WKCE Diagnostic Practice Test

GRADE 10

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WKCE Diagnostic Test Turkey
The word Turkey brings to mind exotic images— jewel-colored tiles set against whitewashed walls, minarets and gilded spires, rugged mountains, volcanoes, and blue, crystalline seas. Turkey is also known for its exquisite handicrafts—rugs, wood inlays, embroidery and woven fabrics, and ornate leatherwork. Turkey is an urban nation. The country’s five largest cities have millions of inhabitants. The population of the Istanbul metropolitan area alone is over fifteen million. Turkey is also rural. Much of the country’s population continues to live in small cities, towns, and farming villages. Turkey is a bridge between Europe and Asia. Part of Turkey is in Europe and part is in Asia. The two sections of the country are separated by two narrow straits, the Dardanelles and Bosporus, and the sea that lies between them, the Sea of Marmara. European Turkey, known as Thrace, is about the size of the state of Massachusetts. It is bordered by Greece and Bulgaria to the west. Turkey in Asia is called Anatolia. Anatolia is about the size of Texas. It is bordered by Russia and Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, and Iraq. Present-day Turkey is at the center of what was once the mighty Ottoman Empire. At its largest, in the 1500s, the Ottoman Empire reached from what is today Kuwait in the Persian Gulf, east across North Africa to Algeria. In Europe, the Ottoman Empire included the present-day nations of Greece, Albania, Macedonia, Bosnia, and Romania, among others. The Ottoman dynasty has its origins around 1300. At that time, Muslim soldiers led by Prince Osman I began expanding their territory in the name of Islam. Most of the territory they invaded and took over was part of the Christian Byzantine Empire. In 1453, the Ottomans took over the city of Constantinople, renaming it Istanbul, the city where Europe and Asia meet. Ottoman rulers worked hard to expand their rule. Suleiman the Magnificent (1520–1566) captured Iraq, Hungary, and Albania. His navy ruled the Mediterranean. Suleiman created centers of learning and art, codified the laws and structure of the state, and turned his empire into one of the great powers of Europe. But after Suleiman’s death, the Ottoman Empire began to fall apart. By the 19th century, most of the European territory had broken away into independent states, and the Ottomans had begun to lose North Africa. In 1829, Greece became an independent country. Other ethnic groups revolted. In 1878, Serbia, Romania, and Montenegro became independent nations as well. World War I (1914–1918) led to the death of the Ottoman Empire. The empire allied itself with Germany and Austria, and with their defeat at the hand of the Allies, the Ottoman Empire collapsed. The only part that was left of the once vast empire was Turkey, which became a republic in 1923. Kemal Ataturk, Turkey’s first president, began to modernize Turkey. During his rule, control of the courts and schools was taken away from Muslim leaders, and women attained the right to vote. Nonreligious schooling was required for all children. After the death of Ataturk in 1938, Turkey was ruled by democratically elected governments until 1960, when a military uprising removed Prime Minister Menderes from office and then executed him. Civilian government returned to Turkey in 1982. Today, Turkey’s cities are modern and industrialized. Turks work in modern buildings and wear European-style clothes. Few women wear veils. Turkey is a favorite tourist site. Visitors tour Istanbul; the ancient ruins in Ephesus; treasures in Dalyan and Caunus; Bodrum, the land of the Crusaders; and Antalya, the Turquoise Coast resort. The ancient land of the Ottomans has become part of the global economy.

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WKCE Diagnostic Test
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According to the passage, why did the Ottoman Empire gradually collapse? A The countries separated from the empire. B Its rulers became weak. C Famine and poverty overtook the country. D Too many different languages were spoken in the empire. Why did the author most likely write this selection? A to inform readers about the roots of modern Turkey B to shock readers with tales of the decadence of the Ottoman Empire C to explain to readers why Turkey fought on the losing side of World War I D to convince readers to accept a new interpretation of the origins of the Ottoman Empire According to the passage, which event occurred last? A The Ottomans took over the city of Constantinople. B Turkey became a republic. C Civilian government returned to Turkey after a period of military rule. D Ataturk died. Read the following sentence from the passage. Suleiman created centers of learning and art, codified the laws and structure of the state, and turned his empire into one of the great powers of Europe. Which of the following means about the same as codified ? A systematically arranged B recently invented C translated D completely destroyed

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How does the author support the claim that Turkey is an urban nation? A The author goes through Turkey’s history and gives the reader dates and facts that are important. B The author states that Turkey is no longer ruled by the military and is instead ruled by an elected government. C The author shows that Turkey is the bridge between Europe and Asia, which makes it essential to the economy. D The author shows how people dress and where they work and what types of cities and industries Turkey has. Which of the following is a good summary of the passage? A The history of Turkey is complex and turbulent. B Turkey is the nucleus of what was the Ottoman Empire. Kemal Ataturk began to modernize Turkey, and today, Turkey’s citizens are modern and industrialized. C Today, Turkey is popular with tourists who visit the country’s ancient ruins and relax on its Turquoise Coast. D After the death of Suleiman, the Ottoman Empire began to fall apart. Ultimately, the Ottoman Empire collapsed as a result of World War I. How is the European part of Turkey different from the Asian part of Turkey? A The European part is rural, while the Asian part is urban. B The European part is the size of Massachusetts, while the Asian part is the size of Texas. C The European part is known for its exquisite handicrafts, while its Asian part is known for its exotic images. D The European part was never part of the Ottoman Empire; only the Asian part was.
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WKCE Diagnostic Test
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Who began to modernize Turkey, and how did he do it? Use details and information from the passage to support your answer.

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WKCE Diagnostic Test Richard Bentley: Judged Too Swiftly
Richard Bentley, the most prominent classical scholar of the 1700s, is notorious today as the person who antagonized Jonathan Swift into writing The Battle of the Books. Swift, who wrote Gulliver’s Travels in 1728, remains one of the most frequently read authors in British literature and is famous for his biting satires. These stories ridicule people and behavior for the purpose of improving society. Although Bentley’s role in the fight between old learning and new learning in The Battle of the Books merits extensive discussion, it is important to understand Bentley’s life and career before they became forever connected to the literary history of Swift. Swift is important, of course, as the author of The Battle of the Books, but his satire would not have been written if not for the work of Richard Bentley. Bentley’s Career in Classics Bentley was born in 1662 near the city of Wakefield in England, and he studied Latin both at home and at grammar school. He entered St. John’s College at Cambridge University when he was only 14 years old— the usual age for college entrance was 17 or 18. After finishing his undergraduate degree, he continued his study of classics (that is, the languages and literature of ancient Greece and Rome), while living as a teacher in London. During this time, when he was around 30 years old, he published many papers on classical writings, many of which were considered masterpieces of accurate literary criticism. Professors in Europe and England soon considered him one of England’s brightest young stars. Although a “dunce” in the eyes of Swift, Bentley was respected and admired in some circles.
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The Battle of Ideas Despite his legitimate success in the field of classical studies, Bentley is probably most remembered for his part in the debate between the ancients and moderns in Swift’s The Battle of the Books. On one side of this debate were those writers who supported more traditional and conservative philosophies of art and education; they favored older styles of learning, so they were known as the “ancients.” On the other side, the “moderns” supported the modern advancement of physical and mathematical sciences. Swift favored the ancients, but Bentley was considered a modern. He soon was involved in a paper war with the ancients, against whom he wrote many critical papers. Much of his criticism was well received, but some of the writers he condemned were Swift’s friends. Thus, Swift decided to use him as the target for attack on the modern philosophies, in part because Swift did not agree with him and in part because Bentley had attacked his friends. Final Judgments Even though Bentley is considered a learned classical scholar by those who know his work—a statue of him stands on the grounds of Cambridge University— most people only know him as the ill-tempered and complaining character from The Battle of the Books. Because Swift’s writings are still read today and Bentley’s generally are not, Swift’s harsh judgment of the classical scholar remains the accepted view.

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WKCE Diagnostic Test
9

Read the following sentence from the passage. Although Bentley’s role in the fight between old learning and new learning in The Battle of the Books merits extensive discussion, it is important to understand Bentley’s life and career before they became forever connected to the literary history of Swift. Which of the following means about the same as merits? A awards B deserves C gets a trophy D continues

12 The primary purpose of this passage it to A refer the reader to many of Bentley’s

literary works. explain how Bentley’s reputation has been affected by Swift. C reveal to the reader the close friendship Swift and Bentley shared. D demonstrate the different types of literary criticism.
B 13 Swift attacked Bentley in The Battle of the

10 If Swift’s writings were not so popular

today, how would Bentley probably be judged? A as the person who held back the writings of Swift B as an intelligent scholar of classical literature C as the president of Cambridge University D as an intelligent child who wasted his talent
11 Which of the following statements is a

Books because he felt A that the older styles of learning that Bentley favored were outdated. B less confident about his own work. C that Bentley was mean-spirited. D loyalty towards his friends and did not agree with Bentley’s modern style.
14 To better understand the work of Bentley,

the author might recommend that one should A analyze his childhood. B learn to read Greek and Latin. C read Swift’s commentary about him. D read Bentley’s literary criticism.

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FACT? A Bentley was ill-tempered and complained a great deal. B Swift favored modern mathematical advancements. C Bentley published many papers on classical writings. D Most people consider Bentley to be a learned classical scholar.

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WKCE Diagnostic Test
15 What methods does the author use to convince readers that Bentley has been misjudged by

history? Use details and information from the reading to explain your answer.

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WKCE Diagnostic Test from The Gift of the Magi
by O. Henry
So now Della’s beautiful hair fell about her, rippling and shining like a cascade of brown waters. It reached below her knee and made itself almost a garment for her. And then she did it up again nervously and quickly. Once she faltered for a minute and stood still while a tear or two splashed on the worn red carpet. On went her old brown jacket; on went her old brown hat. With whirl of skirts and with the brilliant sparkle still in her eyes, she fluttered out the door and down the stairs to the street. Where she stopped, the sign read “Mme. Sofronie. Hair Goods of All Kinds.” One flight up Della ran and collected herself, panting, before madame, large, too white, chilly, and hardly looking the “Sofronie.” “Will you buy my hair?” asked Della. “I buy hair,” said Madame. “Take yer hat off and let’s have a sight at the looks of it.” Down rippled the brown cascade. “Twenty dollars,” said Madame, lifting the mass with a practiced hand. “Give it to me quick,” said Della. Oh, and the next two hours tripped by on rosy wings. Forget the hashed metaphor. She was ransacking the stores for Jim’s present. She found it at last. It surely had been made for Jim and no one else. There was none other like it in any of the stores, and she had turned all of them inside out. It was a platinum fob chain simple and chaste in design, properly proclaiming its value by substance alone and not by meretricious ornamentation—as all good things should do. It was even worthy of The Watch. As soon as she saw it, she knew that it must be Jim’s. It was like him. Quietness and value—the description applied to both. Twenty-one dollars they took from her for it, and she hurried home with the 87 cents. With that chain on his watch Jim might be properly anxious about the time in any company. Grand as the watch was, he sometimes looked at it on the sly on account of the old leather strap that he used in place of a chain. . . . At 7 o’clock the coffee was made, and the frying pan was on the back of the stove hot and ready to cook the chops.
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Jim was never late. Della doubled the fob chain in her hand and sat on the corner of the table near the door that he always entered. Then she heard his step on the stair away down on the first flight, and she turned white for just a moment. She had a habit of saying little silent prayers about the simplest everyday things, and now she whispered: “Please, God, make him think I am still pretty.” The door opened, and Jim stepped in and closed it. He looked thin and very serious. Poor fellow, he was only twenty-two—and to be burdened with a family! He needed a new overcoat, and he was without gloves. Jim stopped inside the door, as immovable as a setter at the scent of a quail. His eyes were fixed upon Della, and there was an expression in them that she could not read, and it terrified her. It was not anger, nor surprise, nor disapproval, nor horror, nor any of the sentiments that she had been prepared for. He simply stared at her fixedly with that peculiar expression on his face. Della wriggled off the table and went for him. “Jim, darling,” she cried, “don’t look at me that way. I had my hair cut off and sold it because I couldn’t have lived through Christmas without giving you a present. It’ll grow again—you won’t mind, will you? I just had to do it. My hair grows awfully fast. Say ‘Merry Christmas!’ Jim, and let’s be happy. You don’t know what a nice—what a beautiful, nice gift I’ve got for you.” “You’ve cut off your hair? asked Jim, laboriously, as he had not arrived at that patent fact yet even after the hardest mental labor. “Cut it off and sold it,” said Della. “Don’t you like me just as well, anyhow? I’m me without my hair, ain’t I?” Jim looked about the room curiously. “You say your hair is gone? he said, with an air almost of idiocy. “You needn’t look for it,” said Della. “It’s sold, I tell you—sold and gone too. It’s Christmas Eve, boy. Be good to me, for it went for you. Maybe the hairs of my head were numbered,” she went on with a sudden serious sweetness, “but nobody could ever count my love for you. Shall I put the chops on, Jim?”

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WKCE Diagnostic Test
Out of his trance Jim seemed to quickly wake. He enfolded his Della. For ten seconds let us regard with discreet scrutiny some inconsequential object in the other direction. Eight dollars a week or a million a year—what is the difference? A mathematician or a wit would give you the wrong answer. The magi brought valuable gifts, but that was not among them. This dark assertion will be illuminated later on. 16 What are Della’s and Jim’s prized Jim drew a package from his overcoat pocket and threw it upon the table. “Don’t make any mistake, Dell,” he said, “about me. I don’t think there’s anything in the way of a haircut or a shave or a shampoo that could make me like my girl any less. But if you unwrap that package, you may see why you had me going awhile at first.”

19 What conclusion can you draw about Jim’s

possessions? A hair and chain B hair and watch C love and Christmas gifts D twenty dollars and love
17 When Della finds out how much Madame

feelings when he asks, “You’ve cut off your hair?” A anger B disbelief C disapproval and outrage D peculiarity
20 Which of the following statements best

Sofronie is paying for hair, why does Della say, “Give it to me quick”? A She was in a hurry. B She didn’t trust Madame Sofronie. C She was afraid she might change her mind. D The stores were about to close.
18 Upon seeing Della, Madame says, “Take yer

summarizes Della’s understanding of Jim’s reaction? A She thought Jim was ill. B Jim threatened her. C She was uncertain of his reaction. D She thought Jim hated her.
21 What words in the selection compare the

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hat off and let’s have a sight at the looks of it.” Which statement below is closest in meaning to Madame’s comment? A Take your hat off and let me see your hair. B Take your hat off and let me cut your hair off. C Take your hat off and let me see what you look like. D Take your hat off and look away from me.

watch chain to Jim? A none other like it B simple and chaste C proclaiming its value by substance alone D quietness and value

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WKCE Diagnostic Test
22 How would you describe Della and Jim’s relationship? Use details and information from the

reading to explain your answer.

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