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J408/508 Super-J in NYC Experience

School of Journalism and Communication, University of Oregon


Spring 2019

Key information
Instructor: Damian Radcliffe, Carolyn S. Chambers Professor in Journalism
Office: 201 Allen Hall
Office hours: 4pm-5pm Monday, 12pm-1pm on Wedneday. Other times by appointment.
Email: damianr@uoregon.edu
Telephone: 541-346-7643 (voicemail). SMS/Text 541-972-5531 from 9am-9pm.
You can also email or DM me on Twitter @damianradcliffe
Class Time: 18.00 – 19.50, Tuesday 307 Allen Hall
CRN: 36185 (for J408) TBD for J508.

NY trip 18th – 21st June 2019. Based at The Roosevelt Hotel:


http://www.theroosevelthotel.com/
Address: 45 E 45th St, New York, NY 10017
Phone: (212) 661-9600

Please arrive by 8pm on Monday 17th June, for a group check-in/briefing. You can typically
check into the hotel from 2-3pm, although you can drop your luggage there earlier than this.

You’re free to leave after evening Friday 21st June 2019. But, your hotel room will be booked
for that night, with checkout on Saturday 22nd June. If you wish to stay in NYC after this date,
you are responsible for organizing your own accommodation.

Course Background
New York is arguably the media capital of the world. It is home to heavyweight media legacy organizations such
as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, newer digital players like Vice, BuzzFeed and The Huffington
Post as well as leading graduate schools, and global NGOs with a strong interest in the power of journalism,
media and communications.

We will be meeting with many of these organizations during a visit to New York in June 2019.

The first part of this course is designed to prepare students for this trip, so that attendees get the most out this
experience before-during-and after. The second part of the course involves the experiential learning element in
New York, where we will spend four days talking about the current, and future, state of journalism with a range
of different experts, researchers and practitioners.

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Learning outcomes

• Identify and understand key issues affecting the contemporary journalism industry, including outdated
and emerging economic models, widespread distrust, and technological disruption and innovation.

• Within this, demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical principles and work ethically in
pursuit of truth, accuracy, fairness and diversity; as well as an understanding of the history and role of
professionals and institutions in shaping communications and journalism today.

• Apply that research – derived through a combination of class lectures, discussion, as well as your own
reading, research and analysis, to a wide variety of media organizations based in New York,
demonstrating the ability to think critically, creatively and independently.

• Synthesize this knowledge through informed, in-depth, face-to-face conversations with industry
leaders.

• Evaluate and express your potential career path – including skills, attitudes and knowledge that you
may need to develop – through a strong, up-to-date, professional online portfolio.

Approach
Learning methods will include:

● Pre-fieldtrip research into the organizations and people we will be meeting with.
● Presenting your research findings to your class peers and instructors.
● On-site visits to leading media and news organizations.
● In-class assignments and tasks (listening, pitching etc.)
● Out of class assignments (portfolio creation, analysis of reading etc.).

Estimated student workload

This 2-credit workshop includes one class a week + assignments to be completed outside of class, as well as a
busy four-days of meetings and networking in New York.

Undergraduate Courses
Under the UO quarter system, each undergraduate credit reflects approximately thirty hours of student
engagement. Therefore, this 2-credit course is akin to approximately 60 hours total of student time.

Class time (10 weeks at 110 minutes per week), readings, assignments and experiential learning in New York,
will account for another c.40 hours of your time this term.

Graduate Courses
Graduate students are expected to perform work of higher quality and quantity, typically with forty hours of

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student engagement for each student credit hour. Therefore, a 2-credit graduate course would typically engage
students c. 80 hours.

For graduate students, class time (10 weeks at 110 minutes per week), readings, assignments and experiential
learning in New York, will account for another c.60 hours of your time.

Out of class work will typically take 2-4 hours a week to complete, although sometimes this will be greater.

In a typical week, non-class work may include:

● Research into a media organization / journalist(s)


● Portfolio development
● Wider industry reading and reflections

Note: Assignments to be completed outside of class – such as the above reading, preparation of in-class
presentation materials, keeping a journal to track your learning and analysis from the class etc. - will run
concurrent with other tasks, so you will need to manage your time accordingly to balance competing workloads
for this class and others.

How this class works


Much of the learning from this class will derive from you.

1. Research tasks
This will typically involve online research into a specific organization, or individual(s) that we will be
meeting with. Each student will take the lead on a given site visit. You will also lead a pre-trip briefing to
the rest of the group on your assignment organizations/person.

2. Portfolio development
Prior to our trip I will work with you to develop your online presence, across social networks and
specifically across your own portfolio website, to ensure that these are as strong as possible.

3. Wider industry reading


You will need to keep track of key developments in the media and journalism space, with a particular
focus on the organizations and people that we will be meeting with. This is to ensure that you are as
informed as possible when we make our site visits. Given that the news and media industry moves at a
fast pace, you will need to keep abreast of the latest industry developments. Many of the latest issues
and developments that we will be discussing in New York may not have happened yet.

Recommended sites include: Nieman Lab, What’s New In Publishing, Poynter, CJR, daily newsletters from
the Pew Journalism Center and the American Press Institute.

These are the publications which the journalists you will be meeting in New York read each day.
Therefore, you need to read these regularly too. That will enable you to come to meetings with the
latest industry knowledge, and ensure that you are in a position to debate and discuss the latest
industry hot topics.

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We will assign you a publication to read, throughout the term, in the first week of class. This will be
coupled with other assigned reading e.g. industry/academic reports, which provide a foundational
knowledge for the more contemporary reading.

The sites that you will be assigned to read publish original reporting and analysis, as well as relevant
stories that link to other developments and reports. You should follow your designated outlet on social
media, subscribe to their newsletters and read their website.

You are required to read for a minimum of 30 minutes each week; ideally more. At a minimum you
should read 3-5 articles from your chosen publication (articles typically range from 800-1,500 words)
each week, as well as any deep-dive reports were have identified.

In a week where there is a major report to read, read this + 3 articles (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

In a week with no report, read a minimum of 5 articles (akin to 4,000 – 7,500 words).

We will discuss your reading in class each week.

4. Analysis
In our first class, you will be assigned a specific news site (such as those listed above) to monitor – and
reflect on – for the duration of the term. In addition to in-class discussion, learning from this reading will
be captured each week in a written online journal.

The journal will feature your analysis of the on-going research you are undertaking – in class and in your
own time – into the current state of media and journalism. These are the contemporary topics (themes,
developments and news) which we will be discussing, in person, with senior editors and journalists in
New York.

5. Participation and Discussion


In addition to this, you will each present takeaways from your industry reading to the group,
twice in the term. Through this, you will help to spark further discussion about the impact/importance of
these issues and developments.

Alongside this, there will also be presentations and workshops, led by your instructor, on a range of topics such
as digital disruption, media economics, changing consumption habits, rebuilding trust, networking and
professional behavior.

New York Do’s and Don’ts

Do
● Dress to impress. Overdress. Don’t underdress.
● Always have your ID on you. (Required for security passes at many organizations)
● If we are going to be doing a lot of walking, consider having a spare pair of comfortable shoes to slip on.
● Make sure you have group contact numbers - and travel directions - on hand at all times.

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When we visit people:
● Ask smart, informed questions.
● Act like you belong.
● Take handwritten notes.
● Be polite and respectful.

You’ll work hard but to don’t forget to:


● Make the most of being in the city.
● Remember things go wrong, visits overrun, change or get cancelled.
● Be flexible.
● Have fun!

Don’t

● Arrive late for an appointment, or a pre-appointment security check. You WILL BE excluded from that
visit if you are late.
● Take selfies in reception, or of office views etc. Play it cool!
● Be on your phone in any meeting.
● Dominate the group. Ensure everyone has airtime.
● Hide within the group. Put yourself out there!

Grading/Weighting

Activity Points % of total grade


1. Class attendance 100 10%
2. Class participation 200 20%
3. Pre-fieldtrip research briefing 150 15%
4. Personal Portfolio 250 25%
5. Weekly Journal (5% each, Weeks 2-9) 50 each – 450 in total 5% each - 45% in total
TOTAL 1,000 100%

Assessment Criteria
You will be given more detailed assignment notes ahead of each task. But, broadly speaking, this term you will
produce four pieces of graded work.

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The rest of your marks are based on attendance, active participation and professionalism. The latter is
important, given that this class is designed to prepare you for employment.

1. Class attendance (10%)


Attendance is compulsory. This is reflected in the grading structure for the term. If you are unable to make a
class, please notify me – by email - as soon as possible and before your absence. You will need to provide a valid
reason for your absence.

2. Participation (20%)
You’re expected to be active in class. You will do this in a manner which is respectful of different opinions, and
where all ideas are valid. This means asking intelligent questions of your peers and instructors, and contributing
to a collaborative – supportive - learning environment.

You will also each, twice in the term, share an industry story/development, with the group for discussion.

You will also be expected to bring these sensibilities with you to New York.

Don’t just turn up and observe. You’ll be expected to ask questions – based on your research and reading – and
be in a position to answer questions asked of you by the people we visit (expect them to turn the tables and also
ask your opinion).

More specifically, you will be expected to take the lead at organizations where you’ve been the primary student
background researchers, and to contribute actively across the trip. But group dynamic is also important, so your
participation will also take account of the need to ensure that everyone gets “airtime”.

3. Pre-fieldtrip research briefing document + presentation (15%)


A good journalist does their homework. There will be no room for “blagging it” in this class (gold star if you know
what this very British term means). Your job will be to ensure that everyone – and not just you - is well briefed
ahead of any of our site visits.

You will fill out an online template for this assignment. This will cover areas such as:

● An outlet’s primary work


● Its audience
● Challenges it may be facing – and the responses to it
● Great content / work that it have done (and why it’s so good)
● The background of key individuals we are meeting with (e.g. work and education history, role etc.)

You will share findings via a collaborative Google Document, which will be the class handbook for our visit.

4. Personal Portfolio (25%)


A good online presence is fundamental. In a competitive job market, how do you stand out from the crowd?
Networking – as manifest in this trip – is key; as is a strong and demonstrable portfolio. This is especially
important for those starting out in this industry. We will work with you to determine the image and personal
brand that you wish to project, before turning that aspiration into reality. The importance of your online
presence is reflected in the fact that this assignment alone is worth a quarter of your grade for the term.

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5. Weekly Journal (45%)
Show me what you’re reading and what you’re learning from it. Each week (Weeks 1-9) you will write a
reflection on what you have learned that week. Entries will be submitted by 5.59PM on Sunday each week, via
Canvas. Reflections should be 400-600 words (undergrad) – 600-800 words (grad students).

Your journal is a key way to keep track of your learning and pre-NY prep, therefore your journal is worth 45%
of your grade for the term. Each entry is worth 5% of your grade. I will grade three of your journal entries, at
random, during the term and from this determine an average grade for your other entries.

Your reflections should include:

▪ Looking Back: Your takeaways from our conversations in class that week.
▪ Latest News/Research: Lessons from your own reading that week (with links).

To do this, you will need to set up a blog on WordPress, Tumblr, Medium or another publishing platform of
your choosing. You will produce your journal entries on these platforms and submit the URL (which can be
password protected, if you do not want your entries to be made public) to Canvas.

If you wish to publish these reflections, so that they are available to a wider audience, you’ll need to sign a
social media release form, which can be found on Canvas. I will also bring physical copies of these for you to
the first class of term.

If you’d rather not publish them, aside from making your entries password protected (you submit the
password and URL in Canvas each week) you can submit them directly to Canvas as an MS Word or a Google
Doc (you will need to hyperlink to content, so text-only entries will not be sufficient).

Either way, public or not, this weekly research and analysis piece is a key component of this class and the
preparation for our visit to New York.

Here are some tips for these publishing platforms:

https://www.wikihow.com/Use-WordPress
https://www.wikihow.com/Create-a-Tumblr-Account
https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/how-to-use-medium
https://www.techradar.com/news/the-best-free-blogging-sites
https://makeawebsitehub.com/choose-right-blogging-platform/

Journal Tips

• Make your online journal engaging to look at. I’m going to read 14 of these. Every week. So, use
images, sub-headings and other visual cues to break up the text and make it interesting to
read/look at. If you wouldn’t want to read it, why would I?

• Always hyperlink to the research, developments and articles you are sharing. In the digital age,
hyperlinking should be standard. If you’ve shared – or summarized – something interesting, make it
easy for the reader to go to the original source. The best way to do that is by linking to it.

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• Make sure your blog has a title. Even if it’s just your name and this class.

• Note your journal does not need to be public. (See above, reprinted below.)

If you wish to publish these reflections, so that they are available to a wider audience, you’ll need to sign
a social media release form, which can be found on Canvas. I will also bring physical copies of these for
you to the first class of term.

If you’d rather not publish them, aside from making your entries password protected (you submit the
password and URL in Canvas each week) you can submit them directly to Canvas as an MS Word or a
Google Doc (you will need to hyperlink to content, so text-only entries will not be sufficient).

Grading
This course is graded [Pass/Fail] for all students. However, individual assignments – portfolio,
participation, research briefing documents etc. will be graded.
You need to secure a C or above to pass.
The following chart applies to graded assignments and the final grade. Grades will be posted to Canvas.

A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F

≥93% 90 87 83 80 77 73 70 67 63 60 59-0

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How Grades For Written Work + Class Presentations Will Be Determined

Category A B C D F

Strong lead: Vivid, telling Provides Essential Not a direct Factual


Informative detail. essential information lead and/or error(s).
hard information. but lacking important
(summary) clarity, information
news lead or conciseness missing.
compelling and/or detail.
anecdotal
opening.

Essential Who, what, 5 Ws covered Essential Essential Does not tell a


information where, when and but story not information information story.
covered. why organized provided but missing and/or
answered. clearly with disorganized. disorganized.
Story / most
Analysis important
logically information
organized. at the top.

Appropriate Strong use of Appropriate Quotes and Quotes or Quotes and


use of quotes quotes, with best use of quotes attribution attribution attribution
and quote high in and provided. missing missing
attribution. story. Attribution attribution.
provided when
needed.

Clear and Clear and concise Basically clear Thorough Writing style is Unintelligible.
concise writing. and concise. editing inappropriate
writing. Appropriate needed to for a news
writing style (i.e., meet story.
Appropriate short paragraphs, standards.
writing and/or descriptive detail,
analytical active verbs, no
style. first-person).

Factually Mechanically 1-2 minor 1 major error 2 major errors Fatal flaws:
accurate. sound, no errors. errors. Style such as a and multiple Factual errors,
Correct inconsistent. fragment, minor issues. misspelling of
grammar, run-on, proper names,
spelling and comma splice, multiple
punctuation. or more than grammar,
two minor spelling errors.
errors.

Other factors which also come into the mix:

• Layout, formatting, for digital submissions. Have you used this to your advantage?

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Course Schedule
This schedule is a draft and is subject to change, depending on student interests, inclement weather and other
unplanned – and currently unknown - factors. You will be made aware of any major changes if/when they arise.

Week 1: Tuesday 2nd April 2019

In class ● Introductions: Overview of the program, expectations - in class and in NYC - getting
to know each other.

● Assignment of Industry Reading.

● Presentation/Discussion: The Impact of Digital Disruption.

Homework ● Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class and
industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
3 x articles from your chosen publication (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

+ The leaked New York Times innovation report is one of the key documents of this
media age, by Joshua Benton, Nieman Lab (May 2014)

+ 97-page PDF of the NYT’s 2014 Innovation Report, which provides a great
overview of changes in the sector and the NYT’s efforts to make sense of them.

Week 2: Tuesday 9th April 2019

In class ● Discussion with former SuperJ in NYC students.


(Damian)
● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

● Presentation/Discussion: Introduction to Portfolios.

Homework  Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class
and industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
3 x articles from your chosen publication (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

● + Ensure your portfolios are ready for review for peer-review next week.

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Week 3: Tuesday 16th April 2019

In class ● Presentation/Discussion: Key issues for Digital and Legacy News providers.

● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

● Peer reviews of Portfolios (working in 4 x groups of 4) BRING A LAPTOP/TABLET

Homework  Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class
and industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
3 x articles from your chosen publication (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

Plus: “The secret cost of pivoting to video,” by Heidi N. Moore, CJR (September
2017, 4 pages)

+ Overview and Key Findings of the 2018 Report, Reuters Institute for the Study of
Journalism, Oxford University, by Nic Newman (lead author, Digital News Report
2018, 34 pages)

Week 4: Tuesday 23rd April 2019

In class ● Presentation/Discussion: Rebuilding Trust in Journalism

● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

● Assignments of orgs/people to research.

Homework  Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class
and industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
3 x articles from your chosen publication (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

Plus: The 32 Percent Project: Exploring How Citizens Define Trust and How
Journalists Can Earn It.”, by Lisa Heyamoto and Todd Milbourn (41 pages)

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Week 5: Tuesday 30th April 2019

In class. ● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

● 1-1 Portfolio Reviews.

● Work on research analysis of you assigned org/person. BRING A LAPTOP/TABLET

Homework ● Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class and
industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
3 x articles from your chosen publication (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

+ Make any outstanding changes to your portfolio (by end Week 5).

Week 6: Tuesday 7th May 2019

In class ● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

● 1-1 Portfolio Reviews.

● Work on research analysis of you assigned org/person. BRING A LAPTOP/TABLET

Homework ● Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class and
industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
5 x articles from your chosen publication (c.4,000 – 7,500 words).

+ Submit draft of your research on your assignment person/org (via Canvas) for
feedback (Class Week 7, 1-1 with me) and revisions ahead of in-class presentations
in Week 8+9.

Week 7: Tuesday 14th May 2019

In class ● Professionalism and networking discussion.

● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

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● 1-1 feedback on your research assignment (for revision).

Homework ● Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class and
industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
5 x articles from your chosen publication (c.4,000 – 7,500 words).

Week 8: Tuesday 21st May 2019

In class ● Student presentations: research analysis (Group 1, 7 x 5 minute presentations)

● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

Homework  Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class
and industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
3 x articles from your chosen publication (c.2,400 – 4,500 words).

Plus: Damian Radcliffe / What’s New in Publishing: 50 Ways to Make Media


Pay (download the 40-page report here)

Week 9: Tuesday 27th May 2019

In class ● Student presentations: research analysis (Group 2, 7 x 5 minute presentations)

● Discussion about Industry Reading (4 students)

Homework  Produce a 400 – 600 word journal on your key learning from the previous class
and industry reading this week. Deadline for submission Sunday 5.59PM.

Reading
5 x articles from your chosen publication (c.4,000 – 7,500 words).

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Week 10: Tuesday 4th June 2019

In class ● Travel planning (in groups): BRING A LAPTOP/TABLET


Create shared doc with flight details and daily travel plan.

● Final check-in (schedule, travel etc.)

Homework ● Keep up to date with industry reading.

NY trip 18th – 21st June 2019.

Don’t miss your flight! Make sure you have emergency contact details for the group.

The Roosevelt Hotel: http://www.theroosevelthotel.com/


Address: 45 E 45th St, New York, NY 10017
Phone: (212) 661-9600

Please arrive by 8pm on Monday 17th June, for a group check-in/briefing.

Course policies
Attendance
As outlined above, in line with UO and SOJC policy, this is mandatory for this class. I don’t expect to have
to chase you up about any absences. Be proactive. Treat me, and this class, as you would do a job.

You are expected to be in class, be on time, and stay through the end of class.
Attendance will be taken promptly at the beginning of each class session.

We’re meeting from 6-7.50pm, which is dinner time for many of you. So, you’re welcome to bring food to
class, just be respectful of others when eating!

Any unexcused absence will result in a one-letter-grade deduction (per such absence) from your
overall course grade.

If you have an emergency or a University-approved reason for missing class, please notify the professor in
advance and provide documentation; otherwise, absences are assumed to be unexcused.

Accessibility
The University of Oregon seeks to create inclusive learning environments. If aspects of this course result in
barriers to your participation, please notify me as soon as possible. You are also welcome to contact Disability
Services in 164 Oregon Hall at 346- 1155 or disabsrv@uoregon.edu.

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Basic needs
Any student who has difficulty affording groceries or accessing sufficient food to eat every day, or who lacks a
safe and stable place to live, and believes this may affect their performance in the course, is urged to contact
the Dean of Students Office (346-3216, 164 Oregon Hall) for support.

Furthermore, if you are comfortable doing so, please let me know about your situation so I can help point you
in the right direction for assistance.

Crisis Center
The University of Oregon Counseling Center provides students with confidential telephone crisis intervention
24/7. The number is 541-346-3227.

Diversity
Open inquiry, freedom of expression, and respect for differences are fundamental to a comprehensive and
dynamic education. SOJC is committed to upholding these ideals by encouraging the exploration,
engagement, and expression of divergent perspectives and diverse identities.

Discrimination of any kind, disrespect for others, and inequity in educational opportunity are not acceptable.
Students, faculty, and staff are expected at all times to maintain the School of Journalism and
Communication’s high standards of ethical and compassionate conduct.

Please see me if you need help or have any questions.

Academic integrity
The U of O policy on academic dishonesty will be observed throughout this course. Plagiarizing and/or cheating
will result in an automatic failure of the course.

To avoid this, you should read: http://researchguides.uoregon.edu/citing-plagiarism. Careers can – and have
been – destroyed as a result of breaking these rules. Don’t be foolish and make the same mistakes!

Technology – submission of papers and use of laptops and phones.


All assignments should be shared with the URL for your work inserted into Canvas.

With a few exceptions (see below), electronic devices, including laptops, cell phones, and tablets, are
not permitted. This may seem harsh, but it’s for the good of the learning environment.

Numerous studies have found that technology’s benefits are often outweighed by the distractions they
create (for you and people around you). Similarly, multiple studies have also shown the value of making
written notes. I encourage you to keep a written notebook for this class.

Exceptions to this ICT policy include in-class activities that require devices to look things up—which may
happen occasionally – and the group presentations. But you should feel no obligation to bring a device to
class for that reason; you’ll always be OK without one. (You can email group presentations to me, for
example, in advance, and you can run them from my laptop.)

If you have any questions or concerns about this policy, please let me know.

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Questions
If you want to know more about anything mentioned here, or anything which you think is missing, then please
do not hesitate to email me! damianr@uoregon.edu (or pop by Allen Hall 201) at any time.

Additional Course Information: Accreditation Guidelines and Goals


The national accrediting agency for journalism education has required that all accredited journalism schools
assess student mastery of 12 core values and competencies that every graduate of a journalism and mass
communication program should possess.

According to the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC), all
graduates, irrespective of their particular specialization, should be able to:

1. Understand and apply the principles and laws of freedom of speech and press, for the country in
which the institution that invites ACEJMC is located, as well as receive instruction in and understand
the range of systems of freedom of expression around the world, including the right to dissent, to
monitor and criticize power, and to assemble and petition for redress of grievances;

2. Demonstrate an understanding of the history and role of professionals and institutions in


shaping communications;

3. Demonstrate an understanding of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and, as appropriate,


other forms of diversity in domestic society in relation to mass communications;

4. Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of peoples and cultures and of the significance and
impact of mass communications in a global society;

5. Understand concepts and apply theories in the use and presentation of images and information;

6. Demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical principles and work ethically in pursuit of


truth, accuracy, fairness and diversity;

7. Think critically, creatively and independently;

8. Conduct research and evaluate information by methods appropriate to the communications


professions in which they work;

9. Write correctly and clearly in forms and styles appropriate for the communications professions,
audiences and purposes they serve;
10. Critically evaluate their own work and that of others for accuracy and fairness, clarity,
appropriate style and grammatical correctness;

11. Apply basic numerical and statistical concepts;

12. Apply tools and technologies

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Instructor bio http://journalism.uoregon.edu/member/radcliffe-damian/

Damian Radcliffe is the Carolyn S. Chambers Professor in Journalism, and a Professor of Practice, at the
University of Oregon. Alongside holding the Chambers Chair at the School of Journalism and Communication
(SOJC), he is also a Fellow of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, an Honorary
Research Fellow at Cardiff University’s School of Journalism, Media and Culture Studies, and a fellow of the
Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA).

An experienced digital analyst, consultant, journalist, and researcher, Damian has worked in editorial,
research, policy, and teaching positions for the past two decades in the UK, Middle East, and USA. This
includes roles in all media sectors (commercial, public, government, regulatory, academic, and nonprofit/civil
society) and all platforms (print, digital, TV and radio).

Damian continues to be an active journalist, writing monthly columns for ZDNet (CBS Interactive) and What's
New in Publishing, and frequently appearing in journalism.co.uk. He writes about digital trends, social media,
technology, the business of media, and the evolution of journalism.

These themes are also at the heart of the Demystifying Media speaker series, which Damian curates. He
launched the series in January 2016, with the goal of bringing leading academics and industry professionals
to the SOJC. To date, more than 30 experts have participated in the program.

Outside of this series, Damian has chaired sessions, provided training, and spoken at events, around the
world including: USA (New York, Portland, Philadelphia, Colorado Springs, Albany; New York, Chicago and
Washington D.C.), UK (London, Edinburgh, Oxford, Cardiff, Belfast, Bristol), Europe (Paris, Strasbourg, Vienna,
Barcelona, Istanbul, Amsterdam, various cities in Germany) and the Middle East (Doha and Dubai).

Before joining the University of Oregon in 2015, Damian previously worked full-time for The Local Radio
Company, BBC, Volunteering Matters, Ofcom (the UK communications regulator), and Qatar’s Ministry of
Information and Communications Technology (ictQATAR).

He has also written, spoken to, or provided consulting services, for a wide range of additional industry and
academic organizations, such as: Abramis Academic Publishing, ASDA’A Burson-Marsteller, Association of
Information and Communication Media (AMIC, Spain), BBC Media Action, BBC Monitoring, BBC World
Service, Carnegie UK Trust, Cass Business School, Centre for Research on Communities and Culture
(Canterbury University), City University London, Cognizant, European Journalism Observatory, Eyewitness
Media Hub, FJUM (forum journalism and media, Vienna), German-American Institutes, The Guardian, IBC
Content Everywhere, Media Development Investment Fund, Middle East Broadcast Network (MBN), NESTA,
Northwestern University in Qatar, Online Journalism Blog, Qatar Today, Street Fight, TEDx Reset (Turkey),
The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at Oxford University and Your Middle East.

Other outlets to feature Damian's work include: BBC College of Journalism and BBC Academy (36
bylines), The Conversation (6 bylines), Digital Content Next (6 bylines), Huffington Post (12 bylines), IJNet (9
bylines) and - prior to their closure - PBS MediaShift (14 bylines) and TheMediaBriefing (35 bylines).
Additional bylines can also be found in Columbia Journalism Review (CJR), Harvard's Nieman
Lab, Poynter and elsewhere.

Find out more about him on his website. Follow him on Twitter @damianradcliffe

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