations further benefit
To strengthen the bridge between cultural practice the cultural organizations because they offer increased
and forming cultural organizations, the District will visibility and access to cultural consumers.
work with partner organizations to create a network of
cultural incubators that will provide space and technical In addition to supporting long-term cultural spaces, this
assistance to help aspiring cultural leaders test and Plan also encourages retail and office buildings to offer
scale new ideas for a range of creative disciplines. vacant spaces as low cost, temporary cultural spaces.
These efforts increase opportunities for cultural creators
The District will prioritize cultural space in major real to connect with new consumers while also generating
estate development projects through discretionary positive benefits to surrounding retail by introducing
development processes to meet ongoing creative an attractor that brings more potential customers
space needs as the city grows. This approach will help strengthening the adjoining retail environment.
generate both production and presentation spaces
that meet different needs in the creative process. This strategy for cultural space will maximize the city’s
Production spaces should be out of public view so, cultural assets while creating new opportunities that
creators can feel comfortable developing new projects enable cultural space to grow with the city to create
and techniques that are not on display until or unless spaces that connect with creative consumers where
the creator is ready to share their work. Conversely, they live, work and gather. Partnership within the
presentation spaces should be public facing and cultural community will ensure that both public and
engaging. private cultural spaces are utilized to the greatest
extent possible. This type of collaboration will also
Incorporating presentation spaces in new or remodeled become increasingly important for individual artists and
facilities is an opportunity to establish a unique identity smaller cultural organizations who are encouraged to
for the building that can help create a stronger sense form collectives and cooperatives to pool resources to
of place and increase appeal to potential tenants in the secure space and materials.
competitive regional market. For example, production
spaces can be located in parts of buildings with low This strategy is specifically designed to help cultural
external visibility that are not well suited to other types organizations adapt to new business models that
of ground floor use. Additionally, many older office leverage the city’s strengths. These strategies will
buildings have large footprints designed for in-house create stronger networks of cultural space that will help
production and document storage facilities that are creators better reflect the District’s diversity. Ultimately,
not required by most contemporary tenants. In many this strategy will create the cultural infrastructure
cases, these spaces could be repurposed as cultural needed to elevate the District’s unique culture.
production facilities, creating efficiencies by utilizing
space with low demand to fill a need, while imparting a
dynamic image to older facilities.

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CULTURAL SPACES
RECOMMENDATIONS
Timeframes include short-term, mid-term, long-term and ongoing. Short term recommendations can be completed within two years;
mid-term recommendations can be completed within 5 years; long-term recommendations can be completed within 10 years. Ongoing
recommendations are for currently occurring activities that are encouraged to continue. Note: Recommendations include agency and
organization acronyms. The glossary of terms on page 171 includes a definition of each acronym used in this report.

Affirm civic identity and community heritage through space


1.0 Leverage the built environment’s potential to affirm civic identities and diverse community heritage.
Use historic preservation as well as adaptive reuse to maintain buildings and spaces that are culturally
significant as the city continues growing. It is critical that these approaches affirm and celebrate Black
culture including African American life and spaces throughout the built environment.
[Implementation Lead: HPO and Property Owners; Timeframe: Ongoing]

2.0 Use innovative tools to daylight cultural heritage


Use wayfinding, interpretative signage, murals and interactive platforms to help new residents connect
with community heritage in innovative ways. These tools will use a mix of traditional wayfinding and
creative placemaking through partnerships with BIDs, Main Streets, DDOT, and CAH.
[Implementation Lead: DDOT, CAH and BIDs; Timeframe: Mid-term]

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Continue incorporating culture into community planning


2.1 Fully integrate arts and culture into the neighborhood planning that the District undertakes across the
city to promote inclusive, resilient and vibrant communities. Approaches include tools that screen for
cultural assets, identify gaps and seek opportunities for enhancing culture (such as public art) and
identify cultural priorities for new construction and redevelopments (such as cultural space).
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Ongoing]

2.2 Deploy experimental strategies for infusing culture in public space


Continue to plan for spaces that can serve as a backdrop or canvas for cultural expression and
creative placemaking, allowing for creative collaboration and exchange to occur, particularly in areas
experiencing rapid change or in areas with higher barriers to accessing cultural facilities. Spaces
can include public assets, such as sidewalks, parks and alleys as well as private spaces. District
government can play a leading role in promoting space through its planning, development and
permitting functions.
[Implementation Lead: OP and DDOT; Timeframe: Ongoing]

Increase options for cultural expression in public space


2.3 Design and implement ‘frequent expression zones’ in commercial areas across the District where
a minimal permitting process is required for performers to use public space. Frequent expression
zones are dedicated spaces that allow performers to use parts of public space that do not interfere
with the free flow of transportation including pedestrians.
[Implementation Lead: OP and DDOT; Timeframe: Short-term]

Conduct a review of the city’s noise ordinances


2.4 Review the city’s noise ordinances as well as enforcement practices and conduct a national practices
assessment to identify good practices and policies to consider in the District. These initiatives will
help the District determine if the city’s policies should be adjusted to better balance the needs of
residents, cultural creators and other stakeholders.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Short-term]

2.5
Conduct Educational Outreach to Public Space Presenters
Develop educational outreach materials to inform cultural presenters who work in public space about
key regulations that pertain to them. The materials will also include guidance and resources for issue
resolution.
[Implementation Lead: CAH; Timeframe:Short-term]

Align Comprehensive Plan Policies


2.6 OP will review the Comprehensive Plan—and its Arts and Culture Element in particular—and align
its policies with the recommendations of the Cultural Plan and other current District cultural policy
documents. The alignments will translate the Cultural Plan's aspirational recommendations into
policy for the Comprehensive Plan, which is a foundational legal document that guides growth and
development in the District.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Short-term]

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2.7 Leverage the Capital Budgeting Process through Partnerships


Identify opportunities to align investments in shared use cultural facilities within new and significantly
renovated public facilities through collaboration between OP, the City Administrator’s Office and
agencies including DPR, DCPL, and DCPS. The agencies will collaborate with partners, such as the
Office of Public Private Partnerships and the foundation community to seek value added opportunities
where additional partner investment can create shared use facilities that meet outstanding community
demand.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED and OP; Timeframe: Ongoing]

3.0 Promote a range of cultural spaces throughout the city


The District and its partners should continue to review opportunities for any type of space to serve as a
temporary or permanent platform for cultural production, expression and consumption.

The District government will use the master facility planning and Comprehensive Plan processes to
assess opportunities for public cultural infrastructure, including: physical buildings, such as libraries,
schools, museums, universities, recreation centers, fire and police stations, public athletic facilities and
government administration buildings; public open spaces, such as parks, athletic fields, and other man-
made and natural features of the District; and, horizontal infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, viaducts,
unused railway easements, subway platforms and entrances as well as water and energy easements
and structures.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Ongoing]

Implement a Festival Streets Program


3.1 Implement a Festival Streets program that creates a streamlined process for public space events,
such as a flexible permit for a commercial street that can be held by a BID, Main Street, Business
Association or Community Association.
[Implementation Lead: BIDs, Main Streets, DDOT and DCRA; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Leverage District assets to create affordable cultural space


3.2 Encourage provision of affordable cultural space when District property is redeveloped or disposed.
Tools and approaches, such as requests for proposals pertaining to site or facility reuse and public-
private partnerships will be aligned to produce new spaces where feasible. New cultural spaces
should be incorporated in addition to all affordable housing deemed appropriate for the site.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED, DGS and DHCD; Timeframe: Ongoing]

Develop partnerships for behind the scenes cultural spaces


3.3 Develop partnerships among property owners and cultural organizations to create increased cultural
space for fabrication and storage for theatrical sets, costumes, artwork, artifacts and offices.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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4.0 Maximize Access to Public Facilities for Cultural Presentation


Maximize access to public assets (including public facilities, infrastructure and physical spaces) to
increase the ability of entities, such as nonprofits to undertake/present/offer cultural activities. Where
appropriate, use of public assets for cultural uses could include both highly visible and less visible
space, such as areas for public interaction, presentation, display and exhibition. Public facilities should
be offered at low or no cost whenever possible.
[Implementation Lead: DCPL, DCPS, DPR, DGS and ORM; Timeframe: Short-term]

Increase evening and weekend access to cultural spaces


4.1 Work to increase access to public and privately owned cultural spaces including museums across
the city. The District will also work to provide additional evening hours at facilities it controls while
engaging partner organizations to increase evening hours at museums and other cultural facilities.
[Implementation Lead: CAH, DPR, DCPL and DCPS; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Create a standardized price schedule for public facilities and services


4.2
Create a standard price schedule for the District’s cultural space and services to help creators better
plan and anticipate costs. The price schedule will be created in collaboration with agencies that
provide services and space for cultural events including the DGS, DCPS, DPR, MPD, FEMS, and
DDOT.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Short-term]

Reduce insurance and security costs for cultural events


4.3 Explore programs to make insurance and security costs more predictable and less burdensome for
community-based creators and cultural organizations that use public space and facilities. Potential
agencies include DISB, ORM, MPD, FEMS, DPW, and DDOT.
[Implementation Lead: DISB and ORM; Timeframe: Mid-term]

5.0 Streamline permitting for cultural uses


Appoint a cultural permitting ambassador to help cultural organizations navigate permitting, licensing
and resources through coordination across permitting agencies including DCRA, DDOT, DOH, ABRA,
MPD and FEMS. Bring all applications into a single online portal, with options for various elements that
can be selected (such as alcohol or food vending and amplified sound).
[Implementation Lead: DCRA and DDOT; Timeframe: Mid-term]

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6.0 Encourage affordable ground floor space for cultural


organizations
Develop requirements and assess the need for incentives that encourage private property owners to
incorporate cultural uses in their buildings, creating connections between the city’s continued growth,
real estate development and cultural space production. Through this process, OP and DMPED will
develop benchmarks and metrics to guide future development decisions.
[Implementation Lead: OP and DMPED; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Support low-cost, long-term cultural space leases


6.1 Create programs that support affordable production and presentation space by creating a Cultural
Facilities Fund that provides support for a wide range of cultural organizations, including both
performance and arts administration.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED and CAH; Timeframe: Long-term]

6.2 Develop cultural space purchase assistance programs


Work with District and foundation partners to create programs that use public and/or foundation
grants to provide down payment assistance that enables cultural organizations, including collectivized
creators, to purchase space at affordable rates. Down payment assistance provides access to
mortgage financing while reducing the loan amount, and higher levels of down payment assistance
increase affordability.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED and CAH; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Encourage temporary cultural use in vacant commercial space


6.3 Encourage property owners to host temporary cultural uses in vacant commercial space, including
vacant land. Explore opportunities for temporary certificates of occupancy that include relaxed
building code requirements, tax incentives to encourage property owners to utilize ground floor
for creative uses between tenants, and benefit agreements to require temporary uses of unleased
ground floor retail space in new construction of major redevelopment.
[Implementation Lead: OP, BIDs and Main Streets; Timeframe: Ongoing]

6.4 Encourage Cultural Space in Planned Unit Developments


Encourage Planned Unit Development to include low-cost space for cultural presentation, production
and administration. Developing low-cost cultural spaces is a priority for the District and should be
provided in addition to all affordable housing deemed appropriate for the project. Presentation
spaces should have prominent street level visibility with ceiling heights of at least twelve feet and
open areas suitable for performance. Production spaces should offer private work space that is
not visible to the general public with access to loading facilities. Administrative space should be
provided in comparable delivery condition to market rate office space. These spaces are encouraged
to maximize non-prime ground floor, second floor and/or below grade space within buildings.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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7.0 Create a portfolio of cultural incubators and collective production


spaces
Create a portfolio of incubators and shared production / collective studio space that allows cultural
producers to test, start-up and scale businesses.

Recognize the critical role that access to shared equipment, facilities, technical assistance and
collaboration can play in enabling cultural producers to develop their practices into successful
enterprises. Develop models and approaches for incubators and shared space that include public-
private partnerships, catalytic and/or stewardship roles for local government, cooperative and equity-
building business models and phased development. Approaches should be inclusive (targeting all types
of cultural creators) and sustainable (providing for long-term operation).
[Implementation Lead: DMPED and DSLBD; Timeframe: Long-term]

Pursue public-private-partnership opportunities to create cultural space


7.1 Review the District’s facility portfolio for opportunities to create or enhance cultural space through
public-private-partnerships. The review should assess opportunities to create smaller community
facilities, including instructional and studio space, as well as centrally located facilities that could
serve larger populations with more robust facilities. Partnerships can also be used to make value
added investments in public facilities such as high school auditoriums, public libraries, as well as
creating cultural facilities within other District assets.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED, DME, DGS and OP; Timeframe: Short-term]

Establish a cultural space consortium


7.2 Work with Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) to create a cultural space consortium
to purchase and preserve available cultural spaces and preserve their long-term affordability.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Partner with banks to target Community Reinvestment Act investments


Conduct a review of how banks do business in the District to meet their CRA obligations to identify
7.3 opportunities for alignment and partnership to increase impact from the funds invested in the District.
The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) is a federal law that requires financial institutions to invest in
low and moderate-income areas where they do business to mitigate divestment in previous decades.
[Implementation Lead: DISB; Timeframe: Short-term]

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CULTURAL
CONSUMERS
GOALS

• Cultural Consumers will have more


information about cultural events in
the city.
• Cultural Consumers will have access
to a broader and more diverse range
of cultural practices.
• Cultural Consumers will have
inclusive access to cultural spaces
and practices.
• Cultural Consumers will experience
culture in every community.

CULTURAL
CONSUMERS
C O L L E C T I V E A C T I O N F O R S U S T A I N A B L E C U L T U R E

[CULTURAL CONSUMERS]
Culture must be inclusive, equitable and accessible to ensure the District’s culture reflects
its residents and communities. Each cultural consumer lifts up their own cultural interests
alongside fellow residents to form the District’s culture. By participating in cultural events,
consumers strengthen cultural creators. Experiencing culture is one of the ways that
community cohesion is built. These shared experiences are opportunities for residents to both
share their culture and gain a window into other people’s experiences. Funders, including
government, foundations and the private sector can help construct cultural spaces, but
consumers must fill them.

The District’s consumer base starts with the city’s 700,000 residents. Each resident engages
with the practices and traditions that they value. These practices represent the breadth of
society extending through places of worship, theater performances, concerts, festivals and
sporting events. When participation increases, opportunities increase for creators, forming a
virtuous cycle. However, it is important to emphasize that professional creators must be paid
for their work. Exposure alone is not enough.

The cultural community’s potential relies upon both maximizing District residents’ cultural
participation and increasing participation from visitors. The District is the hub of a metropolitan
region that is home to more than 9,600,000 people. These residents are potential consumers
who likely already attend cultural events in the District. Building stronger connections with
this regional population can fuel sustained cultural growth.

The District is also a national and international cultural destination for more than 25,000,000
visitors annually. Many people only visit federally supported institutions, such as the National
Air and Space Museum, National Museum of African American History and Culture and other
museums on the National Mall. This Plan builds on the District’s strengths to forge stronger
connections with cultural organizations that harness visitors to support more diverse cultural
opportunities.

This chapter presents a strategy that builds on shared stewardship by strengthening the
connections between cultural consumption, creation and space.

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EXISTING CONDITIONS
FOR CULTURAL CONSUMERS
The District is one of the nation’s leading cultural indicates that the District is competitive with markets
destinations. DC, New York, Boston, Chicago and twice its size because it has a unique market position
Los Angeles are comparable markets for cultural as the nation’s capital.
consumption. The District has a population of 700,000,
and the city is part of a larger regional market of more On a per capita basis, District residents are three times
than 9,600,000 in the Washington-Baltimore Combined more likely to be professional artists than New Yorkers,
Metropolitan Statistical Area. Most metropolitan and six times more likely than Chicagoans. The District
residents are within sixty miles of the District and is also a leading cultural tourism market with one of the
they have the potential to become regular cultural highest cultural attendance rates in the country. The
consumers in the District. For comparison, metropolitan high levels of participation are drawn from both District
Chicago has a population just over 10,000,000 people, residents and visitors, giving the District’s cultural
while metropolitan Boston's population is less than community a base to thrive from.
5,000,000. However, the New York and Los Angeles As an added benefit, many of the District’s visitors
metropolitan areas are much larger, with 20 million and come for cultural tourism and are likely receptive
18 million people respectively. Still, this Plan’s analysis audiences for local cultural opportunities. Federal

Cultural Metrics for Major US Cultural Markets, 2014

DC New York City Boston Chicago Los Angeles

Number of professional artists


10,205 93,670 12,600 23,890 79,920
and creatives
Professional artists and
creatives as share of total 1.57% 0.46% 0.27% 0.25% 0.61%
population

Total Attendance 20.5 M 69.1 M 18.9 M 24.9 M 15.6 M

Attendance per capita 31 8 29 9 4

Total cultural nonprofit revenue $660.8 M $6,136.8 M $1,192.7 M $1,456.1 M $1,025.9 M

Total revenue earned per capita $1,003 $730 $1,846 $536 $264

Theater,
Largest Disciplines by
Education and Theater, Music Music, History Theater, Music Music, Theater
Organization Count
Instruction

Cultural volunteers
44,000 89,000 66,000 57,000 48,000

Cultural volunteers per capita


0.07 0.01 0.10 0.02 0.01

Source: Analysis by HR&A Advisors with data from: EMSI on industries and occupation, and SMU DataArts on earned income, contributed
income and attendance.

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cultural space, including the national museums and each year, with typical attendance ranging from 2,000
the National Cathedral, are some of the world’s most to over 60,000 participants, and a few events draw
prominent cultural spaces. On any given day, the more than a million people. These festivals represent
District hosts as many as 60,000 visitors, equivalent the diversity of District culture, and include the world-
to 11% of the city’s entire population. Many of these famous Cherry Blossom Festival, local favorites such
visitors only experience federal cultural institutions. For as the Funk Parade, Chinese New Year Parade,
example, 8 million visitors a year are brought directly Broccoli City Festival, and community festivities such
to and from the National Mall by tour buses. Cultural as Celebrate Petworth. In addition, smaller events are
organizations along the National Mall play such a large regularly held throughout the District, including block
role in the District’s cultural economy that half of all parties and farmers markets that build community and
cultural spending in the District is associated with the culture.
Smithsonian Institution, which famously offers free
Cultural stakeholders must participate in cultural
admission.
practices to sustain these events. There are indications
DC culture is a point of pride for residents. The that cultural preferences are shifting. Within the
success of the Made in DC and 202 Creates programs District, attendance is declining across the seven
demonstrates that District residents are eager to benchmark arts tracked by the National Endowment for
support creative people in their communities. Cultural the Arts including jazz, classical music, opera, musical
consumers can invest time, passion and resources theater, ballet, theater and visual art. The declines are
together to grow the cultural community, making it more particularly pronounced among the 18-24-year-old
diverse and inclusive. audience. Reversing the downward participation trend
with this demographic is important for building long-
Informal cultural activity reaches diverse audiences term support for these practices.
across the District. Over 55 major festivals take place

EXPAND COMMUNITY INCREASE CULTURAL


ORIENTED PROGRAMMING EXPOSURE

· Oral History · In-school


· Local Public · Out-of-school
Facilities
CULTURAL · Transit
· Federal Cultural
Organizations
CONSUMERS
· Partnerships

PROMOTE CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES


· Inclusive · Local/Resion
Outreach
· International
· National

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SMITHSONIAN
01
F O R K L I F E F E S T I VA L

The Smithsonian Institution’s annual Folklife


Festival is one of the largest cultural events in
the nation. It is an international exposition of
living culture that attracts local, national and
international audiences. The Festival is an
exercise in cultural democracy where cultural
practitioners speak for themselves, with each
other and to the public. Importantly, the Festival
encourages visitors to participate—to learn,
sing, dance, eat traditional foods and converse
with people in the Festival program. This is one
of many large nationally oriented events that
presents an opportunity to connect visitors with
supplemental off-the-Mall experiences.

C R E AT I V E
02
PLACEMAKING

Creative placemaking is the intentional use of


arts and culture to shape physical, social and
economic opportunities in communities. These
projects deploy arts and cultural resources
to illuminate new ways of utilizing places. In
many cases, creative placemaking interventions
present public expressions of dynamic and
vibrant community cultures that already exist but
lack visibility.

137 DC Cultural Plan


CROSSING
THE STREET:
PLACEMAKING
The District government recognizes equitable
development is informed by culture, that includes shared,
as well as individual values and practices. Over the past
decade, the District has become a national leader in
applying innovative approaches for daylighting culturally
relevant practices and traditions to advance equitable
community development. The DC Office of Planning calls
this approach creative placemaking, an arts-and-culture-
forward approach to equitable community development
that deploys collaborative experiences to connect people,
support creativity, celebrate the community, and inspire
Crossing the Street took a unique approach to featuring
action.
an alternative use of the District’s public facilities and
In 2016, OP launched Crossing the Street: Building DC’s spaces for creative purposes. Projects demonstrated
Inclusive Future Through Creative Placemaking. Crossing how: public spaces could be transformed, alleys
the Street is the District’s most innovative placemaking activated, and publicly accessible parts of buildings
program to date. The initiative focused on creating could be used to build community empathy and foster
engaging experiences across the city to build community social cohesion. In total, Crossing the Street engaged
in areas experiencing rapid change. Each experience used more than 17,000 people, 330 artists and more than
arts and culture to activate space, foster conversation and 100 community organizations through 73 unique events
strengthen collaboration while highlighting and supporting in 17 communities across the city.
existing neighborhood assets through placemaking.
The impact of Crossing the Street was significant.
Crossing the Street projects demonstrated the value Projects catalyzed new voices, partnerships and
of incorporating arts and culture as part of the District’s momentum helping advance community goals and
approach to community development. The projects cultural identity. The initiative also helped reframe
provided authentic experiences that elicited community the role of arts and culture as critical components of
curiosity and made people want to spend time together in equitable community development. Building on the
public space. Each project enlisted the skills, knowledge momentum of Crossing the Street the District will seek
and abilities of local cultural creators to achieve robust new ways to demonstrate the power of how arts and
community engagement throughout development and culture can be leveraged to further advance equity
execution of the projects. while connecting and deepening the cultural and social
fabric of the city.

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CULTURAL CONSUMERS
STRATEGY
Increasing consumers for cultural creation will fuel frequent cultural visits by reinforcing their identity as
expansion of the cultural community. To increase Washingtonians.
participation, the Implementation Steering Committee
Nationally, most people envision the District as a federal
will work with partners, such as DestinationDC and
cultural space. The promotional campaign will introduce
EventsDC to launch a multi-pronged promotional
fellow citizens to the District’s rich culinary, arts and
campaign that resonates with District residents while
entertainment culture. Introducing more Americans to
attracting more cultural visitors. The campaign will
DC beyond the Mall will broaden the perceptions of
share unique offerings, such as the Frederick Douglas
what the District has to offer and attract more visitors.
National Historic Site and GALA Hispanic Theatre.
Promotions for visitors will target four different Internationally, visitors are drawn to the American
audiences: local residents, regional residents, national culture, ideals and symbolism in the nation's capital.
visitors and international visitors. The District can build on this interest by promoting the
city as a leading place to experience the American story
The campaign for District residents will promote
through the National Mall, its monuments and national
local events through advertising and a compelling
museums. The campaign for international visitors
consolidated online resource. These promotions will
will also introduce them to the District’s local history
build on OP’s Crossing the Street creative placemaking
that presents a contrasting view on the American
initiative by forming intersectional opportunities for
experience through narratives of oppression, diversity
residents with different backgrounds to connect by
and innovation.
creating and engaging in shared cultural expression.
These promotions will leverage District residents’ deep Tailoring the city’s cultural promotion to resonate with
city pride by building on the success of the Made in DC District and regional residents along with national and
and 202 Creates brands. international visitors will strengthen the cultural base
to make increased cultural creation sustainable. More
Promotions for the regional market will remind the
participation will enable the cultural community to grow,
District’s 9 million neighbors that they are less than
creating more opportunities for District residents to
an hour away from one of the nation’s leading cultural
perform while supporting more cultural space to build
destinations. The promotions will be designed to
the District’s shared culture.
encourage those residing in the region to make

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CULTURAL CONSUMERS
RECOMMENDATIONS
Timeframes include short-term, mid-term, long-term and ongoing. Short term recommendations can be completed within two years;
mid-term recommendations can be completed within 5 years; long-term recommendations can be completed within 10 years. Ongoing
recommendations are for currently occurring activities that are encouraged to continue. Note: Recommendations include agency and
organization acronyms. The glossary of terms on page 171 includes a definition of each acronym used in this report.

1.0
Promote cultural events to residents
Build awareness among all residents about the District’s cultural events using multi-channel outreach
tools, including print, video, social media and online advertising. This effort should include a promotion
of free and low-cost programs such as ‘pay-what-you-can’ theater tickets and free admission days.
[Implementation Lead: OCTFME and Destination DC; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Utilize inclusive outreach strategies


1.1
Ensure that outreach is conducted through traditional as well as digital channels because
many District residents speak English as a second language, are older, or are lower-income
and do not have home internet access. Traditional media, including print and radio ensure that
cultural promotion and engagement initiatives reach all residents.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Ongoing]

1.2 Work with community-facing partners to promote culture


Coordinate with key partners working in communities across the city to promote cultural
programs and offerings in innovative ways to retain existing and attract new cultural consumers,
with a focus on reaching youth.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Short-term]

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1.3 Collect feedback from cultural consumers


Periodically collect feedback from cultural consumers to help tailor outreach strategies and
undertake pilot projects to test new programming.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Short-term]

2.0 Market local cultural events to regional residents and national visitors
Expand promotion efforts to increase cultural visits from the 9 million residents who live in the surrounding
region. Efforts could include an advertising campaign, such as “DC like a local” that helps visitors
seeking federal attractions also enjoy locally ‘paired’ options, such as a concert at the Black Cat and a
Half Smoke at Ben’s Chili Bowl. Promotion partners include Destination DC and the network of BIDs and
Main Streets.
[Implementation Lead: Destination DC; Timeframe: Short-term]

3.0 Launch a targeted international campaign promoting the District’s local culture
Launch a targeted international tourism campaign to connect more visitors from international markets
to local cultural events by promoting the District as a leading cultural destination, emphasizing the city’s
local brand. This campaign will build on the District’s identity as the nation’s capital and strategically pair
cultural offerings with shopping and dining.
[Implementation Lead: Destination DC; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Partner with embassy public diplomacy programs


3.1 Whenever possible, the District will partner with embassy public diplomacy programs housed at
more than 170 diplomatic missions in the city to increase cultural exchanges between residents
and the international community.
[Implementation Lead: CAH; Timeframe: Short-term]

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4.0 Expand community-oriented cultural programming


Cultural programming in communities is one of the most impactful ways to increase cultural participation
and exploration for all District residents. The District government and cultural organizations, such as
the DC Jazz Festival, will work to increase and diversify community-oriented cultural programming for
residents of all ages. These programs will help increase cultural participation among District residents,
which will help increase the local base of support for performers and stages.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Long-term]

Expand cultural programming in public facilities to serve diverse consumers


4.1 Identify opportunities for public facilities to serve as hubs for cultural programs that can attract
and enrich a diverse cross-section of the population. Public facilities include libraries, schools,
recreation centers, and stadiums. Example approaches include: collections and programs focused
on community heritage and cultural literacy (including book clubs), presentations by local artists,
and spaces that encourage intergenerational cultural dialogue.
[Implementation Lead: DCPL, DPR, DCPS and CAH; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Leverage universities as cultural anchors


4.2 Leverage the many cultural activities that occur at universities, including theater, dance, music, and
art, by having universities identify new and innovative ways to promote their cultural programming
to District residents. Universities are encouraged to foster cultural mentorship that pairs students
with residents and to open their spaces to community use, including joint use cultural spaces.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Short-term]

5.0 Increase cultural awareness through a permanent oral history program


Launch a permanent program that documents oral histories and community heritage, preserving
residents’ stories for current and future generations. The program will prioritize new storytelling and
recorded interviews with notable residents whose stories are in danger of being lost and will support the
work of community historians interested in starting hyper-local oral history projects throughout the city.

Share these stories through platforms such as the DC Digital Museum. This initiative builds off a current
pilot program by the DC Public Library, Humanities DC and the Historical Society of Washington, DC. The
recordings captured through this program will be linked to the heritage trail program via an interactive
website.
[Implementation Lead: HPO and CAH; Timeframe: Long-term]

5.1 Highlight community heritage


Continue to provide grants to organizations that highlight community heritage. Specifically, HPO and
CAH will provide ongoing support for District heritage through grants, research and outreach.
[Implementation Lead: HPO and CAH; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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6.0 Build stronger connections between local cultural creators and consumers in federal
cultural space
Increase District resident cultural presentation and consumption in federal cultural spaces including
the Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery and Kennedy Center. Explore opportunities for increased
evening presentations and District-oriented programing as well as partnerships for transportation, low-
cost tickets and locally-oriented promotion.
[Implementation Lead: OP, Smithsonian Institution and the Kennedy Center; Timeframe: Ongoing]

7.0 Strengthen youth exposure to culture


Through innovative partnerships, expand both the variety and frequency of cultural expression accessible
to youth and families in-school and after-school, ensuring youth have opportunities to experience both
local and national culture. Examples include supplementing a humanities curriculum with a visit to the
U.S. Capitol Visitor Center and/or a local poetry event.
[Implementation Lead: CAH and OCTFME; Timeframe: Ongoing]

8.0 Support art in transit


Integrate culture into transit through temporary and permanent public art installations or performances.
Increasing art in transit can provide localized expressions of heritage and culture that build community
identity while creating frequent opportunities for residents and visitors to interact with cultural expression.
[Implementation Lead: WMATA and DDOT; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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145 DC Cultural Plan
CULTURAL
INVESTMENT
FRAMEWORK
C U L T U R A L I N V E S T M E N T F R A M E W O R K

[CULTURAL INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK]


The Cultural Investment Framework identifies high-impact opportunities where the District
can use its resources to create cultural opportunities beyond existing funding sources and
programs. Specifically, the framework will help create cultural space, increase cultural
capacity, support cultural programs and facilitate cultural resilience. It maximizes unique
roles the public sector can take as a major property owner and multi-sector investor, while
establishing key alignments with other funders and cultural stakeholders.

The framework increases access to culture designed to measurably fulfill missions.


for every District resident. To do this, the Impact organizations typically use business
District will leverage new funding sources to models that enable the organization to scale
create opportunities for more cultural space proportionately to their mission by generating
in communities across the city. Over time, higher ratios of earned revenue while using
using the District’s resources to leverage contributed revenue for capacity building.
additional funding will enable the city to
The District plans to make investments
increasingly focus its grant funding on people
that increase cultural creators’ creative and
and programs. In conjunction with new
organizational capacity through community-
funding tools, this framework emphasizes
based enrichment programs and capacity
opportunities for social impact organizations
building grants. Creators will gain access to
and cultural enterprises to help more District
new financing tools that can help scale their
residents create, consume and exchange
ideas and secure facilities. These efforts
culture.
will be amplified by tailored promotion that
The planning team reached out to numerous increases connections between creators
foundations and community development and consumers as the cultural community
finance organizations to learn about their expands. This framework will enable the
expectations for the future of cultural District’s cultural spaces and cultural
investment. The team found that many presentations to become more diverse and
funders are shifting their focus from charitable inclusive as the city continues growing.
organizations to impact organizations

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STRATEGIC
APPROACH
The first step is leveraging the community facilities facilitate transitions to social innovation or cultural
currently in place by improving the cultural amenities entrepreneurship business models. These tools will be
within them. These facilities serve each community designed as the entry point in a progressive system that
across the District with an array of cultural spaces will help cultural organizations build capacity, innovate
including dance studios, arts spaces, kitchens, and secure space.
computer labs, and presentation space. Additionally,
Cultural funding for innovation and facilities will grow
nongovernmental facilities, such as places of worship are
significantly by using public investments to leverage
also encouraged to expand their cultural programming.
larger private investments for increased and improved
Capacity to increase cultural programming within
cultural space. The District will use its funding for
these facilities can be unlocked through community
cultural space more efficiently, enabling a portion of the
leadership and public-private partnerships.
current public funding for cultural space to shift toward
Looking toward existing cultural organizations as the programmatic investments that will directly benefit
second step, the District and its funding partners will creators and consumers. This funding model uses public
work collaboratively to create tools and resources cultural funding as leverage to unlock an emerging
to help cultural organizations adapt to new business source of private funding called social impact investing
models. These tools and approaches include expanding to support cultural facilities in the District. Over time,
technical assistance programs that support business social impact investing will finance larger portions of
planning and implementing financial management facility construction and renovation, freeing substantial
best practices. Additionally, a new grant program public resources for increased programmatic funding.
will help cultural organizations reduce overhead to

SOCIAL IMPACT
INVESTING
Social impact investing is an umbrella term that applies Social impact investing has many different cultural
to an emerging segment of the investment market with applications that vary based on the funder. The highest
billions of dollars in resources that connects a variety opportunity impact investing funds have been created
of investors with social impact organizations and social through Community Development Financial Institutions
enterprises. Money for these funds comes from a range (CDFIs), foundations and public-private-partnerships.
of investors including foundations, pensions, banks, These funds may have below market rates of return
investment funds and private individuals. Impact funds and have risk tolerant underwriting standards.
are unified by goals to provide scalable financing to
The key to harnessing social impact investing both
social impact organizations and social entrepreneurs
in nonprofit and for-profit organizations is stronger
with proven and sustainable success filling public
business planning and financial management practices.
needs.
Many creators and organizations will benefit from

DC Office of Planning 148


technical assistance that will increase their knowledge are well suited to connect with funders that seek
of financial management, financial planning, business opportunities to catalyze new concepts or scale proven
planning and legal structures. It is important to have successes. Ultimately, both for-profit and nonprofit
a well-crafted business plan that is easily conveyed to cultural organizations with sound business plans that
funders using familiar business models and terms. It is produce consistent positive revenues will have the
also important to have a rigorous financial plan aligned strongest pathways for growth. This framework is a
with the business plan that demonstrates funder or guide for the District’s cultural community to adapt to
investor resources will be effectively used. a funding landscape that is evolving toward impact-
oriented models.
In the business planning phase, cultural organizations
should consider if their business model is for a This framework is designed to overcome the biggest
charitable organization, social impact organization, financial barriers to traditional cultural funding models.
social enterprise or commercial enterprise and ensure There are vast resources available that can increase
the business has a suitable legal structure. In some cultural equity and inclusion by ensuring that viable
cases, it might be beneficial to consider forming parent organizations are funded and not just the most
and subsidiary companies to spin-off certain functions established or connected. The District will invest in
that are not aligned with an organization’s business publicly accessible cultural space to help residents
model into a better suited subsidiary. develop their cultural practices while facilitating
incubators that will lift up aspiring cultural organizations.
Nonprofit organizations with traditional funding models These approaches will form stronger connections
can become more resilient by updating their business between creators and consumers that will enable more
practices. As social impact investing becomes more people and communities to contribute to the District’s
common, business planning and financial management culture.
requirements are likely to become increasingly rigorous.
Social impact organizations and social enterprises

Public Cultural Funding will: Support District


government priorities

Lead the way toward new


opportunities

DISTRICT’S CULTURAL
INVESTMENT APPROACH

Align municipal programs


to advance District
priorities

Facilitate on-going dialogues


that continuously inform policy
development.

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FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS
THAT SUPPORT CULTURAL SPACE
Federal tax credit programs are widely used in the 40% debt financed. Reducing the amount of debt for
District as the base of affordable facility financing. Tax a facility reduces the amount of operating revenue
credits from three programs including the Low-Income needed, which results in predictable affordable rents
Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC), New Markets Tax Credits for tenants.
(NMTC) or Historic Preservation Tax Credits (HPTC)
Additionally, other federal programs including tax-
can reduce borrowing needs by leveraging federal
exempt bonds and Opportunity Zones also present
programs to increase equity investments. These, tax
significant funding sources that could be used to
credit programs can provide equity for a high portion
produce cultural space. Tax-exempt bonds reduce
and even a majority of project costs, resulting in much
financing costs for qualifying facilities. Opportunity
lower debt service on a property. In exchange for the
Zones offer a tax advantaged investment opportunity
financial assistance these tax-credit programs require
for individuals and organizations that have earned
public benefits, such as long-term affordable rents, job
significant capital gains and are interested in using
creation and building preservation. For example, many
those proceeds to make long-term equity investments
commercial projects are more than 80% debt financed
in qualifying Census Tracts.
while some tax credit supported projects are less than

MAXIMIZING FOUNDATION
RESOURCES FOR CULTURE
Another layer of support can be provided by foundations. typically run by separate teams with different objectives
Traditionally, foundations provide grants to cultural than the charitable giving team.
organizations to support programs and facilities. Like
However, some foundations leverage one or both
governments, foundations are often willing and able to
funding pools to achieve greater impact than traditional
invest in higher risk or less proven concepts that can
grantmaking can achieve alone. Program Related
facilitate innovative cultural opportunities.
Investments (PRIs) are typically below market rate
Foundations typically have two sets of resources: 1) the loans made on a revolving basis from a foundation’s
endowment, which is invested to generate sustained charitable funds. These loans can be risk tolerant
high rates of return, and 2) charitable funds, which are therefore to potential losses. Frequently, grants and
distributed on an ongoing basis. Foundations have PRI loans are made together to help scale a concept.
a payout requirement of approximately five percent In some cases, foundations can also make Mission
of their endowment’s value annually; however, most Related Investments (MRIs) from the endowment side.
foundations are designed to perpetuate themselves Such investments are typically risk adverse and return-
indefinitely, which means that the endowment side oriented. MRIs can substantially amplify the impact
must grow its assets at a rate exceeding the five of a grant and/or PRI loan, but they require rigorous
percent charitable payout requirement. This growth underwriting and risk management, making them less
rate requires a well-planned and carefully managed common.
investment approach. Consequently, endowments are

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MRIs and PRIs are currently less common types of foundation support, but there are indications that these
tools may become more common. Leading foundations, such
YOUR as Rockefeller and Kresge, are investing
NOTES
heavily in expanding the use of these tools in an effort to move beyond charitable giving and into impact-
based approaches. This shift is an important trend for both local foundations and organizations supported


by foundations. Large national foundations typically seek local foundation partners. Local foundations and
cultural organizations that build capacity for impact investing will be in better position to partner with highly
resourced foundations.

Revolving Loan
YOUR NOTES
Cultural Fund
Fund

Capacity Building

Reduced Barriers

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T H E D I S T R I C T ’ S C U L T U R A L P R O F I L E

SOCIAL
I M PAC T
INVESTING •

Investment in organizations and funds to

generate measurable and beneficial social

impact alongside a financial return. Social

Impact Investment is a funding model that offers

scalable financial resources to nonprofit and for-

profit companies that produce measurable social

impact while utilizing high standards of financial

planning and management.


C U L T U R A L I N V E S T M E N T F R A M E W O R K

RECOMMENDED FUNDING
TOOLS FOR THE DISTRICT
To realize the opportunity for impact investing in organizations to balance capital campaigns against
cultural uses, the District will build on its experience operational fundraising. Most nonprofits tap the same
working with impact investors in the affordable housing, funder base for both types of campaigns and there are
economic development and sustainable energy fields to risks that overly ambitious capital campaigns can stress
create two funds a Cultural Facilities Fund and Cultural donors and diminish annual contributions. Organizations
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Revolving Loan can use the Cultural Facilities Fund to finance a portion
Fund. The funds will help cultural organizations unlock of the capital facility or renovation costs instead of
social impact funding sources to support innovation raising all the needed funding at the beginning of the
and facilities. These partnerships will improve cultural project. This approach enables the organization to pay
equity by creating a merit-based funding system where for a portion of the facility or renovation over an extended
cultural organizations will be able to more easily access period as a portion of operating costs that can be
financing to sustain and scale cultural organizations. absorbed in smaller increments. For-profit organizations
with limited credit or assets might also benefit from this
The District’s investments are designed to build on the fund by gaining access to affordable capital.
concept of shared stewardship. This means that the
District will partner with creators, property owners and In addition to facility construction and renovation, the
residents to create additional and unique opportunities Fund can provide credit guarantees for both nonprofits
for culture by layering programs and strategies together. and for-profits to secure leased space in commercially
For example, a property owner should consider owned buildings that require commercially creditworthy
opportunities to cross-subsidize cultural space with tenants. The credit guarantee will enable cultural
higher revenue generating uses, such as housing or organizations to secure 10 and 20-year leases like other
commercial space to add value by offering a uniquely commercial tenants, which provides stable foundations
exciting environment to tenants. The Brookland Arts for them to grow. The credit guarantees are designed to
Walk and the Atlantic Plumbing building are successful layer with recommendations from the Cultural Spaces
examples of this approach in the District. chapter to create affordable cultural space in new and
renovated buildings.
The District will work to establish a Cultural Facilities
Fund modeled on the Department of Housing and The second fund is the Cultural Innovation and
Community Development’s (DHCD) Site Acquisition Entrepreneurship Revolving Loan Fund that will be
Fund. The DHCD program used District funding designed to provide affordable working capital for cultural
to provide first loss financing securing up to 25% organizations as a cost-effective alternative to credit
of any loss to a community development financial cards and unsecured business loans. This revolving fund
institution. By following this model and providing first will be smaller than the Cultural Facilities Fund but more
loss investments from the Cultural Facilities Fund, the risk tolerant. The Revolving Loan Fund will use a larger
District will enable socially motivated lenders to fund proportion of public funding relative to private funds to
cultural organizations that lack the assets or credit provide enough risk mitigation to attract private funding
to secure affordable conventional financing. This to serve cultural creators and organizations with limited
fund will be able to help both for-profit and nonprofit or no credit. Typically, these loans are less than $50,000
organizations. dollars with repayment terms of less than a year.They
can help finance merchandise that generates profit for
Nonprofit organizations will continue to raise funding touring musicians. In other cases, these loans can be
for facility development and expansions through used to purchase equipment for a growing ooperative.
capital campaigns. However, the Cultural Facilities
Fund will enable both charitable and impact nonprofit

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C U L T U R A L I N V E S T M E N T F R A M E W O R K

CULTURAL INVESTMENT
RECOMMENDATIONS
Timeframes include short-term, mid-term, long-term and ongoing. Short term recommendations can be completed within two years;
mid-term recommendations can be completed within 5 years; long-term recommendations can be completed within 10 years. Ongoing
recommendations are for currently occurring activities that are encouraged to continue. Note: Recommendations include agency and
organization acronyms. The glossary of terms on page 171 includes a definition of each acronym used in this report.

1.0 Expand capacity building grants through partnerships


Expand the District’s cultural organization capacity building programs and work with foundations, corporate
social responsibility programs and major donors to create a cultural funding collaborative that will increase
grant funding for both nonprofit and for-profit cultural organization capacity building. These grants will
enhance and expand existing efforts to help cultural organizations meet short-term needs while implementing
more advanced business planning and financial management programs, as well as to increase capacity and
meet transitional organization needs.
[Investment Level: $$; Timeframe: Mid-term]

2.0 Create a Cultural Innovation and Entrepreneurship Revolving Loan Fund


Create a fund to provide small short-term loans to cultural organizations that increase organizational
creative capacity and support innovation. The loans can be used for a wide range of projects, including
recording for musicians, event promotion and equipment acquisition. These loans will require underwriting
and risk assessment.
[Investment Level: $$$; Timeframe: Mid-term]

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3.0 Create a Cultural Facilities Fund


Establish a Cultural Facilities Fund that uses public cultural facility funding as leverage to unlock much
greater levels of private sector investment from social impact investors including foundations. The fund will
support leasing in commercial buildings, maintenance of existing facilities and creation of new facilities that
provide cultural presentation, production and administration spaces.
[Investment Level: $$$$; Timeframe: Short-term]

4.0 Institute a Cultural Space Tax Credit Program


Create a tax credit program that encourages property owners to incorporate both permanent and temporary
cultural space with affordable rents by reducing the costs of taxes that are passed through to cultural
tenants. These tax credits will encourage property owners to pursue cultural facilities that benefit adjoining
uses in the building by attracting more potential customers.
[Investment Level: $$; Timeframe: Long-term]

5.0 Create a Cultural Navigator Position at the Center for Cultural Opportunities
Create a cultural navigator position to assist creators with permitting processes and work with agency
partners to refine programs and processes to better meet the needs of the cultural community. The navigator
will also help connect creators to the full breadth of programs the District offers.
[Investment Level: $$; Timeframe: Short-term]

Create an online storefront through the Made in DC Brand


5.1 Establish an online marketplace as a venue for District creators to showcase their work and connect with
consumers who value locally made products under the successful Made in DC brand.
[Investment Level: $; Timeframe: Short-term]

Create a Web-Based Center for the Cultural Opportunities Platform


5.2 Create an online platform as the digital presence for the Center for Cultural Opportunities, providing a
portal to business-support programs and resources, networking and business to business opportunities.
The platform will be actively maintained with resources that help cultural creators develop cultural
practices, establish cultural organizations, build partnerships and leverage government programs.
The resources will illustrate how creators can gain access to personal and professional development
resources, use public space and facilities, and access support programs including affordable housing.
[Investment Level: $; Timeframe: Mid-term]

155 DC Cultural Plan


6.0 Create a Community Event Security Fund
Create a fund to support community oriented cultural events in public facilities and space by offsetting some
security costs.
[Investment Level: $$$; Timeframe: Mid-term]

7.0 Expand The Labs at DCPL


Partner with DCPL and the DC Public Library Foundation to explore and possibly expand The Labs to
neighborhood libraries.
[Investment Level: $$; Timeframe: Mid-term]

8.0 Invest in Marketing


Partner with Destination DC and DMPED to market the District’s cultural opportunities to District, regional,
national and international audiences.
[Investment Level: $$; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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C U L T U R A L I N V E S T M E N T F R A M E W O R K

HOW
F O U N DAT I O N
FUNDING
F O R C U LT U R E
I S E V O LV I N G

Cultural organizations can access new funding

streams by partnering with foundations to

leverage loans and investments from program

related investments (PRIs) and mission related

investments (MRIs) that build on traditional

grants. An example of how they could be

applied is launching a cultural incubator, where

a foundation makes a series of investments at

varying risk levels. It can start with a grant to

establish proof of concept followed by a PRI to

fund a pilot. Ultimately, the incubator is refined

based on the pilot and scaled with a MRI equity

investment. The incubator could combine the

MRI funds with loans from the Cultural Facilities

Fund and Innovation Revolving Fund to purchase

the space and equipment to create a successful

cultural enterprise that incubates other

companies and propels the cultural community’s

continued growth. (For more information on

PRIs and MRIs see page 148)


C U L T U R A L I N V E S T M E N T F R A M E W O R K

CASE STUDIES ON CULTURAL FUNDING


TA X C R E D I T S A N D
01
A F F O R DA B L E H O U S I N G

Affordable live work space can be developed using Low-Income


Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) to provide a high equity ratio for a
mixed use residential building that includes affordable housing and
ground floor studio space. By starting with a high equity ratio, the
building will require a much smaller revenue stream than a similar—
conventionally financed—building. LIHTC provides a tax credit to
investors in exchange for the property owners providing a fixed
number of housing units in the building at rents that are affordable
to low-income households for twenty years. This program has been
used to produce facilities, such as the Brookland Artspace Lofts.
However, in the past, LIHTCs could not entirely close the gap
between the building’s projected operating income and its projected
debt service, which required special fund-raising. This type of fund-
raising is particularly challenging because it requires extremely
complex financing practices that are not particularly cost-effective.
02 ANACOSTIA
To close this gap in the future, low-interest loans from the Cultural ARTS CENTER
Facilities Fund can help support the remainder of the project’s costs,
further reducing the revenue required to finance the space. One
potential impact of this approach could be reduced pressure for the
building’s owners to maximize revenue from ground floor uses, which
The Anacostia Arts Center is a strong example
can facilitate lower-cost, long-term leases to cultural organizations
of a community cultural space. It is owned by the
that are aligned with the building’s mission.
ARCH Development Corporation, a community-
based organization working to reinvigorate the
Anacostia community. ARCH Development
purchased the former Woolworths Department
Store housing the Anacostia Arts Center with
a commercial loan combined with government
and foundation financial support. The larger
facility hosts innovative facilities including the
Arts Center and the Hive 2.0—a small business
incubator. The Anacostia Arts Center includes a
black box theater, five galleries, a café and a
short-term exhibit space. The Center is a space
that strengthens the community by empowering
cultural producers and cultural entrepreneurs
by creating space for cultural production and
consumption.

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INCLUSIVE
03
I N N O VA T I O N F U N D

The District is launching one of the first social impact funds


that uses a public-private partnership model. The program
called the Inclusive Innovation Fund, will leverage a
$1.5 million District investment to attract $4.5 million in
private sector capital. The goal of this fund is to bridge a
critical gap many entrepreneurs, and particularly minority
entrepreneurs, face at the first round of outside investment
in start-up businesses—often called the friends and family
round. This fund will be privately managed and make
investments that provide capital either as loans or in return
for equity in the business. The investments will enable
start-ups to achieve proof-of-concept, which is necessary
to attract larger amounts of venture capital needed for
scaling enterprises to optimize profitability. The Inclusive
Innovation Fund is targeted toward scalable commercial
enterprises. The experiences, insights and partnerships
from this program will help the District create tailored
approaches that serve social impact organizations and
social enterprises.

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CONVERGENCE
C O N V E R G E N C E

[CONVERGENCE]
Culture requires inspiration from experience and genuine personal connection; it is not the
product of a formula. The strategies for cultural creators, spaces and consumers fit together
in a systemic approach that maximizes culture in the District through shared stewardship,
organizational innovation and leveraged funding.

To thrive, the cultural community needs business models for social impact and social
shared stewardship from cultural creators, enterprise. These business models use start-
consumers, government, funders, institutional up and grant funding to generate financially
partners and nonprofits. Ensuring that the sustainable organizations that are mission
cultural community is representative of the oriented. These business models are likely
city’s diverse population will provide the to be particularly effective because they
support for cultural spaces and practices to are well suited to utilize emerging funding
affirm the city’s cultural heritage and reflect sources, such as impact investing.
all residents’ cultural practice.
The strategies in the convergence chapter
Organizational innovation means that align existing resources and leverage
cultural organizations will continue refining new ones to link the strategies for cultural
their process, practices and business models creators, spaces and consumers to generate
to fulfill their missions. This approach will amplified benefits to the cultural community.
ensure that cultural programming, education The cultural creators strategy increases
and facilities are representative of the diversity of cultural expression. The cultural
District’s residents and accessible to them. space strategy provides tools that facilitate
sustainable cultural space in a growing city.
Leveraged funding is the last part of the The consumer strategy increases access and
equation. The cultural community must grow exposure to culture. This chapter’s strategy
to address two challenges simultaneously. connects each of these approaches to
First, it must continue creating space, systematically enable the cultural community
capacity and opportunities to ensure that to thrive.
historically marginalized communities
are equitably represented in the cultural Cultural convergence bolsters a virtuous
landscape. Second, the community must cycle where growing numbers of diverse
continue growing to reflect the expanding cultural consumers will support increased
cultural needs of the growing city. Based on inclusion of creators, which provides support
an assessment of the funding environment more cultural spaces. Increasing cultural
conducted for this Plan, it is clear that spaces will help cultural creators earn a living
the greatest opportunities for cultural while impacting more consumers. When
organization growth will be in emerging growing numbers of cultural consumers

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C O N V E R G E N C E

connect with creators, more people will be techniques to bring new crowds into
inspired to find and share their creative their Penn Quarter museum by filling
voices. These relationships among creators, the atrium with vintage and independent
spaces and consumers form a cycle that this video games through partnerships
Plan amplifies to generate more equitable including American University’s Game
and accessible cultural opportunities. Lab. These models should be adopted by
other cultural creators and organizations
Organizational innovation will be driven by to form new and stronger connections to
increased creator revenue from cultural consumers.
consumers. Over time, participation in
traditional cultural expressions such as Leveraged funding will build on the exciting
symphony performances and ballet have work by cultural leaders across the city.
declined in part because Public sector and foundation funding has
fu n d e r s and creators a unique ability to build cultural capacity.
have diverged from When leveraged funding is combined with
consumers. The Kennedy shared stewardship and organizational
Center is leading the way innovation, it has enormous potential to
toward a new approach enable cultural organizations to grow and
where traditional thrive along with the city. This approach
practices are remixed is critical for building equity because it
with performances enables established funding streams to
outside the concert hall reach farther, enabling accessible and
and groundbreaki ng impactful support for both established
collaborations are and emerging creators.
hosted within the concert
Additionally, the District will refine its
hall. The Smithsonian
culture policies in part by partnering
American Art Museum
with international peers through Culture
has also adopted these
21, which connects the District with
a global network of city governments

The District government is a major cultural investor that


provides funding through numerous programs that fit
together as a four-phase system that increases cultural
impact and equity:

check Public cultural funding will support District priorities

check Public funding will lead the way toward new


opportunities

check Public funding will align municipal programs to


advance District priorities

check Publicly funded actions will facilitate on-going


dialogues that continuously inform policy development

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C O N V E R G E N C E

striving to integrate culture as a pillar of sustainable Development; the Director of the Office of Planning;
economic development. The District will also draw on Executive Director of the Commission on the Arts and
the experiences of many other cities that have worked Humanities; Chair Person of the Commission on the
to comprehensively support diverse and inclusive Arts and Humanities; Director of the Office of Cable
culture and heritage. The District has already deployed Television, Film, Music and Entertainment; Chairman
a cultural audit tool developed by Culture 21. In the of the Council’s designee; Chairman of the Council’s
future, the District will participate in peer learning Committee on Finance and Revenue’s designee; and
exchanges with government leaders from cities around the DC BID Council Executive Director.
the world to learn about techniques to strengthen
The DC Cultural Plan is a framework for inclusive,
culture and preserve heritage while sustaining growth.
representative and sustainable culture in the District.
Most importantly, this Plan introduces strategies that Specifically, the framework is designed to help the city’s
strengthen the symbiotic relationship between cultural cultural organizations evolve to a shared stewardship
development and the city’s growth while preserving approach that affirms heritage and creates equitable
heritage. This means that not only will cultural opportunities for cultural expansion. This Plan is a
creators have access to programs that support their guide for DC culture to grow diversely, inclusively and
development, it also means that cultural creators will accessibly with firm foundations in the city’s heritage.
be empowered to adopt new business models that
offer more opportunities for exposure, growth and
funding. Cultural spaces are special spaces for cultural
exchange—they will also be vehicles for partnership,
ensuring they are never dark.

Implementation will be guided by a Steering Committee


whose members are stipulated by the Fiscal Year
2016 Budget Support Act of 2015. The committee
will include three representatives from the arts and
creative economy; a representative from the Office
of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic

163 DC Cultural Plan


C O L L E C T I V E C N
A C T I O O NF VOE RG ES N
U C EA I N A B L E
S T C U L T U R E

CONVERGENCE
RECOMMENDATIONS
Timeframes include short-term, mid-term, long-term and ongoing. Short term recommendations can be completed within two years;
mid-term recommendations can be completed within 5 years; long-term recommendations can be completed within 10 years. Ongoing
recommendations are for currently occurring activities that are encouraged to continue. Note: Recommendations include agency and
organization acronyms. The glossary of terms on page 171 includes a definition of each acronym used in this report.

1.0 Promote a comprehensive, inclusive and healthy cultural community


Understand the attributes and recognize the importance of a fully-functioning, inclusive, and healthy cultural
community that is interconnecting and self-reinforcing. The community represents all creators: including
individual artists, small cultural organizations and larger institutions. It includes artists, creatives, heritage
and humanities professionals. It uplifts both nonprofit and for-profit cultural producers, leveraging programs
and resources that support both. It is comprised of cultural creators, spaces and consumers and allows
opportunities for production, expression and consumption. It promotes collaboration across cultural industry
segments and individuals. It relies on many types of platforms for distribution of culture, including physical
and virtual platforms. Lastly, it promotes feedback loops between the local, regional, federal and international
oriented cultural organizations enriching District culture and improving communities and residents’ quality-
of-life across the city.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Ongoing]

1.1 Strengthen the nexus between traditional and nontraditional culture


Encourage artists, small cultural venues, larger institutions and audiences to think of cultural offerings
in the District as a spectrum that is fluid, flexible and benefits from mutual exchange. For example, build
off efforts by the Kennedy Center to ‘bring the local to the institutional’ through its programming that is
aimed at residents.

Consider opportunities through artist and program development that is aimed at audiences who would
typically visit the larger more established cultural institutions. Through these approaches, cultivate artistic
talent, evolve programing and grow audience interest in the range of cultural presentation available in
neighborhoods across the city.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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C O N V E G E N C E

Strengthen culturally underserved communities


1.2 Target local government resources towards improving access to culture in communities with fewer
facilities.
[Implementation Lead: DMPED; Timeframe: Ongoing]

Support residents’ ability to use public space for cultural activity


1.3 Create resources for District residents that provide clear and simple guidance for accessing low or
no cost options to use public spaces for cultural expression. These resources will increase cultural
equity by connecting performers with stages in their communities and move forward the Cultural Plan
concept that ‘all residents are performers.’
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Mid-term]

1.4 Consolidate mural programs


Strengthen and consolidate government-supported mural programs to ensure that the District is fully
leveraging its resources and promoting local artists' work in neighborhoods across the city. Recognize
the role that murals can play in providing platforms for artistic entrepreneurship and expression of
community heritage, enlivening space and creating opportunities for audience dialogue.
[Implementation Lead: CAH; Timeframe: Short-term]

Encourage shared parking agreements for cultural spaces


1.5 Encourage new development near cultural spaces to include shared use parking agreements that
increase off-street parking for cultural spaces.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Short-term]

1.6 Establish an Arts & Culture Planning Position


Establish a new arts & culture planning position at OP to provide ongoing support for the Cultural
Plan through mid-to-long term interdisciplinary cultural policy development and coordination, as
well as ongoing creative placemaking initiatives that support continued cultural practice and policy
innovation.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Short-term]

1.7 Strengthen Boards of Directors


Partner with professional organizations, such as the American Bar Association to recruit board
members for cultural organizations that can provide technical assistance with strategic planning,
legal and financial planning and business operations.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Short-term]

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C O N V E R G E N C E

2.0 Form bridges to new cultural models


Develop programs that increase awareness of new cultural models based on principles of cultural
innovation and impact investing. These programs will also offer resources that increase capacity for
cultural creators and organizations to adopt the new models. These programs should focus on aligning
government, nonprofit and for-profit organizations and their expectations, needs and investments.
[Implementation Lead: OP and DMPED; Timeframe: Short-term]

Advance a collective contribution-shared stewardship model


2.1 Frame and advance a new approach based on collective contributions and shared stewardship from
all stakeholders that will provide the resources and support needed for the District’s cultural sector
to reach its full potential. This approach can be based off a 1% model, whereby the public, private
and nonprofit sectors each contribute 1% of resources. For example, local government dedicates 1%
of funding for eligible capital projects to public art and/or cultural space; private developers allocate
1% of space to culture; artists dedicate 1% of time towards mentoring aspiring artists; and the public
commit 1% of their time to experiencing culture.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Long-term]

Transform capacity-building
2.2 Develop robust capacity-building programs aimed at strengthening cultural organizations with an
emphasis on smaller organizations. Approaches could include peer exchange, webinars and technical
assistance focusing on a range of topics such as fundraising, talent attraction and development,
partnership cultivation, and scaling / growing an organization. DC Agencies can help frame, package
and/or deliver the programs in collaboration with technical assistance partners including foundations
and CDFIs.
[Implementation Lead: DSLBD; Timeframe: Mid-term]

Develop a heritage business program


2.3 Develop a heritage business program that recognizes long-standing businesses that are community
anchors. The Steering Committee will identify partner organizations to certify and promote heritage
businesses. Promoting these businesses will help increase patronage and perpetuate their roles as
community anchors.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Mid-term]

2.4 Leverage the District’s Public Space Stewardship Guide


Use the Public Space Stewardship Guide to clarify align District and relevant federal agencies to
facilitate public space stewardship and advance innovative opportunities for culture. The guide will
be a collaboration tool to help cultural creators and organizations work effectively with government
and public space management entities including BIDs and Main Streets.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Short-term]

DC Office of Planning 166


Nurture the link between culture and equitable development
3.0 Encourage government, nonprofit and private sector organizations to recognize the role of culture
in supporting stable neighborhoods and inclusive development. Affirm that recognizing heritage and
identity, as well as offering opportunities for expression and enrichment will make the growing city more
representative and inclusive. Work with partners to identify ways in which existing and future initiatives
can be reframed to incorporate cultural strategies.
[Implementation Lead: Shared Stewardship; Timeframe: Ongoing]

3.1 Partner with Culture 21


Partner with Culture 21 to connect DC with peer cities that will help advance cultural policies that
support sustainable economic development through international best practices and city to city
information sharing. Through the Culture 21 network, the District will gain insights and resources
to celebrate and strengthen the city’s cultural diversity and cultural sustainability over the long-
term. Focus on enhancing links between culture the environment, education, equity, health and
employment. Continue to strengthen links between culture and heritage, urban planning and public
space.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Short-term]

Customize Culture 21 to local context


3.2 Identify ways to customize Culture21 to local conditions, including leveraging and aligning existing
programs, tools and approaches such as inclusive development, land use tools, local agendas for
sustainability and resilience, and local governance and institutions.
[Implementation Lead: OP; Timeframe: Short-term]

Institutionalize culture across the city


3.3 Align with Culture 21 by identifying ways culture can be embedded across government functions,
institutionalizing culture and ensuring that public sector actions are serving multiple objectives,
including uplifting the cultural sector.
[Implementation Lead: Steering Committee; Timeframe: Ongoing]

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APPENDICES
CULTURAL PLAN
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I N T R O D U C T I O N

169 DC Cultural Plan


CULTURAL PLAN APPENDICES
I. APPENDIX OF RECOMMENDATIONS
II. APPENDIX OF TABLES
III. APPENDIX OF ENGAGEMENT
IV. APPENDIX OF CULTURAL PROGRAMS
V. PHOTO CREDITS
VI. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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I . A P P E N D I X O F R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

I. APPENDIX OF RECOMMENDATIONS
a. Table 1 – Summary of Acronyms

b. Table 2 – Cultural Creators Recommendations

c. Table 3 – Cultural Spaces Recommendations

d. Table 4 – Cultural Consumers Recommendations

e. Table 5 – Convergence Recommendations

f. Table 6 – Cultural Investment Recommendations

DC Office of Planning 172


SUMMARY OF ACRONYMS TABLE 1
Acronym Name/Description
BID Business Improvement District

CDFI Community Development Financial Institution

CAH District of Columbia Commission on Arts & Humanities

DCHFA DC Housing Finance Agency

DCPL District of Columbia Public Library

DCPS District of Columbia Public Schools

DCRA Department of Consumer & Regulatory Affairs

DDOE District Department of the Environment

DDOT District Department of Transportation

Destination DC DC’s Official Destination Marketing Organization


DGS District Department of General Services

DHCD District Department of Housing & Community Development

DISB District Department of Insurance, Securities and Banking

DME Deputy Mayor for Education

DMPED Deputy Mayor for Planning & Economic Development

DPR District Department of Parks & Recreation

DPW District Department of Public Works

DSLBD District Department of Small & Local Business Development

FEMS DC Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department

HPO District Historic Preservation Office

Main Streets Certified DC Main Street Organizations

MPD DC Metropolitan Police Department

NPS National Park Service


OCTFME District Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment

OP District of Columbia Office of Planning


ORM District Office of Risk Management

Shared Stewardship All public, private and civic leaders

Steering Committee DC Cultural Plan Implementation Steering Committee

WDCEP Washington DC Economic Development Partnership

WMATA Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority

173 DC Cultural Plan


I . A P P E N D I X O F R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S

The following section is a compilation of the recommendations in this Plan. Each recommendation is categorized by its Impact, Implementation Lead and
Timeframe. Impacts include reduced barriers, new capacity and increased equity. Implementation Lead indicates the organization or organizations that are best
positioned to lead implementation of each recommendation in partnership with the Implementation Steering Committee and other stakeholders. Timeframes
include short-term, mid-term, long-term and ongoing. Short term recommendations can be completed within two years; mid-term recommendations can be
completed within 5 years; long-term recommendations can be completed within 10 years. Ongoing recommendations are for currently occurring activities that
are encouraged to continue.

Implementation
Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead

TABLE 2 - CULTURAL CREATORS RECOMMENDATIONS


Creator Launch a Form a Center for Cultural Opportunities within the District's Increased DSLBD with Short-term
1 Center for Small Business Resource Center that offers cultural creators the Equity DCRA, CAH,
Cultural tools they need to launch and/or grow careers and businesses. OCTFME
Opportunities The Center will have both a physical and digital presence.
Resources will include comprehensive training programs that
offer guidance on small business planning and development;
business management and financing, including guidance on
accessing traditional and non-traditional financing; as well
as grant application and management. Through the Center,
residents will learn how to navigate District, federal and private
programs that can support their personal and professional
development. The District will work with partners to align and
expand existing programs that target the needs of cultural
creators.
Creator Align cultural Align programs that help individual cultural creators, such Reduced DSLBD with CAH Short-term
1.1 creators with as artists, access programs to launch, cultivate and grow Barriers and OCTFME
small business small businesses. Highlight the Certified Business Enterprise
programs (CBE) program as a platform for catalyzing small business
development through a preferred status in District procurement
opportunities. The preferred status enables the District to
leverage its procurement needs to expand opportunities for local
businesses. Additionally, increased cultural creator participation
in the CBE program would enable the District to provide the list
to the private sector as a resource for identifying local creative
firms for business-to-business purchasing.
Creator Increase Work with the Department of Housing and Community Increased DHCD and Mid-term
2 access to Development (DHCD) and the Housing Finance Agency (DCHFA) Equity DCHFA
affordable to increase access to affordable housing programs for cultural
housing producers and individual artists. Approaches include working
with cultural creators to help them qualify for existing programs
and developing financing tools to increase housing options for
District residents with non-traditional income. The agencies
should investigate tools and techniques for co-locating cultural
space with affordable housing.
Creator Produce Develop a toolkit that provides creators with consolidated Increased OP and DHCD Short-term
2.1 a cultural information about the District and its nonprofit partners’ housing Equity
creator's programs, including rent supplement, affordable dwelling units,
affordable inclusionary housing and home purchase assistance as well as
housing toolkit homelessness assistance.
Creator Produce a Develop a toolkit that provides information to cultural creators Reduced WDCEP Short-term
2.2 cultural tenants' on resources for commercial tenants and the programs available Barriers
toolkit to support them.
Creator Increase youth Develop additional youth programming and partnerships that New DME and CAH Mid-term
3 programming offer mentorship and pre-professional education to youth, Capacity
allowing them to build creative foundations, develop creative
skills and enabling them to thrive as cultural creators. These
programs will be developed in partnership with organizations
including the Kennedy Center, DC Education Collaborative, DPR,
DCPL, Humanities DC and cultural organizations.
Creator Continue Continue strengthening Pre-K-12 arts programs, resources and New DME and DCPS Ongoing
3.1 strengthening coordination to advance DCPS’ Framework for Arts Learning. This Capacity
Pre-K-12 arts approach will provide enhanced opportunities to students at
and culture all grade levels by leveraging partnerships that build on existing
programs programs including the Fillmore Arts Center and the Duke
Ellington School of the Arts.

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead
Creator Leverage the Any Through the Any Given Child program, DCPS and the DC New DCPS Short-Term
3.2 Given Child and Collaborative will assess the DCPS Arts education programs for Capacity
Turnaround Arts students, Pre-K-12 to identify key gaps and implement targeted
Programs programs that improve arts education for all students. The Any
Given Child program will build on the targeted arts education
support provided to four DCPS schools through the Turnaround
Arts Program.
Creator Increase out-of- Build partnerships between District agencies that operate out-of- New DCPS, DPR and Ongoing
3.2 school cultural school educational facilities including DCPL, DPR and DCPS and Capacity DCPL
programming for community-based cultural organizations to increase out-of-school
youth cultural programming for youth.
Creator 4 Support Continue to invest in cultural and local history initiatives and Increased CAH, OCTFME Ongoing
local cultural expand access to resources that support the cultivation and Equity and HPO
identity and expression of cultural identity and locally significant traditions
traditions including music, food, fashion and art. Leverage existing programs
offered through CAH, OCTFME, HPO, Humanities DC and the
Historical Society of Washington DC.
Creator Continue HPO will continue supporting the Preservation Grants program New HPO Ongoing
4.1 supporting and seeking additional opportunities to support heritage and Capacity
culture through culture including Civil Rights heritage, oral history and LGBTQ
historic heritage. HPO’s Preservation Grants offer support for a wide
preservation range of programs including preservation planning, research,
outreach and education, and construction. New programs will use
a partnership approach to leverage the existing grants to increase
funding from additional stakeholders.
Creator 5 Support Support existing programs while developing new programs Reduced CAH and Mid-term
innovation in enabling innovation in local culture. These efforts should build on Barriers OCTFME
local culture existing programs, including 202 Creates, The Labs at DCPL and
CAH grants, while launching new platforms.
Creator Reinforce The Continue to support and reinforce The Labs at DC Public Library Reduced DCPL Mid-term
5.1 Labs at DC Public as a platform for residents to create and exchange cultural Barriers
Library expressions in shared space. Strengthen the links between
support provided at The Labs and entrepreneurship, enabling
residents to use The Labs as a pathway to cultural careers
and businesses. Consider expanding and tailoring The Labs to
neighborhood libraries to increase cultural production resources
in communities across the District.
Creator Continue to Continue to implement and refine CAH's complement of grant Increased CAH Ongoing
5.2 implement and programs that support both individual cultural creators and Equity
refine CAH grant nonprofit cultural organizations. Refinement should be focused
programs on increasing impact, programmatic alignment, grantee diversity
and geographic diversity.
Creator Develop innovative Develop innovative operating models for incubators and shared New DMPED Mid-term
5.3 operating models space that include public-private partnerships. Consider seed/ Capacity
for cultural catalyst funding from the District as well as performance-based
incubators multi-year operating support funding. Approaches should be
and collective inclusive and target all types of cultural producers.
production space

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead

TABLE 3 - CULTURAL SPACES RECOMMENDATIONS


Space 1 Affirm civic Leverage the built environment’s potential to affirm civic Increased HPO and Ongoing
identity and identities and diverse community heritage. Use historic Equity Property
community preservation as well as adaptive reuse to maintain buildings Owners
heritage and spaces that are culturally significant as the city continues
through space growing. It is critical that these approaches affirm and celebrate
Black culture including African American life and spaces
throughout the built environment.
Space 2 Use innovative Use wayfinding, interpretative signage, murals and interactive Reduced DDOT, CAH Mid-term
tools to daylight platforms to help new residents connect with community heritage Barriers and BIDs
cultural in innovative ways. These tools will use a mix of traditional
heritage wayfinding and creative placemaking through partnerships with
BIDs, Main Streets, DDOT, and CAH.
Space Continue Fully integrate arts and culture into the neighborhood planning Increased OP Ongoing
2.1 incorporating that the District undertakes across the city to promote equity
culture into inclusive, resilient and vibrant communities. Approaches
community include tools that screen for cultural assets, identify gaps
planning and seek opportunities for enhancing culture (such as public
art) and identify cultural priorities for new construction and
redevelopments (such as cultural space).
Space Deploy Continue to plan for spaces that can serve as a backdrop Reduced OP and DDOT Ongoing
2.2 experimental or canvas for cultural expression and creative placemaking, Barriers
strategies for allowing for creative collaboration and exchange to occur,
infusing culture particularly in areas experiencing rapid change or in areas
in public space with higher barriers to accessing cultural facilities. Spaces can
include public assets, such as sidewalks, parks and alleys as
well as private spaces. District government can play a leading
role in promoting space through its planning, development and
permitting functions.
Space Increase options Design and implement ‘frequent expression zones’ in Reduced OP and DDOT Short-term
2.3 for cultural commercial areas across the District where a minimal Barriers
expression in permitting process is required for performers to use public
public space space. Frequent expression zones are dedicated spaces
that allow performers to use parts of public space that do
not interfere with the free flow of transportation including
pedestrians.
Space Conduct a review Review the city’s noise ordinances as well as enforcement Reduced Steering Short-term
2.4 of the city’s noise practices and conduct a national practices assessment to Barriers Committee
ordinances identify good practices and policies to consider in the District.
These initiatives will help the District determine if the city’s
policies should be adjusted to better balance the needs of
residents, cultural creators and other stakeholders.
Space Conduct Develop educational outreach materials to inform cultural New CAH Short-term
2.5 Educational presenters who work in public space about key regulations Capacity
Outreach to that pertain to them. The materials will also include guidance
Public Space and resources for issue resolution.
Presenters
Space Align OP will review the Comprehensive Plan—and its Arts and Reduced OP Short-term
2.6 Comprehensive Culture Element in particular—and align its policies with the Barriers
Plan Policies recommendations of the Cultural Plan and other current
District cultural policy documents. The alignments will
translate the Cultural Plan's aspirational recommendations
into policy for the Comprehensive Plan, which is a
foundational legal document that guides growth and
development in the District.
Space Leverage Identify opportunities to align investments in shared use cultural New DMPED and Ongoing
2.7 the Capital facilities within new and significantly renovated public facilities Capacity OP
Budgeting through collaboration between OP, the City Administrator’s Office
Process Through and agencies including DPR, DCPL, and DCPS. The agencies will
Partnerships collaborate with partners, such as the Office of Public Private
Partnerships and the foundation community to seek value added
opportunities where additional partner investment can create
shared use facilities that meet outstanding community demand.
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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead
Space 3 Promote The District and its partners should continue to review New Capacity OP Ongoing
a range of opportunities for any type of space to serve as a temporary or
cultural spaces permanent platform for cultural production, expression and
throughout the consumption.
city
The District government will use the master facility planning
and Comprehensive Plan processes to assess opportunities for
public cultural infrastructure, including: physical buildings, such
as libraries, schools, museums, universities, recreation centers,
fire and police stations, public athletic facilities and government
administration buildings; public open spaces, such as parks,
athletic fields, and other man-made and natural features of the
District; and, horizontal infrastructure, such as roads, bridges,
viaducts, unused railway easements, subway platforms and
entrances as well as water and energy easements and structures.
Space Implement a Implement a Festival Streets program that creates a streamlined Reduced BIDs, Main Mid-term
3.1 Festival Streets process for public space events, such as a flexible permit for a Barriers Streets, DDOT,
Program commercial street that can be held by a BID, Main Street, Business and DCRA
Association or Community Association.
Space Leverage District Encourage provision of affordable cultural space when District New Capacity DMPED, DGS, Ongoing
3.2 assets to create property is redeveloped or disposed. Tools and approaches, such and DHCD
affordable as requests for proposals pertaining to site or facility reuse and
cultural space public-private partnerships will be aligned to produce new spaces
where feasible. New cultural spaces should be incorporated in
addition to all affordable housing deemed appropriate for the site.
Space Develop Develop partnerships among property owners and cultural New Capacity OP Ongoing
3.3 partnerships for organizations to create increased cultural space for fabrication
behind the scenes and storage for theatrical sets, costumes, artwork, artifacts and
cultural spaces offices.
Space 4 Maximize Maximize access to public assets (including public facilities, New Capacity DCPL, DCPS, Short-term
Access to infrastructure and physical spaces) to increase the ability of DPR, DGS and
Public Facilities entities, such as nonprofits to undertake/present/offer cultural ORM
for Cultural activities. Where appropriate, use of public assets for cultural
Presentation uses could include both highly visible and less visible space,
such as areas for public interaction, presentation, display and
exhibition. Public facilities should be offered at low or no cost
whenever possible.
Space Increase evening Work to increase access to public and privately owned cultural Reduced CAH, DPR, Mid-term
4.1 and weekend spaces including museums across the city. The District will also Barriers DCPL, and
access to cultural work to provide additional evening hours at facilities it controls DCPS
spaces while engaging partner organizations to increase evening hours
at museums and other cultural facilities.

Space Create a Create a standard price schedule for the District’s cultural Reduced Steering Short-term
4.2 standardized space and services to help creators better plan and anticipate Barriers Committee
price schedule costs. The price schedule will be created in collaboration with
for public agencies that provide services and space for cultural events
facilities and including the DGS, DCPS, DPR, MPD, FEMS, and DDOT.
services
Space Reduce Explore programs to make insurance and security costs more Reduced DISB and ORM Mid-term
4.3 insurance and predictable and less burdensome for community-based Barriers
security costs for creators and cultural organizations that use public space and
cultural events facilities. Potential agencies include DISB, ORM, MPD, FEMS,
DPW, and DDOT.
Space 5 Streamline Appoint a cultural permitting ambassador to help cultural Reduced DCRA and Mid-term
permitting for organizations navigate permitting, licensing and resources Barriers DDOT
cultural uses through coordination across permitting agencies including
DCRA, DDOT, DOH, ABRA, MPD and FEMS. Bring all applications
into a single online portal, with options for various elements
that can be selected (such as alcohol or food vending and
amplified sound).

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead
Space 6 Encourage Develop requirements and assess the need for incentives that New OP and Mid-term
affordable encourage private property owners to incorporate cultural Capacity DMPED
ground uses in their buildings, creating connections between the
floor space city’s continued growth, real estate development and cultural
for cultural space production. Through this process, OP and DMPED will
organizations develop benchmarks and metrics to guide future development
decisions.
Space Support low Create programs that support affordable production and New DMPED and Long-term
6.1 cost, long-term presentation space by creating a Cultural Facilities Fund that Capacity CAH
cultural space provides support for a wide range of cultural organizations,
leases including both performance and arts administration.
Space Develop cultural Work with District and foundation partners to create programs New DMPED and Mid-term
6.2 space purchase that use public and/or foundation grants to provide down Capacity CAH
assistance payment assistance that enables cultural organizations,
programs including collectivized creators, to purchase space at affordable
rates. Down payment assistance provides access to mortgage
financing while reducing the loan amount, and higher levels of
down payment assistance increase affordability.
Space Encourage Encourage property owners to host temporary cultural uses New OP, BIDs Main Ongoing
6.3 temporary in vacant commercial space, including vacant land. Explore Capacity Streets
cultural use opportunities for temporary certificates of occupancy that
in vacant include relaxed building code requirements, tax incentives to
commercial encourage property owners to utilize ground floor for creative
space uses between tenants, and benefit agreements to require
temporary uses of unleased ground floor retail space in new
construction of major redevelopment.
Space Encourage Encourage Planned Unit Development to include low-cost New OP Ongoing
6.4 Cultural Space space for cultural presentation, production and administration. Capacity
in Planned Unit Developing low-cost cultural spaces is a priority for the District
Developments and should be provided in addition to all affordable housing
deemed appropriate for the project. Presentation spaces should
have prominent street level visibility with ceiling heights of at least
twelve feet and open areas suitable for performance. Production
spaces should offer private work space that is not visible to the
general public with access to loading facilities. Administrative
space should be provided in comparable delivery condition
to market rate office space. These spaces are encouraged to
maximize non-prime ground floor, second floor and/or below
grade space within buildings.
Space 7 Create a Create a portfolio of incubators and shared production / New DMPED and Long-term
portfolio collective studio space that allows cultural producers to test, Capacity DSLBD
of cultural start-up and scale businesses.
incubators
and collective Recognize the critical role that access to shared equipment,
production facilities, technical assistance and collaboration can play in
spaces enabling cultural producers to develop their practices into
successful enterprises. Develop models and approaches
for incubators and shared space that include public-private
partnerships, catalytic and/or stewardship roles for local
government, cooperative and equity-building business models
and phased development. Approaches should be inclusive
(targeting all types of cultural creators) and sustainable
(providing for long-term operation).
Space Pursue Review the District’s facility portfolio for opportunities to create or New DMPED, DME, Short-term
7.1 public-private- enhance cultural space through public-private-partnerships. The Capacity DGS, and OP
partnership review should assess opportunities to create smaller community
opportunities to facilities, including instructional and studio space, as well as
create cultural centrally located facilities that could serve larger populations with
space more robust facilities. Partnerships can also be used to make
value added investments in public facilities such as high school
auditoriums, public libraries, as well as creating cultural facilities
within other District assets.

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead
Space Establish a Work with Community Development Financial Institutions Reduced DMPED Mid-term
7.2 cultural space (CDFIs) to create a cultural space consortium to purchase and Barriers
consortium preserve available cultural spaces and preserve their long-term
affordability.
Space Partner with Conduct a review of how banks do business in the District New OP Short-
7.3 banks to target to meet their CRA obligations to identify opportunities for Capacity term
Community alignment and partnership to increase impact from the funds
Reinvestment Act invested in the District. The Community Reinvestment Act (CRA)
investments is a federal law that requires financial institutions to invest in
low and moderate-income areas where they do business to
mitigate divestment in previous decades.

Implementation
Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead

TABLE 4 - CULTURAL CONSUMERS RECOMMENDATIONS


Consumer 1 Promote Build awareness among all residents about the District’s New Destination DC Mid-term
cultural events cultural events using multi-channel outreach tools, including Capacity and OCTFME
to residents print, video, social media and online advertising. This effort
should include a promotion of free and low-cost programs
such as ‘pay-what-you-can’ theater tickets and free admission
days.
Consumer Utilize inclusive Ensure that outreach is conducted through traditional as well Increased Shared Ongoing
1.1 outreach as digital channels because many District residents speak Equity Stewardship
strategies English as a second language, are older, or are lower-income
and do not have home internet access. Traditional media,
including print and radio ensure that cultural promotion and
engagement initiatives reach all residents.
Consumer Work with Coordinate with key partners working in communities across Reduced Shared Short-
1.2 community- the city to promote cultural programs and offerings in Barriers Stewardship term
facing partners innovative ways to retain existing and attract new cultural
to promote consumers, with a focus on reaching youth.
culture

Consumer Collect feedback Periodically collect feedback from cultural consumers to help Reduced Steering Short-
1.3 from cultural tailor outreach strategies and undertake pilot projects to test Barriers Committee term
consumers new programming.
Consumer 2 Market local Expand promotion efforts to increase cultural visits from the 9 New Destination DC Short-
cultural events million residents who live in the surrounding region. Efforts could Capacity term
to regional include an advertising campaign, such as “DC like a local” that
residents helps visitors seeking federal attractions also enjoy locally ‘paired’
and national options, such as a concert at the Black Cat and a Half Smoke at
visitors Ben’s Chili Bowl. Promotion partners include Destination DC and
the network of BIDs and Main Streets.
Consumer 3 Launch a Launch a targeted international tourism campaign to connect New Destination DC Mid-term
targeted more visitors from international markets to local cultural events Capacity
international by promoting the District as a leading cultural destination,
campaign emphasizing the city’s local brand. This campaign will build on
promoting the the District’s identity as the nation’s capital and strategically
District’s local pair cultural offerings with shopping and dining.
culture
Consumer Partner with Whenever possible, the District will partner with embassy Reduced CAH Short-
3.1 embassy public public diplomacy programs housed at more than 170 Barriers term
diplomacy diplomatic missions in the city to increase cultural exchanges
programs between residents and the international community.

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead

Consumer Expand Cultural programming in communities is one of the most Reduced Shared Long-
4 community- impactful ways to increase cultural participation and exploration Barriers Stewardship term
oriented for all District residents. The District government and cultural
cultural organizations, such as the DC Jazz Festival, will work to increase
programming and diversify community-oriented cultural programming for
residents of all ages. These programs will help increase cultural
participation among District residents, which will help increase the
local base of support for performers and stages.
Consumer Expand cultural Identify opportunities for public facilities to serve as hubs New DCPL, DPR, Mid-term
4.1 programming in for cultural programs that can attract and enrich a diverse Capacity DCPS and CAH
public facilities cross-section of the population. Public facilities include
to serve diverse libraries, schools, recreation centers, and stadiums. Example
consumers approaches include: collections and programs focused on
community heritage and cultural literacy (including book clubs),
presentations by local artists, and spaces that encourage
intergenerational cultural dialogue.
Consumer Leverage Leverage the many cultural activities that occur at universities, Reduced Steering Short-
4.2 universities as including theater, dance, music, and art, by having universities Barriers Committee term
cultural anchors identify new and innovative ways to promote their cultural
programming to District residents. Universities are encouraged
to foster cultural mentorship that pairs students with residents
and to open their spaces to community use, including joint use
cultural spaces.
Consumer Increase Launch a permanent program that documents oral histories New HPO and CAH Long-
5 cultural and community heritage, preserving residents’ stories for Capacity term
awareness current and future generations. The program will prioritize new
through a storytelling and recorded interviews with notable residents
permanent whose stories are in danger of being lost and will support the
oral history work of community historians interested in starting hyper-local
program oral history projects throughout the city.

Share these stories through platforms such as the DC Digital


Museum. This initiative builds off a current pilot program
by the DC Public Library, Humanities DC and the Historical
Society of Washington, DC. The recordings captured through
this program will be linked to the heritage trail program via an
interactive website.
Consumer Highlight Continue to provide grants to organizations that highlight Increased HPO and CAH Ongoing
5.1 community community heritage. Specifically, HPO and CAH will provide Equity
heritage ongoing support for District heritage through grants, research
and outreach.
Consumer Build stronger Increase District resident cultural presentation and Reduced OP, Ongoing
6 connections consumption in federal cultural spaces including the Barriers Smithsonian
between Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery and Kennedy Center. Institution and
local cultural Explore opportunities for increased evening presentations the Kennedy
creators and and District-oriented programing as well as partnerships for Center
consumers in transportation, low-cost tickets and locally-oriented promotion.
federal cultural
space
Consumer Strengthen Through innovative partnerships, expand both the variety Reduced CAH and Ongoing
7 youth exposure and frequency of cultural expression accessible to youth Barriers OCTFME
to culture and families in-school and after-school, ensuring youth have
opportunities to experience both local and national culture.
Examples include supplementing a humanities curriculum with
a visit to the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center and/or a local poetry
event.
Consumer Support art in Integrate culture into transit through temporary and Reduced WMATA and Ongoing
8 transit permanent public art installations or performances. Increasing Barriers DDOT
art in transit can provide localized expressions of heritage and
culture that build community identity while creating frequent
opportunities for residents and visitors to interact with cultural
expression.

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead

TABLE 5 - CONVERGENCE RECOMMENDATIONS


Promote a Understand the attributes and recognize the importance of Reduced Shared Ongoing
Convergence comprehensive, a fully-functioning, inclusive, and healthy cultural community Barriers Stewardship
1 inclusive and that is interconnecting and self-reinforcing. The community
healthy cultural represents all creators: including individual artists, small New
community Capacity
cultural organizations and larger institutions. It includes artists,
creatives, heritage and humanities professionals. It uplifts Increased
both nonprofit and for-profit cultural producers, leveraging Equity
programs and resources that support both. It is comprised
of cultural creators, spaces and consumers and allows
opportunities for production, expression and consumption. It
promotes collaboration across cultural industry segments and
individuals. It relies on many types of platforms for distribution
of culture, including physical and virtual platforms. Lastly, it
promotes feedback loops between the local, regional, federal
and international oriented cultural organizations enriching
District culture and improving communities and residents’
quality-of-life across the city.
Convergence Strengthen the Encourage artists, small cultural venues, larger institutions New Shared Ongoing
1.1 nexus between and audiences to think of cultural offerings in the District as Capacity Stewardship
traditional and a spectrum that is fluid, flexible and benefits from mutual
nontraditional exchange. For example, build off efforts by the Kennedy Center Increased
culture Equity
to ‘bring the local to the institutional’ through its programming
that is aimed at residents.

Consider opportunities through artist and program


development that is aimed at audiences who would typically
visit the larger more established cultural institutions.
Through these approaches, cultivate artistic talent, evolve
programing and grow audience interest in the range of cultural
presentation available in neighborhoods across the city.
Convergence Strengthen Target local government resources towards improving access Increased DMPED Ongoing
1.2 culturally to culture in communities with fewer facilities. Equity
underserved
communities
Convergence Support Create resources for District residents that provide clear and Increased Steering Mid-term
1.3 resident’s ability simple guidance for accessing low or no cost options to use Equity Committee
to use public public spaces for cultural expression. These resources will
space for cultural increase cultural equity by connecting performers with stages
activity in their communities and move forward the Cultural Plan
concept that ‘all residents are performers.’
Convergence Consolidate Strengthen and consolidate government-supported mural Reducing CAH Short-
1.4 murals programs programs to ensure that the District is fully leveraging its Barriers term
resources and promoting local artists' work in neighborhoods
across the city. Recognize the role that murals can play
in providing platforms for artistic entrepreneurship and
expression of community heritage, enlivening space and creating
opportunities for audience dialogue.
Convergence Encourage Encourage new development near cultural spaces to include New OP Short-
1.5 shared parking shared use parking agreements that increase off-street parking Capacity term
agreements for for cultural spaces.
cultural spaces
Convergence Establish and Establish a new arts & culture planning position at OP to New OP Short-
1.6 Arts & Culture provide ongoing support for the Cultural Plan through mid- Capacity term
Planning Position to-long term interdisciplinary cultural policy development and
coordination, as well as ongoing creative placemaking initiatives
that support continued cultural practice and policy innovation.
Convergence Strengthen Partner with professional organizations, such as the American New Shared Short-
1.7 Boards of Bar Association to recruit board members for cultural Capacity Stewardship term
Directors organizations that can provide technical assistance with
strategic planning, legal and financial planning and business
operations.

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Implementation
Number Recommendation Description Impact Timeframe
Lead
Convergence Form bridges Develop programs that increase awareness of new cultural New OP and Short-
2 to new cultural models based on principles of cultural innovation and impact Capacity DMPED term
models investing. These programs will also offer resources that
increase capacity for cultural creators and organizations
to adopt the new models. These programs should focus on
aligning government, nonprofit and for-profit organizations and
their expectations, needs and investments.
Convergence Advance a Frame and advance a new approach based on collective Reduced Steering Long-
2.1 collective contributions and shared stewardship from all stakeholders that Barriers Committee term
contribution- will provide the resources and support needed for the District’s
shared cultural sector to reach its full potential. This approach can
stewardship be based off a 1% model, whereby the public, private and
model nonprofit sectors each contribute 1% of resources. For
example, local government dedicates 1% of funding for eligible
capital projects to public art and/or cultural space; private
developers allocate 1% of space to culture; artists dedicate
1% of time towards mentoring aspiring artists; and the public
commit 1% of their time to experiencing culture.
Convergence Transform Develop robust capacity-building programs aimed at Reduced DSLBD Mid-term
2.2 capacity-building strengthening cultural organizations with an emphasis on Barriers
smaller organizations. Approaches could include peer
exchange, webinars and technical assistance focusing on
a range of topics such as fundraising, talent attraction and
development, partnership cultivation, and scaling / growing an
organization. DC Agencies can help frame, package and/or
deliver the programs in collaboration with technical assistance
partners including foundations and CDFIs.
Convergence Develop Develop a heritage business program that recognizes long- Increased Steering Mid-term
2.3 a heritage standing businesses that are community anchors. The Steering Equity Committee
business Committee will identify partner organizations to certify and
program promote heritage businesses. Promoting these businesses
will help increase patronage and perpetuate their roles as
community anchors.
Convergence Leverage Use the Public Space Stewardship Guide to clarify align Reduced Shared Short-
2.4 the District’s District and relevant federal agencies to facilitate public space Barriers Stewardship term
Public Space stewardship and advance innovative opportunities for culture.
Stewardship The guide will be a collaboration tool to help cultural creators
Guide and organizations work effectively with government and public
space management entities including BIDs and Main Streets.
Convergence Nurture the link Encourage government, nonprofit and private sector Increased Shared Ongoing
3 between culture organizations to recognize the role of culture in supporting Equity Stewardship
and equitable stable neighborhoods and inclusive development. Affirm
development that recognizing heritage and identity, as well as offering
opportunities for expression and enrichment will make the
growing city more representative and inclusive. Work with
partners to identify ways in which existing and future initiatives
can be reframed to incorporate cultural strategies.
Convergence Partner with Partner with Culture 21 to connect DC with peer cities that will Increased OP Short-
3.1 Culture 21 help advance cultural policies that support sustainable economic Equity term
development through international best practices and city to city
information sharing. Through the Culture 21 network, the District will
gain insights and resources to celebrate and strengthen the city’s
cultural diversity and cultural sustainability over the long-term. Focus
on enhancing links between culture the environment, education,
equity, health and employment. Continue to strengthen links between
culture and heritage, urban planning and public space.
Convergence Customize Identify ways to customize Culture21 to local conditions, Increased OP Short-
3.2 Culture 21 to including leveraging and aligning existing programs, tools Equity term
local context and approaches such as inclusive development, land use
tools, local agendas for sustainability and resilience, and local
governance and institutions.
Convergence Institutionalize Align with Culture 21 by identifying ways culture can be Increased Steering Ongoing
3.3 culture across embedded across government functions, institutionalizing Equity Committee
the city culture and ensuring that public sector actions are serving
multiple objectives, including uplifting the cultural sector.

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Number Recommendation Description Impact Investment Level Timeframe

TABLE 6 - CULTURAL INVESTMENT RECOMMENDATIONS


Investment Expand capacity Expand the District’s cultural organization capacity building New $$ Mid-term
1 building programs and work with foundations, corporate social Capacity
grants through responsibility programs and major donors to create a cultural
partnership funding collaborative that will increase grant funding for both
nonprofit and for-profit cultural organization capacity building.
These grants will enhance and expand existing efforts to
help cultural organizations meet short-term needs while
implementing more advanced business planning and financial
management programs, as well as to increase capacity and
meet transitional organization needs.
Investment Create a Cultural Create a fund to provide small short-term loans to cultural New $$$ Mid-term
2 Innovation and organizations that increase organizational creative capacity Capacity
Entrepreneurship and support innovation. The loans can be used for a wide
Revolving Loan range of projects, including recording for musicians, event
Fund promotion and equipment acquisition. These loans will require
underwriting and risk assessment.
Investment Create a Establish a Cultural Facilities Fund that uses public cultural New $$$$ Short-
3 Cultural facility funding as leverage to unlock much greater levels of Capacity term
Facilities Fund private sector investment from social impact investors including
foundations. The fund will support leasing in commercial
buildings, maintenance of existing facilities and creation of
new facilities that provide cultural presentation, production and
administration spaces.
Investment Institute a Create a tax credit program that encourages property owners New $$ Long term
4 Cultural Space to incorporate both permanent and temporary cultural space Capacity
Tax Credit with affordable rents by reducing the costs of taxes that are
Program passed through to cultural tenants. These tax credits will
encourage property owners to pursue cultural facilities that
benefit adjoining uses in the building by attracting more
potential customers.
Investment Create a Cultural Create a cultural navigator position to assist creators with Reduced $$ Short-
5 Navigator permitting processes and work with agency partners to Barriers term
Position for refine programs and processes to better meet the needs of
the Center the cultural community. The navigator will also help connect
for Cultural creators to the full breadth of programs the District offers.
Opportunity
Investment Create an online Establish an online marketplace as a venue for District creators Reduced $ Short-
5.1 storefront through to showcase their work and connect with consumers who value Barriers term
the Made in DC locally made products under the successful Made in DC brand.
Brand
Investment Create a Web- Create an online platform as the digital presence for the Center Reduced $ Mid-term
5.2 Based Platform for Cultural Opportunities, providing a portal to business- Barriers
for the Cultural support programs and resources, networking and business to
Opportunity business opportunities. The platform will be actively maintained
Center with resources that help cultural creators develop cultural
practices, establish cultural organizations, build partnerships
and leverage government programs. The resources will
illustrate how creators can gain access to personal and
professional development resources, use public space and
facilities, and access support programs including affordable
housing.
Investment Create a Create a fund to support community oriented cultural events in Increase $$$ Mid-term
6 community public facilities and space by offsetting some security costs. Equity
event security
fund
Investment Expand the Partner with DCPL and the DC Public Library Foundation Increase $$ Mid-term
7 Labs at DCPL to explore and possibly expand The Labs to neighborhood Equity
libraries.
Investment Invest in Partner with Destination DC and DMPED to market the District’s New $$ Ongoing
8 marketing cultural opportunities to District, regional, national and Capacity
international audiences.

183 DC Cultural Plan


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

II. APPENDIX OF TABLES


a. Tables
i. Cultural Economy Employment
ii. Employment in Cultural Occupations
iii. Employment in Cultural Industries
iv. Nonprofit Cultural Organizations Serving A District Audience (Vs National)
v. Business Improvement District Programming (2016)
vi. Nonprofit Cultural Organizations Serving A District Audience
vii. University Programs (2016)
viii. Individual Artist Employment by Occupations, (2015)
ix. Characteristics of Common Cultural Spaces and Commercial Uses

b. Graphs
i. Average Spending by Organization Size for District-Serving Organizations
ii. Average Shares of Income for District-Serving Cultural Organizations
iii. Individual Artists, DC Metro Area

DC Office of Planning 184


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

TOTAL PRIVATE GOVERNMENT


Employment in Cultural Economy Industries
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
Total Federal
Total Private Private Self-
Industry Employment Government
Employment Employment
by Industry Employees
Visual and Performing Arts 5,890 4,690 1,520 1,200
Museums and Heritage 10,460 2,230 110 8,230

Broadcast, Film, Television 8,350 8,350 400 -

Music Industry 60 60 - -
Religious Organizations 5,900 5,900 160 -
Culinary Arts 32,390 31,970 80 420
Building Arts 6,380 4,050 250 2,330
Media and Communications 15,750 15,680 470 70
Sports 3,400 3,340 300 60
Specialized Retail 710 710 30 -
SUBTOTAL 89,290 76,980 3,320 12,310
TOTAL EMPLOYMENT OF CULTURAL SELF-EMPLOYMENT IN CULTURAL
Employment in Cultural Economy Occupations OCCUPATIONS OUTSIDE OF OCCUPATIONS OUTSIDE CULTURAL
CULTURAL INDUSTRIES INDUSTRIES
SUBTOTAL 23,100 790

TOTAL DIRECT CULTURAL 112,390


EMPLOYMENT
a. Tables (i)

NAICS Industry
District of Columbia Employment by Industry, 2016; HR&A Analysis of EMSI 2015 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) data.

SOC Occupations

District of Columbia Employment by Occupation, 2016; HR&A Analysis of EMSI 2015 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) System data.

185 DC Cultural Plan


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Employment in Cultural Occupations in Other Industries

TOTAL SELF-
EMPLOYED SELF- SELF-
CULTURAL EMPLOYED EMPLOYED
IN NON EMPLOYED EMPLOYED
EMPLOYMENT IN CULTURAL IN NON
CULTURAL (INDIVIDUAL) IN CULTURAL
BY INDUSTRIES CULTURAL
INDUSTRIES TOTAL INDUSTRIES
OCCUPATION INDUSTRIES

TOTAL CULTURAL EMPLOYMENT IN


41,820 18,720 23,100 2,250 1,460 790
CULTURAL OCCUPATIONS
CORE CULTURAL OCCUPATIONS 7,480 4,540 2,940 1,640 1,160 480

27-1011 Art Directors 400 220 180 70 40 30

27-1012 Craft Artists 90 60 30 80 70 10


Fine Artists, Including
27-1013 Painters, Sculptors, and 200 120 80 160 130 30
Illustrators
Multimedia Artists and
27-1014 180 70 110 50 30 20
Animators
Artists and Related Work-
27-1019 1,130 1,070 60 - - -
ers, All Other
27-2011 Actors 320 220 100 60 60 10
27-2012 Producers and Directors 1,760 1,060 700 100 80 30
27-2031 Dancers 110 50 60 20 - 20
27-2032 Choreographers 20 - 20 - - -
Music Directors and Com-
27-2041 260 180 80 60 40 20
posers
27-2042 Musicians and Singers 750 610 140 310 290 10
27-3043 Writers and Authors 1,560 650 910 330 280 50
27-4021 Photographers 480 140 340 300 80 220
Entertainers and Perform-
27-2099 ers, Sports and Related 220 90 130 80 60 30
Workers
Anthropologists and Ar-
19-3091 110 50 60 - - -
chaeologists
19-3093 Historians 250 170 80 - - -
25-4011 Archivists 180 90 90 - - -
25-4012 Curators 150 90 60 - - -
Museum Technicians and
25-4013 430 390 40 - - -
Conservators
25-4021 Librarians 1,280 350 930 - - -
25-4031 Library Technicians 780 210 570 - - -
Audio-Visual and Multime-
25-9011 60 - 60 - - -
dia Collections Specialists
Education, Training, and
25-9099 410 210 200 - - -
Library Workers, All Other

a. Tables (ii)
SOURCE District of Columbia Employment by Occupation, 2016; HR&A Analysis of EMSI 2015 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) System data.

DC Office of Planning 186


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Employment in Cultural Occupations in Other Industries

TOTAL SELF-
EMPLOYED SELF- SELF-
CULTURAL EMPLOYED EMPLOYED
IN NON EMPLOYED EMPLOYED
EMPLOYMENT IN CULTURAL IN NON
CULTURAL (INDIVIDUAL) IN CULTURAL
BY INDUSTRIES CULTURAL
INDUSTRIES TOTAL INDUSTRIES
OCCUPATION INDUSTRIES

Library Assistants, Cler-


43-4121 550 140 410 - - -
ical
35-1011 Chefs and Head Cooks 1,430 860 570 20 - 20
EXPANDED CULTURAL
28,710 11,620 17,090 600 300 290
OCCUPATIONS
Architects, Except Land-
17-1011 2,250 1,870 380 70 20 50
scape and Naval
17-1012 Landscape Architects 80 50 30 10 - 10
Commercial and Industrial
27-1021 80 30 50 30 - 30
Designers
27-1022 Fashion Designers 40 - 40 - - -
27-1023 Floral Designers 120 - 120 - - -
27-1024 Graphic Designers 1,600 690 910 160 120 50
27-1025 Interior Designers 900 700 200 100 70 20
Merchandise Displayers
27-1026 160 60 100 10 - 10
and Window Trimmers
27-1027 Set and Exhibit Designers 210 140 70 10 - 10
27-1029 Designers, All Other 60 - 60 - - -
Radio and Television
27-3011 450 220 230 20 - 20
Announcers
Public Address System
27-3012 80 60 20 40 30 -
and Other Announcers
27-3021 Broadcast News Analysts 50 40 10 - - -
Reporters and Corre-
27-3022 2,430 1,900 530 20 10 10
spondents
Public Relations Special-
27-3031 14,900 3,700 11,200 20 - 20
ists
27-3041 Editors 3,030 1,050 1,980 70 30 40
27-3042 Technical Writers 820 180 640 20 - 20
Media and Communica-
27-3099 250 70 180 - - -
tion Workers, All Other
Camera Operators, Tele-
27-4031 vision, Video, and Motion 600 500 100 20 20 -
Picture
Media and Communica-
27-4099 tion Equipment Workers, 390 340 50 - - -
All Other
Motion Picture Projection-
39-3021 - - - - - -
ists
43-9031 Desktop Publishers 70 20 50 - - -
Camera and Photographic
49-9061 - - - - - -
Equipment Repairers
Musical Instrument Re-
49-9063 10 - 10 - - -
pairers and Tuners
Photographic Process
51-9151 Workers and Processing 130 - 130 - - -
Machine Operators

187 DC Cultural Plan


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Employment in Cultural Industries


TOTAL PRIVATE PRIVATE PUBLIC
CULTURAL SECTOR SECTOR SECTOR
EMPLOYMENT CULTURAL SELF- EMPLOYMENT
BY INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYED BY INDUSTRY

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT IN CULTURAL INDUSTRIES 89,290 76,980 3,320 12,310


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS 5,890 4,690 1,520 1,200
711120 Dance Companies 140 140 20 -

711510 Independent Artists, Writers, and Performers 1,500 1,500 1,300 -

711130 Musical Groups and Artists 160 160 40 -


711190 Other Performing Arts Companies 20 20 - -
Promoters of Performing Arts, Sports, and Similar Events
711310 1,580 1,540 30 40
with Facilities
Promoters of Performing Arts, Sports, and Similar Events
711320 320 320 40 -
without Facilities
711110 Theater Companies and Dinner Theaters 2,070 910 40 1,160
541921 Photography Studios, Portrait 80 80 30 -
541922 Commercial Photography 20 20 20 -
MUSEUMS AND HERITAGE 10,460 2,230 110 8,230
519120 Libraries and Archives 3,710 440 - 3,270
712110 Museums 5,860 900 40 4,960
712190 Nature Parks and Other Similar Institutions - - - -
712120 Historical Sites 50 50 10 -
611610 Fine Arts Schools 520 520 50 -
611630 Language Schools 320 320 10 -
BROADCAST, FILM, TELEVISION 8,350 8,350 400 -
512191 Teleproduction and Other Postproduction Services 60 60 30 -
512199 Other Motion Picture and Video Industries - - - -
515111 Radio Networks 1,510 1,510 20 -
515112 Radio Stations 690 690 20 -
515120 Television Broadcasting 2,320 2,320 70 -
512110 Motion Picture and Video Production 890 890 240 -
512120 Motion Picture and Video Distribution 20 20 - -

512131 Motion Picture Theaters (except Drive-Ins) 220 220 10 -

515210 Cable and Other Subscription Programming 680 680 10 -


519110 News Syndicates 1,960 1,960 - -
MUSIC INDUSTRY 60 60 - -
512230 Music Publishers - - - -
512240 Sound Recording Studios 30 30 - -
512290 Other Sound Recording Industries 30 30 - -
512210 Record Production - - - -
RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 5,900 5,900 160 -
813110 Religious Organizations 5,900 5,900 160 -
CULINARY ARTS 32,390 31,970 80 420
722320 Caterers 1,830 1,830 40 -
722330 Mobile Food Services 160 160 10 -
722410 Drinking Places (Alcoholic Beverages) 2,260 2,260 - -

a. T
 ables (iii)
SOURCE District of Columbia Employment by Industry, 2016; HR&A Analysis of EMSI 2015 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) data.

DC Office of Planning 188


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Employment in Cultural Industries


TOTAL PRIVATE PRIVATE PUBLIC
CULTURAL SECTOR SECTOR SECTOR
EMPLOYMENT CULTURAL SELF- EMPLOYMENT
BY INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYED BY INDUSTRY

722511 Full-Service Restaurants 28,140 27,720 30 420


BUILDING ARTS 6,380 4,050 250 2,330
541310 Architectural Services 5,700 3,370 110 2,330
541320 Landscape Architectural Services 220 220 20 -
541410 Interior Design Services 460 460 120 -
MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS 15,750 15,680 470 70
511110 Newspaper Publishers 2,380 2,310 60 70
511120 Periodical Publishers 2,120 2,120 80 -
511130 Book Publishers 190 190 30 -
511199 All Other Publishers 40 40 20 -
323111 Commercial Printing (except Screen and Books) 210 210 - -
323113 Commercial Screen Printing 10 10 - -
323117 Books Printing - - - -
323120 Support Activities for Printing - - - -
451211 Book Stores 530 530 - -
451212 News Dealers and Newsstands 40 40 - -
Internet Publishing and Broadcasting and Web Search
519130 1,070 1,070 - -
Portals
519190 All Other Information Services 140 140 - -
541430 Graphic Design Services 540 540 150 -
541490 Other Specialized Design Services 20 20 20 -
541810 Advertising Agencies 940 940 - -
541820 Public Relations Agencies 6,950 6,950 70 -
541830 Media Buying Agencies - - - -
541840 Media Representatives 20 20 - -
Agents and Managers for Artists, Athletes, Entertainers,
711410 130 130 40 -
and Other Public Figures
Blank Magnetic and Optical Recording Media Manufac-
334613 - - - -
turing
Software and Other Prerecorded Compact Disc, Tape,
334614 - - - -
and Record Reproducing
511210 Software Publishers 420 420 - -
SPORTS 3,400 3,340 300 60
711211 Sports Teams and Clubs 1,140 1,140 20 -
711212 Racetracks - - - -
711219 Other Spectator Sports 40 40 60 -
712130 Zoos and Botanical Gardens 60 - - 60
713910 Golf Courses and Country Clubs 120 120 - -
713940 Fitness and Recreational Sports Centers 2,040 2,040 220 -
SPECIALIZED RETAIL 710 710 30 -
453920 Art Dealers 90 90 - -
451110 Sporting Goods Stores 470 470 10 -
451120 Hobby, Toy, and Game Stores 120 120 20 -
451130 Sewing, Needlework, and Piece Goods Stores 20 20 - -
451140 Musical Instrument and Supplies Stores 10 10 - -

189 DC Cultural Plan


Nonprofit Cultural Organizations Serving A District Audience (Versus National) a. Tables (iv)
Small (under Count % Medium ($250,000 to Count %
Nonprofit Cultural Organiza-
$250,000) total $999,999) total
tions Serving A District Audi-
Performing Arts 66 13% Performing Arts 25 26% ence (Versus National)
Cultural/Ethnic 57 12% Museums & Museum Activ- 16 16%
Awareness ities District of Columbia Cultural Nonprofit
Organizations by Budget Size and
Historical Societies 47 10% Arts and humanities educa- 12 12% Category, 2014; analysis of 2014 Internal
and Related Activ- tion/Schools Revenue Service Data by Data Arts with
ities HR&A
Arts and humanities 34 7% Historical Societies and Re- 8 8%
education/Schools lated Activities
Arts, Cultural Organi- 33 7% Community 7 7%
zations—
Multipurpose
Theater 20 4% Support & Other 7 7%
Music 17 3% Broadcast, Media and Liter- 4 4%
ary Arts
Community 16 3% Printing, Publishing 3 3%
Film, Video 15 3% Music 2 2%
Humanities Organi- 15 3% Visual Arts Organizations 2 2%
zations
Dance 14 3% Cultural/Ethnic Awareness 2 2%
Museums & Museum 14 3% Other Art, Culture, Humani- 2 2%
Activities ties Organizations/Services
Broadcast, Media 14 3% Garden Clubs 1 1%
and Literary Arts
Visual Arts Organi- 12 2% Single Organization Support 1 1%
zations
Singing Choral 10 2% Professional Societies & 1 1%
Associations
Other 110 22% Other 5 5%
TOTAL 494 100% TOTAL 98 100%

DC Office of Planning 190


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Business Improvement District Programming, 2016 a. Tables (v)


Number of Number of
Organization Cultural/Arts Events Business Improvement District
Events Attendees
Programming, 2016
DowntownDC BID 19 300,000 -Regular programming
- Public Arts Initiative
Golden Triangle BID 130 46,000 - Golden Cinema Movie
Screening
- Outdoor summer
movie series
Georgetown BID 23 30,000
- GLOW Holiday Light
Art Exhibition
Capitol Hill BID 2 1,000 -Regular programming
Mount Vernon Triangle
31 15,000 -Regular programming
CID
- Movie Series
Adams Morgan Partner- - Adams Morgan Porch
5 35,000
ship BID Fest
- Concert Series
- Nerds in NoMa
speaker series
NoMa BID 50 28,000
- NoMa Summer
Screen
- Friday Concerts in
Yards Park
- Film Series
Capitol Riverfront BID 362 315,000
- DC Jazz Fest
- 202 Arts & Music
Festival
- Anacostia River
Festival
Anacostia BID - Anacostia Playhouse
- Anacostia Arts Center
Events
SW BID -- 16,000 -Regular programming
TOTAL 622 786,000

Largest 45% 7% 19% 6% 23%


b. Graphs (i)

Very Large 51% 2% 22% 4% 21% Average spending by


Large 42% 4% 23% 3% 27%
organization size for District-
serving organizations
Medium 37% 9% 25% 1% 31%

1% 31%
District of Columbia Cultural Nonprofit
Small 24% 16% 31%
Organizations by Budget Size and
Expenditures, 2014; analysis of
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
2014 data reported to Data Arts by
participating District of Columbia
Staff salaries & benefits Non-staff salaries & benefits Occupancy Depreciation Other Expenses cultural nonprofit organizations

191 DC Cultural Plan


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Nonprofit Cultural Organizations Serving A District Audience (Versus National) a. Tables (vi)

Very Large ($5,000,000 to Largest ($25,000,000 and Nonprofit Cultural


Large ($1,000,000 to $4,999,999)
$24,999,999) over)
Organizations Serving
Museums Museums A District Audience
Performing Arts 16 27% & Museum 10 34% & Museum 4 50% (Versus National)
Activities Activities
Arts and District of Columbia Cultural
Arts and
Humanities Performing Nonprofit Organizations by
Humanities 10 17% 6 21% 3 38%
Education/ Arts Budget Size and Category,
Education/Schools 2014; analysis of 2014
Schools
Internal Revenue Service
Historical Data by Data Arts with
Performing History
Societies and 9 15% 5 17% 1 13% HR&A
Arts Museums
Related Activities
Community 8 13% Community 4 14%
Historical
Societies
Support & Other 5 8% 2 7%
and Related
Activities
Museums & Performing
4 7% 1 3%
Museum Activities Arts Schools
Theater 1 2% Music 1 3%
Other 7 12%

TOTAL
60 100% 29 100% 8 100%
ORGANIZATIONS

b. Graphs (ii)
Largest 42% 21% 27% 2% 4% 2%2%

Very Large 25% 14% 8% 3% 5% 35% 9% Average shares of


income for District-
Large 32% 3% 13% 2% 14% 18% 18% serving cultural
organizations
Medium 21% 5% 18% 4% 19% 20% 14%

29% 17% 4% 16% 17% 15%


District of Columbia
Small 1%
Cultural Nonprofit
Organizations by Budget
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Size and Income Sources,
2014; analysis of 2014
data reported to Data Arts
Onsite Earned Revenue Other Earned Revenue Individual Giving Corporate Giving Foundation Giving Public Funding Other Contributed
by participating District
of Columbia cultural
nonprofit organizations

DC Office of Planning 192


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

University Programs a. T
 ables (vii)
Institution Students Programs offered Partnerships
Enrolled Business Improvement District
Programming - Universities
University of the 5,667 Art: Studio Art; Hosts a series of public
District Photography; Graphic events, including the (2016)
of Columbia Design JazzAlive series in
conjunction with the Felix
E. Grant Archives
American 13,061 Arts Management; Fellowships with the
University Audio Production; Kennedy
Performing Arts; Center, Strathmore
Dance; Fine Arts;
Graphic Design
Gallaudet 1,011 Art and Media Design; Provides accessible
University Theater Arts education for the hearing
impaired community; home
to a Dance troupe and the
Motion Light Lab, which
explores the intersection
of creative litera-ture and
digital technology
Howard 10,002 Fine Arts, Music, Film incubator;
University Theater Arts, Graphic Internships with the
Design; Fashion Arlington Arts Center;
Design; Digital Media Smithsonian
Arts
Corcoran 400 Digital Media Design; Through the Design
Institute at Fine Art; Music; Corps, opportu-nities to
George Theater & Dance; Fine mount design projects in
Washington Arts & Art History a number of public and
University private spaces across the
District
George 25,613 Fine Art; Art History; Film Studies Graduate
Washington Film Studies program part-ners with K
University – 12 schools
Catholic 6,699 Architecture, School Host performances at the
University of Music, School of school of Music
Arts and Sciences
Trinity University 2,164 Journalism and Media Associate of Arts at The
Studies, Art history, ARC
Fine Arts, Language
and Cultural Studies
Georgetown 4,793 Musical Culture; Art Hosts public
University History; Fine Art; performances originat-ing
Performing Arts from student and outside
work; has partnered
with local organiza-tions
to host conferences
including Building the
Music Capital

193 DC Cultural Plan


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Individual Artist Employment by Occupation, 2015 METRO AREA DC a. T


 ables (viii)
2006 - 2016 % 2006 - 2016 %
Description Change Change Individual Artist Employment by
Art Directors (4%) (6%) Occupations, 2015
District of Columbia Employment by
Craft Artists (7%) (6%) Occupation, 2016; HR&A Analysis of
Fine Artists, Including Painters, Sculptors, and Illus- (9%) (10%)
EMSI 2015 Standard Occupational
trators Classification (SOC) System data.
Multimedia Artists and Animators (3%) (7%)

Artists and Related Workers, All Other 17% -

Actors 15% 23%

Producers and Directors 0% 38%

Dancers (16%) (25%)

Choreographers - -

Music Directors and Composers 30% 40%

Musicians and Singers 26% 24%


Entertainers and Performers, Sports and Related 14% 21%
Workers, All Other
Writers and Authors 18% 79%

Photographers 56% 38%

b. Graphs (iii)
12,000
Individual Artists, DC Metro
10,000
Area (2006 - 2016)

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000
28% 26% 26% 26%
25% 26% 24% 24% 24% 24% 23%

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

DC Share of Individual Artists Metro region individual artists

DC Office of Planning 194


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Characteristics Of Common Cultural Spaces And Commercial Uses a. Tables (ix)

Cultural Space Competitive Uses Characteristics of Common


Flexible performance/event space: Convenience retail: Cultural Spaces and
• Theater or flexible event space • Chain drugstores, supermarkets, and Commercial Uses
that could support dance, theater, discount stores
music, lectures, meetings, and • Example: Walgreens Summary of Characteristics of
other events • 13,000 – 15,000 SF Cultural Space; data compiled
• 600 – 800 attendees • Real Estate Typology: Commercial
• 12,000-15,000 SF • Preferred Deal Structure Terms: 20 – 25 by HR&A from interviews with
• Real estate typology: commercial years, with 10, 5 year options brokers and developers, from public
• Physical attributes: Lobby, climate engagement conducted by Building
control, Wi-Fi, water, electricity,
loading dock Community Workshop, and from
• Location Preferences: access to past HR&A work establishing
audiences, proximity to transit and national real estate typologies.
other entertainment uses

“Hub” rehearsal facility or studio Hip destination retail:


space:
• Fashion-oriented, leisure, tourist-oriented
• Rehearsal space for artists, • Example: REI anchor store, Apple
actors, and musicians over 1 – 2 • 13,000 – 15,000 SF
floors with rehearsal, studio, and/ • Real estate typology: commercial or
or administrative space refurbished industrial
• 14,000 - 16,000 SF, containing • Preferred Deal Structure Terms: 10 year
individual studios or spaces from with 3, 5 year options, open floor plan
300 – 600 SF delivery
• Real estate typology: commercial
or moderately refurbished
industrial
• Physical attributes: Climate
control, Wi-Fi, water, electricity,
loading dock
• Location Preferences: proximity to
transit and other creatives

For-profit cabaret-style music Destination restaurant:


venue:
• Full-scale destination restaurant by local or
• For-profit cabaret-style music national operator closing by 11pm
venue, potentially with an • Example: Matchbox; Founding Farmers
adjacent restaurant and bar, • 3,000 – 5,000 SF
would extend activity through the • Real Estate Typology: Commercial
evening • Preferred Deal Structure Terms: Long term
• 3,000 – 6,000 SF lease, typically with significant capital
• 150 – 250 attendees investment in fit-out
• Real estate typology: commercial
• Physical attributes: Lobby, climate Service Retail:
control, Wi-Fi, water, electricity,
soundproofing or distance from • Example: Bank of America
nearby residents. • 5,000 – 7,000 SF
• Location Attributes: Access to • Real Estate Typology: Commercial
audiences, proximity to transit • Preferred Deal Structure: 5 - 10 year with
and other entertainment uses moderate build-out

195 DC Cultural Plan


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Characteristics Of Common Cultural Spaces And Commercial Uses


Cultural Space Competitive Uses

Small to Medium Size Gallery Convenience dining or boutique retail


space: chain:

• F or-profit or nonprofit small- to • Smaller-scale convenience dining, with


medium-size gallery space for limited seating, or chain boutique retail.
the showcasing and sale of visual • Example: Origins, MAC cosmetics,
art. Could potentially host small Starbucks, Pret a Manger
events on an occasional basis • 500 – 1,500 SF
including show openings. • Real Estate Typology: Commercial
• 300 – 1,500 SF • Preferred Deal Structure: 5 year lease with
• 50 – 100 attendees full standardized build-out
• Real estate typology: commercial
• Physical attributes: Climate
control, Wi-Fi, water, electricity
• Location Attributes: Access to
audiences, proximity to transit
and other entertainment uses

Arts Administration and Office Traditional office space or flex office


Space: space:

• O ffice space for artists and • Traditional office space for non-culturally
other cultural entrepreneurs for related small businesses and start-ups
business-related tasks, digital • Example: Small start-up offices, offices for
production, and other artistic or one to two employees on larger floorplates
cultural activities suited to an • 300 – 5,000 SF
office • Real estate typology: office
• 300 – 3,000 SF • Preferred Deal Structure: 5 year lease with
• 1 – 15 office users or employees tenant improvements
• Real estate typology: office
• Physical attributes: Wi-Fi,
climate control, water, electricity,
desk space, flexible furniture,
brainstorming space or
conference rooms, flex studio or
production space
• Location attributes: Proximity to
transit, proximity to production or
performance space

DC Office of Planning 196


I I . A P P E N D I X O F T A B L E S

Characteristics Of Common Cultural Spaces And Commercial Uses


Cultural Space Competitive Uses

Small to Medium Size Gallery Convenience dining or boutique retail


space: chain:

• F or-profit or nonprofit small- to • Smaller-scale convenience dining, with


medium-size gallery space for limited seating, or chain boutique retail.
the showcasing and sale of visual • Example: Origins, MAC cosmetics,
art. Could potentially host small Starbucks, Pret a Manger
events on an occasional basis • 500 – 1,500 SF
including show openings. • Real Estate Typology: Commercial
• 300 – 1,500 SF • Preferred Deal Structure: 5 year lease with
• 50 – 100 attendees full standardized build-out
• Real estate typology: commercial
• Physical attributes: Climate
control, Wi-Fi, water, electricity
• Location Attributes: Access to
audiences, proximity to transit
and other entertainment uses

197 DC Cultural Plan


I I I . A P P E N D I X O F E N G A G E M E N T

III. APPENDIX OF ENGAGEMENT


a. Kickoff

b. Community Conversations
i. 10/4 – SE Community Conversation
ii. 10/11 – SW Community Conversation
iii. 10/18 – NW Community Conversation
iv. 10/25 – NE Community Conversation
c. Targeted Engagement
i. Arts Organizations
ii. Youth and Educators
iii. Individual Artists and Cultural Producers

DC Office of Planning 198


I I I . A P P E N D I X O F E N G A G E M E N T

(A) KICKOFF
Held at MLK Central Library. Attended by 500 people

The Kick-off celebrated District culture by highlighting resident At the ‘Collaboration Lounge’: participants suggested that simplified
performers from diverse backgrounds and disciplines at the Martin permits would increase live music opportunities across the city.
Luther King Jr. Memorial Central Library. The planning team selected Other participants expressed desires for increased networking
the central library for this event because its status as a cultural opportunities to help form potential partnerships. Several participants
common ground for all Washingtonians. During the event, the team shared that their cultural practices would be strengthened by
gathered wide-ranging input through seven interactive stations that increased access to cultural space. Above all else, participants
encouraged creativity and open discussion. The interactive stations sought stronger relationships with the District’s cultural agencies.
framed discussions about where, how and why people engage in Specifically, participants requested more community outreach to
culture. increase awareness of the available opportunities for events and
support.
‘All the city is a stage’ used a conceptual community-building
exercise that brought participants from different backgrounds An artistic exercise called “What’s in a space?”: used a graphic
together to explore perspectives on space, community and recorder to capture rich dialogue, along with space for participants
culture. Through the exercise, participants recommended creating to sketch their own ideas. At this station, participants emphasized
space in mixed-use buildings for nonprofit and for-profit cultural the need for affordable and accessible cultural space. Participants
organizations, affordable housing including live/work space and highlighted a wide range of spaces, including black box theaters,
incorporation of arts in green spaces. They also introduced systemic textiles and fashion arts, digital media and literary art. Participants
recommendations to integrate cultural planning with transportation also emphasized preferences for co-located facilities using public
planning so that cultural space would be accessible to creators and space that is flexible, collaborative and affordable.
consumers.
The planning team synthesized volumes of input from the kick-off
The ‘Equity Atlas’ offered both digital and analog interactive mapping and four key themes emerged; cultural identity, space, partnership,
that captured and displayed the locations where participants and entrepreneurship. These themes framed the next four
engaged culture. These maps produced powerful depictions INTERMISSION DC events that were community conversations.
showing the geography of cultural activity across the District.
Participants highlighted the need for more cultural space in Wards
7 and 8. Additionally, participants emphasized that transportation,
green space and cultural networks are all interconnected. The maps
showed that people who live in the District have different cultural
needs than those who live in surrounding communities.

‘Switch Board’ was an open-ended cultural diary that enabled


participants to record their cultural narratives and share their visions
for DC’s Cultural future. Through these conversations participants
encouraged the planning team to reveal and promote the history and
culture of District residents. Participants were concerned about the
impact of rapid change on neighborhood culture and encouraged
the Plan to include strategies to reinforce African American traditions
including jazz and go-go. Participants also encouraged the Plan to
support affordable accessible cultural spaces such as libraries. They
emphasized that cultural programs should have a youth focus to
establish connections to the District’s heritage in future generations.

‘The Directors’ Salon’ invited participants to discuss their


perspectives and needs with the Directors of OP, CAH and OCTFME.
The conversations were wide ranging and included discussions on
what culture is and how it should be identified. For example, one
participant highlighted how poetry can be a force for change. Other
participants discussed challenges and funding needs, such as
cultural education, and the need for more affordable housing.

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(B) COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS


Following the kick-off meeting the planning team held four stakeholders delved into specifics regarding how to strengthen
community conversations with one in each quadrant of the District community partnerships, noting that the key is to meet creators
in the fall of 2016. Each meeting sought to capture community where they are. In a lot of cases, this means in public space such
focused discussions to help the planning team develop a better as streets and parks. “Go go is rooted in DC, it was created as
understanding of differing cultural needs across the city. However, an outdoor space.” Others suggested legitimizing cultural practices
all cultural stakeholders were encouraged to attend any meeting to that already occur and often occur in public spaces.
ensure their voice was heard. Each meeting included an aspiration
Another key theme in this conversation were concerns with the
station where participants were encouraged to post a note sharing
government’s role in supporting and permitting culture. Many
their desires for District culture. The participants rotated through a
participants raised concerns about the accessibility and equity of
series of loosely facilitated conversations on DC cultural identity,
the District’s public art funding process. Others shared systemic
entrepreneurship, partnership and space. The themes remained
challenges with permitting. Many noted that their organizations
the same for each community conversation but each engagement
and projects did not fit into the rigid application process, while
varied slightly, as the planning team refined the ‘flat’ engagement
others shared that the permitting process was difficult to navigate.
approach based on the experience with each successive event.
Participants suggested adding cultural ambassadors at DCRA to
help advance creative efforts. They recommended that the District
update programs such as the Certified Business Enterprise (CBE)
program to create more opportunities for residents to provide
creative services to the city.
(i) 10/4/2016 SE Conversation
Held in Anacostia. Attended by 40 people Through the entrepreneurship conversation participants sought
resources and guidance. “How can we make arts and culture
Participants at this conversation introduced innovative ideas to
functional? Not just entertainment. We need to support all of our
increase cultural partnership and entrepreneurship, but they also
craft. How do we monetize it and focus more on the fact that we are
emphasized that many people including creatives are under financial
not just entertainment.” “Artists are asked to work for free and they
and cultural stress. Basic human needs such as affordable housing,
shouldn’t be.” The entrepreneurship and partnership conversations
access to food and transportation were shared throughout the
had a high level of overlap. “My ideal partnership would connect
conversation. One person placed a sticker on the Aspiration Station
public and private finance, leveraging cash and in-kind resources
that read “The tastes and opinions of the very wealthy determine the
within a space to generate revenues that form a self-sustaining
course of art and culture.” There were concerns that changes and
partnership.”
growth in the city were weakening District culture. “Local artists are
not benefiting from the influx of wealth and are losing out the most.” Overall, the Southeast community conversation was difficult.
A number of participants identified race as a barrier in the city’s It exposed fundamental challenges facing many creators that
culture with one saying that “race is holding us back. Socioeconomic participants felt were exacerbated by economic growth.
strata is holding us back.” While another participant said that “go-go
music should be a major export.” “DC used to have a lot of block
parties featuring funk, punk and go-go.” “People feel that as their
neighborhood changes, their culture is being lost.”

There was a tension throughout the conversation between


increasing free and low costs access to culture and cultural space (ii) 10/11/2016 SW Conversation
while also valuing culture and creating sustainable cultural practice. Held in the Southwest Waterfront Neighborhood.
“If it’s not funded, it’s not respected.” Attended by 45 people

The partnerships conversation emphasized that informal cultural This conversation reflected the many divisions that run through the
creators need to be strengthened while formal partnerships with District’s culture, including insiders/outsiders, residents/tourists and
corporations, federal institutions, and schools should be expanded. haves/have nots. One participant put a fine point on the sentiments
Participants suggested forming partnerships that increase cultural expressed at the meeting, stating that “Gentrification is cultural
marketing, school programming and corporate giving. The genocide.” Participants said that go-go, crabs, punk, jazz, Black

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Broadway, churches, roller-skating, basketball, and high school Stakeholders in the Northwest Community Conversation shared
sports are all part of District culture. Many people called for greater that DC Culture is diverse and accessible, with more going on than
connections to cultural heritage and affordable housing. many people think. Participants emphasized music as a key part
of District culture, citing jazz, go-go, reggae, street performers and
Participants were enthusiastic about opportunities for cultural
drum circles among others. There were also deep frustrations that
entrepreneurship; however, they identified several barriers, including
Black culture in the District has changed as the city has grown. One
lack of affordable production and presentation space compounded
participant said, “the definition of DC as Chocolate City is erasure
by diminished trust in the District government. Participants also
of the Black experience.” Another person shared that the District
advanced solutions to improve cultural entrepreneurship, which one
should actively work to “preserve current business and tenants
person describes as “maintaining cultural fabric.” These solutions
to help preserve traditional Black culture.” Several participants
included “support for culture that reflects communities”, cultural
referenced concerns about displacement, high housing costs, and
incubators, exporting our culture, creating pathways for cultural
costly cultural space.
entrepreneurs, and leveraging development with offsets. Participants
encouraged more recognition of artists as small businesses and The discussion of cultural entrepreneurship drew a wide range
increased busking (street performance) opportunities. of ideas. Some were low-hanging fruit such as how-to guides,
a one-stop information and permit facility, a database for local
The entrepreneurship discussion dovetailed with the space
creators, and a space finder app targeting cultural needs. Others
conversation. Participants shared that many of the cultural spaces
introduced more complex but potentially high impact solutions,
the District helped catalyze in the early 2000s are experiencing
such as an arts tax district, a low-profit Limited Liability Corporation
significant financial hardships threatening the cultural community.
designation, and credit enhancements for cultural organizations.
There was also a recognition that there are untapped partnership
Others suggested recommendations aimed at improving innovation
opportunities between organizations seeking space and those
including entrepreneurship education, increased co-working space,
with space seeking access to funding for maintenance. Other
increased incubators and increased “areas of experimentation and
participants suggested that a capital facilities grant funding would
participation such as hackathons.” Several stakeholders expressed
be more impactful if it were offered on an ongoing basis because
that the District’s strict noise ordinance is a challenge, particularly for
needs do not always align with the annual grant cycle. Others
musicians and music venues. Others focused on helping creators
shared concerns about long-term affordability of spaces, such as
work through city processes, including permitting assistance, and
Mather Studios, that have term-limited affordability.
creating a night mayor based on models from Amsterdam, London
Some participants expressed interest in the District diversifying and Paris.
cultural expression beyond performing arts. Many other participants
The discussion around space emphasized how regulatory and cost
expressed interest in “arts as community space.” Several
barriers have created challenges for cultural creators. There was a
participants noted the need for intermediary organizations to help
concern that “Unaffordability leads to the loss of talent.” Affordability
form partnerships. While others shared that Metro accessible
was a major concern that extended to a range of cultural production
production facilities were also important. There was broad support
and presentation spaces as well as housing. Others noted that it
for using DCPS and DPR facilities for cultural use. However,
can be difficult to secure specialized cultural spaces with tools and
participants noted that DCPS has a very difficult process to navigate.
facilities needed for disciplines, such as dance or theatrical set
Additionally, participants shared that they had difficulty with the
production.
timeline and process related to the Special Events Taskforce.
There were additional concerns about access to park space for
The southwest conversation balanced the perspectives of larger
cultural use particularly National Park Service property. Participants
organizations and smaller creators, indicating that while the cultural
also introduced several ideas to address the challenges with space,
community’s needs span a wide range, the opportunities also span
including community oriented RFPs such as the OUR RFP program,
that range. This conversation introduced some particularly insightful
as well as community partnerships with the development industry.
perspectives on opportunities to increase cultural partnership.
Participants also encouraged an “information clearinghouse
for grants, space and government resources.” Several people
celebrated The Labs at MLK Library as a leading example that
should be expanded. Others suggested new funding mechanisms
such as an increased restaurant tax, a liability fund and tax breaks
for cultural space. Another participant suggested building on the
(iii) 10/18/2016 NW Community Conversation simplified street use permitting systemin Portland, Oregon.
Held in Columbia Heights. Attended by 110 people.

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Participants shared that partnerships needed to be value-added participants proposed solutions including ensuring more geographic
and innovative while based on realistic expectations. Ultimately, equity in public grant funding, dedicating underutilized public facilities
these partnerships need to bring culture to consumers. Participants in Ward 7 for cultural use. Participants highlighted the vacant Strand
experienced division between local and national serving cultural and Senator Theatres as potential opportunity sites. Participants
organizations. Several people found these divisions create emphasized that high quality, and in some cases low cost, transportation
misunderstandings and poor communications between cultural would reduce barriers for northeast residents to access more of the
organizations. One of the most interesting ideas was to structure District’s culture.
grants for large cultural organizations to encourage partnership with
“Human rights are a concern in this city, people getting pushed
smaller organizations.
out, silenced, made invisible. Therefore, arts and culture
Several other people highlighted libraries, recreation centers and organizations need to be empowered to express the local
houses of worship as widely accessible community-based cultural flavor, history, traditions, political concerns, and needs of this
facilities that could be better utilized. Some encouraged outreach place so that these communal encounters are productive for
to houses of worship while others shared that they would be more those voices. Aka not just focusing on positive, superficial
interested in using recreation centers if they could charge a fee to expressions of culture to attract ‘creative class’ of newcomers.”
profit from work at the facilities. Some participants recommended
The need for affordable housing was a top concern for many
a partnership facilitator that could be an honest broker between
participants. Some recommended dedicated, affordable artist
organizations that would support innovative partnerships. Several
housing distributed throughout the city while others expressed a
participants recommended increased cultural funding to better
broader view. “We need more affordable housing for EVERYONE,
support cultural organizations and partnerships particularly for those
not just artists. Culture belongs to and should arise from everyone.”
that breakdown “socio-economic and cultural barriers.” Participants
also encouraged the District to increase both direct partnership Many of the commenters noted that cultural programming needs
funding in addition to government financing or loans. Overall, there to focus more effort on connecting with hard to reach populations
was a sense that partnerships should be vehicles to do “something with limited English and internet access. Specifically, they noted that
new, different or unusual including the partnership itself.” many announcements are made through social media channels and
do not reach some interested residents.
The Northwest Conversation had a particularly robust emphasis
on partnership and entrepreneurship that was juxtaposed by deep Participants identified music as a key part of the city’s culture,
concerns about the impact of growth on the city. and one participant recommended “go-go incubator space, to
cultivate local musicians for indigenous jazz and blues.” They also
characterized DC Culture as rich, Blackness, independent and
survival. They shared perspectives that food is an important aspect
of their culture. “Respect the culture that is here.”

“The gap between ‘Washington’ and ‘DC’ seems to hinder


(iv) 10/25/2016 NE Community Conversation
access, physical, emotional and psychological to traditional
Held in Downtown Ward 7. Attended by 90 people.
culture. Traditional culture is looked as a thing of the past as
Participants in the Northeast Community Conversation were deeply we embrace change instead of evolution. The gap between
concerned about cultural change in DC and particularly the role of “Washington” and “DC” seems to manifest itself in legal
Black culture going forward. As a part of these concerns, participants structures like permits.”
strenuously voiced needs for affordable housing, production and
The partnerships discussion had two major veins: one focused
presentation space. For example, one participant encouraged the
on increasing the amount and diversity of public funding for
District to “fund African American legacy projects that highlight its
culture, and the other on discussing options for making cultural
unique history through life in DC.” There were specific concerns that
activities more profitable and sustainable. Many stakeholders
racism, cronyism and classism are serious threats to DC Culture.
felt that the District should increase funding for cultural grants to
“There is a cultural struggle taking place in DC that is the product of
support community cultural organizations, facilitate new types of
gentrification and development.” “There’s a concern that artists and
partnerships and new investments in communities. “Support more
creative placemaking contribute to gentrification.”
after-school programming to keep more talent from the prison-
Participants in this conversation were concerned that cultural facilities industrial complex.” Another participant recommended that the
are concentrated in a few communities while very few organizations District commercialize marijuana and incorporate a tax dedicated
or spaces serve Ward 7. Throughout the conversation, a number of to supporting culture. Cooperatives were a common theme of the

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partnerships conversation. One participant encouraged the Plan organization representing a diverse array of cultural organizations
to support “cooperatively owned resources including supplies and across the District. The partnership leveraged Arts Action’s membership
housing.” which includes many of the District’s leading cultural organizations.

Indoor and outdoor creative space was highlighted by Ward 7 Participants shared that cultural entrepreneurs need more tools,
stakeholders seeking more access to a wide range of spaces. There including “doing business guides”, marketing assistance and access
was also an emphasis on inexpensive spaces, such as Busboys to public facilities such as schools. In addition to these themes,
and Poets, that empower creators to experiment and take risks. For access to cultural space and improved permitting emerged as leading
outdoor spaces, the costs and complexity of permits was a significant opportunities to improve cultural entrepreneurship. Some participants
concern for many. Participants who had organized outdoor events suggested creating linkages with real estate development that produce
shared that DDOT’s requirement to pay meter revenue for all new cultural space. Others suggested building on national and
affected meters had proven prohibitively expensive. Others shared international models of cultural finance, such as the Inter-American
that the NPS process was difficult and time consuming to navigate. Cultural Bank or the Baltimore Arts Reality Corporation. Another theme
throughout this conversation was a need for capacity building, such
Participants shared that entrepreneurship would benefit from easier
as incubator space to help small creators scale up. Throughout the
access to space and increased technical assistance. Increased
conversation there was a discussion on how cultural entrepreneurs
access to grants, startup funding and cultural business development
should relate to the District’s economy. Some suggested the value of
funds were identified as opportunities. Many participants
culture needed to be connected with costs of living and doing business
emphasized that cultural entrepreneurship should be introduced
in the District by partnering with the development industry, pooling
in school by teaching techniques, such as grant writing, in high
resources and using an economic development model focusing on
schools. The conversation was marked by a pervasive concern that
returns. Others emphasized that cultural entrepreneurship requires
something needs to be done and it needs to be done now. “The
different approaches for nonprofit and for-profit organizations.
city needs to change the cultural space paradigm—there will be
a mass exodus of artists soon.” One participant shared a concern The Cultural Space conversation centered on issues and opportunities
that “nonprofit and for-profit cultural organizations are getting away related to divisions in the District’s culture, including race, age, tenure
from audience desires.” “Create an arts ambassador that makes it in the District, geographic, arts and heritage, and federal/local. The
easier to navigate space.” Participants encouraged the city to “make federal/local division was prominent theme throughout the conversation,
it easier for incubators and co-ops to purchase space.” where one commentator shared that “Local culture is overshadowed
by federal culture and that is part of our culture.” Discussion of race and
The Northeast conversation was passionate and wide ranging
cultural change were also key themes characterized by a participant
with emphasis on the desire for more facilities in Ward 7 and more
who shared that “artswashing is being used by developers to profit
broadly the opportunities for the District government to support
from the image of artists while pricing them out of the space.” “As an
culture.
artist, the most painful thing is having a voice.” These sentiments align
with another comment that the “things and people that define DC’s
identity are closing or moving to the suburbs.”

Participants recognized these divisions as opportunity areas to bring


the District together around unifying traditions such as go-go. One
(C) TARGETED ENGAGEMENT participant suggested that the “District should build a cultural brand
to direct audience energy.” Participants also suggested that creating
In addition to the community conversations, the planning team partnered
community culture guides to educate, preserve and share community
with leading cultural organizations to host a series of INTERMISSION
history, as well as spaces to grow local culture, could help close gaps in
DC events designed to be more focused on key components of the
our culture. Another participant shared that we need to breakdown the
creative community.
perception that “arts are elite and not for everyone.”

The partnerships conversation focused on the need for partnership


infrastructure. There was extensive conversation about the need
(i) 11/14/2016 Arts Organizations
for tools such as a maintained database of cultural organizations,
Held at Arena Stage. Attended by 150 people.
partnership models and in person networking opportunities. There were
In November 2016, the planning team partnered with Arts Action DC to concerns that partnerships are limited by brand confusion or dilution,
host an INTERMISSION DC event focused on cultural identity, space, as well as challenges related to funding and legal issues. Participants
partnership and entrepreneurship. Arts Action DC is an arts advocacy expressed a deep and genuine interest in strengthening District culture
through increased partnerships that encourage small organizations to

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join forces to realize opportunities available to larger organizations. themselves. “If your school doesn’t have a program, you get stuck.”
Several participants thought partnership workshops would help While another student suggested a “science fair for the arts” could help
different types of organizations develop common language and establish connections between interests and professions.
expectations, particularly regarding planning time and funding models.
Several students expressed desires for forums to discuss
Many participants envisioned a more robust cultural organization
uncomfortable and difficult issues associated with adolescence such
database that provides model partnership agreements that would help
as sexual identity, race and inequity among other issues. They felt that
cultural organizations align programming to reduce duplicated efforts.
art and cultural opportunities would provide critical venues for these
One stakeholder recommended the Boston Choral Consortium as a
discussions. The students suggested innovative ideas, including arts
potential model to replicate in the District.
hackathons, opportunities for shared programming across schools and
Throughout the conversation participants shared that one of their low-cost out-of-schoolopportunities to increase the range of programs
greatest challenges is local culture being overshadowed by federal available to students. They also suggested programs that offer low or
culture. They encouraged the planning team to seek strategies no cost extra-curricular opportunities for students to take introductory
that elevate neighborhood culture and promote District culture classes, including instrument lessons and art to help students explore
as a collection of community cultures. Arts Action members also a greater range of practices.
encouraged the District government to seek more opportunities to
Students expressed that District culture is defined by go-go, slang,
increase cultural exposure for youth in and out of school. Members
fashion and the Black Lives Matter movement. There were desires
emphasized that access to affordable space was a key challenge,
for increased dance, music and visual art opportunities, as well as
and they recommended lowering cost and permitting barriers for
better advertising for theater events and programs that reach students
using public space and facilities. Arts Action thought that partnerships
without personal computer access. “Art is part of culture but also food
were under-utilized and that more networking opportunities and better
and fashion.”
information sharing would make a big difference.
The educators focused their discussions on two primary themes
connecting students to cultural career paths and increasing cultural
exposure for students. Educators noted that barriers created during
segregation still impact District youth of color. “Segregation has a lasting
(ii) 12/15/2016 Youth and Educators impact on how welcome some people feel in museums and other
Held at the Kennedy Center attended by 55 people. cultural spaces.” They shared experiences where parents did not feel
comfortable accompanying their children on field trips to Smithsonian
At the Youth and Educators, INTERMISSION DC students and
museums because the parents did not feel like they had the required
educators from DCPS and charter schools came together at the
wardrobe and/or education. The educators went on to share that these
Kennedy Center for a conversation about what holds them back and
experiences highlight larger barriers tied to the District’s long standing
what would help them succeed. Students and educators had separate
racial and wealth inequities.
facilitated conversations, capturing their unique points of view.
The educators were classroom teachers and representatives from Many educators shared that the costs associated with a cultural visit
arts organizations who work in schools. They focused on systemic were prohibitive for many of their students. Even visits to museums
opportunities such as increased funding, transportation and career with free entry can be difficult for many families considering the costs of
readiness. Students expressed desires for increased opportunities for metro fare and lunch at the museum. This was a particularly significant
cultural career paths and cultural programs. concern for field trips where students from lower-income households
can feel left out. To address these challenges, the educators suggested
The students felt that arts and culture were not priorities, noting that
increasing low-cost and free transportation for families, bringing more
many peers had unmet desires for more access to cultural programs,
cultural programming to schools and communities, and forming bridges
and that many of the offerings for students were not aligned with their
between popular culture and traditional culture. “Make cultural space
interests. One participant poignantly stated “Our voices matter.” The
less bougie!” “Larger institutions need to provide programming that is
students offered some exciting solutions, including more community
culturally relevant to a wide variety of groups.”
based cultural programing at the places they already visit, such
as Boys and Girls Clubs. They also suggested that more access to Partnerships were another theme in the educator discussions where
pre-professional programs that teach skills such as modeling and interest in increased cultural resources both in school and out-of-school
graphic design would help them convert their interests into careers. were a priority. They highlighted ideas such as artists in residence
The students also sought more mentorship opportunities along with and partnerships with innovative organizations such as FAB LAB.
access to space to perform to help them develop capacity to express Educators also suggested that a centrally located youth arts facility

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would be exceptionally helpful for achieving stronger outcomes. Many participants shared that most outdoor spaces are either
controlled by the National Park Service or Business Improvement
This INTERMISSION DC was particularly powerful because the
Districts (BIDs) and that each presents major challenges. Many
students who participated represented a broad cross-section of cultural
participants found the National Park Service processes to be slow,
experience in the city and introduced challenging but tangible insights.
cumbersome and uncertain. Others found BID controlled space to be
The educators’ systemic view highlighted the private struggles from
prohibitively expensive to use costing $5,000 to $10,000 to rent for
many different families while also emphasizing the impact that more
an event. Participants were enthusiastic about increased access to
affluent parents offer through volunteer grant writing and financial
DCPL and DPR facilities for cultural uses but many noted that current
contributions.
processes such as requiring a cashier’s check three days in advance
create barriers for some organizations.

Across these discussions a number supporting needs were identified,


including parking for cultural creators and consumers, an easier
permitting process, tools and policy supporting cultural space
purchase, and predictable funding. Participants introduced a range of
(iii) 3/9/2017 Individual Artists and Cultural
suggestions for supporting cultural space purchase, including crating
Producers
a tenant purchase program, increased public funding, social impact
Held at the Hamiltonian Gallery and attended by 90 people
investing, and dedicated public outdoor public space.
The Individual Artists and Cultural Producers INTERMISSION DC was
The Individual Artists INTERMISSION DC emphasized that individual
an open house event where participants were encouraged to come
artists are under pressure and would benefit from increased access to
and share their perspectives with the planning team. The event was
networking, production space and presentation spaces.
less structured than the four community conversations emphasizing
opportunities for the artists and cultural producers to speak directly with
the Directors from OP, CAH and OCTFME.

Cultural space was the biggest topic of conversation at this


INTERMISSION DC. The event covered a wide range of issues
and opportunities, including preservation of existing cultural space,
affordability of new cultural space, access to outdoor space,
transportation access, and capacity building.

Access to cultural production space was a significant theme of the


conversation where participants suggested nonprofit space providers
and property tax relief. Others noted that cultural space created in new
developments often comes with strings attached. One commenter
shared that “Production space needs privacy, accessibility.” Along
these lines, there was a significant amount of discussion about the
role of public-private-partnerships for culture that revolved around a
mix of enthusiasm and skepticism. Numerous participants championed
the Artspace Lofts as a leading model for creating affordable cultural
space and housing. One stakeholder suggested that “need based
solutions, not processes, should be implemented that create a network
of Artspace buildings.” Still others encouraged a cautious approach
to public-private-partnerships noting that artists’ objectives might be
compromised. One stakeholder made this point by saying “What’s often
missing from public-private-partnership models is a non-governmental
organization. The Brookland Artspace Lofts work because Artspace
served as the facilitator.” Other commenters advanced the Blind Whino
and the Baltimore Arts Reality Corp as models for creating sustainable
cultural space.

Access to outdoor space was another major theme of conversation.

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IV. APPENDIX OF CULTURAL PROGRAMS


a. Existing Resources for Cultural Creators
i. DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH)
ii. Office of Cable Television, Film, Music, and Entertainment (OCTFME)
iii. DC Public Schools (DCPS)
iv. DC Public Libraries (DCPL)
v. Department of Small and Local Business Development (DSLBD)
vi. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA)
vii. Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD)
viii. Department of Public Works
ix. DC Office of Planning (OP)
x. DC Historic Preservation Office (HPO)
xi. Cross Cutting Organizations
xii. Federal Organizations and Institutions
b. Existing Resources for Cultural Space
i. Deputy Mayors for Planning and Economic Development (DMPED)
ii. District Department of Transportation (DDOT)
iii. DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH)
iv. Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD)
v. DC Public Libraries (DCPL)
vi. Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR)
vii. DC Public Schools (DCPS)
viii. District Department of General Services
ix. DC Office of Planning (OP)
x. Federal Network
xi. Cross Cutting Organizations
c. Existing Resources for Cultural Space
i. DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (CAH)
ii. DC Public Libraries (DCPL)
iii. Cross Cutting Organizations
iv. Federal Organizations and Institutions

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(A) EXISTING RESOURCES FOR CULTURAL CREATORS


(i) DC Commission on the Arts and Projects, Events or Festivals: Supports projects, events and festivals
to promote arts and humanities activities to DC residents.
Humanities (CAH)
Sister Cities Grant: Supports arts and humanities projects that
CAH grants are a leading resource to the District’s Creators.
foster cultural exchange and diplomacy between the District of
Despite funding pressures, granting has remained consistent at
Columbia and DC’s Sister Cities.
approximately $10 million annually. The Commission makes grants
available to support individual artists, arts organizations, humanities UPSTART: The UPSTART Program is the signature capacity
organizations, cultural education, cultural facilities improvements, building program of the DC Commission on the Arts and
capacity building and cultural exchange with other communities. Humanities. UPSTART assists established DC-based arts and
humanities nonprofit organizations with significant programmatic
General Operating Support: Offers general operating support to
functions that face operational and infrastructure challenges and
nonprofit arts, humanities and arts education organizations whose
financial limitations that prevent organizational and programmatic
primary focus is in one or more of the following areas: dance, design,
sustainability. This program is for organizations with annual
folk and traditional arts, literature, media arts, music, theater, visual
expenses above $250,000.
arts or any of the other disciplines, such that its total activities
and/or services are concentrated on and devoted to the arts and LiftOff: The LiftOff program is a capacity building program for
humanities and/or arts education. organizations with less than $250,000 in annual expenses. The
program provides funding for a capacity building project and peer
General Operating Support (Service Organization Cohort):
coaching with a grantee cohort.
Offers general operating support to nonprofit arts, humanities,
and arts education service organizations whose primary mission Field Trip Experiences: Supports arts and humanities organizations
is to provide specialized services which can include professional to offer comprehensive field trip experiences for students in the
development, technical assistance, networking opportunities, District’s public schools. The scope of the grant includes the cost
shared operational services, printed materials, and/or research to of field trip tickets and associated transportation costs, professional
Washington, DC-based arts and humanities organizations. development opportunities for classroom educators and the
provision of pre-and post-field trip workshops for students.
Public Art Building Communities: Supports the creation and
installation of permanent or temporary public artwork that enhances Facilities and Buildings: Supports projects related to the
District neighborhoods. improvement or purchase of facilities operated by nonprofit arts and
humanities organizations.
Arts and Humanities Fellowship Set: Supports individual artists,
teaching artists and humanities professionals who significantly Art Bank: Supports visual artists and art galleries in the Washington
contribute to the arts and humanities and substantially impact the metropolitan area by acquiring fine artwork to expand the District’s
lives of DC residents through excellence in the arts and humanities. Art Bank Collection, a growing collection of moveable works funded
through the Art in Public Places Program. Works in this collection are
Arts and Humanities Education Projects: Supports in-school and
owned by CAH and loaned to other District government agencies for
out-of-school-time arts and humanities programs for children and
display in public areas within government buildings.
youth in pre-school through high school settings. The grant also
supports professional development opportunities in the arts and Curatorial Grant: The Curatorial Grant Program aims to provide
humanities for classroom educators. a greater opportunity for the development and public presentation
of visual art exhibitions by District resident curators. Through grant
East of the River: The East of the River (EOR) grant provides
support and access to a contemporary exhibition space, CAH
access to high-quality arts and humanities experiences for DC
intends to serve the District’s residents by presenting compelling
residents who live east of the Anacostia River. Activities may be
exhibition concepts of resident curators.
programs or projects that include, but are not limited to, dance,
design, folk and traditional arts, literature, media arts, music, theater
and visual arts. Funding may be used to support operational and
programmatic costs directly related to the East of the River activities
described in the application.

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CAH Share of Total Applications and Awards by Ward, 2017


Ward 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

% of Total Applications 18 18% 10% 11% 14% 15% 6% 8%

% of Total Applications Awarded 75 69% 72% 57% 62% 71% 53% 57%

% of Total Awards 20 19% 11% 10% 14% 16% 5% 7%

% of Total Funds Awarded 21 36% 8% 3% 7% 16% 3% 6%

(ii) Office of Cable Television, Film, Music Public Access Television: OCTFME provides 24-hour informative,
open government and public interest programming on three channels:
and Entertainment (OCTFME)
the District Council Channel (DCC), District of Columbia Network
The DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment (DCN), and the District Knowledge Network (DKN). Programming
(OCTFME) is one of the most important sources of District Cultural includes coverage of the activities of Executive Offices of the Mayor
Investment. OCTFME implemented Mayor Bowser’s 202Creates and the executive branch; the District of Columbia City Council, the
Initiative by crafting a unifying brand that has been embraced by the Office of the Attorney General, and the State Board of Education.
creative community. 202Creates promotes and celebrates the work OCTFME provides transparent public access to the governmental
of local creatives and adds needed marketing support to the creative process and insights into life in the District. OCTFME is dedicated to
economy. Through a robust marketing and promotional campaign, providing quality, diverse programming and services that educate,
202Creates amplifies creative residents and organizations whose enlighten, and empower the residents of the District of Columbia.
day-to-day investment in the DC community energizes restaurants,
202 Creative Co-working Days: OCTFME welcomes creatives to
music venues, galleries and pop up shops. To date, 202Creates
their office to work, collaborate, network and meet with government
has worked with 233 local partner organizations and 10 partner
representatives. This is an opportunity for creatives to connect
agencies and those numbers are growing.
with Government services and other creative service organizations
Creative Economy Career Access Program (CECAP) program: eager to support DC Creatives. OCTFME has hosted four co-
An on-the-job training program offering underserved District of working days, welcoming roughly 80 creatives to date.
Columbia residents an opportunity to receive the training, experience
Film Incentive Fund: This fund supported 12 projects with budgets
and job placement support required to establish sustainable careers
of $250,000 and above in FY16. This fund has been a strong asset
in the creative economy. Local employer partners that work in the
to the portfolio of funding opportunities for the local film and media
media, creative, or technology segment of the economy agree to
organizations.
take on District residents from an underserved community as a
trainee/apprentice for 12-months. The 12-month period includes a OCTFME Sponsorship Fund: supports a diverse range of
combination of on-site work experience with the employer partner a projects from festivals to small film projects, photography exhibits
training curriculum funded by the District government. The training and creative tech activities, supported over 43 organizations and
program that teaches entry-level media and creative technology skill activities working within the creative economy in FY16.
sets designed to supplement the on-the-job experience trainees
gain through the program.

DC Radio: OCTFME operates DC Radio 96.3 HD4, the District of (iii) DC Public Schools (DCPS)
Columbia’s first and official government radio station, in partnership The DCPS Arts curriculum—the Framework for Arts Learning—
with Howard University’s WHUR. The station’s programming sets out a vision for arts education in DCPS. This vision includes
enhances the quality of life for District residents by broadcasting creating a forum to discuss arts education across disciplines as a
vital information, sharing programming on emergency and non- space for exploring and investigating universal human themes. The
emergency services and alerts, and providing community and curriculum provides flexibility in execution to account for the range
government affairs programming. In addition, DC Radio 96.3 HD4 of environments in which students are educated, the Framework for
provides a media literacy training platform for DC residents and Arts Learning makes clear expectations for the student experience
students. in an arts learning environment, defining the role of the teacher as a

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facilitator and the student as a creator. media arts labs and seven schools with digital cameras to begin
photography programs. In the 2014-15 school year, DCPS Arts
Students’ experiences in DCPS Arts include opportunities for critical
developed a digital imaging project-based curricular resource and
thinking and building digital literacy at early ages. Students are
partnered with the Hirshhorn Museum to provide a professional
offered a variety of arts instruction across all grades. In each grade
development series to 20 teachers focused on project-based
and across the District, students have the opportunity to create,
learning in digital imaging and manipulation. DCPS Arts will continue
perform, respond and connect to works in a range of arts disciplines.
to support the growth of media integration. In the 2016-17 school
Elementary school: Students receive a minimum of 45 minutes of year, DCPS Arts created digital media labs in two high schools to
music and visual arts instruction each week and, through partners support the generative development of digital integration in music
and local schools, have opportunities to experience museums and and visual arts programs.
performances throughout the city.
Partnerships: At both the district and school level, DCPS Arts
DC Keys - a collaboration with Washington Performing Arts and partners with a broad range of organizations to bring exceptional
launched in 2017, DC Keys is the elementary instructional model arts experiences to students both in and out of the classroom.
that places the keyboard as the central instrument of instruction in Partners include: Washington Performing Arts, the Kennedy Center,
DCPS music classrooms. the Washington Ballet, Young Playwright’s Theater, the Smithsonian
institution, Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, Yamaha.
Middle school: Students receive a minimum of one semester of
instruction in both music and visual art each year.

EverydayDC - a collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis (iv) DC Public Library (DCPL)
reporting, EverydayDC is a digital visual literacy program in middle
grades program that provides students with experience as a Digital Commons: The Digital Commons is located on the first
photojournalist and asks them to take control of their own narrative. floor of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library. It houses more
The program culminates in a student-curated citywide exhibition. than 70 public access computers, the Digital Commons is not just
a computer lab: It offers four computers loaded with software like
High school: Students are required to take a minimum of a half the Adobe Creative Suite; access to tools like an Espresso Book
credit in both music and visual art. To fulfill that requirement, Machine; and enhanced meeting rooms and gathering spaces
students are able to choose from the following (based on local aimed at encouraging creation and innovation.
school availability):
Dream Lab: The Dream Lab is a collaborative, shared space for
Music – General Music, From Bach to Rap, Concert Band I, Concert small organizations, groups and individuals using technologies to
Choir I develop and sustain new ventures.
Visual Art – Art, Imaging, Ceramics, Sculpture, Drawing & Painting, Fab Lab: The Fabrication Lab or "Fab Lab" offers programs for all
Cinematic Arts ages. It includes fabrication tools such as a Laser Cutter, 3-D Printer,
Afterschool Programs: DCPS afterschool programs allow Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machines, and DIWire.
students to participate in academic and extracurricular enrichment Studio Lab: The Studio Lab offers spaces and programs for District
activities and to develop new hobbies and skills. DCPS teachers, residents of all ages. The Studio Lab has three rooms: Digital
paraprofessionals, and community-based organizations provide a Production Lab, Main Production Studio, Video and Photo Editing
variety of unique programming options to students. Suite. These spaces enable residents to produce and share original
Turnaround Arts: DC: In 2015, DCPS was selected by the content.
President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities to become a Memory Lab: The Memory Lab provides equipment for digitizing
Turnaround Arts site. Turnaround Arts is a model that uses the arts home movies and scanning photographs and slides. You can also
as a key lever in turning around struggling schools. Beginning in take classes and find resources for your personal archiving needs.
2012, Savoy Elementary School participated as a pilot school in the
program. In 2015, four new schools began the three-year program.
The participating schools include: Bunker Hill, Moten, Noyes and (v) Department of Small And Local Business
Turner Elementary Schools.
Development (DSLBD)
Digital Media Arts: In 2013, DCPS Arts began the development
DSLBD supports the development, economic growth and retention
and integration of a media arts curriculum within the broader arts
of District-based businesses and promotes economic development
curriculum. In the first year, DCPS provided four schools with
throughout the District's commercial corridors. Many performers,

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particularly cultural entrepreneurs are also small and local (DHCD) works to produce and preserve opportunities for affordable
businesses. The District Department of Small and Local Business housing and economic development in communities across the
Development (DSLBD) has several programs that provide support District; while revitalizing underserved communities. DHCD does
and technical assistance designed to help cultural entrepreneurs this by preserving and producing the supply of quality affordable
succeed. housing, increasing home ownership and revitalizing neighborhoods
promoting community development and providing economic
Simple Steps to Business for the Creative Entrepreneur: DSLBD
opportunities.
has partnered with the Service Core of Retired Executives (SCORE)
to offer a 5-week training course for creative entrepreneurs, targeting Housing Production Trust Fund: The HPTF is a permanent,
creative economy industries. revolving fund organized and administered to facilitate the creation
of affordable housing and related activities for District residents,
Center for Entrepreneurial Education and Development:
through the provision of financial assistance to eligible nonprofit and
Serves entrepreneurs and organizations seeking to grow, providing
for-profit developers.
information about how to access capital, develop marketing tools
including websites, free legal advice and classes to refine proposal Housing Resource Center: This is the District of Columbia's free
or grant writing skills. The Center also offers one on one technical affordable housing listing and search engine, where you can find
training for up and coming organization or business leaders. everything from accessible homes to affordable rental and for-sale
homes. Users can also find helpful resources such as renter's rights
Made in DC Program: Made in DC supports businesses who
information, assistance programs and an affordability calculator.
produce and make their products completely in DC. The program
offers a community of support (networking events, workshops, etc.) Housing Counseling Services: DHCD’s partner network of
for local producers, as well as access to DSLBD resources. Made Community Based Organizations (CBOs) provides counseling
in DC businesses also benefit from marketing and promotion efforts services and training to tenants, potential homeowners and current
to build awareness for their products. Over 150 local businesses homeowners. Specific topics include foreclosure prevention
receive financial and business support through the Made in DC or mitigation, credit counseling, home/budget management,
program. Registration is a simplified process requiring that a homebuyers clubs and relocation, applying for program assistance,
business be located in the District, have a business license and managing the home purchase process, homeowner training,
employ a majority of employees must be District residents. apartment locating and other services that assist residents with
housing needs.

Renter assistance is also provided to aid tenants in understanding


(vi) Department of Consumer And Regulatory their rights and responsibilities, including issues such as potential
Affairs (DCRA) displacement, rental/eviction counseling and ongoing apartment
DCRA is responsible for regulating construction and business management. Workshops are offered by CBO partners on a regular
activity in the District of Columbia. To protect consumers, DCRA basis throughout the month and one-on-one counseling is available
registers corporations, inspects weighing and measuring devices by appointment.
used for monetary profit and issues business licenses, professional Affordable Dwelling Unit Program: Through this program DHCD
licenses, building permits, special events permits. monitors and enforces compliance with requirements to provide
Small Business Resource Center: The Resource Center strives or maintain Affordable Dwelling Units (ADUs) in the District of
to make it easier to start a business in the District. DCRA launched Columbia. Affordable Dwelling Unit is an umbrella term applied to the
its new Small Business Resource Center (SBRC) to provide training for-sale and for-rent homes that are locally restricted for occupancy
and consultation services to customers seeking more information by households whose income falls within a certain range and are
related to DCRA services. The existing Business Permitting Center generally offered at a below-market rate. ADUs do not include
(BPC) and Business Licensing Center (BLC) are transactional housing that is federally restricted or developments funded through
in nature whereas, the new SBRC will provide direct business Housing Production Trust Fund. ADUs are generally produced in
education services with the theme of navigating the District’s exchange for zoning relief, tax incentives, public financing and/or
regulatory environment. the right to purchase or lease District-owned land.

Inclusionary Zoning Housing Program: The District’s Inclusionary


(vii) Department of Housing and Community
Zoning (IZ) Program requires 8–10% of the residential floor area
Development (DHCD) be set-aside for affordable units in new residential development
The District Department of Housing and Community Development projects of 10 or more units; and rehabilitation projects that are
expanding an existing building by 50% or more and adding 10 or

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more units. DHCD disposes of IZ units through a lottery process.

Development Finance: DHCD's Development Finance (x) DC Historic Preservation Office (HPO)
Division (DFD) provides funding for the development of rental,
homeownership and community facility developments that serve The HPO housed within the Office of Planning has a preservation
District of Columbia neighborhoods. As both the creation and planning program that produces the State Historic Preservation
preservation of affordable housing units are important to DHCD, Plan that that guides HPO programs and community preservation
DFD plays a prominent role in helping the agency achieve its annual activities. HPO also produces Ward Heritage Guides that highlight
multifamily housing production goals. unique local cultural environments across District. HPO partners
with community cultural organizations including Humanities DC, the
Tenant Opportunity to Purchase: DHCD provides financial and
Preservation League, Archeology in the Community, the Historical
technical assistance to tenant groups that are threatened with
Society of Washington DC and many other community heritage
displacement due to the sale of their apartment building. DHCD
organizations.
provides seed money, earnest money deposits and acquisition
assistance to tenant groups that are threatened with displacement DC Community Heritage Project: Local voices are emerging
due to the sale of their apartment building. With DHCD’s assistance, through the DC Community Heritage Project, a ten-year partnership
the tenant groups are able to purchase the building and convert between HPO and Humanities DC. Each year, participating
the units into cooperatives or condominiums. More than 1,000 units professionals present two educational symposia on topics of interest
have been preserved as affordable housing since FY 2002. This to preservation newcomers. The program also awards grants of up
program not only helps residents avoid displacement, but it also to $2,500 to local groups for projects that build familiarity with DC’s
helps them become homeowners. community heritage. Grant recipients showcase their projects at an
open community forum each December.
Property Acquisition and Disposition Division: The
Property Acquisition and Disposition Division (PADD) stabilizes The heritage project emphasizes grass-roots organizing and
neighborhoods by decreasing the number of vacant and abandoned youth participation in recording local history. Innovative ideas are
residential properties in the District and transforming vacant and/or welcomed to push the envelope of traditional historic preservation
abandoned residential properties into homeownership opportunities concerns. The neighborhood brochures, oral histories, videos and
or District of Columbia residents at all income levels. other project products are available on the Humanities DC website.

Local History Programs: The Historic Preservation Office promotes


DC history projects through public engagement and partnerships
(viii) Department of Public Works with community organizations. Some examples include, the Cultural
Murals DC: This program is collaboration between the DC Commission Tourism Heritage Trails, DC Historic Alley Building Survey, Historic
on the Arts and Humanities and the Department of Public Works Farms and Estates Survey and History Quest, an interactive GIS
(DPW). The program began in 2007 to combat the growing trend of map that provides historical data on approximately 127,000 extant
illegal graffiti and reduce urban blight. DPW seeks owners of chronically buildings in Washington, DC.
graffitied walls, or who are located in areas where graffiti is likely, who Preservation Grants: District of Columbia community groups,
would like to donate wall space for this free program. MuralsDC has organizations, and nonprofits are eligible to apply for preservation
been extremely effective in ending the cycle of tagging. Through this grants from two grant-making entities—the Humanities Council of
program 43 artists have produced murals. Washington, DC, and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
The Humanities Council of Washington DC program has provided
grants “to support community leaders interested in preserving the
(ix) Office of Planning (OP) history, architecture, and collective memory of their neighborhoods.”
Grants of up to $2,500 focus on community heritage or historic
Comprehensive Plan: OP develops and manages the District’s
preservation through an intensive four-month grant period (June
Comprehensive Plan which is a 20-year framework that guides
through October) resulting in a tangible product.
future growth and development. It addresses a wide range of topics
that support performers including housing, urban design, economic The DC Preservation League's Preservation Initiatives (PI) Grant
development, and arts and culture. Program provides matching grants to individuals and nonprofit
organizations for preservation planning, research, outreach/
Community Planning: OP works with community stakeholders to
education, and bricks and mortar projects related to historic and
develop small area plans that guide community investment and real
cultural sites. These grants are intended to help stimulate public
estate development. Based on community consensus, these plans
discussion, introduce the public to preservation concepts and
can create space and partnerships that support performers.

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techniques, make technical expertise accessible, and encourage Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA):
partnerships. WMATA’s MetroPerforms, recruits musicians to be placed in various
Metrorail stations.
(xii) Cross-Cutting Organizations
Washington DC Economic Partnership: The Washington DC
DC Collaborative: The Collaborative provides professional Economic Partnership supports local entrepreneurs through
development opportunities for educators and other collaborative mentorship, conferences, and partnership development.
members. These opportunities are open to all teachers and members
creating collaborative, high-quality, effective pathways for teaching
DC students through DC's arts and humanities organizations—
(xiii) Federal Organizations and Institutions
providing additional knowledge and tools for resilient, lifelong-
learners through the arts and humanities. Kennedy Center: The Kennedy Center offers a range of programs
for performers including their youth ambassadors program and the
Humanities DC: The Soul of the City youth leadership program
Institute for Arts Management. These programs along with masters
uses the city of Washington and its unique neighborhoods and
classes offer District residents unique opportunities to gain invaluable
culture as a classroom. Each year, in partnership with the Summer
experience at one of the Nation’s leading Arts Centers.
Youth Employment Program, Humanities DC takes students on
neighborhood tours where they meet with scholars, interview Hirshorn: ARTLAB+ at the Hirshhorn is a radically inclusive, free
residents, take photographs, and create a final media project after-school digital arts program for teenagers between 13 and 19. In
documenting the entire experience. addition to providing access to professional technology equipment,
art-making tools, and art materials, ARTLAB+ connects teens to
Humanities DC sponsors Humanities a monthly humanities
artist mentors who support them in their creative pursuits. Through
conversation held in bars and restaurants across the city. They also
collaboration and a range of special programs, participants strengthen
host CulturalCapital.com a marketing and communications outlet for
their critical thinking skills and learn to express themselves creatively.
Greater Washington’s arts and culture sector. The HumanitiesDC
The mission of ARTLAB+ is to give teens the opportunity to develop the
Job Bank, a job posting database for Greater Washington’s arts and
marketable technological skills they need to lead the next generation of
culture sector.
innovators. Participants explore, tinker, and experiment with a variety
Washington Performing Arts: Washington Performing Arts helps of media and are given the chance to use professional video and
youth and adults develop their practice with an emphasis on music. photo gear, music and recording equipment, and other resources to
They provide masters classes, in school education, and youth produce video games, graphic designs, and 3D designs, as well as
summer programs. other creative projects.

Washington Project for the Arts: Washington Project for the Arts Folklife Festival: The Folklife Festival features an average of 350
(WPA) is an artist-centered catalyst for the creation and presentation cultural producers annually and provides important talent development
of contemporary art supporting visual artists at all stages of their in the form of over 100 internships each year to support the Festival’s
careers. production.

Transformer: Transformer's mission is to provide a consistent,


supportive, and professional platform for emerging artists to explore
and present experimental artistic concepts, build audiences for
(i) Deputy Mayors For Planning And
their work and advance their careers, while increasing dialogue, Economic Development (DMPED)
understanding, and audiences for contemporary visual arts. Great Streets Small Business Grants: Since 2006, the District has
Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts: There are many other provided competitive reimbursable grants of up to $50,000 for small
organizations that also provide support such as University legal businesses to improve interior space and facades. The goal of the
clinics and Washington Area Lawyers for the Arts (WALA). WALA is program is to foster economic development through the retention
a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides access to education, and support of existing small businesses and the attraction of new
advocacy and legal services through workshops and seminars, businesses to targeted commercial and retail corridors. The initiative
legal clinics and pro-bono referral services for creatives and cultural has awarded millions to small businesses and retail developers and
organizations. WALA has partnered with CAH in the past to present has invested over $100 million in streetscape improvements along
workshops and series on artist professional development. The the District’s 13 Great Streets corridors.
organization’s offerings include its “The Basics” courses – monthly Revenue Bond Program: The District of Columbia Revenue Bond
workshops on copyright, trademarks, licensing, and forming a Program provides market interest rate loans to help lower cost
501c3 organization. of funds available for capital projects. These bonds are used to

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(B) EXISTING RESOURCES FOR CULTURAL SPACE


finance a wide variety of projects including: health care, housing, Educational Arts Cultural Facility (THE ARC) in Ward 8, the Atlas
transit and utility facilities, recreational facilities, health facilities, Theater in Ward 6, the Dance Institute of Washington in Ward 1,
manufacturing, sports, convention and entertainment facilities, and others.
elementary, secondary, college and university facilities, student loan
Site Acquisition Funding Initiative: The Site Acquisition Funding
programs, pollution control facilities and industrial and commercial
Initiative (SAFI) is designed to provide quickly accessible, revolving
development.
loan funds for acquisition and predevelopment costs to nonprofit
OUR RFP: “Our RFP” is a Mayoral and DMPED initiative to developers committed to the production, rehabilitation and
incorporate community engagement early in the RFP process. preservation of affordable housing. SAFI leverages DHCD funds
Early engagement with District residents will ensure that the public’s with private monies for the preservation of affordable housing.
perspective and priorities are understood in conjunction with the
District’s goals when crafting and issuing the RFP for a District-
owned parcel. This program offers the opportunity for District (v) DC Public Library (DCPL)
residents to advocate for cultural space when qualifying District
owned properties are identified for redevelopment. DCPL Facilities: The library provides meeting and study spaces
to the public for the purpose of disseminating literary, cultural,
Neighborhood Prosperity Fund: In 2017 DMPED launched the educational and community information.
Neighborhood Prosperity Fund as a pilot program to invest up to $3
million in gap financing for commercial space in mixed-use projects
in Census Tracts where unemployment is above 10%. (vi) Department Of Parks And Recreation (DPR)
Field Permits and Reservations: Residents can reserve DRP
(ii) District Department of Transportation facilities for meetings, games and events using an online system.

(DDOT) Community Gardens: There are 244 District Parks and Recreation
areas across the city, including 71 recreation center grounds and
Block Parties: The District Department of Transportation offers a
89 triangle or pocket parks. Between fiscal years 2017 and 2021
simplified and expedited permitting process for neighborhood block
$263 million has been allocated for capital projects in District parks
parties where a simple majority of adjoining property owners need
in the current Capital Improvement Plan. Department of Parks and
to approve the event.
Recreation, DC’s recreation facilities offer programming including
seasonal and regular activities for youths and teens, as well as
workshops on urban gardening and nutrition.
(iii) DC Commission on the Arts and
Humanities (CAH)
Cultural Facilities Projects Grant Program: The Cultural (vii) DC Public Schools (DCPS)
Facilities Projects (CFP) grant will be awarded to arts and
DCPS Facilities: DCPS facilities can be rented by outside
humanities organizations within the District of Columbia that own
organizations for reasonable rates. However, organizations that rent
or rent facilities designed to present performances, exhibitions or
DCPS space must provide liability and property damage insurance
professional training so that all District of Columbia residents and
in addition to supplemental security staff, that is assessed on a
visitors can experience the city’s rich culture.
case-by-case basis. School-related organizations can use facilities
at reduced rates during normal building hours.

(iv) Department of Housing And Community


Development (DHCD) (viii) District Department Of General Services
Community Facility Financing: DHCD's Development Finance (DGS)
Division provides funding to assist with the development of
DGS Capital Funding for the Arts: The District Department of
community and commercial facilities that serve District of Columbia
General Services invests 1% of the Capital Budget in capital eligible
neighborhoods. These facilities include community office buildings,
public art. Each project is capped at $500,000 and the 1% calculation
clinics, day care centers and recreation centers. Community
excludes some projects including transportation facilities.
facilities are typically funded through DHCD's competitive Request
for Proposals (RFP) process. DHCD has funded numerous
community facilities throughout the District, including The Town Hall

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(ix) DC Office of Planning (OP) are intended to provide general operating support to organizations
whose primary mission is performing, exhibiting and/or presenting
Comprehensive Plan: OP develops and manages the District’s the arts operating principally in Washington, DC. Recipients of past
Comprehensive Plan which is a 20-year framework that guides NCACA grants include such institutions as the Arena Stage, the
future growth and development. It addresses a wide range of topics National Building Museum, the Washington Performing Arts Society
that support performers including housing, urban design, economic and the Phillips Collection. The program is not intended to support
development, and arts and culture. organizations that receive substantial federal support.
Community Planning: The Office of Planning deploys community
(xi) Cross-Cutting Organizations
planning tools including studies, vision frameworks and small area
plans in partnership with communities. These tools can assess Events DC manages seven venues across the District including
cultural priorities and advance opportunities for cultural space. the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Carnegie Library at
Mount Vernon Square, RFK Stadium, Festival Grounds at RFK
Historic Homeowner Grants: The grants are available to low- and
Stadium, Gateway DC, DC Armory and Nationals Park.
moderate-income households living in specific historic districts.
Grants may be up to a maximum of $25,000, except the Anacostia “Art at the Center,” free curator-led public art tours. The diverse $4
Historic District where the maximum is $35,000. million art collection is the largest in any convention center and the
largest public art collection in the District outside of a museum with
more than 130 works of art. With works of art by both local and
international artists, the collection of site-specific sculpture, painting
(x) Federal Organizations
and photography brings a sense of human scale to the Convention
National Park Service: The National Park Service operates 59 Center.
properties across the District. The National Park Service has
CulturalDC Space Finder: Culture DC helps cultural organizations
pledged to provide educational opportunities to at least 25% of the
locate spaces that meet their needs in the District with their Space
national K-12 population annually. Included in these community
Finder tool.
activities are artist-in-residency programs, Girl and Boy Scout
programs and youth nature science classes. Both District- and Washington DC Economic Partnership: The Partnership supports
NPS-owned open spaces are also home to hundreds of special small business and entrepreneurship through its site location and
events that occur annually, providing an important “informal” venue assistance program.
for consuming culture.

U.S. Commission of Fine Arts: The National Capital Arts and


Cultural Affairs (NCACA) grant program (Public Law 99-190, as
amended, 20 USC 956a) supports larger artistic and cultural
institutions operating in the District of Columbia. NCACA grants

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(C) EXISTING RESOURCES FOR CULTURAL CONSUMERS


The District Government along with many other federal and local For All offers free performances of a Shakespearean classic to the
cultural stakeholders offer unique support to a wide range of general public each summer. To date, the Free For All has reached
opportunities for consumers to engage culture. more than 662,000 area residents and counting.

Shakespeare Theatre Company also offers discounted tickets for


seniors, military service members and people under 35 years old.
(i) DC Public Libraries (DCPL)
Woolly Mammoth Theatre: The theater offers Pay What You Can
DCPL: The Libraries offers cultural events for residents of all ages (PWYC) tickets for a select number of preview performances.
including book clubs and storytime for children.
Studio Theatre: Audience members under the age of 30 are eligible
to for Studio25, a program offering $25 tickets to all performances.
(ii) Cross-Cutting Organizations Discounts are also available for senior citizens and military service
members.
Destination DC: Destination DC serves as the lead organization
to successfully manage and market Washington, DC as a premier Constellation Theatre Company: The Constellation Theatre
global convention, tourism and special events destination, with a Company offers pay-what-you-can for the first public performance
special emphasis on the arts, cultural and historical communities. of their productions.

Events DC: Events DC is the face of conventions, sports, Arena Stage Theatre: Arena Stage Offers Pay Your Age tickets for
entertainment and cultural events within our nation’s capital. As the people under 30 where your age determines the price. Arena Stage
official convention and sports authority for the District of Columbia, also offers discounts for students and military service members.
Events DC leverages the beauty, history and diversity of the most Phillips Collection: Visitors under 18 are admitted for free.
powerful city in the world to attract and promote an extensive variety
of events, resulting in amazing experiences for residents and visitors
alike and generating economic and community benefits for the city. (iii) Federal Organizations
Washington Performing Arts: Provide educational opportunities Kennedy Center: MyTix makes the arts more accessible with
in the performing arts for youth, adults and seniors that enrich discounted and free tickets to people 18‒30 years old and active
and engage the community in a spectrum of activities designed to duty member of the armed services.
encourage participation in and appreciation of the performing arts.
BravO, Washington National Opera's program that offers discounts
Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority (WMATA): The for students and young professionals between the ages of 18 and
WMATA Art in display art in 24 Metro stations. Permanent art 40.
installations could emphasize neighborhood heritage, providing
residents and visitors alike with a “first impression” at their
destination that celebrates DC’s diverse history and communities.

Washington DC Economic Partnership: The Washington DC


Economic Partnership promotes the District to local, national and
international audiences. They uses events like SXSW to showcase
District culture as a key asset.

DC Collaborative: The Collaborative’s Arts and Humanities for


Every Student (AHFES) program has provided more than 575,000
DC public and public charter school students and educators access
to cultural opportunities at member institutions such as the DC
Arts Center and Shakespeare Theatre. AHFES ensures student
learning equitably benefits from DC’s diverse and rich array of arts
and humanities amenities. The Collaborative is striving to provide
field trip opportunities to every District student attending DCPS and
Public Charter Schools.

Shakespeare Theatre: The Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Free

215 DC Cultural Plan


V. PHOTO CREDITS

DC Office of Planning 216


2017.06.26 Ben's Chili Bowl Mural, Washington, DC USA 6865 United House of Prayer For All People
Photo Rights: Ted Eytan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/VyVDmm | Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Cover Image Buford | Cover Image

Smithsonian American Art Museum DC Craftsman with DC Woodwork Flags


Photo Rights: Smithsonian American Art Museum | Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Photographer: Tim Hursley | Page 162; Cover Image | Cover Image

H Street Festival – Male Patron Evie - Liz Lot


Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Cover Image
| Cover Image
Watma T. Daniel / Shaw Library
DCCAH2016.092 Jaffe Rose Homeless Lives Matter Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities | | Page 134; Cover Image
Cover Image
Eastern Market – Butterfly Craftsman
DCCAH2014.055 NaDaaa Design Firm - First Street Sculpture Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities | | Page 88; Cover Image
Cover Image
Fiesta de las Madres 2016
Nail Technician – 202 Creates Kick-off Event Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Giijm7 |
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Cover Image Page 83; Cover Image

Cherry Blossom – Smithsonian Institution Woman with Child at Eastern Market


Photo Rights: Shinya Suzuki | URL: https://flic.kr/p/e9EHwL Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Cover Image | Cover Image

Japanese Stone Lantern Lighting Ceremony DC 2018 Singer Entertainer at Eastern Market
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/26VfwmJ Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 61 | Cover Image

2018.11.09 The Main Squeeze w Hamish Anderson at Pearl Violinist Entertainer at Eastern Market
Street Warehouse, Washington, DC USA 07834 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Photo Rights: Ted Eytan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/2cHKL2W | | Cover Image
Cover Design
Woman with Tattoo
Go-Go Symphony & Capitol City Symphony – Atlas Performing Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Arts Center | Cover Image
Photo Rights: Go-Go Symphony | Photographer: Joshua
Cruse | Page 4, 6, Cover Design Chuck Brown performing at the 30th Year celebration of
WPGC Radio host Donnie Simpson on Washington DC radio
7th Annual Armistice Day Commemoration & Peace Vigil Washington DC, USA
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/odty1P | Photo Rights: WENN Rights Ltd | Page 14; Cover Image
Page 155
202 Arts and Music Festival 2017
Anacostia River Festival – Boy playing violin Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/23ZqdFU
Photo Rights: Jeff Salmore | Page 85; Cover Design | Cover Image

The National Cathedral is Lit up in Colorful Lights | Washington Star and Bars Street Artwork – Eastern Market
DC Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Photo Rights: Brendan Kownacki of Kownacki Media | URL: | Page 14; Cover Image
https://flic.kr/p/2c4mLuJ | Page 69

DCCAH2017.008.2 Cogan Joshua - Malcolm X Dancer Man with I Could Do That Poster – Eastern Market
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities | Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Page 54; Cover Image | Cover Image

Nowruz Festival DC 2018 Woman Carrying Flowers in Eastern Market


Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/26XwnJE Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Cover Image | Cover Image

Smithsonian’s Portales Exhibit Mural by Rosalia Torres Weiner A Perch for the Parade
Photo Rights: Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum | A tall perch for a small victory parade go-er in Washington,
Page 16; Cover Image DC.
Photo Rights: John Terp | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Lhnq6y | Page
All of Us Journey Pilot – Washington DC 4, 42; Cover Image
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 10; Cover Image
Salute of the Triumphant
Young Girl with Pink Background Portrait from victory parade in Washington DC
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Cover Image Photo Rights: John Terp | https://flic.kr/p/27pccfC | Page
45; Cover Image

217 DC Cultural Plan


Asia Fiesta 2018 Udofia Aniekan - The Girl with the Pencil
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/29Pv4ad | Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 158; Cover Image Page 5

Hand Dancing Under The Stars 2 – Freedom Plaza A huge cherry blossom balloon is pulled down Constitution
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Avenue during the Parade of the National Cherry Blossom
| Page 57; Cover Image Festival, Saturday, April 11, 2015, in Washington. In the
background at right is the Washington Monument.
IA&A at Hillyer Photo Rights: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster | Page 8
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 30 – 31; Cover Image IVY City Placemaking Street Art
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 9
Dance Place in Washington, DC
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford All of Us Journey Pilot – Washington DC
| Page 119; Cover Image Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 10

“Kennedy Center Nordic Cool 2013 Festival” Young Girl with Purple Teddy Bear – Hillsdale
Photo Rights: Tom Finzel | URL: https://flic.kr/p/e4fygi | Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 11
Page 14; Cover Image
Big Ben Painting
Mundy @ Dupont Underground (6/15/2018) Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Photo Rights: Daniel Kelly | URL: https://flic.kr/p/JL8JCZ | Page 11
Page 104; Cover Image
202 Creates Event
H Street Festival 2018 – LOVE CITEES Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 11
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Buford | Page 56; Cover Image Eastern Market – Painter
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Art of the 8th Creative Placemaking | Page 11
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 135; Cover Image Girl in front of Hustle Sign
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 11
Craftsman with Shades - Eastern Market
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 90; Cover Image Fire Show – Crowd View
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 13
A huge cherry blossom balloon is pulled down Constitution
Avenue during the Parade of the National Cherry Blossom Chuck Brown performing at the 30th Year celebration of
Festival, Saturday, April 11, 2015, in Washington. In the WPGC Radio host Donnie Simpson on Washington DC radio
background at right is the Washington Monument. Washington DC, USA
Photo Rights: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster | Page 8; Cover Image Photo Rights: WENN Rights Ltd | Page 14

Dance to the Music – DC Funk Parade 2015 National Museum of American History - Smithsonian Institution
Photo Rights: Miki Jourdan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/spYxWU | Photo Rights: Amy Meredith | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Uvzjen |
Page 62; Cover Image Page 14, 63

H Street Festival 2018 – Jamaica, Trinidad, and DC Flag Step Afrika! at kingman Island
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 14
Buford | Page 56; Cover Image

H Street Festival 2018 – High School Drummer Boy USA Washington DC youth concert at the Tidal Basin with the
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah Washington Monument in the distance
Buford | Page 56; Cover Image Photo Rights: Vittorio Sciosia | Page 14
Whitman-Walker: Block Is Hot
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 2
Star and Bars Street Artwork – Eastern Market
Go-Go Symphony & Capitol City Symphony – Atlas Performing Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Arts Center | Page 14
Photo Rights: Go-Go Symphony | Photographer: Joshua
Cruse | Page 4, 6 Disco Jockey – Anacostia Festival – Washington DC
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 14
A Perch for the Parade
A tall perch for a small victory parade go-er in Washington, “Kennedy Center Nordic Cool 2013 Festival”
DC. Photo Rights: Tom Finzel | URL: https://flic.kr/p/e4fygi |
Photo Rights: John Terp | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Lhnq6y | Page 14
Page 4, 44
Smithsonian’s Portales Exhibit Mural by Rosalia Torres Weiner
Hip Hop Tap Dancer – Kennedy Center – National Dance Day Photo Rights: Smithsonian’s Anacostia Community Museum
2018 DC | Page 16
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/27ew2rY
| Page 4, 168, 169

DC Office of Planning 218


Looking up at the Smithsonian Castle, in Washington, DC Jantzen Franz - Uptown Theater
Photo Rights: Jonbilous | Page 16 Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 50 – 51
2016 National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade in front of
National Archives Eastern Market – Local Painter
Photo Rights: National Cherry Blossom Festival | Page 20, Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
21 | Page 52

DJ for H Street Festival Wentzel Volkmar - Cherry Blossom Time


Photo Rights: Angela Napili | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Ng6eAM | Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 22 and 109 Page 52

Whitman-Walker Health Benjamin Isaiah Kamau Frank - Jammin at the Howard Theater
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 23, 120 Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 53
Eastern Market – Washington, DC
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Cogan Joshua - Malcolm X Dancer
| Page 24, 140 Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 54
DC Funk Parade 2016: Batala Band - Washington, DC
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/G5LEXb Burning Man Art: Hybycozo | Renwick Gallery, Washington,
| Page 25 DC Yelena Filipchuk & Serge Beaulieu
Photo Rights: Eric Schweikert | URL: https://flic.kr/p/25um4Bf
DC Funk Parade 2016: Artists Creating Public Art Mural - | Page 54 - 55
Washington, DC
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/G5TE3v National Museum of African American History and Culture
| Page 27 Photo Rights: National Museum of African American History
and Culture | Photographer: Alan Karchmer | Page 54
Time is Fire
DC's own Time is Fire playing the first night of the 50th season Queer Youth Block Party
of the summer concert series at Fort Reno Park, Washington, Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 55
DC.
Photo Rights: Mike Maguire | URL: https://flic.kr/p/K7ku5X Martin Luther King Jr Memorial
| Page 28 Photo Rights: Victor Dvorak | URL: https://flic.kr/p/24ANsZc
| Page 55
IA&A at Hillyer
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford H Street Festival 2018 – LOVE CITEES
| Page 30 – 31 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Buford | Page 56
Eastern Market – Local Performers
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Rita from Adinkra Expo – H Street Festival
| Page 37 Photo Rights: Miki Jourdan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/2aCuoMR
| Page 56
Cultural Plan- Kick Off Event Graphic Recording
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 40
H Street Festival 2018 – High School Drummer Boy
Cultural Plan – Kick Off Event & Community Conversations Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Photos Buford | Page 56
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 40 - 41
H Street Festival 2018 – Jamaica, Trinidad, and DC Flag
From Edgewood to the Edge of the World Mural by Joshua Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Mays Buford | Page 14, 56
Photo Rights: Art Around | URL: https://flic.kr/p/bGQhzK |
Page 44 H Street Festival 2018 – She From DC
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Salute of the Triumphant Buford | Page 56
Portrait from victory parade in Washington DC
Photo Rights: John Terp | https://flic.kr/p/27pccfC | Page 45 202Creates Event – Makeup Artist
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 56
CHAW Capitol Hill Arts Workshop
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Pineapple Drinks – H Street Festival
| Page 46 Photo Rights: Miki Jourdan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Nh4fui |
Page 57
| URL: https://flic.kr/p/23Zq9ho | Page 49
H Street Festival 2018 – Family Photo
DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities – Art Bank Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Collection Buford | Page 57
Harris David Allen - Malcolm X Park 1 2007
Muniak Susan - Three Generations Finley's Gym H Street Festival 2018 – 60th Anniversary Ben’s Chili Bowl
Fenster Adam - Block Party R Johnson Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Winterbottom Colin - Capitol Catwalk Buford | Page 57
Farmer Sharon - Hula Hoop - Side Waist

219 DC Cultural Plan


Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Eastern Market – Local Violinist Page 86 – 87
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 57 Eastern Market – Butterfly Craftsman
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Hand Dancing Under The Stars – Freedom Plaza | Page 88
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 57

"I Have a Dream Speech" 50 years ago Eastern Market – Craftsman


Photo Rights: Brandon Kopp | URL: https://flic.kr/p/fAv3oA Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 59 | Page 90

Photo Rights: Matt Garrity | URL: https://flic.kr/p/2bJLAt7 | H Street Festival – Black Rock Star Super Hero
Page 60 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Buford | Page 90
Japanese Stone Lantern Lighting Ceremony DC 2018
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/26VfwmJ Capitol Hill Flea Market
| Page 61 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 90
Angry Dragon
Photo Rights: Ben Stephenson | URL: https://flic.kr/p/B7H5J 202 Arts & Music Festival 2017: Brazilian Dancing Group
| Page 61 Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/23ZqcqY
| Page 90
Dance to the Music – DC Funk Parade 2015
Photo Rights: Miki Jourdan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/spYxWU | 202Creates – Two Ladies Chatting
Page 62 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 91

202Creates – Makeup Artist


Oku Plazza – DC Event Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 91
Photo Rights: DC Office of Planning | Page 66 – 67
202Creates – Local DC Creators (Step and Repeat)
The National Cathedral is Lit up in Colorful Lights | Washington Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 91
DC
Photo Rights: Brendan Kownacki of Kownacki Media | URL: H Street Festival – Two Street Drummers
https://flic.kr/p/2c4mLuJ | Page 69 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Ayannah
Buford | Page 92
America’s First Museum of Modern Art | The Philips Collection
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Cultural Plan Community Conversation – Kick Off Event
| Page 81 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 94

202 Arts & Music Festival 2017: Dancing Group Cultural Plan Meeting – SE Community Conversation
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/23Zrg4Y Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 96
| Page 82
Cultural Plan Meeting – SW Community Conversation
Fiesta de las Madres 2016 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 97
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/Giijm7 |
Page 83 Cultural Plan Meeting – NE Community Conversation
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 97
Ricks Eric B
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities | Gallaudet Chapel Hall
Page 83 Photo Rights: Mr.TinDC | URL: https://flic.kr/p/6txCYG | Page
98
Circulator Bus on Game Day
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 83 Deaf and Hard of Hearing Conversation
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 98
2016.06.11 LGBTQ Pride in Washington, DC USA 05650
Photo Rights: Ted Eytan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/HEqPTm |
Page 83 2017.06.26 Ben's Chili Bowl Mural, Washington, DC USA
6859 by Aniekan Udofia
Anacostia River Festival Photo Rights: Ted Eytan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/VyVAvS |
Photo Rights: Jeff Salmore | Page 85 Page 100 - 101

Crossett Michael - Capitol Reset DC Funk Parade 2016: Masqueraders - Washington, DC


Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities | Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/27nTobq
Page 86 | Page 102

Holder Kevin - Checkmate at Dupont Circle Mundy @ Dupont Underground (6/15/2018)


Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities | Photo Rights: Daniel Kelly | URL: https://flic.kr/p/JL8JCZ |
Page 87 Page 104

Taylor Marcel – Transformation

DC Office of Planning 220


Crossing the Street Kingman Island Scatter Orchestra
Photo Rights: Step Afrika!| Page 109 Photo Rights: DC Office of Planning

Whitman-Walker R Street Walter Reed Dreams – Crossing the Street Creative


Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 114 Placemaking
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 146
Anacostia Arts Center @ Night
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 118 7th Annual Armistice Day Commemoration & Peace Vigil
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/odty1P |
Dance Place in Washington, DC Page 152
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 123 Francisa Gregory Library
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Replacement: The new Brookland neighborhood sign, off | Page 154
Monroe Street NE, in Washington, DC
Photo Rights: Mr.TinDC | URL: https://flic.kr/p/eeu8qY | 202Creates
Page 122, 123 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 156

Brookland ArtSpace Lofts in Washington, DC Colorful historic buildings in Adams Morgan neighborhood on
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford May 9, 2015 in Washington DC.
| Page 123 Photo Rights: Amedved | Page 158
Anacostia Arts Center Façade – Washington, DC
Brookland Arts Walk DC Photo Rights: Anacostia Arts Center | Page 156
Photo Rights: The Washington Post/Getty Images |
Page 123 Leguina Alberto – Clerencia Kindred Mural
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Work It Graffiti Page 157
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 124, 126
Hustle Art Instiallation
2017.09.17 H Street Festival, Washington, DC USA 8720 Photo Rights: DC Office of Planning | Page 159
Photo Rights: Ted Eytan | URL: https://flic.kr/p/YwXuiC |
Page 132 Asia Fiesta 2018
Photo Rights: Sagar Pakhrin | URL: https://flic.kr/p/29Pv4ad
Eastern Market – Shopper | Page 160
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 136 West End Library Exterior
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 162

Circus Bella performs "The Big Juggle": Smithsonian Folklife Foundry Gallery Exterior
Festival in Wash. DC [Video Screenshot] Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Photo Rights: Jeff Malet Photography | Page 137 | Page 162

Oku Plaza - OP Creative Placemaking THEARC Exterior


Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 137 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 162
Watma T. Daniel / Shaw Library
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford Morton Fine Art Exterior
| Page 138 Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
| Page 163
Art of the 8th Creative Placemaking
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities Exterior – Color
| Page 139 Door
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
Crossing the Street Creative Placemaking: Ward 8 Place | Page 163
Project
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 139 Francis A. Gregory Library Exterior
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Photographer: Doug Sanford
NaDaaa Design Firm – First Street Sculpture | Page 163
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 139 Smithsonian American Art Museum
Photo Rights: Smithsonian American Art Museum |
Oxman Zachary – Encore Photographer: Tim Hursley | Page 164
Photo Rights: DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities |
Page 139 Cultural Plan Meeting – SW Community Conversation
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 169
202Creates Staff
Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 150

202Creates – Painting with Creator/Painter


Photo Rights: Office of Planning | Page 140

221 DC Cultural Plan


VII. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

DC Office of Planning 222


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA*

Muriel Bowser, Mayor

Andrew Trueblood, Acting Director, DC Office of Planning

Angie Gates, Director, Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment

Terrie Rouse-Rosario, Executive Director DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities

PLANNING TEAM

Sakina Khan, Deputy Director for Citywide Strategy; DC Office of Planning

Ryan Hand, Senior Economic Planner; DC Office of Planning

Josh Silver, Lead Planner for Strategic Initiatives and Partnerships; DC Office of Planning

Michael Bigley, Deputy Director; DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities

Maryann Lombardi, Chief Creative Economy Officer; Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment

Rogelio Flores, Lead Capital Facilities and Infrastructure Planner; DC Office of Planning

Patsy Fletcher, Neighborhood Heritage Coordinator; DC Office of Planning

PLANNING AND EVENT PARTNERS CONSULTING TEAM


ENGAGEMENT The plan was developed with support
CONTRIBUTORS Arts Action DC from the following consulting firms.
Arena Stage
Joyetta Delaney HR&A Advisors
Anacostia Arts Center
Rishawna Gould
GALA Hispanic theatre Stan Wall
Stephen Gyor
Hamiltonian Gallery
Karen Harris
The Kennedy Center BC Workshop
Deborah Crain-Kemp Omar Hakeem
DC Public Library Foundation
Emily Johnson
Gallaudet University
Andrea Limauro B.Brilliant
David Markey Ayannah Buford
Erkin Ozberk
Patrick Realiza
Regan Spurlock
Jennifer Steingasser
Ashley Stephens
Elisa Vitale
Theo Wilhite
Valecia Wilson

* Thank you, former Directors Eric Shaw and Arthur Espinoza, for your contributions to this Plan.

223 DC Cultural Plan


Government of the District of Columbia
DC Office of Planning in coordination with the DC Commission on the Arts and
Humanities and DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment

Published March 2019