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Assumption University

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Business Administration

(International Program)

Modified Program

i1fll'jflfl'Hl 2560

Academic Year 2017


Doctor of Philosophy Program in Business Administration 1
(International Program/Modified Program 2017)

47
AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree

Doctor of Philosophy Program

In Business Administration

(International Program)

Modified Program 2017

Institution Assumption University

Campus/Faculty/Department Huamak Campus

Martin de Tours School of Management and Economics

Section 1 : General Information

1. Code and Title of Program

Code 25500741104845
Program Doctor of Philosophy Program in Business Administration (International Program)
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2. Title of Degree and Major Field

Full Title Doctor of Philosophy (Business Administration)


tlf"ll'qi1'i.!~~um4i'il (u1Vi111pn-;J)
Abbreviated Title Ph.D. (Business Administration)
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3. Major Field None

4. Total Credits 60 Credits

5. Type of Program

5.1 Level

Doctoral Degree Program in compliance with the Thai Qualifications Framework for Higher
Education B.E. 2552 and Program Standard Criteria B.E. 2558
5.2 Medium of Instruction

English
5.3 Admission
Thai and international students

As of Mar. 17, 2017


AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree

5.4 Collaboration with Other Institutions

This program is AU program.


5.5 Type of Conferred Degree

One degree (one major)

6. Program Status and Endorsement/Approval

Modified Program 2017


t
Implementation Schedule: Semester 1, Academic Year 2017
This program was endorsed by the AU Academic Committee in its meeting 3/2017 on
5 April 2017 and approved by the University Council in its meeting 4/2016 on 25 May 2017

7. Expected Year of Program Registration: 2019

8. Professions/Careers after Graduation

(1) Lecturers in Business Disciplines


(2) Business Researchers
(3) Business Entrepreneurs/Owners
(4) Business Development Professionals
(5) Consultants in Business Areas

9. Faculty Members Responsible for the Program

1. Ms. Theingi
Ph.D. (Marketing), University of Western Australia, Australia, 2004
M.B.A. (Business Administration), Assumption University, Thailand, 1997
B.B.A. (International Business Management) Assumption University, Thailand, 1995
Academic Title: Assistant Professor
2. Mrs. Hla Theingi •
Ph.D. (International Business), Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand, 2007
M.B.A. (Business Administration), Assumption University, Thailand, 1995
B.B.A. (International Business Management), Assumption University, Thailand, 1994
Academic Title: Assistant Professor

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3. Mrs. Patricia Arttachariya

Ph.D. (Industrial and Business Studies), University of Warwick, UK, 1997


M.A. (Communication and Business Management), University of the Thai Chamber of
Commerce, Thailand, 1989
M.A. (Industrial Relations), University of Warwick, UK, 1995
B. Com. (Economics & Business Environment), Nagpur University, India, 1974
Post-Graduate Diploma in Business Administration, K.C. College of Management Studies,
India, 1977
Academic Title: Assistant Professor

10. Instructional Venue

Martin de Tours School of Management, Huamak Campus

11. External Contexts or Development Affecting Program Planning

11.1. Economic Context or Development

Given the growth in Thailand's economy and increased globalization, there is a strong need to
develop professionals who can conduct research and impart knowledge in key business areas,
such as marketing, management, and finance. Our curriculum comprises courses that strengthen
students' knowledge in these areas and strengthen the literature related to business in the Thai
context.
11.2.Social and Cultural Context or Development

Whilst our courses have strong business underpinning, there is also the need for holistic
development of our students. This means the program also needs to create cultural awareness
and recognize diversity. Our courses emphasize not just local development of people and
resources but also many seminar courses offered have an international context and scope to give
students a better perspective on Thailand and to compare cultural and business practices in
international settings.

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12. Impacts of Item 11.1and11.2 on Program Development and Relations to AU Mission

12.1. Impacts on Program Development

All courses in the program are geared toward developing professionals who can operate in a
changing world of business. Our strength is our strong emphasis on theory and research. With
the expanding role of business in global society and the increasing sophistication of the practice
of management, the demand for faculty researchers and educators at business schools in
Thailand has never been greater and this is what we have emphasized when developing our
program.
12.2.Relations to AU Mission

The vision of AU "Educating Intelligences and Active Minds to Change the World" is a philosophy
that has guided our program planning and implementation. Our doctoral students will have the
opportunity to develop and test new ideas and paradigms-and to defend them vigorously before
other respected scholars. Our doctoral students are expected to one day make a unique
contribution to the field of business.

13. Relationships (if any} with Other Programs Offered by Faculties/Departments within AU

13.1. Course (s} Offered by Other Programs

None
13.2. Course (s} Offered to Other Programs

None

13.3. Management

None

Section 2 : Program Specific Information

1. Philosophy, Significance and Objectives of Program

1.1 Philosophy
Assumption University aims to offer a Ph.D. program in Business Administration as an educational
building block for prospective scholars in search of pursuance of a rigorous, innovative, and discipline
based research in business. The mission of the School is to achieve leadership - through thought
and action - in the world of management. Our Ph.D. Program is central to that mission, providing
rigorous training toward an academic career, thus producing future leaders in business research and

management.
The philosophy of the doctoral program is to build on a solid foundation in the social sciences to
develop rigorous analytical capabilities in the study of the underlying disciplines, while at the same
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Doctoral Degree

time, discussing topics of common interest in a diverse community of scholars. Our doctoral students
undertake a broad curriculum while providing the flexibility to pursue multidisciplinary studies.
This structure reflects the School's philosophy that the major goal of the doctoral program is to
produce the next generation of scholars and researchers in business. In a world that increasingly
values knowledge, students will therefore have the skills and expertise to make a significant
contribution.

1.2 Objectives: To produce graduates who have the characteristics, knowledge and skills as

follows:

1. Adhere to moral principles and justice.


2. Able to keep up with current developments and state of art knowledge in the field with
proven ability to successfully carry out research.
3. Able to link and integrate applied research findings as a precursor to the formulation of
visions, strategies, and operations to support the local and international business sectors.
4. Able to develop and maintain co-operative networks and working relationships with
supervisors, colleagues and peers, within institutions and the wider research community.

5. Able to design and execute systems for the acquisition and collation of
information/knowledge through the effective use of appropriate resources and technology.
6. Able to construct coherent arguments and articulate ideas clearly to a range of audiences,
formally and informally through a variety of techniques. etc.

2. Program Improvement and Modification Plan

Improvement/Modification Strategies Evidence/Indicators

Plan

1. Curriculum update. 1. Conduct survey of 1. Survey results.


graduates' opinions about
the program.
2. Modification of courses 2. Conduct the interview for 2. Interview report.
every 5 years. experts in business, current
students, and other
stakeholders

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Section 3 : Educational Management System, Implementation and Curriculum Structure

1. Educational Management System

1.1 System

Semester System, 15 Weeks per Semester


1.2 Summer Session

A summer session of 8 weeks is offered.

1.3 Credit Equivalent to Semester System (In case of trimester system)

None


2. Program Implementation

2.1 Study Period

First Semester : August-December


Second Semester : January-May
Summer Session : June-July

2.2 Admission Requirements

1. Master's degree from the institutions accredited by the Ministry of Education, Thailand.
2. GPA of at least 3.25
3. TOEFL (P) score of at least 575 or TOEFL (iBT) score of at least 90 or IELTS (Academic)
score of at least 6.5 or obtain at least 70% of the total scores in the English Admission
Examination for graduate program.
4. GMAT I GRE scores or pass the exam of the School.
5. Two acceptable letters of recommendation
6. A research proposal
7. Statement of Purpose indicating why the applicant wants to pursue a doctoral degree

2.3 Problems of Newly Enrolled Students

1. Some students have poor time management skills leading to attrition from the program. •
2. Some students are not strong in numerical skills.

2.4 Strategies for Solving Problems/ Limitations of Students Specified in Item 2.3

1. Conduct orientation program which help students to deal with time-management


issues.
2. Offer foundation courses for all students to review the core business areas so
they are better prepared for the courses in the first year.

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2.5 Student Enrollment Plan and Expected Numbers of Graduates in 5 Years

Year of Study Number of Students

2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

First Year 10 10 10 10 10
Second Year - 10 10 10 10

Third Year - - 10 10 10

Fourth Year - - - 10 10

Total 10 20 30 40 40

Expected to 10 10

graduate

2.6 Planned Budget

Revenues Budget (Unit : Baht)

Academic Year
Description
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

University fee 388,000.00 776,000.00 1, 164,000.00 1,552,000.00 1,552,000.00

Tuition fee 1,476,000.00 2,952,000.00 4,428,000.00 5,904,000.00 5,904,000.00

Other fee 454,000.00 718,000.00 842,000.00 1, 116,000.00 1,116,000.00

Total Revenues 2,318,000.00 4,446, 000. 00 6,434,000.00 8,572,000.00 8,572,000.00

Revenues : Head 231,800.00 222,300.00 214,466.67 214,300.00 214,300.00

Expenses Budget (Unit : Baht)

Academic Year
Description
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

Remuneration 1,046,866.30 2,093, 732.61 3, 140,598.91 4,187,465.21 4,187,465.21

Operating expenses 962,341.94 1,924,683.89 2,887,025.83 3,849,367.78 3,849,367.78

Total Expenses 2,009,208.25 4,018,416.50 6,027,624.74 8,036,832.99 8,036,832.99

Expenses : Head 200,920.82 200,920.82 200,920.82 267,894.43 200,920.82

Remarks: Expenses Budget excludes investment and depreciation.

2.7 Teaching and Learning Mode

Classroom Mode

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2.8 Credit Transfer, Course Transfer and Cross-University Registration

Students who formerly studied in other institutions may have their courses and credits
· transferred to their current programs in accordance with the Commission on Higher Education's
Criteria of Degree Transfer B.E. 2545.
Cross-university registration can be done whereby AU allows students of other programs
recognized by the Commission on Higher Education to register for courses at AU.

3. Curriculum and Faculty Members

3.1 Curriculum

3.1.1 Number of credits 60 Credits •


3.1.2 Duration of Study

Students must complete all the requirements for the degree in a maximum of 6 years.
3.1.3 Curriculum Structure

Type 2.1 : Coursework and Dissertation (Master's degree holder)


Core Courses 18 Credits

Research Courses 6 Credits

Dissertation 36 Credits
Total 60 Credits

3.1.4 Course Code

Course code has the following meanings.

Letters
OBA Ph.D. Business Administration Course

Numbers
6000-6300 Foundation Courses

7001-7300 Core Courses


8001-8300 Research Courses
9001-9004 Dissertation

3.1.5 Courses

Foundation Courses
OBA 6100 Management and Organization Theory Non-credit

OBA 6200 Marketing Theory Non-credit

OBA 6300 Financial Theory Non-credit

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Core Courses 18 Credits

OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business 3 (3-0-6)


OBA 7002 Quantitative Analysis for Research 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design 3 (3-0-6)


OBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization Theory 3 (3-0-6)
OBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Research Courses 6 Credits

Select 1 course from the following courses


OBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 8002 Applied Econometrics 3 (3-0-6)

Select 1 course from the following courses


OBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research 3 (3-0-6)

Dissertation 36 Credits

OBA 9001 Doctoral Project I 6 (0-0-18)


OBA 9002 Doctoral Project 11 9 (0-0-27)

OBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill 9 (0-0-27)

OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV 9 (0-0-27)


OBA 9005 Doctoral Project V 3 (0-0-9)

3.1.6 Study Plan

Type 1.1

First Year
First Semester

Course Code Course Title Credits


OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business 3 (3-0-6)
OBA 7002 Quantitative Analysis for Research 3 (3-0-6)
OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design 3 (3-0-6)

Total 9 (9 -0-18)

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Second Semester
Course Code Course Title Credits
DBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization Theory 3 (3-0-6)
DBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory 3 (3-0-6)
DBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory 3 (3-0-6)
Total 9 (9 -0-18)

Second Year
First Semester
Course Code Course Title Credits
Select 1 course from the following courses

DBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)


or or
DBA 8002 Applied Econometrics 3 (3-0-6)
Select 1 course from the following courses

DBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research 3 (3-0-6)


or or

DBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6)


or or
DBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research 3 (3-0-6)
Total 6 (6-0-12)
Second Semester
Course Code Course Title Credits

DBA 9001 Doctoral Project I 6 (0-0-18)


Total 6 (0-0-18)

Third Year
First Semester •
Course Code Course Title Credits

DBA 9002 Doctoral Project II 9 (0-0-27)

Total 9 (0-0-27)

Second Semester
Course Code Course Title Credits

DBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill 9 (0-0-27)

Total 9 (0-0-27)

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Fourth Year
First Semester

Course Code Course Title Credits


OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV 9 (0-0-27)
Total 9 (0-0-27)

Second Semester

Course Code Course Title Credits

OBA 9005 Doctoral Project V 3 (0-0-9)

Total 3 (0-0-9)

3.1. 7 Course Description

See Course Description from page 40 to page 46

3.2 Faculty Members


3.2.1 Program Faculty Members

(1) Ms. Theingi

Ph.D. (Marketing), University of Western Australia, Australia, 2004

M.B.A. (Business Administration), Assumption University, Thailand, 1997

B.B.A. (International Business Management) Assumption University, Thailand, 1995


Academic Title: Assistant Professor

Teaching Load: 6 hrs./week

(2) Mrs. Hla Theingi

Ph.D. (International Business), Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand, 2007


M.B.A. (Business Administration), Assumption University, Thailand, 1995
B.B.A. (International Business Management), Assumption University, Thailand, 1994

Academic Title: Assistant Professor

Teaching Load: 6 hrs./week

(3) Mrs. Patricia Arttachariya


Ph.D. (Industrial and Business Studies), University of Warwick, UK, 1997

M.A. (Communication and Business Management), University of the Thai Chamber of

Commerce, Thailand, 1989


M.A. (Industrial Relations), University of Warwick, UK, 1995
B. Com. (Economics & Business Environment), Nagpur University, India, 1974

Post-Graduate Diploma in Business Administration, K.C. College of Management Studies,


India, 1977

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Academic Title: Assistant Professor

Teaching Load: 6 hrs./week


(4) Mr. Nopphon Tangjitprom
Ph.D. (Finance), National Institute of Development Administration, Thailand, 2013
M.Sc. (Information Technology), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Thailand,
2006
B.B.A. (Finance and Banking, International Business Management) (Summa Cum Laude),
Assumption University, Thailand, 2003
Academic Title: Assistant Professor
Teaching Load: 6 hrs./week
(5) Ms. Veeranuch Leelalai
Ph.D. (Finance) (International Program), National Institute of Development Administration,
Bangkok, Thailand, 2015
M.B.A (Finance and International Business), National Institute of Development Administration,
Bangkok, Thailand, 2010
B.A. (English), Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, 2008
Academic Title: Lecturer
Teaching load : 6 hrs./week

3.2.2 Full-time Faculty Members

(1) Ms. Wanida Ngienthi


D.C.Sc. (Marketing and Applied Economics), Kobe University, Japan, 2009
M.A. (International Economics and Finance), Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, 2002
B.B.A. (International Business Management), Assumption University, Thailand, 1998
Academic Title: Assistant Professor
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week
(2) Dr. Piyawan Puttibarncharoensri
Ph.D. (Business Administration), Assumption University, Thailand, 2010

M.S. (Insurance), University of Hartford, USA, 1994


B.B.A. (Insurance) (Magna Cum Laude), Assumption University, Thailand, 1993
Academic Title: Faculty Member
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week

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(3) Ms. Ing Wei Huang

Ph.D. (International Development), Nagoya University, Japan, 2004


M.A. (Business and Managerial Economics), Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, 1999

B.A. (Economics), Thammasat University, Thailand, 1996


Academic Title: Faculty Member
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week
(4) Mr. Jirayut Poomontre

Ph.D. (International Program) (Administration Management, NIDA, 2005


M.Econ. (Business Economics: Project Analysis), University of Wollongong, Australia, 1993

M.Com. (Business Information System), Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, 1990


B.Sc. (Applied Statistics) (2nd Class Honors), King Mongkut's University of Technology

Ladkrabang, Thailand, 1981


Academic Title: Assistant Professor
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week
(5) Dr. Marisa Laokulrach
Ph.D. (Development Administration) (International), NIDA, 2011

M.B.A., Assumption University, Thailand, 2001


B.B.A. (Finance and Banking), Assumption University, Thailand, 1998
Academic Title: Faculty Member
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week

3.2.3 Full-time Faculty Members of Other Programs

(1) Mr. Kriengsin Prasongsukarn


Ph.D. (Marketing), University of New South Wales, Australia, 2004
M.Com. (Marketing), University of New South Wales, Australia, 1999

B.B.A. (Marketing) (Cum Laude), Assumption University, Thailand, 1996


Academic Title: Assistant Professor
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week
(2) Dr. Wisaroot Pariyaprasert
Ph.D. (Economics), University of California, Riverside, CA, USA., 2005
M.A. (Economics), University of California, Riverside, CA, USA. 1999

M.B.A. (Management), University of Larvene, Riverside, CA, USA. 1996

B.Eng. (Electrical Engineer), King Monkut's Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Thailand, 1991

Academic Title: Faculty Member


Teaching load : 3 hrs./week

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3.2.4 Part-time Faculty Members

(1) Mr. Chaiyakrit Charoensiriwath

Ph.D. (Industrial Engineering), Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, 2004


M.S. (Electrical Engineering), Stanford University, USA, 1997
M.S. (Engineering-Economic Systems and Operations Research), Stanford University, USA,
1998
B.S. (Electrical Engineering), Northwestern University, USA, 1995
Academic Title: Faculty Member
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week
(2) Mr. Vuttichai Chatpattananan
Ph.D. (Management Science), University of Tennessee, USA, 2004
M.B.A. (Management), University of Tennessee, USA, 1998
M.S. (Management Science), University of Tennessee, USA, 2001
M.S. (Statistics), University of Tennessee, USA, 2004
B.Eng. (Civil Engineering), Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, 1992
Academic Title: Faculty Member
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week
(3) Dr. Siwarit Pongsakornrungsilp
Ph.D. (Management Studies in Marketing), The University of Exeter, Exeter, UK, 2010
M.B.A. (Business Administration), Maejo University, Thailand, 1999
B.B.A. (Marketing), Maejo University, Thailand, 1995
Academic Title: Faculty Member
Teaching load : 3 hrs./week

4. Field Experience Components

None

5. Dissertation Requirements

5.1 Brief Description of Task


The dissertation, as required by the Program, involves formulating an original idea or area of
inquiry which is either quantitative ( e.g .typically involves either an empirically based, provable
hypotheses) or is qualitative (e.g., includes explorative outcomes, along with data collection and

analysis).

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5.2 Standard Learning Outcomes

(1) Able to explore a new field or area in business


(2) Able to make a substantial contribution to available literature

(3) Able to apply the right research methodology


(4) Able to come up with verifiable results

5.3 Scheduling

Second Year Second Semester to Fourth Year

5.4 Number of Credits

36 Credits

5.5 Preparation

(1) An advisor (and in some cases, co-advisor) is assigned to the student after the topic has

been approved by the Academic Committee.


(2) Advisor gives guidance about the nature of research and standards expected, about the
choice of research topic, about the planning of the research program and about relevant
literature and resources.
(3) Students are expected to attend two research forums per year to present their research

paper.
5.6 Evaluation Process

The Final Defense normally consists of a public presentation and defense of the student's
dissertation research. The decision on grading the dissertation is based on the majority voting
principle. The examination committee deliberates as to the following recommendations:
A. Candidate be awarded the degree without further modification in the
dissertation

B. Candidate be awarded the degree subject to modifications in the dissertation to


Advisor/Program Director/Examining Committee's satisfaction
C. Candidate not yet be awarded the degree but permitted to re-submit the dissertation
in a revised form
D. Candidate not be awarded the degree and needs to reapply.

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Section 4: Learning Outcomes, Teaching and Evaluation Strategies

1. Development of Students' Special Characteristics

Special Characteristics Strategies or Student Activities

1. Skills in writing research papers Courses organized for students to enable them to write papers
that can be presented in conferences or published in journals

2. Teaching skills/Research skills All doctoral students are encouraged to teach one
undergraduate class during the course of their study and they
are prepared for this through numerous presentations made in '
seminar courses. A student can, in lieu of teaching, become a
research assistant for a period of one semester.

3. Team work and Leadership Skills Through seminars and training. Also project work is done in
teams so interaction is a requirement.

2. Development of Learning Outcomes in Domains of Learning

2.1 Morals and Ethics

2.1.1 Morals and Ethics to be developed

(1) Have strong integrity and develop social responsibility.


(2) Have respect for self and others.
(3) Able to conform with the professional code of ethics.
2.1.2 Teaching Strategies

( 1) Case studies
(2) Discussions on ethical issues
(3) Individual I Group assignments I Projects

2.1.3 Evaluation Strategies

(1) Class behavior in terms of punctuality


(2) Check that students have not plagiarized on assignments and papers
f
(3) Marks allotted for team performance
2.2 Knowledge

2.2.1 Knowledge to be acquired


(1) Thoroughly understand the core areas of business
(2) Thoroughly understand the interdisciplinary nature of business
(3) Able to produce original research in related fields

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2.2.2 Teaching Strategies

(1) Foundation lectures


(2) Seminars and workshops
(3) Research workshops and forums.
2.2.3 Evaluation Strategies

(1) Examinations
(2) Assignments
(3) Oral presentations
2.3 Cognitive Skills

2.3.1 Cognitive Skills to be developed

(1) Apply rigorous analytical capabilities in business disciplines


(2) Able to exercise independent thinking
(3) Able to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge and application
2.3.2 Teaching Strategies

(1) Case studies which require the use of cognitive skills


(2) Seminars and workshops
(3) Individual and group projects
2.3.3 Evaluation Strategies

(1) Synthesis research papers


(2) Examinations/ Quizzes
(3) Research proposals
2.4 Interpersonal Skills and Responsibilities

2.4.1 Interpersonal Skills and Responsibilities to be developed

(1) Demonstrate respect for people who come from diverse backgrounds
(2) Demonstrate collaborative and teamwork skills
(3) Apply conflict resolution skills
2.4.2 Teaching Strategies

(1) Classroom activities on interpersonal skills development


(2) Team assignments
(3) Lectures on Group Dynamics, Sensitivity Training
(4) Case studies
2.4.3 Evaluation Strategies

(1) Students' classroom behavior


(2) Peer reviewed assignments

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Doctoral Degree

(3) Team work skills


2.5 Numerical Analysis, Communication and Information Technology Skills

2.5.1 Numerical Analysis, Communication and Information Technology Skills to be

developed

(1) Have strong knowledge on quantitative skills, oral and written communication and IT skills,
(2) Able to apply quantitative skills in research methods
(3) Able to work with data sets and solve problems through effective use of information
technology
(4) Able to present academic articles in English
2.5.2 Teaching Strategies

(1) Presentations
(2) Seminars I training
3) Dissertation writing workshops
2.5.3 Evaluation Strategies

(1) Examinations
(2) Assignments
(3) Presentations

3. Curriculum Mapping

Meanings of Learning Outcomes in the Curriculum Mapping

Morals and Ethics

(1) Have strong integrity and develop social responsibility.


(2) Have respect for self and others.
(3) Able to conform with the professional code of ethics.

Knowledge

(1) Thoroughly understand the core areas of business


(2) Thoroughly understand the interdisciplinary nature of business
(3) Able to produce original research in related fields

Cognitive Skills
(1) Apply rigorous analytical capabilities in business disciplines
(2) Able to exercise independent thinking
(3) Able to integrate multidisciplinary knowledge and application

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Interpersonal Skills and Responsibilities

(1) Demonstrate respect for people who come from diverse backgrounds
(2) Demonstrate collaborative and teamwork skills
(3) Apply conflict resolution skills
Numerical Analysis, Communication and Information Technology Skills

(1) Have strong knowledge on quantitative skills, oral and written communication and IT skills,
(2) Able to apply quantitative skills in research methods

(3) Able to work with data sets and solve problems through effective use of information
technology
(4) Able to present academic articles in English

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Curriculum Mapping Illustrating the Distribution of Program Standard Learning Outcomes to Course Level

•Major Responsibilities 0 Minor Responsibilities

Course 5. Numerical Analysis,


4. Interpersonal
1. Morals and 3. Cognitive
Communication and
2. Knowledge Skills and
Ethics Skills
Information
Responsibilities
Technology Skills

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 4

Foundation Courses

OBA 6001 Management and Organization Theory • 0 0 • • 0 • • • • 0 0 0 0 0 •


OBA 6002 Marketing Theory • 0 0 • • 0 • • • • 0 0 0 0 0 •
OBA 6003 Financial Theory • 0 0 • • 0 • • • • 0 0 0 0 0 •
Core Courses

OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business • 0 0 0 • • • • • 0 0 0 • • • •


DBA 7002 Quantitative Analysis for Research • 0 0 0 • 0 • • • 0 0 0 • • • 0
OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design • • 0 • • • • 0 • 0 0 0 • • • •
OBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization Theory • • • • • 0 0 0 • • • • 0 0 0 •
OBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory • • • • • 0 0 0 • • • • 0 0 0 •
DBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory • • • • • 0 0 0 • • • • 0 0 0 •

As of Mar. 17, 2017

.
AU TQF 2

Doctoral Degree

Course 5. Numerical Analysis,


4. Interpersonal
3. Cognitive
1. Morals and Communication and
2. Knowledge Skills and
Skills
Ethics Information
Responsibilities
Technology Skills

1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 4

Research Course Courses

OBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis • 0 0 • • 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 • • • •


OBA 8002 Applied Econometrics • 0 0 • • 0 • 0 0 0 0 0 • • • •
OBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research • 0 0 • 0 • • • • • • • • • • •
OBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research • • 0 • 0 • • 0 0 • • • • • • •
OBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research • 0 0 • • • 0 0 • • • • • • • •
Dissertation

DBA 9001 Doctoral Project I • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •


OBA 9002 Doctoral Project II • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
OBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
OBA 9005 Doctoral Project V • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Overall Major Responsibilities • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Doctoral Degree

Section 5 : Student Evaluation Criteria

1. Regulations and Criteria for Allocation and Distribution of Grades

1.1 Grading System


Letter grades are used to show the academic standing of all students with the following
meanings and values.

GRADE MEANING POINT VALUE


A Excellent 4.00
A- Almost Excellent 3.75
B+ Very Good 3.25
B Good 3.00
8- Fairly Good 2.75
C+ Fair 2.25
c Satisfactory 2.00
C- Minimum Satisfactory 1.75
D Poor 1.00
F Failure 0.00
R Course repeated later
s Satisfactory
u Unsatisfactory
w Withdrawal with Permission
WF Withdrawal with F 0
Withdrawal from course after time limit
AUD Audit and non-credit
Incomplete, used in case a student fails to complete his/her
assignment within the time limit or is absent from the
examination with approval from the University due to exceptional
.
reasons

WP/IP Work in progress


NR No Report
TR Transfer Credits

AsofMar.17,2017
AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree

1.2 Course Evaluation

Evaluation of student's performance in each course is based on :

• At least 80% of class attendance

• Quizzes, Mid-term and final examinations

• Term paper
• Synthesis Paper

• Presentations

• Proposal
1.3 Minimum Grade Requirements

At least a "B" grade is required for all courses.

2. Verification Process of Student Achievements

2.1 Verification of Student Achievements while Studying

(1) Academic Committee to approve course outlines, exam papers and grades
(2) Lecturers' evaluation of students in all courses
(3) Dissertation Advisor's progress report

2.2 Verification of Student Achievements after Graduation

(1) Employers' satisfaction report


(2) Student feedback on teaching performance
(3) Journal Publications
(4) Promotion in current jobs

3. Graduation Requirements

Type 2 .1 and Type 2.2 : Coursework and Dissertation

• Have completed all the courses of the curriculum

• Have obtained a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.00


• Have passed the proficiency test of English
• Have passed the qualifying examination
• Have proposed the dissertation and passed the final oral dissertation defense
evaluated by a committee approved by the University. The final oral defense is
opened to the public.

• Have the dissertation/part of the dissertation published or have obtained an


acceptance of its publication in a national or international journal in accordance

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Doctoral Degree

with OHEC's Regulation on Criteria for Selection of Academic Journals for


Publication of Academic Work (B.E. 2556)

• Have obtained library and financial clearance from the University

• Have demonstrated good behavior and discipline

Section 6 : Faculty Development

1. Preparation of New Faculty Members

(1) Organize an orientation to familiarize new faculty members with the university's policies, the
faculty and the assigned course/courses.
(2) Assign a mentor to provide advice on teaching and learning.

2. Knowledge and Skills Development for Faculty Members

2.1 Teaching, Assessment and Evaluation Skills Development

(1) Seminars and workshops are organized for lecturers.


(2) Each course is assessed for quality of teaching by students every semester and
feedback on teaching is provided to the lecturers.
2.2 Academic and Professional Development

(1) Lecturers are trained in workshops and seminars every semester.


(2) Guest speakers from outside are invited for various courses in the program and these
sessions are attended by lecturers and students.
(3) A visiting professor is invited to hold a workshop every year in which lecturers and
students participate.

Section 7: Program Quality Assurance

1. Program Standard Control


Program administration is in compliance with the Thai Qualifications Framework for Higher
Education B.E. 2552 and with the Program Standard Criteria BE. 2558. The Thai Qualification
Framework for Higher Education (TQF: HEd) and other relevant criteria as follows;
1. A program committee is appointed to monitor, advise and guide faculty members. The
program has the program faculty members who responsible for;

- Follow the functional program implementation

- Hold the minimum master degree for educational qualification

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Doctoral Degree

- Conduct the planning , implementing , reviewing of program performance including the on


time submission of TQF3, TQF5 and TQF?

- The program modification is done every 5 academic years and approved by the university

council for the implementation in the following year.


2. All program faculty member is expected to attend academic conference, professional
seminar and publish research and academic work
3. A survey is conducted to determine the graduates' satisfaction with the curriculum and the

teaching and learning.


2. Graduates

2.1 Graduate Quality in accordance with Thai Qualification Framework for Higher

Education

Program committee monitors the curriculum which inclusive of all 5 criteria required by

OHEC. The learning outcome score of Morals and ethics, Knowledge, Cognitive skills
Interpersonal skills and responsibilities and Numerical analysis, communication and
information technology skills will be assessed in order to produce the graduate with quality in

accordance with Thai Qualification Framework for Higher Education. In addition, The
stakeholder survey will also be conducted to update the anticipated learning outcome in

reality.
2.2 Graduates employment status

The program regularly distributes the graduates survey during the rehearsal period of
commencement day to reflect the securing jobs within one year or being self-employed. The
results are obtained for program improvement.

3. Students

a. Student Admission

The program uses policies and procedures to admit students that are clear, fair, explicit
and consistently applied. The Program's Admissions Statement sets out both the
admissions policy and the monitoring process, and is available to applicants via website
and student handbook. Information provided for applicants at all stages of the application
process is clear, easy to find and comprehensible. The program's admission process
requires the following:
1. Master's degree from the institutions accredited by the Ministry of Education, Thailand.
2. GPA of at least 3.25

3. TOEFL (P) score of at least 575 or TOEFL (iBT) score of at least 90 or IELTS

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Doctoral Degree

(Academic) score of at least 6.5 or obtain at least 70% of the total scores in the
English Admission Examination for graduate program.
4. GMAT I GRE scores or pass the exam of the School.
5. Two acceptable letters of recommendation
6. A research proposal
7. Statement of Purpose indicating why the applicant wants to pursue a doctoral degree
Selection Process

Candidates are screened for suitability of qualifications by Program Director. Applicants


who do not have TOEFL or GMAT scores are asked to sit for Internal equivalent exams.
If they pass these exams, an interview is then scheduled with a panel of 3 lecturers
consisting of the Program Director and two lecturers currently teaching in the program. In
some cases, conditional entry is permitted based on committee members' decision. After
the candidate has passed the interview, the candidate is called for an Orientation at which
the Rector, Dean, Program Director, and lecturers address the candidates on the rules
and regulations. The new students are also invited to a brief meeting with alumni and
current students in previous batches so that a buddy system can be established. Finally
luncheon is provided to all students, both newcomers and those from previous batches
including alumni.
Student preparation before entering university

After the candidate has passed the interview, the candidate is called for an Orientation at
which the Rector, Dean, Program Director, and lecturers address the candidates on the rules and
regulations. The new students are also invited to a brief meeting with alumni and current students
in previous batches so that a buddy system can be established. Finally luncheon is provided to
all students, both newcomers and those from previous batches including alumni.
Moreover, the admitted students attended the Induction Workshop at the outset of the Ph.D.
Program. The Induction workshop covered the following courses:

Student Preparation
3.2 Student Development

3.2.1 Supervision of thesis and independent study advising for graduate students

The current process used for advising students is outlined in the student policies
handbook and the special report prepared by the Director last year. The steps are
indicated with great clarity and students knew exactly what is required for each step. The
report also outlined what a student could do in the event that he/she wanted to change
current advisor. There is a dissertation writing handbook prepared for students which is

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Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree

distributed to students who register for the All forms related to advising process are
attached to the student dissertation guide and can be obtained in soft file from the office.
Moreover, students are required to present their progress in the Research Forum.
The program will invite other faculty members in the School who are specialized in each
field to provide the comments to student works.
3.2.2 Activities for the development of students' capability and learning skills for the

21st century

The Program realizes that there is an increasing competition in the education industry
worldwide. Thus, the Program needs to prepare itself and its students to move forward to
the 21st century.
For doctoral degree study, the skills in conducting research are very crucial. The
program realizes about this and has prepared 3 activities for students regarding to this
context. The first is research workshop that students will learn about the knowledge and
skills used in developing each part of research including introduction, research framework,
hypothesis development, and data analysis. The second activity is foreign language
workshop that students will learn for using English language in the context academic
writing. The third activity is research forum that students will present the progress of their
dissertation and they will have a chance to get the comments and feedbacks from the
guests who are expertise in each area of research including marketing, management, and
finance.

4. Faculty Members

4.1 Management and development of faculty members

4.1.1 Recruitment of program faculty members

The majority of lecturers teaching in the program came from the MSME's faculty. The part-
time lecturers came from a variety of state and private universities. The criteria used to select
a lecturer for a particular course was: (1) educational qualifications (2) specialization/field
selected for Bachelors, Masters, and Doctoral levels (3) teaching experience (4) research
publications (5) Chairperson's/Department Supervisor's recommendation.
The Committee will consider the lecturer who is appropriate to teach in specific course based
on teaching experience and research publication. Moreover, the Committee will select the
program faculty members based on their potential in contribution of development of the
program.

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Doctoral Degree

1. Have English proficiency


2. Have research experience

3. Have thorough knowledge of the subject and are able to deliver the knowledge effectively
and professionally
4. Have good attitude, personality and sociable nature
5. Willing to abide by the University's regulations
6. Willing to work hard
7. Have a thorough grasp of the nobility of the teaching profession
8. Initiative and enthusiastic
4.1.2 Management of faculty member

1. To serve as a policy development group, defining/developing the following types of


policies:
a. Policies of academic deficiencies, including Academic Warning, Academic
Probation, Academic Suspensions;
b. Policies related to prohibited academic conduct (i.e., academic dishonesty),
including warnings, suspensions, and dismissals from the university.
c. Policies on appointment of full and part time faculty
d. To review and take action on situations of prohibited academic conduct by
students which, by its very nature may lead to suspension or dismissal.
(When academic dishonesty cases require fact finding beyond traditional
academic evaluation, the process for such cases must follow the guidelines
mentioned in the School's policy for plagiarism).
e. To review and take action on petitions from students asking for special
consideration in the application of any academic regulations. These academic
regulations include, but are not limited to, policies related to:
i. A. request for withdrawal from the Program;
ii. A request for special leave of absence
iii. A request for academic forgiveness.
f. To review and make final decision on grades for a course in which the lecturer
uses inappropriate criteria or ignores stated procedures and grading standards.
g. The conduct and direction of such matters which will in the Committee's
judgment promote the Program and its best interests.
2. The Program's Administrative Committee will meet at least three times per one
academic year in order to do the planning, follow-up, and review all relevant processes in

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Doctoral Degree

the program.

Offer a Career Path for better pay, recognition, and advancement

The School provides Scholarships for personal advancement. The school also makes

sure that instructors are rewarded and given recognition for their achievements every
year. There are rewards and award ceremonies organized by the University and every
year the school selects members and nominate them for the awards.
Fringe Benefits

There also encouraged through attractive HR welfares and benefits set by the university
and they are provided with a faculty manual. The School makes use of flexible work
hours, children's educational assistance and scholarship for faculty members and staff.
The full- time lecturer has a minimum load of 12 hours teaching and any extra hours
taught is considered extra and paid by the University. They have three months paid leave

apart from the sick leave and maternity leave. The International faculty members or staff
members are provided with work permit and visa. The Human Resource office will
process the family visa for the international staff. The faculty members are also provided

with social security, insurance and pension plans.


Workforce performance

Performance evaluation is done based on the contribution made the instructor. Formal
groups are created and the roles are clarified, so that they are motivated to work together.
Different teams or committees are set up for different activities like, social, cultural,

academic, research and training. The culture of the School and the university is in such a
way that members at all levels from the top management participate in all the activities.
The role model set by the top leaders motivates others to participate in all the activities
organized by the school or University. The reward criteria is set based on the key
performance indicators such as teaching performance, research, extra activities. The
criterion for promotion is also based on the key performance indicators. There is a clear
system already established to evaluate the performance in different levels.
4.2 Faculty development

As the majority of faculty members come from other schools within the university, they
receive development in the form of training, seminars and workshops within their
departments. The Program encourages faculty members teaching in the same specialization
to exchange perspectives/new pedagogy in teaching and learning. All full-time faculty
members in the MSME which includes those teaching in graduate level programs are required
to attend the annual seminar, research workshops, conferences and other training activities

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Doctoral Degree

organized.

As we do not have full-time faculty members working only for the program, we have not
organized any special training/workshops. Even the Program Director is a member of the
MSME and has to attend all activities organized by the School.
The rapid increases in technological development, volatility in world markets, the changing
political scenario, opening of AEC at the end of this year, and many other situations have
made us aware that our current faculty needs to have multi-disciplinary knowledge.
Three suggestions are made here by the Academic committee members: One, a pooling •
system of lecturers should be used for sharing of resources, for providing opportunities for
higher-level teaching and for increasing research publications. Second, even a doctoral ~

program needs a course to "train the trainer" as most doctoral programs are content-oriented
and devote little time to the pedagogy of teaching. Finally, there should be an annual
workshop for all faculty teaching in the program on the creation and interpretation of new
knowledge, especially in multi-disciplinary research.

5. Program, Teaching Learning and Student Evaluations

5.1 Course Content

Program design and course content

The fast changing requirements in business, economy, political and financial sector
have affected people in term of social and economy. These existing changes in the
business world, world economy and financial markets need to be investigated and
analyzed in order to understand and develop essential skills in business and other
related fields to serve the current needs in the industry. There is also a high demand
for people with quantitative, analytical and problem-solving skills in order to enhance
the understanding for analyzing the business problems.
The program faculty members have informal meetings with the external experts in
term of both practitioners and academicians every semester in order to design the
course and make some modifications in order to. make the program up-to-date.
Moreover, this is to get the feedback from other experts in order to be used in
program evaluation and implementing some changes as necessity.

Program update in line with the development in the field of study

The program faculty members have informal meetings with the external experts in
term of both practitioners and academicians every semester in order to design the
course and make some modifications in order to make the program up-to-date.

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Doctoral Degree

Moreover, this is to get the feedback from other experts in order to be used in
program evaluation and implementing some changes as necessity.
5.2 Lecturers' working assignment system and teaching - learning process

Selection of lecturers for teaching assignment

The majority of lecturers teaching in the program came from the MSME's faculty. The
part-time lecturers came from a variety of state and private universities. The criteria
used to select a lecturer for a particular course was : (1) educational qualifications (2)

specialization/field selected for Bachelors, Masters, and Doctoral levels (3) teaching
experience (4) research publications (5) Chairperson's/Director Supervisor's
recommendation. When a lecturer has almost finished teaching a course (week 14-
15), a lecturer evaluation form is sent to all students in the class. The results of the
evaluation are used to make a decision on whether the particular lecturer should be
invited again or not. Feedback from students who have already completed the course
is sometimes sent to the Program Director via email or discussion.

Monitoring and following up of TQF 3 and TQF 4 preparation and teaching-

learning process
After the name of lecturer for each course is designed by the program director, the
invitation letter will be sent to each lecturer together with the request to submit the
TQF3 and course outline (if any) to the program director before the semester begins.
Around two weeks before semester begins, the staffs will contact each lecturer to

follow-up the submission of TQF3.

Supervising the selection of thesis/dissertation titles and independent study

topics in graduate program to ensure that they are within the scope of the field of

study and go along with the development in the field of study

The current process used for advising students is outlined in the student policies
handbook and the special report prepared by the Director last year. The steps are
indicated with great clarity and students knew exactly what is required for each step.
The report also outlined what a student could do in the event that he/she wanted to

change current advisor. There is a dissertation writing handbook prepared for students
which is distributed to students who register for the All forms related to advising
process are attached to the student dissertation guide and can be obtained in soft file
from the office.

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Appointment of thesis/dissertation and independent study advisors whose

specialization is related to the thesis/dissertation titles and independent study

topics

The criteria used to select advisors for a particular topics was : (1) educational
qualifications (2) specialization/field selected for Bachelors, Masters, and Doctoral
levels (3) teaching experience (4) research publications (5) Chairperson's/Director
Supervisor's recommendation.
Based on the above criteria, research publications are the most important criteria. The
advisor must have publications in the topic that are related to the topic proposed by
students. If necessary, the co-advisor may be assigned in order to ensure the quality
of dissertation.

Assisting, monitoring and following up of the thesis/ dissertation and


independent study progress including the publication of thesis/ dissertation and

independent study

In order to assist students in their dissertation process, the program has arranged two
workshops, which are academic writing workshops and research workshops, for
students who have passed the qualification examination and started their dissertation
process.
Moreover, in order to follow up the dissertation process, the program has arranged
research forum in which students will present their own updated progress of
dissertation. The program will invite two faculty members who are specialized in each
area including management, marketing, and finance in order to provide the comments
for each student.
Finally, in order to monitor the progress of dissertation, all advisors will do the

progress report for each advisee and submit to the program director.
5.3 Students evaluation

Students' learning outcome evaluation in accordance with TQF: HEd

For each course, the lecturer will design the course contents according to 5 domains,
which are Moral and ethics, Knowledge, Cognitive skills, Interpersonal skills and
responsibility, Quantitative skills, communication skills, and ICT skills. The lecturers
will specify how these 5 domains of learning outcome are evaluated in their respective
courses in their course planning and TQF3 before the semester begins. These 5
domains should contribute to the student performance in that course as specified in
evaluation methods and mark allocation.

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After semester end, the lecturers will submit the course report or TQF5 in order to
summarize the result of student evaluation in that subject.

Checking of evaluation of students' learning outcomes

For each course, the lecturer will design the course contents according to 5 domains,
which are Moral and ethics, Knowledge, Cognitive skills, Interpersonal skills and
responsibility, Quantitative skills, communication skills, and ICT skills. In order to verify
the evaluation of students' learning outcomes, there are the graduates' employers
survey in order to measure the level of employer satisfaction based on 5 domains.

Supervision of the teaching-learning evaluation and program evaluation (TQF 5, 6

and 7)

At the end of each semester, each lecturer needs to submit the course report or
TQF5 within 30 days after semester ends. Each lecture needs to report the results of
course evaluation and improvement plans for each responsible course.

Thesis/dissertation and independent study evaluation

After the student has completed his/her dissertation, the student can submit the full
report for his/her dissertation and request for final defense upon the approval of
his/her advisor.
The program will appoint the committee of examiners including the program directors,
advisor, and other two faculty members who are specialized in that research topic.
Moreover, the program will invite the external expertise who is specialized in that
research topic as a member of the examiner committee in order to ensure the quality
of research.

6. Learning Support Facilities

Learning support facilities

Department/ school/ institution system of acquiring learning support facilities with the
participation of program faculty members
The program has devised a systematic procedure to acquire appropriate & sufficient
learning support facilities. The procedure is as follows:
1. Need (for learning support facilities) Survey & Assessment
The survey is divided into quantitative and qualitative survey. The quantitative is
conducted by the University and the qualitative survey is done by the Department
through the discussion with both lecturers and students. Subsequently, the need is
assessed by program faculty members whether they are significantly appropriate to

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Doctoral Degree

improve learning process. The need survey and assessment is conducted every
regular semester.
2. Request for Approval (ASAP)
Towards the end of every second semester, the Department compiles all significant
need and put them in the ASAP in order to obtain approval and budget from
University.
3. Procurement
Once the budget is approved all need for learning support facilities are submitted to •
relevant units e.g. library, ITS, etc. for procurement.
4. Satisfaction survey ,,
Once the requested learning support facilities are in place, the satisfaction survey
is qualitatively conducted through the discussion with relevant stakeholders e.g.
lecturers, students, employers, etc. Subsequently, program faculty members will
respond to the feedback accordingly.

Budget Management

1) The School prepares the ASAP which covers the budget for teaching and
learning, research, academic service and preservation of art and culture. The
ASAP is endorsed by the University Planning and Budgeting Committee prior to
the beginning of the academic year and implemented according to the university

regulations.
2) The School is allocated sufficient annual budget for textbooks, instructional media,
computers, etc.

Existing Teaching and Learning Resources

(1) Library
The AU Library provides services for books, text books, journals and on-line

databases.

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Doctoral Degree

From

starting Units
Details June 2016 Total
date to Quantities

May 2016

1. No. of Library Staff-regular FT 32 0 32 Staff

2. Total No. of books 423,231 77 423,308 Books

Thai 157,264 36 157,300 Books

English 265,967 41 266,008 Books

- Books in Martin De Tour School of


Management and Economics 162,061 15 162,076 Books

Thai 54,947 7 54,954 Books

English 107,114 8 107, 122 Books

3. Total No. of Electronic Materials 19,653 1 19,654 Copies

Thai 3,437 1 3,438 Copies

English 16,216 0 16,216 Copies

- Electronic Materials in Martin De Tour School


of Management and Economics 6,577 0 6,577 Copies

Thai 875 0 875 Copies

English 5,702 0 5,702 Copies

4. Total No. of Journals 1,781 * 368/0 ** 1,781 Titles

Thai 595 91/0 595 Titles

English 1, 186 27710 1, 186 Titles

- Journals in Martin De Tour School of


Management and Economics 436 0 436 Titles

Thai 85 0 85 Titles

English 351 0 351 Titles


Databases/
5. Total No. of E-books 7/8,163 0/51 7/8,214 Titles

- E-books in Martin De Tour School of Databases


Management and Economics 4/851 010 4/851 /Titles
Databases/
6. Total No. of E-Journals 1/278 0/0 1/278 Titles

- E-Journals in Martin De Tour School of Databases/T


Management and Economics 1/216 010 1/216 itles

7. Total No. of E-Newspapers 1 0 1 Titles

- E-News12a12ers in Martin De Tour School of


Management and Economics 1 0 1 Titles

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Doctoral Degree

From

starting Units
Details June 2016 Total
date to Quantities

May 2016

8. Total No. of Online Databases Full text 13 0 13 Databases

- Online Databases Fulltext in Martin De Tour


7 Databases
School of Management and Economics 7 0

9. Total No. of Online Databases Abstracts 1 0 1 Databases

- Online Databases Abstracts in Martin De


1 0 1 Databases
Tour School of Management and Economics

10. Total No. of Tools 3 0 3 Programs

- Tools in Martin De Tour School of


2 Programs
Management and Economics 2 0

11. Total No. of Educational Materials 4 0 4 Programs

- Educational materials in Martin De Tour


Programs
School of Management and Economics 0 0 0
Programs/
12. others 2/>642 0 2/>642 Vol.

- Other 12rograms in Martin De Tour School of Programs/

Management and Economics 0 0 0 Vol.

Note * No. of Journals that need yearly renewal.


** No. of Journals in the Library that increased from subscription and complementary items.

(2) Equipment and Information Technology


1. BIS Computer labs
2. AU Wifi
3. AIS Wifi
4. AU Library Database
5. Financial Database e.g. Reuters
(3) Laboratories, Studios,
1. N/A
(2) Equipment and Information Technology
1. Computers
2. Internet access

3. Projectors
4. LCD
5. Related software

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Doctoral Degree

(3) Laboratories, Studios,

N/A

Assessment of Sufficiency of Teaching and Learning Resources

All faculty members satisfied with the supporting service by internal evaluate on by
department committee. However, the committee still keeps monitoring the problem

and sends feedback and requirements to school level and university level. However,
all faculty member keep improving the channel to access the better learning support

facilities by giving more feedback to the unit provider

7. Key Performance Indicator

Performance Indicator 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021


1. At least 80% of full-time faculty members are
involved in the planning, following up and ./ ./ ./ ./ ./
reviewing of the program performance.

2. The Program Specification (TQF 2 Form) in


compliance with the Thai Qualifications ./ ./ ./ ./ ./
Framework for Higher Education is provided.

3. The Course Specification (TQF 3 Form) and


the Field Experience Specification (TQF 4
./ ./ ./ ./ ./
Form) (if any) of all courses are provided
before the semester begins.

4. The Course Report (TQF 5 Form) and the


Field Experience Report (TQF 6 Form) (if any)
./ ./ ./ ./ ./
of all courses are completed within 30 days
after the semester ends.

5. The Program Report (TQF 7 Form) is


completed within 60 days after the academic ./ ./ ./ ./ ./
year ends.
6. The students' learning achievements according
to the learning outcomes specified in the TQF

3 and TQF 4 (if any) of at least 25% of the ./ ./ ./ ./ ./


courses offered in each academic year are
verified.

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Performance Indicator 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021


7. The teaching and learning process, the
teaching strategies or the evaluation strategies
are developed/improved according to the - ~ ~ ~ ~
performance evaluation reported in the TQF 7

of the previous year.

8. All new faculty members (if any) are given


~ ~ ~ ~ ~
orientation or advice on teaching and learning.

9. All full-time faculty members participate in


academic and/or professional development ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
programs at least once a year.

10. At least 50% of support staff participates in


academic and/or professional development ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
programs each year.

11. The average level of satisfaction of fourth-year


students/new graduates with the quality of the - - - ~ ~
program are at least 3.5 out of 5.0.

12. The average level of satisfaction of employers


- - - - ~
with new graduates is at least 3.5 out of 5.0.

Evaluation Criteria
Good: Indicators 1-5 are achieved and at least 80% of the indicators are achieved each year.
Very Good: Indicators 1-5 are achieved and all indicators are achieved each year.

38
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree

Section 8 : Program Evaluation and Improvement

1. Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness

1.1 Evaluation of Teaching Strategies

(1) Observe students' behaviour and participation

(2) Organize meeting of faculty members to share experiences and recommend improvement
(3) Collect student feedback

1.2 Evaluation of Faculty Members' Skills in Using Teaching Strategies

(1) Collect student feedback on all aspects of teaching such as teaching methodology, course
objectives, evaluation criteria, use of teaching aids and punctuality of the faculty members
(2) Self-evaluation
(3) Peer-evaluation

2. Overall Program Evaluation

Overall program evaluation will be done by (1) current students and graduates (2) external experts
(3) employers and/or other stakeholders. The assessment results are used to modify the program at
least every five years.

3. Evaluation of Program Performance

The Program performance is evaluated according to the Key Performance Indicators specified in
Section 7, Item 7. The evaluation is conducted by the Evaluation Committee of at least 3 members,
comprising of at least 1 external expert, appointed by the University.

4. Review of Program Evaluation and Improvement Plan.

(1) Meeting are arranged to discuss the results of evaluation obtained from students, graduates,
employers, other stakeholders, course coordinators, program director, and academic committee
(2) Improvement plans are prepared accordingly
(3) All faculty members are involved in setting up strategies for improvement plan.

39
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2 •
Doctoral Degree

Course Description

I. Foundation Courses

OBA 6100 Management and Organization Theory Non-credit

Theories, practice and problems of management and organization, planning, leading, organizing
and controlling, organizational decision-making, connections made between the planning process
and the controlling function to evaluate organizational performance, communication concepts,
human resource management, organizational structures, motivational theory, and application of
principles to entrepreneurial, corporate and international organizations.

OBA 6100 rlflitSn1'ii'lP'lnTnta::eh'l~n'i 13.iih-'IU'U.lll<Pl


'YlrJ~fi n11ui]lJ1i ~~a~"ilUU....qJV11LfiLJ1nlJn11i~m1LL~::Eh'llfn1 m111.JLLi:.Ju n11'll1 m1i~a.Jlfn1u~::
n11f111Jfl:IJ
q
n11~~~Ul"il'Yl1.Jli1n"il m1Li1a:1J~m::V111.Jn1::lJ1un11m111.JLrnu u~::n11f111Jfl:1J
q q
Lv1a

1.J1::dJui:.J~.J1W~l.J8.JEJ.Jlfn1 LL U 1fl11:1J~~ l Un11~8ITT1 n11lJ1'Vl11'YlfVm1n11Jflfl~ lfl1.J~f1.J8.J Ifn1


q

'YlrJ~lin11"il.J
:;.! 'U
h LL~::m1u1::LJn ~1iffiV1flJ~u1::n mm11
q 'U
a.Jlfn1~1 lu LL~::a.Jlfn11::V111.Ju1::L 'Yl~

OBA 6200 Marketing Theory Non-credit


Theories, practice and problems in marketing and the underlying business foundations required for
the understanding and development of marketing, distribution, financing, marketing information
management, pricing, product and service management, promotion and selling foundations of
economics and communications.
OBA 6200 "'
rlflit!Jfl1'i<Pln1lP'I
'YlrJ~fi n11ufiu1i ~~8~1l'UU~'V\1LfiLJ1nlJn11~~1~ ~ULL1J1J11n~1'U 'Yl1.J1pn"il .Jf.J LU'U~U~1Ufl11:1J Li1 h
LL~::n11-W-~uT~1.Ja.Jm1~~1~ m1u1V111i~m1ia:1J~'Yl1.Jm1~~1~
'U
11m n11i'~n11~ufi'1LL~::n11

lJ1m1n11ti.J L~1:1Jm1~1 LJ VI ;nm1~1 LJ .Jf .J Luu 11rnnm~1~:tJm~~·:fo~::n11~a ITT"J


... ...

OBA 6300 Financial Theory Non-credit

Theories, practice and problems in finance, how to value assets and businesses given forecasts of
future cash flows, risk characteristics of different asset classes, stocks, bonds and interest rates,
measuring and pricing risk, derivative instruments, theoretical underpinnings of finance with real-
world examples.

40
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2

Doctoral Degree

OBA 6300 hHhni·u.1n<Pl


'Ylll~~ m1tJi)u1J ~b'lfl~"ilUU..,tlJ~1tfit.11rl1Jn11"l~U n11"~1~b'lfl1~it'YlfVHJllb'l~~1"n"il"il1nn11"fl1~n11"rn"llfl.J
n1~tb~l~U~~1uflit1fl~ fl111H~t.1.J"lJfl.JffU'YlfVHJU1"~l.1l'Yl~1.J 6) ~u rZitliU~1" llb'l~er~,-1~flmflt.1 n11"l~
q

fl11:JJ t~t.1-Jttb'l ~tJ,-~ djuf\1 f111:JJ t~t.1-J ~11 ~11flit r4"'ulf 'Ylll~;i ~1Un11t~unu ~1flci1.J"il1.J1ut b'lntJ;"iJUU
q :;) q

II. Core Courses

OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business 3 (3-0-6)

Application of economic principles to support business decisions within organizations,


understanding of the external business environment in which an organization operates, application

of economic theories, methodologies and economic analysis to develop essential tools for making
optimal decision
d'..._I d' o Q...I A
OBA 7001 t~~'.IY~~1~<Pl~u~~~n<Pl~1~~un~n~
... q q
3 (3-0-6)

n11tJ1~ t.1n
q
~1 i~inm1'Yl1.Ji~,-~~m~~-n um1ffuu~uq um1~~ffith'Yl1.Jli1"n"il
cU q
1itfl.Jfi'n1 m111i°li1h1u

ff.1l1'V'l tt1 ~~fl :JJ'Yl1.Jli1"n"il"ll fl.J fl.Jfi'n1 m1tJ1~ t.1n ~1i'Ylll ~11i~,-~~~1 ~~f 11fm1ttb'l~m1it f11"1~~'Yl1.J
q q dJ "'

i~,-~~m~~fi 'Vtflm1vr~u1 tfl~fl.Jii fl~"il1 iuu1 um1~~ffuh~~~~~


~ q

OBA 7002 Quantitative Analysis for Research 3 (3-0-6)

Mathematical methods which are necessary for understanding literature, statistical analysis,

comparative statistical analysis, optimization problems, basic dynamic analysis and mathematical
programming, matrix algebra, calculus and various quantitative technique used for developing
researches.

OBA 7002 n1~~lA~1~~l~\lU~3J1mt-vJun1~~i~ 3 (3-0-6)

11fm1'Yl1.J mli.~m ~~f~"il1iuu1um1i °li1hU'Ylf11111~n ~1 m1itf111~'1f'Yl1.J~i1 ~ m1i bm1~~'Yl1.J ~fl~

i ii.J itJ1t.1u i Yi t.1u tJ....nrn1m1t ~11tJ1~ff'YlTI.1l1'V'I m1itf111~~ttuu1~u1iln.ffu


~
vfu~1u t tJ1iin111'Yl1.J
~

OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design 3 (3-0-6)

Behavioral research design appropriate for behavioral research, methodology for implementing
such design, sampling technique, sampling procedure, questionnaire design, interviewing, focus
group, and other approaches for behavioral research

41
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2

Doctoral Degree

OBA 7003 nTHJflnttulJnT.fj-ijm~\l'Wfl~n''.i".i3J 3 (3-0-6)

nTHl an bbuum1iiri~b V1m:1.n1~1V1fun11iiri b1r.J'V'lb]~n11aJ n11'1l1Lm bbuuiimfui.tJ1i.JT\.r'il1.J

b'Ylflitfl1 un111.taJaci1.J n1:u1un111.taJ<?1'1aci1.J m1aamLUUbbUUl.lauri1aJ m1iaJ111Mrn n111.lu'Ylu1n~aJ


• • •
bbl.'l:iTin11~u 6J ~1i~1V1fun11iim 1r.J'Y'lb]~n11aJ

OBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Advance theories and recent literature about organization and its environment, function and
structure of authority and responsibility, formal and informal organization and social system,
organizational behavior, organizational control, research and development, changing of corporate
structure, human resource management, conflict management, motivation, coordination, dynamics
of change, leadership, and stress management.
~ Q,..I tf ~
OBA 1100 't1fllt!Jn1".i'ij@ln1".itt~::fl\l~n".it1'M>\1\l 3 (3-0-6)

'Ylb]Mfi.ff
~
ui.l.JbLi.'l:.J1u
'II
iiri~11.l<n

Lfi ri1nun11i<nn111.l1111:bb 1<n~a rn.1 a.J a.Jffn1 11.l
'II
Lbuu LL!.'l::Lf11.J 1.lf1.J

a1u1'<il viu1~LLi.'l:f111aJfutl<n"ll'au111ri1 ua.Jffn1 ~nMru:a.Jffn1~1inLJ1:Lu rJULLl.'l:i.~1 inLJ1:Lu riu1un11


i<nn11 1:UUfl113JiaJvfulf111 rJLUel.Jflfij 'Y'lb]~fijj3Jfl1 rJLUel.Jflfij n11fl1Uf13Jel.Jflfij n11iimbl.'l::n11

vr~u1 el.Jflfij n11Ltl~ rJULbUi.'l.JLfl1.Ji.lf1.J"llel.J el.Jflfij m1u1'Vl11'Ylf'Y'l mn1Uflfli.'l n11u1'Vl11fl11 aJ°ll<?JbbrJ.J

n111.lf1.Jbb1.J'<il.Jh
'II
ft11aJi1aJ5'.ia Lb1.J°llrnfl~au"1.la.Jn~aJ •
n11:~'1l1bbl.'l:n11i<nm1ft11mfl1ri<n
'II

OBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Advance theories and recent literature about transfer of goods and services from producer to
consumer, consumer's buying motives, basic product, distribution, price, promotion mix strategies,
and improvement of marketing efficiency, consumer behavior, influence of socio psychological
factors, personality, social groups, demographic variables, social class, culture on the formation of

consumers' attitudes, consumer purchasing behavior, and after-purchase evaluation .


""
...
.....
OBA 7200 't1fllt!)n1".i@l~1~tl'M>\1\l 3 (3-0-6)

'YJnMfi.ff
·1 ~
ui.l.J
'II
LL!.'l:.J1u iiri~11.l<nLfi

ri1nun111.t.J ~uf11LL!.'l:u1n11'<il1n ~~~<n
'II
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'II
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"1.la.J~u1111fl ~uf11~u~1u m1n1:'<il1ri~uf1111m~uf11


C\J ""'
ni.'lri'Yllfn11<nl.'l1<n
q
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Cf

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•1 'II
~.J~iia'YlTI'Y'll.'l<?i1u~<ni'Ylm'Yl1.Ji.JflaJ Ufl~n111'Y'l

n~aJi.JflaJ

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1~ull11aJ <?la'Yl~ufl~"lla.J~u1111fl m1u1111flbLi.'l:'Y'lq~n11aJn11.ffa"1.la.J~u1111fl


"ll'wffu'Yl1.Ji.JflaJ 'II 'II

.ffu<naun11<?1<n~UL'<il.ffa bbi.'l:m1tl1:biluV1~.Jm1.ffa

42
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2

Doctoral Degree

OBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Advance theories and recent literature about corporate financial decision, financial projection, cost
of capital, evaluating the return from investment, the new techniques in evaluating the investment
opportunities, philosophical basis of investment principles, ethics in investment, risk and expected
return relationship, security exchanges and indexes, company and securities analysis, portfolio

management theories and analysis, capital market theories, capital market efficiency theories, and
behavioral finance
... A
...
._.

OBA 7300 'YlflM-!JflTH\l'Wll'U\'f\I 3 (3-0-6)


'Ylti~riifu~\'IUf:i::'11uiii.1i;;i1~~b~mnum1i~~uh'Yl1'1n11b~u1mnn11
:..I 'IJ , ,
m11h:::i...11rnm1'Yl1'1n11b~u
~ru 'Ylm~u
, , n111h::biimrn~EJrnb 'Ylu111nn11f:i'1'YlU
'YlU , n111°1fbfl~EJ'1:0EJ1'Vl1l1un111h::biiufan1~1un11
f:i'1'YlU
q
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QJ ..is q q

~i;:i~EJ1Jbb'YlU~fl1~1111::~Gifu ~i;:i1~'Vl~n'Ylf~cl'bbf:i::~11"1l'ii.~i;:i1~ m1ibfl11::tfu11J'mrn::::'Vl~n'Ylf~rf m1~fi


bbf:i::m1ibfl11::tfn11u1V111~EJf~i;:i.,,'Ylu
, m1~ri~i;:i1~'Ylu
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:..I , bbf:i::::n11b~ub1i'1
~riGln111.1

Ill. Research Courses

OBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)

Basic multivariate techniques that are currently used in literature, principal components analysis,
explanatory and confirmatory factor analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function
analysis, structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling, cluster analysis, canonical
correlation, and multidimensional scaling.
OBA 8001 n1';i~b~';i1:::lf'WlllPl'JUU';i 3 (3-0-6)

b'Yl flUfln11ibfl11::'Vl°'~V1i1 bb1.l1.efu ~mn


, .... u ~1"1l'1 U.'11 u ii£.J n11ib fl11::tfi;f1u.1.l1::n El1J'Vl~n n11i bfl11::::tf
EJ'1'11l1::::n EJ1J b.;a.,, ~11111 bbf:i::::n11ibfl11::::tfEJ'1rf1l1::n eiu b11'1 r'.iutl'u n11ib fl11::::'Vl°'fl111.1 bb1l11l11mb1J1J ~'VI,i i

bb1l1 m1ibfl11::tf1!1bmn1l1::::b.fl'Yl bbuu1!1i;:iEJ'1m.im11fl1'1 ~11'1 Lbuu1!1i;:iEJ'1b 1i'1ufai;:i~mru m1ibfl11::tfi~

ni;;ll.l m1ibfl11::tf~m~-1.lvru.Jfm 1u ii.flEJf:i bbi;:i::n11ibfl11::'Vl°'~'Vlii~


, ,

OBA 8002 Applied Econometrics 3 (3-0-6)


Applied econometrics in regression analysis, some of the variety of models that are used when the
linear model proves inadequate or inappropriate, probability and distribution theory, statistical
inference and prediction, regression analysis, least square method, time series analysis,
forecasting, long-run relationship, and limited dependent variable model, and quantitative tools in
recent research

43
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree

OBA 8002 3 (3-0-6)


bf'l1M~ii~Lii\IU1!'.~Jn'ilLUnT:i1Lfl11!'.rf~nmTHl'ilrlfHJbii\ILiU'il":i\I bb'.IJU'911~fl\l~U
"' q
61
J
trlmnm11Lilli'il1\liJ

ffn3J13.i LV1m:;~3JV11fl1a.h v:l ~\li"l fl 'YlflMfi ffn 3Jlh'il:::LumL~:::m1LL "iln LL "il\I m1flU3J1UL
q
ii\! mi~ LL~:;n11
fS' A fS' A.c:::i O <V d 11"" d A fj' fj'
i"l mn1ru m1'JLf!11:;V1~3Jn11ri'ilrifl~ 'Jlrn1~\l~fl\l'YIUfl ~'Yl~'il m1'JLf!11:;V1 flUn13J n~1 n11i"l ~1n1ru
q q

fl'J13Jim4'u£l u1:; ~:; m'J Lmu'911~fl\l~i'J LLtl1m 3Jrin'911n'il LL~:; Lfl~fl\lilfl Lii'1tl1m ru~1itun1119lmh ~'il
. ~ q

OBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research 3 (3-0-6)


Selected topics in management research and the critical evaluation of current theory and
methodology in organizational behavior, organizational control, human resource management,
conflict management, motivation, coordination, dynamics of change, leadership, and stress
management.
OBA 8100 3 (3-0-6)
tl1:::L~un11~nM1~L~~'J°1lfl\lnum1i'91~~1un11'91'ilm1 n11tl1:;Liimii\l'YlflM~LL~:::1:;Lu~u1li19l~Lfl~'Jnu
i"lfl~n11mn ~ 1Ufl\lfi'n1 n11fl'JUfl3Jfl\lfln1
q
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LL1\l"il\Ih fl'J13J'°f'J3Jilfl LL1\l"llrnfl~flWl.lfJ\ln~3J n1'J:::t:ru1 LL~:;n11i'iln11fl'J1 mfl1 ~ 'il
~ q ~

OBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6)


Selected topics in marketing research and the critical evaluation of current theory and methodology
in distribution, price, promotion mix strategies, consumer behavior, consumers' attitudes, consumer
purchasing behavior, and after-purchase evaluation
OBA 8200 3 (3-0-6)

tJ1:;L~Un11~nM1~Lri ~'J°llfl\ITlUm1191~ ~1Un11'il ~1'il n11tl1:;LiJUb ii\l'YlflM~ bb~!'.1!'.bU ~ u11i1'91~ b~ ~'Jn'.IJ

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q
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~
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OBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research 3 (3-0-6)

Selected topics in financial research and the critical evaluation of current theory and methodology

in corporate financial decision, cost of capital, security exchanges and indexes, company and
securities analysis, portfolio management theories and analysis, capital market theories, capital
market efficiency theories, and behavioral finance
OBA 8300 3 (3-0-6)

tJ1:;L~un11~nM1~ L~~'Jifl\lnum1i'91~~1un11L'.ju tl1::: Lil ULii\l'YlflM~ LL~:;1:; LU~ uiTI-~91~ Lri ~'Jnun11
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'il~1'il'Vlin'Ylf'l"l ~bb~!'.'il11"1fU'il~1'il m1iLm1:;rfu1M''YI bb~!'.

44
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2
Doctoral Degree
a...< a...< 6' a A o' A o' a ,::::1 .d.a
'VI slni'lJ"VHJ i'lb]M!J LLt:i::mJ"1 LflJ"1::'VI n1J"'.l.Jj'V\1J"V-Je)j~ sh'l ~it i'lb]M!J ~Gl1~ ~it LLG:i::i'lb]M!J ~Gl1~ ~it i'l:JJ

ih::~i'lTill1 '\Al LLt:i::n1J"L~itL ii.J'Wb]GJnjj;JJ

IV. Dissertation

OBA 9001 Doctoral Project I 6 (0-0-18)

Formulating introductory of the dissertation, background to the research, research problems,


hypotheses or issues, justifications, significance, and limitation of research

OBA 9001 l~")\'.lfl1")tl~runnrnn


., ., I 6 (0-0-18)

OBA 9002 Doctoral Project II 9 (0-0-27)

Reviewing related literature, underlying theories, theories and previous studies related to variables

used in research, developing research framework, and formulating research hypotheses.

OBA 9002 l~")\lfl1")tl~iyqprnn II 9 (0-0-27)

mJ"i'l'.Ui'l1it1J"J"mnJ"J":JJ~L flLJ1°1ia.J i'lb]M~'VI ~n~ib m 1 i i'lb]M~us:i::.J1itii'LJ~L fi mia.JT1u ~1 mh~1 "jjl ti

OBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill 9 (0-0-27)

Reviewing related literature about research methodology, evaluation of relevant research


methodology, formulating appropriate research methodology, sampling design, data collection

procedure, and statistical treatment in data analysis


OBA 9003 l~")\lfl1")ITTruru1rnn
., ., Ill 9 (0-0-27)

n1J"i'l'.Ui'l1it1J"J"mnJ"J":JJ~L fiLJ1°1ia.Jn'.IJJ":: dfouiTI-iiLJ n1J"1.h:: dJitJ":: LU LJuiTI-iiLJ~L fi LJ1°1ia.J n1J"a an LL'.IJ u


J"::L U LJ'.UlTiliLJ~L 'VI :JJ1::trn n1J"a anU'.IJ '.IJ n1J"ci':JJ~1 mh.J nJ"::'.IJ1itn1J"L fi'.IJJ"1 '.l.Jj1:JJ°1ia:JJG:i LLG:i::n1J"L~ an 1 "JY
q ~

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~

OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV 9 (0-0-27)

Gathering data, using appropriate statistical technique to analyzing data, and presenting research
findings in appropriate format based on research hypotheses
OBA 9004 l~")\lfl1")tl~ruru'Hflfl
., ., IV 9 (0-0-27)

45
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
AU TQF 2

Doctoral Degree

OBA 9005 Doctoral Project V 3 (0-0-9)

Developing research conclusions and recommendations, acknowledgement of limitations, and


recommendations for future research and applications in management practice.

OBA 9005 t~ri\lflTn.J~tMQPLDfl V 3 (0-0-9)


n1'db ii tJ u 1J i'l ~'dtJ bblil ;:::,Ye:i b~ue:i Lb u::: bfl tJ 1rl1Jli'l t.11\.t 'V'I ufi n1'dfUf
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46
Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs
Doctor of Philosophy Program in Business Administration (International Program)

(551-XXXX- 591-XXXX)

1. ~EJ'Viin\'J(?l":i (Name of Program) 1. ~EJ'ViinGj(?l":i (Name of Program)

Doctor of Philosophy Program in Business Administration Doctor of Philosophy Program in Business Administration
(International Program) (International Program)
vi in~<111tlf"ll'ru1
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~

2. ~m..l~iyqp (Name of Degree) 2. ~m..l~iyqp (Name of Degree)

~m~:JJ Doctor of Philosophy ( Business Administration) d "'


"ll'eJ6<1l:lJ Doctor of Philosophy ( Business Administration)

tlf"ll't1J1<1ll3-~uru.<Vl<11 (u1V1111pn"il) tlf"Jl'ru1<11'.13-fiu


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d ' d '
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tJ1.<11. cu~'V\1":i1i1n"iJ) tl1.<11. (1J1Vl111i":ifl"il)


• •
3. T~rnn'f-i'1\l'Viin~(?l":i (Curriculum 72 Credits ..
3. fa"a\liif-i'1\l'Viin~(?l":i (Curriculum Structure) Gomlm.1n(?l

Structure) trn"Hn1":i~nit1 (LblJlJ 2.1) G'l<11~1'U1'U'V\U'H.Jn<1l":i1:lJ"il1n 72 V\U1£.Jn<11LU'U

LL~"Hn1":i~nit1 (LL1J1J 2.1) 60 viu1£.Jn<11 L<11£.JhJ:iJm1LLtl.Ji"ll'1Leirnvi:iJeiu


A .d'
1"1l'1~'U21'U (Foundation Courses)
A .d'
1"1l'1~'U~1'U (Foundation Courses) VI in~<111L~:JJ u<111 ii!n~n'.13-1~.JL 'l!ub~foum1'Yl1
Non-credit Non-credit ~ '
, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - + - - - - - - - + - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - + - - - - - - - - 1 1imL'Yl'U L<11£.Jun~n'.13-1~1:w11m~ein'Yl11"il'"'£.J1u
1"1l'1bLn'U (Core Courses) 18 1"1l'1bbn'U (Core Courses) 18 <111ufii1Lei.Jiei.Jm1 flei m":ii<11m1 m1<11G'l1<11

1"1l'1LeJnU.JfllJ (Major Required Courses) 1"1l'11i£.J (Research Courses) vi1eim":ib~'U


12 6

1"1l'1Leirn~ein (Major Elective Courses 6


A A 6' A A 6'
1'Yl£.l1'U~'U1i (Dissertation) 36 1'Yl£.J1'U~'U1i (Dissertation) 36

Total 72 Total 60

47
"'
":i11'.JG'l::LeHl!ilTI1":i

(551-XXXX- 591-XXXX) (601-XXXX tflumuhi) 11 f mh\I trn::a V1@11:rn


• •
~ J:' •
Foundation Courses Non-Credit 1"l11~U~1U (Foundation Courses) Non-Credit

ECO 6000 Basic Quantitative Analysis Non-Credit


.1.d .. ~
MGT 6000 Principles of Management Non-Credit OBA 6100 Management and Organization Theory Non-Credit bJJlilr.JU"l1€l1"l11bbli1:::

fi1 €l Tim r.i 11 r.i i "l11

MKT 6000 Principles of Marketing Non-Credit OBA 6200 Marketing Theory Non-Credit
'Yltfl!!-flm":i<illi11~
FIN 6000 Principles of Finance Non-Credit OBA 6300 Financial Theory Non-Credit

'Yltfl!!-fl n1":ib~U

Core Courses 18 Credits 1'111LLTIU (Core Courses) 18 viil.11'.ln@l

ECO 7100 Advanced Microeconomics 3 (3-0-6)

ECO 7101 Advanced Macroeconomics 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business 3 (3-0-6)

ECO 7102 Quantitative Analysis 3 {3-0-6) OBA 7002


.
Quantitative Analysis for Research
.
L~":i"M-~~1~<ilfi.J7:::r.in<if~1~fDTI":in~
~

3 (3-0-6) Li.J~r.iu1'1f~i"l11bbli1:::
n11lbfl"l"1:::ib.;a\li.J1:1-11ruL~€ln11l~...r.J fi1€lTimr.i11 r.i i "l11

ECO 7103 Econometrics I 3 (3-0-6)


.1.d .. ~
MGT 7100 Research Design and Methodology 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design 3 (3-0-6) LJJ1i1r.JU"l1€l1"l11bbli1:::

m":iL~uTI":in~Lrn:::m":ilil\l'Ylu fi1 aTimr.i11r.ii"l11


• •
MGT 7101 Applied Behavioral Science 3 (3-0-6)

OBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization Theory


3 (3-0-6)

OBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory


3 (3-0-6)

OBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory


3 (3-0-6)
'Ylt]'M'fln11b~U'JJ..."'U\1'\I

48
.
·1-rn"'mllil"aU'il'ilUU

V1im1lil,-ufu1h\I
., •
..
':i'HJGl::teH.lliln1'a
(551-XXXX- 591-XXXX) (601-XXXX tflu~u1u) iJ fuu "a\I LLGl:: m (ii i:.i Gi
• •
Major Required Courses 12 Credits

The program offers three areas of specialization. A student must choose one
upon registration in the first semester.

Finance

FIN 8201 Seminar in Financial Economics 3 (3-0-6) rim~ni"lf1bEm


FIN 8202 Seminar in Corporate Finance 3 (3-0-6)
FIN 8203 Seminar in Investment and Portfolio 3 (3-0-6)
Management

ECO 8204 Econometrics II 3 (3-0-6)


Management

MGT 8201 Seminar in Organizational Issues 3 (3-0-6)


MGT 8202 Seminar in Human Resource Management 3 (3-0-6)
MGT 8203 Seminar in Strategic Management 3 (3-0-6)

ECO 8205 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)

Marketing

MKT 8201 Seminar in Consumer Behavior 3 (3-0-6)


MKT 8202 Seminar in Marketing Strategy 3 (3-0-6)

MKT 8203 Advanced Topic in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6)

ECO 8205 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)

Major Elective Courses 6 Credits rim~ni"lf1b€ln

Finance

FIN 8301 Seminar in Continuous-Time Finance 3 (3-0-6)


FIN 8302 Seminar in International Finance 3 (3-0-6)

FIN 8303 Seminar in Financial Engineering and Risk 3 (3-0-6)

Management

49
..
V1anam'l"if~~uu
• 'i1ua:t5 u mm 'i

(551-XXXX- 591-XXXX) (601-xxxx tflum'uhl) 11 fm.h\ltta:mm


• •~a
FIN 8304 Seminar in Financial Markets and Financial 3 (3-0-6)
Institutions

Management

MGT 8301 Seminar in Organizational Change and 3 (3-0-6)


Development

MGT 8302 Seminar in Leadership 3 (3-0-6)

MGT 8303 Seminar in International Management 3 (3-0-6)

MGT 8304 Seminar in Operations Management 3 (3-0-6)

Marketing

MKT 8301 Seminar in Price and Product Management 3 (3-0-6)

MKT 8302 Seminar in Marketing Channel Strategy 3 (3-0-6)

MKT 8303 Seminar in Marketing Communication 3 (3-0-6)

MKT 8304 Seminar in International Marketing 3 (3-0-6)

12111iu (Research Courses) 6 Credits

DBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)


n1'ilbfl'i1::i'V'J'Vli1bblh

DBA 8002 Applied Econometric 3 (3-0-6) b~:IJTit11'J11

.
b~'i'lf~:iJ~1h::t1n~
"'

OBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research 3 (3-0-6)


i:1J:1JU11iti~1'Un1'ii~m'i
'
DBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6) bi'.'i:IJTitJ1'l11

Lf:JJ :1JU1iit1~1'Un1'i<ll b'l1~


DBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research 3 (3-0-6)
Lf:JJ :IJ U 11iti~1Un1'ib1U

50
'-· .....
":11tl~:::L~tl@ITIT'a
(551-XXXX - 591-XXXX) ilfui.h\ILL~:::L'lil@Hrn
• •
Dissertation 36 Credits 1'1'1t11ii.-w~fi (Dissertation) 36 Credits

DST 9901 Doctoral Project: Proposal Development 9 (0-0-27) DBA 9001 Doctoral Project I 6 (0-0-18)
~ Q A ,;'

1m..:JnTa.J1qJqJ1be:in I ~\l'Yl:::blJ tJU1"lf1U'V'l'U1i


DST 9902 Doctoral Project: Introduction 3 (0-0-9) OBA 9002 Doctoral Project II 9 (0-0-27)) 1~tJ~1u1u~u1tJn~11~
!---~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-;

DST 9903 Doctoral Project: Literature Review 6 (0-0-18) Lm..:JnTnJ1qJqJ1bEJn 11 tl'..:Jfl\lb~~

DST 9904 Doctoral Project: Data Gathering and 9 (0-0-27) DBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill 9 (0-0-27)
Analysis Lm..:Jm·nJ1qJqJ1bEJn Ill
DST 9905 Doctoral Project: Conclusions and 9 (0-0-27) OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV 9 (0-0-27)

Recommendations Lm..:Jm11.l1qjqJ1bEJn IV
DBA 9005 Doctoral Project V 3 (0-0-9)

hmm·nJ1qJqJ1bEJn v

51
. .
"Ham1m·n.Jfrn..J~"
(551:XXXX- 591:XXXX) (601 - XX.XX Lfl"m"ltl)
First Year

Year 1, Semester 1 Year 1, Semester 1

ECO 7100 Advanced Microeconomics 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business 3 (3-0-6) LU~E.l'H.bbi..h'h'l~1E.ll'111 Lc;1E.it'lc;ll'l11
ECO 7102 Quantitative Analysis 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7002 Quantitative Analysis for Research 3 (3-0-6) ~ .
'Yl1'1L111~N~l1!1~~·fo'1 LLt'l:::;:iJ'1LUi.t1i..l
MGT 7100 Research Design and Methodology

Foreign Language Examination


3 (3-0-6) OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design 3 (3-0-6)
" .
~i '111~ Ltlu~rn:1Jf'Yl1'11i~n"il 1c;lLLfi
m~ic;im~ m~~t'l1c;lLLt'l:::;m~L~i.t

Total 9 (9-0-18) Total 9 (9-0-18) L~ei1~i!n~nN1il11i..l~eiE.Jeic;ir11


Year 1, Semester 2 Year 2, Semester 2 iiE.J1 ui1u~i1 Lfl'1iei'1m~

ECO 7101 Advanced Macroeconomics 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization 3 (3-0-6)
Theory

ECO 7103 Econometrics I 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory 3 (3-0-6)

MGT 7101 Applied Behavioral Science 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Total 9 (9-0-18) Total 9 (9-0-18)

Second Year

Year 2, Semester 1 Year 2Semester1

xxx 8201 Major Required Course 3 (3-0-6)

xxx 8202 Major Required Course 3 (3-0-6) OBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)
or or
OBA 8002 Applied Econometrics

52

.
'Vl~nt'f<il";fu1111u"
• .
'Vl~nt'f<il";itlfm..l,.\I
• "j1 t1G'l:::tBt1<ilTI1";itl futl";i\I trn:::
'
(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx tfl"<?i'"1tl) mmrn
'
xxxx Major Elective Course 3 (3-0-6) OBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research 3 (3-0-6)
or or
OBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research

or or
OBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research

Total 9 (9-0-18) Total 9 (9-0-18)

Year 2, Semester 2 Year 2, Semester 2

xxx 8203 Major Required Course 3 (3-0-6) OBA 9001 Doctoral Project I 6 (0-0-18) lliiJ 1m._'l~f1,m1"j~._'!'Yl::biJr.iui'l11
xxx 8204 Major Required Course 3 (3-0-6) uy..iuif1'iimhmu~u1r.inm1:w
xxxx Major Elective Course 3 (3-0-6) LJ._'jf)._'lb~:IJ

Qualifying Examination

Total 9 (9-0-18) Total 6 (0-0-18)

Third Year iJm,.~m.+1~ 3

Year 3, Semester 1 Year 3, Semester 1

DST 9901 Doctoral Project: Proposal Development 9 (0-0-27) OBA 9002 Doctoral Project II 9 (0-0-27)

Total 9 (0-0-27) Total 9 (0-0-27)

Year 3, Semester 2 Year 3, Semester 2

DST 9902 Doctoral Project: Introduction 3 (0-0-9) OBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill 9 (0-0-27)

DST 9903 Doctoral Project: Literature Review 6 (0-0-18)

Total 9 (0-0-27) Total 9 (0-0-27)

Fourth Year iJm,.~m+i~ 4


Year 4, Semester 1 Year 4, Semester 1

DST 9904 Doctoral Project: Data Gathering and 9 (0-0-27) OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV 9 (0-0-27)

Analysis

Total 9 (0-0-27) Total 9 (0-0-27)

53
'Viaml<Pl':i'U"il"i>UU
... 'Viam1!Pl':i'l.Hm.h\l
... ':i11)H'l~tBl).)Vln1':itlfm.h\ltt&'I~
• • •
(551:XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx tflu~ul'l.J) t'Vi<Pl e.16'1

Year 4, Semester 2 Year 4, Semester 2

DST 9905 Doctoral Project: Conclusions and 9 (0-0-27) OBA 9005 Doctoral Project V 3 (0-0-9)
Recommendations

Total 9 (0-0-27) Total 3 (0-0-9)

54
(551XXXX- 591XXXX)
A ,;/'

Foundation Courses 111'1W\4>j?1\4> (Foundation Courses)

ECO 6000 Basic Quantitative Analysis Non-credit

Scientific approach to managerial decision making which consists of


problem definition, model development, data collection, model
implementation using the data, model validation, result analysis, and
using the findings to implement changes which solve the original
problem, and various quantitative models and methods.

MGT 6000 Principles of Management Non-credit OBA 6100 Management and Organization Theory Non-credit

Fundamental functions of management: planning, leading, organizing Theories, practice and problems of management and organization,
and controlling and their application to business decision-making, planning, leading, organizing and controlling, organizational
connections made between the planning process and the controlling decision-making, connections made between the planning process
function to evaluate organizational performance, principles of and the controlling function to evaluate organizational
management, communication concepts, human resource management, performance, communication concepts, human resource

organizational structures as well as motivational theory, application of management, organizational structures, motivational theory, and
principles to entrepreneurial, corporate and international organizations. application of principles to entrepreneurial, corporate and
international organizations.
OBA 6100 Y1I]ltljmi-il>lm1w:i::eh1~ni- hiih'l'l-i11:.1n1?1
'Yltp~~ m'j"tl~1J1\ <ll"1eJ~9lutl""'tlJ'V11b~r.i1n1Jm'j"i~m'j"bb"1::e:i\lfi'm m'j"
11\lbb~u n1'j"U1 m'j"i~e:i\lfi'musi::m'j"m1Jf1a.J
q
m'j"<i~~uhm\Jll'j"fl"iJ
q
d I I d
mwlfe:ia.J<l! eJ'j"::'V\11\ln~1J1um'j"m'j"11\lbb~u bb"1::m'j"fl11Jf1a.J
q
bvrn
ol A ..
u'j"::ba.JU~SJ\l1WlleJ\leJ\lf1m
A 1 d
bbU1f111a.Jf1~ Un1'j"~eJITT'j"
A
n1'j"1J'j"'V\1'j"

'Yl~vw1m1Jf1f1si
q
tm\l~f1\leJ\lfln'j" 'Ylbl~nm'j""il\Jh
~ ~
bbsi::m'j"tl'j"::r.Jn<ll1'lf
q

Ri'VlrrnrtJ'j"::ne:i1Jm'j"
'\I
e:i\lfi'm~1ttl Lrn::e:i\lfi'm'j"::'V\11\Jtl'j"::b'Yl~

55
(551.XXXX - 591.XXXX)
.
viani:'l'm~'l.Jf1nJ~\I

(601 - XXXX
.
Lfl\lom\i.1'1.J)
MKT 6000 Principles of Marketing Non-credit OBA 6200 Marketing Theory Non-credit

Marketing concepts and skills and the underlying business foundations Theories, practice and problems in marketing and the underlying
required for the understanding and development of marketing, business foundations required for the understanding and
distribution, financing, marketing information management, pricing, development of marketing, distribution, financing, marketing
product/service management, promotion and selling foundations of information management, pricing, product and service
economics and communications. management, promotion and selling foundations of economics and
communications.
OBA 6200 nq»fim~ma11P1 1~iimlm.1nm
'Ylfl'M~ m11.Jij'l.J1i <lli.'lfllfi"il'UU~qj'V\1b~!.J1rl'l.Jn1i<lli.'l11fi iubb'l.J'l.JTITI~1'U

.
'Y11.\lli1n"il ~.\IL1lu~u~1um111 L'll1h Lbi.'l::m1vr~u1'll ei.\lm1<11 i.'l11fi
"'
m1

FIN 6000 Principles of Finance Non-credit OBA 6300 Financial Theory Non-credit

Introduction to finance, how to value assets and businesses given Theories, practice and problems in finance, how to value assets
forecasts of future cash flows, risk characteristics of different asset and businesses given forecasts of future cash flows, risk

classes, stocks, bonds and interest rates, measuring and pricing risk, characteristics of different asset classes, stocks, bonds and

and derivative instruments. This course will combine the theoretical interest rates, measuring and pricing risk, derivative instruments,

underpinnings of finance with real-world examples, including several theoretical underpinnings of finance with real-world examples.

case discussions.

OBA 6300 'Ylfl1+DTI1~l~\lo


'Ylfl"M~ m1iJ~'l.J1i <11!.'leJIYl"i!uiJ~V11b~!.l1n'l.Jm1L~u n1i'V\1111.'lfl1
"
~u 'Ylf~ LJLLl.'l::li1n"il"il1nmwn 1Y1m1rn'll ei.\lm::LL~L~u~lfi1ueiu1f1<11

m1m~!.l.\l'lleJ.\l~U'Ylf~tl'th::b.fl'Yl<ll1.\I ~ iu vruliu<111 bb~::e1<11111Y1eimfl!.l

m111Y1m1m~!.l.\lbbl.'l::iJ1::L~ufi1m1m~!.l.\I <1111~11ei~vru1f 'Ylfl"M~
~1um1L~un'l.Ji1eiLJ1.\l"il1.\l1u11.'lniJ;"i!tl'u

56
.,
(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx ilJuYlu1ti)
Core Courses 1'7i1unu (Core Courses)
ECO 7100 Advanced Microeconomics 3 (3-0-6)

Neo-classical general equilibrium theory: economic analysis and

optimal decision, customer choice and demand for products, production

function and cost curve, market structure, pricing, existence of

competitive equilibrium, fundamental welfare theorems, externalities,


and uncertainty.

ECO 7101 Advanced Macroeconomics 3 (3-0-6)

Basic Keynesian model: consumption, investment, and money demand

functions, open economy, determinants of money supply, interest rate,

national income, effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policy, inflation

and income policy, employment, elementary growth models,


investment, consumption, and government expenditure, and balance of

payments. Analyses are conducted through the use of macroeconomic

models ..

OBA 7001 Applied Economics for Business

Application of economic principles to support business decisions

within organizations, understanding of the external business

environment in which an organization operates, application of

economic theories, methodologies and economic analysis to


develop essential tools for making optimal decision

OBA 7001
- . .
t~'l'l~Hi~1&'f(;l{tl'l~tln<;f°~1'Vliirn'llh1

m~ii1n"il 1uei~fi'm m1:JJ b"J!1h1 u~m'V'l bn<n i.fei:JJ'Yl1~ii1n"il"ll ei~ ei~fi'm


• •
m11h:~nin1-l'Ylb]~~bfl1~~f!1~inf 1llm1bbl.'l::mihm1::vlm~
Lf!1~~m~infb~eimwr~mbf!~ei~~ei~"51dju1um1~inffu1"il~~~~in
~ .
57
(551XXXX.- 591.XXXX)

ECO 7102 Quantitative Analysis 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7002 Quantitative Analysis for Research 3 (3-0-6)
Basic mathematical methods which are necessary for understanding Mathematical methods which are necessary for understanding
literature, statistical analysis, comparative statistical analysis, literature, statistical analysis, comparative statistical analysis,
optimization problems, basic dynamic analysis and mathematical optimization problems, basic dynamic analysis and mathematical
programming, matrix algebra, differential and integral calculus, programming, matrix algebra, calculus and various quantitative
differential equations, difference equations, and linear programming. technique used for developing researches.

OBA 7002 TI1'l1L~d1::'1·fiil\ltl'i-3J1nLLTie:im'l1iv 3 (3-0-6)

11fm'l'Y11 "~ ni~ 1'!1 ff~ f~··ih dh1l un1'lb-ir1h iJ'YlW.rnJ ~n-is-1 m,-
1bm1::'1Km" ffiHi nT~1bvi·n::'!Km"fffi~bi1"b1rforn Yi mJ tl....I!J'Vl1m~
b~ ~tl~::ff'Yl~m'V'-1 m~1 b~TI::'1Kbb1JiJ t~u1iin.ffu~u~1u
... 1tl~bbm~m"

ECO 7103 Econometrics I 3 (3-0-6)

Applied econometrics including basic techniques in regression analysis


and some of the variety of models that are used when the linear model
proves inadequate or inappropriate, probability and distribution theory,
statistical inference and prediction, and regression analysis.

58
(551XXXX - 591XXXX) (601 - :XXXX Lfl"~"ltl)
MGT 7100 Research Design and Methodology 3 (3-0-6) OBA 7003 Behavioral Research Design 3 (3-0-6)
Research design appropriate for basic and field research, including Behavioral research design appropriate for behavioral research,
methodology for implementing such design, analysis of various methodology for implementing such design, sampling technique,
statistical methods for evaluating research data, prospectus and sampling procedure, questionnaire design, interviewing, focus
manuscript writing and submission, and also a critical review of various group, and other approaches for behavioral research
research currently published.

3 (3-0-6)

nTrn Elnbb:UlJn1jlitJfib ~:IJ1:::ff:W ITTWfon1jlitJ b~'1'VHl ~ndj:IJ n1j

i.t1LEJ1u:u:u1'il""'mfu1t11-l,:i1u'il~'1 b'Ylf!Uflhmdi*:w
q
El ci1,:i nJ:::mumdi*:w
q
CL.I I Q..I ff' I

lil1Eltl1'1 n1jEJEJnbb:U:Ubb:U:UffEl:Ub11:W n1jff:IJ.Tl11!1-nt n1jffU'YlU1nG'l:W


q

uG'l:::1Timd5u 6J ~1-Im~f:umd1i°'tJ Li'1VHl ~md:w

MGT 7101 Applied Behavioral Science 3 (3-0-6)

In-depth review of recent research findings and contributions in

behavioral science, with emphasis on new theoretical development


such as self-efficacy, group dynamics, self-managing teams, learning
organizations, and world-class organizations, innovation and
organizational learning, evolution of firms and industries, corporate
culture, power and politics in organization, social identity theory,
motivation, affect, emotion, justice, job attitudes, leadership, and social
networks.

59
(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx tiiu~ulll)
OBA 7100 Advance Management and Organization Theory

3 (3-0-6)

Advance theories and recent literature about organization and its

environment, function and structure of authority and responsibility,

formal and informal organization and social system, organizational

behavior, organizational control, research and development,


changing of corporate structure, human resource management,

conflict management, motivation, coordination, dynamics of

change, leadership, and stress management.


.:I ~ tt ~
OBA 7100 't1fl'ltDTI17'il~TI1-:iLL~~eh'l~TI":i'll'M.\'f\l 3 (3-0-6)
"
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60
(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx Lflu~uhl)
OBA 7200 Advance Marketing Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Advance theories and recent literature about transfer of goods and


services from producer to consumer, consumer's buying motives,
basic product, distribution, price, promotion mix strategies, and
improvement of marketing efficiency, consumer behavior, influence
of socio psychological factors, personality, social groups,
demographic variables, social class, culture on the formation of
consumers' attitudes, consumer purchasing behavior, and after-
purchase evaluation.

3 (3-0-6)

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61
(551:XXXX - 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx ttiumu1t1)
OBA 7300 Advance Financial Theory 3 (3-0-6)

Advance theories and recent literature about corporate financial


decision, financial projection, cost of capital, evaluating the return
from investment, the new techniques in evaluating the investment
opportunities, philosophical basis of investment principles, ethics
in investment, risk and expected return relationship, security
exchanges and indexes, company and securities analysis,
portfolio management theories and analysis, capital market
theories, capital market efficiency theories, and behavioral finance
...
OBA 7300 'Ylfl'.IYDTIT'H~WllU\'f-1 3 (3-0-6)

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'l.J1":::~'Yl~Il1Y-l bb~:::m1"L~UL~\IY-lf]~nndJ

62
(551XXXX - 591XXXX)

Major Required Courses

Finance

FIN 8201 Seminar in Financial Economics 3 (3-0-6)

Basic theories of asset pricing: individual investment decision under

uncertainty including expected utility theory, state-preference theory,


risk aversion, stochastic dominance, and two-period consumption-
portfolio problem, equilibrium pricing theories including mean-variance
efficiency, Capital Asset Pricing Model, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory,
and recent development in asset pricing.

FIN 8202 Seminar in Corporate Finance 3 (3-0-6)

Intensive review of modern theories of corporate finance, extensive


reading of the current literature in corporate finance field which
includes the Modigliani-Miller invariance theorems, dividend policy,

capital structure theory, mergers and acquisition, agency theory,

asymmetric information and signaling, impact of taxes, and financial


distress.

FIN 8203 Seminar in Investment and Portfolio Management 3 (3-0-6)

Major areas in investments: portfolio theory, asset pricing, valuation

models market efficiency, pricing anomalies, performance evaluation,


management of equity portfolios, management of fixed income
portfolios, hedging strategies, asset allocation strategies, market timing,
and the use of options and futures in portfolio management.

63
.. .
viimtlFl':iilfrnJ':i\I
(551.XXXX - 591.XXXX) (601 - xxxx ill'"~'"lu)
ECO 8204 Econometrics II 3 (3-0-6)

Quantitative tools in recent research and sophisticated valuation


models to understand and produce research in finance, mechanics of
GMM estimation, nonlinear least squares, maximum likelihood
estimation, asymptotic results for regression models, Simultaneous
Equations Models and Time-Series Models.

Management

MGT 8201 Seminar in Organizational Issues 3 (3-0-6)

Issues in organizational strategy, behavior, theory, principal theoretical

perspectives and empirical findings used to explain relationships


among environments, organizational strategies, designs, and
performance, multiple theoretical paradigms including decision theory,
structural contingency theory, institutional theory, transaction cost
economics, network theory, resource dependence theory,
organizational ecology, and industrial organization economics.

MGT 8202 Seminar in Human Resource Management 3 (3-0-6)

Selected topics on current research on organizational behavior and


human resource management: theories of individual difference,
motivation, leadership, decision making, interpersonal relations;
significant issues currently confronting Personnel/Human Resource

professionals, process used by organizations in analyzing and


implementing new programs and projects with consideration given to

both the behavioral and economic (costs/savings) aspects of

proposals.

64
(551:XXXX - 591:XXXX) (601 - :XXXX tflu<?iultl)
MGT 8203 Seminar in Strategic Management 3 (3-0-6)

Principal theoretical perspectives and empirical findings in the field of


strategy, the complexity of business problems and the interrelationship

of business functions, strategic decision making, assessing the


strategic situation, strategic planning systems and techniques, and
implementation and control, theoretical perspectives which include
industrial organization economics, resource-based view, agency and
game theory, transaction cost economics, institutional theory, and
organization ecology.

ECO 8205 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)

Basic multivariate techniques that are currently used in literature,


principal components analysis, explanatory and confirmatory factor
analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function
analysis, and other techniques, such as structural equation modeling,

hierarchical linear modeling, cluster analysis, canonical correlation, or


multidimensional scaling.

65
(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - XXXX Lih~@l~lu)

Marketing

MKT 8201 Seminar in Consumer Behavior 3 (3-0-6)

Current research underlying individual and group behavior of


consumers, theories and conceptual approaches to the choice,
purchase, and consumption behavior of buyers, behavioral science
with the emphasis on quantitative approaches and emphasizes
research applications, behavioral science-related theories which are
applied to consumer behavior from descriptive, predictive, and
normative perspectives, consumer knowledge (learning, memory,
categorization), attitude theory, decision-making, affect and social

influence, relationship marketing, impact of technology on marketing


thoughts and practice and marketing application of psychological,

sociological and social psychological factors.

MKT 8202 Seminar in Marketing Strategy 3 (3-0-6)

Evolution of the marketing strategy, the formulation of marketing


strategies, and the management functions of directing, planning,
organizing, coordinating and controlling as they are applied to
operational marketing issues, and the analysis of external environment,
the areas of product pricing, distribution strategies, promotion,
positioning and differentiation, evaluation of strategic frameworks,

assumptions, and concepts and their relationship to other functional

areas.

66
....
V1imr@l,-iT~~u" ·V1iml'@l":itlfm..h\I ,., m::i:::tfil lll91TI1":itlfutl,-.., m::i :::t 'Vi@! m::i
"' • "' • ' •
(551:XXXX- 591:XXXX) (601 - :xxxx tfl"@l"ltl)

MKT 8203 Advanced Topic in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6)


In-depth study of the development and validation of self-report

measures used in marketing research, with the focus on conceptual

and methodological tools for developing and investigating


measurement scales with particular emphasis on reliability and
construct validity used in current stream of research in marketing.

ECO 8205 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)


Basic multivariate techniques that are currently used in literature,
principal components analysis, explanatory and confirmatory factor
analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function
analysis, and other techniques, such as structural equation modeling,
hierarchical linear modeling, cluster analysis, canonical correlation, or
multidimensional scaling.

Major Elective Courses

Finance

FIN 8301 Seminar in Continuous-Time Finance 3 (3-0-6)


Continuous-time finance: continuous-time stochastic processes,
viability and state-price densities, equivalent martingale measures,
optimal consumption with complete markets and under constraints,
derivations of some classic asset-pricing models and equilibrium

models in continuous time

67
. .
V1inl.'fG1~tlfutl~\I
(601 - xxxx ttluG!u1tl)
(551XXXX- 591.XXXX)

FIN 8302 Seminar in International Finance 3 (3-0-6)

Application of the theory of business finance in an international context:

determinants of exchange rate and management of foreign exchange


risk including hedging with financial instruments and operational hedge
strategies, exchange rate forecasting, financial analysis and control of
foreign investment decisions, foreign exchange markets efficiency,
capital flows, balance of payments and exchange-rate policies,
international monetary system, and financial functions in the
multinational firms including capital budgeting, cost of capital, and
capital structure.

FIN 8303 Seminar in Financial Engineering and Risk Management

3 (3-0-6)

Design of new financial securities, advanced techniques for pricing and


measuring the risks of derivative securities, strategies employing
derivative securities, trading mechanisms, hedging and speculation,
practical risk management issues, Market Risk (Value at Risk), and

Credit Risk.

68
"-' 'II
(551XXXX - 591:XXXX) (601 - xxxx tflumuhl)
FIN 8304 Seminar in Financial Markets and Financial Institutions

3 (3-0-6)

Major financial markets and financial institutions with emphasis on

current trends and developments, strategic financial issues including


optimal asset allocation, regulatory environment, and cost of capital;
modern management techniques including duration-based asset-liability
modes, a variety of risk-hedging instruments, instruments, level and
term structure of interest rates, globalization of financial markets, asset
securitization, financial innovation, and technique to hedge interest-rate

and foreign-currency risk.

Management

MGT 8301 Seminar in Organizational Change and Development

3 (3-0-6)

Significant issues on organizational paradigms, metaphors and

organizational research, organizational learning and knowledge

management, systems concepts and systems thinking, strategies and


methods of organizational change and systems practice, organizational

culture, creativity and cross-cultural perspectives, consultative methods

and the role of the change agent, the nature of organizations in the

future, methods of needs assessment, and indicators of organizational


effectiveness.

MGT 8302 Seminar in Leadership 3 (3-0-6)

Major theories of leadership, traditional and contemporary perspectives

on leadership and the group process toward which leadership is


directed, conceptual background and empirical support for each

leadership theory.

69
~irm'I 1wnl~:u U';i\l
.. '
(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx tilu~ulil)
MGT 8303 Seminar in International Management 3 (3-0-6)

Emerging and leading ideas in management in the recognized areas of


international business, the change to the service and knowledge
economy, globalization, international business practice and
international business and trade forums with their international

protocols, the design of multi-national corporations, virtual


organizations, alliances and networks, risk management and
addressing complexity.

MGT 8304 Seminar in Operations Management 3 (3-0-6)

Selected topics in Operations Management (OM) including research


issues in OM, research in OM strategy, statistical quality control,
productivity, inventory management and control, service operations
with the focus on the critical evaluation of current theory and
methodology.

Marketing

MKT 8301 Seminar in Price and Product Management 3 (3-0-6)

Product management functions and pricing strategy in contemporary


business, product management: product strategies, product planning,
product auditing, and legal aspects of products, production
management: demand estimation, techniques used in setting prices,

psychological aspects of pricing, and legal aspects of pricing.

70
.(
(551XXXX - 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx iilu~ultl)
MKT 8302 Seminar in Marketing Channel Strategy 3 (3-0-6)

Analysis of marketing channels as social, economic and political


systems, with the emphasis on understanding and dissecting
behavioral dimensions of channel relations: roles of channel members,
use of power, conflicts that arise among them, and their

communication networks, economic and structural dimensions of


retailing, wholesaling, physical distribution and constraints on channel
activities.

MKT 8303 Seminar in Marketing Communication 3 (3-0-6)

Decision-making in the management of promotions, evaluation of


promotional mix, communications theories, advertising and promotional

management and strategy development, advertising objectives and


budget, media strategy, client-agency relationships, and measuring
advertising effectiveness.

MKT 8304 Seminar in International Marketing 3 (3-0-6)

International marketing policies, strategies, and objectives when


entering and operating in foreign markets, foreign market selection,
product adaptation, and distribution channels.

71
(551XXXX - 591XXXX:)
..
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~~11iu (Research Courses)


OBA 8001 Multivariate Analysis 3 (3-0-6)

Basic multivariate techniques that are currently used in literature,


principal components analysis, explanatory and confirmatory factor
analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function
analysis, structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling,
cluster analysis, canonical correlation, and multidimensional scaling.
OBA 8001 fl1"j1l~"j1:::~-n'ViGl1U'l.h 3 (3·0·6)

. '
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OBA 8002 Applied Econometrics 3 (3-0-6)

Applied econometrics in regression analysis, some of the variety of


models that are used when the linear model proves inadequate or
inappropriate, probability and distribution theory, statistical inference
and prediction, regression analysis, least square method, time series
analysis, forecasting, long-run relationship, and limited dependent
variable model, and quantitative tools in recent research

72

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OBA 8002 L~7'lt~aJ~U7:::lln~
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OBA 8100 Seminar in Management Research 3 (3-0-6) b~d-171£Jl"151

Selected topics in management research and the critical evaluation of


current theory and methodology in organizational behavior,
organizational control, human resource management, conflict
management, motivation, coordination, dynamics of change,
leadership, and stress management.

3 (3-0-6)

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DBA 8200 Seminar in Marketing Research 3 (3-0-6)

Selected topics in marketing research and the critical evaluation of


current theory and methodology in distribution, price, promotion mix
strategies, consumer behavior, consumers' attitudes, consumer
purchasing behavior, and after-purchase evaluation
QJ A Cl.J i.J
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1.h::b~umd~n'lfl~b~£.11ieh1numdi-;i'i1~1umd~Gl11ii md1.h:::dJub'li\I

DBA 8300 Seminar in Financial Research 3 (3-0-6)

Selected topics in financial research and the critical evaluation of


current theory and methodology in corporate financial decision, cost of
capital, security exchanges and indexes, company and securities
analysis, portfolio management theories and analysis, capital market
theories, capital market efficiency theories, and behavioral finance
ca.,,o A Q...ol i.J A

DBA 8300 i.'f3J3J\l,111ili:J@l1\l,TI1dL'1\I, 3 (3-0-6)

1.h::b~umd~n~1~b~£.11iei\lnumdii£.1~1umdb~'\.t th::biiub~\l'Yl'J~flbbGl::
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Dissertation 1'Yltl1WVmfi (Dissertation)

DST 9901 Doctoral Project: Proposal Development 9(0-0-27) OBA 9001 Doctoral Project I 6 (0-0-18) tlfo1m-:iNf1..Jn1':i61..J'Yl'::LUtl'Ul'l51U'Vmf
Candidate focuses on refining the research proposal in Formulating introductory of the dissertation, background to the 1<n t1'<ii1wm VI ib1t1n<il':i1~5-:iri-:i L~~

consultation with the main supervisor. research, research problems, hypotheses or issues, justifications,
significance, and limitation of research
OBA 9001 t~':i\ITI1':iU~Q!Q!1LDn I 6 (0-0-18)

n1':irl1'VIU<i11J'Y1U1"1Jfl..Jl'Ylt11U'V-l'UTI m1~LUUm"1J ei-:i-:i1uiit1 u"'ty'Vl1n1':i1iti

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-:i1uiit1

DST 9902 Doctoral Project: Introduction 3 (0-0-9) OBA 9002 Doctoral Project II 9 (0-0-27)

Candidate formulates the Introductory Chapter of the dissertation, Reviewing related literature, underlying theories, theories and previous
which includes background to the research, research problems, studies related to variables used in research, developing research
hypotheses or issues, justifications, delimitations, definitions and framework, and formulating research hypotheses.

terms according to the guidelines.


OBA 9002 t~':i\ITI1':iU~qjqj1LDn II 9 (0-0-27)
n1':i'Y11J'Y11U1':i':irnm':i~.yjb~t11".llei-:i 'Yltl'lY~'VI inrllbm1i 'Yltl'lY~bbG1::-:i1u1it1
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(551XXXX- 591XXXX) (601 - xxxx Lflu~u111)
DST 9903 Doctoral Project: Literature Review 6 (0-0-18) OBA 9003 Doctoral Project Ill 9 (0-0-27)

Candidate writes the Literature Review Chapter of the Reviewing related literature about research methodology, evaluation of
dissertation. Supervisor(s) and candidate will consult on an relevant research methodology, formulating appropriate research
ongoing basis during this period. methodology, sampling design, data collection procedure, and
statistical treatment in data analysis
OBA 9003 t~,-\lm,-1.l~tyqp Lfln Ill 9 (0-0-27)

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T:U £J'Ylbm.11'll €1~ n1'r€1€1nbblJlJ'r::blJ £.11J11i1-:U £.l'Ylb 'Vl:IJ1::ff:IJ n1'r€1€1nbblJ1Jn1"jff:IJ


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DST 9904 Doctoral Project: Data Gathering and Analysis OBA 9004 Doctoral Project IV 9 (0-0-27)

9 (0-0-27) Gathering data, using appropriate statistical technique to analyzing


data, and presenting research findings in appropriate format based on

This stage is the data gathering and analysis for the dissertation. research hypotheses
OBA 9004 t~,-\lm,-1.l~tyty1rnn IV 9 (0-0-27)

mwim1tJ-r1:1J m-r1-lb 'Yl~U~m~ fffl ~~b 'V\:1J1::ff:1J1 um,-ibm1::'1{'Jl€1:1J Gl


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DST 9905 Doctoral Project: Conclusions and OBA 9005 Doctoral Project V 3 (0-0-9)

Recommendations 9(0-0-27) Developing research conclusions and recommendations,

Candidate is expected to write the final Conclusions and acknowledgement of limitations, and recommendations for future

Recommendations chapter of the dissertation. This chapter research and applications in management practice.

includes a summary of findings, acknowledgement of limitations, DBA 9005 l~1"-'TI11"il'7tyqprnn V 3 (0-0-9)

recommendations for future research and applications in


management practice. Then, the focus will be made on re-
.
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writing, corrections and revisions of all the chapters in the tl'j:~n<n1 'll'"l umf'ltl~1J1i'1l El.Jm'jic;im'j
dissertation. Supervisor can recommend the acceptance of the

dissertation for dissertation examination. The final grade will


depend on the dissertation committee.

77
Ph.D. (Marketing), University of Western Australia, Australia, 2004
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(V1Gfn~~nu1u1"n1~) :uV111'YI rnGftJ eJtli:ui'qi


l"n1 1. MKT 3530 Consumer Behavior
2. MKT 4848 Contemporary Issues in Marketing
3. MKT 3620 Global Marketing, Department of Marketing
iJf"nru1~Mriurn<fi~
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(VI ~n~~1U1'U1"111~) :JJ'V\1l'YI LJ1~f'.J eJGlff:JJ"lfqJ


l"n1 1. MKT 8304 Seminar in International Marketing

1. Theingi, Suchira Phoorithewet, Yunmei Wang and Sikankaew Panthongprasert (2016),


"The Antecedents and Consequences of Customer Engagement: An Exploratory Study on
Mobile Network Business in Thailand"15th International Business and Economy
Conference, 7-9 January, 2016, NOrtingen-Geislingen University, NOrtingen, Stuttgart
Metropolitan Region, Germany.
2. Theingi and Hla Theingi. ''The Competitiveness of Informal Channel and Networks in
Emerging Market: The Case of Cross-border Money Transfer by Myanmar Immigrants in
Thailand." Proceedings of the International Marketing and Purchasing Group (IMP) Asia
Conference, Bali, Indonesia, December 7-10, 2014.

3. Theingi. "Exploring Market Exit Strategy in the Context of Corporate Sustainability."


Proceedings of the Asian Conference on Corporate Governance and Business
Sustainability, Bangkok, Thailand, October 7 - 9th, 2013.

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Shoppers in Thailand?" Proceedings of the 11 International Business Economy

Conference, Hawaii, USA, January 5- 8 , 2012.

5. Theingi and Sharon Purchase. "How Exporters' and Intermediaries' Resources Influence
Export Performance." Australasian Marketing Journal 19 (2011): 100-107.

6. Theingi, Hla and Theingi. "Sikh Business Community in Thailand." Sikhs in Southeast
Asia: Negotiating an Identity, Shamsul AB and Arunajeet Kaur (eds.), ISEAS Publishing,
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore, 2011.
7. Theingi. "Mini-case: B2B Planning Problems in an Unconventional Market." Business to
Business Marketing: Relationships, Networks & Strategies. (eds.), Nick Ellis Oxford:
Oxford University Press, 2011: 153-154.
8. Theingi. "Strategy Capsule 9.1: Business Networking in Developing Countries."

Contemporary Strategic Management Text: An Australian Perspective." (ed.), Robert


Grant, Bella Butler, Humphry Hung and Stuart Orr, (eds.), John Wiley & Sons Australia,
Ltd, 2011 :267-268.

Ph.D. (International Business), Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand, 2007

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Myanmar's Financial Sector. Yangon, A Joint Publication of GIZ-Myanmar and Thura Swiss,
2016.

2. Theingi, Hla. (2015) "Logistic Competitiveness and Export Performance: The Case of

Myanmar Fresh Produce" The Journal of American Academy of Business, Cambridge I, 2

(2015):101-108
3. Theingi and Hla Theingi. "The Competitiveness of Informal Channel and Networks in
Emerging Market: The Case of Cross-border Money Transfer by Myanmar Immigrants in
Thailand." Proceedings of the International Marketing and Purchasing Group (IMP) Asia

Conference, Bali, Indonesia, December 7-10, 2014.


4. Theingi, Hla. "A Conceptual Paper on Role of Consumers in Corporate Governance: Focus
of Triple Bottom Line in a Less Developed Country." Proceedings of the 2013 Asian
Conference on Corporate Governance and Business Sustainability (ACCGBS 2013),

Bangkok, Thailand, 7-9 October 2013.


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5. Hla Theingi. Export Import Practices: ASEAN Focus (1 ed.). Charleston, South Carolina,
Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013
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Knowledge Diffusion: A Study of Thai Multilevel Marketing Business", Au Journal of

Management, 10, 1(2012): 47-54

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Thailand, Paper presented at 5th International Conference on Engineering, Science,
Business and Management, 1-2 August, 2016, UAE.

2. Arttachariya, P. (2015). Environmentally conscious purchasing behavior: A study on


generation Y consumers in Bangkok, Thailand. Paper presented at the International
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Conference on Pacific-Rim Management, July 9-11 , 2015, Los Angeles, California.
3. Arttachariya, P. (2012). Environmentalism and green purchasing behavior: A study on
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Stock Exchange of Thailand. RMUTT Global Business and Economics Review, 11(2), 41-

2. 58
Tangjitprom, N., Chavalittumrong, P., & Leelalai V., (2016). "Does Real Estate Fund in

Thailand Provide Diversification Benefits for Stock Investment?", AU Journal of

3. Management, 14 (2)

Tangjitprom, Nopphon. "Bank Stock Return Sensitivity to Interest Rate Change in


4. Thailand." Proceedings of the International Business and Economy Conference 2015

Tangjitprom, Nopphon. "Over-investment and Free Cash Flow: Evidence from Thailand."
5. Proceedings of the International Conference on Business, Economics and Management

2015
Tangjitprom, Nopphon. "Propensity to Pay Dividends and Catering Incentives in Thailand.
Studies in Economics and Finance 30, 1 (2013): 45-55.

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ability on dividend policy: how do talented manager view dividend payouts?" Applied
Economics Letters, 23, 12 (2015): 857-862.
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2 Leelalai, Veeranuch. "How talent managers make dividend decision: evidence from
U.S. market" Proceedings of the 15th International Economic Conference, Rome,
Italy, April 14-17, 2015: 662-672.
3. Leelalai V., (2015). "Managerial ability and share repurchases: Evidence from U.S.
market" SS International Research Network, 5 (4).
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4. in Thailand Provide Diversification Benefits for Stock Investment?", AU Journal of


Management, 14 (2)

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40

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