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ShadeTree®

Version 6.1

Interface Configuration User Guide


ShadeTree Interface Configuration User Guide
V6.1
Catalog No: X91549
Drawing No: 497006-2401-143-AOO
January 2015
1st Edition

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Contents
1 About this Guide ............................................................................................. 1-1
1.1 Intended Audience .............................................................................................................1-1
1.2 Document Organization .....................................................................................................1-1
1.3 Notes and Warnings...........................................................................................................1-2
1.4 Related Documentation .....................................................................................................1-3
1.5 How to Obtain ECI Technical Documentation .....................................................................1-4
1.6 Technical Assistance...........................................................................................................1-4

2 Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification..................................................... 2-1


2.1 Chassis Slot Layout .............................................................................................................2-1
2.1.1 OPT9624 Slot Numbering ........................................................................................................ 2-2
2.1.2 OPT9608 Slot Numbering ........................................................................................................ 2-4
2.1.3 OPT9603 Slot Numbering ........................................................................................................ 2-5
2.1.4 Artemis Slot Numbering .......................................................................................................... 2-5
2.2 Card Types .........................................................................................................................2-7
2.3 Port and Interface Naming ...............................................................................................2-11
2.4 OPT9600 Series Port Numbering ......................................................................................2-11
2.5 Port and Interface Types ..................................................................................................2-14
2.5.1 OTN........................................................................................................................................ 2-14
2.5.2 FC ........................................................................................................................................... 2-16
2.5.3 Video ..................................................................................................................................... 2-16
2.5.4 Management ......................................................................................................................... 2-17
2.5.5 Physical Optical ..................................................................................................................... 2-17
2.5.6 SDH/SONET............................................................................................................................ 2-17
2.5.7 Gigabit Ethernet Ports ........................................................................................................... 2-18
2.5.8 Logical Interfaces................................................................................................................... 2-19
2.6 Configuring Slots and Cards..............................................................................................2-20
2.6.1 Configuring the NPB Slot and Type ....................................................................................... 2-21
2.6.2 Specifying a Chassis Slot, Card Name, Port, and Interface Configuration ............................. 2-21
2.6.3 Understanding Interface and Tributary Slot Configuration................................................... 2-22
2.7 Displaying Cards, Interfaces, and Subinterfaces ................................................................2-29
2.7.1 Displaying the Chassis Configuration .................................................................................... 2-29
2.7.2 Displaying RCP Card Configuration........................................................................................ 2-31
2.7.3 Displaying Interfaces ............................................................................................................. 2-32

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3 Multi-Shelf Configuration ............................................................................... 3-1


3.1 Multi-Shelf Architecture .....................................................................................................3-1
3.2 Requirements and Guidelines.............................................................................................3-2
3.3 Configuring the Multi-Shelf NE ...........................................................................................3-3
3.4 Configuring the Main Shelf .................................................................................................3-3
3.5 Configuring a Subtending Shelf...........................................................................................3-5
3.6 Configuring Cards on a Subtending Shelf ............................................................................3-6
3.7 Deleting a Subtending Shelf................................................................................................3-7

4 Port Configuration .......................................................................................... 4-1


4.1 Minimum Port Configuration..............................................................................................4-2
4.1.1 Specifying a Port Number........................................................................................................ 4-2
4.1.2 Enabling a Port ........................................................................................................................ 4-3
4.2 Complete Slot and Port Configuration Statement ...............................................................4-3
4.3 Configuring a Customer for a Port or Subinterface .............................................................4-8
4.4 Configuring CBR Options ....................................................................................................4-9
4.5 Configuring ETY Options .....................................................................................................4-9
4.6 Configuring Encryption Options........................................................................................4-10
4.7 Configuring FC Options.....................................................................................................4-11
4.8 Configuring Fiber Connectivity Options ............................................................................4-11
4.9 Configuring OA Options....................................................................................................4-12
4.10 Configuring OCH Options..................................................................................................4-12
4.11 Configuring OCHP Options................................................................................................4-13
4.12 Configuring ODU Options .................................................................................................4-14
4.13 Configuring OMS Options .................................................................................................4-16
4.14 Configuring OS Options ....................................................................................................4-16
4.15 Configuring OSC Options ..................................................................................................4-17
4.16 Configuring OTS Options ..................................................................................................4-17
4.17 Configuring OTU Options..................................................................................................4-18
4.18 Configuring Passive OADM Options ..................................................................................4-19
4.19 Configuring PO Options ....................................................................................................4-20
4.20 Configuring Port Behavior ................................................................................................4-20
4.21 Configuring Port Direction ................................................................................................4-20
4.22 Configuring Port Loopback Capability ...............................................................................4-21
4.23 Configuring Port Mapping ................................................................................................4-21
4.24 Configuring ROADM Options ............................................................................................4-21

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4.25 Configuring SPO Options ..................................................................................................4-22


4.26 Configuring TR100 Options...............................................................................................4-22
4.27 Configuring Transceiver Options.......................................................................................4-23
4.28 Configuring ULL Options...................................................................................................4-24
4.29 Port Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data) ....................................................4-25

5 Interface Configuration .................................................................................. 5-1


5.1 Configuring Ports and Interfaces ........................................................................................5-1
5.2 Configuring Interfaces ........................................................................................................5-1
5.2.1 Configuring a GRE Tunnel........................................................................................................ 5-2
5.2.2 Monitoring Traffic on Interfaces ............................................................................................. 5-3
5.2.3 Interface Alarms ...................................................................................................................... 5-6

6 Cross Connection Configuration ..................................................................... 6-1


6.1 Layer 1 Cross Connections..................................................................................................6-2
6.1.1 L1-XC Compatibility Guidelines ............................................................................................... 6-2
6.1.2 L1-XC Leg Directionality ........................................................................................................... 6-3
6.1.3 XC Owners ............................................................................................................................... 6-4
6.1.4 XC Modes................................................................................................................................. 6-4
6.1.5 ODU-XC Fabric Support ........................................................................................................... 6-6
6.1.6 L1-XC Protection Support ........................................................................................................ 6-7
6.1.7 Working with L1-XCs ............................................................................................................. 6-11
6.1.8 Cross Connection Attributes.................................................................................................. 6-13
6.1.9 L1-XC Configuration Example ................................................................................................ 6-15
6.1.10 Complete L1-XC Configuration Statement ............................................................................ 6-16
6.1.11 L1-XC Connection Tables ....................................................................................................... 6-17
6.2 Packet Cross Connections.................................................................................................6-21

7 Fiber Connectivity........................................................................................... 7-1


7.1 Prerequisites and Guidelines ..............................................................................................7-3
7.2 Defining Fiber Connectivity ................................................................................................7-3
7.3 Defining Fiber Connectivity for Non-ShadeTree Equipment ................................................7-6
7.4 Defining Fiber Connectivity for Alien Lambdas....................................................................7-6
7.5 Modifying/Deleting Fiber Connectivity Parameters ............................................................7-9
7.5.1 Impact of Port Modifications on Fiber Connectivity ............................................................. 7-11
7.6 Fiber/Port Connectivity Rules ...........................................................................................7-12

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Contents

8 Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and Ports................................................. 8-1


8.1 AoC10-L2 Configuration Workflow .....................................................................................8-2
8.2 Basic Layer 2 Card Configuration Parameters .....................................................................8-4
8.3 VLAN Configuration............................................................................................................8-7
8.3.1 Wildcard VLAN ID Assignment................................................................................................. 8-9
8.4 Untagged Handling with CD-VLAN Configuration ..............................................................8-10
8.5 SVLAN Configuration ........................................................................................................8-11
8.6 PseudoWire Configuration ...............................................................................................8-13
8.7 H-VPLS Configuration .......................................................................................................8-14
8.8 Entity Naming Conventions ..............................................................................................8-16
8.9 Retrieving Card and Tunnel Information ...........................................................................8-18
8.10 Efficient Resource Management.......................................................................................8-20
8.11 VSI P2P/MP2MP Configuration Examples .........................................................................8-21
8.12 Configuring Bi-Directional Tunnels with Linear Protection ................................................8-25
8.12.1 Configuring the Head-End (Originating Node) ...................................................................... 8-32
8.12.2 Configuring the XC (Transit Node)......................................................................................... 8-35
8.12.3 Configuring the Tail-End (Terminating Node) ....................................................................... 8-36
8.12.4 Displaying Dynamic Information for Bidirectional LSP from RCP Side .................................. 8-39
8.12.5 Displaying Dynamic Information for Bidirectional LSP from I/O Side ................................... 8-42
8.12.6 Displaying the Number of Inbound and Outbound Tunnel Segments per Card or
Slot......................................................................................................................................... 8-43
8.12.7 Displaying the Number of Working XCs Associated with a Tunnel ....................................... 8-43
8.13 Configuring CFM Card Options .........................................................................................8-44
8.13.1 Basic MEG Configuration ....................................................................................................... 8-46
8.13.2 Implicit MEP Configuration under Provider or Operator Levels............................................ 8-47
8.13.3 Configuring Specific MEG Attributes ..................................................................................... 8-47
8.13.4 MEG Configuration under Provider, Operator and Nested Operator Levels ........................ 8-48
8.13.5 Remote MEP Configuration ................................................................................................... 8-49
8.13.6 Deleting a MEG ...................................................................................................................... 8-50
8.13.7 Retrieving CFM MEG Information ......................................................................................... 8-51
8.13.8 Running a Loopback Command ............................................................................................. 8-51
8.13.9 Running a Link Trace Command ............................................................................................ 8-51
8.13.10 CFM Fault Management ........................................................................................................ 8-52
8.14 PCP and DSCP to CoS Mapping in VSI................................................................................8-53
8.14.1 Configuring Classification for E-NNI Ports ............................................................................. 8-55
8.14.2 Configuring Classification for UNI Ports ................................................................................ 8-56
8.14.3 Changing Priority Bit CoS Mapping for UNI Ports.................................................................. 8-57

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8.14.4 Changing Priority Bit to CoS Mapping for E-NNI Ports .......................................................... 8-58
8.14.5 Changing CoS to P-Bit Mapping for E-NNI Ports.................................................................... 8-59
8.14.6 Changing DSCP CoS Mapping for UNI Ports .......................................................................... 8-59
8.14.7 Changing DSCP CoS Mapping for E-NNI Ports ....................................................................... 8-60
8.14.8 Complete CLI Configuration Example .................................................................................... 8-61
8.15 Configuring ERP Options...................................................................................................8-62
8.15.1 Configuring VSIs for ERP Protection ...................................................................................... 8-64
8.15.2 Configuring VSIs for ERP Protection on Non-Aggregation Access Ring Nodes ...................... 8-64
8.16 Configuring Ethernet and Packet Handling Port Options ...................................................8-65
8.17 Configuring EXP Mapping Options ....................................................................................8-69
8.17.1 Configuring EXP Mapping on an MPLS Interface................................................................... 8-71
8.17.2 Configuring EXP Mapping under a Routing Instance............................................................. 8-73
8.17.3 Deleting a Specific EXP Mapping ........................................................................................... 8-76
8.17.4 Deleting a Complete EXP Mapping Set.................................................................................. 8-76
8.18 Configuring Fault Management Options ...........................................................................8-77
8.18.1 Default Severity Profile at the Card Level.............................................................................. 8-78
8.18.2 Editing a Severity Profile ....................................................................................................... 8-78
8.18.3 Deleting a User-Defined Severity Profile ............................................................................... 8-79
8.18.4 Modifying a Severity Profile Configuration ........................................................................... 8-79
8.18.5 Displaying Alarms (Two Methods)......................................................................................... 8-80
8.19 Configuring FDB Card Parameters.....................................................................................8-81
8.20 Configuring LAG Options ..................................................................................................8-81
8.20.1 Typical LAG Configuration Work Flow ................................................................................... 8-83
8.20.2 Configuring the LAG Master .................................................................................................. 8-84
8.20.3 Configuring LAG Slaves .......................................................................................................... 8-85
8.20.4 Deleting a LAG Slave .............................................................................................................. 8-85
8.20.5 Deleting a LAG Master........................................................................................................... 8-86
8.20.6 Configuring the LAG Link Down Threshold............................................................................ 8-86
8.20.7 Deleting the LAG Link Down Threshold ................................................................................. 8-87
8.20.8 Enabling/Disabling LAG Distribution ..................................................................................... 8-87
8.20.9 Retrieving LAG Group Information for a Specific Slot ........................................................... 8-88
8.20.10 Retrieving LAG Group Information for a Specific Slot and Port ............................................ 8-89
8.21 Configuring Layer 2 Ethernet Options ...............................................................................8-89
8.22 Configuring Link OAM Options .........................................................................................8-91
8.23 Configuring LLCF Options .................................................................................................8-93
8.24 Configuring IGMP Options ................................................................................................8-93
8.25 Configuring MPLS Options ................................................................................................8-93

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8.26 Configuring Pause Port Options...................................................................................... 8-103


8.27 Configuring Performance Monitoring Options ................................................................ 8-103
8.27.1 Egress Counting ................................................................................................................... 8-104
8.28 Configuring Policing Management Options..................................................................... 8-105
8.28.1 Policer Profile Configuration ............................................................................................... 8-108
8.28.2 Port Policer Configuration ................................................................................................... 8-109
8.28.3 No-Rate-Limit Policer Configuration ................................................................................... 8-110
8.28.4 Port+VSI Policer Configuration ............................................................................................ 8-111
8.28.5 Port+VSI+CoS Group Policer Configuration ......................................................................... 8-113
8.28.6 BSC Policer Configuration .................................................................................................... 8-117
8.29 Configuring Port Mirroring Options ................................................................................ 8-119
8.29.1 Example: Defining and Editing Port Mirroring Configuration.............................................. 8-122
8.30 Configuring RSTP Card and Port Parameters ................................................................... 8-123
8.31 Configuring Traffic Management Options ....................................................................... 8-126
8.31.1 Initial TM Configuration per Card/Slot ................................................................................ 8-136
8.31.2 Editing TM Configuration per Card/Slot .............................................................................. 8-137
8.31.3 Initial TM Configuration per Port ........................................................................................ 8-138
8.31.4 Editing TM Configuration per Port ...................................................................................... 8-140

9 ONCP............................................................................................................... 9-1
9.1 ONCP Data Values ..............................................................................................................9-3
9.2 Displaying ONCP Data Values .............................................................................................9-4

10 ASON Trail Restoration................................................................................. 10-1


10.1 What is ASON Restoration? ..............................................................................................10-1
10.2 Configuring Your System for ASON Functionality ..............................................................10-2
10.3 Configuring ASON Trail Protection ....................................................................................10-3
10.3.1 Step by Step in ASON Configuration...................................................................................... 10-3
10.4 ASON Trail Configuration Parameters............................................................................. 10-11
10.5 Trails Attributes Example ............................................................................................... 10-13
10.6 ASON Restoration Configuration Examples..................................................................... 10-14
10.6.1 1++ Trail Protection Example .............................................................................................. 10-14
10.6.2 1+1+R Trail Protection Example .......................................................................................... 10-15
10.7 ASON Trail Management ................................................................................................ 10-16
10.7.1 Switching the Trail Route Manually..................................................................................... 10-16
10.7.2 Viewing the Trail Configuration........................................................................................... 10-16
10.7.3 Viewing the Trail Status ....................................................................................................... 10-17

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10.8 Viewing ASON Interface and Link Information ................................................................ 10-18


10.8.1 Viewing MPLS Interface Status............................................................................................ 10-18
10.8.2 Viewing an NNI Port’s GMPLS Settings................................................................................ 10-20
10.8.3 Listing the BW Available on a Data Link .............................................................................. 10-20
10.9 Complete ASON Configuration Example ......................................................................... 10-21

11 Configuring Protection Mechanisms ............................................................ 11-1


11.1 Equipment Protection ......................................................................................................11-1
11.2 Port Protection.................................................................................................................11-2
11.2.1 Configuring Port Protection................................................................................................... 11-2
11.2.2 Supported Port Configuration Parameters............................................................................ 11-3
11.3 Traffic Protection .............................................................................................................11-4
11.3.1 SNCP Protection .................................................................................................................... 11-4
11.3.2 IOP Protection ....................................................................................................................... 11-4
11.4 Protection Groups ............................................................................................................11-5
11.4.1 Creating a Protection Group ................................................................................................. 11-5
11.4.2 Viewing a Protection Group .................................................................................................. 11-5
11.4.3 Viewing the Operational State of a Protection Group .......................................................... 11-6
11.4.4 Removing a Protection Group ............................................................................................... 11-7
11.4.5 Triggering a Switch Over........................................................................................................ 11-7
11.5 Modifying Protection Group Parameters ..........................................................................11-8
11.5.1 Modifying the WTR Period .................................................................................................... 11-8
11.5.2 Modifying the Hold-Off Time ................................................................................................ 11-9
11.5.3 Defining Protection as Revertive/Non-Revertive ................................................................ 11-10
11.5.4 Defining the Main Unit ........................................................................................................ 11-11
11.5.5 Defining the Alarm Severity Profile Name........................................................................... 11-12
11.5.6 Enabling the Alarm Mask Master ........................................................................................ 11-12
11.6 Performing Maintenance Operations ............................................................................. 11-13
11.6.1 Performing a Protection Lockout ........................................................................................ 11-13
11.6.2 Performing a Force Switch .................................................................................................. 11-15
11.6.3 Performing a Manual Switch ............................................................................................... 11-16
11.6.4 Summary of Protection Group Commands ......................................................................... 11-17
11.7 Troubleshooting FM Module Errors................................................................................ 11-19
11.7.1 Viewing FM Fabric Status .................................................................................................... 11-19

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12 Upgrading the Software ............................................................................... 12-1


12.1 Update Process ................................................................................................................12-2
12.2 Viewing the Software Version ..........................................................................................12-3
12.3 Upgrading NE Software ....................................................................................................12-5
12.3.1 Performing a Software Pre-Installation Test ......................................................................... 12-5
12.3.2 Installing the Software Package ............................................................................................ 12-5
12.3.3 Installing a Software Package with an Earlier Version Number ............................................ 12-5
12.3.4 Checking the Installation Status ............................................................................................ 12-6
12.3.5 Installation Example .............................................................................................................. 12-6
12.3.6 Software Installation Events.................................................................................................. 12-7
12.4 Activating the New Software Upgrade..............................................................................12-7
12.4.1 Performing a Software Pre-Upgrade Test ............................................................................. 12-7
12.4.2 Upgrading the Software ........................................................................................................ 12-7
12.4.3 Standby-Only Software Upgrade ........................................................................................... 12-8
12.4.4 Checking the Upgrade Status ................................................................................................ 12-8
12.4.5 Scheduling an Upgrade to be Completed Now ..................................................................... 12-8
12.4.6 Scheduling an Upgrade for a Later Date................................................................................ 12-9
12.4.7 Check Status of a Scheduled Upgrade ................................................................................... 12-9
12.4.8 Software Upgrade Events .................................................................................................... 12-10
12.5 Rollback to Previously Installed Version.......................................................................... 12-10

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List of Figures
Figure 2-1: OPT9624 chassis slots...............................................................................................................2-2
Figure 2-2: OPT9624 with four FM1000 cards ............................................................................................2-3
Figure 2-3: OPT9624 with two FM100 cards ...............................................................................................2-3
Figure 2-4: OPT9624 with no fabric cards ...................................................................................................2-4
Figure 2-5: OPT9608 chassis slots...............................................................................................................2-4
Figure 2-6: OPT9603 slot numbering ..........................................................................................................2-5
Figure 2-7: Artemis-1P slot numbering .......................................................................................................2-5
Figure 2-8: Artemis-2A slot numbering.......................................................................................................2-6
Figure 2-9: Artemis-4A slot numbering.......................................................................................................2-6
Figure 2-10: 4-port TR10_4 10 Gbps transponder card - OPT9600 series ..................................................2-11
Figure 2-11: ROADM_9A50 card - OPT9600 series....................................................................................2-12
Figure 2-12: REG40 card - OPT9600 series................................................................................................2-12
Figure 2-13: OPT9600 series 88-port MXD88 card ....................................................................................2-13
Figure 2-14: OPT9600 series 18-port AoC10 card .....................................................................................2-13
Figure 2-15: Relationship between ODU interfaces and their component TPN and tributary slot
combinations .........................................................................................................................2-23
Figure 2-16: PT20 multiplexing structure..................................................................................................2-24
Figure 2-17: MSI structure .......................................................................................................................2-24
Figure 3-1: Multi-shelf architecture............................................................................................................3-2
Figure 5-1: Example of monitor interface traffic display .............................................................................5-4
Figure 6-1: ODU-XC cross connect configuration ........................................................................................6-6
Figure 6-2: ODUi <--> ODUktrib[m] cross connect configuration.................................................................6-7
Figure 6-3: ODUi trib[n] <--> ODUitrib[m] cross connect configuration.......................................................6-7
Figure 6-4: 1-way unprotected P2P L1-XC leg .............................................................................................6-7
Figure 6-5: 1-way unprotected P2MP L1-XC legs ........................................................................................6-8
Figure 6-6: 2-way unprotected P2P L1-XC leg .............................................................................................6-8
Figure 6-7: 1-way protected P2P L1-XC leg .................................................................................................6-8
Figure 6-8: 2-way protected P2P L1-XC legs................................................................................................6-9
Figure 6-9: 2-way protected P2MP L1-XC legs ............................................................................................6-9
Figure 6-10: 2-way fully protected L1-XC ..................................................................................................6-10
Figure 7-1: Fiber Connectivity ....................................................................................................................7-1
Figure 7-2: Example of fiber connectivity connected peer configuration ....................................................7-2
Figure 7-3: Alien Lambda example .............................................................................................................7-6
Figure 9-1: ONCP transmission along the network......................................................................................9-2

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List of Tables
Table 2-1: OPT9600/Artemis series service and optical cards .....................................................................2-7
Table 2-2: OTN port and interface terminology ........................................................................................2-15
Table 2-3: FC port and interface terminology ...........................................................................................2-16
Table 2-4: Video port and interface terminology ......................................................................................2-16
Table 2-5: Management port terminology................................................................................................2-17
Table 2-6: PO port and interface terminology ..........................................................................................2-17
Table 2-7: SDH/SONET port and interface terminology.............................................................................2-17
Table 2-8: Layer 1 ETY/GbE port and interface terminology......................................................................2-18
Table 2-9: Layer 2 ETY/GbE port attributes and options ...........................................................................2-19
Table 2-10: Logical interface terminology.................................................................................................2-20
Table 2-11: Relationship between MSI, ODU, and TPN values ..................................................................2-25
Table 3-1: Multi-Shelf NE parameters ........................................................................................................3-3
Table 3-2: Multi-Shelf main shelf parameters.............................................................................................3-4
Table 3-3: Subtending Shelf Parameters.....................................................................................................3-5
Table 4-1: TR10_4EN Card: Port Configuration Rules................................................................................4-10
Table 4-2: Optical and photonic card attributes .......................................................................................4-25
Table 5-1: Keyboard commands .................................................................................................................5-5
Table 5-2: Keyboard commands .................................................................................................................5-5
Table 5-3: Interface alarms ........................................................................................................................5-6
Table 6-1: Supported signal rates for L1-XC endpoints................................................................................6-2
Table 6-2: XC mode comparison.................................................................................................................6-5
Table 6-3: Maximum number of L1-XC legs ..............................................................................................6-10
Table 6-4: L1-XC attributes .......................................................................................................................6-13
Table 6-5: L1-XC leg attributes .................................................................................................................6-14
Table 6-6: ODUk L1-XC options for OTU ports ..........................................................................................6-17
Table 6-7: ODUk L1-XC options for Ethernet ports....................................................................................6-18
Table 6-8: ODUk L1-XC options for SDH ports...........................................................................................6-18
Table 6-9: ODUk L1-XC options for SONET ports.......................................................................................6-19
Table 6-10: ODUk L1-XC options for FC ports............................................................................................6-19
Table 6-11: ODUk L1-XC options for CBR ports .........................................................................................6-20
Table 7-1: Inter/Intra-fiber Connectivity Parameters ..................................................................................7-3
Table 7-2: OCHP port and related alien lambda parameters .......................................................................7-7
Table 7-3: Modifying/deleting intra (internal) fiber connectivity parameters..............................................7-9
Table 7-4: Modifying/deleting inter (external) fiber connectivity parameters ...........................................7-10
Table 7-5: Port modifications and their impact on fiber connectivity ........................................................7-11
Table 7-6: Fiber connectivity rules for OTN technology ............................................................................7-12
Table 7-7: Fiber connectivity rules for STM technology ............................................................................7-13
Table 7-8: Fiber connectivity rules for SONET technology.........................................................................7-13
Table 7-9: Fiber connectivity rules for FC technology ...............................................................................7-14
Table 7-10: Fiber connectivity rules for Ethernet technology....................................................................7-15

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Table 7-11: Fiber connectivity rules for CBR technology ...........................................................................7-16


Table 8-1: Basic VSI configuration parameters............................................................................................8-4
Table 8-2: MPLS tunnel configuration options ..........................................................................................8-25
Table 8-3: CFM configuration options ......................................................................................................8-44
Table 8-4: DSCP and P-bit mapping options..............................................................................................8-53
Table 8-5: ERP options .............................................................................................................................8-62
Table 8-6: Ethernet and packet handling port parameters........................................................................8-67
Table 8-7: EXP bit mapping options ..........................................................................................................8-70
Table 8-8: FM severity profile options ......................................................................................................8-77
Table 8-9: FDB configuration options .......................................................................................................8-81
Table 8-10: LAG options ...........................................................................................................................8-82
Table 8-11: Link OAM configuration options ............................................................................................8-91
Table 8-12: LLCF configuration options.....................................................................................................8-93
Table 8-13: IGMP configuration options ...................................................................................................8-93
Table 8-14: MPLS configuration options ................................................................................................. 8-102
Table 8-15: Port pausing configuration options ...................................................................................... 8-103
Table 8-16: PM configuration options .................................................................................................... 8-103
Table 8-17: Policing configuration options ............................................................................................. 8-106
Table 8-18: Port Mirroring configuration options ................................................................................... 8-121
Table 8-19: RSTP card and port configuration options ............................................................................ 8-125
Table 8-20: TM card and port options .................................................................................................... 8-127
Table 9-1: ONCP data .................................................................................................................................9-3
Table 10-1: ASON Trail Parameters ........................................................................................................ 10-11
Table 11-1: Parameters automatically copied to the protecting port - per service type ............................11-3
Table 11-2: Triggers for port switch over events and their relative priorities ............................................11-8
Table 11-3: Summary of Protection Commands ..................................................................................... 11-17
Table 11-4: FM fabric status information ............................................................................................... 11-20
Table 11-5: Summary of protection-related alarms and events .............................................................. 11-23

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1 About this Guide
The ShadeTree User Guide Interface Configuration explains how to configure ports, interfaces, cross
connections, and fiber connectivity.
To obtain the most current information about these platforms and devices, refer to the release notes that
accompanied the product. The release notes may contain late-breaking information or corrections to the
information in this guide.

1.1 Intended Audience


This guide is designed for network engineers who are setting up and maintaining the configuration of
Apollo and <Artemis> series devices. This guide assumes that you have a fundamental understanding of IP
networking.

NOTE: The CLI commands and parameters provided in this book are part of a comprehensive
system implementation developed for a wide range of platforms and devices. Some of the
specific commands and parameters that are included in these code fragments are not
supported in the current version of ShadeTree. In addition, not every user has full privileges to
perform commands in the CLI. Therefore, you might not be able to run some of the commands
described in this manual, with the specific syntax and parameters listed.

1.2 Document Organization


This guide is organized as follows:
 Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification. Describes interface naming and how to configure ports on
Apollo and Artemis devices.
 Multi-Shelf Configuration. Describes how to configure the main shelf and subtending shelves. It also
describes how to specify the subtending shelf during the configuration of cards and ports that reside
on a subtending shelf.
 Port Configuration. Describes how to configure physical ports located on various data, photonic, and
optical service cards.
 Interface Configuration. Describes how to configure interfaces and logical interfaces on Apollo and
Artemis devices.
 Cross Connection Configuration. Describes how to configure Layer 1 and Layer 2 cross connections
between card ports on Apollo devices.
 Fiber Connectivity. Defines the characteristics of the connectivity between ports connected via
physical fibers.
 Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and Ports. Defines the attributes required for Layer 2 Ethernet and
MPLS functionality.
 ONCP. Describes how to work with optical network control parameters to enable proper gain setting
and power equalization along the entire network.

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 ASON Trail Restoration. Describes how to work with ASON trail protection and restoration
parameters.
 Configuring Protection Mechanisms. Outlines the configuration required for cards and ports to
support these protection schemes; the commands that can be used to modify protection temporarily
during maintenance operations; and the commands that can be used to view and troubleshoot
protected entities.
 Upgrading the Software. Describes how to view and upgrade the NE software version.

1.3 Notes and Warnings


When applicable, this manual uses the following notes and warnings:

NOTE: clarifying information, specific instructions, commentary, sidelights, or interesting


points of information.

CAUTION: failure to follow directions could result in damage to equipment or loss of


information.

WARNING: failure to follow directions could result in bodily harm or loss of life.

LASER WARNING: how to avoid personal injury. All personnel involved in equipment
installation, operation, and maintenance must be aware that laser radiation is invisible.
Therefore, although protective devices generally prevent direct exposure to the beam,
personnel must strictly observe the applicable safety precautions and, in particular, must
avoid staring into optical connectors, either directly or using optical instruments.

ESD: information on how to avoid discharge of static electricity and subsequent damage to
the unit.

TIP: helpful information and handy hints that can make your task easier.

IMPORTANT: essential information to which you must pay attention.

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1.4 Related Documentation


The complete ShadeTree User Guide consists of the following user guides and reference manuals (including
the current document):
 System Overview and Configuration User Guide: Contains an overview of Apollo and Artemis series
devices, information about the CLI, initial system configuration instructions, and information about
performing system management.
 Interface Configuration User Guide: Contains information about configuring interfaces, including
firewall filters, and accounting options.
 Routing Protocols User Guide: Contains information about routing and routing protocols.
 Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) User Guide: Contains information about Generic Routing
Encapsulation (GRE).
 Configuration Statement Reference Manual: A reference of the configuration statements for each
configuration top-level hierarchy.
 Command Reference Manual: A reference of operation and high-level configuration mode
commands.
The following publications provide related content:
 ShadeTree System Software Release Notes: Contains the latest information about known problems
and suggested workarounds.
 Apollo Series Installation and Maintenance Manuals: Describe the relevant device and explains how
to unpack and install the device, set up the device, perform basic troubleshooting and maintenance,
and repack the device for transport or return.
 STMS Getting Started Guide: Provides information about preparing for ShadeTree Management Suite
installation, installing and removing the ShadeTree Management System software, and performing
basic tasks.
 STMS User Guide: Provides information about using the ShadeTree Management System Console to
provision, manage, and monitor Apollo and Artemis series devices.

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1.5 How to Obtain ECI Technical Documentation


To obtain technical documentation related to any ECI product, contact:
ECI Telecom Ltd.
ECI Documentation Group
30 Hasivim St.
Petach Tikva 4959388 – Israel
Fax: +972-3-9268060
Email: techdoc.feedback@ecitele.com

1.6 Technical Assistance


For all product-related questions and issues, including installation, configuration, operation, and
maintenance, contact your local ECI Customer Support representative.
You can also contact the global ECI Customer Support Center at:
Telephone +972-3-9266000
Telefax +972-3-9266370
Email on.support@ecitele.com

ECI Telecom Ltd. Proprietary 1-4


2 Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification
This section describes the physical layout of each type of platform chassis and multi-shelf NE configuration,
including the slot numbering used for each chassis. This section also describes the cards that are used in the
various types of chassis, including the port numbering on those cards.
Before using your equipment, you must configure the chassis, slot, and card port properties appropriately
for your system configuration. You can configure port and interface properties for equipment that is
currently installed as well as for equipment not yet installed in the system. When you add ports and
interfaces that have been pre-configured (for example, by inserting a service card), the software detects
the interfaces and applies the configuration.

NOTE: Port configuration is described in Port Configuration. Interfaces configuration is


described in Interface Configuration. Cross connection configuration is described in Cross
Connection Configuration. Management and auxiliary interface configuration are described in
the System Overview and Configuration User Guide.

2.1 Chassis Slot Layout


This section describes the physical layout of the equipment being used, including the slot numbering
arrangements on the various types of platforms. It is essential to understand slot and port numbering
conventions in order to correctly identify the slot and port being used when configuring an interface for
service.

NOTE: In the CLI, slot names begin with the letter u followed by the slot number.
For example, the location that houses Slot 0 is called u0 in the CLI. The ports on the sNPB
(located on the RCP card) are considered to be in slots ua (RCP-A) or ub (RCP-B).

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2.1.1 OPT9624 Slot Numbering


There are 24 universal I/O slots in the OPT9624 chassis. These slots are organized into two logical slot
banks, the upper and lower slots. The slots are numbered u0 to u23, running from the left to right sides,
with the even numbered slots in the upper slot bank and the odd numbered slots in the lower slot bank.
Slot u0 is on the top left, slot u1 below slot u0, slot u2 to the right of slot u0, slot u3 below slot u2, and so
on, as illustrated in the following figure.
Figure 2-1: OPT9624 chassis slots

Card slots are organized for use with the following card combinations:
 24 universal I/O slots, with slot allocation optimized per application:
 Up to 4 slots that can be used for either fabric cards or service and photonic cards, identified as
slots u8, u9, u10, and u11. In the preceding figure, these slots are identified as slot#/FM_#,
indicating that they can be used for standard service cards or fabric cards, depending on the
platform configuration.
 An additional 20 slots for service and photonic cards, referred to as slots u0-u7 and u12-u23.
 Two slots for redundant Routing Control Processor (RCP_24T) cards that may include optional sNPB
modules. These slots are identified as slots ua and ub.
The OPT9624 can be configured with different fabric matrix cards, or without fabric at all, to support
various applications. Depending on the fabric installation, there are three main configurations:
 High capacity 1 Tbps fabric, suitable for mixed OTN and data applications.
 Medium capacity 100 Gbps fabric, suitable mainly for metro applications, supporting data, OTN, and
optic cards.
 No fabric, suitable for pure WDM applications.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification

The following figures depict the layout of the three OPT9624 configurations:
Figure 2-2: OPT9624 with four FM1000 cards

Figure 2-3: OPT9624 with two FM100 cards

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Figure 2-4: OPT9624 with no fabric cards

2.1.2 OPT9608 Slot Numbering


There are eight slots in the OPT9608 chassis into which you can insert service cards. The slots are
numbered Slot 0 to Slot 7, with Slot 0 on the top left and Slot 7 on the bottom right, as illustrated in the
following figure.
Figure 2-5: OPT9608 chassis slots

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2.1.3 OPT9603 Slot Numbering


There are three I/O slots in the OPT9603 numbered Slot 0 to Slot 3, with Slot 0 on the top left, and Slot 2 on
the bottom right. A single slot is provided for the Routing Control Processor card (RCP03), and two slots for
redundant Power Filter Modules (PMs), using a DC power source, or an AC power source (with a
PFM03_AC). A single slot is provided for a Fan Control Module (FCM) (with two fans in the FCM03), as
illustrated in the following figure.
Figure 2-6: OPT9603 slot numbering

2.1.4 Artemis Slot Numbering


The following sections describe slot numbering in Artemis platforms.

2.1.4.1 Artemis-1P Shelf


The Artemis-1P is a 1U shelf housed in a 239.5 mm (9.43 in.) deep, 443 mm (17.4 in.) wide, and 43.4 mm
(1.7 in.) high equipment cage. The Artemis-1P features a highly flexible structure with a significantly small
footprint. All modules can be inserted even when the shelf delivers live traffic without affecting it. The shelf
is totally passive and requires no power for its operation.
The Artemis-1P supports Artemis passive cards, as well as passive cards of the Apollo product line, with a
default configuration of two single slots. These slots can be configured as a double slot, by removing the
divider bracket between the single slots. The following figure shows the slot numbering of the Artemis-1P.
Figure 2-7: Artemis-1P slot numbering

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2.1.4.2 Artemis-2A Shelf


The Artemis-2A shelf is a 2U shelf housed in a 239.5 mm (9.43 in.) deep, 443 mm (17.4 in.) wide, and 87.9
mm (3.46 in.) high equipment cage. The Artemis-2A features a highly flexible structure with a significantly
small footprint. All modules can be inserted even when the shelf delivers live traffic without affecting it.
The shelf can accommodate a controller card, which enables it to report inventory information. The
Artemis-2A must be connected to a power source to enable the controller card to operate.
The Artemis-2A supports Artemis passive cards, as well as passive cards of the Apollo product line, with a
default configuration of four single slots. These slots can also be configured as two single slots and one
double slot, as two double slots, or as one quad slot by removing the divider brackets between the single
slots. The following figure shows the slot numbering of the Artemis-2A.
Figure 2-8: Artemis-2A slot numbering

2.1.4.3 Artemis-4A Shelf


The Artemis-4A shelf is a 4U shelf housed in a 239.5 mm (9.43 in.) deep, 443 mm (17.4 in.) wide, and 175.8
mm (6.92 in.) high equipment cage. The Artemis-4A features a highly flexible structure with a significantly
small footprint. All modules can be inserted even when the shelf delivers live traffic without affecting it.
The shelf can accommodate a controller card, which enables it to report inventory information. The
Artemis-4A must be connected to a power source to enable the controller card to operate.
The Artemis-4A supports Artemis passive cards, as well as passive cards of the Apollo product line, with a
default configuration of eight single slots. These slots can be configured in any mixture of single slots,
double slots, and quad slots by removing the divider brackets between the single slots. The following figure
shows the slot numbering of the Artemis-4A.
Figure 2-9: Artemis-4A slot numbering

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2.2 Card Types


Apollo and Artemis devices support L1 service cards as well as various types of photonic and passive optical cards. The various card types are described in the
following table. The platforms in which each card can be used are indicated.
Note that a specific card cannot automatically always be used in the corresponding platform; usage might depend on controller card selection or platform
configuration. For example, the OPT9624 can be configured for three different working modes, as described in OPT9624 Slot Numbering. Not all cards that can be
used in OPT9624 platforms are appropriate for every working mode configuration.

Table 2-1: OPT9600/Artemis series service and optical cards

Category Card type Name syntax 9603 9608 9624 Artemis


L1 service cards Transponder tr<service-rate>-<ports>  tr10-4  tr10-4  tr10-4
 tr10-4en  tr10-4en  tr10-4en
 tr10-12  tr10-12  r10-12
 tr100  tr100  tr100
 tr100-l  tr100-l  tr100-l
 tr100m  tr100m  tr100m
ADM on a card aoc<service-rate>  aoc10  aoc10  aoc10
 aoc10b  aoc10b  aoc10b
 aoc25  aoc25  aoc25
 aoc25b  aoc25b  aoc25b

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Category Card type Name syntax 9603 9608 9624 Artemis


Combiner (muxponder) cmr<service-rate>  cmr40  cmr40  cmr40
mxp<service-rate>  cmr40b  cmr40b  cmr40b
 cmr100  cmr100  cmr100
 cmr100-l  cmr100-l  cmr100-l
 cmr100m  cmr100m  cmr100m
 mxp100e10  mxp100e10  mxp100e10
 mxp100e40  mxp100e40  mxp100e40
L1 fabric service cards fio<service-rate/multirate>-<po  fio10-5
(connecting to central rts>  fio10-5b
fabric)  fiomr-16
 fiomr-16b
 fio100
 fio100m
L2 data cards Layer 2 data switching aoc10-l2  aoc10-l2  aoc10-l2  aoc10-l2
card Configured for one of the (Inserted into slots
following modes: 1,3,5,7 only.)
 pb (default)
 mpls-pe
Controller cards RCP cards  rcp03  rcp14ad-t  rcp24-t
 rcp08-o  rcp24-o

Modules inserted into snpb<GbE-rate>-<ports>  snpb1-4


RCP cards  snpb1-2i

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Category Card type Name syntax 9603 9608 9624 Artemis


Common cards Power feed modules  pfm03  pfm  pfm24
 pfm03-ac

Fan modules  fcm03  fcm  fcm24

Common external  cem24


modules
Fabric cards Fabric cards fm<service-rate>  fm100
 fm1000

Protection cards  olp-s2  olp-s2  olp-s2


 omsp  omsp  omsp
Other OSC channel access osc<ports>  osc8  osc8  osc8

Photonic cards Amplifiers oa-<service>  oa-pa  oa-pa  oa-pa


 oa-fb  oa-fb  oa-fb
 oa-fhbs  oa-fhbs  oa-fhbs
 oa-ml  oa-ml  oa-ml
 oa-m  oa-m  oa-m
 oa-mhs  oa-mhs  oa-mhs
 oa-l  oa-l  oa-l
 oa-lehrs  oa-lehrs  oa-lehrs
 oa-ehrs  oa-ehrs  oa-ehrs
 oa-hrs  oa-hrs
ROADM roadm-<degree>a(add)  roadm-2a  roadm-2a  roadm-2a
<spacing>  roadm-2a50  roadm-2a50  roadm-2a50
 roadm-4a  roadm-4a  roadm-4a
 roadm-4a50  roadm-4a50  roadm-4a50
 roadm-9a  roadm-9a
 roadm-9a50  roadm-9a50
Tunable filter array tfa-<channels>  tfa-8  tfa-8  tfa-8
(TFA)

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Category Card type Name syntax 9603 9608 9624 Artemis


Passive optics Dispersion-compensate dcf<fiber-type>  dcf652  dcf652  dcf652  dcf652
cards d fibers (DCF)  dcf655lf  dcf655lf  dcf655lf

Mux/DeMux (DWDM) mxd<channels>  mxd8  mxd8  mxd8  mxd8


 mxd16  mxd16  mxd16  mxd16
 mxd16-rmux  mxd16-rmux  mxd16-rmux  mxd16-rmux
 mxd16-bmux  mxd16-bmux  mxd16-bmux  mxd16-bmux
 mxd44  mxd44  mxd44  mxd44¢
 mxd88  mxd88
Mux/DeMux (CWDM) d-md<channels>  d-md-40

Mux/DeMux (XDM) cmxd<channels>  cmxd8  cmxd8  cmxd8  cmxd8

OADM (fixed DWDM) foadm<channels><spacing>  foadm2  foadm2  foadm2  foadm2


 foadm4  foadm4  foadm4  foadm4
 foadm850  foadm850  foadm850  foadm850
OADM (CWDM) coadm<channels>  coadm4  coadm4  coadm4  coadm4

OADM oadmc<channels>  oadmc4  oadmc4  oadmc4  oadmc4


(colorless/flexible)  oadmc8  oadmc8  oadmc8  oadmc8

Splitter sp-<fiber-type>-<splitters>  sp-ce4-2  sp-ce4-2  sp-ce4-2  sp-ce4-2


 sp-ce8-1  sp-ce8-1  sp-ce8-1  sp-ce8-1
fiber type: colorless extender
 sp-ce32-1  sp-ce32-1  sp-ce32-1  sp-ce32-1
(CE), multimode (MM), and
 sp-mm4  sp-mm4  sp-mm4  sp-mm4
singlemode (se)
 sp-sm4  sp-sm4  sp-sm4  sp-sm4
C/T filters ct-<OSCchannel[nm]>-  ct-1310-2  ct-1310-2  ct-1310-2  ct-1310-2
<filters>  ct-1510-2  ct-1510-2  ct-1510-2  ct-1510-2
 clt-1510/  clt-1510/  clt-1510/  clt-1510/
1590 1590 1590 1590
 rb-2  rb-2  rb-2  rb-2

For a more detailed description of the various card types available, refer to the Reference Manual of the specific device.

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2.3 Port and Interface Naming


Understanding how ports and interfaces are named is an important part of equipment configuration, since
it is the name that identifies the object which you are configuring. Each type of port and interface and port
can be identified using the relevant elements in the following generic naming scheme. (The abbreviations
associated with each type of port and interface are described in Port and Interface Types.)
type-slot/port:channel:(2channel | group-unit:channel-group).logical

Where:
 type is the type of port interface, such as ge for a GbE interface or lo0 for a loopback interface.
 slot is chassis slot in which the card is inserted, such as u0 for the first slot in a 9600 chassis or sa-u0
for the first slot in a subtending Artemis shelf. For more information about subtending shelves, see
Multi-Shelf Configuration.
 port is the number of the card port.
 channel is the channel number.
 2channel is the DS-1/E-1 channel number, if relevant.
 group-unit is the group and unit number, if relevant.
 channel-group is the channel of the first DS-0 channel in the channel group interface, if relevant.
 logical is the logical interface number, if relevant.

2.4 OPT9600 Series Port Numbering


This section describes the physical arrangement of the ports on various types of cards. It is essential to
understand slot and port numbering conventions in order to correctly identify the slot and port being used
when configuring an interface for service. Different types of OPT9600 series cards have a varying number of
ports; however, the port numbering scheme generally follows one of the following patterns.
If the ports are all arranged on a single row, then the port on the left-hand side of the card when the card is
lying horizontally is Port 0. The port numbering increments from left to right. the following figure illustrates
the port numbering on a 4-port 10 Gbps transponder card. Similar left-to-right port numbering progressions
are found on the other cards with ports arranged in a single row, including TFA, FIO, OSC, CMR, DCF, CT,
OADM, COADM, and FOADM cards.
Figure 2-10: 4-port TR10_4 10 Gbps transponder card - OPT9600 series

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The numbering on ROADM cards refers to degree ports, but a similar principle applies. For example, on a
ROADM_9A50 card, the ports in a single row are numbered from left to right, with the port on the far left
for local use or for Degree 1, the second for Degree 2, and so on, until you reach the port on the far right
side, used for Degree 9.
Figure 2-11: ROADM_9A50 card - OPT9600 series

The port numbering on REG40 regenerator cards follows the same left-to-right pattern when looking at the
card standing vertically.
Figure 2-12: REG40 card - OPT9600 series

If the ports are arranged on multiple rows, then in most cards the port on the upper left-hand side of the
card when the card is inserted horizontally into the chassis is Port 0. The port numbering increments from
left to right for the ports along the top row, then continues from left to right for the ports on the bottom
row.
For example, this is the port numbering scheme on the 12-port SP_MM_4 and SP_SM_4 splitter cards,
running from Port 0 to Port 5 along the top row, and from Port 6 to Port 11 along the bottom row. The
10-port SP_CE_2 splitter card follows the same pattern with 5 ports on each row, numbered from Port 0 to
Port 4 along the top row and from Port 5 to Port 9 along the bottom row.

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In the CMXD8, OADMC8_21, and FOADM850_21 cards, the port numbering refers to channels, but a similar
principle applies. The first group of ports runs from left to right along the upper row, and the second group
runs from left to right along the bottom row. Similarly in the MXD44, ports are numbered left to right from
Port 1 to Port 22 along the upper row, and Port 23 to Port 44 along the bottom row. In the MXD88, the
ports are arranged in four rows of 22 ports each, similarly numbered from left to right, with the numbering
again beginning with the left side port in the top row. The following figure illustrates the port numbering on
a 10-port GbE NPB card.
Figure 2-13: OPT9600 series 88-port MXD88 card

Ports on AoC10 and FIOMR_16 cards are numbered slightly differently. Both cards provide 16 SFP-based
client ports arranged in three groups, as follows. When the card is inserted horizontally into the chassis, the
port on the lower left-hand side of the card is Port 0. The port numbering increments from left to right for
six ports along the bottom left side (Port 0 - Port 5). Port numbering then continues from left to right for six
ports along the top left side (Port 6 - Port 11). The last group of four SFP ports increment from left to right
for four ports along the bottom right side (Port 12 - Port 15). The AoC10 card also provides two XFP-based
OTU-2 line ports are located on the upper right side (Port 16 and Port 17). The following figure illustrates
the port numbering on an 18-port AoC10 card.
Figure 2-14: OPT9600 series 18-port AoC10 card

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2.5 Port and Interface Types


Interfaces are implemented through ports located on the various types of service cards. This section
describes the interfaces supported through ports on service cards installed in the chassis slots.

2.5.1 OTN
Optical Transport Network (OTN) technology, supported by the OPT9600 platforms, offers a range of rates
up to 100Gbps. OTN interfaces are supported through the following types of ports:
 Optical Transmission Section (OTS) ports for equipment with more than one wavelength, supporting
OMS and xOCH interfaces. Used, for example, in amplifiers or DCF cards, or in OADM or Mux/DeMux
cards for channelization purposes.
 Optical Channel Ports (OCHP), for single-wavelength OCH interfaces.
 Optical Transport Unit (OTU) ports, for port rates ranging from OTU1 to OTU4, for comparable ODUk
interfaces ranging from ODU0 to ODU4. Used, for example, in OTU2 ports in TR10_4 cards, or for ODU
interfaces multiplexed to an OTUk port in an AoC10B or FIO10_5B card. Also used for ECI’s proprietary
ODUSlot interface for ports with interface rates under 2.5G on cards that predate V5.1.
Note that when you configure an OTU port, the software automatically creates the comparable high
order (HO) interfaces. If you wish to configure that OTU port for multiplexing, you must explicitly
define the low order (LO) ODUs to be multiplexed for that port.

NOTE: ODU0 and the set of ODUflex interfaces, working with payload type 21 (PT21), are
supported by cards from V5.1 and later. ODUSlot interfaces, working with PT20 and PT82, are
supported by cards that predate V5.1.
In the following table, all LO interfaces are implemented on cards from V5.1 and later using
PT21 unless otherwise noted.

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The following table clarifies the correspondence between OTN ports and interfaces. These ports and
interfaces are identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in this table.

Table 2-2: OTN port and interface terminology

Port Types HO Interfaces LO Interfaces (for multiplexing)


ochp och ---
ots oms  xoch
(where the specific choice depends on the spacing)
otu1 (~2.5Gbps) odu1  2 x oduslot (PT82 only)
 2 x odu0 (PT20 only)
otu2 (~10Gbps) odu2 Any of the following interfaces, in any combination
totaling up to 10Gbps:
 Up to 4 x odu1 (PT20 or PT21)
 Up to 8 x odu0
 Up to 2 x oduf-sdi3g
 Up to 2 x oduf-fc400
 Up to 1 x oduf-fc800
otu2e (~10Gbps) odu2e ---
otu2f (~10Gbps) odu2f ---
otu2x (~10Gbps) odu2  odu2
 8 x spo
(where configured for XDM-AoC functionality)
otu3e (~40Gbps) odu3e Any of the following interfaces, in any combination
totaling up to 40Gbps:
 Up to 4 x odu2e (PT20 or PT21)
 Up to 4 x odu2 (PT20 or PT21)
 Up to 16 x odu1 (PT20 or PT21)
 Up to 32 x odu0
 Up to 8 x oduf-sdi3g
 Up to 8 x oduf-fc400
 Up to 4 x oduf-fc800
otu4 (~100 Gbps) odu4 Up to 80 of any of the following interfaces, in any
combination totaling up to 100 Gbps. Note that all of the
following are implemented using PT21.
 Up to 2 x odu3e
 Up to 10 x odu2e
 Up to 10 x odu2
 Up to 40 x odu1
 Up to 80 x odu0
 Up to 20 x oduf-sdi3g
 Up to 20 x oduf-fc400
 Up to 10 x oduf-fc800

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2.5.2 FC
Fibre Channel (FC) technology, supported by the OPT9600 platforms, offers a range of rates up to FC10G.
The following table clarifies the correspondence between FC ports and interfaces. These ports and
interfaces are identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in this table.

Table 2-3: FC port and interface terminology

Port Types Interfaces


fc100  oduslot
 odu0 (V5.1 and later)
fc200  odu1
fc400  2 x odu1
 oduf-fc400 (V5.1 and later)
fc800  odu2
 oduf-fc800 (V5.1 and later)
fc1200  odu2f
 odu2e (V5.1 and later)
ull_fc800  ull-fc800 (V6.1 and later)
ull_fc1200  ull-fc1200 (V6.1 and later)
ull_fc1600  ull-fc1600 (V6.1 and later)

2.5.3 Video
Constant Bit Rate (CBR) technology is supported by the OPT9600 platforms. The following table clarifies
the correspondence between video ports and interfaces. These ports and interfaces are identified in the CLI
using the abbreviations listed in this table.

Table 2-4: Video port and interface terminology

Port Types Interfaces


video270  oduslot
(270 Mbps)  odu0 (V5.1 and later)
hdsdi1485  odu1
(1.485 Gbps)
hdsdi3g  oduf-sdi3g (V5.1 and later)
(3 Gbps)

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2.5.4 Management
Optical Supervisory Channel (OSC) technology is supported for an industry-standard range of management
channel ports:
 1510 nm OSC port for DWDM applications.
 1310 nm OSC port for CWDM applications.
 100 Mbps (FE) OSC port.
 2 Mbps OSC port.
Management ports are identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in the following table.

Table 2-5: Management port terminology

Port Types
oscchannel
osc100m
osc2m
osc-8

2.5.5 Physical Optical


Physical Optical (PO) technology is supported for splitter/coupler ports using Optical Section (OS)
interfaces. The following table clarifies the correspondence between PO ports and interfaces. These ports
and interfaces are identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in this table.

Table 2-6: PO port and interface terminology

Port Types Interfaces


po os

2.5.6 SDH/SONET
SDH/SONET technologies are supported for STM/OC ports using ODU interfaces. The following table
clarifies the correspondence between SDH/SONET ports and interfaces. These ports and interfaces are
identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in this table.

Table 2-7: SDH/SONET port and interface terminology

Port Types Interfaces


stm64 odu2
oc192
stm16 odu1
oc48

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Port Types Interfaces


stm4 oduslot
oc12 odu0 (V5.1 and later)
stm1 oduslot
oc3 odu0 (V5.1 and later)
stm1e oduslot
oc3e odu0 (V5.1 and later)

2.5.7 Gigabit Ethernet Ports


Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) interfaces work with corresponding (appropriate capacity) GbE ports. A range of
interface options are supported, including 1GbE, 10GbE, and 100GbE. GbE interfaces support multiple
logical interfaces per physical interface and can support multiple VLANs. The following table clarifies the
correspondence between Layer 1 ETY and GbE ports and interfaces. These ports and interfaces are
identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in this table.

Table 2-8: Layer 1 ETY/GbE port and interface terminology

Port Types Interfaces


ety1g | ety1ge  oduslot
 odu0 (V5.1 and later)
ety1gx  oduslot
 spo
(where configured for XDM-AoC functionality)
ety1gxe  oduslot
 odu0 (V5.1 and later)
otu2x  odu2
 8 x spo
(where configured for XDM-AoC functionality)
ety10g  odu2
ety10goc  odu2e
ety100g  odu4
ull_ety10goc  ull-ety10goc (V6.1 and later)

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Layer 2 ports on the AoC10_L2 card have their own set of attributes and configuration options. The
following table introduces the attributes and options supported for Layer 2 ports.

Table 2-9: Layer 2 ETY/GbE port attributes and options

Port Types Port Mode Switching Mode


External ports (with transceivers)
1 GbE (ge)  UNI (default)  PB
 I NNI  MPLS
 E NNI
 Mirror
 MoE  MPLS
10 GbE (ge10)  UNI (default)  PB
 I NNI  MPLS
 E NNI
 Mirror
 MoE  MPLS
10 GbE with OTN  UNI  PB
(ge10-otu2e)  I NNI (default)  MPLS
 E NNI
 Mirror
 MoE  MPLS
Internal ports (internal communication between cards in the same platform, no transceivers)
10 GbE (ge10)  I-MoE (default)  MPLS

2.5.8 Logical Interfaces


A logical interface is a virtual interface on a physical interface or subinterface. One interface or subinterface
can support multiple logical interfaces. Multiple logical interfaces are supported by applying tagging, such
as VLAN-IDs, to packets arriving from or sent to different destinations. The logical interface number
corresponds to the logical unit number which can be any number from 0 through 999,999.

2.5.8.1 GRE Interfaces


Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) interfaces are software-only interfaces. Logical GRE interfaces are
dependent on the GRE routing protocol and are used to create endpoints for GRE routing tunnels in certain
system management configurations.
GRE interfaces are identified with the abbreviation gre0. For example, the interface name gre0.53
corresponds to a GRE interface that has a logical unit number of 53.

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2.5.8.2 Logical Loopback Interfaces


Logical loopback interfaces are software-only interfaces that are internal to the device. Logical loopback
interfaces are virtual interfaces that are never down and allow for routing protocol adjacencies to remain
up, even if the outbound interface is down. For example, you can use a logical loopback interface as a
neighbor address for a BGP session.
Logical loopback interfaces are identified with the abbreviation lo0. For example, the interface name lo0.0
corresponds to the primary logical loopback interface on the device. Logical loopback interfaces for inband
management are identified with the abbreviation dcu0.
Logical interfaces are identified in the CLI using the abbreviations listed in the following table.

Table 2-10: Logical interface terminology

Interface Types
dcu0
lo0
gre0

2.6 Configuring Slots and Cards


Configuring a device involves the following steps:
 At the [edit chassis] hierarchy level, specify the chassis configuration, including which service
card is located in each slot, as described in this section.
 Configure the NE and any sub-shelves as described in Multi-Shelf Configuration.
 Configure the slot parameter settings, listed in Complete Slot and Port Configuration Statement.
 Configure the physical properties of the port at the [edit port] hierarchy level, as described in Port
Configuration.
 When working with SDH/SONET service cards, configure interfaces at the [edit interfaces]
hierarchy level, as described in Interface Configuration.
 When working with photonic, optical, or data cards, configure Layer 1 or Layer 2 cross connections at
the [edit cross connections] hierarchy level, as described in Cross Connection Configuration.
 Configure fiber connectivity at the [edit port] hierarchy level, as described in Fiber Connectivity.
This section describes how to configure the chassis slots and cards. The examples in this section focus on
the basic configuration options that are most commonly used. For a summary of the complete chassis
configuration command, including each type of configuration statement, see the Configuration Statement
Reference Manual.

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NOTE: The CLI examples provided in this section are for illustrative purposes only, to clarify
the style or syntax of a type of command. Some of the specific commands and parameters
used in these examples are not supported in the current version of ShadeTree. In addition, not
every user has full privileges to perform commands in the CLI. Therefore, you might not be
able to run some of the commands described in this manual, with the specific syntax and
parameters listed.

2.6.1 Configuring the NPB Slot and Type


Before configuring any ports or interfaces, you must specify the location and type of the NPB you want to
configure. To specify the NPB location and type, include the following statement at the [edit chassis]
hierarchy level:

set npb npb npb-type;

Where:
 npb identifies the NPB card slot location:
 rcpa-np and rcpb-np are the sNPB modules on the RCP cards in slots ua and ub.

2.6.2 Specifying a Chassis Slot, Card Name, Port, and


Interface Configuration
In order to configure card ports, you must specify the type of card and in which chassis slot the card is
located. To specify a card and slot, include the following statement at the [edit chassis] hierarchy
level:
set chassis slot slot-number card-name [port port-number] [port-type port-type]
[HO-interface] [LO-interface];

Where:
 slot is the chassis slot in which the card is located:
 ca, cb - Slots RCPA and RCPB (9600 CTM module)
 u0, u2, ..., uN-1, uN – Slots NPB0 through NPBN, where N depends on the number of slots in
that specific chassis
 ua, ub – Slot RCPA and RCPB (9600 sNPB module)
 sa-u1, sa-u2... sa-u6, sa-u7 - Slots in subtending shelf A, where used
 sb-u1, sb-u2... sb-u6, sb-u7 - Slots in subtending shelf B, where used
 sc-u1, ..., sl-u7 - Slots in subtending shelves C through L, where used
For more information about subtending shelves, see Multi-Shelf Configuration.

NOTE: For more information about slot numbering, see Chassis Slot Layout.

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 card-name is the name of the card, such as aoc10b or fio100. For a complete list of the cards and
their naming abbreviations, see Card Types.
 mode is the running mode, pb (default) or mpls-pe, relevant for aoc10-l2 only.
 port is the number of the port being configured.
 port-type is the type of interface being configured for this port.
 HO-interface and LO-interface information is optional, depending on the card configuration
and use. Interface configuration is explained in the following section.

2.6.3 Understanding Interface and Tributary Slot


Configuration
The High Order (HO) and Low Order (LO) interface specification fields are not always needed when
configuring a new card/slot/port combination. Once the port type has been specified, the remaining fields
are set automatically to the default values appropriate for the specified card and port type.
These command parameters are only necessary when assigning specific HO, LO, and Tributary Slot (TS)
combinations. Tributary slots are the smallest possible subdivisions for an ODU interface, where the size of
the tributary slot depends on the payload type (PT). For example, when working with PT21, an ODU2 port
can be divided into 8 tributary slots of 1.25G each. When working with PT20, an ODU2 port can be divided
into 4 tributary slots of 2.5G each.
The finer granularity provided by PT21 enables greater transport efficiency. PT21 also provides flexibility in
LO mapping, since the user can select which tributary slots should be assigned to a specific service.
Tributary slot options depend on the underlying equipment capabilities. For example, ODU0 interfaces
working with PT21 are supported by cards from V5.1 and later. The payload type and corresponding
multiplexing scheme configured for a card port are detected automatically by the system. The
multiplexing-scheme parameter identifies the multiplexing scheme (if any) used by that port. The
Tributary Port Number (TPN) identifies the set of tributary slots used in a specific multiplexing scheme.
When two OTUk ports supporting ODUk multiplexing are fiber connected, if they don’t utilize identical MSI
structures the system generates a Multiplex Structure Identifier (MSI) Mismatch error. This error is only
generated if the MSI monitor parameter is enabled. An ODU-MSIM mismatch alarm is generated for HO
ODU if at least one LO ODU is mismatched. The alarm remains in effect as long as there are mismatched
MSI structures in the LO ODUs. In addition, the system generates a LO-ODU-MISM alarm for each LO ODU
with a mismatched MSI structure. This provides additional troubleshooting information.

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The following figure provides a graphic illustration of the relationship between ODUs and the
corresponding TPN and tributary slot values when working with PT21. Note that the system supports single
stage multiplexing with different LO-ODU, ODUk, and/or ODU-Flex (CBR) such as ODUf-fc400 at the same
level.
Figure 2-15: Relationship between ODU interfaces and their component TPN and tributary slot
combinations

V5.1 supports ODUk both P20 and P21 multiplexing schemes. PT20 is supported on service cards released
prior to V5.1, such as AOC10 and FIOMR_16. PT21 is supported on service cards released as of V5.1 and
later, such as FIO100, FIOMR_16B, and AOC10B.

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While the PT21 multiplexing scheme is flexible, with PT20 the tributary slot allocation is fixed. The LO-ODUs
in PT20 are only ODUk, with ODU0 supported only under ODU1. The following figure illustrates the fixed
multiplexing structure used for PT20. To distinguish between the different ODUs, each LO-ODUk occupies a
pre-defined TPN, and the corresponding list of TSs cannot be edited. In this figure, four ODU2s are
multiplexed into an ODU3e. The tributary slots for each TPN are identified by color. For example, TPN 1
uses tributary slots 1, 5, 9, and 13, colored purple in the following figure.
Figure 2-16: PT20 multiplexing structure

Multiplexing information is stored in a Multiplex Structure Identifier (MSI) structure that includes the TPN
and ODTU type information, as illustrated in the following figure.
Figure 2-17: MSI structure

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The following table lists the corresponding ODU rates, multiplexing schemes, ODU types, and TPN values.

Table 2-11: Relationship between MSI, ODU, and TPN values


Multiplexing ODTU type: ODTU type: TPN values
ODU rate LO ODU
scheme String Value [naming convention]
ODU1 PT20 ODU0 ODTU01 11 1,2
[odu0-tpn1, odu0-tpn2]
ODU2 PT20 ODU1 ODTU12 00 1-4
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn4]
PT21 ODU1 ODTU12 00 1-4
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn4]
ODU0 ODTU2.ts 10 1-8
ODUF-FC400 [odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn8]
ODUF-FC800
ODUF-SDI3G
None Unallocated 11 1-8
ODU3 PT20 ODU1 ODTU13 00 1-16
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn16]
(ODU2 only)
ODU2/ODU2e ODTU23 01 1-4
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn4]
(ODU2 only)
PT21 ODU1 ODTU13 00 1-16
ODU2 ODTU23 01 1-4
ODU2e ODTU23 01 1-3
ODU0 OODTU3.ts 10 1-32
ODUF-FC400
ODUF-FC800
ODUF-SDI3G
None Unallocated 11 1-32
ODU3e PT20 ODU1 ODTU13 00 1-16
ODU2/ODU2e ODTU23 01 1-4
PT21 ODU1 ODTU13 00 1-16
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn16]
ODU2/ODU2e ODTU23 01 1-4
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn4]
ODU0 ODTU3.ts 10 1-32
ODUF-FC400 [odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn32]
ODUF-FC800
ODUF-SDI3G
None Unallocated 11 1-32

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Multiplexing ODTU type: ODTU type: TPN values


ODU rate LO ODU
scheme String Value [naming convention]
ODU4 PT21 Any LO-ODUk Allocated 1 1-80
[odu0-tpn1...odu0-tpn80]
None Unallocated 0

2.6.3.1 Port Configuration Examples


For example:
 To identify chassis 1, slot 0, port 2, ODU2 (ts 3), ODU1 (ts 2), enter:
odu1-1-u0/2:3:2
 To identify chassis 1, slot 1, port 1, ODU2 (ts 2), ODU1 (ts 2), ODUSlot (ts 2) enter:
odu1-1-u1/1:2:2:2
 To identify chassis default, slot 0, port 2, ODU3 (ts 3), ODU2 (ts 2), enter:
odu2-u0/2:3:2
 To identify chassis 1, slot 1, port 1, ODU3 (ts 2), ODU1 (ts 5) enter:
odu1-1-u1/1:2:...:5
 The following command configures port 0 of an AoC10 card located in slot u10, assigning a port type
of FC400. The corresponding interfaces are configured automatically.
set chassis slot u10 AOC10 port 0 port-type FC400;
 The following command configures port 0 of a TR10-4 card located in slot u5, assigning a port type of
STM-64. The corresponding interfaces are configured automatically.
set chassis slot u5 tr10-4 port 0 port-type stm64;
 The following command configures port 1 of a TR10-4 card located in slot u5, assigning a port type of
OTU2. The HO interface is an ODU with a rate of ODU2/2e/2f, and there is no alarm masking.
set chassis slot u5 tr10-4 port 1 port-type otu2 odu 1 alarm-master-mask disable;
 The following command configures port 2 of an FIO10-5 card located in slot u10, assigning that card a
port type of OTU2. The HO interface is implicitly understood to be ODU with a rate of ODU2, the LO
interface is an ODU1, and the Tributary Port Number (TPN) is 3.
set chassis slot u10 FIO10-5 port 2 port-type otu2 odu 1 odu odu1-TPN3;
If you prefer to explicitly define the HO-ODU rate, use the following command. To make the
difference clearer, the changes in the command wording are highlighted.
set chassis slot u10 FIO10-5 port 2 port-type otu2 odu 1 type odu2;
If you want to explicitly define the HO-ODU rate and define the LO-ODU, use the following command.
To make the difference clearer, the changes in the command wording are highlighted.
set chassis slot u10 FIO10-5 port 2 port-type otu2 odu 1 type odu2 odu odu1-TPN3
alarm-master-mask disable;
In general there is no need to explicitly specify the HO-ODU since it is implicitly created by the
embedded system.

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 The following command configures port 0 of an FIO100 card located in slot u6. The HO interface is an
ODU with a rate of ODU4, the LO interface is an ODU2, the Tributary Port Number (TPN) is 2, and the
operator is selecting 8 specific tributary slots to be assigned to this port.
set chassis slot u6 fio100 port 0 odu 1 odu odu2-TPN2 tributary-slots
2,12,22,32,42,52,62,72;
After entering the preceding set chassis command, entering a show chassis command would
typically list the following port parameter values. (Note that most of these values are default settings
or automatically detected by the system. Parameter values that were set through the preceding
command line are highlighted in the following listing.)

...
tpn 2;
msi-expected-tpn 2;
tributary-slots 2,12,22,32,42,52,62,72;
tim-monitor disable;
tti-expected-sapi "Apollo Port";
tti-sent-sapi "Apollo Port";
tti-expected-dapi 0000000000000000;
tti-sent-dapi 0000000000000000;
tti-sent-operator 00000000000000000000000000000000;
payload-type-expected unknown;
payload-type-sent unknown;
plm-monitor disabled;
deg 10e-9;
force-ais disabled;
send-ais disabled;
send-bdi disabled;
send-csf disabled;
pattern-type-tx off;
pattern-type-rx off;
severity-profile default;
pm-profile default;
alarm-master-mask enable;
plm-consequent-action disabled;
tim-oci-lck-consequent-action disabled;
pm-monitor enabled;
 Tributary port number (TPN) provides the port number to be used as part of the ODUk multiplexing
scheme. Values defined based on ODU type. For example, a typical port configuration listing may
display:
port 1 {
interface-type otu2;
otu3-options {
...
}
odu {
type odu2;
...

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...
expected-payload-type 5;
sent-payload-type 5;
deg 10E9;
odu oduf-fc400-TPN1 {
tributary-slots 1,3,5,7;
...
}
odu oduf-fc400-TPN2 {
tributary-slots 2,4,6,8;
...
}
odu odu1-TPN3 {
...
}
odu odu1-TPN4 {
...
}
...
}
}
interfaces {
odu2-u1/1:1;
oduf-fc400-u1/1:1:TPN1;
oduf-fc400-u1/1:1:TPN2;
odu1-u1/1:1:TPN3;
odu1-u1/1:1:TPN4;

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification

2.7 Displaying Cards, Interfaces, and


Subinterfaces
2.7.1 Displaying the Chassis Configuration
Enter the show chassis configuration command in operation mode to display the service cards
installed in the chassis, as well as the physical interfaces and subinterfaces configured on the chassis. A
typical configuration listing is provided here.
root@localhost> show chassis configuration
Chassis
framing-mode sdh
Name Encapsulation Admin Oper
Slot u0 cmr40 N/A Up Up
Port 0 port-u0/0 N/A Up Down
OTU otu2e-u0/0 N/A Up Down
Port 1 port-u0/1 N/A Up Not Present
Port 2 port-u0/2 N/A Up Not Present
Port 3 port-u0/3 N/A Up Not Present
Port 4 port-u0/4 N/A Up Up
OTU otu3e-u0/4 N/A Up Up
Slot u4 cmr40 N/A Up Up
Port 0 port-u4/0 N/A Up Down
OTU otu2-u4/0 N/A Up Down
Port 1 port-u4/1 N/A Up Down
OTU otu2-u4/1 N/A Up Down
Port 2 port-u4/2 N/A Up Down
OTU otu2-u4/2 N/A Up Down
Port 3 port-u4/3 N/A Up Down
OTU otu2-u4/3 N/A Up Down
Port 4 port-u4/4 N/A Up Down
OTU otu3e-u4/4 N/A Up Down
Slot u12 fio100 N/A Up Up
Port 0 port-u12/0 N/A Up Up
OTU otu3e-u12/0 N/A Up Up
Slot u18 aoc10 N/A Up Not Present
Port 0 port-u18/0 N/A Up Not Present
Port 1 port-u18/1 N/A Up Not Present
Port 2 port-u18/2 N/A Up Not Present
Port 3 port-u18/3 N/A Up Not Present
Port 4 port-u18/4 N/A Up Not Present
GBE ety1g-u18/4 N/A Up Not Present
Port 5 port-u18/5 N/A Up Not Present
Port 6 port-u18/6 N/A Up Not Present
Port 7 port-u18/7 N/A Up Not Present
Port 8 port-u18/8 N/A Up Not Present
Port 9 port-u18/9 N/A Up Not Present
Port 10 port-u18/10 N/A Up Not Present
GBE ety1g-u18/10 N/A Up Not Present
Port 11 port-u18/11 N/A Up Not Present

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Port 12
port-u18/12 N/A Up Not Present
Port 13
port-u18/13 N/A Up Not Present
Port 14
port-u18/14 N/A Up Not Present
Port 15
port-u18/15 N/A Up Not Present
Port 16
port-u18/16 N/A Up Not Present
OTU otu2-u18/16 N/A Up Not Present
Port 17 port-u18/17 N/A Up Not Present
Slot u19 fio10-5 N/A Up Up
Port 0 port-u19/0 N/A Up Down
OTU otu2-u19/0 N/A Up Down
Port 1 port-u19/1 N/A Up Not Present
Port 2 port-u19/2 N/A Up Not Present
Port 3 port-u19/3 N/A Up Not Present
Port 4 port-u19/4 N/A Up Not Present
OTU otu2-u19/4 N/A Up Not Present
Slot u22 fio100 N/A Up Not Present
Port 0 port-u22/0 N/A Up Not Present
OTU otu3e-u22/0 N/A Up Not Present
Slot ua snpb1-2i N/A Up Not Present
(*) - No usable configuration available for the indicated slot.
(#) - Swap in failed for the indicated port.

The command displays installed service cards and all currently configured interfaces and subinterface. It
also lists the encapsulation type and the state of the interfaces.

NOTE: For more information about the show chassis configuration command, see the
Command Reference Manual.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification

2.7.2 Displaying RCP Card Configuration


Multiple RCP card versions are available for use in Apollo platforms. The system automatically detects
which cards are installed and configures the relevant system parameters accordingly. Configuration data is
also transmitted to STMS at the EMS level. RCP configuration data is listed as part of the show chassis
command, described in the previous section. The complete RCP configuration statement includes the
following sections.
rcp {
port <port> {
enable;
encapsulation {
dix;
}
ethernet-options {
(auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
speed (10g | 1g | 100m | 10m);
}
}
rcp-type (<rcp-card-list>);
redundancy {
primary (a | b);
auto-switchover {
timeout <timeout>;
configsync {
high-availability (enable | disable);
high-availability-retry <retry>;
}
no-configsync;
}
}
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
}

The following code sample portrays a typical RCP card configuration.


root@localhost> show chassis
rcp {
expected-type rcp1-4xt;
port 0 {
enable;
}
redundancy {
auto-switchover {
configsync {
high-availability enable;
}
}
}
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification

2.7.3 Displaying Interfaces


From the operation mode of the CLI, you can display the interfaces that are configured on the chassis by
using the show interfaces command:

root@localhost> show interfaces


Interface Admin Oper Family Address
fe-rcp Down Down
odu2e-u0/0:1 Up Lower Down
odu3e-u0/4:1 Up Up
odu2e-u0/4:1:1 Up Down
odu2e-u0/4:1:2 Up Down
odu2e-u0/4:1:3 Up Down
odu2e-u0/4:1:4 Up Down
odu2-u4/0:1 Up Lower Down
odu2-u4/1:1 Up Lower Down
odu2-u4/2:1 Up Lower Down
odu2-u4/3:1 Up Lower Down
odu3e-u4/4:1 Up Lower Down
odu2e-u4/4:1:1 Up Lower Down
odu2e-u4/4:1:2 Up Lower Down
odu2e-u4/4:1:3 Up Lower Down
odu2e-u4/4:1:4 Up Lower Down
odu3e-u12/0:1 Up Up
odu2-u12/0:1:1 Up Down
odu-slot-u18/4:1 Up Down
odu-slot-u18/10:1 Up Down
odu2-u18/16:1 Up Down
odu2-u19/0:1 Up Lower Down
odu2-u19/4:1 Up Down
odu3e-u22/0:1 Up Down
odu2-u22/0:1:1 Up Down
ge-ua/0 Up Up
ge-ua/0.0 Down Down
gcc-s1-u4/1:otu2 Up Up inet
gcc-s1-u4/3:otu2 Up Up inet
lo0 Up Up
lo0.0 Up Up inet 1.0.0.114/32
lo0.100 Up Up inet 1.0.0.114/32

The command displays the currently configured interfaces, whether the link is up, the protocol family
currently configured on that interface, and the address of the interface.

NOTE: For more information about the show interfaces command, see the Command
Reference Manual.

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3 Multi-Shelf Configuration
Multi-shelf architecture provides a management solution where multiple shelves are represented as one
single functional element towards external management systems. The ability to configure a multi-shelf
architecture enables you to easily expand the capacity of an Apollo shelf, and provide a simpler structure
for equipment installation and management.
Apollo shelves can manage up to 12 subtending passive optical shelves. This section describes how to
configure the main shelf and subtending shelves. It also describes how to specify the subtending shelf
during the configuration of cards and ports that reside on a subtending shelf.

3.1 Multi-Shelf Architecture


Multi-shelf architecture consists of the following:
 Multi-shelf Node/NE: A single logical entity that includes the main shelf and all subtending shelves.
The multi-shelf NE designates a single service shelf as the main shelf through which all control and
management functions are performed. A single external IP is assigned to the multi-shelf NE, and is
used to identify the main shelf and all subtending shelves. The multi-shelf NE serves as a single
interface to the external management systems.
 Main shelf: The main shelf from which all management functions related to the multi-shelf NE are
performed. Configuration and management commands relating to subtending shelves are performed
via the main shelf. The main shelf forwards requests and/or responses between the external
management system and all shelves in the multi-shelf NE.
All physical interfaces to the management systems are accessed via the main shelf.
 Subtending shelf: All shelves that reside in the same multi-shelf NE that are not designated as the
main shelf are considered to be subtending shelves. A subtending shelf functions as equipment
extension to the main shelf. The subtending shelf sends and receives configuration and management
requests via the main shelf only.
Passive shelves can function as subtending shelves. Passive shelves do not contain controller cards,
and cannot be inventory managed. A local interface is used by subtending shelves for installation and
maintenance operations only.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Multi-Shelf Configuration

Figure 3-1: Multi-shelf architecture

NE configuration is persistent and can be detached from the NE and saved to another location on the
network.
In the event that one or more subtending shelves are out of service, as long as the main controller card is
operational within the main shelf, it is still possible to access PM history, logs, and status of all (functioning)
shelves, and to perform configuration operations. It is also possible to view a partial status of a faulty or
disconnected subtending shelf. Partial configuration and retrieval of PM history, and logs may also be
possible.
If the main shelf malfunctions, and/or its controller card is removed, management of the main shelf, and/or
any of the subtending shelves is suspended, until such time as recovery of the main controller card is
complete.

3.2 Requirements and Guidelines


 OPT96xx shelves (e.g., OPT9608, OPT9624) should always be defined as the main shelf in the
multishelf NE, irrespective of whether a subtending shelf is configured.
 Each Apollo shelf can manage up to 12 subtending passive optical shelves.
 Main and subtending shelves require at least one RCP card. RCP redundancy is recommended for the
main shelf. The RCP card used in the subtending shelf does not need to be the same type as that of
the main shelf.
 Only the main shelf can include data cards.
 L2/L3 switching is only performed in the main shelf.
 The addition of a subtending shelf is not traffic-affecting.
 Card protection and/or port protection can be configured on adjacent slots of the same shelf.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Multi-Shelf Configuration

3.3 Configuring the Multi-Shelf NE


The OPT96xx shelf is automatically enabled as a multi-shelf NE.

To define the NE as a multi-shelf NE:


 To define the NE as a multi-shelf NE, at the root hierarchy level, type:
user@root# set network-element opt96xx description <description> enable
Where:
 <description> (optional) is a description of the NE.

Table 3-1: Multi-Shelf NE parameters

Attribute Options Description


description <string> (Optional) description of the multi-shelf NE.
enable enable Enable the shelf (read-only).
severity-type <severity-profile> A managed entity that supports fault
(Default value = default. management functionality is automatically
Possible values = any string of associated with the default severity profile.
up to 255 characters.)
alarm-master-mask enable; disable Enabling the alarm mask master causes all
alarms for the specified entity to be masked.

In addition, the following parameters should also be configured explicitly at the NE-level:
 External input alarm configuration: to operate the external input dry contacts.
 External output alarm configuration: to operate the external output dry contacts.
For details of how to configure these parameters see the System Overview and Configuration User Guide.

3.4 Configuring the Main Shelf


To define an OPT96xx as the main shelf in a multi-shelf NE configuration involves the following steps:
 Configure the OPT96xx NE.
 Modify the NE shelf mode, if required.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Multi-Shelf Configuration

To configure the main shelf and the shelf mode:


 At the root level, include the following statements at the [set network-element opt96xx] hierarchy
level:
s0 shelfType mode;

Table 3-2: Multi-Shelf main shelf parameters

Attribute Options Description


description <string> Description of the main shelf.
enable enable Enable the shelf as the main shelf.
shelf s0 Indicate that the shelf is the main shelf, to
which all subtending shelves must connect for
management purposes

shelfType <shelf-list> (opt9624h, opt96241, Expected shelf type.


opt9624, etc.)

mode  fm100 Shelf configuration mode.


 fm1000
 soldered-fabric
 without-fabric
 without-controller-card
 with-controller-card
severity-type <severity-profile> A managed entity that supports fault
(Default value = default. Possible management functionality is automatically
values = any string of up to 255 associated with the default severity profile.
characters.)
alarm-master enable; disable Enabling the alarm mask master causes all
-mask alarms for the specified entity to be masked.

ne-id <ne-id> Identifying string, optional, otherwise


assigned by system.
lct-security-  no-access Configures the level of security for LCT access.
mode  no-access-with-ro-option
 ro-access
 ro-access-with-rw-option
 rw-access

Example
set network-element opt96xx shelf s0 opt9624h fm1000

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Multi-Shelf Configuration

3.5 Configuring a Subtending Shelf


Configuring a subtending shelf involves the following steps:
 Define the shelf ID (in relation to the main shelf).
 Define the shelf type.
 Modify the shelf mode, if required.

NOTE: Adding a subtending shelf is not traffic-affecting.

To configure a subtending shelf:


 Include the following statements at the [set network-element] hierarchy level:
opt96xx shelf shelf shelftype shelf-mode

Table 3-3: Subtending Shelf Parameters

Attribute Options Description


opt96xx OPT96xx NE type.
shelf sa; sb; sc; sd; se; sf; sg; sh; si; sj; sk; sl Subtending shelf ID (passive shelves).

shelftype artemis1p; artemis2a; artemis4a Type of passive optical shelf. (The


same syntax will be used for
subtending service shelves.)

Description <string> (Optional) Description of the shelf.

enable enable; disable Enable the shelf as a subtending shelf.


severity- <severity-profile> Subtending shelves that supports
profile (Default value = default. Possible values = any fault management functionality, are
string of up to 255 characters.) automatically associated with the
default severity profile.

shelf-mode  with-controller-card Artemis mode.


 without-controller-
card (default)
alarm-master  enable Enabling the alarm mask master
-mask  disable causes all alarms for the specified
entity to be masked.

Example
set network-element opt96xx shelf sg artemis4a with-controller-card

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Multi-Shelf Configuration

3.6 Configuring Cards on a Subtending Shelf


To configure a card on a subtending shelf:
 Include shelf in the relevant statement at the [edit chassis] level:
slot shelf-slot card-name
Where:
 shelf is the identity of the subtending shelf.
 slot is the slot name.
 card-name is the card name.

Example
set chassis slot sb-u0 mxd16

See also Specifying a Chassis Slot, Card Name, Port, and Interface Configuration.
Once your card has been configured, configure ports, interfaces, Layer 1 cross connections, and fiber
connectivity as explained in the following sections. Be careful to specify the subtending slot name correctly,
using the shelf-slot syntax described here.
 Configure the physical properties of the port at the [edit port] hierarchy level, as described in Port
Configuration.
 When working with SDH/SONET service cards, configure interfaces at the [edit interfaces]
hierarchy level, as described in Interface Configuration.
 When working with photonic, optical, or data cards, configure cross connections at the [edit cross
connections] hierarchy level, as described in Cross Connection Configuration.
 Configure fiber connectivity at the [edit port] hierarchy level, as described in Fiber Connectivity.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Multi-Shelf Configuration

3.7 Deleting a Subtending Shelf


All XCs and associated trails must be deleted prior to the deletion of a subtending shelf.

NOTE: Removing a subtending shelf does not cause a service interruption to shelves within
the same multi-shelf NE.

To delete a subtending shelf:


1. Delete all configured XCs on the subtending shelf, and trail IDs, where necessary as follows:
a. To delete all configured XCs, at the root level, type:
user@root# delete cross-connects
All XCs on the shelf are deleted (except for those that participate in a trail. .

a. For each XC that participates in a trail, delete the trail ID, type commit and then delete all XCs
again. To delete a XC trail ID, at the root level, type:
delete cross connects <XC name> trail-id
2. To delete all cards residing on the shelf, at the root level, type:
user@root# delete chassis slot <slot>
3. To delete the subtending shelf, at the root level, type:
user@root# shelf shelf shelftype

Example
 Deleting all XCs:
user@root# delete cross-connects
 Deleting a specific trail ID:
user@root# delete cross-connects odu1-xc trail-id
 Deleting all cards:
user@root# delete chassis slot sa-u0 mxd16
 Deleting the subtending shelf:
user@root# delete network-element opt96xx shelf sa artemis2p

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4 Port Configuration
This section describes how to configure physical ports located on various data, photonic, and optical service
cards. For a summary of the complete chassis configuration command, including each type of configuration
statement, see the Configuration Statement Reference Manual.
In order to use ports and interfaces for routing or tunneling you must configure port and interface
properties for each card port. You can configure port and interface properties for equipment that is
currently installed as well as for equipment not yet installed in the system. When you add ports and
interfaces that have been pre-configured (for example, by inserting a service card), the software detects
the interfaces and applies the configuration.

NOTES:
 CLI commands can be used to configure a wide range of features, as explained in this
section. Not all features are relevant for all types of cards. This section begins with an
explanation of the minimal requirements for port configuration, including the basic
command syntax (Minimum Port Configuration). Other features and attribute
configuration settings are then listed in alphabetical order.
 RCP cards contain management and auxiliary interface ports. This section does not discuss
the management or auxiliary interfaces. For information about configuring these
interfaces, see the System Overview and Configuration User Guide.
 Interface configuration is described in Interface Configuration.
 Cross connection configuration is described in Cross Connection Configuration.
 Fiber connectivity configuration is described in Fiber Connectivity.
 Layer2 Ethernet port configuration is described in Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Ports.
 The CLI examples provided in this section are for illustrative purposes only, to clarify the
style or syntax of a type of command. Some of the specific commands and parameters
used in these examples are not supported in the current version of ShadeTree. In addition,
not every user has full privileges to perform commands in the CLI. Therefore, you might
not be able to run some of the commands described in this manual, with the specific
syntax and parameters listed.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.1 Minimum Port Configuration


To configure a port, you must at least configure the port number. The minimum port configuration
statement is:
port port;

Example
The following example configures port 1 and port 2 on a 10-port GbE NPB card located in slot u0 on an
OPT9600 device. The ports are disabled by default.
chassis {
slot u0 npb1-10ad {
port 1;
port 2;
}
}

4.1.1 Specifying a Port Number


To enable and configure a port on an sNPB, you must specify that port’s number. For detailed information
about port numbers, see Card Port Numbering.
To specify a port number, include the following statement at the [edit chassis slot slot card-name]
hierarchy level:
port port;

Where port is the port number.

NOTE: Because different types of cards have a varying number of ports, the CLI allows you to
enter up to 40 ports for any type of card. However, if you try to configure a non-existent port
on a card, you will be unable to commit the configuration.
If the port is located on a card that resides on a subtending shelf of a multi-shelf NE, include
the subtending shelf name with the slot number (for example, sa-u0). For more information
about subtending shelves, see Multi-Shelf Configuration.

Example
The following example configures port 1 and port 5 on a 20 port GbE NPB card located in slot u3 on a
device. The ports are disabled by default.
chassis {
slot u3 phyc-20p-ge {
port 1;
port 5;
}
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.1.2 Enabling a Port


By default when you configure a physical port on an NPB card, the port is disabled. To use the port and its
corresponding subinterfaces, you must enable the port.
To enable a port, include the following statement at the [edit chassis slot slot card-name port port]
hierarchy level:
enable;

NOTE: To disable a port after it has been enabled, delete the enable statement and commit
the configuration.

4.2 Complete Slot and Port Configuration


Statement
The following slot and port configuration statement outline includes the heading sections for each type of
card and port attribute. Some of these attributes are outside the scope of this section; cross references are
provided to where they are documented elsewhere in this User Guide. The complete text of the port
configuration statement is provided in the Configuration Statement Reference Manual.
Note that CLI commands can be used to configure a wide range of features, as explained in this section. Not
all features are relevant for all types of cards. Some of these features are not supported in the current
version of ShadeTree. Attributes that are commonly configured for most types of ports include fault
management and performance monitoring (described in the System Overview and Configuration User
Guide), fiber connectivity (Fiber Connectivity), and transceiver options (Configuring Transceiver Options).
Other attribute settings are often technology-specific and only apply to specific types of equipment or
interfaces. For example, the attributes that are configured for an OTN connection are not the same as those
configured for an STM connection. The attribute settings explained in this section are listed in the order in
which they appear in the Show Chassis Configuration listing. For convenient reference, a table listing
the attributes relevant for optical and photonic cards is provided in Optical and Photonic Card Port
Configuration Attributes.

TIP: Very often the user does not have to explicitly set the port attribute values because the
system automatically configures the most appropriate settings for the specific port being
configured; see the System Overview and Configuration User Guide.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

slot slot card-name {


port port {
customer customer;
enable;
port-mapping port-mapping;
port-type port-type;
see Port and Interface Types
port-behavior (uni-in | uni-out | bidirectional | uni-in-out);
direction (uni-in | uni-out | bidirectional | uni-in-out);
transceiver-options {
transceiver-attributes-list;
see Configuring Transceiver Options
}
severity-profile severity-profile;
pm-profile pm-profile;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
ains (enable | disable);
description description;
label label;
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
fiber-connectivity (internal | external)
(uni-in | uni-out | bidirectional | uni-in-out) {
peer-ne peer-ne;
peer-slot peer-slot;
peer-port peer-port;
fiber-attributes-list;
see Configuring Fiber Connectivity Options
}
sdh-sonet-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf |
ndc | nos | idles | v-char | pn-11);
tim-monitor (enable | disable);
tti-expected tti-expected;
}
ochp-options {
ochp-attributes-list;
see Configuring OCHP Options
}
ots-options {
als-state (enabled | disabled);
los-threshold <los-threshold>;
osc-channel-peer osc-channel-peer;
see Configuring OTS Options
}
otu-options {
otu-attributes-list;
see Configuring OTU Options
}
po-options;

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cbr-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf | ndc | nos | v-char | pn-11);
gfp-consequent-action (enable | disable);
send-csf (enable | disable);
see Configuring CBR Options
}
ety-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf | ndc | nos | v-char | pn-11);
max-frame-size <max-frame-size>;
lf-rf-mode (local | transparent);
send-csf (enable | disable);
test-mode (normal | test);
tx-pattern (none | pseudorandom | prbs31 | idles | off);
rx-pattern (none | pseudorandom | prbs31 | idles | off);
gfp-consequent-action (enable | disable);
gfp-upi-values (standard | xdm);
see Configuring ETY Options
}
fc-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf | ndc | nos | v-char | pn-11)
gfp-consequent-action (enable | disable);
send-csf (enable | disable);
see Configuring FC Options
}
osc100-options {
wavelength (non-colored);
}
osc2m-options {
wavelength (non-colored);
}
see Configuring OSC Options
odu odu {
type (none | odu-slot | odu1 | odu2 | odu3 | odu2e | odu3e |
odu2f | odu4 | odu0 | oduf-sdi3g | oduf-fc400 | oduf-fc800 |
och | oms | os | spo | oc | ull-ety10goc | ull-fc800 |
ull-fc1200 | ull-fc1600);
odu-attributes-list;
see Configuring ODU Options
}
oms {
oms-attributes-list;
see Configuring OMS Options
}
och {
och-attributes-list;
see Configuring OCH Options
}
spo spo {
spo-attributes-list;
see Configuring SPO Options
}

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os;
ull;
encapsulation (frame-relay | ppp | atm | cisco-hdlc | dix);
encapsulation (dix | multilink-ethernet);
ethernet-options {
(auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
link-mode (full-duplex | half-duplex);
ifg-optimization (enabled | disabled);
speed (10g | 1g | 100m | 10m);
pma-mode (master | slave);
port-mode (uni | e-nni | i-nni | moe | i-moe | mirror);
stpId <stpId>;
llcf-options {
llcf-ingress-enable (enabled | disabled);
llcf-egress-enable (enabled | disabled);
}
pause-options {
force-pause (enabled | disabled);
pause-type (rx-only | disable);
pause-advertisement (no-pause | sym-pause |
asym-pause | sym-asym-pause);
}
rstp-options {
port-enable (enabled | disabled);
priority <priority>;
path-cost <path-cost>;
hold-off-time <hold-off-time>;
port-change-detect (enabled | disabled);
dynamic-port-cost-update (enabled | disabled);
admin-edge (enabled | disabled);
auto-cost-config (enabled | disabled);
bpdu-mac-address (bridge-group | provider-bridge-group);
}
}
dcn;
force_ms (ais | rdi);
hold-time-up hold-time-up;
queue-block qname;
scheduler scheduler-name;
policer-block pbname;
remote-fault-disable;
cac-pirmax-algorithm (flat | hierarchical);
cac-failure-action (syslog | userlog | reject);
cac-syslog-level (debug | event | audit | warn);
scheduling-mode (access | trunk);
scheduling-model scheduling-model;
loopback (remote | local);
oschannel-options {
wavelength (non-colored);
}

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sdh-options {
section-trace section_trace;
ber-sf (10e-5 | 10e-4 | 10e-3);
ber-sd (10e-9 | 10e-8 | 10e-7 | 10e-6 | 10e-5);
tx-clock (loop | local | system);
}
vlan-tagging;
} // end port configuration
enable;
ains (enable | disable);
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
oa-options {
edfa-mode (none | automatic | constant | semiautomatic);
initial-gain <initial-gain>;
tilt <tilt>;
max-number-channels <max-number-channels>;
amplifier-state (on | off);
output-pwr-per-channel <output-pwr-per-channel>;
exp-raman-gain <exp-raman-gain>;
tilt-offset <tilt-offset>;
response-to-los
(immediate-shut-down | delay-50-msec-shut-down);
}
passive-oadm-options <first-channel>;
roadm-options (roadm | terminal | dge | directionless | collector);
total-channels-options <total-channels>;
dcf-fiber-length-options <dcf-fiber-length>;
tr100-options (transponder | regenerator);

layer2-ethernet-options {
mode (pb | mpls-pe);
ethernet-network-id <ethernet-network-id>;
bridge-options {
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
rstp-options {
rstp-notifications (enabled | disabled);
bridge-priority <priority>;
max-age <max-age>;
hello-time <hello-time>;
forward-delay <forward-delay>;
bpdu-frame-format (standard | standard-b);
tx-hold-count <tx-hold-count>;
}
cfm-options {
ltm-flooding (enabled | disabled);
local-mep-id <local-mep-id>;
}

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ccn-options {
ccn (enabled | disabled);
ccn-forwarding (enabled | disabled);
}
port-mirroring-options {
source-port <source-port>;
ingress-dest-port <ingress-dest-port>;
egress-dest-port <egress-dest-port>;
}
}
fdb-options {
age-time <age-time>;
over-quota-action (forward | drop);
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
}
mpls-pe-options {
pe-id <pe-id>;
mpls-id <mpls-id>;
}
tm-options {
high-priority-cos-delimiter
<high-priority-cos-delimiter>;
per-cos-tm {
cos <cos> {
best-effort-cos (enabled | disabled);
over-booking-factor <over-booking-factor>;
}
}
}
}
}

4.3 Configuring a Customer for a Port or


Subinterface
Customer names can be associated with ports or subinterfaces. The customer name can be configured at
the following hierarchy levels:
 [edit chassis slot slot card-name port port]
 [edit chassis slot slot card-name port port sub-interface channel]

To configure the customer name, include the following statement:


customer customer;

Where customer is the name of a customer. If the name includes special characters, enclose the customer
name in quotes (").
If the port is located on a card that resides on a subtending shelf of a multi-shelf NE, include the subtending
shelf name with the slot number (for example, sa-u0). For more information about subtending shelves, see
Multi-Shelf Configuration.

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4.4 Configuring CBR Options


Constant Bit Rate (CBR) ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete
configuration statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are
defined in Port Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure CBR options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
cbr-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf | ndc | nos | v-char | pn-11)
gfp-consequent-action (enable | disable);
send-csf (enable | disable);
}

4.5 Configuring ETY Options


ETY ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure ETY options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
ety-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf | ndc | nos | v-char | pn-11);
max-frame-size <max-frame-size>;
lf-rf-mode (local | transparent);
send-csf (enable | disable);
test-mode (normal | test);
tx-pattern (none | pseudorandom | prbs31 | idles | off);
rx-pattern (none | pseudorandom | prbs31 | idles | off);
gfp-consequent-action (enable | disable);
gfp-upi-values (standard | xdm);
}

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4.6 Configuring Encryption Options


The TR10_4EN is a 10 Gbps transponder card with encryption capabilities. The card maps the client signal
according to G.709 to OTU2/ODU2e/ODU2f. The encryption is performed at the optical ODU2/2e layer,
using an encryption system and sends it to the line. The encryption system encodes the data with AES-GCM
256 algorithm to ensure a high security level. In addition to its main role as a transponder, the TR10_4EN
provides encryption on the optical (ODU2/e) layer. The TR10_4EN provides the following encryption
capabilities:
 AES256-GCM encryption with initialization vector and message integrity check
 Diffie-Hellman group 5 key exchange
 Encryption can be applied to any of its client-line interface mappings: 10G LAN to OTU2/2e, 10G WAN
STM-64 to OTU2/2e, FC8 to OTU2, and FC10 to OTU2f
For more information about the TR10_4EN card and its encryption capabilities, see the Apollo Reference
Manual. For more information about specifying digital certificates, see Specifying Digital Certificates in the
System Overview and Configuration User Guide.

Table 4-1: TR10_4EN Card: Port Configuration Rules

Number of Port Label Port Number Port Role Port Type Sub-IF Type
Ports
2 C1, C2 0,2 Client  STM64  ODU2
 OC192  ODU2
 FC800  ODU2
 FC1200  ODU2f
 ETY10GOC  ODU2e
 OTU2  ODU2
 OTU2e  ODU2e
2 L1, L2 1,3 Line OTU2/2e/2f ODU2/2e/2f

To configure the TR10_4EN encryption capabilities, the network operator must define the relevant security
certificate and peer IP address, using the following two CLI commands.

set security certificates peer <DCN IP of Peer-NE> load-key-file <Certificate File


path and name>

set chassis slot u0 tr10-4en port 1 odu 1 peer-ip <DCN IP of Peer-NE>

For example:

set security certificates peer 9.9.9.181 load-key-file /config/public_181

set chassis slot u0 tr10-4en port 1 odu 1 peer-ip 9.9.9.181

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4.7 Configuring FC Options


FC ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure FC options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
fc-options {
csf-tsf-action (lol | none | lf | ndc | nos | v-char | pn-11);
gfp-consequent-action (enable | disable);
send-csf (enable | disable);
}

4.8 Configuring Fiber Connectivity Options


Fiber connectivity defines the characteristics of the connectivity between ports connected via physical
fibers, through its own set of attributes and options. For a detailed explanation, including a description of
each attribute option, see Fiber Connectivity. For convenient reference, the complete configuration
statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port
Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure fiber connectivity options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
fiber-connectivity (internal | external)
(uni-in | uni-out | bidirectional | uni-in-out) {
peer-ne peer-ne;
peer-slot (u0 | u1 | u2 | u3 | u4 | u5 | u6 | u7 | ua | ub |
ca | cb | sa-u0 | sa-u1 | sa-u2 | sa-u3 | sa-u4 | sa-u5 | sa-u6 |
sa-u7 | sb-u0 | sb-u1 | sb-u2 | sb-u3 | sb-u4 | sb-u5 | sb-u6 |
sb-u7 | sc-u0 | sc-u1 | sc-u2 | sc-u3 | sc-u4 | sc-u5 | sc-u6 |
sc-u7 | sd-u0 | sd-u1 | sd-u2 | sd-u3 | sd-u4 | sd-u5 | sd-u6 |
sd-u7 | se-u0 | se-u1 | se-u2 | se-u3 | se-u4 | se-u5 | se-u6 |
se-u7 | sf-u0 | sf-u1 | sf-u2 | sf-u3 | sf-u4 | sf-u5 | sf-u6 |
sf-u7 | sg-u0 | sg-u1 | sg-u2 | sg-u3 | sg-u4 | sg-u5 | sg-u6 |
sg-u7 | sh-u0 | sh-u1 | sh-u2 | sh-u3 | sh-u4 | sh-u5 | sh-u6 |
sh-u7 | si-u0 | si-u1 | si-u2 | si-u3 | si-u4 | si-u5 | si-u6 |
si-u7 | sj-u0 | sj-u1 | sj-u2 | sj-u3 | sj-u4 | sj-u5 | sj-u6 |
sj-u7 | sk-u0 | sk-u1 | sk-u2 | sk-u3 | sk-u4 | sk-u5 | sk-u6 |
sk-u7 | sl-u0 | sl-u1 | sl-u2 | sl-u3 | sl-u4 | sl-u5 | sl-u6 |
sl-u7);
peer-port peer-port;
input-fiber-loss input-fiber-loss;
output-fiber-loss output-fiber-loss;
fiber-length fiber-length;
fiber-type (g652 | g653 | g654 | g655-leaf | g655-tw-rs |
g655-tw-reach | multimode);
allowed-fiber-loss-margin allowed-fiber-loss-margin;
pmd pmd;
management-buffer-b64 management-buffer;
}

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4.9 Configuring OA Options


Optical amplifiers work with their own set of attributes and options. For convenience, the complete
configuration statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are
defined in Port Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data). Some of these attributes are also
explained in greater detail in Fiber Connectivity.
To configure OA options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
oa-options {
edfa-mode (automatic | constant | semiautomatic);
initial-gain <initial-gain>;
tilt <tilt>;
max-number-channels <max-number-channels>;
amplifier-state (off | on);
output-pwr-per-channel <output-pwr-per-channel>;
exp-raman-gain <exp-raman-gain>;
tilt-offset <tilt-offset>;
response-to-los (immediate-shut-down | delay-50-msec-shut-down);
}

4.10 Configuring OCH Options


OCH ports work with their own set of attributes and options. For convenience, the complete configuration
statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port
Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data). Some of these attributes are also explained in greater
detail in Fiber Connectivity.
To configure OCH options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
och {
power-offset power-offset;
rx-wavelength (non-colored);
tx-wavelength (non-colored);
severity-profile severity-profile;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
}

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4.11 Configuring OCHP Options


OCH ports work with their own set of attributes and options. A detailed explanation, including a description
of each attribute option, is provided in Fiber Connectivity. For convenient reference, the complete
configuration statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are
defined in Port Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure OCHP options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
ochp-options {
alien-lambda (enabled | disabled);
wdm-type (na | cwdm | dwdm | non-colored);
spacing spacing;
rx-wavelength (non-colored);
tx-wavelength (non-colored);
los-threshold los-threshold;
multi-wavelength (false | true);
alien-lambda-rx-options {
signal-type (ochp | ots | otu1 | otu2 | otu2e | otu2f |
otu2x | otu3 | otu3e | otu4 |stm64 | stm16 | stm4 | stm1 |
stm1e | oc192 | oc48 | oc12 | oc3 | oc3e | ety1g |
ety1ge | ety1gx |ety1gxe | ety10g | ety10goc | ety40g |
ety100 | ety100g | fc1600 | fc1200 | fc800 | fc400 |
fc200 | fc100 | video270 | sdi360m | hdsdi1485g |
ge | ge10 | ge10-otu2e | osc100 | osc2m | oschannel | po |
ull-ety10goc | ull-fc800 | ull-fc1200 | ull-fc1600);
frequency-spread (50ghz | 100ghz | 20nm);
power power;
osnr osnr;
pmd pmd;
pdl pdl;
nlt nlt;
accumulated-dispersion accumulated-dispersion;
}
alien-lambda-tx-options {
power-minimum power-minimum;
power-maximum power-maximum;
accumulated-dispersion-minimum accumulated-dispersion-minimum;
accumulated-dispersion-maximum accumulated-dispersion-maximum;
osnr-minimum osnr-minimum;
pmd-maximum pmd-maximum;
pdl-maximum pdl-maximum;
accumulated-nlt-maximum accumulated-nlt-maximum;
}
}

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4.12 Configuring ODU Options


ODU ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data). Some of these attributes are also explained in greater detail in Fiber
Connectivity.
To configure ODU options, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

odu odu {
type (none | odu-slot | odu1 | odu2 | odu3 | odu2e | odu3e | odu2f | odu4 | odu0
| oduf-sdi3g | oduf-fc400 | oduf-fc800 | och | oms | os | spo | oc | ull-ety10goc
| ull-fc800 | ull-fc1200 | ull-fc1600);

tpn tpn;
tributary-slot tributary-slot;
tim-monitor (sapi | dapi | both | disable);
tti-expected-sapi tti-expected-sapi;
tti-sent-sapi tti-sent-sapi;
tti-expected-dapi tti-expected-dapi;
tti-sent-dapi tti-sent-dapi;
tti-sent-operator tti-sent-operator;

payload-type-expected (none | experimental | asyncronous | bit-syncronous |


atm-mapping | gfp-mapping | vcat-signal | transparent-ety | 1000basex-into-odu0 |
fc1200-into-odu2e | gfp-into-opu2?? | stm1-gmp | stm4-gmp | stm1-into-odu0 |
odu-slot-proprietary | bitstr-with-octet | bitstr-without-octet | odu-multiplex-jk
| odu-multiplex-k-ts | na-55 | na-66 | null-test-signal | prbs-test-signal | gbe10-oc
| fc-10g | fc-8g-gfp-mapping | fc200-into-odu1 | cbr-mapping | fc100-gmp | fc400-flex
| fc800-flex | video270-gmp | hdsdi1485-gmp | hdsdi-3g-flex | na-ff | unknown);

payload-type-sent (none | experimental | asyncronous | bit-syncronous |


atm-mapping | gfp-mapping | vcat-signal | transparent-ety | 1000basex-into-odu0 |
fc1200-into-odu2e | gfp-into-opu2?? | stm1-gmp | stm4-gmp | stm1-into-odu0 |
odu-slot-proprietary | bitstr-with-octet | bitstr-without-octet | odu-multiplex-jk
| odu-multiplex-k-ts | na-55 | na-66 | null-test-signal | prbs-test-signal | gbe10-oc
| fc-10g | fc-8g-gfp-mapping | fc200-into-odu1 | cbr-mapping | fc100-gmp | fc400-flex
| fc800-flex | video270-gmp | hdsdi1485-gmp | hdsdi-3g-flex | na-ff | unknown);

plm-monitor (enabled | disabled);


deg (10e-9 | 10e-10 | 10e-11 | 10e-12);
force-ais (enabled | disabled);
send-ais (enabled | disabled);
send-bdi (enabled | disabled);
send-csf (enabled | disabled);
force-csf (enabled | disabled);
pattern-type-tx (none | pseudorandom | prbs31 | off);
pattern-type-rx (none | pseudorandom | prbs31 | off);
severity-profile severity-profile;
pm-profile pm-profile;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-monitor (enabled | disabled);

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tim-oci-lck-consequent-action (enabled | disabled);


plm-consequent-action (enabled | disabled);
multiplexing-scheme (none | transparent | pt-20 | pt-21 | pt-82)
is-connected (false | true);
odu odu {
<Full set of ODU attributes - nested 1level>
index-for-io <index-for-io>;
is-connected (false | true);
odu <odu> {
<Full set of ODU attributes - nested 2levels>
}
}

spo spo {
tim-monitor (enabled | disabled);
expected-tti expected-tti;
sent-tti <sent-tti>;
expected-signal-label (unequipped | tug-structure | gfp-mapping);
sent-signal-label (unequipped | tug-structure | gfp-mapping);
plm-monitor (enabled | disabled);
deg (10e-6 | 10e-7 | 10e-8 | 10e-9);
exc (10e-3 | 10e-4 | 10e-5);
severity-profile severity-profile;
pm-profile pm-profile;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-monitor (enabled | disabled);
tim-consequent-action (enabled | disabled);
plm-consequent-action (enabled | disabled);
}
gcm-mode (standard | monitor);
}

Note that ODU port interfaces include support for hierarchical attribute configuration nesting to multiple
levels. This means that a higher-capacity OTU port can support a single corresponding high-order ODU
interface or a multiplexed group of low-order ODU interfaces. Attributes configuring the multiplexed
L1 interfaces can be nested up to three levels deep. ODU port interfaces can also be configured to work
with a single level of nesting for SPO sub-interfaces where configured for XDM-AoC functionality. SPO
attributes are listed in Configuring SPO Options.

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4.13 Configuring OMS Options


OMS ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data). Some of these attributes are also explained in greater detail in Fiber
Connectivity.
To configure OMS options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

oms {
wdm-type (na | cwdm | dwdm | non-colored);
first-wavelength (non-colored);
last-wavelength (non-colored);
space space;
och och {
power-offset power-offset;
rx-wavelength (non-colored);
tx-wavelength (non-colored);
severity-profile severity-profile;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
}
}

Note that OMS ports include support for a single level of nesting for OCH sub-interfaces. OCH attributes are
listed in Configuring OCH Options.

4.14 Configuring OS Options


OS ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To automatically configure the complete set of OS options with settings optimized for the installed
equipment, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
os;
...

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4.15 Configuring OSC Options


OSC management ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration
statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port
Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure OSC options, include one of the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level. Choose the appropriate type of OSC
port to match your network configuration.

osc100-options {
wavelength (non-colored);
}

osc2m-options {
wavelength (non-colored);
}

oschannel-options {
wavelength (non-colored);
}

4.16 Configuring OTS Options


OTS management ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration
statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port
Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure OTS options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

ots-options {
als-state (enabled | disabled);
los-threshold <los-threshold>;
osc-channel-peer osc-channel-peer;
}

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4.17 Configuring OTU Options


OTU ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. Most of the attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port
Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data). The GMPLS options, used for ASON protection and
restoration, are described in ASON Trail Restoration.
To configure OTU options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

otu-options {
tim-monitor (sapi | dapi | both | disable);
tim-ca (enabled | disabled);
fec-mode (fec | efec4 | efec7 | efec7-10 | efec7-13 | sd-fec);
fec-ignore (enabled | disabled);
send-bdi (enabled | disabled);
gcc-termination (disable | 0 | 1 | 2);
gcc-mode (standard);
tti-expected-sapi tti-expected-sapi;
tti-expected-dapi tti-expected-dapi;
tti-sent-sapi tti-sent-sapi;
tti-sent-dapi tti-sent-dapi;
tti-sent-operator tti-sent-operator;
deg (10e-9 | 10e-10 | 10e-11 | 10e-12);
odu-ais-to-lol (enabled | disabled);
gmpls-options (uni | nni) {
remote-node <remote-node>;
remote-interface <remote-interface>;
remote-flat-port <remote-flat-port>;
remote-mpls-if-index <remote-mpls-if-index>;
auto-discovery (enabled | disabled);
auto-discovery-state (none | not-done | succeeded |
failed);
link-length <link-length>;
link-cost <link-cost>;
trib-slot-for-restoration (u0 | u1 | u2 | u3 | u4 | u5 | u6 | u7 | u8 | u9 |
u10 | u11 | u12 | u13 | u14 | u15 | u16 | u17 | u18 | u19 | u20 | u21 | u22 | u23
| ua | ub | ca | cb | sa-u0 | sa-u1 | sa-u2 | sa-u3 | sa-u4 | sa-u5 | sa-u6 | sa-u7
| sb-u0 | sb-u1 | sb-u2 | sb-u3 | sb-u4 | sb-u5 | sb-u6 | sb-u7 | sc-u0 | sc-u1 |
sc-u2 | sc-u3 | sc-u4 | sc-u5 | sc-u6 | sc-u7 | sd-u0 | sd-u1 | sd-u2 | sd-u3 | sd-u4
| sd-u5 | sd-u6 | sd-u7 | se-u0 | se-u1 | se-u2 | se-u3 | se-u4 | se-u5 | se-u6 |
se-u7 | sf-u0 | sf-u1 | sf-u2 | sf-u3 | sf-u4 | sf-u5 | sf-u6 | sf-u7 | sg-u0 | sg-u1
| sg-u2 | sg-u3 | sg-u4 | sg-u5 | sg-u6 | sg-u7 | sh-u0 | sh-u1 | sh-u2 | sh-u3 |
sh-u4 | sh-u5 | sh-u6 | sh-u7 | si-u0 | si-u1 | si-u2 | si-u3 | si-u4 | si-u5 | si-u6
| si-u7 | sj-u0 | sj-u1 | sj-u2 | sj-u3 | sj-u4 | sj-u5 | sj-u6 | sj-u7 | sk-u0 |
sk-u1 | sk-u2 | sk-u3 | sk-u4 | sk-u5 | sk-u6 | sk-u7 | sl-u0 | sl-u1 | sl-u2 | sl-u3
| sl-u4 | sl-u5 | sl-u6 | sl-u7);

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trib-slot-for-provision (u0 | u1 | u2 | u3 | u4 | u5 | u6 | u7 | u8 | u9 | u10


| u11 | u12 | u13 | u14 | u15 | u16 | u17 | u18 | u19 | u20 | u21 | u22 | u23 | ua
| ub | ca | cb | sa-u0 | sa-u1 | sa-u2 | sa-u3 | sa-u4 | sa-u5 | sa-u6 | sa-u7 | sb-u0
| sb-u1 | sb-u2 | sb-u3 | sb-u4 | sb-u5 | sb-u6 | sb-u7 | sc-u0 | sc-u1 | sc-u2 |
sc-u3 | sc-u4 | sc-u5 | sc-u6 | sc-u7 | sd-u0 | sd-u1 | sd-u2 | sd-u3 | sd-u4 | sd-u5
| sd-u6 | sd-u7 | se-u0 | se-u1 | se-u2 | se-u3 | se-u4 | se-u5 | se-u6 | se-u7 |
sf-u0 | sf-u1 | sf-u2 | sf-u3 | sf-u4 | sf-u5 | sf-u6 | sf-u7 | sg-u0 | sg-u1 | sg-u2
| sg-u3 | sg-u4 | sg-u5 | sg-u6 | sg-u7 | sh-u0 | sh-u1 | sh-u2 | sh-u3 | sh-u4 |
sh-u5 | sh-u6 | sh-u7 | si-u0 | si-u1 | si-u2 | si-u3 | si-u4 | si-u5 | si-u6 | si-u7
| sj-u0 | sj-u1 | sj-u2 | sj-u3 | sj-u4 | sj-u5 | sj-u6 | sj-u7 | sk-u0 | sk-u1 |
sk-u2 | sk-u3 | sk-u4 | sk-u5 | sk-u6 | sk-u7 | sl-u0 | sl-u1 | sl-u2 | sl-u3 | sl-u4
| sl-u5 | sl-u6 | sl-u7);
local-cp-port <local-cp-port>;
supported-odu-types <supported-odu-types>;
effective-payload-type (none | experimental | asyncronous | bit-syncronous |
atm-mapping | vcat-signal | transparent-ety | fc1200-into-odu2e | gfp-into-opu2 |
stm1-gmp | stm4-gmp | odu-slot-proprietary | bitstr-with-octet |
bitstr-without-octet | odu-multiplex-jk | odu-multiplex-k-ts | na-55 | na-66 |
null-test-signal | prbs-test-signal | gbe10-oc | fc-10g | fc-8g-gfp-mapping |
fc200-into-odu1 | cbr-mapping | fc100-gmp | fc400-flex | fc800-flex | video270-gmp
| hdsdi1485-gmp | hdsdi-3g-flex | na-ff | unknown);
trib-slot-type (none | 1-25 | 2-5);
link-protection <link-protection>;
srlg <srlg>;
te-link-id <te-link-id>;
}
}

4.18 Configuring Passive OADM Options


Passive OADM ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration
statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port
Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To automatically configure the complete set of passive OADM options with settings optimized for the
installed equipment, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
passive-oadm-options first-channel;
...
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.19 Configuring PO Options


PO ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To automatically configure the complete set of PO options with settings optimized for the installed
equipment, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
po-options;
...
}

4.20 Configuring Port Behavior


By default, bidirectional ports are configured for bidirectional cross-connection traffic flow. To configure
bidirectional ports to support unidirectional cross connections, and to identify the direction of the cross
connection, include the following statement at the [edit chassis slot slot card-name port port]
hierarchy level:

port port {
...
port-behavior (uni-in | uni-out | bidirectional | uni-in-out);
...
}

4.21 Configuring Port Direction


To configure the direction of the physical traffic flow for the port, (one-way in, one-way out, or running in
both directions), include the following statement at the [edit chassis slot slot card-name port port]
hierarchy level:

port port {
...
direction (uni-in | uni-out | bidirectional | uni-in-out);
...
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.22 Configuring Port Loopback Capability


You can configure a port to have loopback capability, looping packets to itself in either terminal or facility
modes. In CLI terminology, terminal loopback functionality is known as local and facility loopback
functionality is known as remote.
To configure a port to be a loopback, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
loopback (local | remote);
...
}

4.23 Configuring Port Mapping


To configure the mapping scheme for mapping ports and interfaces into (sub)interfaces, include the
following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
port-mapping port-mapping;
...
}

Port and interface options are described in Port and Interface Types.

4.24 Configuring ROADM Options


ROADM ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To automatically configure the complete set of ROADM options with settings optimized for the installed
equipment, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
roadm-options (roadm | terminal | dge | directionless | collector);
...
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.25 Configuring SPO Options


SPO ports work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure SPO options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:
spo spo {
tim-monitor (enabled | disabled);
expected-tti expected-tti;
sent-tti sent-tti;
expected-signal-label (unequipped | tug-structure | gfp-mapping);
sent-signal-label (unequipped | tug-structure | gfp-mapping);
plm-monitor (enabled | disabled);
deg (10e-6 | 10e-7 | 10e-8 | 10e-9);
exc (10e-3 | 10e-4 | 10e-5);
severity-profile severity-profile;
pm-profile pm-profile;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-monitor (enabled | disabled);
tim-consequent-action (enabled | disabled);
plm-consequent-action (enabled | disabled);
}

4.26 Configuring TR100 Options


TR100 modules can be configured to function as either transponders or regenerators. The complete
configuration statement is included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are
defined in Port Configuration Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
To configure the TR100 module with settings optimized for the installed equipment, include the following
statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
tr100-options (transponder | regenerator);
...
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.27 Configuring Transceiver Options


Transceivers work with their own set of attributes and options. The complete configuration statement is
included in this section. The attributes configured through this statement are defined in Port Configuration
Attributes (Optical, Photonic, Data).
As of V5.1 and later, the system supports two different 10G form factor transceivers: XFP and the newer
SFP+ transceivers, both fixed and tunable. SFP+ transceivers, used, for example, in TR10_12 modules, offer
many advantages over XFP transceivers, since they are more compact, providing more ports per card at a
reduced cost. Note that XFP and SFP+ transceivers cannot be used interchangeably - cards work with either
XFP or SFP+ transceivers, not both.
To configure transceiver options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

transceiver-options {
exp-transceiver-type (none | etgbe | etr1 | etsdi | otc10-alxx |
otc10-psxx | otc25-alxx | otc25-psxx | otgbe-ex | otgbe-l3bd |
otgbe-l5bd | otgbe-lx | otgbe-s3bd | otgbe-s5bd | otgbe-sx |
otgbe-zx | otr1-l3 | otr1-l5 | otr1-s3 | otr1-v5 | otr1-vl5 |
otr1-x3 | otr1-x5 | otr10-alxx | otr10-asxx | otr100-lr4 |
otr100-lr10 | otr100-sr10 | otr100-lr4dr | otr100-sr10dr |
otr100pt-c1200 | otr100ptf-c1200 | otr100p2-lr4 | otr100p2-lr10 |
otr100p2-sr10 | otr103-er | otr103-lr | otr103-sr |
otr103-zr | otr10t-al | otr10t-nb-al | otr16-i3 | otr16-l3 |
otr16-l3bd | otr16-l5 | otr16-l5bd | otr16-mm | otr16-s3 |
otr16-s3bd | otr16-s5bd | otr25-abxx | otr25-avxx | otr2m-ulh |
otr4-l3 | otr4-l5 | otr4-s3 | otr4-v5 | otr64-al5 | otr64-pi3 |
otr64-ps5 | otfc4-mm | otfc4-s3 | otfc8-mm | otfc8-pi3 |
rz-dqpsk | dp-dqpsk | dp-dqpsk-40 | otr1-vl62 | otr1-vl59 |
otp40-lr4 | otp40-sr4 | otp10-sr | otp10-lrm | otp10-lr |
otp10-er | otp10-zr | otp10-s27bd | otp10-s33bd | otp10-l27bd |
otp10-l33bd | otp10d-alxx | otp10d-allmxx | otp10t-allm |
otp10t-alln | otp10c-psxx | otp10c-allmxx | otpmr-pi3 |
otpmr-ps5 | otpmr-allm5 | otpmrc-psxx | otpmrc-allmxx | otp8-mm |
otp8-pi3 | otp16-mm | otp16-pi3 | otp16d-allmxx | otp16d-asxx |
otp16d-psxx | otp8d-allmxx | alien-sfp | alien-xfp);

rx-wavelength (non-colored);
tx-wavelength (non-colored);
tx-enable (enable | disable);
tx-power <tx-power>;
als-state (enable | disable);
coherent (true | false);
config-chromatic-dispersion config-chrom-disp;
last-known-chromatic-disp last-known-chrom-disp;
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

4.28 Configuring ULL Options


Latency in telecom networks measures the time delay between when a source sends out a signal to when
the destination receives that signal. In optical networks, that speed obviously approaches the speed of
light. However, there is always some element of "drag" on a signal, usually a factor of the transmission
length and the number of cross-connects and equipment transfers. Low latency and ultra-low latency (ULL)
transmissions utilize advanced optical technology to minimize the "drag" on an optical signal. ShadeTree
equipment options include ULL transceiver options (for 10GB, FC8, FC10, and FC16 rates) that minimize
drag to the point that the latency delay is as low as physically possible.
To work with a ULL port, specify the ULL port type in the port configuration statement. For example:

set chassis slot u3 tr10-12 port 1 port-type ull-fc1600

To automatically configure the complete set of ULL options with settings optimized for the installed
equipment, include the following statement at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level:

port port {
...
ull;
...

The following show configuration and show interfaces statements illustrates the port configuration
settings for a ull-fc1600 port type.

root@localhost# run show configuration chassis slot u3 tr10-12 port 1

enable;
port-mapping ull-fc1600;
port-type ull-fc1600;
port-behavior bidirectional;
direction bidirectional;
transceiver-options {
exp-transceiver-type otp16-pi3;
rx-wavelength non-colored;
tx-wavelength non-colored;
tx-enable enable;
als-state disable;
coherent false;
}
severity-profile default;
pm-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
description none;
label P1;
pm-monitor enable;
ull;

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

root@localhost# run show interfaces

Interface Admin Oper Family Address


ull-fc1600-u3/1:1 Up Lower Down

4.29 Port Configuration Attributes (Optical,


Photonic, Data)
The following tables summarize the attributes that operators use to configure different types of optical and
photonic card ports, including the attribute name, options, and usage guidelines. Additional attributes that
are for SDH/SONET data cards or for internal use only by the NE are not listed here. Attributes that are
configured as part of fiber connectivity functionality are explained in Fiber Connectivity. Attributes that are
configured as part of L2 data services are explained in Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and Ports.
Attributes that are part of the FCAPS functionality set are explained in greater detail in the System Overview
and Configuration User Guide.

NOTE: Not all attributes are relevant for all types of ports. Even when an attribute is relevant
for a specific type of port, not all the attribute values may be relevant for that port type. For
specific usage examples, see the relevant command line explanations provided previously in
this section.

TIP: Many of these attributes are preconfigured with default values appropriate for the
specific type of port being configured. To simplify port configuration, begin with the default
settings and change the attribute settings only as needed.

Table 4-2: Optical and photonic card attributes

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
ains  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled utilize automatic in-service functionality, by default
disabled.
alarm-master-mask  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled mask reporting of selected classes of alarms.
alien-lambda  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled interconnectivity with third party WDM transceivers
that are connected directly to ECI equipment, but are
not managed by ECI’s NMS.
alien-lambda-rx-options  <attribute set> See Defining Fiber Connectivity for Alien Lambdas.
alien-lambda-tx-options

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
allowed-fiber-loss-margin  <numeric> The margin of fiber loss allowed before an alarm is
raised (dB). (Default: intra-fiber connectivity=0.1;
inter-fiber connectivity=3, and resolution=0.1.
Possible intra-fiber connectivity values=0-7.)
als-state  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled automatically implement an automatic laser
shutdown (ALS) for this transceiver port in case of Rx
loss error. Default setting depends on the port type.
amplifier-state  off Current state of this amplifier module.
 on
config-chromatic-dispersion  config-chrom-di Sets the chromatic dispersion value for this
sp transceiver port. Range of -360 to +1200 ps/nm,
configurable in steps of 5 ps/nm.
connection-mode  configurable  All L1-XCs created explicitly by the user are
(default for configurable.
user-created  All L1-XCs created automatically by the NE are
L1-XCs) fixed.
 fixed  This value cannot be edited once the L1-XC has
(default for been created.
NE-created
L1-XCs)
csf-tsf-action  none In the case of csf (Client Signal Failure) or tsf (Trail
 lol Signal Failure), the system should stop transmission
 lf (lol - Loss of Light) or send a sequence (e.g., lf (Local
Fault) or ndc - Neutral Disparity Code) to the remote
 ndc
client.
 nos
 v-char
 pn-11
dcf-fiber-length-options  <value> Length of the transmission fiber for whose dispersion
the DCF module is compensating.
deg  10e-6 Bit error rate threshold that triggers a degraded signal
 10e-7 error condition. Depends on port rate for the installed
 10e-8 hardware.
 10e-9
 10e-10
 10e-11
 10e-12
edfa-mode  automatic EDFA mode configured for this amplifier.
 constant
 semiautomatic

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
exc  10e-3 Bit error rate (BER) threshold that triggers an
 10e-4 excessive BER condition. Usually applicable within an
 10e-5 SPO context.
exp-raman-gain  <value> Expected gain value configured for this RAMAN-type
amplifier.
exp-transceiver-type  <expected- The type of transceiver module inserted into the port,
transceiver selected from a list of choices.
type>
Refer to the following list, subject to change:
none | etgbe | etr1 | etsdi | otc10-alxx | otc10-psxx | otc25-alxx |
otc25-psxx | otgbe-ex | otgbe-l3bd | otgbe-l5bd | otgbe-lx | otgbe-s3bd |
otgbe-s5bd | otgbe-sx | otgbe-zx | otr1-l3 | otr1-l5 | otr1-s3 | otr1-v5 |
otr1-vl5 | otr1-x3 | otr1-x5 | otr10-alxx | otr10-asxx | otr100-lr4 |
otr100-lr10 | otr100-sr10 | otr100-lr4dr | otr100-sr10dr | otr100pt-c1200 |
otr100ptf-c1200 | otr100p2-lr4 | otr100p2-lr10 | otr100p2-sr10 | otr103-er
| otr103-lr | otr103-sr | otr103-zr | otr10t-al | otr10t-nb-al | otr16-i3 |
otr16-l3 | otr16-l3bd | otr16-l5 | otr16-l5bd | otr16-mm | otr16-s3 |
otr16-s3bd | otr16-s5bd | otr25-abxx | otr25-avxx | otr2m-ulh | otr4-l3 |
otr4-l5 | otr4-s3 | otr4-v5 | otr64-al5 | otr64-pi3 | otr64-ps5 | otfc4-mm |
otfc4-s3 | otfc8-mm | otfc8-pi3 | rz-dqpsk | dp-dqpsk | dp-dqpsk-40 |
otr1-vl62 | otr1-vl59 | otp40-lr4 | otp40-sr4 | otp10-sr | otp10-lrm |
otp10-lr | otp10-er | otp10-zr | otp10-s27bd | otp10-s33bd | otp10-l27bd |
otp10-l33bd | otp10d-alxx | otp10d-allmxx | otp10t-allm | otp10t-alln |
otp10c-psxx | otp10c-allmxx | otpmr-pi3 | otpmr-ps5 | otpmr-allm5 |
otpmrc-psxx | otpmrc-allmxx | otp8-mm | otp8-pi3 | otp16-mm | otp16-pi3
| otp16d-allmxx | otp16d-asxx | otp16d-psxx | otp8d-allmxx | alien-sfp |
alien-xfp
expected-signal-label  unequipped Type of signals expected. Usually applicable within an
 tug-structure SPO context.
 gfp-mapping
expected-tti  <expected-tti> The TTI (Trail Trace ID) string expected by the system;
verified when working with TIM monitoring.
Attributes can be set explicitly for DAPI, Operator,
SDH/SONET, and SAPI contexts.
fec-ignore  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled ignore FEC (Forward Error Correction) alarms.

fec-mode  fec Specifies the FEC mode to be implemented by the


 efec4 system.
 efec7
 efec7-10
 efec7-13
 sd-fec

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
fiber-connectivity  uni-in Set this attribute to configure how the peer-port fiber
 uni-out is connected (one-way in, one-way out, running in
 bidirectional both directions, or two separate unidirectional trails).
 uni-in-out
fiber-length  <numeric> The length of the fiber (km).
(Intra-fiber connectivity values 0-500; resolution=0.1).

fiber-type  g652 The type of fiber (default = G652).


 g653
 g654
 g655-leaf
 g655-tw-rs
 g655-tw-reach
 multimode
first-wavelength  <wavelength> Lower bound of supported wavelength range for this
port, when working with tunable transceivers.
Specific value depends on hardware capabilities.
Options include:
 DWDM (17-60.5)
 CWDM (1471-1611)
 non-colored
force-ais  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled force Alarm Indication Signals (AIS).
force-csf  enable The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disable forcing Client Signal Failure (CSF) signals.

frequency-spread  50GHz Filtering tolerance for this channel. Indicator of


 100GHz transmitter stability.
gcc-mode  standard The system should run and handle GCC management
 xdm communication as is standard for Apollo networks
(not currently (standard, default) or as is standard for XDM
available) networks (xdm).
gcc-termination  disable Indicates that this port is to be used as a termination
 gcc0 point for the specified GCC management
 gcc1 communication channel.
 gcc2
gcm-mode  standard Boolean value indicates whether system is running in
 monitor standard or monitor mode.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
gfp-consequent-action  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled implement the predefined "consequent actions" or
responses that have been configured for this port in
case of a GFP error.
gmpls-options Full set of values, GMPLS options are utilized for ASON protection and
usually set restoration, described in ASON Trail Restoration.
automatically by the Most of the attribute values are set automatically by
embedded system. the embedded system. The use can assign values to
some of the attributes, for example, to identify the
port as either UNI or NNI and set the port’s
"link-cost". Link-cost and link-length are ranking
values used to optimize segment selection for
ASON-protected trails.
index-for-io  <value> Index value used for I/O actions.
initial-gain  <value> Initial gain setting for the amplifier.
input-fiber-loss  <value> The configured input fiber loss (dB). (Default value=0;
possible values 0-100; resolution=0.1)
is-connected  false Boolean values indicates whether this interface is
 true connected.
last-known-chromatic-  last-known- Saves the last known chromatic dispersion value for
dispersion chrom-disp this transceiver port. Range of -360 to +1200 ps/nm.
last-wavelength  <wavelength> Upper bound of supported wavelength range for this
port, when working with tunable transceivers.
Specific value depends on hardware capabilities.
Options include:
 DWDM (17-60.5)
 CWDM (1471-1611)
 non-colored
lf-rf-mode  local System reactions to certain types of fault conditions
 transparent should be implemented either locally (local) or
network-wide (transparent).
los-threshold  <value> Loss of Signal threshold that triggers an alarm.
management-buffer-b64  <value> Read-only, set at the NMS level.

max-frame-size  <value> Maximum frame size supported by this module.


max-number-  <value> Maximum number of channels supported by this
channels module.
mode  pb Configuration mode for AoC10_L2 cards, either PB
 mpls-pe (default)or MPLS.
Additional card and port configuration parameters
relevant for L2 data services are described in
Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Ports.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
multi-wavelength  true Indicates whether the module is configured to work
 false with multiple wavelengths simultaneously.
multiplexing-scheme  none Identifies the multiplexing scheme (if any) used by
 transparent this port. Read-only, automatically detected.
 pt-20
 pt-21
 pt-82
(ODU) type  <odu-types> Type of ODU interface for which the port is being
configured.
Refer to the following list, subject to change:
odu-slot, odu1, odu2, odu3, odu2e, odu3e, odu2f, odu4, odu0, oduf-sdi3g,
oduf-fc400, oduf-fc800, och, oms, os, spo, oc, ull-ety10goc, ull-fc800,
ull-fc1200, ull-fc1600
odu-ais-to-lol  enabled The ODU port should (enabled) or should not
 disabled (disabled) shut down the laser if an Alarm Indication
Signals (AIS) alarm is triggered.
os --- Configure this port for OS (splitter/coupler)
functionality using preconfigured optimized settings.
osc-channel-peer  <string> The channel of the corresponding (peer) osc channel.

output-fiber-loss  <value> The configured input or output fiber loss (dB).


(Default value=0; possible values 0-100;
resolution=0.1)
output-pwr-per-channel  <value> Requested average output power per channel for this
port.
passive-oadm-options  <first-channel> Defines the starting channel for this passive OADM
module, based on the ITU grid.
pattern-type-rx  none Defines what (if any) pattern should be used for signal
pattern-type-tx  off transmission and reception when working in test
 pseudorandom mode.
 prbs31
payload-type-expected  payload-type The type of traffic content expected by the port, and
payload-type-sent the type of traffic actually sent to the port, selected
effective-payload-type from a list of choices.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Port Configuration

Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
Refer to the following list, subject to change:
none | experimental | asyncronous | bit-syncronous | atm-mapping |
gfp-mapping | vcat-signal | transparent-ety | 1000basex-into-odu0 |
fc1200-into-odu2e | gfp-into-opu2 | stm1-gmp | stm4-gmp |
stm1-into-odu0 | odu-slot-proprietary | bitstr-with-octet |
bitstr-without-octet | odu-multiplex-jk | odu-multiplex-k-ts | na-55 | na-66
| null-test-signal | prbs-test-signal | gbe10-oc | fc-10g | fc-8g-gfp-mapping |
fc200-into-odu1 | cbr-mapping | fc100-gmp | fc400-flex | fc800-flex |
video270-gmp | hdsdi1485-gmp | hdsdi-3g-flex | na-ff | unknown
peer-ne  unspecified The IP address of the peer router. Configured
 <ip-address> explicitly for inter-fiber connectivity only.
peer-port  <numeric> The number of the peer port number.
peer-slot  <string> The shelf and slot name of the peer slot.
plm-consequent-action  allow The system should (allow/enabled) or should not
 disabled (disabled/inhibit) implement the predefined
 enabled "consequent actions" or responses that have been
configured for this port in case of a PLM (payload
 inhibit
mismatch) error.
plm-monitor  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled utilize PLM (payload mismatch) monitoring to check
for mismatches between expected and actually-sent
payload types.
pm-monitor  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled utilize performance monitoring (PM). Performance
monitoring can be configured at various hierarchical
levels for a wide range of system entities (see
Performance Monitoring in the System Overview and
Configuration User Guide).
pm-profile  <pm-profile Specifies a user-defined PM profile to be applied.
name> Profiles are used to store sets of user-defined PM
thresholds. Traffic performance can be monitored
using either the default system settings or some
combination of user-defined settings (see
Performance Monitoring in the System Overview and
Configuration User Guide).
pmd  <numeric> Polarized Mode Dispersion (PMD)
 For intra-fiber connectivity, default=0.
 For inter-fiber connectivity, PMD range=0-40,
resolution=0.1. Default PMD varies according to
fiber length: <10km=0; >10km=0.7sqrt.
po-options --- Configure this port for PO functionality using
preconfigured optimized settings.

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Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
port-behavior  uni-in By default, bidirectional ports are configured for
 uni-out bidirectional cross-connection traffic flow. Set this
 bidirectional attribute to configure bidirectional ports to support
unidirectional cross connections, and to identify the
 uni-in-out
direction of the cross connection (one-way in,
one-way out, running in both directions, or two
separate unidirectional trails).
port-description  <string> User comments providing information regarding
essential port characteristics.
port-direction  uni-in Set this attribute to configure the direction of the
 uni-out physical traffic flow for the port, (one-way in,
 bidirectional one-way out, running in both directions, or two
separate unidirectional trails).
 uni-in-out
port-mapping  <port-mapping> Defines how to map various types of ports and/or
interfaces to a specific (sub)interface choice when
multiple interface options are available.
User chooses from the list of available options
provided by the CLI, including OCH, OMS, OS, and
various ODU types, as appropriate.
port-type  <port type Type of port being configured, dependent on installed
value> hardware capabilities. Cannot be changed once the
port has been configured. To change the port type,
delete the current port and configure a new one.
power-offset  <power-offset Specific the power offset, with the possible values
value> determined by the hardware capabilities. (N/A for
TFA cards.)
response-to-los  immediate- Defines how this module should respond to a loss of
shut-down signal event; immediate shutdown or shut down after
 delay-50-msec- a 50msec delay.
shut-down
roadm-options  roadm Identifies the configuration of this ROADM module.
 terminal
 dge
 directionless
 collector
rx-pattern  none When the system is running in test-mode, defines
 idles what (if any) testing pattern should be used for signal
 off transmission and reception.
 pseudorandom

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Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
rx-wavelength  <wavelength> Input wavelength for this port. Specific value depends
on hardware capabilities. Must match expected
tx-wavelength. Options include:
 DWDM (17-60.5)
 CWDM (1471-1611)
 non-colored
send-ais  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled send AIS signals.
send-bdi  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled transmit Backward Defect Indication (BDI) signals.
send-csf  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
 disabled send CSF (Client Signal Fail) signals.
sent-signal-label  unequipped Type of signals actually sent. Usually applicable within
 tug-structure an SPO context.
 gfp-mapping
sent-tti  <sent-tti> The TTI (Trail Trace ID) string actually sent by the
system; verified when working with TIM monitoring.
Attributes can be set explicitly for DAPI, Operator,
SDH/SONET, and SAPI contexts.
severity-profile  <severity-profil Specifies a user-defined severity profile to be applied.
e name> Severity profiles are used to store sets of user-defined
alarm severity settings. Alarms are triggered using
either the default system settings or some
combination of user-defined settings. For more
information, see the System Overview and
Configuration User Guide.
signal-type  <value> Type of signal being transmitted.
Refer to the following list, subject to change:
ochp | ots | otu1 | otu2 | otu2e | otu2f | otu2x | otu3 | otu3e | otu4
|stm64 | stm16 | stm4 | stm1 | stm1e | oc192 | oc48 | oc12 | oc3 | oc3e |
ety1g | ety1ge | ety1gx |ety1gxe | ety10g | ety10goc | ety40g | ety100 |
ety100g | fc1600 | fc1200 | fc800 | fc400 | fc200 | fc100 | video270 |
sdi360m | hdsdi1485g | ge | ge10 | ge10-otu2e | osc100 | osc2m |
oschannel | po | ull-ety10goc | ull-fc800 | ull-fc1200 | ull-fc1600
space  DWDM: 50GHz Specify the wavelength channel spacing.
spacing or 100GHz
 CWDM: 20nm
 <empty> where
not relevant
(for amplifiers,
OLP, OMSP)

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Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
spo --- Used to configure AoC cards working in XDM mode
using SPO subinterfaces for ETY ports. Implements
preconfigured optimized settings.
test-mode  normal The system should run and handle network traffic
 test normally (normal) or should run in test mode and not
handle live traffic (test).
tilt  <value> Tilt setting for this amplifier.
tilt-offset  <value> Tilt offset setting for this amplifier.
tim-ca  allow The system should (allow/enabled) or should not
tim-consequent-action  disabled (disabled/inhibit) implement the predefined
 enabled "consequent actions" or responses that have been
configured for this port in case of a Trace Identifier
 inhibit
Mismatch (TIM).
tim-monitor Enable or disable TIM (Trace Identifier Mismatch)
monitoring.
SDH/SONET mode:  When working with SDH/SONET options, this
 disabled attribute can only be enabled or disabled
(default).
 enabled
 When working with optical or photonic options,
this attribute specifies the TIM monitoring mode
Optical/Photonic to be used:
mode:
---SAPI (Secure Access Point Identifier, usually
 sapi used for P2P or P2MP topologies)
 dapi ---DAPI (Destination Access Point Identifier,
 both usually used for MP2P topologies)
 disabled ---Both
---Disabled
tim-oci-lck-  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not (disabled)
consequent-action  disabled implement the predefined "consequent actions" or
responses that have been configured for this port in
case of an instance of one of these types of error
conditions: Trace Identifier Mismatch (TIM), Open
Connection Indication (OCI), or Locked upstream
connection (LCK).
tributary-slot <value> Defines the smallest possible subdivision for an ODU
subinterface. The slot size depends on the payload
type (PT). For example, PT21 provides a granularity of
1.25G. These means, for example, that an ODU2 port
can be divided into eight PT21 tributary slots.
total-channels-options  16 Defines the total number of channels configured for
 44 this ROADM-9a module.

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Attribute/
Options Usage guidelines
Keyword
tpn <value> Tributary port number (TPN) provides the port
number to be used as part of the ODUk multiplexing
scheme. Values defined based on ODU type (see
Understanding Interface and Tributary Slot
Configuration).
tr100-options  transponder Defines how this TR100 module is being configured
 regenerator and used; as a transponder or as a regenerator.
tti-expected <tti-expected> The TTI (Trail Trace ID) strings expected by the
tti-expected-dapi system; verified when working with TIM monitoring.
tti-expected-operator Configured as appropriate for DAPI, Operator, SAPI,
tti-expected-sapi or SDH/SONET modes.

tti-sent <tti-sent> The TTI strings actually sent by the system; verified
tti-sent-dapi when working with TIM monitoring.
tti-sent-operator Configured as appropriate for DAPI, Operator, SAPI,
tti-sent-sapi or SDH/SONET modes.
tx-enable  enabled Defines the laser state, indicating whether
 disabled transmission should be enabled (default) or disabled
from this transceiver port.
tx-pattern  none When the system is running in test-mode, defines
 idles what (if any) testing pattern should be used for signal
 off transmission.
 pseudorandom
tx-power <tx power> Transmission power level.
tx-wavelength <wavelength> Output wavelength for this port. Specific value
depends on hardware capabilities. Options include:
 DWDM (17-60.5)
 CWDM (1471-1611)
 non-colored
ull Optimize configuration settings for ultra low latency
transceivers.
wavelength  <wavelength> Wavelength for this port, usually configured when
working with fixed transceivers. Specific value
depends on hardware capabilities. Options include:
 DWDM (17-60.5)
 CWDM (1471-1611)
 non-colored
wdm-type  na WDM type, preconfigured setting based on the type
 cwdm of equipment.
 dwdm
 non-colored

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5 Interface Configuration
This section describes how to configure logical interfaces located on service cards. Note that there are two
other interfaces located on RCP cards: management and auxiliary. This section does not discuss the
management or auxiliary interfaces. For information about configuring these interfaces, see the System
Overview and Configuration User Guide.
To use interfaces for routing, you must configure chassis and interface properties for each port and
interface. You can configure properties for currently installed interfaces, or properties for interfaces not yet
present in the system. When you add the pre-configured interfaces to the system (by inserting the
appropriate card), the software detects the interfaces and applies the configuration.

5.1 Configuring Ports and Interfaces


There are two overall steps to configuring an interface on a device:
 At the [edit chassis] hierarchy level, specify which card is located in a slot, and then configure the
physical properties of the port (and subinterfaces, where relevant).
If the card resides on a subtending shelf of a multi-shelf NE, include the subtending shelf name with
the slot number (for example, sa-u0). For more information about subtending shelves, see Multi-Shelf
Configuration.
 At the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level, configure interfaces, and logical interfaces.
You should configure the physical properties of a port at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level before you
configure interface or subinterface properties at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level.
To configure:
 Statements at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level, see Configuring Slots and Cards.
 Statements at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level, see Configuring Interfaces.

5.2 Configuring Interfaces


This section provides examples of typical interface configuration commands. To configure interfaces,
include one or more of the following statements at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level. The complete
interfaces hierarchy statement is provided in the Configuration Statement Reference Manual.

NOTE: The CLI examples provided in this section are for illustrative purposes only, to clarify
the style or syntax of a type of command. Some of the specific commands and parameters
used in these examples are not supported in the current version of ShadeTree. In addition, not
every user has full privileges to perform commands in the CLI. Therefore, you might not be
able to run some of the commands described in this manual, with the specific syntax and
parameters listed.

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5.2.1 Configuring a GRE Tunnel

NOTE: For detailed information about configuring GRE, see the GRE User Guide.

If you are using GRE to create tunnels across an IP network, you can create a tunnel for a GRE interface. To
create a GRE tunnel, you configure:
 Source IP address of the tunnel
 Destination IP addresses of the tunnel
 An optional description of the tunnel

NOTE: The name of a GRE interface is always gre0. You may configure multiple GRE logical
interfaces under the [interfaces gre0 unit unit] hierarchy.

To configure a GRE tunnel, include the following statements at the [edit interfaces gre0 unit unit]
hierarchy level:
tunnel {
disable;
description description;
source source;
destination destination;
mtu mtu;
(rebalance | no-rebalance);
keepalive-interval keepalive-interval;
keepalive-limit keepalive-limit;
}

Where:
 disable disables the tunnel.
 source is the IP address to use as the source of this tunnel.
 description is a text description of the tunnel. If the description contains spaces or special characters,
enclose the text in quotes (").
 destination is the IP address to use as the source of this tunnel.
 mtu is the MTU for the tunnel, from 256 to 9,600 bytes.
 rebalance allows the GRE tunnel to be rebalanced (default).
 no-rebalance keeps the GRE tunnel from being rebalanced.
 keepalive-interval is the length of time the device waits before sending the next GRE keepalive
packet, from 0 to 32,766 seconds. The default is zero seconds (i.e., disabled).
 keepalive-limit is the maximum number of keepalives to send without hearing a response before
declaring the GRE protocol down on the interface, from 1 to 254 packets. The default is three packets.

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NOTE: You can only create one GRE tunnel per logical interface. You cannot configure GRE
tunnels if high availability is enabled. For more information about high availability, see the
System Overview and Configuration User Guide.

Example
The following example configures a GRE tunnel called "Tunnel to 159" with a source IP address of
10.1.1.153 and a destination IP address of 10.1.1.159:
interfaces {
gre0 {
unit 0 {
tunnel {
description "Tunnel to 159";
source 10.1.1.153;
destination 10.1.1.159;
}
}
}
}

5.2.2 Monitoring Traffic on Interfaces

NOTE: The Apollo (OPT9600) Platforms include special performance monitoring features. For
example you can define threshold values in a profile and assign different profiles to different
entities (see Performance Monitoring in the System Overview and Configuration User Guide).

The monitor interface command allows you to monitor, in real-time, interface-specific counters for a
specific interface or all interfaces. There are two modes:
 monitor interface interface-name: Allows you to monitor counters on a specific physical interface
(port or subinterface). Certain logical interfaces, such as lo0, can also be monitored. Displays
information in long mode.
 monitor interface traffic: Allows you to monitor traffic counters for all interfaces. Displays
information in short mode.
 monitor interface logical interface-name: Allows you to monitor counters on a specific logical
interface. Displays information in long mode.

NOTE: Once the monitor interface command is running, you can switch between modes.

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5.2.2.1 Using the Monitor Interface Command


The monitor interface command is a program that runs within the CLI.
To use the monitor interface operation mode command to monitor real-time interface information,
perform the following steps:
1. At the operation mode prompt, type monitor interface (interface-name | traffic | logical
interface-name), where interface-name is the name of a specific interface.
2. Press Enter.

Default display
By default, the monitor interface traffic command displays:
 The rate of traffic, rather than the absolute value of the counters
 Packets, rather than bytes
 Information in short mode rather than long mode
By default, the monitor interface interface-name command displays information in long mode.
Real-time information about all of the interfaces on the device displays, as illustrated in the following
figure.
Figure 5-1: Example of monitor interface traffic display

Key commands within monitor interface


Once you are running the monitor interface command, you can use key commands to modify what
information the command displays. You can use different keyboard commands for the different monitor
interface modes.

The following table lists the keyboard commands you can use within the monitor interface traffic
command (short mode).

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Table 5-1: Keyboard commands

Command Description
b Displays traffic in bytes and displays the traffic rate in bytes per second.

c Clears the display and restarts the averaging interval for rate measurement.
d Displays the absolute counter increments for traffic, rather than the average rate.
f Temporarily freezes the display. Only the t (thaw) and q (quit) commands are operational.
Press t to unfreeze the display.
l Changes the display to long mode, that is, displays information about an interface. Usually,
information about the first interface in the traffic list displays. If you have previously
displayed an interface in long mode, that interface information displays. To change back to
short mode, press s.
p Displays traffic in packets and displays the traffic rate in packets per second (Default).
q Exits the monitor interface command and returns to the CLI.
r Displays the average rate of traffic, rather than the absolute counter increments (Default).
t Unfreezes the display. This option is only available when the display is frozen.
Ctrl-u Scrolls the display up.
Ctrl-d Scrolls the display down.

The following table lists the keyboard commands you can use within the monitor interface
interface-name command (long mode).

Table 5-2: Keyboard commands

Command Description
c Clears the display and restarts the averaging interval for rate measurement.

f Temporarily freezes the display. Only the t (thaw) and q (quit) commands are
operational. Press t to unfreeze the display.
i Displays information about a specified interface. You are prompted to enter the
interface name.
n Displays information about the next interface.
s Changes the display to short mode, that is, displays traffic information for all interfaces.
To change back to long mode, press l.
q Exits the monitor interface command and returns to the CLI.
t Unfreezes the display. This option is only available when the display is frozen.

Ctrl-u Scrolls the display up.


Ctrl-d Scrolls the display down.

NOTE: You can also press Ctrl-c to exit the monitor interfaces command.

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5.2.3 Interface Alarms

NOTES:
 The Apollo platforms include special fault management features. For example you can
define alarm severity levels in a profile and assign different profiles to different entities
(see Fault Management in the System Overview and Configuration User Guide).
 You can display additional information by issuing the show interfaces extensive
command.

There are alarms for Gigabit Ethernet interfaces. You can display interface alarm information by using the
show interfaces detail command from the operation mode.

5.2.3.1 Gigabit Ethernet Alarms


The following table lists the Gigabit Ethernet interface alarms and the actions you can take to correct them.

Table 5-3: Interface alarms

MIB Text Description Severity Recommended Actions


interface-name A terminal loopback is — To disable the loopback configuration,
ge-unit-number/ configured on the enter configuration mode, and then
port-number – specified port. type: delete chassis slot slot- number
Terminal (local) loopback card-type port port- number loopback
interface-name The specified port is Major Ensure the fiber is correctly installed.
ge-unit-number/ experiencing a loss of
port-number – carrier failure.
Loss of carrier

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6 Cross Connection Configuration
This section describes how to configure Layer 1 cross connections (L1-XCs) between ports on various
photonic and optical service cards. XCs provide connections between transport entities (signals from
tributaries or interfaces). Incoming signals or tributaries are connected to outgoing signals or tributaries of
compatible bandwidth. For example, you can configure L1-XCs between two OTU2 ports (using ODU2 as the
L1-XC endpoints), or between an OTU2 port and up to four different OTU1 ports (using ODU1 as the L1-XC
endpoints). (Detailed connectivity rules and guidelines are provided later in this section.)
L1-XC connectivity can be configured between:
 Endpoints residing on one or more service cards with Fabric Interface Control (FIC). Cross connections
between cards run through the ODU-XC fabric, via the backplane. For example:
 Between endpoints on FIOMR_16B and FIO10_5B cards
 Between endpoints on FIOMR_16B and FIO100 cards
 Tributaries on a single service card without FIC. For example:
 ODUk L1-XCs on L1 service cards (transponders or AoC cards)
 OCH L1-XC on a Mux/DeMux card
To configure an L1-XC on a device via CLI commands, the physical port properties must first be configured
at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level, including slots, cards, and supporting ports. The assumption in this
section is that the equipment and interfaces have already been configured; see Configuring Slots and Cards.
You can create and configure L1-XCs for equipment that is already installed or for equipment that is not yet
installed. When you add the pre-configured equipment to the system (by inserting the appropriate card),
the software detects the L1-XCs and applies the configuration. You can also retrieve and modify certain
L1-XC configuration settings under certain circumstances, as described later in this section. Configurable
L1-XCs can be deleted as long as they are not in use by a trail.

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6.1 Layer 1 Cross Connections


This section introduces L1-XCs and explains how they are used.

6.1.1 L1-XC Compatibility Guidelines


L1-XCs can be configured between matching endpoints supporting the signal rates described in the
following table. Note that the two endpoints must be compatible in terms of rates and payloads, where
relevant.

Table 6-1: Supported signal rates for L1-XC endpoints

Endpoint Card type Connection guidelines


OMS  Photonic cards  Between two OTS ports.
 Passive optics cards
OCH  Photonic cards  Between two OTS or OCHP ports
 Passive optics cards (any combination).
 Input and output wavelengths between
two OCH endpoints must be identical.
ODUk  L1 service cards with FIC ODUk cross connections can be configured between ports
 L1 service cards without FIC on the same card, for cards without FIC, or between ports
residing on the same or different cards, for cards with FIC.
Cards must reside within the same NE, either on the main
platform or (in multi-shelf configurations) on the
subtending shelves.
Incoming signals or tributaries are connected to outgoing
signals or tributaries of compatible bandwidth.
Multiplexing signals is supported for greater bandwidth
efficiency. For example, up to four different ODU1s can
be multiplexed to an ODU2. Detailed connectivity rules
and guidelines are provided in L1-XC Connection Tables.
Refer to the following list, subject to change:
odu-slot, odu1, odu2, odu3, odu2e, odu3e, odu2f, odu4, odu0, oduf-sdi3g, oduf-fc400,
oduf-fc800, och, oms, os, spo, oc
ODUSlot  L1 service cards with FIC Proprietary rate developed by ECI for lower-rate ports
 L1 service cards without FIC supporting less than 1.25 Gbps bandwidth, such as STM1
and ETY1G.
Up to two adjacent ODUSlot endpoints based in the
low-rate ports on the client side can be connected to two
ODUSlot endpoints contained within a single
ODU1interface at the network side.
If one of the ODUSlot connections to an ODU1 interface
has been configured as a protected type, then the NE
automatically configures the second ODUSlot connection
to that ODU1 as the protection connection. If the main
ODUSlot connection is deleted, then the NE automatically
deletes the protection connection.

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Endpoint Card type Connection guidelines


OS Splitter/coupler cards used for Relevant for OS interfaces between passive optics ports
port protection only. When a splitter/coupler card is assigned, the NE
implicitly configures the card ports and interfaces and
creates the appropriate number of L1-XCs necessary to
provide protection for that card. Each L1-XC is configured
with two unidirectional legs.
SPO AoC10 cards Relevant only for AoC10 card working with XDM AoC card. An OTU2x
port is automatically connected via eight SPO cross connections using
two unidirectional legs, running between each SPO of the ETY1G port
and the SPOs contained within the ODU2 interface of the second
OTU2x port.
When the OTU2x port is deleted, if the SPO cross connections are not
part of a trail, the NE automatically deletes all the related SPO cross
connections.

6.1.2 L1-XC Leg Directionality


L1-XCs are actually containers that can hold multiple cross connect legs, where each leg represents a single
connection configured between two endpoints. L1-XC legs are defined with directionality:
 Unidirectional, with up to two independent L1-XC legs configured, one in each direction, between
two endpoints. The direction is indicated by identifying the two endpoints as the starting (from-tp)
and destination (to-tp) endpoints. Note that L1-XCs configured in fixed mode (see XC Modes) always
have unidirectional legs.
 Bidirectional, with a single two-way L1-XC leg configured between the two endpoints. While the two
endpoints in a bidirectional leg are also identified as the from-tp and to-tp endpoints, these names
are not significant in the classic sense, since this is a bidirectional leg on which traffic is running back
and forth in both directions between the two endpoints. The to-tp endpoint is significant in terms of
protection configurations, since that is the endpoint the NE uses as the basis when creating the
associated protection group.
Note that L1-XC leg directionality depends on the underlying hardware capabilities. Ports that do not
support bidirectionality cannot be configured with bidirectional L1-XC legs.
Directionality of the L1-XC leg is not dependent upon or affected by the direction of the fiber connectivity
(Fiber Connectivity) configured for the same ports.
Directionality of the L1-XC leg is not dependent upon or affected by the direction of the trails configured for
the same ports, with one exception: a unidirectional trail must be configured over a unidirectional L1-XC.

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6.1.3 XC Owners
Following introduction of GMPLS support for ODU-XCs, XCs may be "owned" or controlled by either the
management plane, or the control plane, or even both, depending on the network context.
 Management plane ownership (via ShadeTree, STMS, and LightSoft) indicates that the object is
configured, setting card assignment, port configuration, and so on, through the management plane.
 Control plane ownership, identified by the relevant LSP ID number, is relevant for XCs that are
participating in ASON protection and restoration configuration, which is handled by the control plane.
Typically, ODU-XCs for restoration purposes are implicitly created by the control plane and can be
implicitly deleted only by the control plane.
 An object can be owned simultaneously by both the management and control planes when
performing maintenance operations on objects owned by the control plane or during transition states
from non-ASON to ASON and vice versa.
A XC may have multiple owners, depending on how that XC is being used and by what. For example, XCs
that migrate from non-ASON functionality to ASON protection, or vice versa, are considered "owned" by
both the management and the control planes. Multiple ownership also provides a safety net, since a XC
cannot be deleted unless it is owned by only a single owner and is not carrying any traffic, thereby ensuring
that a XC is not mistakenly deleted, leading to an unintentional impact on traffic.
Ownership is determined by the system, depending on the XC creation and usage context, and can be
checked through the owner CLI parameter.

6.1.4 XC Modes
XCs are automatically configured in one of the following modes:
 Configurable: XCs that are explicitly created, edited, and deleted by users working through the
management or control plane. Note that not all attributes can be edited, and some attributes can
only be edited under certain conditions. Some modifications are traffic-affecting, while others are
not.
 Fixed: XCs that are created automatically by the NE without operator intervention. Fixed-mode XCS
are used to connect two endpoints with a unidirectional connection at a single fixed connectivity rate.
Examples include cross connections in amplifiers or in passive optics cards such as DCFs or
Mux/DeMuxes.
Operators are not allowed to create or delete fixed-mode XCs. Operators are allowed to edit
non-traffic-affecting attributes such as trail ID and customer name. When these cross connections are
used by a trail, the relevant trail information is so noted by the XC to prevent inadvertent deletion of
a cross connection in use.

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The following table summarizes when XCs can be modified.

Table 6-2: XC mode comparison

Fixed XC: Mgmt Fixed XC: Control Configurable: Mgmt Configurable: Control
XC Action
plane owner plane owner plane owner plane owner
Creation No user action, implicitly created by NE Explicit XC creation Created via control
only. only if XC created via plane only if XC
Mgmt plane. created as part of
GMPLS/WSON trail
configuration.
Modification Explicit editing Explicit editing Explicit editing only if Explicit editing for
only for enabled in future at least one of the traffic-affecting
non-traffic versions. owners is the Mgmt parameters only for a
affecting plane. single owner.
attributes such as Explicit editing for
trail ID. non-traffic-affecting
parameters allowed
for multiple owners.
Deletion No user action, implicitly deleted by NE Explicit deletion only if Explicit deletion only if
only. the last owner is the the last owner is the
Mgmt plane. Control plane.
Notifications Notifications sent for all creation, modification, and deletion actions in all modes.
User retrievable Yes in all modes.
Saved in
non-volatile Yes in all modes.
memory

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6.1.5 ODU-XC Fabric Support


ODU-XCs are configured using fabric cards (such as FM1000 cards) to create connections between
L1 service cards with FIC (such as FIO10_5B, FIO100, and FIOMR_16B). The ODUk cross connections are
created over an ODU-XC fabric, via the backplane. Cards must reside within the same NE, either on the
main platform or (in future multi-shelf configurations) on the subtending shelves. The following figure
illustrates a typical ODU-XC configuration.
Figure 6-1: ODU-XC cross connect configuration

Incoming signals or tributaries are connected to outgoing signals or tributaries of compatible bandwidth.
For example, the following cross connections are currently supported:
 ODU0ODU0
 ODU1ODU1
 ODU2ODU2
 ODU2eODU2e
 ODU4ODU4
 ODUFlex (CBR)ODUFlex (CBR)
 ODUSlotODUSlot
ODUSlot is a proprietary rate developed by ECI for lower-rate ports supporting less than 1.25 Gbps
bandwidth, such as STM1 and ETY1G. Up to two adjacent ODUSlot endpoints based in the low-rate
ports on the client side can be connected to two ODUSlot endpoints contained within a single
ODU1interface at the network side. Note that throughout the network the ODUSlots are aggregated
into ODU1s. Only at the trail edges they are split into ODUSlot cross connections.
If one of the ODUSlot connections to an ODU1 interface has been configured as a protected type,
then the NE automatically configures the second ODUSlot connection to that ODU1 as the protection
connection. If the main ODUSlot connection is deleted, then the NE automatically deletes the
protection connection.

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 ODUiODUktrib[m] (where i<k)


For example, the following figure illustrates a cross connection where i=2, k=3, and the ODU2
endpoint is a tributary [0] of an OTU3 port.
Figure 6-2: ODUi <--> ODUktrib[m] cross connect configuration

 ODUitrib[n]ODUitrib[m]
For example, the following figure illustrates a cross connection between two tributaries of two OTU2
ports.
Figure 6-3: ODUi trib[n] <--> ODUitrib[m] cross connect configuration

Multiplexing is supported for greater bandwidth efficiency. For example, up to four different ODU1s can be
multiplexed to an ODU2. Detailed connectivity rules and guidelines are provided in L1-XC Connection
Tables.

6.1.6 L1-XC Protection Support


L1-XCs can support a range of connectivity protection options, both unprotected and protected. During
L1-XC configuration, the NE determines whether any of the protected configurations would be applicable
for the new L1-XC. If so, the NE automatically creates an appropriate protection group object that includes
the relevant L1-XC legs.
If an L1-XC is configured with protection (and is therefore a member of a protection group), all
maintenance actions applied to that L1-XC are automatically applied to both the main cross connection and
the protection group entity. Some maintenance operations may also be applied directly to the protection
group by the user. For more information about protection groups, see Protection Groups.

6.1.6.1 Unprotected Configurations


 1-way unprotected P2P: This is the simplest type of connection. A single L1-XC leg is configured as a
unidirectional P2P connection from an input endpoint port to a compatible output endpoint port of
equal bandwidth. There is no protection built into this connection, and the corresponding L1-XC leg
running in the opposite direction can be used for a completely different service.
Figure 6-4: 1-way unprotected P2P L1-XC leg

This type of cross connection is used, for example, when connecting local tributaries on a board or
tributaries from client to line or from line to line.

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 1-way unprotected P2MP: Multiple L1-XC legs are configured as a group of unidirectional P2MP
connections that all originate at the same input port (from-tp), with each one terminating at a
different endpoint (to-tp).
Figure 6-5: 1-way unprotected P2MP L1-XC legs

This type of cross connection is used, for example, when connecting an input port to multiple output
ports for multicast or broadcast applications.
 2-way unprotected P2P: A single L1-XC leg is configured as a bidirectional P2P connection between
two compatible endpoint ports of equal bandwidth.
Figure 6-6: 2-way unprotected P2P L1-XC leg

Note that a bidirectional cross connection may also consist of two unidirectional cross connections
managed together.

6.1.6.2 Protected Configurations


When the L1-XC structure would support a protection configuration, the NE automatically creates the
appropriate protection group entity.
 1-way protected P2P: Two unidirectional L1-XC legs that both end at the same endpoint (to-tp).
Each protected L1-XC is associated with a single protection group.
Figure 6-7: 1-way protected P2P L1-XC leg

This type of cross connection is used, for example, when creating unidirectional connections between
two source tributaries and a single destination tributary.

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 2-way protected P2P: Two bidirectional L1-XC legs that both end at the same endpoint. Each
protected L1-XC is associated with a single protection group.
Figure 6-8: 2-way protected P2P L1-XC legs

This type of cross connection is used, for example, when creating bidirectional connections between
two source tributaries and a single destination tributary. Note that while the terms source and
destination are not meaningful in the classic sense for a bidirectional leg on which traffic is running
back and forth in both directions, the destination endpoint is significant in terms of protection
configurations, since that is the endpoint the NE uses as the basis when creating the associated
protection group.
 1-way protected P2MP: Up to four unidirectional L1-XC legs can be configured to create a group of
connections that all originate at different endpoints (from-tp) but all end at the same endpoint
(to-tp). Each protected L1-XC is associated with a single protection group.
This type of cross connection is used, for example, for ROADM-Add applications with multiple drop
points.
 2-way protected P2MP: Up to four bidirectional L1-XC legs can be configured to create a group of
connections that all originate at different endpoints (from-tp) but all end at the same endpoint
(to-tp). Each protected L1-XC is associated with a single protection group.
Figure 6-9: 2-way protected P2MP L1-XC legs

This type of cross connection is used, for example, for ROADM applications with multiple add/drop
points. Since there are multiple legs protecting the line port, the operator must specify which is the
main leg.

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 1-way fully protected XC: Four unidirectional L1-XC legs can be configured to create a group of
connections that all run between the same set of four endpoints, providing full traffic protection.
Each unidirectional L1-XC leg participates in two different protection group entities.
 2-way fully protected XC: Four bidirectional L1-XC legs can be configured to create a group of
connections that all run between the same set of four endpoints, providing comprehensive traffic
protection. Each bidirectional L1-XC leg participates in two different protection group entities.
Figure 6-10: 2-way fully protected L1-XC

6.1.6.3 Maximum Number of L1-XC Legs


An unprotected L1-XC can include an unlimited number of legs. The number of legs for a protected L1-XC
can be limited, depending on the XC configuration. The following table summarizes the maximum number
of legs that can be configured for a protected XC.

Table 6-3: Maximum number of L1-XC legs

Protected XC
Usage Maximum XC legs
endpoint
ODU FIO cards 4 (V5.1)
2 (earlier versions)
Other L1 service cards 2
OCH Non-WSON ROADM cards 4
WSON ROADM cards 2 (future)
OLP 2
OMS Protection cards (OMSP, OLP, etc.) 2
OS Splitter/Coupler 2

6.1.6.4 L1-XC Protection Attributes


Protection groups are entities created to protect various types of objects, such as equipment or ports. If an
L1-XC is configured with the relevant legs, the NE automatically creates the appropriate protection group of
type traffic.
All maintenance operations completed for the L1-XC are automatically applied to the protection group.
Some maintenance operations for the protection group are applied explicitly by the user. For more
information, see Protection Groups.

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6.1.7 Working with L1-XCs


Network operators are able to create, edit, and delete L1-XCs, as described in this section, subject to
certain guidelines and rules. Cross-connection configuration is completed at the [edit cross-connects]
hierarchy level.

6.1.7.1 Configuring an L1-XC


The L1-XC is actually a container that can hold one or more L1-XC legs, with any combination of
directionalities, within a single L1-XC container. Each leg is identified by a unique index number, endpoints,
and direction. The leg endpoints identify the origination and destination points for the L1-XC leg. The
directionality identifies whether this leg is unidirectional, running in one direction only, or bidirectional,
running in both directions between the two endpoints.
To configure an L1-XC on a device, the physical port properties must first be configured at the [edit
chassis] hierarchy level, configure the underlying equipment, including chassis, cards, and supporting
ports; see Configuring Slots and Cards.
Operators configure L1-XCs at the [edit cross-connect] hierarchy level, using set commands with the
following basic format:
set cross-connects <name> leg <leg#> directionality <direct-value>
from-tp <source> to-tp <destination>

For example:
set cross-connects odu2-xc leg 1 directionality bidirectional
from-tp odu2-u3/1:1 to-tp odu2-u3/2:1

The preceding code line illustrates a minimal L1-XC configuration command, creating an L1-XC named
odu2-xc with one bidirectional leg running between port 1 and port 2 on the card in slot 3. When
configuring L1-XCs for their system, operators would include a full set of relevant attribute specifications,
depending on their network configuration. A list of L1-XC attributes and their options is provided in Cross
Connection Attributes.

6.1.7.2 Modifying an L1-XC


Operators are not allowed to edit attributes of L1-XCs created in fixed mode.
Operators are allowed to edit many of the attributes of L1-XCs created in configurable mode. Some of these
editing actions are traffic-affecting, and some are not, as explained in the following section. If a
modification to an L1-XC would be traffic-affecting, a warning message is displayed.

6.1.7.2.1 Non-Traffic-Affecting Modifications


 Connection labels: Assigning a different user label to the L1-XC.
 Trail ID: Associating this L1-XC to a specific trail, or removing the association by resetting the value to
null. Note that modifications to one L1-XC within a trail are non-traffic-affecting for any other L1-XCs
assigned to the same trail.
 Adding a leg: Adding an additional leg to a P2MP L1-XC container is non-traffic-affecting for any other
legs in the same L1-XC. Similarly, changing a unidirectional P2P L1-XC leg to a leg in a P2MP L1-XC by
adding legs is non-traffic-affecting for the original leg.

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 Deleting a leg: Deleting a leg from a multi-leg L1-XC, when that leg is not the active leg of a protected
L1-XC and at least one leg remains to carry traffic, is non-traffic-affecting.
 Changing a unidirectional leg to bidirectional: Reconfiguring an L1-XC leg that was originally
unidirectional so that it now carries traffic in both directions, (or alternatively, adding a second
unidirectional leg so that traffic can be carried in both directions) is non-traffic-affecting. For example,
if traffic used to run from Point A to Point B, switching the configuration so that the traffic now only
runs in both directions between Point A and Point B.

6.1.7.2.2 Traffic-Affecting Modifications


Changes to the endpoints and direction of a cross connection are often traffic-affecting. Specific examples
are provided in this section. Note that if a modification to an L1-XC would be traffic-affecting, a warning
message is displayed.
 Switching origin and destination endpoints: Replacing the from-tp endpoint with the to-tp
endpoint in a unidirectional L1-XC leg (and vice versa) is traffic-affecting. For example, if traffic used
to run from Point A to Point B, switching the configuration so that the traffic now runs from Point B to
Point A.
 Changing a bidirectional leg to unidirectional: Reconfiguring an L1-XC leg that was originally
bidirectional so that it now carries traffic in one direction only is traffic-affecting. For example, if
traffic used to run back and forth between Point A and Point B, switching the configuration so that
the traffic now only runs from Point A to Point B.
 Changing a subset of the cross connection endpoints: Changing some (but not all) of the endpoints of
a cross connection is traffic-affecting. For example, if traffic used to run from Point A to Point B,
switching the configuration so that the traffic now runs from Point A to Point C.
 Deleting the active leg in a protected L1-XC: If an L1-XC has been configured for protection, deleting
the active leg and moving the traffic to one of the protection legs is traffic-affecting.

6.1.7.3 Deleting an L1-XC


Operators are only allowed to delete configurable L1-XCs that are not currently associated with and in use
by a trail. Operators are not allowed to delete L1-XCs created in configurable mode if they are currently in
use by a trail (i.e., trail-id is not null). Operators are not allowed to delete L1-XCs created in fixed
mode. These cross connections are created and deleted automatically by the NE.
To change the wavelength of an OCH L1-XC, or to change the payload of an ODUk L1-XC, the operator must
delete the original L1-XC and recreate it with the new attribute values.
To delete an L1-XC, enter the following command sequence, using the name attribute of the L1-XC being
deleted:
delete cross-connects <name>
commit

For example:
delete cross-connects fio100_odu2
commit

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6.1.8 Cross Connection Attributes


The following tables summarize the attributes that operators use to work with L1 and packet XCs, their
component legs, and their protection types, including the attribute name, options, and usage guidelines.
Additional attributes that are for internal use only by the NE are not listed here.

6.1.8.1 L1-XC Attributes


Table 6-4: L1-XC attributes

Attribute/Keyword Options Usage guidelines


Name <string> Unique value for each L1-XC, identifying the
cross connection entity.
 Set by the user when the user creates a
configurable L1-XC.
 Assigned automatically by the NE when
the NE creates a fixed L1-XC.
trail-id  <numeric>  Identifies the trail using this cross
 NULL connection, when in use.
(default)  Null if not in use by any trail.
 This value can be edited.
connection-mode  configurable  All L1-XCs created explicitly by the user
(default for user-created are configurable.
L1-XCs)  All L1-XCs created automatically by the NE
 fixed are fixed.
(default for NE-created  This value cannot be edited once the
L1-XCs) L1-XC has been created.
management-buffer-b64  <management-buffer> Read-only, set at the NMS level.
stms-id  <stms-id> Read-only, set at the STMS level.

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6.1.8.2 L1-XC Leg Attributes


Table 6-5: L1-XC leg attributes

Attribute/Keyword Options Usage guidelines


Index <numeric> Unique value for each L1-XC leg. Assigned
automatically by the NE.
from-tp <string> Unique string identifying the origination point
for this L1-XC leg. Identifies the endpoint
location, using the format:
endpoint-slot/port/interface-index.
to-tp <string> Unique string identifying the destination point
for this L1-XC leg. Identifies the endpoint
location, using the format:
endpoint-slot/port/interface-index.
management-buffer-b64  <management-buffer> Read-only, set at the NMS level.
owners-b64  <owners> Read-only, set at the NMS level. Identifies
whether this XC is being managed by:
 The management plane (indicated by
Mgmt)
 The control plane (LSP-ID)
 Both
ASON functionality is implemented through the
control plane; see ASON Trail Restoration.
directionality  unidirectional This attribute identifies whether this leg is
 bidirectional unidirectional, running in one direction only, or
bidirectional, running in both directions
between the two endpoints.
Note that each L1-XC can include multiple legs,
where:
 A mixture of directionalities can be
configured for the various legs.
 Only one leg can be bidirectional.
 Multiple legs can be unidirectional.
This attribute is only assigned when the L1-XC
container includes multiple legs with different
directionalities. Note that when this attribute is
assigned for each leg, the directionality
attribute of the L1-XC container is left empty.

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6.1.9 L1-XC Configuration Example


In this example we are creating a configurable L1-XC named sample-xc, associated with trail 12. The
L1-XC container holds two bidirectional legs for traffic running between endpoints identified by strings in
the following format:
<endpoint-name>-<slot>/<port>/<interface-index>

In this example, the first leg runs between odu2-u3/1:1 and odu2-u3/2:1. The second leg runs between
odu2-u3/1:1 and odu2-u3/3:1. The two legs share the odu2-u3/1:1 endpoint. The system automatically
creates a corresponding protection group, identified by the type (traffic, indicating that it protects a L1-XC)
and by the identity of the shared endpoint (odu2-u3/1:1). The main traffic leg is the one running between
the shared endpoint and odu2-u3/2:1.
In this example, the user enters a series of set cross-connects commands to configure a cross connect,
and then enters a show cross-connects command and a show protection-group command to see
the structure of the new L1-XC entity and the protection group created automatically for this entity.
root@localhost# set cross-connects sample-xc trail-id 12

root@localhost# set cross-connects sample-xc leg 1 from-tp odu2-u3/1:1 to-tp


odu2-u3/2:1 directionality bidirectional

root@localhost# set cross-connects sample-xc leg 2 from-tp odu2-u3/1:1 to-tp


odu2-u3/3:1 directionality bidirectional

root@localhost# commit

root@localhost# show cross-connects


sample-xc {
leg 1 {
from-tp odu2-u3/1:1;
to-tp odu2-u3/2:1;
directionality bidirectional;
}
leg 2 {
from-tp odu2-u3/1:1;
to-tp odu2-u3/3:1;
directionality bidirectional;
}
trail-id 12;
connection-mode configurable;
}

root@localhost# show protection-group traffic odu2-u3/1:1


protection-group traffic odu2-u3/1:1 {
units odu2-u3/2:1, odu2-u3/3:1;
main-units odu2-u3/2:1;
hold-off-time 10;
wtr-period 10;
is-revertive false;
}

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6.1.10 Complete L1-XC Configuration Statement


The complete L1-XC configuration statement is as follows:
cross-connects {
optic-xc {
leg leg {
from-tp from-tp;
to-tp to-tp;
directionality (unidirectional | bidirectional);
management-buffer-b64 management-buffer;
owners-b64 owners;
}
trail-id trail-id;
connection-mode (fixed | configurable);
management-buffer-b64 <management-buffer>;
stms-id <stms-id>;
}
}

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6.1.11 L1-XC Connection Tables


The following tables list in detail the L1-XC options available for each type of port and interface.

Table 6-6: ODUk L1-XC options for OTU ports

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3e OTU4


OTU1 ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A ODU1-XC ODU1-XC
OTU2 ODU1-XC ODU2-XC N/A N/A ODU2-XC ODU2-XC
ODU1-XC ODU1-XC ODU1-XC
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC
OTU2e N/A N/A ODU2e-XC N/A ODU2e-XC ODU2e-XC
OTU2f N/A N/A N/A ODU2f-XC N/A N/A
OTU3e ODU1-XC ODU2-XC ODU2e-XC N/A ODU3e-XC ODU2-XC
ODU1-XC ODU2-XC ODU1-XC
ODU0-XC ODU1-XC ODU0-XC
ODU0-XC
OTU4 ODU1-XC ODU2-XC ODU2e-XC N/A N/A ODU4-XC
ODU1-XC ODU3-XC
ODU0-XC ODU2-XC
ODU1-XC
ODU0-XC

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Table 6-7: ODUk L1-XC options for Ethernet ports

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3e OTU4 ETY 1Gx ETY 1Ge ETY 1G ETY 10G ETY 10GOC

ETY 1Gx1 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A

ETY 1Gxe ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A

ETY 1Ge ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

ETY 1G ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

ETY 10G N/A ODU2-XC N/A N/A ODU2-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A ODU2e-XC N/A

ETY 10GOC N/A N/A ODU2e-XC N/A ODU2e-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A ODU2e-XC

ETY100G N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A ODU4 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Table 6-8: ODUk L1-XC options for SDH ports

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3e OTU4 STM1 STM1e STM4 STM16 STM64

STM1 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

STM1e ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

STM4 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC N/A ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

STM16 ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A N/A ODU1-XC N/A

STM64 N/A ODU2-XC N/A N/A ODU2e-XC ODU2-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A ODU2-XC

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Table 6-9: ODUk L1-XC options for SONET ports

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3e OTU4 OC3 OC3e OC12 OC48 OC192

OC3 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

OC3e ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

OC12 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

OC48 ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A N/A ODU1-XC N/A

OC192 N/A ODU2-XC N/A N/A ODU2e-XC ODU2-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A ODU2-XC

Table 6-10: ODUk L1-XC options for FC ports

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3e OTU4 FC100 FC200 FC400 FC800 FC1200

FC100 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

FC200 ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A ODU1-XC ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A ODU1-XC N/A N/A

FC400 N/A 2 x ODU1-XC N/A N/A 2 x ODU1-XC 2 x ODU1-XC N/A N/A 2 x ODU1-XC N/A N/A
ODUF-FC400 ODUF-FC400 ODUF-FC400 ODUF-FC400

FC800 N/A ODU2-XC N/A N/A ODU2-XC ODUF-FC800 N/A N/A N/A ODU2-XC N/A
ODUF-FC800 ODUF-FC800 ODUF-FC800

FC1200 N/A N/A ODU2e-XC ODU2f-XC ODU2e-XC ODU2e-XC N/A N/A N/A N/A ODU2f-XC
ODU2e-XC

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Table 6-11: ODUk L1-XC options for CBR ports

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3e OTU4 VIDEO270 HDSDI1485 HDSDI3G

VIDEO270 ODUSlot-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A ODUSlot-XC ODU0-XC ODUSlot-XC N/A N/A
ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC ODU0-XC

HDSDI1485 ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A N/A ODU1-XC ODU1-XC N/A ODU1-XC N/A

HDSDI3G N/A ODUF-SDI3G-XC N/A N/A ODUF-SDI3G-XC ODUF-SDI3G-XC N/A N/A ODUF-SDI3G-XC

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Cross Connection Configuration

6.2 Packet Cross Connections


This section documents the packet cross connections used for Layer 2 services. The complete Packet-XC
configuration statement is as follows:

packet-cross-connects {
<cross-connect> {
description <description>;
disable;
type (l2t | pw-stitching);
interface <interface_name>;
options {
pw-type (ethernet | ethernet-vlan);
pw-status-relay;
pw-stitching-tlv;
pwgroup-id <pwgroup-id>;
ethernet-attributes {
mtu <mtu>;
}
}
}
}

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7 Fiber Connectivity
Fiber connectivity defines the characteristics of the connectivity between ports connected via physical
fibers. Defining fiber connectivity provides the following benefits:
 Power equalization: fiber connectivity is essential for ports participating in power equalization to pass
power control parameters to one another (e.g., ports residing in passive optics cards, optics cards and
WDM ports on L1 service cards). With the exception of passive optics cards, these ports cannot
transmit traffic if fiber connectivity configuration is missing. For all other cards, fiber connectivity is
optional.
 Diagnostic information: provided via ONCP (Optics Network Control Parameters).
 Top Down Trail application: Links and trails can be created in the NMS and their configuration sent to
STMS. The STMS can then send the configuration to the NE.
Fibers can be connected in one of the following ways:
 Intra-fiber connectivity (internal): fibers are connected with an NE. For example connectivity between
cards residing in the same chassis, or between an Apollo card and an Artemis (passive) optical card.
Fiber connectivity parameters defined on one port are automatically copied to the peer port.
 Inter-fiber connectivity (external): Fiber connectivity between two different NEs. Fiber connectivity
parameters must be defined on the NEs at both endpoints of the fiber.
The following figure illustrates the two types of fiber connectivity.
Figure 7-1: Fiber Connectivity

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

When fiber connectivity is defined, each port provides details of the fiber connectivity configuration of its
connected peer. The following figure is an example of a pre-amplifier, connected to a ROADM, and a
ROADM connected to a booster. The figure displays the fiber connectivity information of each peer port.
Figure 7-2: Example of fiber connectivity connected peer configuration

Fiber connectivity must be defined on the following ports:


 OTUk, STM (for service ports with C/DWDM transceivers)
 OTS
 OCHP

IMPORTANT: OTUk, OTS, and OCHP ports cannot transmit traffic if fiber connectivity
configuration is missing (unless the ports reside on passive cards). Power equalization is
possible where both external and internal fiber connectivity have an NE_PEER IP, (as long as
the NE_PEER IP is not unspecified).

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

7.1 Prerequisites and Guidelines


The following prerequisites and guidelines should be adhered to when configuring fiber connectivity:
 Before configuring fiber connectivity, configure the relevant ports.
 For a bidirectional port, up to two unidirectional fibers can be defined per port. For a unidirectional
port, only a single fiber of the applicable direction can be applied.
 When configuring intra-fiber connectivity, it is not necessary to explicitly configure both peer ports.
Configure fiber connectivity parameters on one peer port and the NE automatically configures fiber
connectivity parameters on the other port.
 It is possible to define fiber connectivity without specifying a wavelength value. For intra-connectivity,
if the wavelength value is defined at one end, the NE automatically configures the wavelength value
in the corresponding peer port during configuration.

7.2 Defining Fiber Connectivity


Fiber connectivity configuration is part of the chassis configuration.

To define fiber connectivity:


 At the [edit chassis] level enter the relevant commands from the following table.

Table 7-1: Inter/Intra-fiber Connectivity Parameters

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
Connectivity Type  external Type of fiber connection.
 internal
Direction  uni-in How the peer-port fiber is connected (one-way in,
 uni-out one-way out, running in both directions, or two
 bidirectional separate unidirectional trails).
 uni-in-out
Peer_NE  unspecified The peer router IP address. Configured explicitly for
 ip-address inter-fiber connectivity only.
Peer_Slot <string> The peer shelf and slot name (e.g., u4).
Peer_Port <numeric> The peer port number (e.g., 2).
input-fiber-loss <value> The configured input fiber loss (dB). (Default
value=0; possible values 0-100; resolution=0.1)

output-fiber-loss <value> The configured input or output fiber loss (dB).


(Default value=0; possible values 0-100;
resolution=0.1)

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Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
fiber-type  g652 The type of fiber (default = G652).
 g653
 g654
 g655-leaf
 g655-tw-rs
 g655-tw-reach
 multimode
fiber-length <numeric> The length of the fiber (km).
(Intra-fiber connectivity values 0-500;
resolution=0.1).
allowed-fiber-loss-margin The margin of fiber loss allowed before an alarm is
<numeric>
raised (dB).
(Default: intra-fiber connectivity=0.1; inter-fiber
connectivity=3, and resolution=0.1. Possible
intra-fiber connectivity values=0-7).
pmd <numeric> Polarized Mode Dispersion (PMD)
 For intra-fiber connectivity, default=0.
 For inter-fiber connectivity, PMD range=0-40,
resolution=0.1. Default PMD varies according
to fiber length: <10km=0; >10km=0.7sqrt.
management-buffer-b64 <value> Read-only, set at the NMS level.

The following code chunks provide examples of intra-fiber connectivity with the peer_ne defined as the
loopback IP address:
 uni-directional fiber connectivity
fiber-connectivity internal uni-in
peer-ne 127.0.0.1;
peer-slot u13;
peer-port 2;
input-fiber-loss 0;
fiber-length 0;
fiber-type g652;
allowed-fiber-loss-margin 1;
pmd 0;
}
fiber-connectivity internal uni-out
peer-ne 127.0.0.1;
peer-slot u12;
peer-port 1;
output-fiber-loss 0;
fiber-length 0;
fiber-type g652;

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

allowed-fiber-loss-margin 1;
pmd 0;
}
 bidirectional fiber connectivity:
fiber-connectivity internal bidirectional
peer-ne 127.0.0.1;
peer-slot u4;
peer-port 2;
input-fiber-loss 0;
output-fiber-loss 0;
fiber-length 0;
fiber-type g652;
allowed-fiber-loss-margin 1;
pmd 0;
}
The following code chunks provide an example of inter-fiber connectivity, including definition of the peer
NE IP address.
fiber-connectivity external uni-in
peer-ne 10.4.4.30;
peer-slot u4;
peer-port 2;
input-fiber-loss 0;
fiber-length 0;
fiber-type g652;
allowed-fiber-loss-margin 1;
pmd 0;
}
fiber-connectivity external uni-out
peer-ne 10.4.4.30;
peer-slot u5;
peer-port 1;
output-fiber-loss 0;
fiber-length 0;
fiber-type g652;
allowed-fiber-loss-margin 1;
pmd 0;
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

7.3 Defining Fiber Connectivity for


Non-ShadeTree Equipment
You can defining fiber connectivity for NEs that are not managed by ShadeTree, such as the XDM platform,
or for third party equipment.

To define fiber connectivity for non-ShadeTree equipment:


 Define the following attributes at the [set chassis] level:
 Connectivity type: external
 Direction: select the relevant directionality. (uni-in; uni-out; bidirectional; uni-in-out)
 Peer NE: unspecified

NOTE: If the Peer NE is unspecified, all other attributes are automatically defined as null and
cannot be modified.

7.4 Defining Fiber Connectivity for Alien Lambdas


Alien lambdas are third party WDM transceivers that are connected directly to ECI equipment, but are not
managed by ECI’s NMS. The NE can monitor all types of lambdas. Lambdas that are not used by ECI
equipment can be blocked. The following figure shows an example of alien lambdas.
Figure 7-3: Alien Lambda example

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

Alien lambdas are included in the power equalization mechanism.

To enable monitoring of alien lambdas:


1. Configure the OCHP port to receive an alien lambda, at the [set chassis] level enter the following
command:
user@root# slot <slotname> <card type> <port number> ochp-options
alien-lambda enabled
2. Configure the relevant alien lambda options on the OCHP port, as defined in the following table.

Table 7-2: OCHP port and related alien lambda parameters

Attribute/keyword Options Usage/Guidelines


alien-lambda  enabled Enable or disable an alien-lambda connection
 disabled from this port.
wdm-type  NA WDM type (default = dwdm). Defined by the
 cwdm equipment type (read-only).
 dwdm
 non-colored
spacing  DWDM: 50GHz or 100GHz Specify the wavelength channel spacing.
 CWDM: 20nm
 <empty> where not
relevant (for amplifiers,
OLP, OMSP)
rx-wavelength  DWDM (17-60.5) Input wavelength for this port. Specific value
 CWDM (1471-1611) depends on hardware capabilities. Must match
 non-colored expected tx-wavelength.
tx-wavelength  DWDM (17-60.5) Output wavelength for this port. Specific value
 CWDM (1471-1611) depends on hardware capabilities. Must match
 non-colored expected rx-wavelength.
los-threshold  <value> Loss of Signal threshold that triggers an alarm.

multi-wavelength  true Indicates whether the module is configured to


 false work with multiple wavelengths simultaneously.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

Attribute/keyword Options Usage/Guidelines


alien-lambda-rx-  signal-type <signal> The type of service. For example: ochp, otu2,
options stm64. Default = OTU2.
(rx options for the
OCHP service to  frequency-spread Minimum width of the filter through which the
which the alien (50ghz | 100ghz | 20nm) wavelength can pass. Indicator for wavelength
lambda is stability. DWDM default = 100ghz.
connecting.)  power <value> Alien Transceiver Transmitted power (dBm).
Default = 0
 osnr <value> OSNR (Optical Signal to Noise Ratio) of the
channel entering the network (db/0.1nm).
Default = 45
 pmd <value> Accumulated PMD (Polarization Mode
Dispersion) of the channel entering the network
(psec). Default = 0
 pdl <value> Accumulated PDL (Polarization Dependent Loss)
of the channel entering the network (dB).
Default = 0
 nlt <value> Accumulated non linearity of the channel
entering the network (dBm). Default = -45
 accumulated-dispersion Accumulated dispersion of the channel entering
<value> the network (ps/nm). Default = 0

alien-lambda-tx-  power-minimum <value> Minimum Rx power tolerance (dBm). Value can


options be 0 to -25; default tolerance = -20.
(tx options for the
OCHP service to  power-maximum <value> Maximum Rx power tolerance. Value can be
which the alien between -12 to 10; default tolerance = -9
lambda is
connecting.)  accumulated-dispersion- Minimum accumulated dispersion tolerance
minimum <value> (ps/nm). Value can be between -800 and 0;
default tolerance = 0.
 accumulated-dispersion- Maximum accumulated dispersion tolerance
maximum <value> (ps/nm). Value can be between 700 and 60000;
default tolerance = 1400

 osnr-minimum <value> Minimum OSNR tolerance (db/0.1nm). Value can


be between 10 and 25; default tolerance = 18.
 pmd-maximum <value> Maximum PMD tolerance (psec). Value can be
between 0 and 30; default tolerance = 10
 pdl-maximum <value> Maximum PDL tolerance (dB). Value can be
between 0 and 10; default tolerance = 4
 accumulated-nlt-maximum Maximum accumulated power tolerance (dBm).
<value> Value can be between 0 and 20; default
tolerance = 17.0.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

7.5 Modifying/Deleting Fiber Connectivity


Parameters
NOTE: Modifying fiber connectivity does not affect the connectivity of the associated
cross-connects.

When deleting fiber connectivity configuration on one port, deletion of fiber connectivity on the peer port
varies as follows:
 For external fiber connectivity: Fiber connectivity configuration must be deleted separately on each
peer port, unless the NE_PEER is unspecified.
 For internal fiber connectivity: the NE automatically deletes the connected peer configuration.
The following table describes how to modify intra-fiber connectivity parameters and indicates which
modifications are traffic affecting.

Table 7-3: Modifying/deleting intra (internal) fiber connectivity parameters

Attribute Action Traffic Affecting


Connectivity Type This parameter cannot be modified. To change the Yes
connectivity type, delete the existing fiber connectivity and
create new fiber connectivity with the value you require.
Direction This parameter cannot be modified. To change the Yes
connectivity type, delete the existing fiber connectivity and
create new fiber connectivity with the directionality that you
require.
peer_slot For internal connectivity, to modify the peer slot for card A Yes, for old peer
from peer slot B to peer slot C: slot only (slot B in
the example)
1. Delete fiber connectivity of card B.
1. Update fiber connectivity on card A to be connected to
card C.
Card C fiber connectivity information is automatically updated.
peer_port For internal connectivity, to modify the peer port for card A Yes, for old peer
from peer port B to peer port C: 0. port (port B in the
example)
1. Delete fiber connectivity of card B.
1. Update fiber connectivity on card A to be connected to
card C.
Card C fiber connectivity information is automatically updated.
Physical attributes Parameters can be modified. No
such as: fiber_type,  At the [set chassis] level, modify the existing
fiber_length parameter(s), as required.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

The following table describes how to modify intra-fiber connectivity parameters and indicates which
modifications are traffic affecting.

Table 7-4: Modifying/deleting inter (external) fiber connectivity parameters

Attribute Action Traffic Affecting


Connectivity Type This parameter cannot be modified. To change the Yes
connectivity type, delete the existing fiber connectivity and
create new fiber connectivity with the value you require.

Direction This parameter cannot be modified. To change the Yes


connectivity type, delete the existing fiber connectivity and
create new fiber connectivity with the directionality that you
require.
peer_ne_IP_Address To change peer_ne value from unspecified to a specific router No
ID:
 At the [set chassis] level, modify the existing parameter.

To change an existing peer_ne ID to a new ID or to Yes


unspecified:0.

1. Delete the fiber connectivity on the peer port.


1. At the [set chassis] level, update the peer_ne ID to the
required value.
peer_slot For external connectivity, perform the following procedure Yes, for old peer
via STMS. slot only.

peer_port For external connectivity, perform this procedure via STMS. Yes, for old peer
port
Physical attributes such Parameters can be modified. No
as: fiber_type,  At the [set chassis] level, modify the existing
fiber_length parameter(s), as required.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

7.5.1 Impact of Port Modifications on Fiber Connectivity

IMPORTANT: Modifying port parameters can impact fiber connectivity, and some port
modifications can be traffic affecting.

The following table describes port modifications and their impact on fiber connectivity.

Table 7-5: Port modifications and their impact on fiber connectivity

Attribute Action Traffic Affecting


port_type This parameter cannot be modified. To change the Yes
port type:
1. Delete the existing fiber connectivity.
1. Delete the existing port configuration.
2. Create the port type that you require.
Expected/Output This parameter cannot be modified when an OTU No
Wavelength port is connected to an OCHP port, and the
wavelength and/or Rx wavelength attributes are
read only.
For all other port types, wavelength can be
modified. Modifications must be applied on both
ports.
Alien lambda mode in OCHP This parameter cannot be modified if fiber
connectivity is defined on the port.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

7.6 Fiber/Port Connectivity Rules


The following tables provide the fiber connectivity rules for each port type. Where a port combination is compatible, the relevant cell is marked Y. Where a port
combination is not compatible, the relevant cell is marked N. For example, OTU1 can be connected to OTU1 ports.

Table 7-6: Fiber connectivity rules for OTN technology

OTU1 OTU2 OTU2e OTU2f OTU3 OTU3e OTU4 OTS OCHP PO OSC100M OSC2M OSChannel
OTU1 Y N N N N N N N Y Y N N N
OTU2 N Y N N N N N N Y Y N N N
OTU2e N N Y N N N N N Y Y N N N
OTU2f N N N Y N N N N Y Y N N N
OTU3 N N N N Y N N N Y Y N N N
OTU3e N N N N N Y N N Y Y N N N
OTU4 N N N N N N Y N Y Y N N N
OTS N N N N N N N Y N Y N N N
OCHP Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y N N N
PO Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N
OSC100M N N Y N N N N N N N N N Y
OSC2M N N N N N N N N N N N N Y
OSChannel N N N N N N N N N N Y Y N

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

The following table shows the fiber connectivity rules for SDH technology.

Table 7-7: Fiber connectivity rules for STM technology

STM1 STM1e STM4 STM16 STM64 PO OCHP


STM1 Y N N N N Y Y
STM1e N Y N N N Y N
STM4 N N Y N N Y Y
STM16 N N N Y N Y Y
STM64 N N N N Y Y Y
PO Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
OCHP Y N Y Y Y Y Y

The following table shows the fiber connectivity rules for SONET technology

Table 7-8: Fiber connectivity rules for SONET technology

OC3 OC3e OC12 OC48 OC192 PO OCHP


OC3 Y N N N N Y Y
OC3e N Y N N N Y N
OC12 N N Y N N Y Y
OC48 N N N Y N Y Y
OC192 N N N N Y Y Y
PO Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
OCHP Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

The following table shows the fiber connectivity rules for FC technology.

Table 7-9: Fiber connectivity rules for FC technology

ULL_ ULL_ ULL_


FC100 FC200 FC400 FC800 FC1200 PO OCHP
FC800 FC1200 FC1600
FC100 Y N N N N N N N Y Y
FC200 N Y N N N N N N Y Y
FC400 N N Y N N N N N Y Y
FC800 N N N Y N N N N Y Y
FC1200 N N N N Y N Y N Y Y
ULL_FC800 N N N Y N Y N N Y Y
ULL_FC1200 N N N N Y N Y N Y Y
ULL_FC1600 N N N N N N N Y Y Y
PO Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
OCHP Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

The following table shows the fiber connectivity rules for Ethernet technology.

Table 7-10: Fiber connectivity rules for Ethernet technology

ULL-ETY10
GE 10GE ETY1G ETY1Ge ETY1GX ETY1GXe ETY10G ETY10GOC ETY40G ETY100G PO OCHP
GOC
GE Y N Y Y (see note) Y Y (see note) N N N N N Y Y
10GE N Y N N N N Y Y N N N Y Y
ETY1G Y N Y N Y N N N N N N Y Y

ETY1Ge Y (see N N Y N Y N N N N N Y N
note)

ETY1GX Y N Y N Y N N N N N N Y Y
Y (see N N Y N Y N N N N N Y N
ETY1GXe note)

ETY10G N Y N N N N Y N N N N Y Y
ETY10GOC N Y N N N N N Y N N N Y Y
ULL- N Y N N N N N Y Y N N Y Y
ETY10GOC
ETY40G N N N N N N N N N Y N Y Y
ETY100G N N N N N N N N N N Y Y Y
PO Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y Y
OCHP Y Y Y N Y N Y Y N N Y Y Y

NOTE: Only GE ports that reside on NPB cards and have electrical connectors (i.e., the expected type has a suffix starting with e) can connect to the
ETY1Ge port.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Fiber Connectivity

The following table shows the fiber connectivity rules for CBR technology.

Table 7-11: Fiber connectivity rules for CBR technology

VIDEO270 HDSD1485 PO OCHP


VIDEO270 Y N Y Y
HDSD1485 N Y Y Y
PO Y Y N Y
OCHP Y Y Y Y

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8 Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and
Ports
The AoC10-L2 card can be run in one of two modes: Provider Bridge (PB) or MPLS-PE. By default, the card
runs in PB mode. The user can only create MPLS-based services (tunnels, etc.) when the card is run in
MPLS-PE mode.
Each AoC10-L2 card can have multiple Virtual Switch Instances (VSIs), each representing a Layer 2 switch
and performing Layer 2 bridging/tunneling across pure L2 or MoE (MPLS over Ethernet) ports. AoC10-L2
cards support several types of VSIs, including P2P, MP2MP, Rooted MP, and Infrastructure VSIs (I-VSIs) for
RSTP, Dual Homing, and ERP. ShadeTree's VSI implementation is based on the following guidelines:
 VSIs are configured within the context of a routing instance container, where the routing instance is
created per card/slot entity.
 When a slot is configured as aoc10-l2, the required routing instance is created automatically, with
the slot name inserted into a naming string with the format slot-u<x>-routing-instance.
 Each VSI can work with UNI ports, CD-VLANs, NNI ports, and PseudoWires (PW).
The AoC10-L2 card supports 22 ports. Ports 0 through 15 are GbE ports, 16 to 19 are 10GbE, and 20 to 21
are internal 10GbE ports. These internal ports are used for connections between cards in two mate slots.
Ports 16 to 19 also support OTN wrapping, enabled when the port is configured as type ge10-otu2e. The
port-mode parameter identifies the port's run mode: UNI, I-NNI, E-NNI, MOE, I-MoE, or MIRROR.
Many of the required entities are created automatically, working with default attribute values and requiring
minimal explicit configuration by the user. You can tailor the card and port options according to your
network requirements by entering the relevant data service configuration commands at the appropriate
level (chassis, card, port, etc.). This section includes a series of examples illustrating basic entity
configuration. In each example, a basic entity configuration statement is followed by a show command that
illustrates the typical default configuration for that entity.

NOTES:
 Ethernet ports on AoC10_L2 cards are automatically configured as Data Communication
Network (DCN) interfaces.
 A single termination label has been reserved for use by all AoC10_L2 cards.
 The CLI configuration commands assume consistency between the DCN interface
configuration (IMG, GCC and OSC) and configuration of DCN flows on AoC10_L2 Ethernet
ports.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and Ports

8.1 AoC10-L2 Configuration Workflow


Configuring an AoC10-L2 card includes the following steps.
 Slot and card configuration
 Port configuration
 Interface configuration
 Service (VSI) configuration
The configuration flow is described in this section.

Slot and Card Configuration


ShadeTree provides a complete set of default attribute settings that are implemented automatically when a
card is initially configured within a slot. The basic card configuration statement is simply:

lsh> set chassis slot u0 aoc10-l2 enable


lsh> commit

Routing instances are created automatically as part of the card configuration process. Routing-instances are
linked to the specific card and identified by slot number. For example:

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u0-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
}

The routing instance is the container in which the relevant MPLS LSPs, tunnels, and PWs are configured. By
default the card is in PB mode. To switch the card to MPLS-PE mode, enabling LSP and PW functionality,
type:

lsh> set chassis slot u0 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mode mpls-pe


lsh# set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mpls-pe-options mpls-id
1111
lsh# set chassis slot u0 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mpls-pe-options pe-id 1000
lsh> commit

There are no restrictions when changing the card from PB to MPLS mode. Changing the card from MPLS
mode to PB mode is only allowed if no MPLS services are configured on the card.
In addition to the automatic default settings, there are a number of optional card level parameters that you
can configure explicitly for the card. The details of these are covered in the previous subsections. These
include features such as RSTP, CFM, port mirroring, and so on, described later in this section.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and Ports

Port Configuration
To provision a service, at least one pair of card ports must be configured in order to receive and transmit
signals. For example:

lsh> set chassis slot u0 aoc10-l2 port 0 enable ethernet-options port-mode uni
lsh> set chassis slot u0 aoc10-l2 port 17 enable ethernet-options port-mode i-nni
lsh> commit

In this example two ports are configured: Port 0, a 1G UNI port, and Port 17, a 10G I-NNI port. The
necessary underlying infrastructure and attribute setting are configured automatically. To change the port
mode, simply type in a new set chassis command with the new port setting.

Interface Configuration
Port configuration causes ShadeTree to automatically create the corresponding physical interfaces (PIF)
required to transmit traffic for that port. These interfaces can be seen using the show interfaces
command. As with other configuration commands, the necessary underlying setting are configured
automatically and most other interface layer parameters are optional. You can also explicitly configure
attribute values for each PIF through the interface configuration hierarchy. For example:

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/2 ethernet-options max-frame-size 68


lsh> commit

VSI Configuration
VSIs are configured within the context of a specific routing instance. For example:

lsh> set routing-instances routing-instance-u0 virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo


vsi-type MP2MP nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> commit

After the preceding command is executed, an empty VSI is created with the attribute values defined in the
command line.

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u0-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type MP2MP;
nms-service-identifier 1;
}
}
}

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8.2 Basic Layer 2 Card Configuration Parameters


The basic Layer 2 card configuration parameters are listed in the following table. Parameters required by
specific feature configuration commands are defined in the specific feature topics.

Table 8-1: Basic VSI configuration parameters

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


alarm-master-mask  enabled The system should (enabled) or should not
 disabled (default) (disabled) mask reporting of selected classes of
alarms.
card mode  pb Identifies configuration mode for this card;
 mpls-pe Provider Bridge (default) or MPLS.

card name  aoc10-l2 Unique internal string identifying AoC10_L2 card.

CD-VLAN-ID Range from 1 to 4094 Customer VLAN IDs, configured for each port
included in the VSI.

customer-label  <string> Describes the VSI's customer.


disable  true Boolean flag, if not set indicates enabled.
 false (default)
enable  enable Configures the enabled/disabled status of the
 disable (default) port. A disabled port does not transmit, receive,
or monitor alarms. The RSTP port state should
also be forced into the disabled state. Disabling
the port only stops transmission and reception;
the link remains up.
fib-max-size 153600 Maximum size possible in this VSI for Forwarding
(150K = 150x1024) Information Base.
per Aoc10-L2 Card
Default 100.
MAC-Address <string> with the format: Static MAC address value to be configured as the
aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff value is learned for the port.
NMS-Service-Identifier  Range from 1 to STMS identifier.
4294967294
pm-collection-enabled  enabled Enables collection of PM data for this
 disabled (default) object/entity context.
pm-enable  enabled Enables PM for this object/entity context.
 disabled (default)

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


pm-monitor  enabled (default) The system should (enabled) or should not
 disabled (disabled) utilize performance monitoring (PM).
Performance monitoring can be configured at
various hierarchical levels for a wide range of
system elements (see Performance Monitoring in
the System Overview and Configuration User
Guide).
pm-profile  <pm-profile name> Specifies a user-defined PM profile to be applied.
Profiles are used to store sets of user-defined PM
thresholds. Traffic performance can be monitored
using either the default system settings or some
combination of user-defined settings (see
Performance Monitoring in the System Overview
and Configuration User Guide).
port mode  UNI (default) Identifies the port mode configured for this port -
 I-NNI one of the listed options. Note that ports 20 and
 E-NNI 21 can only be configured as I-MoE.
 MoE
 I-MoE
 Mirror
port number 0-21 Number of the port being configured.
port type  ge Type of port being configured. Required. Note the
 ge10 following port type distribution:
 ge10-otu2e  Ports 0-15 are GbE ports.
 Ports 16-19 are 10GbE ports. These ports also
support OTN wrapping, indicated with the
ge10-otu2e option.
 Ports 20 and 21 are internal 10GbE ports,
connecting to a second AoC10-L2 card in the
mate slot.
PW-Name <string> Identifies the PW name.
This value should be unique within a routing
instance. This means that the PW name could be
the same within two different routing instances.

Remote-PE-ID <integer>:<integer> Identifies the remote peer, with the format:


MPLS ID:PE ID

routing-instance-name <string> Unique string that identifies this routing instance.


With the following format:
slot-u<x>-routing-instance

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


receive-pw-label Range from 1024 to Rx label for the PW.
262143
severity-profile  <severity-profile Specifies a user-defined severity profile to be
name> applied. Severity profiles are used to store sets of
user-defined alarm severity settings. Alarms are
triggered using either the default system settings
or some combination of user-defined settings. For
more information, see the System Overview and
Configuration User Guide.
slot name u0, u1, ..., u23 Identifies the slot used by this card. Note that
when working with the 9608, this card can be
inserted into slots 1, 3, 5, and 7 only. For more
information, see Specifying a Chassis Slot, Card
Name, Port, and Interface Configuration.
SVLAN Range from 1 to 4094 Service VLAN identifier.

transmit-tunnel <string> Specifies a tunnel configured within the same


routing instance.

transmit-pw-label Range from 17 to 1048575 Tx label for the PW.


user-label <string> Describes the VSI's user.
VSI-name <string> Identifies the VSI in a routing-instance. As a pot
attribute, identifies the VSI in which the port is
participating.
This value should be unique within a routing
instance. This means that the VSI name could be
the same within two different routing instances.
Up to 8190 VSIs supported per card.
VSI-NNI <string>, with the Interface name for this port (NNI or UNI); see
following format. Entity Naming Conventions.
ge-ux/y, ge10-ux/z Note that a maximum of 16 ports (UNI + NNI) are
VSI-UNI Where: supported per VIS.
 x is the slot number
for this card
 y: [0, 15]
 z: [16, 19]
Max of 16 (UNIs + NNIs)
are allowed per VSI
VSI-type  P2P Identifies the kind of Layer 2 service provided by
 MP2MP (default) this VSI.
 RMP
 RSTP
 ERP

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8.3 VLAN Configuration


When a port (UNI with CD-VLAN, or NNI with SVLAN) is added to the VSI under a routing-instance, the
necessary infrastructure is created automatically, with entities identified by corresponding ID numbers. For
example:

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type P2P nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u0/0 cd-vlans 10
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u0/1 cd-vlans 10
lsh> commit

These commands automatically create the necessary subinterfaces and attribute values. In this example,
this means creation of two interfaces identified as ge-u0/0.10 and ge-u0/1.10, both included in the
routing-instance slot-u0-routing-instance.

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u0-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u0/0.10;
interface ge-u0/1.10;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;
uni-ports {
ge-u0/0 {
cd-vlans {
10;
} // cd-vlans
} // ge-u0/0
ge-u0/1 {
cd-vlans {
10;
} // cd-vlans
} // ge-u0/1
} // uni-ports
} // vsi_foo
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // slot-u0-routing-instance

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lsh# show interfaces


ge-u0/0 {
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}
ge-u0/1 {
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}
lsh# run show interfaces
Interface Admin Oper Family Address
ge-u0/0.10 Up Up
ge-u0/1.10 Up Up

TIP:
To display the port configuration within a CLI command hierarchy structure, type show
interfaces from configuration mode. For example:
lsh> show interfaces
ge-u0/1 {
ethernet-options {
max-frame-size 1604;
link-oam-options {
enable disabled;
local-mode active;
passive-peer-only any;
remote-loopback disabled;
err-frame-threshold 1;
err-frame-window 1;
err-frame-period-threshold 1;
err-frame-period-window 1;
err-frame-sec-sum-threshold 1;
err-frame-sec-sum-window 60;
}
}
}

To display the current port status, type run show interfaces. For example:
lsh> run show interfaces
Interface Admin Oper Family Address
fe-rcp Down Down
ge-u0/1 Up Up
ge-u0/1.1 Up Up mpls
ge-u0/11 Up Up
ge-u0/11.1 Up Up mpls
ge10-u0/16 Up Lower Down
ge10-u0/16.1 Up Lower Down mpls
ge-ua/0 Up Up
ge-ua/0.0 Down Down inet
dcn0 Down Down
gmpls0 Down Down
lo0 Down Down

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8.3.1 Wildcard VLAN ID Assignment


The Ethernet frames received by a UNI port may be one of the following three types:
 Untagged
 Priority tagged, implemented as a single tagged VLAN frame with VLAN ID = 0.
 Tagged, implemented as a single tagged VLAN frame with VLAN ID ranging from 1 to 4094.
The VLAN frames from a given UNI port are assigned to specific VSIs using one of the following methods:
 Explicit assignment of untagged and priority tagged Ethernet frames from a given UNI port to a
specific VSI.
 Implicit assignment of all relevant VLAN tagged frames from a given UNI to a specific "wildcard" VSI.
Implicit assignment applies to all frames that have not already been explicitly assigned to any other
VSI. (These frames are typically called "all others".) When implicit assignment is enabled, none of the
tagged/untagged Ethernet frames from a given UNI port are dropped during ingress classification,
since they will all by default fall into the "all other" category.
Wildcard VLAN assignment is enabled at the [routing instances ri-name
virtual-switching-instances vsi-name uni-port uni-port-name] level. The following code
fragment illustrates the command structure:

routing-instances {
<ri-name> {
virtual-switching-instances {
<vsi-name> {
uni-ports {
<uni-port-name> {
cd-vlan-ids {
<vlan-id-list (10 | 11 | 12 | ...)>;
}
egress-tagged-vlan-action (nochange | translate |
priority-tagged | untagged);
egress-ptagged-vlan-action (nochange | translate |
priority-tagged | untagged);
ingress-untagged-ptagged-vlan (enabled | disabled);
ingress-wildcard-vlan (enabled | disabled);
}
} // end uni ports
}
} // end virtual switching instances
}
} // end routing instances

The following command lines illustrate a typical example of wildcard VLAN mapping.
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 cd-vlan-ids 10
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 ingress-wildcard-vlan enabled
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 ingress-untagged-ptagged-vlan enabled

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8.4 Untagged Handling with CD-VLAN


Configuration
The following configuration example illustrates handling of untagged packets on a UNI port (ge-u0/0).
These packets can be configured with a default-vlan-id or port-vlan-id and handled in the
corresponding VSI, identified by this VLAN.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type P2P nms-service-identifier 1

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u0/0 cd-vlans 10

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u0/1 cd-vlans 10

lsh> set interfaces ge-u0/0 ingress-default-vlan-id 10

lsh> set interfaces ge-u0/0 ingress-untagged-handling pvid

lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u0-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u0/0.10;
interface ge-u0/1.10;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;
uni-ports {
ge-u0/0 {
cd-vlans {
10;
} // cd-vlans
} // ge-u0/0
ge-u0/1 {
cd-vlans {
10;
} // cd-vlans
} // ge-u0/1
} // uni-ports
} // vsi_foo
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // slot-u0-routing-instance

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lsh> show interfaces


ge-u0/0 {
ingress-default-vlan-id 10;
ingress-untagged-handling pvid;
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}
ge-u0/1 {
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}

lsh> run show interfaces


Interface Admin Oper Family Address
ge-u0/0.10 Up Up
ge-u0/1.10 Up Up

8.5 SVLAN Configuration


The following configuration example shows the creation of a VSI with an UNI port with CD VLAN along with
an SVLAN on an NNI port.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type P2P nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u2/0 cd-vlans 10
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports s-vlan 100
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports ge10-u2/17
lsh> commit

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This set of commands automatically creates an interface included in the containing routing instance and
identified as ge10-u2/17.100.

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u2-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge10-u2/17.100;
interface ge-u2/0.10;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;

uni-ports {
ge-u2/0 {
cd-vlans {
10;
} // cd-vlans
} // ge-u2/0
} // uni-ports

nni-ports {
s-vlan 100;
ge10-u2/17 {
} // ge10-u2/17
} // nni-ports
} // vsi_foo
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // slot-u2-routing-instance

lsh> show interfaces


ge10-u2/17 {
unit 100 {
vlan 100;
}
}
ge-u2/0 {
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}

lsh> run show interfaces


Interface Admin Oper Family Address
ge10-u2/17.100 Up Up
ge-u2/0.10 Up Up

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8.6 PseudoWire Configuration


A PseudoWire (PW) has to be explicitly configured under a virtual-switching-instance within a
routing-instance. The following configuration commands illustrate creation of a PW and a UNI port.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type P2P nms-service-identifier 1

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u0/0 cd-vlans 10

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


pseudo-wires pw-A remote-pe-id 288-8 split-horizon-group 1

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo pseudo-wires pw-A transmit-pw-label 100 receive-pw-label 200
transmit-tunnel tunnel_1

lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u0-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u0/16.1; // Implicitly created when this port is set as MoE mode
interface ge-u0/0.0;

protocols mpls {
interface ge-u0/16.1; // Implicitly created when this port is set as MoE mode
static {
label-switched-paths tunnel_1;
}
}

virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;
uni-port ge-u0/0 {
cd-vlans {
10;
}
}
pseudo-wires {
pw-A {
remote-pe-id 288-8;
split-horizon-group 1;
receive-pw-label 200;
transmit-pw-label 100;
transmit-tunnel tunnel_1;
} // pw-A

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} // pseudo-wires
} // vsi_foo
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // slot-u0-routing-instance

lsh> show interfaces


ge-u0/0 {
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}
ge-u0/16 { // Implicitly created when this port is set as MoE mode
unit 1 {
vlan 1;
}
}
}

lsh> run show interfaces


Interface Admin Oper Family Address
ge-u0/0.10 Up Up
ge-u0/16.1 Up Up

8.7 H-VPLS Configuration


VPLS VSIs provide connectivity between non-MPLS interfaces (i.e., service ports) and PWs connecting to the
VPLS core. As an accepted rule, traffic between VSI PWs is not allowed in VPLS. This standard is enforced
through the Split Horizon rule. Hierarchical-VPLS (H-VPLS) provides a solution for this issue by creating a
hierarchy of VPLS domains and allowing MPLS-level connectivity between them.
A VSI is classified as H-VPLS if there is connectivity between two MPLS VSI interfaces within the VSI. A VSI
interface can be either an SHG or a spoke (SHG = 0). In other words, a VSI is classified as H-VPLS when, for
that VSI, there is either:
 More than one MPLS SHG
 More than one MPLS spoke
 One MPLS spoke and one MPLS SHG

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The following configuration commands illustrate how to configure H-VPLS.

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mode mpls-pe


mpls-pe-options pe-id 123
lsh> commit

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode moe
lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 2 port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode moe
lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 3 port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode moe
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance protocols mpls static tunnel


tun1 directionality bi-directional type originating to 100:100

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance protocols mpls static tunnel


tun1 originating-tunnel main-lsp MAIN forward-path out-segment label 1024 nexthop
ge-u1/2.1

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance protocols mpls static tunnel


tun1 originating-tunnel main-lsp MAIN backward-path in-segment label 1025 interface
ge-u1/2.1
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 nms-service-identifier 1 pseudo-wires ge-u1/1.1 receive-pw-label 1024
remote-pe-id 100:100 split-horizon-group 1 transmit-pw-label 32 transmit-tunnel
tun1
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance protocols mpls static tunnel


tun2 directionality bi-directional type originating to 101:101

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance protocols mpls static tunnel


tun2 originating-tunnel main-lsp MAIN forward-path out-segment label 1026 nexthop
ge-u1/3.1

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance protocols mpls static tunnel


tun2 originating-tunnel main-lsp MAIN backward-path in-segment label 1027 interface
ge-u1/3.1
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 nms-service-identifier 2 pseudo-wires ge-u1/2.1 receive-pw-label 1026
remote-pe-id 101:101 split-horizon-group spoke transmit-pw-label 64 transmit-tunnel
tun2
lsh> commit

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lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 bsc-policer-profile "BSC Default CIR 5000 EIR 0";

egress-counting disabled;
vsi-type mp2mp;
max-fib-size 100;
nms-service-identifier 2;
pm-monitor disable;
state enabled;

pseudo-wires {
ge-u1/1.1 {
remote-pe-id 100:100;
split-horizon-group 1;
receive-pw-label 1024;
transmit-pw-label 32;
transmit-tunnel tun1;
}
ge-u1/2.1 {
remote-pe-id 101:101;
split-horizon-group spoke;
receive-pw-label 1026;
transmit-pw-label 64;
transmit-tunnel tun2;
}
}

severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;

8.8 Entity Naming Conventions


Each entity identified in a command line is identified by a name that is unique across all routing instances.
Entity naming conventions are described in this section, followed by a set of typical examples.
 MPLS tunnels and out-segments
 MPLS Static Tunnels: <Routing-Instance> + <Tunnel Name>
 Out-Segments of Originating and Terminating Tunnels: <Routing-Instance> + <Tunnel Name> +
<LSP Name>
 Out-Segments of Transit Tunnels: <Routing-Instance> + <Tunnel Name> + <LSP Name> + <Fwd |
Bwd>

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Entity Routing instance Tunnel name LSP name Final entity name
MPLS static slot-u1-routing- HEAD-BDT N/A slot-u1-routing-instance-
tunnel instance HEAD-BDT
Out-Segment of slot-u1-routing- HEAD-BDT MAIN slot-u1-routing-instance-
Originating/ instance HEAD-BDT-MAIN
Terminating
Tunnels
Out-Segment of slot-u1-routing- XC-BDT MAIN slot-u1-routing-instance-
Transit Tunnel - instance XC-BDT-MAIN-Fwd
Forward
Out-Segment of slot-u1-routing- XC-BDT MAIN slot-u1-routing-instance-
Transit Tunnel - instance XC-BDT-MAIN-Bwd
Backward

 VSI and CFM entities


 VSI: <Routing-Instance> + <VSI Name>
 CFM MEG: <Routing-Instance> + <VSI Name> + <Cos> + <Role>

Entity Routing instance VSI name Cos Role Final entity name

CFM MEG slot-u1-routing- vsi1 0 op slot-u1-routing-instance-


instance vsi1-0-op
slot-u3-routing- vsi3 1 pr slot-u3-routing-instance-
instance vsi3-1-pr
VSI slot-u1-routing- vsi1 N/A N/A slot-u1-routing-instance-
instance vsi1
slot-u3-routing- vsi3 N/A N/A slot-u3-routing-instance-
instance vsi3

 Port, Slot, and LAG entities


 Slot: slot-uX
 Port: port-uX/Y
 LAG: ge-uX/Y
Where X is the slot number and Y is the port number.

Entity Final entity name

Slot u1 slot-u1
Port 0 of slot u1 port-u1/0
LAG master on port 0 of slot u1 ge-u1/0

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8.9 Retrieving Card and Tunnel Information


The following commands are used to retrieve VSI summary or detailed information, organized per slot.

VSI Summary Data


To retrieve a summary data listing of the VSIs defined for a slot, enter the following command.

lsh# run show virtual-switching-instances slot <slot-name>

For example, the following command chunk illustrates use of this command with a typical output listing.

lsh# run show virtual-switching-instances slot u1

VSI_NAME VSI_TYPE VSI_NMS_ID STATE SVLAN_ID


Vsp1 ERP 67 Disabled 78
Vsp2 ERP 45 Disabled 90

Total number of VSIs: 2

CDVLAN Summary Data


To retrieve a complete data listing for all CDVLANs configured for the VSIs defined for a slot, enter the
following command.

lsh# run show cvlans slot <slot-name>

For example, the following command chunk illustrates use of this command with a typical output listing.

lsh# run show cvlans slot u1

CVLAN_ID PORT VSI_NMS_ID VSI_NAME


40 1 78 vsi-foo
40 3 234 vsi-foo1
0 10 100 zz1
49 10 100 zz1
WC 10 100 zz1

Total number of CVLANs: 5

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide Configuring Layer2 Ethernet Cards and Ports

PW Summary Data
To retrieve a complete data listing for all PWs configured for the VSIs defined for a slot, enter the following
command.

lsh# run show pseudowires slot <slot-name>

For example, the following command chunk illustrates use of this command with a typical output listing.

lsh# run show pseudowires slot u1

PW_NAME SHG REMOTE_PE TUNNEL_NAME VSI_NAME


Pw1 1 0 lsp1 vsi_foo
Pw10 1 1 lsp10 vsi_foo
Pw2 1 2 lsp2 vsi_foo1

Total number of Pseudowires: 3

Policer Profile Summary Data


To retrieve a complete data listing for all policer profiles configured for a slot, enter the following
command.

lsh# run show policer-profile slot <slot-name>

For example, the following command chunk illustrates use of this command with a typical output listing.

lsh# run show policer-profile slot u1

ProfileName CIR_ID CIR CBS EIR_ID EIR EBS CM


----------- ------ --- --- ------ --- --- --
p1 0 0bps 0B 0 0bps 0B CA
p2 1 100Mbps 1MB 1 0bps 0B CB
p3 2 0bps 0B 2 200Mbps 2MB CB
Total Number: 3

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Policer Instance Summary Data


To retrieve a complete data listing for all policer instances configured for a slot, enter the following
command.

lsh# run show policer-instance slot <slot-name>

For example, the following command chunk illustrates use of this command with a typical output listing.

lsh# run show policer-instance slot u1

I/E Port VsiName PolicingState ProfileName CoS_List


--- ---- ------- ------------- ----------- --------
I ge-u1/0 NA No-rate-limit N/A 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
E ge-u1/0 NA No-rate-limit N/A 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
I ge-u1/1 NA No-rate-limit N/A 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
E ge-u1/1 NA No-rate-limit N/A 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
I ge-u1/0 vsi1 Policing p2 0
E ge-u1/1 vsi1 Policing p2 0
Total Number: 6

8.10 Efficient Resource Management


Apollo platforms provide a generous level of resources, such as the maximum number of tunnels or
protocols that can be configured per card. Nevertheless, the available resources are not infinite. Network
operators must utilize the available resources wisely for maximum efficiency. Apollo platforms offer the
following tools to help network operators with efficient resource management.
 Shelf-Wide Scalability
Apollo platforms offer the advantage of shelf-wide scalability. This means that while there is a limit on
the maximum number of objects, such as tunnels, which can be created per card, that maximum
number can be extended through the system's ability to distribute objects across multiple cards
within a shelf. The maximum-object value can be multiplied by the scalability factor defined for your
system to reach a greater total number of objects defined for use within your platform.
For example, assume you can configure a maximum of 2K tunnels per card. If the shelf-wide
scalability factor for your system is set to 4, then you could configure 2K x 4 tunnels, for a total of 8K
tunnels per shelf, distributed across the cards in the platform. For a list of system-spec values, see the
Apollo System Specification.

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 Host Budgeting Limits


The Apollo System Specification includes tables listing the maximum number of instances available,
per card or per port, for every type of resource, such as protocol instances. When supporting protocol
packet traffic, all CPU resources are divided into two pools, managed resources and unmanaged
resources. Control protocols are allowed to use up to a maximum of 1800pps from a managed pool of
resources. However, note that if a single protocol consumed the full amount of available resources,
there would not be anything left for any other protocols to be configured on that card. Network
operators that are working with multiple protocols must therefore budget their resources intelligently
to match their network requirements. Network operators can check on the amount of protocol
resources currently allocated or still available for use on a specific card with the following command.

root# run show host-budget slot u1

AvailableBudget UtilizedBudget TotalBudget LowControlResources


0 1800 1800 Yes

8.11 VSI P2P/MP2MP Configuration Examples


P2P VSI with UNI and NNI Ports
The following code chunk illustrates configuration of a P2P VSI that includes one UNI port and one NNI port.

routing-instances {
slot-u0-routing-instance { // Routing Instance will be created implicitly for
each card.
interface ge-u0/0.100; // UNI LIF created implicitly
interface ge-u0/16.200; // NNI LIF created implicitly
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_bar {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1; // Mandatory field
uni-ports {
ge-u0/0 {
cd-vlan-ids{
100;
} // cd-vlan-ids
} // ge-u0/0
} // uni-ports
nni-ports {
svlan 200; // Mandatory field
ge-u0/16 {
} // ge-u0/0
} // nni-ports
} // virtual-switching-instance-name
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // routing-instance-name
} // routing-instances

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interfaces {
interface ge-u0/0 {
unit 100 { // implicitly created
vlan-id 100;
}
}
interface ge-u0/16 {
unit 200 { // implicitly created
vlan-id 200;
}
}
} // interfaces

P2P VSI with UNI Port and PW Segment


The following code chunk illustrates configuration of a P2P VSI that includes one UNI port and one PW
segment.

routing-instances {
slot-u0-routing-instance { // Routing Instance created implicitly for each card
interface ge-u0/0.100; // UNI LIF created implicitly
interface ge-u0/17.1; // MPLS LIF created when port configured in MoE mode
protocols {
mpls {
interface ge-u0/17.1; // implicitly created when port configured in
MoE mode
static {
label-switched-path orig-lsp-abc; // Represents a tunnel
} // static
} // mpls
} // protocols

virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_bar {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;
uni-ports {
ge-u0/0 {
cd-vlan-ids{
100;
} // cd-vlan-ids
} // ge-u0/0
} // uni-ports
pseudo-wires {
xyz {
remote-pe-id 255-8;
split-horizon-group 1;
receive-pw-label 1024;
transmit-pw-label 17;
transmit-tunnel orig-lsp-abc;

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} // xyz
} // pseudo-wires
} // virtual-switching-instance-name
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // routing-instance-name
} // routing-instances

interfaces {
interface ge-u0/0 {
unit 100 { // implicitly created
vlan-id 100;
}
interface ge-u0/17 { // implicitly created when this Port is in MoE mode
unit 1 {
family mpls;
}
}
} // interfaces

MP2MP VSI with UNI and NNI Ports and PW Segment


The following code chunk illustrates configuration of a MP2MP VSI that includes one UNI port, one NNI
port, and one PW segment.

routing-instances {
slot-u0-routing-instance { // Routing Instance created implicitly for each card.
interface ge-u0/0.100; // UNI LIF created implicitly
interface ge-u0/16.200; // NNI LIF created implicitly
interface ge-u0/17.1; // LIF created implicitly when port mode set to MoE
protocols {
mpls {
interface ge-u0/17.1; // implicitly created when port configured in
MoE mode
static {
label-switched-path orig-lsp-abc;
} // static
} // mpls
} // protocols

virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_bar {
vsi-type MP2MP;
nms-service-identifier 1;
vfib-quota 100;
uni-ports {
ge-u0/0 {
cd-vlan-ids{
100;
} // cd-vlan-ids
} // ge-u0/0

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} // uni-ports
nni-ports {
svlan 200;
ge-u0/16 {
} // ge-u0/16
} // nni-ports
pw-segments {
xyz {
remote-pe-id 255-8;
split-horizon-group <0..15>;
receive-pw-label 1024;
transmit-pw-label 17;
transmit-tunnel orig-lsp-abc;
} // xyz
} // pw-segments
} // virtual-switching-instance-name
} // virtual-switching-instances
} // routing-instance-name
} // routing-instances

interfaces {
interface ge-u0/0 {
unit 100 { // implicitly created
vlan-id 100;
}
}
interface ge-u0/16 {
unit 200 { // implicitly created
vlan-id 200;
}
}
interface ge-u0/17 { // implicitly created for the Port in MoE mode
unit 1 {
family mpls;
}
}
} // interfaces

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8.12 Configuring Bi-Directional Tunnels with Linear


Protection
Apollo data cards enable use of bidirectional tunnels that can be configured with linear protection. Tunnels
are logical structures, either unidirectional or bidirectional, composed of head-ends, tail-ends, and transit
nodes. Bidirectional tunnels can be configured with linear protection and a set of TM options. This section
describes the CLI commands that support these tunnel features, including:
 A table of the parameters and options available when configuring static unidirectional or bidirectional
tunnels.
 A complete listing of the static tunnel CLI statement.
 Examples of the CLI used to configure each type of tunnel.
 Examples of the CLI used to retrieve dynamic tunnel information for each type of tunnel.
For more information about these features, please refer to the STMS User Guide.

Table 8-2: MPLS tunnel configuration options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


admin-state  disable Enables or disables (default) BFD admin state.
 enable
ais-ldi  disable Enables or disables (default) AIS LDI.
 enable
backward-path Container for subset of options configuring the
backward path.
bandwidth  N/A Identifies the CoS (bandwidth allocation) for this
 0 (BE), tunnel.
 1-31@1 Default N/A unless BE is enabled. When BE
 32-248@8 enabled, default is 0.
 256-1024@32
 1280-7936@256
 9584, 10000 [Mbps]
bfd Container for subset of BFD options, relevant for
bidirectional tunnels only
bwd-interface <string> Identifies the incoming interface.
bwd-in-label <string> Identifies the incoming LSP label.
bwd-next-hop  ip-address/if-name Identifies the next hop destination on the
 mac-address/if-name incoming LSP (essentially the previous hop),
 if-name working with IP addresses, MAC addresses,
and/or interface names, as relevant.
bwd-out-label <string> Identifies the outgoing LSP label.
control-channel-cos Range from 0 to 7, default 0 Identifies the Class of Service setting for this
tunnel. Default value 0, indicates Best Effort.
cos Range from 0 to 7 Identifies the CoS being configured.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


detection-multiplier Range from 2 to 5, default 3
The standard Rx interval is multiplied by this
factor to define the amount of time to wait for
BFD packets to be detected before assuming that
the connection is down.
directionality  uni-directional Identifies the tunnel as either uni- or
 bi-directional bi-directional
forward-path Container for subset of options configuring the
forward path.
from <src-pe-id>, in the format: Identifies the source PE for this tunnel, in the
<integer>:<integer> format:
MPLS Network ID:PE ID
hold-off-time-main Range from 0 to 10 seconds Time to wait before reporting a new defect and
in 100 ms steps triggering ERP protection switching for main
Default 0 seconds tunnel.
hold-off-time-prot Range from 0 to 10 seconds Time to wait before reporting a new defect and
in 100 ms steps triggering ERP protection switching for protection
Default 0 seconds tunnel.
in-label <string> Label of incoming LSP.
in-segment Container for subset of options configuring the
inbound segment of a path.
interface  ip-address/if-name Identifies the incoming source, working with IP
 mac-address/if-name addresses, MAC addresses, and/or interface
 if-name names, as relevant.

label <string> LSP label.


label-switched-paths <riName> Flag indicating this is a command regarding LSP
<tunnelName> data and identifying the LSP involved by routing
instance and tunnel names.
lsp-name <string> Name of LSP element.
main-lsp <lsp-name> Identifies the primary path for this tunnel, and
container for subset of options configuring the
main lsp.
minimum-receive-  100 (default) Minimum packet reception interval, in
interval  1000 milliseconds.
minimum-transmit-  100 (default) Minimum packet transmission interval, in
interval  1000 milliseconds.
next-hop  ip-address/if-name Identifies the next hop destination, working with
 mac-address/if-name IP addresses, MAC addresses, and/or interface
 if-name names, as relevant.
num-working-xcs Flag indicating request for the number of XCs
associated with a specific tunnel, identified by
routing instance and tunnel names.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


out-label <string> Label of outgoing LSP.
out-segment Container for subset of options configuring the
outbound segment of a path.
path-name <string> Name of LSP element.
originating-tunnel Container for subset of tunnel options configuring
the originating tunnel.
performance-  disable Enables or disables (default) PM functionality (see
monitoring  enable Performance Monitoring in the System Overview
pm-monitor and Configuration User Guide).
protection-lsp <lsp-name> Identifies name of protection lsp, and container
for subset of options used to configure the
protection lsp.
psc-maint-cmd  lockout Defines PSC maintenance behavior.
 force-switch
 manual-switch
 manual-reversion
 release
psc-max-refresh-  <seconds> Defines maximum refresh interval, in seconds.
interval  psc_main
 t_none
psc-protocol Container for subset of options used to configure
the psc protocol.
revertive Boolean indicator of revertive or non-revertive
status.
revertive-mode  disable Enables (default) or disables automatic reversion
 enable functionality.
routing-instance-name <string> Identifies the routing instance being configured,
formatted as "slot-u<x>-routing-instance".
Created automatically for each slot. Followed by
hierarchical subset of properties.
terminating-tunnel Container for subset of tunnel options configuring
the terminating tunnel.
tm-options Container for subset of tm options. Note that tm
options are configured automatically unless the
user explicitly configures them.
to <dest-pe-id>, in the format: Identifies the destination PE for this tunnel, in the
<integer>:<integer> format:
MPLS Network ID:PE ID
tpg-options Container for subset of protection group options,
configured only when lsp protection is enabled
tunnel <tunnel-name> Identifies name of MPLS tunnel, and container for
subset of tunnel configuration options.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


tunnel-info Flag indicating request for tunnel data.
type  originating Identifies this tunnel node as the head-end
 terminating (originating), tail-end (terminating), or XC
 transit (transit).

wait-to-restore-time Range from 1 to 12 seconds Number of seconds to wait before restoring


Default 5 service after repair.

The following statement is used to configure unidirectional or bidirectional tunnels, working at the
[edit routing-instances routing-instance protocols mpls] hierarchy level.

static {
tunnel <tunnel> {
control-channel-cos <control-channel-cos>;
description <description>;
directionality (uni-directional | bi-directional);
originating-tunnel {
main-lsp <main-lsp> {
backward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
} //end in-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
} //end cos
} //end tm-options
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
forward-path {
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}

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} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end main lsp
protection-lsp <prot-lsp> {
backward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
}
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
forward-path {
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end protection-lsp
} //end originating-tunnel

psc-protocol {
psc-max-refresh-interval <psc-max-refresh-interval>;
}

terminating-tunnel {
main-lsp <main-lsp> {
backward-path {
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);

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pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
forward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
protected;
} // end in-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end main-lsp

protection-lsp <protection-lsp> {
backward-path {
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
}
forward-path {

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in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
} // end in-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end protection-lsp
} // end terminating-tunnel

tpg-options {
hold-off-time-main <hold-off-time-main>;
hold-off-time-prot <hold-off-time-prot>;
pm-monitor (enabled | disabled);
psc-maint-cmd (release | lockout | force-switch |
manual-switch | manual-reversion);
revertive-mode (enabled | disabled);
wait-to-restore-time <wait-to-restore-time>;
}

transit-tunnel {
main-lsp <main-lsp> {
ais-ldi (enabled | disabled);
backward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
} // end in-segment
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end backward-path
bidir-lsp-num <bidir-lsp-num>;
forward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
protected;

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} // end in-segment
out-segment {
label <outlabel>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end main-lsp
} // end transit-tunnel

revert-time <revert-time>;
nms-tunnel-identifier <nmsidentifier>;
to <dest-pe-id>;
type (terminating | originating | transit);
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
} // end tunnel
} // END STATIC

Examples of tunnel configuration statements are provided in the following sections. For more information,
see the STMS User Guide.

8.12.1 Configuring the Head-End (Originating Node)


To configure the head-end originating node of a bidirectional tunnel, include the following statements at
the
[edit routing-instances routing-instance protocols mpls] hierarchy level.

static {
tunnel <tunnel-name> { // label-switched-path
type originating;
to 10:20;
directionality bi-directional;
control-channel-cos 0; Range: <0-7>;
//tpg options configured only when protection-lsp enabled
tpg-options {
lockout;
revertive;
wait-to-restore-time <seconds>;
hold-off-time-main <seconds>;
hold-off-time-protection <seconds>;

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pm-monitor enable;
}
psc-protocol {
psc-max-refresh-interval <seconds>;
}
originating-tunnel {
main-lsp <lsp-name> { // primary path
pm-monitor enable;
forward-path {
out-segment {
nexthop ge-u1/1.1;
label 100;
}

tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
cos 2 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
cos 3 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
cos 4 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
cos 5 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
cos 6 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
cos 7 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path

backward-path {
in-segment {
interface ge-u1/2.1;
label 200;
}

tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;

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}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see previous section>
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path

bfd {
disable;
minimum-receive-interval 100;
minimum-transmit-interval 100;
detection-multiplier 3;
} // end bfd
} // end main-lsp

// Configured for linear-protection only


protection-lsp <lsp-name> {
pm-monitor enable;
forward-path {
out-segment {
nexthop ge-u1/3.1;
label 300;
}
tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see previous section>
} // tm-options
} //forward-path
backward-path {
in-segment {
interface ge-u1/4.1;
label 400;
}
tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see previous section>
} // tm-options
} // backward-path
bfd {
disable;

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minimum-receive-interval 100;
minimum-transmit-interval 100;
detection-multiplier 3;
}
} // pm-monitor
} // protection-lsp
} // end originating-tunnel
} // end tunnel
} // static

8.12.2 Configuring the XC (Transit Node)


To configure the XC transit nodes of a bidirectional tunnel, include the following statements at the
[edit routing-instances routing-instance protocols mpls] hierarchy level.

static {
tunnel <tunnel-name> { // label-switched-path
type transit;
directionality bi-directional;
control-channel-cos 0; Range: <0-7>;
transit-tunnel {
main-lsp <lsp-name> { // primary path
pm-monitor enable;
ais-ldi enable;
forward-path {
in-segment {
interface ge-u1/1.1;
label 100;
}
out-segment {
nexthop ge-u1/2.1;
label 200;
}
tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see head-end example>
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path

backward-path {
in-segment {
interface ge-u1/3.1;
label 300;
}

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out-segment {
nexthop ge-u1/4.1;
label 400;
}
tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see head-end example>
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path
} // end main-lsp
} // end transit-tunnel
} // end tunnel
} // static

8.12.3 Configuring the Tail-End (Terminating Node)


To configure the tail-end terminating node of a bidirectional tunnel, include the following statements at the
[edit routing-instances routing-instance protocols mpls] hierarchy level.

static {
tunnel <tunnel-name> { // label-switched-path
type terminating;
from 10:30;
directionality bi-directional;
control-channel-cos 0; Range: <0-7>;
//tpg options configured only when protection-lsp enabled
tpg-options {
lockout;
revertive;
wait-to-restore-time <seconds>;
hold-off-time-main <seconds>;
hold-off-time-protection <seconds>;
pm-monitor enable;
}
psc-protocol {
psc-max-refresh-interval <seconds>;
}
terminating-tunnel {
main-lsp <lsp-name> { // primary path
pm-monitor enable;
forward-path {
in-segment {
interface ge-u1/1.1;
label 100;

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tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see head-end example>
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path

backward-path {
out-segment {
nexthop ge-u1/2.1;
label 200;
}

tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see previous section>
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path

bfd {
disable;
minimum-receive-interval 100;
minimum-transmit-interval 100;
detection-multiplier 3;
} // end bfd
} // end main-lsp

// Configured for linear-protection only


protection-lsp <lsp-name> {
pm-monitor enable;
forward-path {
in-segment {
interface ge-u1/3.1;
label 300;
}
tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {

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bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see previous section>
} // tm-options
} // forward-path
backward-path {
out-segment {
nexthop ge-u1/4.1;
label 400;
}
tm-options {
cos 0 {
bandwidth 1;
}
cos 1 {
bandwidth N/A;
}
... <remaining cos (0-7) values, see previous section>
} // tm-options
} // backward-path
bfd {
disable;
minimum-receive-interval 100;
minimum-transmit-interval 100;
detection-multiplier 3;
}
} // pm-monitor
} // protection-lsp
} // end terminating-tunnel
} // end tunnel
} // static

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8.12.4 Displaying Dynamic Information for Bidirectional LSP


from RCP Side
To display a detailed listing of the configuration data describing a bidirectional LSP, working from the RCP
side, enter the following commands. Four examples are provided here; one listing details about both
ingress and egress tunnels, one listing details for the ingress side only, one listing details for the egress side
only, and one listing details for the transit nodes. A typical output listing follows each command line.

lsh# run show mpls label-switched-paths detail

Mpls Instance: slot-u1-routing-instance

Ingress LSPs
RSVP LSPs
Total 0 RSVP LSP displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Static LSPs
Name: HEAD-BDT, State: Up, Uptime: 00:00:39
To: 1:200, From: 0.0.0.0
Type: BiDirectional
Active Lsp: MAIN

*Primary: MAIN State: Up


Uptime: 00:00:39 Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/1.1, Label(s) Out: 200
Bwd Incoming Interface: ge-u1/1.1, Label In: 201
NextHop: -

Secondary: PROT State: Up


Uptime: 00:00:39 Switchover: Ready
Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label(s) Out: 210
Bwd Incoming Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label In: 211
NextHop: -

Total 1 Static LSP displayed, Up 1, Down 0

Egress LSPs
RSVP LSPs
Total 0 RSVP LSP displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Static LSPs
Name: TAIL-BDT, State: Up, Uptime: 00:00:38
To: 0.0.0.0, From: 1:400
Type: BiDirectional

LSP Name: MAIN State: Up


Uptime: 00:00:38
Incoming Interface: ge-u1/4.1, Label In: 401, Protection: Disabled
Bwd Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/4.1, Label Out: 402

LSP Name: PROT State: Up

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Uptime: 00:00:38
Incoming Interface: ge-u1/5.1, Label In: 410, Protection: Disabled
Bwd Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/5.1, Label Out: 411

Total 1 Static LSP displayed, Up 1, Down 0

Transit LSPs
RSVP LSPs
Static LSPs
Name: XC-BDT, State: Up, Uptime: 00:00:39
To: [INVALID], From: [INVALID]
Type: BiDirectional

LSP Name: MAIN State: Up


Uptime: 00:00:39
Incoming Interface: ge-u1/3.1, Label In: 301, Protection: Disabled
Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label(s) Out: 300
Bwd Incoming Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label In: 302
Bwd Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/3.1, Label Out: 303
NextHop: -

Total 1 Static LSP displayed, Up 1, Down 0

lsh# run show mpls label-switched-paths ingress detail

Mpls Instance: slot-u1-routing-instance

Ingress LSPs
RSVP LSPs
Total 0 RSVP LSP displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Static LSPs
Name: HEAD-BDT, State: Up, Uptime: 00:01:14
To: 1:200, From: 0.0.0.0
Type: BiDirectional
Active Lsp: MAIN

*Primary: MAIN State: Up


Uptime: 00:01:14 Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/1.1, Label(s) Out: 200
Bwd Incoming Interface: ge-u1/1.1, Label In: 201
NextHop: -

Secondary: PROT State: Up


Uptime: 00:01:14 Switchover: Ready
Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label(s) Out: 210
Bwd Incoming Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label In: 211
NextHop: -

Total 1 Static LSP displayed, Up 1, Down 0

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lsh# run show mpls label-switched-paths egress detail

Mpls Instance: slot-u1-routing-instance

Egress LSPs
RSVP LSPs
Total 0 RSVP LSP displayed, Up 0, Down 0
Static LSPs
Name: TAIL-BDT, State: Up, Uptime: 00:01:24
To: 0.0.0.0, From: 1:400
Type: BiDirectional

LSP Name: MAIN State: Up


Uptime: 00:01:24
Incoming Interface: ge-u1/4.1, Label In: 401, Protection: Disabled
Bwd Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/4.1, Label Out: 402

LSP Name: PROT State: Up


Uptime: 00:01:24
Incoming Interface: ge-u1/5.1, Label In: 410, Protection: Disabled
Bwd Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/5.1, Label Out: 411

Total 1 Static LSP displayed, Up 1, Down 0

lsh# run show mpls label-switched-paths transit detail

Mpls Instance: slot-u1-routing-instance

Transit LSPs
RSVP LSPs
Static LSPs
Name: XC-BDT, State: Up, Uptime: 00:01:32
To: [INVALID], From: [INVALID]
Type: BiDirectional

LSP Name: MAIN State: Up


Uptime: 00:01:32
Incoming Interface: ge-u1/3.1, Label In: 301, Protection: Disabled
Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label(s) Out: 300
Bwd Incoming Interface: ge-u1/2.1, Label In: 302
Bwd Outgoing Interface: ge-u1/3.1, Label Out: 303
NextHop: -

Total 1 Static LSP displayed, Up 1, Down 0

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8.12.5 Displaying Dynamic Information for Bidirectional LSP


from I/O Side
To display a detailed listing of the configuration data describing a bidirectional LSP, working from the I/O
side, enter the following command. A typical output listing follows the command line.

lsh# run show mpls tunnel-info instance slot-u1-routing-instance name


tunnel:1169@U1@74

Mpls Instance: slot-u2-routing-instance

Name: tunnel1
LSP info:
Main: MAIN State: Down
BFD info:
Local State: Down Remote State: Down
Uptime: 00:00:00
Negotiated Rx Interval: 1234 Negotiated Tx
Interval: 1234
Remote Session Detect: <>
Local Discriminator: 1234 Remote Discriminator: 1234
Local Diag: <> Remote Diag: <>
LDI AIS state: Down

Protection: PROT State: Down


BFD info:
Local State: Down Remote State: Down
Uptime: 00:00:00
Negotiated Rx Interval: 1234 Negotiated Tx
Interval: 1234
Remote Session Detect: <>
Local Discriminator: 1234 Remote Discriminator: 1234
Local Diag: <> Remote Diag: <>
LDI AIS state: Down

TPG info:
PscState: Remote protection failure BdtOperState: Down

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8.12.6 Displaying the Number of Inbound and Outbound


Tunnel Segments per Card or Slot
The following command displays the number of inbound and outbound tunnel segments in the specified
routing instance. A typical output listing follows the command line.

lsh# run show mpls tunnel-stats <riName>

Mpls Instance: <Routing Instance Name1>


TunnelCount: 1
XcTunnelCount:2
InSegTunnelCount: 2
OutSegTunnelCount: 2

8.12.7 Displaying the Number of Working XCs Associated


with a Tunnel
The following command displays the number of working XCs associated with the specified tunnel, identified
by routing instance and interface. A typical output listing follows the command line.

lsh> run show mpls num-working-xcs instance <routing-instance-name> if-name


<Interface-Name>

Interface Name: <if-name> Tunnel Capacity Mode: <Normal | Extended>


Number of H-Priority Working XCs BW 1-31M <Valid Number>
Number of L-Priority Working XCs BW 1-31M <Valid Number>
Number of BE Working XCs BW 0M <Valid Number>
Number of H-Priority Working XCs BW 32-248M <Valid Number>
Number of L-Priority Working XCs BW 32-248M <Valid Number>
Number of Working XCs BW 256-10000M <Valid Number>

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8.13 Configuring CFM Card Options


Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) enables detection, verification, localization and notifications of
different fault conditions. Working with CFM requires understanding of the following terminology:
 Maintenance Entity (ME): Any entity that requires management.
 Maintenance Association (MA), or Maintenance Entity Group (MEG): A set of MEs that satisfy the
following conditions:
 MEs in an MA exist in the same administrative domain and have the same ME level.
 MEs in an MA belong to the same service provider VLAN (S-VLAN).
 MEG End Point (MEP): A maintenance functional entity that is implemented at the ends of an ME.
The MEP generates and receives OAM frames. An ME represents a relationship between two MEPs.
 MEG Group Intermediate Point (MIP): A maintenance functional entity that is located at
intermediate points along the end-to-end path where Ethernet frames are bridged to a set of
transport links. The MIP reacts and responds to OAM frames. A MIP does not initiate OAM frames and
takes no action on the transit ETH flows.
 Maintenance Point (MP): Generic term to indicate a single point, either MEP or MIP.
 MD Level: Determines the MEPs and MIPs that are interested in the contents of a CFM PDU and
through which the frame carrying that CFM PDU is allowed to pass. In ShadeTree, referred to as one
of the following "roles": Provider, Operator, or Nested Operator.
The AoC10-L22 card can support up to 24 MEG instances per VSI, based on 3 MD Levels with 8 CoS each.
This section provides examples of the different CFM configuration options available. The command lines
are followed by CLI hierarchy chunks that illustrate the relevant attribute settings.
CFM functionality is configured at both the card level and at the VSI level, per routing instance. The
following table listing the CFM card and VSI configuration parameters. For more information, see the STMS
User Guide.

Table 8-3: CFM configuration options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


Card level
ltm flooding  enable Configures behavior as follows:
 disable (default)  Disabled: LTM is not forwarded unless the target
MAC address has been learned.
 Enabled: LTM is flooded when the target MAC
address has not been learned.
local mep id 1-8191 MEP ID of local MEP for all MEGs with configured MEP
0xFFFF (default) in which switch participates.
MEP ID is configured at the card level. The same MEP ID
is used by all VSIs configured for a specific card.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


VSI level
AlarmMasterMask  enable Enables setting the alarm mask.
 disable (default)
cos Range from 0 to 7 Identifies the Class of Service under which the MEG is
being configured.
LocalMepConf  true Boolean, set to true if local MEP ID exists.

 false
LocalMepId 1-8191 Contains the LocalMepId value, configured at the
[chassis layer-2-options bridge-options
cfm-options] hierarchy level.
LocalMipConf  true Boolean, set to true if local MIP ID exists.

 false
oam  provider Identifies the relevant MD level.
 operator
 nested-operator
MaConfigured  true Boolean, indicates whether to configure MA/MEG.

 false
MaName <string> Unique name identifying MA under this VSI.
MdLevel 0-7 Identifies corresponding domain under the relevant MD
Level (provider, operator, or nested-operator).
MdName <string> Unique name identifying MD under this VSI.
MegAlarmsEnabled  enable If disabled, no alarms will be raised and collected.
 disable (default)
MegCcmEnabled  enable If enabled, allows CCM messages to be sent and
disable (default) received.
MegCcmPeriod  100ms CCM transmission period.
 1000ms (default)
 10000ms
 60000ms
 600000ms
MegId <unsigned integer> MEG identification. Generated automatically by STMS
or RCP, based on MA and MD names.
MegLlcfEnabled  enable If enabled, allows LLCF functionality.
 disable (default)
PmCollectionEnable  enable Enables performance monitoring counter collection.
 disable (default)
PmEnable  enable Enables performance monitoring.
 disable (default)

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


RemoteMacAddr <string>, with the MAC address of the remote node that is interested in
format" receiving CCM messages.
oo:pp:qq:rr:ss:tt
RemoteMepId 1-8191 Contains the Remote MEP ID value.
routing-instance-nam <string> Unique string that identifies this routing instance. With
e the following format:
slot-u<x>-routing-instance
SeverityProfile <string> Used to set various severity profiles.
VSI-name <string> Identifies the VSI in which the port is participating.

8.13.1 Basic MEG Configuration


This example illustrates configuring CoS 5 under the Provider OAM with MD Level 4.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 5 provider md-level 4
lsh> commit

lsh>show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm

cos 5 {
provider {
md-level 4;
md-name pr;
ma-name u1-vsi1-5;
meg-id 42pr0029vsi1-5000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable disable;
meg-ccm-enable disable;
meg-ccm-period 1s;
meg-llcf-enable disable;
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}
}

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8.13.2 Implicit MEP Configuration under Provider or


Operator Levels
MEPs are automatically configured for the MEG if the VSI is associated with that MEG has at least one UNI
port. The local-mep-id is a switch level attribute that the user can configure at the
[layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options cfm-options] level. For example:

lsh>set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options cfm-options


local-mep-id 100
lsh>commit

lsh>show chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options


cfm-options

cfm-options {
ltm-flooding disabled;
local-mep-id 100;
}

8.13.3 Configuring Specific MEG Attributes


CFM attributes do not usually have to be set explicitly; the default values that are set automatically are
usually appropriate. User can also set specific MEG attributes such as alarms and ccm, and ccm_period as
they prefer. For example:

lsh>set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 5 provider meg-alarms-enable enable meg-llcf-enable enable
meg-ccm-enable enable meg-ccm-period 100ms
lsh>commit

lsh>show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm

cos 5 {
provider {
md-level 4;
md-name pr;
ma-name u1-vsi1-5;
meg-id 42pr0029vsi1-5000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable enable;
meg-ccm-enable enable;
meg-ccm-period 100ms;
meg-llcf-enable enable;
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}
}

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8.13.4 MEG Configuration under Provider, Operator and


Nested Operator Levels
Users can configure one MEG for each MD Level (provider, operator, or nested operator), enabling up to
3 MEGs per CoS. For example:

lsh>set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 5 provider md-level 4 md-name pr
lsh>commit

lsh>set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 5 operator md-level 2 md-name op
lsh>commit

lsh>set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 5 nested_operator md-level 1 md-name nop
lsh>commit

lsh>show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm

cos 5 {
provider {
md-level 4;
md-name pr;
ma-name u1-vsi1-5;
meg-id 42pr0029vsi1-5000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable disable;
meg-ccm-enable disable;
meg-ccm-period 1s;
meg-llcf-enable disable;
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}
operator {
md-level 2;
md-name op;
ma-name u1-vsi1-5;
meg-id 42pr0029vsi1-5000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable enable;
meg-ccm-enable enable;
meg-ccm-period 100ms;
meg-llcf-enable enable;
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;

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}
nested_operator {
md-level 1;
md-name nop;
ma-name u1-vsi1-5;
meg-id 42pr0029vsi1-5000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable enable;
meg-ccm-enable enable;
meg-ccm-period 100ms;
meg-llcf-enable enable;
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}
}
}

8.13.5 Remote MEP Configuration


Users can configure up to 256 remote MEPs with unique remote-mep-ids per MEG. Note that when CCM is
enabled, users may not remove all the entries from the remote-MEP list. The following example illustrates
configuring two remote MEPs at the provider OAM level.

lsh>set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 1 provider md-name pr remote-mep 10
lsh>set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi1 cfm cos 1 provider remote-mep 11
lsh>commit

lsh>show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm

cos 1 {
provider {
md-level 3;
md-name pr;
ma-name u1-vsi1-1;
meg-id 42pr0026vsi1-1000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable disable;
meg-ccm-enable disable;
meg-ccm-period 1s;
meg-llcf-enable disable;
remote-mep 10 {
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;

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}
remote-mep 11 {
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}
pm-enable disable;
pm-collection-enable disable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
}
}

8.13.6 Deleting a MEG


A MEG can be deleted in one of two ways:
 If the user issues a delete command for the MEG.
 If ma-configured is disabled, which effectively deletes the MEG.

lsh> delete routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 1 provider
lsh>commit

lsh>show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm
cos 1 {
provider {
ma-configured disabled;
md-level 3;
md-name pr;
ma-name u1-vsi1-1;
meg-id 42pr0026vsi1-1000000000000000000000000000000000;
meg-alarms-enable disable;
meg-ccm-enable disable;
meg-ccm-period 1s;
meg-llcf-enable disable;
}
}

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8.13.7 Retrieving CFM MEG Information


The following commands illustrate a summary and a detailed listing of MEG data.

lsh> run show cfm meg slot u1

NMSID MEGID COS LVL MEP MIP ALARMS CCM CCMPRD RDI RMTDFECT RMEPCNT
1 0 1 2 N Y N N 1000 N N 0

lsh> run show cfm meg slot u1 vsi-name vsi1 cos 1 oam operator
Nms-Id: 1
Meg Id: 0
Cos: 1
Md Lvl: 2
Mep: N
Mip: Y
Alarms: N
Ccm: N
Ccm Period: 1000
SendingRDI: N
RmtDefect: N
SNo RMepId RMepOperState RMepRdi
Total number of Megs Configured: 1

8.13.8 Running a Loopback Command


The following line illustrates the loopback command syntax.
lsh> run cfm <loopback> <target-mac-address> routing-instance <ri-name>
virtual-switching-instance <vsi-instance> cos <cos> OAM <operator type
[provider/operator/nested operator]>

For example:
lsh> run cfm loopback target-mac 00:20:8f:80:9e:00 instance
slot-u1-routing-instance vsi-name vsi1 cos 1 oam operator.

8.13.9 Running a Link Trace Command


The following line illustrates the link trace command syntax.
lsh> run cfm <linktrace> <target-mac-address> routing-instance <ri-name>
virtual-switching-instance <vsi-instance> cos <cos> OAM <operator type
[provider/operator/nested operator]>

For example:
lsh> run cfm link-trace target-mac 00:20:8f:80:9e:00 instance
slot-u1-routing-instance vsi-name vsi1 cos 1 oam operator

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8.13.10 CFM Fault Management


Fault management commands are used to enable, disable, and verify the status of various alarms. Users
can also reset alarm severity levels and verify that they are being handle appropriately. The following code
fragments illustrate typical fault management commands and the output they generate.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 cfm cos 0 provider ma-configured enable md-level 3 remote-mep 10
lsh> run debug test opbd:notifications:dump
[10] [MSF_MEG_CLASS(1080) Group(L2Eth) Slot(4) Port(0) ] => Facade Object
:
[11] [MSF_REMOTE_MEP_CLASS(1081) Group(L2Eth) Slot(4) Port(3) ] => Facade Object
:

lsh> run debug test opbd:notifications:enableAlarms 10


lsh> run show chassis alarms
Service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type Element Name
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
major 2014-06-27,02:43:15 megOperationalStateDown protocol u1-vsi1-0pr

Non-service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type Element Name
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
major 2014-06-27,02:43:15 megCfmMismerge protocol u1-vsi1-0pr
major 2014-06-27,02:43:15 megUnexpectedMep protocol u1-vsi1-0pr
major 2014-06-27,02:43:15 megUnexpectedPeriod protocol u1-vsi1-0pr

lsh> run debug test opbd:notifications:enableAlarms 11


lsh> run show chassis alarms
Service-affecting alarms:
alarms for [MSF_REMOTE_MEP_CLASS(1081) Group(L2Eth) Slot(4) Port(3) ] are raised and
sent to:

Non-service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type Element Name
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 rmepSlmUnavailBackward protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 rmepSlmUnavailForward protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 dmIncomplemeteMeasurements15M protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 fD15M protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 fDVBackward15M protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10

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major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 fDVForward15M protocol


u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 sLMIncompleteMeasurements15M protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 sLMUnavailabilityBackward15M protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10
major 2014-06-27,02:43:40 sLMUnavailabilityForward15M protocol
u1-vsi1-0pr-10

lsh> set severity-profiles profile-name protocol default probable-cause


megCfmMismerge severity critical
lsh> commit
lsh> run show chassis alarms
Non-service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type Element Name
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
critical 2014-06-27,02:36:30 megCfmMismerge protocol u1-vsi1-0pr

8.14 PCP and DSCP to CoS Mapping in VSI


Quality of Service (QoS) controllers use Class of Service (CoS) settings to differentiate between different
priority levels of data traffic. UNI and E-NNI ports map service packets to specific CoS values using one of
the following techniques for packet service frame classification.
 Differentiated Services Code Points (DSCP) are mapped to specific CoS identifiers.
 Priority Code Points (PCP, 802.1p) define priority values between 0 and 7 and are mapped to specific
CoS identifiers. For UNI ports, all code points are mapped to CoS 0 by default. For E-NNI ports, the
classification mapping is 0-0, 1-1, 2-2, 3-3,….., 7-7. On the egress side, CoS ID to PCP mapping is only
supported on E-NNI ports.
The following table lists the parameters and options available when configuring DSCP or P-bit mapping.

Table 8-4: DSCP and P-bit mapping options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


cos cos value ranging from 0 to 7 or discard Defines Class of Service value.
dscp codepoint value, any of the following: Defines DSCP value.
cs0, cs1, cs2, cs3, cs4, cs4,
cs5, cs6, cs7, af11, af12, af13,
af21, af22, af23, af31, af32,
af33, af41, af42, af43, or
ef-phb, discard

p-bit p-bit value ranging from 0 to 7 or Defines Priority Bit value.


discard

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


instance-type  forwarding Created automatically.
Forwarding option included for legacy
systems only.
mapping type  ingress-dscp-cos-mapping Identifies the type of mapping being
 ingress-pbit-cos-mapping configured for this port.
 egress-cos-pbit-mapping Note that not all mapping functionality
is available for every type of port.
nni-ports hierarchical subset of properties Properties defined within this level
configure the NNI ports participating in
the current VSI, including
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping,
egress-cos-pbit-mapping, and
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping.
p-bit p-bit value ranging from 0 to 7, mapped Defines Priority Bit to CoS mapping for
to cos value ranging from 0 to 7 this port, ranging from 0 to 7, or
discard.
port type  uni-ports
Indicates that the port being configured
 nni-ports is a UNI or NNI port. Parameters for this
type of port may include interface or
VLAN ID. For example:
uni-ports
ge-u1/1 cd-vlan-ids 1
nni-ports s-vlan 1
routing-instances <string> Identifies the routing instance being
configured, formatted as
"slot-u<x>-routing-instance". Created
automatically for each slot. Followed by
hierarchical subset of properties.
slot-id <slot number> Identifies the card slot.
state  disable Enables or disables specific mapping
 enable functionality for this port.
uni-ports hierarchical subset of properties Properties defined within this level
configure the UNI ports participating in
the current VSI, including
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping and
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping.
virtual-switching- <string> Identifies the VSI being configured.
instances Followed by a hierarchical subset of
properties defined for each
participating port (UNI and NNI) as
relevant).

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Examples of this configuration statement are included in this section. For more information, see the STMS
User Guide.

TIP: VSIs are configured under routing instances, identified by the card's slot number
(slot-u1-routing-instance). Use the show routing-instances command to see this
option. To configure port mapping, no explicit configuration is required at the card level. The
necessary routing instance is created automatically as part of the card assignment stage for a
selected slot. For example:
lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing-instance
slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
}

8.14.1 Configuring Classification for E-NNI Ports


To configure default classification options for E-NNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level.
The results of these commands are displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1


port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode e-nni
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing instance
slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
slot-id u1;
}

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports s-vlan 1
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing-instances
slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
nms-service-identifier 1;
nni-ports {
s-vlan 1;
ge-u1/1;
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping {
p-bit 0 {
cos 0;
}

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p-bit 1 {
cos 1;
}
<default p-bit values>
}
egress-cos-pbit-mapping {
cos 0 {
p-bit 0;
}
cos 1 {
p-bit 1;
}
<default cos values>
}
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping{
state disable;
}
}
}
}

8.14.2 Configuring Classification for UNI Ports


To configure default classification options for UNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level.
The results of these commands are displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1


port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode uni
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing instance
slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
slot-id u1;
}

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
uni-ports ge-u1/1 cd-vlan-ids 1
lsh> commit

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lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
nms-service-identifier 1;
uni-ports {
ge-u1/1 {
cd-vlan-ids {
1;
}
}
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping {
p-bit 0 {
cos 0;
}
p-bit 1 {
cos 0;
}
<default p-bit values>
}
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping{
state disable;
}
}
}
}
}

8.14.3 Changing Priority Bit CoS Mapping for UNI Ports


To change the P-bit mapping options for UNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level. The results of these commands are displayed in
this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
uni-ports ingress-pbit-cos-mapping p-bit 2 cos 5
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
uni-ports ingress-pbit-cos-mapping

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...
...
p-bit 0 {
cos 0;
}
p-bit 1 {
cos 0;
}
p-bit 2 {
cos 5;
}
p-bit 3 {
cos 0;
}
<default p-bit values>
}

8.14.4 Changing Priority Bit to CoS Mapping for E-NNI Ports


To change the P-bit to CoS mapping options for E-NNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level. The results of these commands are
displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports ingress-pbit-cos-mapping p-bit 2 cos 5
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports ingress-pbit-cos-mapping

...
p-bit 0 {
cos 0;
}
p-bit 1 {
cos 1;
}
p-bit 2 {
cos 5;
}
p-bit 3 {
cos 3;
}
<default p-bit values>
...

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8.14.5 Changing CoS to P-Bit Mapping for E-NNI Ports


To change the CoS to P-bit mapping options for E-NNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level. The results of these commands are
displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports egress-cos-pbit-mapping cos 2 p-bit 5
lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports egress-cos-pbit-mapping

...
cos 0 {
p-bit 0;
}
cos 1 {
p-bit 1;
}
cos 2 {
p-bit 5;
}
cos 3 {
p-bit 3;
}
<default cos values>
...

8.14.6 Changing DSCP CoS Mapping for UNI Ports


To change the DSCP mapping options for UNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level. The results of these commands are
displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
uni-ports ingress-dscp-cos-mapping state enable
dscp af11 cos 5
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
uni-ports ingress-dscp-cos-mapping

ingress-dscp-cos-mapping {
state enable;
dscp cs0 {

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cos 0;
}
dscp cs1 {
cos 0;
}
<default dscp csx values>

dscp af11 {
cos 5;
}
dscp af12 {
cos 0;
}
<default dscp afx values>

dscp af43 {
cos 0;
}
dscp ef-phb {
cos 0;
}
}

8.14.7 Changing DSCP CoS Mapping for E-NNI Ports


To change the DSCP mapping options for E-NNI ports, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level. The results of these commands are
displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance


virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports ingress-dscp-cos-mapping state enable
dscp af11 cos 5
lsh> commit
lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi_foo
nni-ports ingress-dscp-cos-mapping

ingress-dscp-cos-mapping {
state enable;
dscp cs0 {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs1 {
cos 0;
}
<default dscp values>

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dscp af11 {
cos 5;
}

<default dscp values>

8.14.8 Complete CLI Configuration Example


The example in this section illustrates a configuration for mapping PCP to COS-ID and DSCP to COS-ID on
the ingress side, as well as the reverse Cos to PCP mapping on the egress side.

routing-instances {
slot-u1-routing-instance {
// Routing Instance are created implicitly for each slot
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_bar {
instance-type <MP2MP|P2P|ROOTED_MP|RSTP|ERP>;
uni-ports {
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping {
p-bit<0-7> {
<cos<0-7> | discard >;
} // end priority
} // end ingress-priority-cos-mapping
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping {
state <enable | disable>
dscp<codepoint-name> {
<cos<0-7> | discard >;
} // end dscp
} // end ingress-dscp-cos-mapping
} // end uni-ports
nni-ports {
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping {
p-bit<0-7> {
<cos<0-7> | discard >;
} // end priority
} // end ingress-priority-cos-mapping
egress-cos-pbit-mapping {
cos<0-7> {
p-bit<0-7>;
} // end cos
} // end egress-cos-priority-mapping
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping {
state <enable | disable>
dscp< codepoint-name > {
<cos<0-7> | discard >;
} // end dscp
} // end ingress-dscp-cos-mapping
} // end nni-ports

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} // end virtual-switching-instance-name
} // end virtual-switching-instances
} // end routing-instance-name
} // end routing-instances

NOTE: The codepoint-name could be any of the following:


cs0, cs1, cs2, cs3, cs4, cs4, cs5, cs6, cs7,
af11, af12, af13, af21, af22, af23, af31, af32, af33, af41, af42, af43, or ef-phb.

8.15 Configuring ERP Options


Ethernet Ring Protection Switching (ERPS) enables Automatic Protection Switching (APS) mechanisms for
Ethernet ring topologies. ERP enables protected P2P, P2MP, and MP2MP connectivity within a single ring or
within multiple interconnected rings. ERP configuration requires that:
 All participating ring nodes must run ERP.
 All participating ring nodes must be connected via Ethernet links to I-NNI ports.
 When working with aggregation nodes, the data cards can be configured in MPLS-PE or PB mode.
Otherwise, the cards must be configured in PB mode.
 ERP protection cannot be combined with RSTP or CFM functionality.
 Timer values for hold-off-time, guard-time, and wait-to-restore are set to default values unless
explicitly set by the user.
 ERP node and port roles can only be edited while the ERP VSI is disabled.
 ERP is configured per VSI with the vsi-type defined as ERP.
For more information about ERP, see the STMS User Guide.
The following table lists the parameters and options available when configuring ERP.

Table 8-5: ERP options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


erp-mode pbring Identifies the type of ERP application
for which this instance is being used.

erp-port-role  rpl Identifies the role of the


 ring-port (default) VSI interface/port in the ERP ring. RPL
value can be used only if node-role is
set to rpl-owner.
guard-time Range from 10 ms to 2 seconds Prevents ring nodes from receiving
in 10 ms steps. outdated ERP messages. During the
Default 500 ms duration of the guard timer, all ERP
messages received are ignored.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


hold-off-time Range from 0 to 10 seconds in Time to wait before reporting a new
100 ms steps defect and triggering ERP protection
Default 0 seconds switching.
instance-name <string> Identifies the routing instance being
configured, formatted as
"slot-u<x>-routing-instance". Created
automatically for each slot. Followed
by hierarchical subset of properties.
node-role  rpl-owner Identifies the role being "played" by
 ring-node the switching card configured here:
RPL owner or ring node.
revertive  revertive Flag indicating whether or not this ERP
protection is revertive.
s-vlan Range from 1 to 4093 VLAN ID associated with the NNI port
of a VSI.
Unique S-VLAN values are used to carry
R-APS frames for each PB ring (ERP
instance) closed by AoC10-L2.
virtual-switching- <string> Container for subset of options that
instances configure VSI instances, defined per VSI
instance, identified by name.
vsi-name <string> Identifies the VSI within a routing
instance.
VSI name must be unique within a
routing instance, but can be repeated
within different routing instances. So
two different routing instances, for
example, could each use the same VSI
name.
Maximum of 8190 VSIs per card.
vsi-type  erp Identifies the type of VSI being
 p2p configured. For ERP protection, set to
 mp2mp erp.

wait-to-restore Range from 1 to 12 minutes in A fixed period of time that must elapse
1 minute steps after a failure recovery before traffic
Default 5 minutes channel reverts to the original path.
Can be modified only when node-role is
RPL Owner.

Examples of this configuration statement are included in this section. For more information, see the STMS
User Guide.

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8.15.1 Configuring VSIs for ERP Protection


To configure VSIs for ERP protection include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port] hierarchy level.
The results of these commands are displayed in this example in the show command that follows.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 vsi-type erp nm-service-identifier 10
lsh> commit

lsh> show routing instance


routing-instances {
slot-u1-routing-instance {
description "routing-instance for
interfaces belonging to card in slot u1";
instance-type forwarding;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi1 {
vsi-type erp;
nms-service-identifier 10;
} // end vsi1
} // end virtual-switching-instances
} // end slot-u1-routing-instance
} // end routing-instances

8.15.2 Configuring VSIs for ERP Protection on


Non-Aggregation Access Ring Nodes
Non-aggregation nodes in PB access rings are connected with Ethernet links running between NNI ports.
When working with non-aggregation nodes, the card must be configured in PB mode.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 nm-service-identifier 10 vsi-type erp erp node-role rpl-owner

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi1 nni-ports s-vlan 10 ge-u1/1 erp-port-role rpl

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instance


vsi1 nni-ports ge-u1/2 erp-port-role ring-port

lsh>commit

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lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


virtual-switching-instances {
vsi1 {
vsi-type erp;
nms-service-identifier 10;
erp {
erp-mode pb-ring;
node-role rpl-owner;
revertive-mode revertive;
hold-off-time 0 sec;
wait-to-restore 5 min;
guard-time 500 ms;
} // end erp
nni-ports {
s-vlan 10;
ge-u1/1 {
erp-port-role rpl;
}
ge-u1/3 {
erp-port-role ring-port;
}
} // end nni-ports
} // end vsi1
}

8.16 Configuring Ethernet and Packet Handling


Port Options
Ethernet ports configured for the Layer 2 data level work with their own set of attributes and options,
configured at the port and interface levels. The port and interface configuration statements are included in
this section, followed by a brief description of the port-level attributes. The interface-level attributes
required for OAM, PM, and TM functionality are described in their own sections. For more information, see
the STMS User Guide.
To configure Ethernet options at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port]
hierarchy level, include the following statement:

ethernet-options {
(auto-negotiation | no-auto-negotiation);
(flow-control | no-flow-control);
ifg-optimization (enabled | disabled);
speed (10g | 1g | 100m | 10m);
pma-mode (master | slave);
port-mode (uni | e-nni | i-nni | moe | i-moe | mirror);
stpId <stpId>;

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llcf-options {
llcf-ingress-enable (enabled | disabled);
llcf-egress-enable (enabled | disabled);
} // end llcf-options

pause-options {
force-pause (enabled | disabled);
pause-type (rx-only | disable);
pause-advertisement (no-pause | sym-pause | asym-pause | sym-asym-pause);
} // end pause-options

rstp-options {
port-enable (enabled | disabled);
priority <priority>;
path-cost <path-cost>;
hold-off-time <hold-off-time>;
port-change-detect (enabled | disabled);
dynamic-port-cost-update (enabled | disabled);
admin-edge (enabled | disabled);
auto-cost-config (enabled | disabled);
bpdu-mac-address (bridge-group | provider-bridge-group);
} // end rstp-options

} // end ethernet-options (port level)

To configure Ethernet options at the


[edit interfaces interface]
hierarchy level, include the following statement:

ethernet-options {
vlan-ethertype (0x8100 | 0x88a8 | 0x9100 | 0x9200);
outer-vlan-id <VlanId> {
vlan-ethertype (0x8100 | 0x88a8 | 0x9100 | 0x9200);
}

mac-filtering (enabled | disabled);


default-c-vlan-priority <default-c-vlan-priority>;
ingress-default-vlan-id <ingress-default-vlan-id>;
ingress-untagged-handling (block | forward | pvid | priority-tagged);
max-frame-size <max-frame-size>;

link-oam-options { (see Configuring Link OAM Options)


enable (enabled | disabled);
local-mode (active | passive);
passive-peer-only (passive | any);
remote-loopback (enabled | disabled);
err-frame-threshold <err-frame-threshold>;
err-frame-window <err-frame-window>;

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err-frame-period-threshold <err-frame-period-threshold>;
err-frame-period-window <err-frame-period-window>;
err-frame-sec-sum-threshold <err-frame-sec-sum-threshold>;
err-frame-sec-sum-window <err-frame-sec-sum-window>;
} // end link-oam-options

tm-options { (see Configuring Traffic Management Options)


per-cos-tm {
cos <cos> {
}
}
} // end tm-options

lag-master { (see Configuring LAG Options)


pm-profile <pm-profile>;
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
lag-distribution (enable | disable);
lag-link-down-threshold <lag-link-down-threshold>;
lag-protection-type (load-sharing);
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
} // end lag-master
lag-slave {
lag-distribution (enable | disable);
master-port <master-port>;
} // end lag-slave

} // end ethernet-options

Table 8-6: Ethernet and packet handling port parameters

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


auto negotiation  auto-negotiation Supported only for :
 no-  100Mbps ports, default disabled
auto-negotiation  1Gbps ports, default enabled
Not valid for I-MoE ports.
default-c-vlan-priority range from 0 to 7 Relevant for UNI ports. configures the
(default 0) default priority for untagged or
Priority-Tagged frames in both port-based
and not-port-based applications.
flow control  flow-control Enables or disables flow control.
 no-flow-control
ifg-optimization  disable Enables or disables inter-frame gap
 enable optimization on the port.
Default disabled for fixed IFG=12.
Default enabled with fixed IFG=11.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


ingress-default-vlan-id range from 1 to 4094 The C-VLAN ID assigned to untagged
frames received on this port (PVID
translation).
ingress-untagged-  block Relevant for UNI ports only. Defines the
handling  forward (default) method used for handling untagged or
 pvid priority tagged traffic.
 priority-tagged
llcf-options  llcf-ingress-enable Enables or disables LLCF functionality on
(enabled | disabled) the ingress and egress ports.
 llcf-egress-enable
(enabled | disabled)
mac-filtering  disable (default) Defines if the reserved MAC address should
 enable be filtered or not.
 Disabling filtering implies transparency
for client frames with these MAC
addresses.
 Enabling filtering implies that frames
with the same MAC address as the
MAC address of the RSTP BPDU are
filtered on UNI ports.
max-frame-size range from 64 to max Maximum frame size.
supported value Default 1540 bytes for ETH ports.
Default 1604 bytes for MoE or I-MoE ports.
next-hop-mac-address FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF Relevant for MoE ports, used as MAC-DA of
MPLS frames transmitted from MoE ports.
Change the default value to
Unicast/Broadcast MAC address before the
port can be enabled.
Changing the address while MoE port is
enabled may be traffic affecting.
pause-options  force-pause Configure pause option settings.
(enabled | disabled)
 pause-type
(rx-only | disable)
 pause-advertisement
(no-pause | sym-pause
| asym-pause |
sym-asym-pause)
pma-mode  master
 slave

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


port-mode  UNI (default) Identifies the port type. Note that ports 20
 I-NNI and 21 can only be configured as I-MoE
 E-NNI ports.
 MoE
 I-MOE
 Mirror
rstp-options <option subset> See Configuring RSTP Card and Port
Parameters.
speed  10 Mbps Speed is only relevant for GbE ports with
 100 Mbps electrical transceivers.
 1Gbps (default)
 10Gbps
stpId range 0x0-0xFFFF Identifies the EtherType of the S-TAG,
default 0x88a8 relevant for NNI ports only.

8.17 Configuring EXP Mapping Options


EXP bits are used to differentiate between different priority levels of incoming MPLS packet traffic. EXP bits
are mapped to one of 16 possible combinations of CoS and color values (one out of eight possible CoS
values combined with one out of two color values (green or yellow)). EXP mapping is configured as follows:
 Incoming traffic: For each MoE and I-MoE port, users define how the EXP bit value should be mapped
to a CoS/color combo.
 Outgoing traffic: For each MoE and I-MoE port, users define how the CoS/color combo should be
mapped to the EXP bit value.
 Any MPLS packet arriving in either direction will be dropped if it has an EXP which has no mapping
defined.
 The default values for CoS is discard.
 The default value for color is N/A.

The following statement is used to configure EXP bit mapping, working at the
[edit routing-instances routing-instance protocols mpls interface] hierarchy level.
exp-map {
cos <cos> {
out-exp {
color-green <color-green>;
color-yellow <color-yellow>;
}
}
in-exp <in-exp> {
cos <cos>;
color (green | yellow);
}
}

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The following table lists the parameters and options available when configuring EXP bit mapping. For more
information, see the STMS User Guide.

Table 8-7: EXP bit mapping options

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
cos cos value ranging from 0 to 7 or Defines Class of Service value.
discard (default) Configured implicitly for outgoing
traffic.
color  green Defines color to be mapped, together
 yellow with CoS value, to EXP bit.
 N/A (default) Configured implicitly for outgoing
traffic.

color-green  <color-green> Identifies the colors being mapped to


color-yellow  <color-yellow> an outgoing EXP bit field.
exp-map Container for the subset of EXP bit
mapping configuration options.
in-exp The EXP field of an incoming MPLS
EXP bit value ranging from 0 to 7
packet. This is the incoming EXP bit
value which is to be mapped to a
CoS/color combo.
Configured implicitly for incoming
traffic.
If the incoming EXP bit cannot be
mapped to a CoS/color combo, the
packets are discarded.
out-exp EXP bit value ranging from 0 to 7 The EXP field of an outgoing MPLS
or packet. A CoS/color combo is mapped
N/A (default) to this outgoing EXP bit.

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8.17.1 Configuring EXP Mapping on an MPLS Interface

To configure EXP bit mapping:


1. Configure the slot and port. For example:

lsh# set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 enable


lsh# commit

By default, the card is configured in PB mode.


2. Configure card in MPLS-PE mode. For example:

lsh# set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mode mpls-pe

lsh# set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mode mpls-pe


mpls-pe-options pe-id <pe-id>

lsh# commit

A new routing instance is automatically generated for this card slot.


3. Configure port in MoE or I-MoE mode. For example:

lsh# set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 port 0


port-type ge enable ethernet-options port-mode moe

lsh# commit

Port configuration automatically creates a physical interface (PIF) and an MPLS interface. These can
be configured with a show interfaces command.

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The following code chunk illustrates the default configuration settings.

slot-u0-routing-instance {
description "routing-instance for interfaces
belonging to card in slot u0";
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u0/0.1;
protocols {
mpls {

interface ge-u1/1.1 {

exp-map {
in-exp 0 {
cos discard;
color N/A;
}
// <continue with in-exp 1...in-exp 7>
in-exp 7 {
cos discard;
color N/A;
}
cos 0 {
color green {
out-exp N/A;
}
color yellow {
out-exp N/A;
}
}
// <continue with cos 1...cos 7>
} // end exp-map
} // end interface
} // end mpls
} // end protocols
slot-id u0;
} // end routing-instance

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8.17.2 Configuring EXP Mapping under a Routing Instance


This section illustrates the command used to configure EXP mapping under a routing instance. The first part
of the command line configures the incoming EXP bit mapping. The second part configures the outgoing
EXP bit mapping.

To Configure EXP Mapping under a Routing Instance:


 Enter the EXP mapping configuration command line. For example:

lsh# set routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance protocols mpls


interface ge-u2/0.1 exp-map in-exp [0-7] cos [0-7] color [green/yellow]
out-exp [0-7]
lsh# commit

This command produces the following configuration:

slot-u0-routing-instance {
description "routing-instance for interfaces
belonging to card in slot u0";
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u0/0.1;
protocols {
mpls {

interface ge-u1/1.1 {

exp-map {
in-exp 0 {
cos 0;
color green;
}
in-exp 1 {
cos 0;
color yellow;
}
in-exp 2 {
cos 1;
color green;
}
in-exp 3 {
cos 1;
color yellow;
}
in-exp 4 {
cos 2;
color green;
}

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in-exp 5 {
cos 2;
color yellow;
}
in-exp 6 {
cos 6;
color green;
}
in-exp 7 {
cos 7;
color green;
}

cos 0 {
color green {
out-exp 0;
}
color yellow {
out-exp 0;
}
}

cos 1 {
color green {
out-exp 1;
}
color yellow {
out-exp 2;
}
}

cos 2 {
color green {
out-exp 3;
}
color yellow {
out-exp N/A;
}
}

cos 3 {
color green {
out-exp N/A;
}
color yellow {
out-exp N/A;
}
}

cos 4 {
color green {

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out-exp N/A;
}
color yellow {
out-exp N/A;
}
}

cos 5 {
color green {
out-exp N/A;
}
color yellow {
out-exp 4;
}
}

cos 6 {
color green {
out-exp 5;
}
color yellow {
out-exp N/A;
}
}

cos 7 {
color green {
out-exp 7;
}
color yellow {
out-exp N/A;
}
}

} // end exp-map
} // end interface
} // end mpls
} // end protocols
slot-id u0;
} // end routing-instance

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8.17.3 Deleting a Specific EXP Mapping


The following example illustrates the commands used to delete a specific EXP mapping instance.

lsh# delete routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance protocols mpls interface


ge-u2/0.1 exp-map in-exp [0-7]

lsh# delete routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance protocols mpls interface


ge-u2/0.1 exp-map cos [0-7] color [green/yellow]

lsh# commit

8.17.4 Deleting a Complete EXP Mapping Set


The following example illustrates the commands used to delete a complete EXP mapping set, returning the
network to the default mapping settings.

lsh# delete routing-instances slot-u2-routing-instance protocols mpls interface


ge-u2/0.1 exp-map

lsh# commit

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8.18 Configuring Fault Management Options


ShadeTree supports a range of Fault Management (FM) severity profiles. A set of default FM profiles that
don't require any explicit configuration commands is provided. Users can also configure specific FM severity
profiles, defined per entity, tailored to their network requirements. For more information, see Fault
Management in the System Overview and Configuration User Guide.
The following table lists the parameters and options available when configuring FM severity profiles.
Examples of the configuration statement are included in this section. For more information, see the STMS
User Guide.

Table 8-8: FM severity profile options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


entity name <string> Identifies the entity being configured. Entity naming
conventions are described later in this section.
entity-superset  erp Identifies the port category of this entity. Indicates that
 l2-eth-otn-port the alarms and events defined here are relevant for
 l2-eth-port this type of port.
 lag
 mpls-interface
 mpls-segment
 mpls-tunnel
 switch
 vsi
probable-cause <probable cause name> Identifies the probable cause
profile-name <string> Identifies the severity profile being configured.
report  true Boolean indicating whether or not a report should be
 false generated.
severity  critical Identifies the severity level of this alarm or event.
 major
 minor
 warning
severity-profiles Container for subset of options configuring this
severity profile.

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8.18.1 Default Severity Profile at the Card Level


The following code sample, included in the output of a show severity-profiles command, illustrates a
typical default severity profile for card entities. This profile is applied to all configured cards.

severity-profiles {
...
profile-name card default {
...
probable-cause hostBudgetExceeded {
severity minor;
report true;
}
probable-cause hostBudgetLowResources {
severity warning;
report true;
}
probable-cause bscDiscardSeconds15M {
severity warning;
report true;
}
probable-cause lowClassDiscardPrcntPkts15M {
severity warning;
report true;
}
probable-cause macMove15M {
severity major;
report true;
}
probable-cause fdbFullSec15M {
severity minor;
report true;
}
} // end profile-name
} // end severity-profiles

8.18.2 Editing a Severity Profile


To edit an existing severity profile or add a new profile, enter the following command with appropriate
parameter settings.

lsh# set severity-profiles profile-name <entity superset> <profile name>


probable-cause <probable cause name> report <true | false> severity <critical | major
| minor | warning>

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8.18.3 Deleting a User-Defined Severity Profile


Built-in default severity profiles cannot be deleted. However, user-defined severity profiles can be deleted,
by entering the following command.

lsh# delete severity-profiles profile-name <Entity superset> <Profile name>

8.18.4 Modifying a Severity Profile Configuration

To configure an FDB severity profile:


1. Before the user-configuration, the default severity profile would appear as follows:

severity-profiles {
...
profile-name card default {
...
probable-cause fdbFullSec15M {
severity minor;
report true;
} // end configuration for fdbFullSec15M probable cause
} // end profile name
} // end severity-profiles

2. Enter the following command to change the severity configuration value.

lsh# set severity-profiles profile-name card default probable-cause


fdbFullSec15M report false severity major

3. The modified severity profile now appears as follows:

severity-profiles {
...
profile-name card default {
...
probable-cause fdbFullSec15M {
severity major;
report false;
} //
} //
} //

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8.18.5 Displaying Alarms (Two Methods)


Two commands can be used to display the alarms received on the RCPD.
 Alarms are defined as triggered events that are configured with severity assignments
(critical/major/minor/warning).
Alarms are reported using the run show chassis alarms command.

root@blrdevjig3-virtual1# run show chassis alarms


Service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type Element
Name
---------------------------------------------------------------------
----
major 2014-04-02,17:58:39 equipmentOut l2-eth-port port-u1/0
major 2014-04-02,17:58:39 wavelengthMismatch l2-eth-port port-u1/0

Non-service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type
Element Name
---------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
minor 2014-04-02,17:58:39 rxPowerHigh l2-eth-port
port-u1/0

 Events are defined as triggered events that are non-alarmed.


Alarms are reported under the Current Suppression List of the run show entity alarms.

root@blrdevjig3-virtual1# run show entity alarms entity_name port-u1/0


Current Suppressions List:

Service affecting alarms:


Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Reported Element Name
Specific Suppressions
---------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------
major 2014-04-02,17:58:39 cardSwUpgradeFailed true port-u1/0

Service-affecting alarms:
Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type Element
Name
---------------------------------------------------------------------
----
major 2014-04-02,17:58:39 equipmentOut l2-eth-port port-u1/0
major 2014-04-02,17:58:39 wavelengthMismatch l2-eth-port port-u1/0

Non-service-affecting alarms:

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Severity Timestamp Alarm Name Type


Element Name
---------------------------------------------------------------------
--------
minor 2014-04-02,17:58:39 rxPowerHigh l2-eth-port
port-u1/0

8.19 Configuring FDB Card Parameters


Forwarding Information Base (FIB), (also known as FDB), is a method commonly used to identify the correct
interface for packet forwarding. Interfaces are uniquely identified through Media Access Control (MAC)
addresses assigned for communication on physical network segments.
ShadeTree Layer 2 cards support efficient FDB flushing and retrieval mechanisms, configured at the card
level. The following table lists the FDB card configuration parameters. For more information, see the STMS
User Guide.

Table 8-9: FDB configuration options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


age-time 10-750000 seconds Timeout period in seconds for aging out
Default 300 seconds dynamically learned forwarding information.
over-quota-action  drop Action to be taken if an over-quota situation
 forward (default) is detected.
pm-monitor  enable Enable or disable performance monitoring
 disable for this function.

8.20 Configuring LAG Options


Link Aggregation (LAG) allows one or more links to be aggregated together to form a Link Aggregation
Group. A LAG Group is treated by MAC Clients as a single link, rather than many separate links.
The following table lists the parameters and options available when configuring or displaying LAG settings.
Note the following LAG configuration guidelines:
 Each LAG Group must include one LAG Master link and up to 7 LAG Slave links.
 LAG functionality must be configured for each member of a LAG Group.
 LAG can only be configured on card ports that have already been defined and configured as types
UNI, I-NNI, or E-NNI.
 LAG ports can only be on cards with configuration mode set to aoc10-l2.
 Port speeds for all participating ports must be consistent.
 Slave ports must be dedicated to a single Master port; a Slave port cannot be associated with multiple
Masters or with any VSI services.

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 Slave ports cannot be configured with any policer profile.


 Slave ports must have RSTP disabled.
 Port mirroring can be configured for LAG ports (see Configuring Port Mirroring Options).

Table 8-10: LAG options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


ethernet-options Container for subset of Ethernet options.
interfaces <if-name-string> Identifies the interface instance being configured,
either Master or Slave.
lag-distribution  disable Link aggregation groups are bundles of up to
 enable 8 links. When distribution is enabled on a link
within a LAG bundle, then that link forwards the
traffic that it receives onward to the network. If
distribution is not enabled on a link, then traffic
will not be forwarded from that link onward.
This parameter indicates whether the port can be
used for distribution.
lag-link-down- Range from 1 to 8, default 8 Defines minimum number of links down that will
threshold trigger a LAG event.
lag-master Indicates that a LAG Master is being configured,
and serves as a container for subset of LAG Master
options.
lag-protection- load-sharing Flag indicating the type of LAG protection,
type currently always set to load-sharing.
lag-slave Indicates that a LAG Slave is being configured, and
serves as a container for subset of LAG Slave
options. Up to 8 LAG Slave ports can be defined
per LAG Group.
master-port <master-if-name> Identifies the LAG Master interface for which this
port is being configured as a LAG Slave.
pm-monitor  disable Enables or disables (default) PM functionality (see
 enable Performance Monitoring in the System Overview
and Configuration User Guide).
pm-profile <profile-name-string> Identifies the pm profile to be used, usually the
or default profile.
default
severity-profile <profile-name-string> Identifies the severity profile to be used, usually
or the default profile.
default

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8.20.1 Typical LAG Configuration Work Flow


This section describes a typical LAG configuration scenario, beginning with creation of the port and ending
with associating the port with a VSI configuration. The workflow steps are followed by CLI code examples.
1. Configure switching mode.
# set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options mode pb
# commit

2. Configure ports.
# set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode uni
# set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 2 port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode uni
# commit

3. Configure LAG master.


# set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options lag-master lag-distribution
enable
# commit

4. Configure LAG slave


# set interfaces ge-u1/2 ethernet-options lag-slave master-port ge-u1/1
lag-distribution disable
# commit

5. Enable LAG distribution on slave port


# set interfaces ge-u1/2 ethernet-options lag-slave lag-distribution
enable
# commit

6. Associate LAG master port to VSI


# set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance
virtual-switching-instances vsi1 nms-service-identifier 10 uni-ports
ge-u1/1 cd-vlan-ids 10
# commit

Examples of various LAG configuration actions are included in the rest of this section. For more information,
see the STMS User Guide.

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8.20.2 Configuring the LAG Master


To configure the LAG Master link, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

set interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options


lag-master lag-distribution <enable | disable>

The following code line and resulting output listing illustrate typical command usage. Note that most of the
configuration settings are automatically configured and don't require explicit user intervention.

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options


lag-master lag-distribution enable
lsh> commit

lsh> show interfaces

ge-u1/1 {
ethernet-options {
lag-master {
lag-link-down-threshold 8;
lag-protection-type load-sharing;
lag-distribution enable;
pm-monitor disable;
pm-profile default;
severity profile default;
}
}
… // Other information
}

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8.20.3 Configuring LAG Slaves


To configure LAG Slave links, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

set interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options


lag-slave master-port <master-if-name>
lag-distribution <enable | disable>

The following code line and resulting output listing illustrate typical command usage. Note that most of the
configuration settings are automatically configured and don't require explicit user intervention.

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/2 ethernet-options


lag-slave master-port ge-u1/1
lag-distribution disable
lsh> commit

lsh> show interfaces

ge-u1/2 {
ethernet-options {
lag-slave {
master-port ge-u1/1;
lag-distribution disable;
}
}
… // Other information
}

8.20.4 Deleting a LAG Slave


To delete a LAG Slave link from a LAG group, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

delete interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options lag-slave

Where <if-name> is the name of the Slave port being deleted. For example:

lsh> delete interfaces ge-u1/2 ethernet-options lag-slave


lsh> commit

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8.20.5 Deleting a LAG Master

NOTE: Deleting a LAG Master essentially means deleting the LAG Group, since without a
Master link there is no LAG Group. LAG Masters can only be deleted if there are no LAG Slaves
or services associated with that Master. Therefore, you must delete all participating LAG
Slaves before deleting the associated LAG Master.

To delete a LAG Master link from a LAG group, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

delete interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options lag-master

Where <if-name> is the name of the Master port being deleted. For example:

lsh> delete interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options lag-master


lsh> commit

8.20.6 Configuring the LAG Link Down Threshold


A threshold can be set for the minimum number of LAG links down that will trigger an event. Thresholds
can range from 1 to 8; the default value is 8.
To set the LAG link down threshold, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

set interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options


lag-master lag-link-down-threshold <threshold number>

Where <if-name> is the name of the Master port and <threshold number> is the minimum value. For
example:

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options


lag-master lag-link-down-threshold 6
lsh> commit

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8.20.7 Deleting the LAG Link Down Threshold


To delete the LAG link down threshold, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

delete interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options


lag-master lag-link-down-threshold

For example:

lsh> delete interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options


lag-master lag-link-down-threshold
lsh> commit

8.20.8 Enabling/Disabling LAG Distribution


Link aggregation groups are bundles of up to 8 links. When distribution is enabled on a link within a LAG
bundle, then that link forwards the traffic that it receives onward to the network. If distribution is not
enabled on a specific link within a LAG bundle, then traffic will not be forwarded from that link onward. LAG
ports can be configured to either enable or disable distribution.
To enable or disable distribution, include one of the following statements at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

set interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options


lag-master lag-distribution enable

OR

set interfaces <if-name> ethernet-options


lag-master lag-distribution disable

For example:

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options


lag-master lag-distribution enable
lsh> commit

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options


lag-master lag-distribution disable
lsh> commit

The following lines illustrate the comparable command for a LAG slave.

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/2 ethernet-options


lag-slave master-port ge-u1/1 lag-distribution enable
lsh> commit

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8.20.9 Retrieving LAG Group Information for a Specific Slot


To list basic information about all LAG Groups configured for a specific slot, include the following statement
at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

lsh> run show lag slot u1

Slot: u1
MasterPort: ge-u1/1
SlaveMembers:
ge-u1/2;
ge-u1/3;
MasterPort: ge-u1/4
SlaveMembers:
ge-u1/5;

To list detailed information about all LAG Groups configured for a specific slot, include the following
statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

lsh> run show lag slot u1 detail

Slot: u1

MasterPort: ge-u1/1
LinkDownThreshold ProtectionType LagDistributionStatus OperStatus
8 load-sharing enabled Up
SlaveMembers:
PortName LagDistributionStatus OperStatus
ge-u1/2 enabled Up
ge-u1/3 disabled Down

MasterPort: ge-u1/4
LinkDownThreshold ProtectionType LagDistributionStatus OperStatus
8 load-sharing enabled Up
SlaveMembers:
PortName LagDistributionStatus OperStatus
ge-u1/5 enabled Up

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8.20.10 Retrieving LAG Group Information for a Specific Slot


and Port
To list basic LAG Group data configured for a specific slot and port, include the following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level. The port identified in this command can be any port associated with this
LAG group, Master or Slave.

lsh> run show lag slot u1 port ge-u1/2

Slot: u1
MasterPort: ge-u1/1
SlaveMembers:
ge-u1/2;
ge-u1/3;

To list detailed information about all LAG Groups configured for a specific slot and port, include the
following statement at the
[edit interface] hierarchy level.

lsh> run show lag slot u1 port ge-u1/2 detail

Slot: u1
MasterPort: ge-u1/1
LinkDownThreshold ProtectionType LagDistributionStatus OperStatus
8 load-sharing enabled Up
SlaveMembers:
PortName LagDistributionStatus OperStatus
ge-u1/2 enabled Up
ge-u1/3 disabled Down

8.21 Configuring Layer 2 Ethernet Options


Layer 2 Ethernet services are configured at the card and port levels with their own set of attributes and
options. This section lists the attributes configured at the slot hierarchy level. For more information, see
the STMS User Guide.

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To configure Layer 2 Ethernet options, include the following statements at the


[edit chassis slot slot card-name] hierarchy level:
layer2-ethernet-options {
mode (pb | mpls-pe);
ethernet-network-id <ethernet-network-id>;
bridge-options {
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
rstp-options {
rstp-notifications (enabled | disabled);
bridge-priority <priority>;
max-age <max-age>;
hello-time <hello-time>;
forward-delay <forward-delay>;
bpdu-frame-format (standard | standard-b);
tx-hold-count <tx-hold-count>;
}
cfm-options {
ltm-flooding (enabled | disabled);
local-mep-id <local-mep-id>;
}
ccn-options {
ccn (enabled | disabled);
ccn-forwarding (enabled | disabled);
}
port-mirroring-options {
source-port <source-port>;
ingress-dest-port <ingress-dest-port>;
egress-dest-port <egress-dest-port>;
}
}
fdb-options {
age-time <age-time>;
over-quota-action (forward | drop);
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
}
mpls-pe-options {
pe-id <pe-id>;
mpls-id <mpls-id>;
}
tm-options {
high-priority-cos-delimiter
<high-priority-cos-delimiter>;
per-cos-tm {
cos <cos> {
best-effort-cos (enabled | disabled);
over-booking-factor <over-booking-factor>;
}
}
}
}

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8.22 Configuring Link OAM Options


Operations, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) functions provide mechanisms for monitoring a
physical or logical connection. OAM provides network operators the ability to monitor the health of the
network and quickly determine the location of faults. Ethernet link OAM includes remote failure indication,
remote loopback control, and link monitoring that includes diagnostic information. For more information,
see the STMS User Guide.
Link OAM is configured per port. Examples of the OAM commands are provided here. A table at the end of
this section lists the main link OAM attributes and their default values.

To Enable Link OAM:


lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge enable
lsh > set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options link-oam-options enable enabled
lsh> commit

To Enable Remote Loopback:


lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge enable
lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options link-oam-options enable enabled
lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options link-oam-options remote-loopback
enabled
lsh> commit

To Configure Local and Passive Peer Mode to Active and Passive


lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge enable
lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/1 ethernet-options link-oam-options passive-peer-only
passive local-mode active
lsh> commit

To Configure OAM TLV Windows and Threshold Value


lsh>set interfaces ge-u1/0 ethernet-options link-oam-options err-frame-threshold 88
err-frame-window 9 err-frame-sec-sum-threshold 7 err-frame-sec-sum-window 88
err-frame-period-threshold 88 err-frame-period-window 7
lsh> commit

Table 8-11: Link OAM configuration options


Attribute/Keyword Options Description
enable  enabled Enable or disable Link OAM on the port.
 disabled (default) Configuration guidelines:
 Link OAM and RSTP cannot both be enabled for a port.
You can enable one or the other, but not both
simultaneously.
 Link OAM cannot be changed (enabled or disabled) on
a port if terminal or facility loopback is currently
defined for that port.
 Link OAM cannot be disabled on a port while remote
loopback is currently enabled for that port.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


err-frame-period- 1-65535 OAM counter.
threshold Default 1 frame
err-frame-period- 1-60 sec OAM counter.
window Default 1sec
err-frame-sec-sum- 1-65535 OAM counter.
threshold Default 1 frame
err-frame-sec-sum- 60-900 sec OAM counter.
window Default 60sec
err-frame-threshold 1 - 65535 OAM counter.
Default 1 frame
err-frame-window 1-60 sec OAM counter.
Default 1sec
local-mode  active (default) OAM mode configuration on the local port.
 passive Configuration guidelines:
 Local mode configuration cannot be changed on a port
if OAM-Enable is currently enabled.
 Local mode cannot be set to passive on a port while
remote loopback is currently enabled for that port.

passive-peer-only  passive Defines when OAM can be enabled, as follows:


 any (default)  Any: OAM can be enabled when the remote port is in
active or passive mode.
 Passive: OAM can be enabled when the remote port is
in passive mode only.
Configuration guidelines:
 This attribute's value cannot be changed on a port if
OAM-Enable is currently enabled or if the OAM local
mode is currently passive.
remote-loopback  enabled Defines OAM remote loopback options.
 disabled (default) Note that this attribute's value cannot be changed on a
port if OAM-Enable is currently disabled, if the OAM local
mode is currently passive, or if the port is a member of a
LAG bundle.

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8.23 Configuring LLCF Options


The AoC10-L2 card supports Link Loss Carrier Forwarding (LLCF), configured per port. LLCF is relevant for
Ethernet ports only. For more information, see the STMS User Guide.

Table 8-12: LLCF configuration options

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
llcf-egress-enable  enabled Enables or disables LLCF on the egress
 disabled (default) side.
llcf-ingress-enable  enabled Enables or disables LLCF on the ingress
 disabled (default) side.

8.24 Configuring IGMP Options


The AoC10-L2 card supports IGMP, configured per port. For more information, see the STMS User Guide.

Table 8-13: IGMP configuration options

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
igmp-multicast- 0-800 Configures the multicast address
address-limit Default 800 threshold.

8.25 Configuring MPLS Options


Layer 2 cards support MPLS network functionality. MPLS functionality is configured at both the card and
port levels. The MPLS sections of the card and port configuration statements are included in this section,
followed by a table listing the MPLS card and port configuration parameters. For more information, see the
STMS User Guide.
To configure MPLS options, include the following statements at the
[edit chassis slot slot card-name] and [routing-instances routing-instance protocols
mpls] hierarchy levels.

Slot/card level attributes:

mpls-pe-options {
pe-id <pe-id>;
mpls-id <mpls-id>;
}

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Protocol/MPLS level attributes:

mpls {
interface <ifname> {
exp-map {
cos <cos> {
out-exp {
color-green <color-green>;
color-yellow <color-yellow>;
}
}
in-exp <in-exp> {
cos <cos>;
color (green | yellow);
}
}
performance-monitoring (enabled | disabled);
tunnel-capacity-mode (normal | extended);
next-hop-mac-address <next-hop-mac-address>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
} // end interface

label-switched-path <lsp_name> {
adaptive;
admin-groups {
exclude-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-all-groups [ <group_name> ];
}
bandwidth <bps>;
bidirectional;
disable;
description <description>;
fast-reroute {
admin-groups {
exclude-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-all-groups [ <group_name> ];
}
bandwidth <bps>;
hop-limit <hop_limit>;
priority <setup_priority> <hold_priority>;
}
from <from>;
no-record;
hop-limit <hop_limit>;
(random | least-fill | most-fill);
record-label;

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link-protection;
no-cspf;
no-decrement-ttl;
no-revert;
no-revert-from-bypass;
node-link-protection;
optimize-timer <optimize_timer>;
preference <preference>;
primary <path_name> {
adaptive;
admin-groups {
exclude-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-all-groups [ <group_name> ];
}
bandwidth <bps>;
disable;
fast-reroute {
admin-groups {
exclude-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-all-groups [ <group_name> ];
}
bandwidth <bps>;
hop-limit <hop_limit>;
priority <setup_priority> <hold_priority>;
}
hop-limit <hop_limit>;
ignore-retry-limit;
no-cspf;
no-record;
optimize-timer <optimize_timer>;
preference <preference>;
priority <setup_priority> <hold_priority>;
record;
} // end primary

priority <setup_priority> <hold_priority>;


record;
retry-timer <retry_timer>;
retry-limit <retry_limit>;
revert;
secondary <path_name> {
adaptive;
admin-groups {
exclude-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-all-groups [ <group_name> ];
}
bandwidth <bps>;
disable;

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fast-reroute {
admin-groups {
exclude-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-groups [ <group_name> ];
include-all-groups [ <group_name> ];
}
bandwidth <bps>;
hop-limit <hop_limit>;
priority <setup_priority> <hold_priority>;
}
hop-limit <hop_limit>;
no-cspf;
no-record;
optimize-timer <optimize_timer>;
preference <preference>;
priority <setup_priority> <hold_priority>;
record;
standby;
} // end secondary
to <destination>;
} // end label-switched-path

no-propagate-ttl;
path <path_name> {
<next_hop> {
(strict | loose);
interface-id <interfaceId>;
interface-name <interfaceName>;
downstream-Label <downStreamLabel>;
upstream-Label <upStreamLabel>;
}
} // end path

static {
tunnel <tunnel> {
bandwidth <bps>;
bypass;
control-channel-cos <control-channel-cos>;
subscription <subscription>;
description <description>;
destaddr <destaddr>;
disable;
directionality (uni-directional | bi-directional);
from <src-pe-id>;
no-revert-from-bypass;

originating-tunnel {
main-lsp <main-lsp> {
backward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;

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interface <ifname>;
}
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
disable;
forward-path {
out-segment {
bandwidth <bps>;
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
preference <preference>;
protected-by {
disable;
outgoing-bypass <bypasstunnel>;
merge-label <label>;
}
nms-tunnel-identifier <nmsidentifier>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
}// end main-lsp

protection-lsp <prot-lsp> {
backward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
}
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}

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} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
disable;
forward-path {
out-segment {
bandwidth <bps>;
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
preference <preference>;
protected-by {
disable;
outgoing-bypass <bypasstunnel>;
merge-label <label>;
}
nms-tunnel-identifier <identifier>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end forward path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end protection-lsp
} // end originating-tunnel

psc-protocol {
psc-max-refresh-interval <psc-max-refresh-interval>;
}

terminating-tunnel {
main-lsp <main-lsp> {
backward-path {
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;

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}
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
disable;
forward-path {
bandwidth <bps>;
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
protected;
} // end in-segment
nms-tunnel-identifier <nmsidentifier>;
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end main-lsp

protection-lsp <protection-lsp> {
backward-path {
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
} // end out-segment
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
} // end tm-options
} // end backward-path
bfd {
admin-state (enabled | disabled);
detection-multiplier <detection-multiplier>;
min-rx-interval <min-rx-interval>;
min-tx-interval <min-tx-interval>;
} // end bfd
disable;
forward-path {
in-segment {

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label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
}
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end protection-lsp
} // end terminating-tunnel

tpg-options {
hold-off-time-main <hold-off-time-main>;
hold-off-time-prot <hold-off-time-prot>;
pm-monitor (enabled | disabled);
psc-maint-cmd (release | lockout | force-switch | manual-switch |
manual-reversion);
revertive-mode (enabled | disabled);
wait-to-restore-time <wait-to-restore-time>;
}

transit-tunnel {
main-lsp <main-lsp> {
ais-ldi (enabled | disabled);
backward-path {
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;
}
out-segment {
label <label>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
}
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end backward-path
disable;
bidir-lsp-num <bidir-lsp-num>;
forward-path {
bandwidth <bps>;
in-segment {
label <inlabel>;
interface <ifname>;

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protected;
}
out-segment {
label <outlabel>;
nexthop <nexthop>;
protected-by {
disable;
merge-label <label>;
outgoing-bypass <bypass-name>;
}
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
pm-profile <pm-profile>;
}
nms-tunnel-identifier <nmsidentifier>;
tm-options {
cos <cos> {
bandwidth <bandwidth>;
}
}
} // end forward-path
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
} // end main-lsp
} // end transit-tunnel

preference <preference>;
revert-time <revert-time>;
nms-tunnel-identifier <nmsidentifier>;
to <dest-pe-id>;
type (terminating | originating | transit);
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
pm-monitor (enable | disable);
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
}
} // end static

traceoptions {
file {
<filename>;
files <files>;
no-stamp;
no-world-readable;
replace;
size <size>;
world-readable;
}
flag (all | cspf | cspf-link | cspf-node | error | state);
}
traffic-engineering (bgp | bgp-igp);
} // end mpls

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Table 8-14: MPLS configuration options

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
Slot/Card attributes
[edit chassis slot slot card-name] hierarchy level
mpls-id 0-65535 MPLS network ID.
Default 1
pe-id 1-65535 PE ID.
Default 65535
Protocol/MPLS attributes
[routing-instances routing-instance protocols mpls] hierarchy level
next-hop-mac-address FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF (default) Relevant for MoE ports only.
Used as MAC-DA of MPLS frames
transmitted from MoE ports.
Default value must be changed to
Unicast/Broadcast MAC address
before the port can be enabled.
Changing the address while MoE
port is enabled may be traffic
affecting.
tunnelCapacityMode  normal (default)
 extended
 hierarchical

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8.26 Configuring Pause Port Options


The AoC10-L2 card supports port pausing, both automatic and forced. For more information, see the STMS
User Guide.

Table 8-15: Port pausing configuration options

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
force-pause  enabled Enables or disables the force-pause
 disabled (default) option. Valid for Ethernet ports only. Not
supported on 10GbE ports.
pause-advertisement  noPause (default) Advertisement of the local device
 SymPause regarding the FC capacity. Not supported
 AsymPause on 10GbE ports.
 SymAsymPause
pause-type  autoNeg Local pause configuration, for Ethernet
 disable ports only. Not supported on 10GbE
 transmit ports.
 receive (default)
 transmit-receive

8.27 Configuring Performance Monitoring Options


Performance monitoring can be configured at various hierarchical levels for a wide range of system entities
(see Performance Monitoring in the System Overview and Configuration User Guide). For each system
entity, PM is either enabled or disabled. When PM is enabled, you may either use the default PM profile, or
specify a user-defined alternative profile. For more information, see the STMS User Guide.

Table 8-16: PM configuration options

Attribute/
Options Description
Keyword
pm-monitor  enabled (default) The system should (enabled) or should not
 disabled (disabled) utilize performance monitoring
(PM). Performance monitoring can be
configured at various hierarchical levels for a
wide range of system entities.
pm-profile  <pm-profile name> Specifies a user-defined PM profile to be
applied. Profiles are used to store sets of
user-defined PM thresholds. Traffic
performance can be monitored using either
the default system settings or some
combination of user-defined settings.

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8.27.1 Egress Counting


By default, egress-counting under VSI is disabled when a VSI is configured. The following example illustrates
the typical VSI configuration.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type P2P nms-service-identifier 1

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 cd-vlans 10

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo nni-ports s-vlan 100

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo nni-ports ge-u1/1

lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo egress-counting enabled

lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u1/0.10;
interface ge-u1/1.100;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;
egress-counting enabled;
uni-ports {
ge-u1/0 {
cd-vlans {
10;
}
}
}
nni-ports {
s-vlan 100;
ge-u1/1;
}
}
}
}

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8.28 Configuring Policing Management Options


The AoC10-L2 card supports policing, configured per port. Policing is a technique commonly used to ensure
smoother traffic flow. Policer profiles define what limits (if any) are placed on traffic transmission. A
bandwidth profile or policer profile specifies the average rate of ‘committed’ and ‘excess’ Ethernet service
frames allowed into the provider’s network.
Up to the 'committed' amount of service frames are allowed into the provider’s network and delivered to
their destinations in accordance with the terms of the SLA. These service frames are referred to as
‘in-profile’ or ‘conformant’ to the policer profile.
Up to the 'excess' amount of service frames are allowed into the provider’s network and delivered to their
destinations, but without any service performance objectives. These service frames are referred to as
‘out-of-profile’ or ‘non-conformant’ to the policer profile. Service frames over the ‘excess’ rate are
discarded.
Metro Ethernet Forum (MEF) bandwidth profiles by definition include CIR, CBS, EIR, EBS, CF, and CM
settings. Users should specify values for at least one pair of the following two setting pairs ({CIR, CBS} or
{EIR, EBS}). The second pair, if unspecified, is set to 0.
Policer profiles are defined per slot, and applied to any of the following flow contexts:
 Port
 Ingress
 Egress
 Port + VSI
 Ingress
 Egress
 Port + VSI + CoS
 Ingress
 Egress
Users can either define their own policer profiles, or use the built-in Broadcast Storm Control (BSC) policers.
Users can associate the BSC flow of a given VSI with one of the default BSC policer profiles, or associate the
flow with a customized Policer Profile instance. For more information, see the STMS User Guide.
Policer profiles are configured at the routing-instance, port, interface, and VSI levels. This section provides
examples of the different policer configuration options available. The command lines are followed by CLI
hierarchy chunks that illustrate the relevant attribute settings. The following table listing the policer
configuration parameters. For more information, see the STMS User Guide.

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Table 8-17: Policing configuration options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


bsc-policer-profile <string> Identifies the BSC policing profile to apply
within this context, configured at the VSI
level.
cbs 0-512MB Committed Burst Size
in steps of 1KB
Default 0KB
cir 0Kbps-10Gbps Committed Information Rate
in steps of 1kbps
Default 0kbps
cf 1 Coupling Flag, always set to 1.
cm  color-blind (default) Color mode
 color-aware
cos 0-7 Identifies the Class of Service for which this
policer configuration applies.

cos-values 0-7, discard List of CoS IDs, separated by commas.


ebs 0-512MB Excess Burst Size
in steps of 1KB
Default 0KB
egress Container for subset of options configuring
policing conditions for egress ports.
eir 0Kbps-10Gbps Excess Information Rate
in steps of 1kbps
Default 0kbps
ingress Container for subset of options configuring
policing conditions for ingress ports.

instance <string> Instance of the policer being configured.

name <string> Name of the policer being configured.

per-cos-policers Container for subset of options identifying the


policer profile to apply to a specific CoS,
configured at the interface level.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


PIFName  ge-ux/y Port name, based on physical interface.
 ge10-ux/z
 ge10-otu2e-ux/z
Where:
 x: slot number for this card
 y: [0, 15]
 z: [16, 19]
Max of 16 ports (UNIs + NNIs) are
allowed per VSI
policer Container for subset of options identifying the
policer profile to apply to this instance,
configured at the interface level.
policer-group <string> Identifies the policing group to which this
instance belongs.
Multiple CoSs can share the same policing
instance by all being members of the same
policing group. This is relevant only for
per-CoS policers.
policer-profile  <string> Name of policer profile to apply in this
 N/A context.
policer-profiles Container for subset of options configuring
policer profiles at the routing-instance level.

policer-state  no-rate-limit
Defines the policing conditions.
 blocked
 If set to policing, a policer profile name
 policing must also be supplied.
 If set to blocked, all traffic on this port is
dropped. (Default for egress, UNI, and
E-NNI ports.)
 If set to no-rate-limit, only internal
policing mechanisms are applied.
(Default for ingress and I-NNI ports.)
policing-info Container for subset of options configuring
policing conditions at the interface level.
profile-name <string> Identifies the policer profile in a routing
instance, should be unique within the routing
instance.
routing-instance-nam <string> Unique string that identifies this routing
e instance. With the following format:
slot-u<x>-routing-instance
vsi-name <string> Name of the VSI in which this port is
participating.

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8.28.1 Policer Profile Configuration


Policer profiles are configured per slot, at the routing-instance hierarchy level, using the commands listed
here. Note that at least one of the pairs ({CIR, CBS} or {EIR, EBS}) should be specified by the user. For the
unspecified pair, values are set to 0. For example:

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance class-of-service


policer-profiles policer1 cir 1000 cbs 100 eir 10000 ebs 1000 cm color-aware
lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
class-of-service {
policer-profiles {
profile1 {
cir 1000kbps;
cbs 256KB;
eir 10000kbps;
ebs 512KB;
cm color-aware;
cf 1;
}
}
}
}

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8.28.2 Port Policer Configuration


A port policer is applied to all traffic on a port, regardless of the VSI or CoS status. Port policers are an
effective choice for limiting traffic indiscriminately, for all VSIs on the port. The following configuration
example illustrates mapping of an ingress port policer to the policer profile profile1.

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance class-of-service


policer-profiles policer1 cir 1000 cbs 100 eir 10000 ebs 1000 cm color-aware
lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
class-of-service {
policer-profiles {
profile1 {
cir 1000kbps;
cbs 256KB;
eir 10000kbps;
ebs 512KB;
cm color-aware;
cf 1;
}
}
}
}

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 0 enable port-type ge ethernet-options


port-mode uni
lsh> commit

lsh> show configuration interfaces


ge-u1/0 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
}

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lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress policer-state policing


policer-profile policer1
lsh> commit

lsh> show interfaces


ge-u1/0 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile policer1;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
}

8.28.3 No-Rate-Limit Policer Configuration


This example illustrates mapping an ingress port policer to a no-rate-limit policer. To link to a NRL Policer,
‘policer-state’ is set to ‘no-rate-limit’ and ‘policer-profile’ is set to ‘N/A’ and cannot be configured by the
user.

lsh> set interfaces ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress policer-state no-rate-limit


lsh> commit

lsh> show interfaces


ge-u1/0 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
}

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8.28.4 Port+VSI Policer Configuration


A port+VSI policer is applied to all traffic for a specific VSI on a specific port. This option offers flexibility for
users who want to apply policers irrespective of the CoS values. This example illustrates configuring a VSI
ingress policer for a UNI port.
This configuration requires that the user either not configure the port-based policer at all, or set it to
no-rate-limit. Policing applied at the VSI level applies to all CoSs configured for that VSI, unless the user has
also configured a policer at the CoS level, which will override the VSI-level policer.

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 0 enable port-type ge ethernet-options


port-mode uni
lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 enable port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode e-nni
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type p2p nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 cd-vlan-ids 10
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports s-vlan 100
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports ge-u1/1
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance class-of-service


policer-profiles policer1 cir 1000Kbps cbs 100KB eir 10000Kbps ebs 1000KB cm
color-aware
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress cos 0 policer-state policing
policer-profile policer1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info egress cos 0 policer-state no-rate-limit
policer-group 0
lsh> commit

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lsh> show routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo
egress-counting disabled;
vsi-type p2p;
nms-service-identifier 1;
pm-monitor disable;
pm-profile default;
state enabled;
uni-ports {
ge-u1/0 {
cd-vlan-ids {
10;
}
policing-info {
ingress {
cos 0 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile policer1;
policer-group 0;
pm-monitor disable;
}
}
egress {
cos 0 {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group 0;
pm-monitor disable;
}
}
}
}
}
nni-ports {
s-vlan 100;
ge-u1/1;
}
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;

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lsh> show interfaces


ge-u1/0 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}
ge-u1/1 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
unit 100 {
vlan 100;
}
}

8.28.5 Port+VSI+CoS Group Policer Configuration


Multiple CoSs can be grouped together into a policer group and share the same policer instance. Policer
groups can only be configured for per-CoS policers where the VSI+port policer is set to no-rate-limit. Note
that when configuring per-CoS policers, values must be set for each CoS level, even if the user does not plan
to use all the CoS levels. For example, even if you only plan to use CoS 0, 1, and 2, you must still configure
the other CoS levels to a blocked state.
This example illustrates configuring a CoS ingress policer for a UNI port. A no-rate-limit policer is configured
at the port and VSI+port levels. Policer groups are defined for various sets of CoS levels.

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 0 enable port-type ge ethernet-options


port-mode uni
lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 enable port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode e-nni
lsh> commit

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lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type P2P nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 cd-vlans 10
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports s-vlan 100
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports ge-u1/1
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress policer-state no-rate-limit
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance class-of-service
policer-profiles profile_1 cir 1000 cbs 100 eir 10000 ebs 1000 cm color-aware
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 0 policer-state
policing policer-profile policer1 policer-group 0
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 1 policer-state
policing policer-profile policer1 policer-group 0
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 2 policer-state
policing policer-profile policer1 policer-group 0
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 3 policer-state
policing policer-profile policer1 policer-group 4
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 4 policer-state
policing policer-profile policer1 policer-group 4
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 5 policer-state
policing policer-profile policer1 policer-group 4
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 6 policer-state
no-rate-limit
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 policing-info ingress per-CoS-policers cos 7 policer-state
blocked
lsh> commit

lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u1/0.10;
interface ge-u1/1.100;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type P2P;
nms-service-identifier 1;
uni-ports {
ge-u1/0 {

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cd-vlans {
10;
}
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
per-cos-policers {
cos 0 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile profile_1;
policer-group 0;
} // end cos0
cos 1 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile profile_1;
policer-group 0;
} // end cos1
cos 2 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile profile_1;
policer-group 0;
} // end cos2
cos 3 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile profile_1;
policer-group 4;
} // end cos3
cos 4 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile profile_1;
policer-group 4;
} // end cos4
cos 5 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile profile_1;
policer-group 4;
} // end cos5
cos 6 {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group N/A;
} // end cos6
cos 7 {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group N/A;
} // end cos7
} // end per-cos policers
} // end ingress
egress {

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policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
} // end egress
} // end policing info
} // end interface ge-u1/0
} // end uni ports
nni-ports {
s-vlan 100;
ge-u1/1 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
}
} // end nni ports
} // end vsi instance
} // end vsi
} // end routing-instance

lsh> show interfaces


ge-u1/0 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}

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ge-u1/1 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
unit 100 {
vlan 100;
}
}

8.28.6 BSC Policer Configuration


Broadcast Storm Control (BSC) Policers, defined per VSI, can either be based on built-in default profile
settings (CIR==5000kbps, EIR==0, BSC Default CIR 5000 EIR 0) or based on a user-configured profile in
which the user edits the CIR value only. The following example illustrates the association of a VSI's BSC
policer profile to a user-configured CIR-only policer profile.

lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 0 enable port-type ge ethernet-options


port-mode uni
lsh> set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 enable port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode e-nni
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi_foo vsi-type MP2MP nms-service-identifier 1
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo uni-ports ge-u1/0 cd-vlans 10
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports s-vlan 100
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo nni-ports ge-u1/1
lsh> commit

lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance class-of-service


policer-profiles policer1 cir 1000 cbs 100 cm color-aware
lsh> set routing-instances slot-u1-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances
vsi_foo bsc-policer-profile policer1
lsh> commit

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lsh> show routing-instances


slot-u1-routing-instance {
instance-type forwarding;
interface ge-u1/0.10;
interface ge-u1/1.100;
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi_foo {
vsi-type MP2MP;
nms-service-identifier 1;
bsc-policer-profile policer1;
uni-ports {
ge-u1/0 {
cd-vlans {
10;
}
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
}
}
nni-ports {
s-vlan 100;
ge-u1/1 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
}
}
}
}
}

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lsh> show interfaces


ge-u1/0 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
unit 10 {
vlan 10;
}
}
ge-u1/1 {
policing-info {
ingress {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
}
egress {
policer-state blocked;
policer-profile N/A;
}
}
unit 100 {
vlan 100;
}
}

8.29 Configuring Port Mirroring Options


Port mirroring is a method of monitoring network traffic. A copy of each incoming and/or outgoing packet
from one port of a network switch is forwarded to another port, where the packet can be studied. Port
mirroring may be used as a diagnostic tool or debugging feature.
A user configures port mirroring by assigning a Source Port from which to copy all packets and another
Destination Port (or Mirror Port) where those packets are to be sent. Packets that are bound for or heading
away from the source port will be forwarded onto the destination port as well. A user may place a protocol
analyzer on the destination port. The analyzer captures and evaluates the data without affecting the client
on the original port.
There can be a maximum of one source port per switch, and a maximum of two mirror ports (ingress &
egress) per switch. The mirror port can also be a single port, configured as both ingress and egress mirror
ports. Port mirroring is also available for LAG bundles, where each LAG bundle of links acts as a single
virtual source or destination, as relevant.

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Configurations in which the Source Port and the Destination Port are located on the same switch are
considered local. Remote port mirroring is not implemented in the current release.
Port mirroring configuration commands are located within the layer2-ethernet-options,
bridge-options, and interfaces containers, as illustrated in the following code samples.

layer2-ethernet-options {
...
bridge-options {
...
port-mirroring-options {
source-port port;
ingress-dest-port port;
egress-dest-port port;
}
...
}
...
}

The ingress and egress destination ports can be configured on same port. All destination mirror ports must
be configured in port-mode mirror. The source port can be in any port-mode other than mirror, and
the source port must be different from the destination ports. Port mode is also set to mirror as part of the
ethernet-options configuration within the [chassis slot port] level.

To configure port mirroring:


 To configure port mirroring, use the following CLI command format:
set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2
layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options
port-mirroring-options source-port <port-name>
egress-dest-port <port-name> ingress-dest-port <port-name>

To delete port mirroring:


 To delete port mirroring, use the following CLI command format:
delete chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2
layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options port-mirroring-options

The following table lists the port mirroring configuration options.

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Table 8-18: Port Mirroring configuration options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


Destination/Mirror Port The port that is monitoring the Source Port, usually the
location of the network analyzer. Also referred to as the
Mirror Port. Maximum of two mirror ports (ingress & egress)
per switch. A single port can serve as both ingress and egress
mirror ports.

destination-interface <string> Identifies the interfaces of the destination port.


destination-port-mirror Flag indicating the mirror port status.
direction  none Identifies the direction of the port mirroring activity.
 rx
 tx
 both
egress-dest-port <string> Identifies the egress port of the mirroring destination (when
ingress and egress ports are separate).
ingress-dest-port <string> Identifies the ingress port of the mirroring destination (when
ingress and egress ports are separate).
Local port mirroring Configurations in which the Source Port and the Destination
Port are located on the same switch are considered local.
Remote port mirroring is not implemented in the current
release.
port-mirror Container within which the port mirroring attributes are
configured.
source-port <string> Identifies the port being monitored through port mirroring.
Maximum of one source port per switch.

Port Mirroring Configuration Example


To implement port mirroring, you must configure the ports to which traffic is to be mirrored as “mirror”
ports. After the mirror ports are configured, the source port, mirror-port for ingress traffic, and mirror-port
for egress traffic are configured at the card level. For example:

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2


lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 port 0 enable port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode uni
lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 port 1 enable port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode mirror
lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 port 2 enable port-type ge ethernet-options
port-mode mirror
lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options port-mirroring-options
source-port ge-u0/0
lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options port-mirroring-options
ingress-dest-port ge-u0/1
lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer2-ethernet-options port-mirroring-options
egress-dest-port ge-u0/2
lsh> commit

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8.29.1 Example: Defining and Editing Port Mirroring


Configuration
In this example, we will configure and then edit the port mirroring options.

Initial Configuration Commands


set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 0 port-type ge

set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge


set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 1
ethernet-options port-mode mirror

set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 2 port-type ge


set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2 port 2
ethernet-options port-mode mirror

set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2


layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options
port-mirroring-options source-port port-u1/0
ingress-dest-port port-u1/1 egress-dest-port port-u1/2

Initial Configuration Listing

layer2-ethernet-options {
...
bridge-options {
...
port-mirroring-options {
source-port port-u1/0;
ingress-dest-port port-u1/1;
egress-dest-port port-u1/2;
}
...
}
...
}

Modifying the Egress Destination Port

set chassis slot u1 aoc10-l2


layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options
port-mirroring-options egress-dest-port port-u1/4

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Updated Configuration Listing

layer2-ethernet-options {
...
bridge-options {
...
port-mirroring-options {
source-port port-u1/0;
ingress-dest-port port-u1/1;
egress-dest-port port-u1/4;
}
...
}
...
}

8.30 Configuring RSTP Card and Port Parameters


Layer 2 cards support RSTP protection mechanisms. RSTP functionality is configured at both the card and
port levels. The RSTP sections of the card and port configuration statements are included in this section,
followed by a table listing the RSTP card and port configuration parameters. For more information, see the
STMS User Guide.
To configure RSTP port options, include the following statements at the ethernet-options,
bridge-options, and protocols levels.

Hierarchy level: chassis slot port ethernet-options


rstp-options {
port-enable (enabled | disabled);
priority <priority>;
path-cost <path-cost>;
hold-off-time <hold-off-time>;
port-change-detect (enabled | disabled);
dynamic-port-cost-update (enabled | disabled);
admin-edge (enabled | disabled);
auto-cost-config (enabled | disabled);
bpdu-mac-address (bridge-group | provider-bridge-group);
}

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Hierarchy level: chassis slot layer2-ethernet-options bridge-options

rstp-options {
rstp-notifications (enabled | disabled);
bridge-priority <priority>;
max-age <max-age>;
hello-time <hello-time>;
forward-delay <forward-delay>;
bpdu-frame-format (standard | standard-b);
tx-hold-count <tx-hold-count>;
}

Hierarchy level: protocols and routing-instances protocols

rstp {
disable;
bpdu-dest-mac (bridge-group | provider-bridge-group);
bridge-priority <bridge-priority>;
forward-delay <forward-delay>;
force-version <force-version>;
hello-time <hello-time>;
interface <ifname> {
cost <cost>;
disable;
edge;
mode (point2point | shared);
priority <priority>;
}
max-age <max-age>;
traceoptions {
file {
<filename>;
files <files>;
no-stamp;
no-world-readable;
replace;
size <size>;
world-readable;
}
flag (all | error | general | normal | packets | rstp | mstp | stp-config
| stp-tc | policy | port-receive-statestate-machine | port-migration-state-machine
| bridge-detect-state-machine | port-transmit-state-machine |
port-information-state-machine | port-role-selection-state-machine |
port-role-transition-state-machine | port-state-transition-state-machine |
topology-change-state-machine | state | task | timer) detail disable hex-dump receive
send;
}
tx-hold-count <tx-hold-count>;
}

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Table 8-19: RSTP card and port configuration options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description

Card options
[edit chassis slot slot card-name] hierarchy level
bpdu-  Standard-BPDU Specifies type of BPDU frame format.
frame-format  Standard-BPDU-B
(default)
bridge priority 0-61440 Specifies the RSTP Bridge Priority to be used along with
Default 8192 the Bridge's MAC Address.
Steps of 4096
forward delay 4-30 seconds The time that the bridge stays in each of the Listening
Default 15 seconds and Learning states that precede the Forwarding State.
In addition, when a topology change is underway and
has been detected, this parameter is used to age all
dynamic entries in the Forwarding database.
hello time 1-10 seconds Specifies the time interval between the generation of
Default 2 seconds Configuration BPDUs by the Root. Set to 2 seconds for
802.1D-2004 compliant RSTP (no validations).
max age 6-40 seconds Specifies the time that learned Spanning Tree
Default 20 seconds information is kept before being discarded.
notifications  enable (default) Enable or disable RSTP notifications.
 disable
tx hold count 1-10 Time interval within which no more than two
Default 3 configuration BPDU frames is transmitted.

Port options
[edit chassis slot slot card-name port port ethernet-options] hierarchy level
admin-edge  true Defines the initial port state value to use when the
 false port is enabled.
For edge ports, default false.
auto-cost-config  enabled Enables or disabled automatic cost configuration.
 disabled Default enable.
bpdu-mac-address  bridge-group Defines the BPDU MAC DA to be used by RSTP. Default
 provider-bridge- values depend on the port type:
group  ETY UNI: 01-80-C2-00-00-00
 ETY NNI: 01-80-C2-00-00-08
 RSTP VI: 01-80-C2-00-00-00
(not changeable)
dynamic-port-cost-  enabled Enables or disables dynamic updating of port cost
update  disabled values.
hold-off-time 0-10,000msec Amount of time to hold off and wait before beginning
Default 200msec fault management and error recovery.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


path-cost 1-2000,000,000 Port path cost. This is the contribution of this port to
the overall path cost, towards the root bridge. Default
values depend on the port interface:
 GE: 1000*int(20000/actual-port-rate in Mbps)
 RSTP VIs: 2
port-change-detect  enabled Enables or disables change detection for this port.
 disabled
port-enable  enabled Enables or disables RSTP for this port. Default values
 disabled depend on the port type:
 I-NNI: enabled
 E-NNI, UNI: disabled
 RSTP VIs: disabled
priority 0-240 Defines the RSTP priority for this port.
Default 128

8.31 Configuring Traffic Management Options


Traffic management (TM) enables network operators to monitor and control network activities, in the
process transforming the network into a managed resource by improving performance, efficiency, and
security. TM also helps to operate, administer, and maintain the network systems. A short introduction to
TM concepts and terminology is provided here. For more information, see the STMS User Guide.
 Class of Service (CoS) is a way of managing traffic in a network by grouping similar types of traffic
(such as email, streaming video, voice, or large document file transfer) together. Each type of traffic is
considered a "class" of service and is assigned its own level of service priority. CoS values can range
from 0 to 7. CoS settings are usually further organized into two general categories, low priority and
high priority.
 High Priority CoS is a parameter that defines the cutoff point between low and high priority. All CoS
values greater than or equal to this value are included in the high priority category, while all CoS
values less than this value are included in the low priority category. If the High Priority CoS delimiter is
set to 8, then all CoS settings (0-7) are categorized as low priority. CoS priority can be changed only
while the CoS is not "in use", meaning no MPLS XCs are configured for this CoS.
 Best-effort describes network services for which the network does not provide any guarantees for
data delivery, QoS, or priority level. In a best-effort network all users obtain best-effort service,
meaning that they obtain unspecified variable bit rate and delivery time, depending on the current
traffic load. Best Effort CoS can be enabled only on low-priority CoS, specified per CoS.
 Overbooking is a term used to describe intentional "over-selling" of network bandwidth, with the
understanding that not all bandwidth reserved for a given purpose is actually utilized at all times. The
extra available bandwidth can be used for other low priority services, which may be pre-empted as
needed if the bandwidth is required elsewhere. With bandwidth overbooking, each traffic source
(network user) is assigned slightly less bandwidth than requested. While the sum of the requested
bandwidth may be greater than the total trunk capacity, if the overbooking factor is chosen correctly
then the traffic flow ends up meeting all SLA requirements while providing higher profit margins for
network service providers, and also benefiting users by lowering subscription costs.

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The committed information rate (CIR) is divided by the overbooking factor to determine actual
bandwidth allocated for this customer's virtual circuit. For example, if 10Mb of bandwidth have been
allocated for CoS-0 and the overbooking factor is 2, then the actual bandwidth allocation for CoS-0 is
10/2=5Mb.
Note that the higher the overbooking factor, the more aggressive or higher the overbooking. For
example, with an overbooking value of 2 (allocating 50% of the actual BW configured in the link), a
customer requesting a T1 (1.5Kbps) line is allocated 0.75Kbps. By comparison, with an overbooking
value of 1.5 (allocating 66% of the actual BW configured in the link), the allocated bandwidth is 1Kbps
for the same request. The larger overbooking value of 2 is more aggressive, accepting more VCs per
trunks.
The overbooking factor is defined per CoS, with a higher priority CoS entitled to a higher overbooking
factor. The overbooking factor can be changed only while the CoS is not "in use", meaning no MPLS
XCs are configured for this CoS.
 A scheduler enforces a minimum average bandwidth for a CoS by pulling packets to be forwarded
from that class’s queue at regular intervals. Scheduling may be either automatic or manual.
Scheduling in ShadeTree is currently available in automatic mode only.
 Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) is a method of avoiding congestion by discarding selected
packets. WRED allows packets within the same queue to have different minimum and maximum
discard thresholds. The packet's service precedence (part of the CoS) determines the discard
thresholds. WRED is particularly useful for preventing lower-priority traffic from consuming shared
buffers and starving higher-priority traffic. WRED may be configured either automatically or manually.
WRED in ShadeTree is currently available in automatic mode only.
 Shaping is a mechanism for controlling the rate at which the switch router transmits traffic through
the network. Shaping buffers traffic so that the switch router can send the traffic through the network
in manageable amounts. Shaping the traffic limits congestion and ensures that traffic conforms to
established rates. Shaping may be configured either automatically or manually. Shaping in ShadeTree
is currently available in automatic mode only.

Table 8-20: TM card and port options

Attribute/Keyword Options Description

bandwidth <integer> The bandwidth available at this point.


best-effort-cos  enabled Indicates whether Best Effort is enabled.
 disabled (default) Configured per Cos, enabled only on low priority
CoSs. Can be changed only while the CoS is not "in
use", meaning no MPLS XCs are configured for
this CoS.
card aoc10-l2 Unique card name identifies this type of card.
cos Range from 0 to 7 Identifies the Class of Service being configured.
Up to 8 classes of service are supported.
CoS priority can be changed only while the CoS is
not "in use", meaning no MPLS XCs are configured
for this CoS.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description

ethernet-network- <integer> Identifies the network in which this card is


id participating.
ethernet-options Container for subset of Ethernet options.
high-priority-cos- Range from 0 to 8, default 6 Defines the threshold dividing high priority CoS
delimiter from low priority CoS. Values above this value are
categorized as high priority. Values equal to or
below this value are categorized as low priority.
interfaces <if-name-string> Identifies the interface instance being configured,
and serves as a container for subset of interface
configuration options.
mode  pb Identifies the mode for which tis card is being
 mpls-pe configured, either for PB networks or for MPLS
networks.
over-booking- Range from 0.1 to 100.0, Sets the overbooking factor to use, configured per
factor default 1.0 CoS.
The customer's bandwidth request (CIR) is divided
by the overbooking factor to determine actual
bandwidth allocated for this customer's virtual
circuit. Note that the smaller the overbooking
factor, the more aggressive or higher the
overbooking.
The overbooking factor can be changed only while
the CoS is not "in use", meaning no MPLS XCs are
configured for this CoS.
per-cos-tm Container for subset of TM options, configured
per CoS.
pifname <string>, formatted as Port name, indicates port location and interface
<if>-ux/y where: type.
 if: interface type (ge,
ge10)
 x: slot number for this
card
 y: [0-19, 21, 22]
With a maximum of 16 (UNIs +
NNIs) allowed per VSI.
routing-instance- <string> Identifies the routing instance being configured,
name formatted as "slot-u<x>-routing-instance".
For example:
slot-u15-routing-instance
slot <slot-name-string> Identifies the slot in which a card is being
configured (u0, u1, ..., u23), and serves as a
container for subset of slot configuration options.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description

tm-options Container for subset of TM options. Valid only for


cards configured in mpls-pe mode. Most of the
TM parameters are configured automatically.
vsi-name <string> Identifies the VSI instance being configured.

TM Configuration Statement (Card Level)


The following code chunk illustrates typical values for the parameters and options available for TM
configuration at the card (slot) level.

slot u2 aoc10-l2 {
enable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
layer2-ethernet-options { //implicitly created
mode mpls-pe;
ethernet-network-id 0;
bridge-options { //implicitly created
rstp-options { //implicitly created
}
cfm-options { //implicitly created
}
ccn-options { //implicitly created
}
}
tm-options { //Valid only when card mode is mpls-pe
and is implicitly created
high-priority-cos-delimiter <0-8>; // default is 6
sched-mode <auto>; // cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos <0-7>{ //implicitly created
over-booking-factor <0.1-100.0>; // default is 1.0
best-effort-cos <enabled/disabled>; // default is disabled
}
}
}
fdb-options { //implicitly created
}
mpls-pe-options { //implicitly created
}
}

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TM Configuration Statement (Port Level)


The following code chunk illustrates typical values for the parameters and options available for TM
configuration at the port (interfaces) level.

interfaces {
ge-u2/1 {
ethernet-options {
max-frame-size 1604;
tm-options{ //implicitly created
shaping-mode <auto>; // cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos <0-7>{ //implicitly created
wred-mode <auto>; // cannot be changed by user
}
}
}
}
monitor-utilization {
severity-profile default;
}
unit 1 {
family mpls;
}
}
} //interfaces

TM Configuration Statement (VSI Level)


The following code chunk illustrates typical values for the parameters and options available for TM
configuration at the VSI (routing-instances) level.

slot-u2-routing-instance { //implicitly created


description "routing-instance for interfaces belonging to card in slot u1";
virtual-switching-instances {
vsi1 {
nms-service-identifier 10;
egress-counting <enabled/disabled>; //default is disable
uni-ports {
}
nni-ports{
}
pseudo-wires {
}
}
}
} // routing-instances

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P-Bit Mapping and Policer Assignment


The following code chunk illustrates typical values for the parameters and options available for P-Bit
mapping and policer assignment.

lsh> show routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi:1231237294@u0@70

bsc-policer-profile Default-BSC-Profile;
user-label 777;
egress-counting disabled;
vsi-type mp2mp;
max-fib-size 100;
nms-service-identifier 1231237294;
pm-monitor disable;
pm-profile default;
state enabled;

uni-ports {
ge10-u0/18 {
cd-vlan-ids {
777;
}
policing-info {
ingress {
cos 0 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile CIR_1000_CBS_1_EIR_2000_EBS_2_CM_0_CF_0;
policer-group 0;
pm-monitor disable;
}
cos 1 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile CIR_1000_CBS_1_EIR_2000_EBS_2_CM_0_CF_0;
policer-group 1;
pm-monitor disable;
}
}
egress {
cos 0 {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group 0;
pm-monitor disable;
}
cos 1 {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group 1;
pm-monitor disable;

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}
}
}
ingress-untagged-ptagged-vlan disabled;
ingress-wildcard-vlan disabled;
}
ingress-pbit-cos-mapping {
p-bit 1 {
cos 1;
}
}
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping {
state disabled;
}
}

nni-ports {
s-vlan 777;
ge-u0/2;
}

pseudo-wires {
1037@1231237294 {
remote-pe-id 1:22222;
split-horizon-group 1;
receive-pw-label 4097;
transmit-pw-label 4097;
transmit-tunnel tunnel:6035@U0@70;
}
}
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;

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DSCP Mapping and Policer Assignment


The following code chunk illustrates typical values for the parameters and options available for DSCP
mapping and policer assignment.

lsh> show routing-instances slot-u0-routing-instance virtual-switching-instances


vsi:1231237295@u0@70

bsc-policer-profile Default-BSC-Profile;
user-label "XDM 1K-Nikhi_14-01-2015_12:44:57";
egress-counting disabled;
vsi-type mp2mp;
max-fib-size 100;
nms-service-identifier 1231237295;
pm-monitor disable;
pm-profile default;
state enabled;

uni-ports {
ge10-u0/18 {
cd-vlan-ids {
888;
}
policing-info {
ingress {
cos 0 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile CIR_1000_CBS_1_EIR_2000_EBS_2_CM_0_CF_0;
policer-group 0;
pm-monitor disable;
}
cos 1 {
policer-state policing;
policer-profile CIR_1000_CBS_1_EIR_2000_EBS_2_CM_0_CF_0;
policer-group 1;
pm-monitor disable;
}
}
egress {
cos 0 {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group 0;
pm-monitor disable;
}
cos 1 {
policer-state no-rate-limit;
policer-profile N/A;
policer-group 1;
pm-monitor disable;

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}
}
}
ingress-untagged-ptagged-vlan disabled;
ingress-wildcard-vlan disabled;
}
ingress-dscp-cos-mapping {
state enabled;
dscp cs0_other {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs1 {
cos 1;
}
dscp cs2 {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs3 {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs4 {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs5 {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs6 {
cos 0;
}
dscp cs7 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af11 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af12 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af13 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af21 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af22 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af23 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af31 {

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cos 0;
}
dscp af32 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af33 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af41 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af42 {
cos 0;
}
dscp af43 {
cos 0;
}
dscp ef_phb {
cos 0;
}
}
}

pseudo-wires {
1037@1231237295 {
remote-pe-id 1:22222;
split-horizon-group 1;
receive-pw-label 4098;
transmit-pw-label 4098;
transmit-tunnel tunnel:6035@U0@70;
}
}

severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;

Typical TM Configuration Work Flow


The rest of this section presents the basic work flows to configure TM options at 4 different levels; per
card/slot, per port, per tunnel, and per VSI. These work flows do not include all the options/attributes
available at each level, just the basic configuration. Refer to the previous table to see all the different
attributes available at each level and their default values.

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8.31.1 Initial TM Configuration per Card/Slot


TM values for a data card are configured automatically whenever an aoc10-l2 card is configured in
mpls-pe mode. TM configuration settings are included in the show chassis command output. A typical
example is provided here.

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer-2-ethernet-options mode mpls-pe


lsh> commit
lsh> show chassis

slot u2 aoc10-l2 {
enable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
layer2-ethernet-options {
mode mpls-pe;
ethernet-network-id 0;
bridge-options {
rstp-options {
}
cfm-options {
}
ccn-options {
}
} //end bridge options
tm-options {
high-priority-cos-delimiter 6;
sched-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos 0{
over-booking-factor 1.0;
best-effort-cos disabled;
}
cos 1{
over-booking-factor 1.0;
best-effort-cos disabled;
}
... <repeated for each cos value, 0 through 7>
} // end per-cos-tm
} // end tm-options
} // end layer2-ethernet-options
} // end slot options

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8.31.2 Editing TM Configuration per Card/Slot


The default TM configuration defined when a card is initially configured can be edited, as illustrated in the
following example. All CoS values that are less than the high-priority-cos-delimiter value are
categorized as low-priority CoSs. Note that best-effort-cos can be enabled only on low-priority CoSs.
The TM parameter settings edited by the user are listed in the show chassis output listing, as illustrated
in this example.

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer-2-ethernet-options


tm-options high-priority-cos-delimiter 5

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer-2-ethernet-options


tm-options per-cos-tm cos 3 best-effort-cos enabled

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 layer-2-ethernet-options


tm-options per-cos-tm cos 3 over-booking-factor 0.2

lsh> commit

lsh> show chassis

slot u2 aoc10-l2 {
enable;
severity-profile default;
alarm-master-mask disable;
layer2-ethernet-options {
mode mpls-pe;
ethernet-network-id 0;
bridge-options {
rstp-options {
}
cfm-options {
}
ccn-options {

}
}
tm-options {
high-priority-cos-delimiter 5;
sched-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos 0{
over-booking-factor 1.0;
best-effort-cos disabled;
}
cos 1{
over-booking-factor 1.0;
best-effort-cos disabled;
}
cos 2{
over-booking-factor 1.0;

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best-effort-cos disabled;
}
cos 3{
over-booking-factor 0.2;
best-effort-cos enabled;
}
<default cos settings through cos 7>
} // end per-cos-tm
} // end tm-options
} // end slot

8.31.3 Initial TM Configuration per Port


TM values for a port are configured automatically whenever an aoc10-l2 card port is configured. TM
configuration settings are included in the show interfaces command output. The following example
illustrates the typical configuration for E-NNI and MoE ports.

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 port 0 port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode e-nni

lsh> set chassis slot u2 aoc10-l2 port 1 port-type ge ethernet-options port-mode moe

lsh> commit

lsh> show interfaces

interfaces {
ge-u2/0 {
ethernet-options {
tm-options{
shaping-mode <auto>;//cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos 0{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 1{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
... <repeated for each cos value, 0 through 7>
}
}
}
monitor-utilization {
severity-profile default;
}
}

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ge-u2/1 {
ethernet-options {
max-frame-size 1604;
tm-options{
shaping-mode <auto>;//cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos 0{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 1{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 2{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 3{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 4{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 5{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 6{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 7{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
}
}
}
monitor-utilization {
severity-profile default;
}
unit 1 {
family mpls;
}
}
}

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8.31.4 Editing TM Configuration per Port


The default TM configuration defined automatically when a port is initially configured can be edited by the
user. The TM parameter settings edited by the user are listed in the show interfaces output listing, as
illustrated in this example. If best-effort-cos is enabled at the slot level, then reserved shared
bandwidth is automatically set to 0. If best-effort-cos is disabled at the slot level, then reserved
shared bandwidth is automatically set to 1. The reserved shared bandwidth value toggles back and forth,
depending on the best-effort-cos value. Note that the TM values in ports running in non-moe mode
cannot be edited.

lsh> set interfaces ge-u2/1 ethernet-options


tm-options per-cos-tm cos 1
lsh> commit

lsh> show configuration interfaces ge-u2/1

ethernet-options {
max-frame-size 1604;
tm-options{
shaping-mode <auto>;//cannot be changed by user
per-cos-tm{
cos 0{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 1{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 2{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
cos 3{
wred-mode <auto>; //cannot be changed by user
}
<default cos values through cos 7>
} // end per-cos-tm
} // end tm-options
monitor-utilization {
severity-profile default;
}
unit 1 {
family mpls;
}

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9 ONCP
Modern optical networks require sophisticated automatic power control. Optical amplifiers should
automatically set their gain to the desired value; ROADMs should automatically equalize the power of all
the channels passing through.
To enable proper gain setting and power equalization along the entire network, ShadeTree utilizes optical
network control parameters (ONCPs), a set of optical parameters transmitted periodically between network
elements. They are generated independently at a terminal or ROADM node, and transmitted through the
entire network from one optical card to the next and from one node to the next. Each optical card updates
the ONCP values before transmitting them onward to the adjacent card. Based on the ONCP values, the
amplifier is able to adjust the optical gain values for optimal efficiency.
ONCP enables the following network functionalities:
 Power/gain control in amplifier and ROADM cards.
 Real time diagnostics., including:
 Span/connection loss diagnostics.
 Performance diagnostics, including channel OSNR, dispersion, polarization mode dispersion
(PMD), and nonlinear phase.
 Performance verification for a preinstalled trail.
ONCPs are generated by the transceivers and transmitted along the network following the optical
transmission path. A port receives and transmits the ONCP from/to the ports to which it is physically
connected (either in the same node or in an adjacent node). ONCP values are received for an input port,
the ONCP data is updated according to predetermined rules, and the updated ONCP data is transmitted to
the next card via an output port. The pre-determined rules depend on the card type.
ONCP data is stored in input and output status tables that are maintained for each input and output port,
with some data also maintained per channel within each port. This means, for example, that an OTS port
configured for multiple channels would maintain data records for each channel within that port.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ONCP

For example, the following figure illustrates one side of a symmetrical configuration of two NEs. The first NE
has an AoC10 transponder receiving a non-colored input signal and transmitting it as an OTS signal over
channels 21 and 22 to an FOADM, which aggregates and converts the OTS signals to DWDM transmitted
out over an OCH port to an adjacent ROADM. The ROADM transmits the signal out to the second NE
through an amplifier. The second NE is configured with a mirror image of the same series of optical
modules. Each optical element participates in the ONCP protocol. Each input and output port includes an
ONCP table that stores the relevant optical parameters for that port. The NE’s RCP receives the ONCP
parameter values and processes them according to the ONCP algorithm. The RCP then sends the
appropriate commands to the active elements (in our example, the amplifier), to update their optical
parameters accordingly.
Figure 9-1: ONCP transmission along the network

Note that ONCP data can be transferred between two ports residing on the same card, or between two
ports on two adjacent cards. The two cards may be within the same platform, on different platforms within
the same node, or even at different nodes.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ONCP

9.1 ONCP Data Values


ONCP data includes a lengthy list of parameters, provided in the following table. When the user requests a
listing of ONCP values, by default only a selected subset is displayed. The user can request a detailed listing
to see all the currently available parameter values.

Table 9-1: ONCP data

Parameter Description
Per Port
Pr Total port power output (dBm)
Pavg Average power per channel at port output (dBm)
ASE Indicates presence/absence of ASE noise at port output (Boolean)
Nch Total number of transmitted channels
Passive hops Number of passive cards between two active cards
Fiber span: Accexp Accumulated expected span loss from last active port (dB)
Fiber span: Accmar Accumulated span loss margin from last active port (dB)
Fiber span: Acctilt Accumulated tilt (dB)
Ptar Required power per channel at previous EDFA output (dBm)
Posc OSC output power, relevant for OA_HR only (dBm)
Per Channel j
ITU ITU channel number
Existence Indicates presence or absence of a channel (Boolean)
Hop counter Indicates the number of WSS transmitted by the channel
BR Type of this channel (text)
D Accumulated dispersion for this channel (psec/nm)
Spreading Filtering tolerance of this channel (GHz)
P Power of this channel (dBm)
Noise ASE noise in this channel’s bandwidth (dBm/0.1nm)
OSNR Optical Sound to Noise Ratio (OSNR) for this channel (dBm/0.1nm)
PMD Polarized Mode Dispersion (PMD) for this channel (psec)
PDL Polarization Dependent Loss (PDL) for this channel (dB)
AccNLT Accumulated nonlinearity for this channel (dBm)
AccDis Accumulated traveled distance for this channel (km)

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9.2 Displaying ONCP Data Values


To display ONCP data values, enter the following command:
show chassis port oncp <port-number> [detail]

ONCP data is presented first for the selected port and then for the channels within that port, arranged with
input data first, followed by output data. For example, the following command output lists the most
frequently requested subset of ONCP data values for a port carrying traffic for two channels (17, 17.5).
Output is provided for two amplifier ports, one input and one output.

root> show chassis port oncp port-u2/1 input-only

Port input status table:

ONCP port parameters:

+ Total power: -15 dBm

+ Actual span loss: 0 dB

+ Average power per channel: -17.4 dBm

+ Number of channels: 2

ONCP channels parameters:

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

| ITU IfType Disper. Power OSNR PMD PDL accNLT Dist. Spread. |

| (ps/nm) (dBm) (dB) (ps) (dB) (dBm) (Km) (Ghz) |

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

| 21 OTU2 0 -17.7 45 0.5 0.6 -45 0 50Ghz |

| 22 OTU2 0 -17.6 45 0.5 0.6 -45 0 50Ghz |

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

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root> show chassis port oncp port-u2/2 output-only

Port output status table:

ONCP port parameters:

+ Total power: 6.3 dBm

+ Actual span loss: N/A dB

+ Average power per channel: 3.6 dBm

+ Number of channels: 2

ONCP channels parameters:

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

| ITU IfType Disper. Power OSNR PMD PDL accNLT Dist. Spread. |

| (ps/nm) (dBm) (dB) (ps) (dB) (dBm) (Km) (Ghz) |

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

| 21 OTU2 0 3.2 34.2 0.6 0.7 -45 0 50Ghz |

| 22 OTU2 0 3.3 34.3 0.6 0.7 -45 0 50Ghz |

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------|

The next two command examples includes the detail option, requesting a listing of
the complete set of ONCP data values for the same two ports (input and output).
root> show chassis port oncp port-u2/1 input-only detail

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Port input status table:

ONCP port parameters:

+ Total power: -15 dBm

+ Actual span loss: 0 dB

+ Average power per channel: -17.4 dBm

+ ASE: 1

+ Number of channels: 2

+ Passive hops: 1

+ Acc. expected span loss: 0 dB

+ Acc. margin: 1 dB

+ Acc. tilt: 0 dB

+ Previous EDFA power: 4 dBm

+ OSC channel power: None dBm

ONCP channels parameters (17 - 60.5):

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---|

| ITU RodmHop IfType Disper. Spread. Power Noise OSNR PMD PDL accNLT
Dist.|

| (ps/nm) (Ghz) (dBm) (dBm) (dB) (ps) (dB) (dBm)


(Km)|

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---|

| 21 1 OTU2 0 50Ghz -17.7 -62.7 45 0.5 0.6 -45


0 |

| 22 1 OTU2 0 50Ghz -17.6 -62.6 45 0.5 0.6 -45


0 |

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---|

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root@101# run show chassis port oncp port-u2/2 output-only detail

Port output status table:

ONCP port parameters:

+ Total power: 6.3 dBm

+ Actual span loss: N/A dB

+ Average power per channel: 3.6 dBm

+ ASE: 1

+ Number of channels: 2

+ Passive hops: 0

+ Acc. expected span loss: 0 dB

+ Acc. margin: 0 dB

+ Acc. tilt: 0 dB

+ Previous EDFA power: 3.6 dBm

+ OSC channel power: N/A dBm

ONCP channels parameters (17 - 60.5):

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--|

| ITU RodmHop IfType Disper. Spread. Power Noise OSNR PMD PDL accNLT Dist.|

| (ps/nm) (Ghz) (dBm) (dBm) (dB) (ps) (dB) (dBm) (Km)


|

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--|

| 21 1 OTU2 0 50Ghz 3.1 -31 34.1 0.6 0.7 -45 0


|

| 22 1 OTU2 0 50Ghz 3.3 -31 34.3 0.6 0.7 -45 0


|

|-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--|

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10 ASON Trail Restoration
10.1 What is ASON Restoration?
Apollo platforms support Automatic Switched Optical Network (ASON) trail restoration. ASON capabilities
provide dynamic signaling-based policy-driven control over OTN networks via a distributed control plane,
which provides auto-discovery and dynamic connection set-up. When working with ASON, network
operators can define main, protection, and dynamic restoration trails for traffic transmission, configuring
the type of traffic protection and restoration based on network requirements.

NOTE: In this document the terms "protection" and "restoration" refer to two different
recovery mechanisms:
Protection switches damaged traffic from one already-set path to another already-set path.
The switch does not involve any control plane operations. This switch can happen very quickly
(sub-50 milliseconds), but requires pre-allocation of extra resources in the network, up to
twice the amount necessary.
Restoration dynamically defines an alternative path (using available shared resources) when
the original path is damaged, and tears this path down (releasing shared resources for further
use) once the original damaged path has been repaired. Restoration requires control plane
operation for the set up and tear down of the additional path and is therefore relatively slow;
on the other hand, it facilitates reuse of shared resources.

Five combinations of trail protection and restoration are available, depending on the level of service
provided:
 1+0: Unprotected trail, with only a main path configured, no protection path, and no ASON
restoration.
 1+1: SNCP-protected trail, with main and protection paths configured, no ASON restoration.
 1+R: Trail restoration provided, with main and main-restoration paths set up as needed, offering one
level of ASON restoration.
 1+1+R: One-time SNCP trail protection together with multiple path restoration, with main, protection,
and main-restoration paths configured, offering a combination of protection and dynamic restoration.
 1++: Trail is protected by both SNCP and restoration mechanisms, with main, protection,
main-restoration, and protection-restoration paths configured. If the main path goes down, traffic is
switched to the protection path and the restoration-main path is prepared. If then the protection
path also goes down, traffic is switched immediately to the restoration-main path and the
restoration-protection path is prepared. In the meantime the original main and protection paths are
restored. In this manner there are always 2 paths kept available for traffic transmission. With this
level of protection, sub-50msec recovery is guaranteed, since there is always an alternative path
immediately available in case of failure.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ASON Trail Restoration

In the event of a failure, ASON-associated entities are controlled exclusively by the ASON control plane
during the time that traffic is restored, independent of the EMS and NMS management systems (STMS and
LightSoft).
During this time the following processes occur:
 Restoration: If a failure occurs on any ASON link or node that the provisioned path traverses (for
example, a fiber cut), a new trail path is automatically found by the ASON control plane (rerouting).
When the trail is interrupted, its head-end node computes the best possible restoration path using
information from the traffic-engineering database (TED) combined with explicitly-defined constraints,
such as avoiding damaged TE links and avoiding all TE links in the same SRLG. When selecting the
optimal path, ASON searches for a data link that traverses a different TE link to the one on which the
failure occurred. If a different TE link is not available, then ASON will use a data link from the same
TE-link on which the failure occurs, if available. ASON then sends signaling to the downstream nodes
hop-by-hop, requesting that they reserve resources and set up a cross connection. When the message
reaches the tail-end, the tail-end node sends a signal upstream hop-by-hop to the head-end,
confirming the success of the LSP setup for trail restoration. The ASON control plane automatically
reroutes the traffic to the new trail path, which becomes visible in the NMS.
 Revertion: After the failure is repaired, revertive rerouting enables the trail to automatically revert
back to the originally provisioned trail path, after the wait to restore (WTR) time has expired. The
rerouted path is released and its bandwidth is made available for use by other services on the
network.
A trail configured in LightSoft can include both ASON and non-ASON components. At the NE level, the ASON
trail is managed through STMS or ShadeTree. STMS and ShadeTree support creation of ODUk ASON trails
over ASON Data Links (DL). OTUk ports in Apollo equipment serve as endpoints for both ASON Data Links
and the underlying TE-Links. The OTUk port attributes determine the creation, deletion, and behavior of
Data Links and TE-Links in the NE.

10.2 Configuring Your System for ASON


Functionality
ASON restoration is supported on OPT9624 platforms with suitable backplane, fabric, and card
configurations. These NEs are known as ‘ASON players’. ASON restoration is available for ODUk trails in a
(virtual) network formed by ASON players interconnected via OTUk links terminated on NNI ports of FIO
cards installed in these NEs. These trails are represented locally by ODU cross connections (XCs) in the
ASON players included along the trail.
ASON control is implemented using a set of GMPLS protocols. These protocols send and receive messages
via ASON control plane channels between adjacent ASON players. These control channels are represented
by GRE tunnels and use whatever infrastructure IP connectivity is available with the Apollo DCN. (See the
System Overview and Configuration User Guide.)
In order to separate ASON Control Channels from the regular DCN channels, it is necessary to enable
GMPLS mode in each ASON player NE. (See the System Overview and Configuration User Guide). set
system gmpls-mode is the minimal command and enables the default settings for that NE.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ASON Trail Restoration

The ASON implementation on the current NE automatically discovers the adjacent ASON player NEs and
sets up the channels needed to communicate (using GMPLS routing protocols) with these adjacent nodes.
In addition to the default automatic discovery mechanism, ASON offers a manual discovery/verification
option in which each ASON NNI port is configured with the identity of its peer ports across ASON data links.
Each ASON port also transmits its own identity to the adjacent peer ports. Thus each ASON player can verify
that the actual port adjacencies match the automatically configured adjacencies.
This discovery mechanism, repeated across all participating ASON nodes, allows ASON to build a database
of the complete network topology, including information about the bandwidth available on each
participating ASON player. This information enables ASON to define alternate routes as needed when a trail
goes down.

10.3 Configuring ASON Trail Protection


To configure ASON protection, the network system and physical device properties must be configured
appropriately, including slots, cards, and supporting ports. The assumption in this section is that the
system, equipment, and interfaces have already been configured, as described in previous sections of this
user guide.
This section explains the steps required to configure ASON protection, describing what must be done at
each point and providing examples to illustrate each step. The exact command syntax and parameters will
vary in each network, depending on the specific network configuration. A series of CLI commands
illustrating these steps is provided at the end of this section, in Complete ASON Configuration Example.

10.3.1 Step by Step in ASON Configuration


1. Configure the inband management settings for this NE, explained in the System Overview and
Configuration User Guide.
2. Set the system to run in GMPLS mode, explained in the System Overview and Configuration User
Guide. For example:

set system gmpls-mode


commit

3. Verify that the FIO cards are installed and the relevant ports configured. These commands are
described in Chassis, Slot, Card, and Port Identification, Port Configuration, and Interface
Configuration. Note that ASON protection is supported by the V5.1 set of FIO cards, including the
FIOMR_16B, FIO10_5B, and FIO100 cards, through NNI ports configured on these cards.
For example:

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 0 port-type otu2 otu-options


gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 0 transceiver-options


exp-transceiver-type
otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

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set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 0 fiber-connectivity external


bidirectional
peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 1 port-type otu2 otu-options


gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 1 transceiver-options


exp-transceiver-type
otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 1 fiber-connectivity external


bidirectional
peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 2 port-type otu2 otu-options


gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 2 transceiver-options


exp-transceiver-type
otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 2 fiber-connectivity external


bidirectional
peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 3 port-type otu2 otu-options


gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 3 transceiver-options


exp-transceiver-type
otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 3 fiber-connectivity external


bidirectional
peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 4 port-type otu2 otu-options

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 4 transceiver-options


exp-transceiver-type
otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 4 fiber-connectivity external


bidirectional
peer-ne unspecified

commit

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ASON Trail Restoration

4. Data links are only visible and enabled by the control plane once the physical OCH trails are created
and the necessary NNI ports defined. Type a show MPLS interface command to see a listing of the
relevant interfaces. For example:

run show mpls interface detail

Mpls Instance: GMPLS-routing-instance

Interface State LocalIfId RemoteIfId Pee


rAddress

dlotu1-u0/6.1 Up 2038530054 2038530054 172.30.130.19

dlotu1-u0/8.1 Up 2038530056 2038530056 172.30.130.21

dlotu1-u0/10.1 Up 2038530058 2038530058 172.30.130.21

dlotu1-u0/12.1 Up 2038530060 2038530060 172.30.130.19

dlotu1-u0/14.1 Up 2038530062 2038530060 172.30.130.21

dlotu2-u5/0.1 Up 2038562976 2038562976 172.30.130.20

dlotu2-u5/1.1 Up 2038562977 2038562977 172.30.130.20

dlotu2-u5/2.1 Up 2038562978 2038562978 172.30.130.21

dlotu2-u6/0.1 Up 2038563008 2038563008 172.30.130.21

dlotu2-u6/1.1 Up 2038563009 2038563009 172.30.130.19

dlotu2-u6/2.1 Up 2038563010 2038563010 172.30.130.19

dlotu2-u6/3.1 Up 2038563011 2038563011 172.30.130.20

dlotu4-u16/0.1 Up 2038759936 2038759936 172.30.130.20

dlotu4-u18/0.1 Up 2038760000 2038760000 172.30.130.19

dlotu4-u20/0.1 Up 2038760064 2038760064 172.30.130.19

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ASON Trail Restoration

5. ASON functionality includes autodiscovery, in which the ASON NE automatically discovers and
identifies the addresses of adjacent ASON nodes. Alternatively, network operators can manually
identify the remote nodes that will serve as peer nodes at either end of a trail, and explicitly list those
node identification addresses when configuring an ASON trail.
For example, the show mpls interface detail command described in the preceding step lists the
local interface ID, the remote interface ID, and the peer address for each interface configured on the
local NE. These are the values needed to manually identify the remote ports used for ASON trails. For
example, the preceding show MPLS interface command included the following output line:

run show mpls interface detail

Mpls Instance: GMPLS-routing-instance

Interface State LocalIfId RemoteIfId PeerAddres


s

dlotu4-u16/0.1 Up 2038759936 2038759936 172.30.1


30.20

The remote interface ID and peer address information in this command output are used to identify
the remote nodes when configuring ASON ports with manual discovery, as follows:

set chassis slot u16 fio100 port 0 otu-options gmpls-options nni


remote-node 172.30.130.20 remote-mpls-if-index
2038759936

When working with manual discovery, the network operator must go to each ASON node in turn and
list the MPLS interfaces on that NE to identify the local interface IDs and addresses. The operator then
goes to each ASON node in turn and enters the set chassis slot commands for all links that begin
on that NE. Note that NEs with parallel card and port configurations will also have similar interface ID
settings.
6. The specific paths used for ASON-protected trails are usually selected automatically. The empty path
name parameter tells the GMPLS control plane that it is free to choose the best possible path at the
time that path is being dynamically provisioned, rather than being required to traverse a specific set
of data links.
However, the network operator is also able to identify specific paths to use or avoid. While path
definition is not included within the scope of this section, the following command line illustrates how
a path would be defined. The path name highlighted in the following example identifies that path for
later use in the ASON trail configuration command.

Set routing-instance GMPLS-routing-instance protocols mpls path path1


172.13.4.5 interface-name dlotu2-u5/1 upstream-label tpn-3 downstream-label
tpn-3

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7. ASON trail restoration is a dynamic process that provisions the best possible trail at the time that the
trail is needed, based on priorities and metrics defined by the network operator. The network
operator defines the appropriate "cost" for each data link, and configures the system to prioritize
data link selection during trail provisioning based on minimizing the total "cost" of that trail. For
example:
a. To tell the system to prioritize link selection based on minimizing the total "link cost" enter the
following command. Note that technically this command is not necessary; link-cost is the
default setting.

set system gmpls-mode te-metric-policy link-cost

b. Link costs are set at the data link level, meaning that data links based on the selected port will
be assigned the specified gmpls link-cost. To define the link-cost of a data link, enter the
following set chassis command:

set chassis slot u16 fio100 port 0


otu-options gmpls-options nni link-cost 40

This assigns a link-cost of 40 to the data link on port 0 (configured as an NNI port), located on
the FIO100 card installed in slot u16.The following code chunk lists the results of a show
chassis command after setting the link-cost.

root@AsonNE1xx# show chassis slot u16 fio100 port 0 otu-options


gmpls-options nni
remote-node 172.30.130.20;
remote-mpls-if-index 2038759936;
auto-discovery disabled;
auto-discovery-state not-done;
link-length 100;
link-cost 40;
trib-slot-for-restoration u0;
trib-slot-for-provision u0;
supported-odu-types odu1,odu2,odu2e,odu0;
trib-slot-type 1-25;

Note that the default value for link-cost and link-length is set to 100.

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ASON Trail Restoration

8. Once you have completed the equipment configuration, the next step is to create bidirectional
co-routed trails that will enjoy ASON protection. Trails are defined between any two client ports that
have the same rate, located on cards that supports ASON functionality. Trails run from the head-end
node to the tail-end node, with trail configuration commands entered at the head-end.
For example, you can define an ASON-protected trail on two GbE ports located on FIOMR_16B cards.
All you have to do is go to the NE that will serve as the head-end for the trail, and from that endpoint
specify the trail’s client endpoints. You don’t have to supply the IP address for the head-end, since
that is the location where are you defining the trail. You do have to supply the IP address for the
trail’s far end (egress) port.
The GMPLS control plane chooses the best route for the trail, selecting the best data links (and their
associated NNI ports) based on the criteria you specified in the preceding step. You also don’t have to
configure or specify the underlying XCs to be used for this trail - the GMPLS control plane manages
the necessary XCs automatically.
You do have to specify which protection and restoration tunnels (if any) should be provisioned for this
trail. The choice of protection and restoration tunnels determines the level of protection that will be
provided for this trail, as explained previously in this section. For each tunnel, you decide whether the
GMPLS control plane should choose the best data links available at the time of provisioning (empty
flag), based on the criteria specified previously, or whether the system should be required to use a
specific path route.
The complete set trails command syntax is included later in this section. In most cases parameter
values are set automatically by the system, and do not have to be included explicitly in the typical set
trails command.
The following command lines include the most basic set of parameters used for ASON trail
provisioning. For clarity, the command has been divided into multiple command lines, to highlight
each type of tunnel being provisioned for this trail.

set trails <trail-name> ingress-endpoint <ingress-endpoint>


egress-endpoint <egress-endpoint>
egress-ne-id <egress-ne-id>

set trails <trail-name> tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails <trail-name> tunnels protection lsp provisioned-path-name


empty

set trails <trail-name> tunnels restoration_main lsp


provisioned-path-name empty

set trails <trail-name> tunnels restoration_protection lsp


provisioned-path-name empty

commit

For example:

set trails tr_odu2_aaa ingress-endpoint odu2-u5/3:1 egress-ne-id


90.90.90.202 egress-endpoint odu2-u5/2:1

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set trails tr_odu2_aaa tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails tr_odu2_aaa tunnels restoration_main lsp


provisioned-path-name empty

commit

set trails tr_odu2_fff ingress-endpoint odu2-u13/4:1 egress-ne-id 90.90.90.204


egress-endpoint odu2-u13/4:1

set trails tr_odu2_fff tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails tr_odu2_fff tunnels restoration_main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

commit

9. Type show trails to see what trails were created after entering a set of trail creation commands.
Note that most of the trail parameters do not have to be set explicitly by the user. In most cases
either the default values are correct, or the system detects the appropriate setting and configures it
accordingly. For example:

root@AsonNE1xx# show trails

Trail_201_16 {
nms-trail-id 558;
trail-id 0.20.8f.60.0.38v95;
trail-rate odu1;
payload-type unknown;
directionality bidirectional;
egress-ne-id 172.30.130.21;
ingress-endpoint odu1-u4/12:1;
egress-endpoint odu1-u4/12:1;
fully-disjoint-protection disabled;
severity-profile default;
restoration-recovery {
recovery-type 1-plus-r;
automatic-reversion enabled;
wtr-period 5;
hold-off-time 0.0;
}

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tunnels main {
lsp {
provisioned-path-name Trail_201_16_M;
actual-path-name Trail_201_16-0.20.8f.60.0.38v95-main;
lockout disabled;
}
}

tunnels restoration_main {
lsp {
provisioned-path-name empty;
lockout disabled;
}
}
}

10. The GMPLS control plane automatically creates the underlying XCs for these trails. Type show
cross-connects to see a listing of the relevant XCs. In the following examples, the trail numbers that
correspond to the preceding trail list are highlighted.

[edit]
root@AsonNE1xx# show cross-connects
Trail_201_16-0.20.8f.60.0.38v95 {
leg 1 {
from-tp odu1-u4/12:1;
to-tp odu1-u6/0:1:TPN1;
directionality bidirectional;
}
trail-id 558;
connection-mode configurable;
}

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ShadeTree® Interface Configuration User Guide ASON Trail Restoration

10.4 ASON Trail Configuration Parameters


The following table summarizes the parameter fields used for ASON trail configuration.

Table 10-1: ASON Trail Parameters

Attribute/Keyword Options Description


trail <string> Name of the trail being defined.
trail-id <value> Unique STMS trail identification, calculated automatically.

nms-trail-id <value> Main NMS trail identification, optional.


trail-rate Supported trail rates, read-only, calculated from egress
value.
One of the following values, subject to change:
odu-slot | odu1 | odu2 | odu3 | odu2e | odu3e | odu2f | odu4 | odu0 | oduf-sdi3g
| oduf-sdi3g-na | oduf-fc400 | oduf-fc800 | och | oms | os | spo | oc
payload-type Identifies the payload type for this transmission.
One of the following values, subject to change:
none, experimental, asynchronous, bit-synchronous, atm-mapping, vcat-signal,
transparent-ety, fc1200-into-odu2e, gfp-into-opu2, stm1-gmp, stm4-gmp,
bitstr-with-octet, bitstr-without-octet, odu-multiplex-jk, odu-multiplex-k-ts, na-55,
na-66, null-test-signal, prbs-test-signal, gbe10-oc, fc-10g, fc-8g-gfp-mapping,
fc200-into-odu1, cbr-mapping, fc100-gmp, fc400-flex, fc800-flex, video270-gmp,
hdsdi1485-gmp, hdsdi-3g-flex, na-ff, unknown
directionality bidirectional Identifies trail directionality configuration, uni- or
unidirectional bidirectional, read-only.
egress-ne-id x.x.x.x Identifies the router ID of the egress NE with which this
trail is connected.
ingress-endpoint <value> Identifies the port and interface type of this trail’s ingress
endpoint. For example:
 ODU2-u3/1:1
 OTU2-u3/0
egress-endpoint <value> Identifies the port and interface type of this trail’s egress
endpoint. For example:
 ODU2-u3/1:1
 OCHP-u3/0
egress-time-slots <value> Array of time slots.
fully-disjoint- enabled Enable or disable the higher level of fully disjointed
protection disabled protection.
severity-profile <value> Identifies the severity profile to be applied for this
transmission trail.

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Attribute/Keyword Options Description


restoration- <value subset> Configures the type and level of restoration to be applied
recovery for this transmission trail. Defined by the following subset
of values.
recovery-type Identifies the type of ASON restoration provided for this
transmission trail. Values are:
 1-plus-0
 1-plus-1
 1-plus-r
 1-plus-1-plus-r
 1-plus-plus
automatic-reversion Enables or disables automatic reversion to the original trail
path upon recovery. Values are:
 enabled
 disabled
wtr-period Defines the minimum amount of time to wait before
reverting to the original trail path upon recovery. Default 5.

hold-off-time Defines the minimum amount of time to wait after a signal


failure before initiating protection switching. Default 0.
force-switch-unit Defines which unit is used for forced switching. Values are:
 main
 protection

tunnels  main ASON protection involves the configuration of up to four


 protection different tunnel types, depending on the level of
 restoration_ protection being provided. Within this section the user
main configures each type of participating tunnel, defined by the
following subset of values. Many of these parameters are
 restoration_
set automatically by the embedded system.
protection
lsp Identifies the LSP tunnel used here. The subset of
parameters includes:
 provisioned-path-name
<provisioned-path-name>
 actual-path-name
<actual-path-name>
 lockout (enabled | disabled)
excluded-te-links Identifies the links to be excluded from this trail
restoration, and configures the restoration standard. The
subset of parameters includes:
 <address value>
 <interface value>
 strict or loose

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10.5 Trails Attributes Example


The following code chunk illustrates how these CLI commands are structured in the output of a show
trails command line:

root@AsonNE4xx# show trails tr_odu2_4ccc

trail-id 2.2.e.ff.c1.1v661;
trail-rate odu2;
payload-type unknown;
directionality bidirectional;
egress-ne-id 90.90.90.201;
ingress-endpoint odu2-u13/3:1;
egress-endpoint odu2-u13/3:1;
fully-disjoint-protection disabled;
severity-profile default;

restoration-recovery {
recovery-type 1-plus-1-plus-r;
automatic-reversion enabled;
wtr-period 1;
hold-off-time 0.0;
}

tunnels main {
lsp {
provisioned-path-name empty;
lockout disabled;
}
}

tunnels protection {
lsp {
provisioned-path-name empty;
lockout disabled;
}
}

tunnels restoration_main {
lsp {
provisioned-path-name empty;
lockout disabled;
}
}

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10.6 ASON Restoration Configuration Examples


Five levels of protection and restoration are available, depending on the level of service provided. This
section provides examples that illustrate how these levels are configured.
 1+0: Unprotected trail, with only a main path configured, no protection path, and no ASON
restoration.
 1+1: SNCP-protected trail, with main and protection paths configured, no ASON restoration.
 1+R: Trail restoration provided, with main and main-restoration paths configured, offering one level
of ASON restoration.
 1+1+R: One-time SNCP trail protection together with multiple path restoration, with main, protection,
and main-restoration paths configured, offering a combination of protection and dynamic restoration.
 1++: Trail is protected by both SNCP and restoration mechanisms, with main, protection,
main-restoration, and protection-restoration paths configured. If the main path goes down, traffic is
switched to the protection path and the restoration-main path is prepared. If then the protection
path also goes down, traffic is switched immediately to the restoration-main path and the
restoration-protection path is prepared. In the meantime the original main and protection paths are
restored. In this manner there are always 2 paths kept available for traffic transmission. With this
level of protection, sub-50msec recovery is guaranteed, since there is always an alternative path
immediately available in case of failure.
To make it easier to identify the different parameters and their values in the following commands,
potentially very long single line commands have been split into multiple command lines. These command
lines are displayed on multiple lines, with the continuation lines indented.

10.6.1 1++ Trail Protection Example


To configure 1++ trail protection, use the following sequence of commands. Note that for 1++ trail
protection, all four types of tunnels (main, protection, restoration_main, and restoration_protection) must
be configured. The empty path name parameter tells the GMPLS control plane that it is free to choose the
best possible path at the time that path is being dynamically provisioned, rather than being required to
traverse a specific set of data links.
set trails trailname
ingress-endpoint odu2-u5/4:1
egress-endpoint odu2-u5/4:1
egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129

set trails trailname


tunnels main
lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails trailname


tunnels protection
lsp provisioned-path-name empty

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set trails trailname


tunnels restoration_main
lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails trailname


tunnels restoration_protection
lsp provisioned-path-name empty

commit

10.6.2 1+1+R Trail Protection Example


To configure 1+1+R trail protection, use the following sequence of commands. Note that for 1+1+R trail
protection, three types of tunnels (main, protection, and restoration_main) must be configured. When the
network operator provides a specific path name for the path name parameter, the GMPLS control plane is
required to use a specific path, including a specific set of data links, when dynamically provisioning the new
path route. In this example the network operator has also configured a wait-to-restore time period of
1 minute (default 5).
set trails trailname
ingress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1
egress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1
egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129

set trails trailname


tunnels main
lsp provisioned-path-name pathMAIN_213

set trails trailname


tunnels protection
lsp provisioned-path-name pathPROT_213

set trails trailname


tunnels restoration_main
lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails trailname


restoration-recovery wtr-period 1

commit

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10.7 ASON Trail Management


Network operators are able to force a manual traffic switch from one trail path to the other (main to
protection or protection to main). Operators can also check trail configuration information and status.

10.7.1 Switching the Trail Route Manually

To manually switch the trail route:


1. Type the following command in configuration mode:
run request trail manual-revert <trail-name>
[<target-lsp> | main | protection]
Where:
 trail-name is the name of the trail being rerouted.
 The path to which the trail should be rerouted is either:
 <target-lsp> is the name of the path to which the trail should be rerouted.
 main indicates that the trail should be switched back to the main path from the
protection path.
 protection indicates that the trail should be switched to the protection path from the
main path.
2. The system reply will indicate if the path switch succeeded or failed.

10.7.2 Viewing the Trail Configuration

To see trail configuration information:


1. Type the following command in configuration mode:
show trails <trail-name>
2. The system will print out a list of trail configuration information, as follows:
 If the command includes a specific trail name, the output lists the trail name and configuration,
including admin-state, oper-state, active-main, and active-protection.
 If the command does not include a specific trail name, then configuration information and data
for all trails currently defined will be displayed.

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10.7.3 Viewing the Trail Status

To see trail status data:


1. Type the following command in configuration mode:
run show trail [detail]
2. The system will print out the trail status data.
 If the command is entered without the detail parameter, a short summary of the trail status is
printed. For example:
run show trail tr_odu0_4_Su2_P0
Name: tr_odu0_4_Su2_P0
Admin State: Up
Oper State: Up
Trail Uptime: 07:34:59
 If the command is entered with the detail parameter, a longer listing of the trail status is
printed. For example:
run show trail tr_odu0_4_Su2_P0 detail
Name: tr_odu0_4_Su2_P0
Admin State: Up
Oper State: Up
Trail Uptime: 07:34:53
Active Main LSP:
tr_odu0_4_Su2_P0-2.2.e.ff.c1.1v573
-restoration_main
Main LSP Uptime: 07:34:53
Active Protect LSP:
Protect LSP Uptime:

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10.8 Viewing ASON Interface and Link Information


MPLS interfaces are linked through data links, with TE links automatically configured corresponding to the
data links. The embedded system provides information about the data links and interfaces available for use.

10.8.1 Viewing MPLS Interface Status

To see MPLS interface status information:


1. Type the following command:
run show mpls interface
<data-link-interface-name> [details]
 If the command is entered without the detail parameter, a short summary of the MPLS
interface status is printed. For example:
run show mpls interface

MPLS Instance: GMPLS-routing-instance

Interface State Administrative Groups


dlotu1-u0/8.1 Up <None>
dlotu1-u0/10.1 Up <None>
dlotu1-u0/12.1 Up <None>
dlotu1-u0/14.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u5/0.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u5/1.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u5/2.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u6/0.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u6/1.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u6/2.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u6/3.1 Up <None>
dlotu2-u6/4.1 Up <None>

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 If the command is entered with the detail parameter, a more detailed summary of the MPLS
interface status is printed. For example:
run show mpls interface detail

MPLS Instance: GMPLS-routing-instance

Interface State LocalIfId RemoteIfId PeerAddress


dlotu1-u0/8.1 Up 2038530056 2038530056 90.90.90.201
dlotu1-u0/10.1 Up 2038530058 2038530058 90.90.90.201
dlotu1-u0/12.1 Up 2038530060 2038530062 90.90.90.201
dlotu1-u0/14.1 Up 2038530062 2038530062 90.90.90.202
dlotu2-u5/0.1 Up 2038562976 2038562976 90.90.90.202
dlotu2-u5/1.1 Up 2038562977 2038562977 90.90.90.202
dlotu2-u5/2.1 Up 2038562978 2038562978 90.90.90.201
dlotu2-u6/0.1 Up 2038563008 2038563008 90.90.90.201
dlotu2-u6/1.1 Up 2038563009 2038563009 90.90.90.203
dlotu2-u6/2.1 Up 2038563010 2038563010 90.90.90.203
dlotu2-u6/3.1 Up 2038563011 2038563011 90.90.90.202
dlotu2-u6/4.1 Up 2038563012 2038563012 90.90.90.203

 If the command is entered with a specific MPLS interface name, a data listing is provided for
that interface only. If no name is provided, the system responds with a data listing for all MPLS
interfaces. For example:

run show mpls interface dlotu1-u0/8.1

MPLS Instance: GMPLS-routing-instance

Interface State Administrative Groups


dlotu1-u0/8.1 Up <None>

If the command is entered with the details flag:

run show mpls interface dlotu1-u0/8.1 detail

MPLS Instance: GMPLS-routing-instance

Interface State LocalIfId RemoteIfId PeerAddress


dlotu1-u0/8.1 Up 2038530056 2038530056 90.90.90.201

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10.8.2 Viewing an NNI Port’s GMPLS Settings

To see an NNI port’s GMPLS option settings:


1. Type the following command in configuration mode:
show chassis slot <slot> <card> port <port>
otu-options gmpls-options nni
For example:
show chassis slot u3 fio10-5 port 1 otu-options gmpls-options nni

2. The system will print out a list of GMPLS attributes for that port. For example:
remote-ne-id: 1.2.3.4
srlgs: srlg1,srlg2
metric: 20
operational state: up
admin state: up
agreed-tributary-slot-type: 1.25G
consistency-status consistent
configured-remote-port-id otu2-u5/3
tributary-slot-type 1.25G
supported-odu-types odu1,odu2
te-link-id 334

10.8.3 Listing the BW Available on a Data Link

To see the bandwidth available on a specific data link:


1. Type the following command in configuration mode:
show interfaces <data-link>
For example:
show interfaces dlotu2-u3/1

2. The system will print out the bandwidth available for each type of interface supported by that link.
For example:

unreserved BW for provisioning:


BW Type Free Units Priority
ODU1 5 0
ODU1 3 1
ODU0 1 2
ODU0 7 3

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unreserved BW for restoration:


BW Type Free Slots Priority
ODU1 5 0
ODU1 3 1
ODU0 1 2
ODU0 7 3

10.9 Complete ASON Configuration Example


This section provides a series of commands illustrating a typical ASON configuration sequence. The exact
parameter settings are specific to a particular network NE, but the general set of steps are fairly typical of
what would be required in most network settings. The following P2P configuration figure illustrates the
objects being configured by this command sequence.
Note that most of these configuration commands must be completed on both ASON nodes (IP28 and
IP129). However, for clarity, the commands are listed here once, with a note that the commands must be
repeated on the second NE.
########### System configuration for two participating ASON NEs ############

### Head-End Node ###

set system management-mode dcn 172.30.130.28

set chassis rcp port 0 enable

set interfaces fe-rcp unit 0 family inet address 172.30.103.211/22

set system services telnet root-login allow

set system services ssh root-login allow

set system host-name ASON211

commit

### Tail-End Node ###

set system management-mode dcn 172.30.130.129

set chassis rcp port 0 enable

set interfaces fe-rcp unit 0 family inet address 172.30.103.213/22

set system services telnet root-login allow

set system services ssh root-login allow

set system host-name ASON213

commit

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## The following system configuration commands must be completed on both Nodes ##

set network-element opt96xx shelf s0 opt9624h shelf-mode fm1000

delete network-element opt96xx shelf s0 opt9624h shelf-mode without-fabric

commit

delete routing-instances DCN-routing-instance protocols ospf area 1.1.1.1 interface


fe-rcp.0 passive

set system gmpls-mode

commit

## The following port configuration commands must be completed on both Nodes ##

########### Client-side 1G port configuration for FIOMR16B card ###########

set chassis slot u4 fiomr-16b

set chassis slot u4 fiomr-16b port 0 port-type ety1g ety-options

set chassis slot u4 fiomr-16b port 0


transceiver-options exp-transceiver-type otgbe-lx

set chassis slot u4 fiomr-16b port 0


fiber-connectivity external bidirectional peer-ne unspecified

commit

######## Configuring one link, using 100G NNI port configuration ###########

########### The FIO100 port configuration command includes an explicit ##########

####### identification of the corresponding remote-node interface ID #########

set chassis slot u16 fio100 port 0 port-type otu4 otu-options gmpls-options nni
remote-node 172.30.130.129 remote-mpls-if-index 2038759936

set chassis slot u16 fio100 port 0


transceiver-options tx-wavelength 21 rx-wavelength 21

set chassis slot u16 fio100 port 0


fiber-connectivity external bidirectional peer-ne unspecified

commit

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######### Configuring four links, using 10G NNI port configuration ########

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 0 port-type otu2 otu-options gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 0 transceiver-options exp-transceiver-type


otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 0 fiber-connectivity external bidirectional


peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 1 port-type otu2 otu-options gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 1 transceiver-options exp-transceiver-type


otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 1 fiber-connectivity external bidirectional


peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 2 port-type otu2 otu-options gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 2 transceiver-options exp-transceiver-type


otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 2 fiber-connectivity external bidirectional


peer-ne unspecified

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 3 port-type otu2 otu-options gmpls-options nni

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 3 transceiver-options exp-transceiver-type


otr64-pi3 rx-wavelength non-colored tx-wavelength non-colored

set chassis slot u5 fio10-5b port 3 fiber-connectivity external bidirectional


peer-ne unspecified

commit

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### MPLS Path configuration - enables subsequent path specification by name ###

### This path configuration command includes remote interface identification ###

### information, found in the show mpls interface detail command ###

### output, as described in Step by Step in ASON Configuration ###

### Note that the path names configured here can be used in later trail ###

### configuration commands to specify paths that must be included in ###

### specific trail routes. ###

set routing-instances GMPLS-routing-instance protocols mpls path pathM_213


172.30.130.129 interface-id 2038562976
downstream-Label tpn-1 upstream-Label tpn-1

set routing-instances GMPLS-routing-instance protocols mpls path pathP_213


172.30.130.129 interface-id 2038759936
downstream-Label tpn-1 upstream-Label tpn-1

commit

########## ASON Restoration for odu0 - 1G Ethernet rate trail ################

1+0:

----

set trails trail_1+0 ingress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1


egress-endpoint odu0-u4/4:1 egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129
tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name pathM_213

commit

1+1:

-----

set trails trail_1+1 ingress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1


egress-endpoint odu0-u4/4:1 egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129
tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name pathM_213

set trails trail_1+1 tunnels protection lsp provisioned-path-name pathP_212_213

commit

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1+R:

-----

set trails trail_1+R ingress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1


egress-endpoint odu0-u4/4:1 egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129
tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name pathM_213

set trails trail_1+R tunnels restoration_main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

commit

1+1+R:

------

set trails trail_1+1+R ingress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1


egress-endpoint odu0-u4/4:1 egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129
tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name pathM_213

set trails trail_1+1+R tunnels protection lsp provisioned-path-name pathP_212_213

set trails trail_1+1+R tunnels restoration_main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

commit

1++:

-----

set trails trail_1++ ingress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1


egress-endpoint odu0-u4/0:1 egress-ne-id 172.30.130.129
tunnels main lsp provisioned-path-name pathM_213

set trails trail_1++ tunnels protection lsp provisioned-path-name pathP_213

set trails trail_1++ tunnels restoration_main lsp provisioned-path-name empty

set trails trail_1++ tunnels restoration_protection lsp provisioned-path-name


empty

commit

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11 Configuring Protection Mechanisms
Apollo platforms can support one or more of the following protection types.
 Equipment protection: FM100, or FM1000 card protection (N/A for OPT9603).
 Port protection: protection of one or more physical port, by the corresponding port of an adjacent
card.
 Traffic protection: L1 cross-connection (L1-XC) protection (e.g., ODU).
 Network traffic protection: configured at the NMS or EMS-level.
 Dual Node Interconnection (DNI) protection: configured at the NMS or EMS-level.
In ShadeTree, the OPT9600 series enables configuration of equipment, port, and traffic protection schemes
via the ShadeTree CLI, at the root level.
This section outlines the configuration required for cards and ports to support these protection schemes;
the commands that can be used to modify protection temporarily during maintenance operations; and the
commands that can be used to view and troubleshoot protected entities.

11.1 Equipment Protection


Equipment protection can be configured on the FM100 or FM1000 fabric cards. An equipment protection
group is automatically created when the shelf mode is configured as FM100 or FM1000. The FM1000 1Tbps
universal fabric is protected 3:1. The FM100 Gbps fabric is protected 1:1.
In the OPT9624, a set of at least three active FM1000 cards is required in order to pass traffic through the
system (in fm1000 mode). If more than three cards are available, the system selects an arbitrary set of
three FM1000 cards to serve as the active set. The FM1000 card provides full protection support and
troubleshooting capabilities.
In the OPT9608, the FM100 card (in fm100 mode) is only able to detect errors in the event that an NPB is
unable to pass traffic through the card.
FM equipment protection is non-revertive. FM protection switching is minimally traffic affecting (<10msec).
With the exception of the following maintenance commands, the equipment protection group attributes
are read-only.
 lock-out
 manual-switch

Example
Equipment protection group configuration is performed automatically.

user@root# set network-element opt96xx shelf s0 opt9624h shelf-mode fm1000

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11.2 Port Protection


NE port protection is employed to protect against card or module failures in the OPT9600 family. It enables
service continuation in the event of the failure or extraction of a service source/sink card or
module/transceiver.
Port protection is activated on a per-service basis. To provide port protection for at least one service, two
ports must be manually associated and assigned as a protection port pair. On a single card, you can choose
to protect selected service ports, or all service ports. For most cards, port protection can be used in parallel
with other protection types.
For each protection group, the two OPT96xx client ports (one on each card) are connected to the client’s
equipment via an external splitter / coupler, and send traffic to both lines via the splitter. The main port
laser is set to ON, and the protecting port laser remains OFF. A control bus between the two cards enables
each card to sends its defect state to the other. In the event of a failure, a protection switch is achieved by
changing the laser state on both ports, so that the new active port laser is set to ON.

11.2.1 Configuring Port Protection


A port protection group is created by manually associating two ports that reside on two separate cards.
Both ports must have the same port number, service type, and card type. Configuration is performed on
the main port, and the relevant configuration parameters are copied to the protecting port. Explicit
association, or specification of a main or standby unit at the card level is not required.
You can choose to protect all ports on a card, or selected ports only. If not all ports are protected, in the
event of a failure, only the traffic on a protected port(s) switches to the protecting port(s).

11.2.1.1 Port Association Requirements


To associate client ports as a protection pair, the following conditions must be fulfilled:
 The relevant cards must be located in adjacent slots, as follows:
 OPT9608: Slot pairs are: 0:2; 1:3; 4:6; and 5:7. For wide cards, card pairs are a subgroup of the
regular cards (0:2, and 4:6).
 OPT9624: Slot pairs are 0:2; 1:3; 4:6; 5:7; 12:14... to 21:23. For wide cards, card pairs are a
subgroup of the regular cards (0:4; 12:16...1:5).
 Ports in a protected pair must have the same card type, and port number.
 The same service type must be configured on both ports.
 The port on the left card is automatically configured as the main port and the configuration is copied
to the port on the right card, which is configured as the protecting port. Any subsequent
configuration changes should be applied to the main port. The relevant parameters are automatically
duplicated to the protecting port (as described in the following table).

CAUTION: Modifying the main and protecting ports role without first deleting the protection
group may cause a traffic hit.

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11.2.2 Supported Port Configuration Parameters


When configuring port association on the main port, the relevant supported parameters are automatically
copied to the protecting port. The following table lists the supported parameters for all service types.

Table 11-1: Parameters automatically copied to the protecting port - per service type

FC port
All port STM/OC ETY100G ETY10GO ETY1G
OTU port ETY10G port and
types port port C port port
CBR ports
ALS state TIM FEC mode CSF/TSF TSFtoLOL TSFtoLOL CSF/TSF CSF/TSF
(enable/ monitor action action action
disable) type type / type
TSFtoLOL
Expected Expected TIM monitor Maximum Maximum GFP UPI GFP GFP
wavelength TTI frame size frame size values header header
(gfp- conseque conseque
compatibility- nt actions nt Actions
mode)
Port Expected TTI LF/RF mode Maximum
behavior (SAPI/DAPI) frame size
Severity DEG GFP header
profile consequent
(alarm actions
event
profile)
PM profile FEC_Ignore CSF_Ordered-
set_mode
Alarm mask GCC_Mode Maximum
master frame size
PM monitor GCC_Terminati
on
Admin TIM
status consequent
actions
Tx rnable Rx wavelength
Sent TTI
(SAPI/DAPI)
Sent TTI
operator string
ConfigChromDi
sp
LastKnown
ChromDisp

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11.3 Traffic Protection


A traffic L1 cross-connect (L1-XC) or sub-interface is a bridge or switch point within a trail. Traffic protection
schemes provide protection against failures which occur between OPT9600 series ODU, or OCH L1-XCs.
L1-XCs can support a range of connectivity protection options, both unprotected and protected. During
L1-XC configuration, the NE determines whether any of the protected configurations would be applicable
for the new L1-XC. If the possibility of protection exists within the L1-XC configuration, the NE automatically
creates an appropriate traffic protection group object that includes the relevant L1-XC legs. In v12.1 and
higher, a traffic protection group is created automatically for all applicable protected configurations. The
XCs may be created implicitly during assignment process or explicitly by the user (see Configuring an L1-XC).
Traffic protection can be configured as revertive or non-revertive. For a list of L1-XC configurations that can
provide traffic protection, see Protected Configurations.

11.3.1 SNCP Protection


In SNCP protection configuration, for each client traffic protection group, in the transmit (ingress) direction
the trail is split into two independent routes (bridging) and the service is sent to two client ports on the
egress side of the OPT9600 series NE. On the receive (egress) side a selection is made between these two
incoming routes (switching), according to protection switching criteria which are based on incoming signal
quality and module (SFP, XFP, etc.) extraction. The traffic protection source and sink points are SNCP points.
Traffic protection can also employ SNCP points on the egress and on the ingress side.

11.3.2 IOP Protection


In IOP protection configuration, for each client traffic protection group, in the transmit (ingress) direction
the trail is split into two independent routes (bridging) and the service is sent to two client ports on two
different cards. On the egress side a selection is made between the two incoming routes, according to the
incoming signal and BIT quality.
If a L1-XC is configured with protection (and is therefore a member of a protection group), all maintenance
actions applied to that L1-XC are automatically applied to both the main L1-XC, and the protection group
entity. Some maintenance operations may also be applied directly to the protection group by the user.
In the case of both SNCP and IOP, the switching criteria vary according to the XC objects and equipment
failure; for example ODU failures in case of OTN. In the case of IOP, BIT failures are also included in
switching criteria calculations. For FIO cards that are connected to matrix cards, SNCP points can be created
in any of the cards.

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11.4 Protection Groups


11.4.1 Creating a Protection Group
A protection group includes unit objects for defining a protection switching relationship where one or more
standby (backup) entities provide protection for one or more working entities.
A unit represents a protected (active/working) unit or a protecting (backup/ standby) unit. A working unit is
the unit over which normal traffic is transported when there are no switch events. A protecting unit is the
unit allocated to transport the normal traffic during a switch event.
Protecting units can be used to carry extra traffic in the absence of a switch event. When there is a switch
event, normal traffic on the affected working unit is bridged onto the protecting unit(s).
A protection group is created automatically upon installation of the relevant hardware and configuration of
the shelf mode, (in the case of equipment protection), or the creation of the relevant L1-XCs, in the case of
traffic protection. Port protection group requires the association of two port entities.

11.4.2 Viewing a Protection Group


You can view one or more protection groups. To view a single protection group, specify the name of the
protection group. To view protection groups of a specific type only, enter the type of protection group that
you want to view. If you do not specify the name or type of protection group, all existing protection groups
are listed.

To view a protection group configuration:


 At the root level, type:
user@root# show protection-group <protection-type> <pgname>
Where:
 <protection-type>: (optional) the type of protection group(s) that you want to view
(equipment, port, or traffic).
 <pgname>: (optional) the name of the protection group. Enables you to view results for only a
single protection group.
The relevant protection group(s) are displayed, showing the active card/port/traffic unit.

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Example
The following example shows a port protection group, and an equipment protection group.

user@root# show protection-group


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u0/0;
hold-off-time 0.0;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive false;
severity-profile default;
}
equipment fm1t {
units slot-u8,slot-u9,slot-u10,slot-u11;
main-units slot-u8,slot-u9,slot-u10;
hold-off-time 0.0;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive false;
severity-profile default;
lockout-units slot-u11;
}

11.4.3 Viewing the Operational State of a Protection Group


You can see which unit is the active unit from the operational mode. You can also view a list of associated
alarms and their severity.

To view the operational status of a protection group:


 In operational mode, type the following:
user@root> show protection <type> <pgname>
Where:
 <type> The type of protection group.
 <pgname> Optionally enter the name of the protection group.

Examples:
user@root> show protection equipment
PG:fm1t Active Source(s): slot-u8, slot-u9, slot-u10 Alarm Status: clear
user@root> show protection port
PG:port-u0/0 Active Source(s): port-u0/0 Alarm Status: clear

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11.4.4 Removing a Protection Group


The method for removing a protection group varies according to the type of group.

11.4.4.1 Removing Equipment Protection

To remove equipment protection:


1. Set the shelf mode to without-fabric.
2. Delete the old shelf mode.
Example:
user@root# set network-element opt96xx shelf s0 opt9624h shelf-mode without-fabric
user@root# delete network-element opt96xx shelf s0 opt9624h shelf-mode fm1000

11.4.4.2 Removing Port Protection


Delete port protection by deleting the association between two ports.

To delete port protection:


1. Ensure the lasers on both ports are set to ON.
2. At the root level, type the following command:
user@root# delete protection-group port <name> <slot number> <port
number>
Example
user@root# delete protection-group port port-u0/0

11.4.4.3 Removing a Traffic Protection Group


To delete a traffic protection group, delete the relevant L1-XCs (see Deleting an L1-XC). The associated
traffic protection group is deleted automatically.

11.4.5 Triggering a Switch Over


A switch over event is triggered by either a maintenance command or an error. It is affected by the relative
priority of other switch over triggers.
To resolve conflicts between switch over triggers, such as a lockout, or a card/transceiver error, switch over
triggers are received by the RCP card and used to rank the possible choices of the active unit(s). Higher
priority commands take precedence over those of a lower priority, and the active set with the highest rank
is selected.
The following table lists possible triggers for port or traffic switch over events, and their relative priority
levels (where 1 represents the highest priority).

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Table 11-2: Triggers for port switch over events and their relative priorities

Trigger Description Relative Priority


Lockout Manually prevent a card or port from being used. The card or 1
port on which the lockout is performed is switched to standby,
and the standby card or port is automatically switched to
active.
Force Switch Force switch over to a specific card or port. 2

Equipment  For equipment protection, a module BIT error, card 3


failure communication loss in the active card, or a hardware
indication, such as a card extract or power brick failure.
 For port protection, a card or transceiver failure.

Signal Failure  For equipment protection, a signal failure such as an 4


equipment link is out between fabric module and FIO card.
 For port protection, a signal failure such as ODU-AIS or
ODU-LCK.
Signal A signal degraded failure such as ODU-DEG. 5
Degraded
Manual Including power and reset commands. 6
switch over

11.5 Modifying Protection Group Parameters


The following section describes the various features and maintenance commands that can be applied to
specific protection groups. The ability to perform a command varies according to the protection group type.

11.5.1 Modifying the WTR Period


The Wait to Restore (WTR) period is the number of minutes a failed unit must be without fault before it can
be used again as the active unit. The WTR period is used to prevent frequent protection switching due to an
intermittent fault. The WTR can be modified for port or traffic protection groups only. The WTR value can
be between 0-12 minutes. The default value is 5 minutes.

To modify the WTR period:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> wtr-period <wtr-period>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <wtr-period> is the WTR period in seconds.

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Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 wtr-period 7

To view the wtr period:

user@root# show protection-group


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u0/0;
hold-off-time 0.0;
wtr-period 7;
is-revertive false;
severity-profile default;
}

11.5.2 Modifying the Hold-Off Time


The hold-off time is the amount of the time they system should wait after a signal failure is generated
before performing protection switching. Protection switching is only activated if a signal failure is still
present at the end of the hold-off time. This mechanism is useful for specifying priorities in the event that
more than one protection scheme is used.
The hold-off time value can be modified for port or traffic protection groups only. Its value can be set to
between 0-10seconds, and can be defined in 100ms intervals. The default value is 0.

To modify the hold-off time:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> hold-off-time
<hold-off-time>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <hold-off-time> is the hold-off time (msec).
Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 hold-off-time 1.1

To view the hold-off time:

user@root# show protection-group


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u0/0;
hold-off-time 1.1;

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wtr-period 5;
is-revertive false;
severity-profile default;
}

11.5.3 Defining Protection as Revertive/Non-Revertive


For port or traffic protection, define protection as either revertive, or non revertive:
 Revertive: the main path has priority over the protection path. If the main path has equal or better
signal than the protection path, it is used. In the event of a failure, when the main path is restored,
the protected path reverts to the main path.
 Non-revertive. The main and protection paths have equal precedence. Switching between paths only
occurs if the active path’s signal quality is lower than the non-active path.
The default value is non-revertive.

NOTE: Equipment protection is non-revertive.

To set protection as revertive:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> is-revertive true
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 true defines the protection as revertive.
Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 is-revertive true

To view the protection group status:

user@root# show protection-group


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u0/0;
hold-off-time 1.1;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive true;
severity-profile default;
}

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11.5.4 Defining the Main Unit


The main unit is defined by the system defaults. System defaults are defined as follows:
 Port protection: Port protection is defined between two ports on different cards (e.g. port 3 on slot 0
and port 3 on slot 2). For OPT96xx platforms, the default main port resides on the slot with the lowest
number.
 In OPT9624, the left port is defined as the main unit by default.
 In the OPT9608, the upper port is defined as the main unit by default.
 In the OPT9603, port protection can be configured between ports on slot 1 and 2 only. By
default the main port resides on slot 1.
 Traffic protection: the L1-XC leg with the lowest index is defined as the main unit by default.
System defaults can be modified in the case of port or traffic protection only.

NOTE: In the case of port protection, changing the main unit is not traffic affecting. However,
in some circumstances it may cause a protection switch event (traffic affecting <50msec). In
the case of traffic protection, changing the main unit is traffic affecting.

To define a unit as the main unit:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> main-units <unit>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <unit> is the name of the unit that you want to define as main.
Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 main-units port-u4/0

To view the protection group status:

user@root# show protection-group


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u4/0;
hold-off-time 1.1;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive true;
severity-profile default;
}

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11.5.5 Defining the Alarm Severity Profile Name


You can define the name of the severity profile assigned to the protection group. The severity name is a
string of up to 255 characters. The default value is default.

To define the name of the alarm severity profile:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> severity-profile
<severity-profile>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <severity-profile> is the name of the profile - a string of up to 255 characters.
Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 severity-profile severityprofilename


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u4/0;
hold-off-time 0;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive true;
severity-profile severityprofilename;
}

11.5.6 Enabling the Alarm Mask Master


Enabling the alarm mask master causes all alarms for the specified protection group to be masked. Masked
alarms do not appear in the show chassis alarms command, or in the relevant EMS/NMS (STMS/LightSoft).
The default value is disable.

To enable the alarm mask master:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> alarm-master-mask enable
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.

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Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 severity-profile severityprofilename


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u4/0;
hold-off-time 0;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive true;
severity-profile default;
}

11.6 Performing Maintenance Operations


You can use maintenance commands to force switching between main or protection units, when required.
Maintenance commands are executed based on priority. If the maintenance command has a higher priority
than the current command, the current command is cleared, and the maintenance command is activated. If
a command with a higher priority than the maintenance command exists, the maintenance command is not
executed and a rejection message is displayed.

NOTE: Maintenance commands are executed according to priority level. When performing
maintenance commands via ShadeTree, enter the command and commit the change
separately for each action, to ensure the commands hierarchy is maintained.

11.6.1 Performing a Protection Lockout


A protection lockout command prevents protection switching from main to the specified protecting unit,
regardless of the state of the main unit. (For fabric cards, this command prevents the system from using the
card as part of an active FM set.)
Lockout clears all externally initiated switch commands and the WTR period at the protected unit to which
the command was addressed. If any service traffic is using the protecting unit when the command is
applied, the traffic is switched back to the main unit, regardless of its condition.

NOTE: Lockout can only be applied to a single unit in a protection group at any given time.
Lockout is persistent and has the highest priority of any FM switch over criteria.

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To perform a protection lockout:


 Enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> lockout-units
<lockout-units>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <lockout-units> is the unit on which you want to perform the lockout.
Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 lockout-units port-u0/0

When viewing the details of the protection group, the relevant unit is listed as locked out:

user@root# show protection-group


port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u0/0;
hold-off-time 0.0;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive false;
severity-profile default;
lockout-units port-u0/0;
}

11.6.1.1 Removing a Protection Lockout

To remove a protection lockout:


 At the root level, type the following:
user@root# delete protection-group <type> <pgname>lockout-units
<lockout-units>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <lockout-units> is the unit on which you want to remove the lockout.

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11.6.2 Performing a Force Switch


A force switch to protection command forces a switch from main to protection units. It takes priority over
any service failure (SF) or service degraded (SD) alarm. Switching occurs, regardless of the status of the
protecting unit.

To perform a force switch:


 Enter the following command:
user@root# set protection-group <type> <pgname> force-switch-unit
<force-switch-unit>
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <force-switch-unit> is the source unit.
Example:

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 force-switch-unit port-u4/0

To view the force switch status:

user@root# show protection-group


{port port-u0/0 {
units port-u0/0,port-u4/0;
main-units port-u0/0;
hold-off-time 0.0;
wtr-period 5;
is-revertive false;
force-switch-unit port-u4/0;
severity-profile default;}

11.6.2.1 Removing a Force Switch

To remove a force switch:


 At the root level, type the following:
user@root# delete protection-group <type> <pgname> force-switch-unit
Where:
 <type> is the type of protection group.
 <pgname> is the name of the protection group.
 <force-switch-unit> is the source unit

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11.6.3 Performing a Manual Switch


Manual switch enables you to switch from the currently active unit to another unit, unless a higher priority
request has been received. This command has a lower priority than Signal Failure or Signal Degraded errors,
and a higher priority than the WTR period. A manual switch cannot be performed if a lockout command is
already applied. A message is displayed if the command cannot be executed.

NOTE: The manual switch command can be overridden by an error or command of higher
priority.

To perform a manual switch:


 At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# request protection manual-switch <name> <sources>
Where:
 <name> is the name of the protection group.
 <units> are the slot(s)/por(s)/interface(s) in which the unit resides.
Example:

user@root# request protection manual-switch fm1t slot-u9,slot-u8,slot-u10


Manual switch complete.

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11.6.3.1 Additional Manual Switch Over Commands


The following manual operations can also trigger a switch over:

Resetting a module:

If a module is reset within an equipment protection group, the other three modules are automatically
switched to active.

To reset a module:
 At the root level, type the following
user@root# reset <modulename>

Powering off a module


If a module is powered off within a protection group, the other three modules are automatically switched
to active.

To power off a module:


 At the root level, type the following:
user@root# request chassis power off <modulename>

11.6.4 Summary of Protection Group Commands


The following table provides a summary of the commands that can be performed on a protection group.

Table 11-3: Summary of Protection Commands

Attribute Options Description Configurable


 port <type> The type of protection group. Yes, for all protection types.
protection-
group <type>  traffic <type>
 equipment <type>
<unit> Source that is receiving Yes, for traffic only.
units
protection. (e.g., ODU, OCH,
port)
<main-units> Source that is the main unit. Yes, for port protection only.
main-units

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Attribute Options Description Configurable


 <hold-off-time> The amount of the time the Yes, for port, and traffic
hold-off-time;
Enter a value system should wait after a protection.
(0-10s with 100ms signal failure is generated
steps; before performing a protection
(Default= 0) switch over. Switch over is only
activated if a signal failure is
still present at the end of the
hold-off time. This mechanism
is useful in specifying priorities
in the event that more than
one protection scheme is used.
wtr-period <wtr-period> Wait to Restore time. The Yes, for port and traffic
number of minutes a failed SNC protection. Relevant only
should be without fault before where protection is
it can be used again. WTR is revertive.
used to prevent frequent
protection switching due to an
intermittent fault.
(value=0-12 mins, default = 5)
 false  Revertive: main path has Yes, for port, and traffic
is-revertive
 true priority over the protection only.
protection path. If the
main path has equal or
better signal than the
protection path, the main
path is used. In the event
of a failure, when the main
path is restored, the
protected path reverts to
the main path.
 Non-revertive. main and
protection paths have
equal precedence.
Switching between paths
only occurs if the active
path’s signal quality is
lower than the non-active
path.
Default: non-revertive.
<force-switch- Source that is the force switch. Yes, for port and traffic
force-switch-
unit> protection.
unit
severity-profile <string> Name of the severity profile Yes, for port and traffic
<severity- assigned to the protection protection.
profile> group (up to 255 characters).

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Attribute Options Description Configurable


alarm-master-m  enable If enabled, all alarms for the Yes, for port and traffic
ask  disable protection group are masked, protection.
and do not appear in the ‘show
chassis alarms’ command, or in
the EMS/NMS
(STMS/LightSoft).
lockout-units  delete Clears all externally initiated Yes, for traffic protection.
<lockout-units> switch commands and WTR at
the protected point to which
the command was addressed.

Example

user@root# set protection-group port port-u0/0 force-switch-unit


protection-group {
(port | traffic | equipment) <type> {
units <units>;
main-units <main-units>;
hold-off-time <hold-off-time>;
wtr-period <wtr-period>;
is-revertive (false | true);
force-switch-unit <force-switch-unit>;
severity-profile <severity-profile>;
alarm-master-mask (enable | disable);
lockout-units <lockout-units>;
}

11.7 Troubleshooting FM Module Errors


11.7.1 Viewing FM Fabric Status
You can view the status of the FM fabric modules. You can also view a more detailed status that includes
details about the FM cards that are currently working. The detailed FM fabric status enables you to view
the connectivity between the fabric card and the I/O module, and can aid troubleshooting. In the event that
there is a loss of connectivity between a fabric card and the I/O module, all errors related to the fabric
module are displayed in the detailed status, including link failure alarms.

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The status includes the information described in the following table.

Table 11-4: FM fabric status information

Parameter Description
Status The status of the fabric module (active/standby):
Condition The condition of the fabric module:
 <none>: module is working.
 Failing: there is currently an error on the module, and it is not working.
 Failed: the module is working, but there was a problem on the module
in the past.

Alarm Status The status of the most severe alarm on the module.
Description The description of the module type.

To view FM fabric status:


 At the root level, type:
user@root# show chassis pxf status

To view a detailed FM fabric status including all reported errors:


 At the root level, type:
user@root# show chassis pxf status detail

The status and condition of the fabric modules is displayed, including the alarm with the highest severity, if
applicable. The status displays the module status for the FM modules only. The details of any known
failures are organized per module, as shown in the following examples.

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Example A
Example of a detailed FM fabric status showing four working fabric cards.

Name Status Condition Alarm Status Description


Reason

np8 active clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit


np9 active clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit
np10 active clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit
np11 standby clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit

Group: pxf0 (pxfa1/pxfb1)


Auto-switchover: Disabled
Active: 0 (Min: 1 Max: 1)
------------------------ Events (2 of 2 ): ------------------------
[ 15.560000s]: rcp activation detected
[ 11.620000s]: group created
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Group: general (pxfa1/pxfa2/pxfb1/pxfb2)


Auto-switchover: Enabled
Active: 3 (Min: 3 Max: 3)
------------------------ Events ( 14 of 14): ------------------------
[ 1h 1m 30.970000s]: switchover to: pxfa1, pxfa2, pxfb1
[ 1h 1m 30.960000s]: manual switch request
[ 58m 25.950000s]: switchover to: pxfa2, pxfb1, pxfb2
[ 58m 25.930000s]: manual switch request
[ 12m 57.570000s]: update: pxfb2 card: healthy
[ 12m 53.800000s]: switchover to: pxfa1, pxfa2, pxfb1
[ 12m 53.790000s]: update: pxfa2 card: healthy
[ 12m 52.440000s]: update: pxfb1 card: healthy
[ 44.450000s]: update: pxfa1 card: healthy
[ 18.820000s]: configuration change
[ 18.760000s]: switchover to: (none)
[ 18.730000s]: enable auto switchover
[ 15.560000s]: rcp activation detected
[ 11.620000s]: group created
----------------------------------------------------------------------
}

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Example B
Example of a detailed FM fabric status showing a combined card failure of pxfa1 and link failure
between pxfb2 and np13.

root@host# show chassis pxf status detail

{Name Status Condition Alarm Status Description


Reason

np8 standby failing clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit


a module reported a defect (see 'show chassis pxf status detail')
np9 active clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit
np10 active clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit
np11 active clear Packet Switch Fabric, 1 Terabit

Fabric defects reported for pxfa1:

pxfa1 reported a 'simulated module failure 0' 1 times


(the last occurrence was reported at 'Mon Mar 12 18:06:15 2012'
due to 'reported defect')

Fabric defects reported for pxfb2:

pxfb2 reported a 'np13:phy: simulated link failure 0' 1 times


(the last occurrence was reported at 'Mon Mar 12 18:00:51 2012'
due to 'reported defect')

Group: pxf0 (pxfa1/pxfb1)


Auto-switchover: Disabled
Active: 0 (Min: 1 Max: 1)
------------------------ Events (2 of 2): --------------------------
[ 15.560000s]: rcp activation detected
[ 11.620000s]: group created
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Group: general (pxfa1/pxfa2/pxfb1/pxfb2)


Auto-switchover: Enabled
Active: 3 (Min: 3 Max: 3)
------------------------ Events (22 of 22): -------------------------
[ 1h 17m 37.920000s]: switchover to: pxfa2, pxfb1, pxfb2
[ 1h 17m 37.920000s]: update: pxfa1 card: failing
[ 1h 12m 13.860000s]: switchover to: pxfa1, pxfa2, pxfb1
[ 1h 12m 13.850000s]: update: pxfb2 card: healthy links: 1 report(s)
[ 1h 11m 49.840000s]: update: pxfa1 card: healthy
[ 1h 11m 44.910000s]: update: pxfa1 card: failed
[ 1h 10m 47.840000s]: switchover to: pxfa2, pxfb1, pxfb2
[ 1h 10m 47.830000s]: update: pxfa1 card: failing
[ 1h 1m 30.970000s]: switchover to: pxfa1, pxfa2, pxfb1
[ 1h 1m 30.960000s]: manual switch request
[ 58m 25.950000s]: switchover to: pxfa2, pxfb1, pxfb2
[ 58m 25.930000s]: manual switch request

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[ 12m 57.570000s]: update: pxfb2 card: healthy


[ 12m 53.800000s]: switchover to: pxfa1, pxfa2, pxfb1
[ 12m 53.790000s]: update: pxfa2 card: healthy
[ 12m 52.440000s]: update: pxfb1 card: healthy
[ 44.450000s]: update: pxfa1 card: healthy
[ 18.820000s]: configuration change
[ 18.760000s]: switchover to: (none)
[ 18.730000s]: enable auto switchover
[ 15.560000s]: rcp activation detected
[ 11.620000s]: group created
----------------------------------------------------------------------}

11.7.1.1 Clearing Equipment Protection Group Failure History

To clear the failure history:


 At the root level, type:
user@root# request chassis clear-failure <modulename>
Example:

user@root# request chassis clear-failure pxfa2

11.7.1.2 Viewing Protection Alarms and Events


The following protection-related alarms and events are reported.

Table 11-5: Summary of protection-related alarms and events

Alarm Description Severity


probable-cause sfActive Service/signal failure detected in the active unit. Major

probable-cause sfProtecting Service/signal failure detected in the protecting unit. Minor


probable-cause sdActive Service/signal degraded condition detected in the Minor
active unit.
probable-cause sdProtecting Service/signal degraded condition detected in the Minor
protecting unit.
probable-cause Protection switch event detected. N/A
protectionSwitch

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12 Upgrading the Software
RCP cards on OPT9600 devices accommodate an 8 Gb Compact Flash (CF) plug-in module (also referred to
as NVM - Non-Volatile Memory) that stores the ShadeTree Operating System (OS) software (future releases
may include a 16 Gb CF version). From time to time you may need to upgrade the CF software when new
versions are issued by ECI Telecom that add new features or correct problems. You can obtain upgrades by
contacting ECI Telecom Customer Support.
Before upgrading ShadeTree, ECI Telecom recommends backing up the current configuration. For more
information about performing a backup, see Backing Up ShadeTree System Software in the System
Overview and Configuration User Guide.
To upgrade ShadeTree, you must:
 Get the upgrade bundle from ECI Telecom
 Replace the existing software and reboot the device
When you replace the existing software and reboot the device, some of the component cards may update
their firmware automatically and some may need to be updated by the request system
firmware-update operation mode command.

About Automatic Network Processor Upgrades


To display information about the version of ShadeTree the device is currently running, use the operation
mode command show version. This command is also the most accurate method for determining whether
an upgrade has completed.
If you are unsure that an upgrade has completed, you must issue this command before attempting to
remove a card, power down the platform, or restart ShadeTree.

WARNING: ECI Telecom recommends that you do not remove a card, power down the
platform, or restart ShadeTree while an upgrade is in progress. Instead, wait until you are
certain that the upgrade has completed.

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12.1 Update Process


This section describes how to view and upgrade the NE software version. The software bundle contains all
the software packages that are required to upgrade an NE, including the cards and card components. It also
includes relevant release information, such as the release notes. A software package can be downloaded
for immediate installation, or you can schedule an upgrade to occur at a specific date and time of your
choice.
The system holds information about the installed version, and the alternative (previous) version. It is
possible to roll back to the previous software version, if required.
The software upgrade process varies according to the hardware configuration. Only software packages that
have changed are upgraded.

NOTE: This section is applicable to a chassis with either a single or dual RCP installed. If two
RCP cards are present on the NE, ensure they are synchronized before performing the
upgrade. To check the RCP status, use the show chassis command.
Before you install new RCS software, ECI recommends that you back up your current
configuration. For more information about backing up the system, see the System Overview
and Configuration User Guide.

You can perform a software upgrade on a single OPT96xx NE or multiple NEs simultaneously. Upgrading the
software involves the following steps:
1. Verify that SSH access has been enabled before running any installation or upgrade commands. If
necessary, run the following two commands:
 Type set system services ssh root-login allow
 Type set system services ssh enable-network
2. Run the software pre-installation test command on each NE in which you want to install the system
upgrade. The test script checks that the NE meets the installation requirements.
3. Run the installation command, which completes the following stages:
a. Download the upgrade software package to the machine that you want to upgrade.
b. Install the new software package.
4. Run the software pre-upgrade test command on each NE in which you want to upgrade the system.
The test script checks that the NE meets the upgrade requirements.
5. Run the upgrade command, which activates the new software. If you wish to schedule the upgrade
for a later date, use the relevant command. The upgrade is performed automatically in a single step
that does not require user intervention.
During the software upgrade, first the RCP cards are upgraded, then the OPB module(s) and FM cards are
upgraded. Traffic is not affected unless a specific component is traffic affecting.
Where RCP protection exists, the software is stored on both active and standby RCP cards. In the event that
an RCP card is added to an NE running a different software version, it is possible to upgrade only the
standby card.

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12.2 Viewing the Software Version


You can view the current software version for one or both RCPs. You can also view package information per
software bundle.

To view the current software version:


1. At the root level, enter the following command:
user@root# show version
2. Type one of the following options:
 both: display software information for both RCPs.
 detail: display package information per bundle.
 standby: display information from the standby RCP only.
The software version is displayed in the format platform_vxx.x..xx (e.g., OPT9624_v03.05.12).
Example:

user@root# show version

ECI Telecom
SR9624 High Capacity
apollo
Branch: main-apollo-candidate
Active RCP Version:

Software Release : 3.6R1.0


Version# : 162105
Build Type : production
Date Created : unknown
File Hash : 0xB44CEFD29E2696AE7541C99AF66116
OS Version : Linux 2.6.30.3-7.5.a-rcpF #1 SMP PREEMPT
Mon Feb 27 16:59:37 EST 2012 ppc

Magnum OS Restricted 5.0ME17 (160641.eci) -


build of Mon Feb 27 22:48:38 EST 2012

Standby RCP not present

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To view software bundles:


 Type show system software bundles

user@root> show system software bundles

Bundle: /var/home/software/opt96_V_CL.tar
Bundle: /var/staging/bundle/curr/opt96_V_CL.tar
Bundle: /var/staging/bundle/prev/opt96_V_CL.tar
End of bundles

To view software bundle information:


 Type show system software bundle-info

user@root> show system software bundle-info

Getting information... (may take few seconds to calc)

File: /var/home/software/opt96_V_CL.tar
In progress: 0
Size: 6
Version: Model: -- / ST: -- / MOS: -- / UBoot: --
MD5: 0x8FEB211FEF744A43469CF07400094C70

To view the current version of both RCP cards:


 Type show system software both

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12.3 Upgrading NE Software


12.3.1 Performing a Software Pre-Installation Test
The software pre-installation test should be performed on each NE that you want to include in the software
upgrade installation.

To perform a software pre-installation test:


 Type request system software pre-install-test
When complete, the following message is displayed: Pre installation test succeeded.

12.3.2 Installing the Software Package


When the software pre-installation test is passed successfully for all NEs that you want to include in the
installation, begin running the installation software.

To install the software:


 Type request system software install <path/package>
Where <path/package> is the location of the software upgrade package, provided in the software
upgrade notification.
When complete, the following message is displayed: Installation succeeded.

12.3.3 Installing a Software Package with an Earlier Version


Number
A network operator may decide to install a software package with a sequentially lower version number
than the currently installed version. For example, the system may currently be running version 4.1 and the
operator decides to install version 3.9. This is different from a classic rollback to a previously installed
version - in this situation the "lower-numbered" software package is actually a new installation.
Since a "new" version number which is less than the current version number is not typically correct,
ShadeTree includes a built-in safeguard to protect against accidental installations of the wrong software
packages. In these situation, the installation command includes a special downgrade parameter that
indicates the unusual version numbering is intentional, and not a mistake.

WARNING: Downgrading the system software erases the configuration settings completely.
The whole system configuration must be redefined. Therefore, before completing this
command, save a backup of the system configuration settings to use with the new
downgraded version.

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To install an earlier version number of the software:


 Type request system software install <path/package> downgrade
Where <path/package> is the location of the software upgrade package, provided in the software
upgrade notification, and downgrade indicates that the unusual version numbering is intentional.
When complete, the following message is displayed: Installation succeeded.

12.3.4 Checking the Installation Status


This command returns the status and progress of the installation, displaying one of the following results, as
relevant:
 During installation, reports the percentage of installation completed.
 While not currently in mid-installation, reports most recent previous installation success or failure,
with reason.

To check installation progress:


 Type show system software install

12.3.5 Installation Example


The following example installs the software bundle all-latest.tar:

user@host> request system software install all-latest.tar

Extracting...
Staging...
Preparing... ############################################# [100%]
1:libpthread ############################# [ 12%]
2:libstdc++ ############################# [ 25%]
3:omniorb ############################# [ 37%]
4:st ############################# [ 50%]
5:st-domestic############################# [ 62%]
6:st-pkg ############################# [ 75%]
7:st- ################################ [ 87%]
Staged successfully.

WARNING: restart required for staged software to be installed and take effect
Software add succeeded

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12.3.6 Software Installation Events


The following events may be generated during the software installation process:
 Start: The software installation has started successfully.
 Ended successfully: The RCP card software was installed successfully. Installation of related fabric
cards and modules in the software bundle may continue even after this event is generated.
 Failed: The software installation was not successful.

12.4 Activating the New Software Upgrade


12.4.1 Performing a Software Pre-Upgrade Test
The software pre-upgrade test should be performed on each NE that you want to include in the software
upgrade. Note that if an upgrade has already been scheduled to begin within the next 10 minutes, the
pre-upgrade test will not run.

To perform a software pre-upgrade test:


 Type request system software pre-upgrade-test
When complete, the following message is displayed: Pre upgrade test succeeded.

12.4.2 Upgrading the Software


When the software pre-upgrade test is passed successfully for all NEs that you want to include in the
upgrade, begin running the upgrade software. Note that the following command is completed at the
operation level. An alternative command that can be run at the configuration level is available; see
Scheduling an Upgrade to be Completed Now.

To upgrade the software:


 Type request system software upgrade
When complete, the following message is displayed: Upgrade succeeded.

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12.4.3 Standby-Only Software Upgrade


It may be necessary to upgrade only the standby RCP card (for example, if the main RCP card has a different
software version when installing the standby card). This command effectively "clones" the software from
the active RCP card to the standby card, completing both the installation and the activation phases of the
upgrade procedure. The command is issued directly on the active card and executed immediately, rather
than as part of a scheduled upgrade.

To upgrade standby RCP card software:


 Type run system software upgrade standby

12.4.4 Checking the Upgrade Status


This command returns the status and progress of the upgrade, displaying one of the following results, as
relevant:
 During upgrade, reports the percentage of upgrade completed.
 While not currently in mid-upgrade, reports most recent previous upgrade success or failure, with
reason.

To check upgrade progress:


 Type show system software upgrade

12.4.5 Scheduling an Upgrade to be Completed Now


You can schedule an upgrade to be completed immediately. This command is effectively similar to the
request system software upgrade command described previously, which is entered at the operational level.
The difference is that a "scheduled-now" upgrade command, entered at the configuration level, is
"remembered" by the system. This means that if there is an unexpected event, such as a power outage or a
switchover, the system remembers that this command was issued and will redo the command after
recovering from the event.

To schedule an immediate software upgrade:


 Type set system scheduled-upgrade now

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12.4.6 Scheduling an Upgrade for a Later Date


You can schedule an upgrade to run at a specific date and time. This can be useful if, for example, you want
to synchronize the upgrade time of different systems in the network.

NOTE: Scheduling time must be defined as GMT time.

To schedule a software upgrade:


1. Type set system scheduled-upgrade at YYYY-MM-DD,HH:mm
Where:
 YYYY = year
 MM = month
 DD = day
 HH = hour
 mm = minutes
2. Type commit. The following message is displayed: commit succeeded.
Example:
User@root# set system scheduled-upgrade at 2012-12-27,10:49
[edit]
user@root# commit
commit started
commit succeeded

12.4.7 Check Status of a Scheduled Upgrade


This command returns the status and progress of a scheduled upgrade, displaying one of the following
results, as relevant:
 When an upgrade has been scheduled, reports that an upgrade has been scheduled.
 During upgrade, reports the percentage of upgrade completed.
 While not currently in mid-upgrade, reports most recent previous upgrade success or failure, with
reason.

To check scheduled upgrade status:


 Type show system software scheduled upgrade

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12.4.8 Software Upgrade Events


The following events may be generated during the software upgrade process:
 Start: The software upgrade has started successfully.
 Ended successfully: The RCP card was upgraded successfully. Upgrade of related fabric cards and
modules in the software bundle may continue even after this event is generated.
 Failed: The software upgrade was not successful.

12.5 Rollback to Previously Installed Version


It is possible to roll back the system to the previous software version.

WARNING: Rollback is traffic affecting.

To roll back to the previous software version:


 At the root level, type the following command:
user@root# request system software rollback

WARNING: Rolling back to a previous software version also restores the previous
configuration status and settings. Any new configuration that was performed with the newer
software is not saved.

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