You are on page 1of 24

Appendix 1.

John’s Story

John is second year math major from De La Salle University. He was


fortunate to be blessed with exceptional intelligence that is why he was granted a star
scholarship. Without the scholarship, he would not be able to afford a private
university because his family has limited financial resources.
Obviously, math is his favorite subject but he also excels in all of his
subjects. Aside from math, he also likes philosophy, psychology and religion because
these subjects taught him how to become a good individual and a good Christian. He
is a member of the math club and COSCA, a school organization that provides
community service to less fortunate people. John likes being involved in volunteer
work and helping other people.
He is a responsible student and a good friend. He has a good relationship
with his family except with father, who was also a scholar during his college years.
His father has high expectations from him and gets disappointed whenever he only
wins second place and not the top prize in a math competition. His father would
always tell him that he should always aim for the top because when he was a student
he always does his best because this will make his family proud. Besides, the cash
prize he gets help the family a lot. Because of this, John is somewhat distant to his
father and he said to himself that when he becomes a parent, he would never pressure
his child like what his father is doing to him. He was closer to his mother who died of
leukemia when he was in third year high school.
Finally, John won first place in an interschool math competition where he
won P5,000. After the contest, he celebrated with his 3 close friends—2 girls and a
guy. John has a big crush on one of the girls but no one knows about it. He treated his
friends in a pizza restaurant and after that they bought some alcoholic beverages from
a store and consumed them in one of his friend’s house. Though they did not drink a
lot, the amount was enough to make them a little disinhibited but not enough to make
them totally unaware of what they are doing. On their way home, they went inside a
24-hour drug store because one of his friends needs to buy a medicine for his asthma.
John noticed a donation box beside the cashier with a note attached to it saying, “Help
save Anna. She has leukemia and she needs financial assistance…” John slowly got
the envelope containing the cash prize from his bag then placed all the money inside
the donation box. His friends saw what he did but never asked why he did it.
The next morning, his father asked for the results of the competition. John
said, “Sorry dad, I did not even win the third place.”
Appendix 1.2

DISCIPLINES IN PSYCHOLOGY

TYPE OF LOCATION TASK SOURCE OF


PSYCHOLOGIST INFORMATION
Appendix 1.3

Observation Sheet

Laboratory Instruments Room Description Types of Research

Physics/Engineering

Chemistry

Psychology

How is the psychology laboratory different from the engineering/physics and chemistry
laboratory?
Appendix 1.4

RUBRIC FOR MINI RESEARCH PAPER


NAME DATE
Use this rubric as a guide to help you evaluate your work. Look at the rating system found on the right
columns. Your work should score at least in the Acceptable Achievement column as described by the items
in the left column. If your work does not score in the Acceptable column, revise your work until it reflects
the criteria. If you want a higher mark, have your work reflect the criteria in the High Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
CHOICE OF TOPIC Topic clearly Topic is The role of
psychological and has psychological and psychology in the
significance. The researchable topic is not that
research question is evident
researchable
APPROPRIATENESS The best method for The method that was The method was
OF RESEARCH the topic was used used was appropriate appropriate but
METHOD and rationale for its enough to answer the other methods
use/choice was problem could have
explained yielded more
valid results
EXECUTION OF The method was well Most of the steps Most of the steps
RESEARCH executed and were correctly were not correctly
METHOD procedures were well followed followed
implemented
RESULTS Results clearly Results partially Results do not
answer the research answers the research answer the
problem problem research problem
WRITTEN REPORT Report was clear, Report is Report lacks
organized, understandable and organization and
grammatically correct satisfactory. quite hard to
and aided with tables, understand.
charts and graphs.
TOTAL RATING
Appendix 2.1

INQUIRY WORKSHEET

1 2 3 4 5
Descriptions Descriptions of Questions we Where do we Answers to
of behaviors/ behaviors / need to ask to find the questions
actions of the actions of the find explanations answers to the
boy tree to the behaviors questions
of boy and tree?
Appendix 2.2

RUBRIC FOR GROUP COLLAGE


NAME DATE
Use this rubric as a guide to help you plan and evaluate your collage. Look at the rating system found on the right
columns. Your work should score at least in the Acceptable Achievement column as described by the items in the
left column. If your work does not score in the Acceptable column, revise your work until it reflects the criteria. If
you want a higher mark, have your work reflect the criteria in the High Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
PHYSICAL Adequate and relevant The basic and Not much physical
DEVELOPMENT components of physical essential components components are
development and in the physical illustrated that show
changes are elaborated. development are the significant
In addition, specific represented. differences between
details about the adolescent
differences between development and the
male and female other stages.
development are
incorporated in the
output.
Adequate and relevant The basic and Not much cognitive
COGNITIVE components of the essential components components are
DEVELOPMENT cognitive development in the cognitive illustrated that show
and changes are development are the uniqueness of the
elaborated. represented. adolescent stage.
SOCIO-EMOTIONAL Adequate and relevant The basic and Not much socio-
DEVELOPMENT components of the essential components emotional
socio-emotional in the socio- components are
development are emotional illustrated that show
elaborated. development are the uniqueness of the
represented. adolescent stage.
MORAL Adequate and relevant The basic and Not much moral
DEVELOPMENT components of the essential components components are
moral development are in the moral illustrated that show
elaborated. development are the uniqueness of the
represented. adolescent stage.
RECOMMENDATION Adequate and clearly Some relevant Vague and generic
explained recommendations are recommendations are
recommendations are given to develop a given.
given to help positive identity
adolescents develop a
positive identity in
terms of the physical,
cognitive, and socio-
emotional aspects of
development
TOTAL RATING
Appendix 2.3

RUBRIC FOR ESSAY


NAME DATE
Use this rubric as a guide to write an essay about any 2 family members who were included in your family
tree. Look at the rating system found on the right columns. Your work should score at least in the
Acceptable Achievement column as described by the items in the left column. If your work does not score
in the Acceptable column, revise your work until it reflects the criteria. If you want a higher mark, have
your work reflect the criteria in the High Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
Adequate behaviors Adequate number Very minimal
DESCRIPTION OF in each facet of the of behaviors in (one or two) and
BEHAVIORS development various areas of or vague
(physical, functioning are description of the
cognitive, socio- described behaviors
emotional, moral)
are described and
explained fully
through specific
examples
DESCRIPTION OF Thorough and clear Some unique Minimal and
CURRENT description of the features of the vague description
DEVELOPMENTAL developmental developmental of the
STAGE stage (looking into stage (physically, developmental
the needs, issues, cognitively, socio- stage
and unique emotionally) are
features) described.
THEORIES / Thorough and clear A theory/paradigm No clear
PARADIGMS on description of the is used to describe paradigm or
HUMAN theories/paradigms the family theory (or
DEVELOPMENT used and explained member’s behavior. conflicting
in an interesting, paradigm) was
complex, and used to describe
detailed way. the behaviors.
RECOMMENDATION Adequate and Some relevant Vague and
clearly explained recommendations generic
recommendations are given as to how recommendations
are given to to appreciate the are given.
understand or family member Recommendation
appreciate the better s are not related
family member to the theories or
paradigms on
human
development.
TOTAL RATING
Appendix 3.1

LEARNING INQUIRY WORKSHEET

1 2 3 4 5
Rating of Aspects of the What questions Answers we What we
potential learning we need to ask found to our learned about
effectiveness program that to know how questions learning
of the will ensure learning
learning learning occurs?
program
Appendix 3.2

AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY EXERCISE

Instructions: After writing down a vivid memory, answer the questions that pertain to this
memory.

Questions:

1. Is your memory a personal memory or a memory that affected many other people (i.e.,
a historical event)? Describe.

2. What kind of experience was your memory all about?

3. Are there strong emotions (positive or negative) associated with the memory?
Describe.

4. Is this a memory that you recall frequently? Do you remember replaying the events in
this memory over and over in your mind? Explain.

5. How did you elaborate on this memory when the event occurred (e.g., did you discuss
the event with others, did you write it down on a diary, were you concerned about how
others would see you, did you have nightmares following the event, etc.)? Describe.

6. Even though this memory is vivid, are parts of this memory missing? Are there pieces
that seem less vivid? What do you do with those missing or less vivid parts of this
memory? Explain.

7. Many vivid memories are memories of special personal importance or meaning. What
meaning does this memory hold for you?
Appendix 3.3

THREE CASES ON MEMORY

The Case of W.

W., a 31-year-old married woman with two young children, worked as an interior
designer in a prestigious design firm. At work, she was recognized to be a creative
and hardworking designer; she could visualize designs very well, and could
remember her designs that she worked on in the past. She was also known for
leaving her bag or wallet in restaurants, or her presentation materials in her car.
She likewise forgot to attend company meetings a few times. Nonetheless, her
talent was valued in the company such that she was recently promoted to the
position of assistant creative director. Her boss made sure that she had an efficient
secretary to remind her of her activities and tasks.

In the personal domain, W. forgot birthdays and anniversaries, even her house
keys. She even forgot to pick up her children from her parents’ house. She tried
writing reminders and to-do lists in a planner, but she would forget to look at it when
she was very busy. Her husband got her a PDA that could remind her of her
appointments and tasks; he simply hoped that she wouldn’t inadvertently leave the
PDA at home, or worse, in a restaurant. However, when it came to facts and
information, she could recall these at the drop of a hat (e.g., the name of the actor
who played a certain character in a certain movie, the capital of Peru, etc.). She
could also vividly recall her past experiences, making her good at storytelling.
The Case of S. (Luria, 1968)

S. had a unique visual imagination that allowed him to remember an


extraordinary amount of detail. When he was asked to recall a series of words or
numbers, not only could he remember as many as 70 numbers, he could also recall
them accurately in reverse order. He also could report the sequence flawlessly with
no warning or practice even as long as 15 years after his initial exposure to the
sequence. Moreover, after the 15-year interval, he could describe what the
researcher had been wearing and where he had been sitting when S. learned the
list. He could also accurately reproduce passages from languages he did not know
after hearing the passage only once.

S. had from a condition known as synaesthesia where the boundaries of the


senses are blurred so that stimulation of one sense prompts a reaction in another.
For example, when told to remember a word, S. would not only hear the word, he
would also experience a unique taste, see a unique color and perhaps feel a
sensation on his skin. All of these sensations provided triggers by which to recall
the word. He experienced daily life through every one of his senses, thus, making it
totally memorable to him. When he was memorizing, he was able to experience the
information presented to him. For example, when presented with a tone at a
particular frequency and sound level, he would describe it as: A brown strip against
a dark background that had red tongue-like edges. The sense of taste is like that of
sweet and sour borscht.

S. moved from job to job, often feeling overwhelmed by the amount of detail he
automatically included in his everyday work tasks. His propensity to create visual
images interfered with his normal processing of information. He had trouble
comprehending whole passages of a text because he became bogged down in the
details. In social conversations, he talked too much, often reporting the images that
filled his mind. Ironically, S. had a very poor memory for faces, finding them too
flexible and changeable to recall. He experienced himself as being two people. He
described himself as “I” when he felt in control of his memory and as “he” when his
imagery ran away with him.

The Case of D.
D., a 28-year-old woman who had minor brain injury due to a vehicular accident,
works as a part-time social worker. She could only work part-time because she
cannot cope with remembering a lot of information. She had to write down
everything in her diary (e.g., things to do, appointments, client’s information, after
she has taken her medicine) because she forgot things easily. Sometimes, if she
didn’t write things down, she even forgot the harsh words or insults that people
might have said to her; consequently, she would not get unduly upset over it.

D. also kept a journal to write down the events of the day, her thoughts and
feelings, and her ideas so that she could refer back to these notes when her
memory became fuzzy. However, she usually did not have to re-read her journal
entries because the act of writing about her experiences seemed to make her
remember them with clarity; she could even recall the exact words that were uttered
by others in conversations. She also had a vivid memory of her past experiences
prior to the accident, enabling her to recall these things easily. She used to play the
violin well before the accident. After the injury, when she would be asked if she
could still play specific violin music, she did not know for sure. But when she picked
up the violin, she automatically played them.
Appendix 3.4

MEMORY INQUIRY WORKSHEET

1 2 3 4 5
Similarities Differences in Questions we Answers we What we
in memory memory of the need to ask to found to our learned about
across three three cases understand questions memory
cases what memory is
and how it
works
Appendix 3.5
PROBLEM SOLVING EXERCISE
1. Think of as many uses as you can for a spoon. (Time limit: 5 minutes. Write your
answer on the back page. When checking the answers, let the class decide if the
answers are acceptable or not)

2. Solve this algebra problem: (3x-2y) (3x+2y)


Answer: 9x2 -4y2

3. If all cows are blue-blooded and Bessie is not a cow. Which of the following necessary
follows? (Place a check mark on the correct answer.)
a) Bessie is not blue-blooded.
b) Bessie is an animal.
c) Bessie is either blue-blooded or not blue-blooded.
d) Bessie is most likely not blue-blooded.
Answer: c

4. A woman who lived in a small town married 20 different men in that same town. All of
them are still living, and she never divorced any of them. Yet she broke no laws.
How could she do this? (Write your answer on the space below)
Answer: She is the judge/minister

5. The triangle shown below points to upwards. Show how you can move three dots to
get the triangle to point downwards

Answer: Lift the left most and right most dots up to second row then drop the top most
dot to the bottom row.

6. Imagine that you are the person standing in the middle of a room, in which two strings
are hanging down from the ceiling. Your goal is to tie together the two strings, but
neither is long enough so that you can reach out and grab the other string while
holding either of the two strings. You have available a few clean paintbrushes, a can of
paint, and a heavy canvas tarpaulin. How will you tie together the two strings?
Answer: Tie paint brush to one string and swing. Get the other string then catch the
swinging paintbrush then tie both sting. No need to use other materials.

7. Arrange the numbers 1 to 9 in a 3x3 matrix in such a way that all directions
(horizontal, vertical and diagonal) will have a sum of 15

Answer: 6 1 8 6 7 2
7 5 3 or 1 5 9
2 9 4 8 3 4
Appendix 3.6

PROBLEM SOLVING, INTELLIGENCE, AND


CREATIVITY INQUIRY WORKSHEET

1 2 3 4 5
Characteris- How did we Questions we Questions we How do we
tics of know if our need to ask to need to ask apply in daily
difficult solutions were do effective about the life what we
problems right problem solving nature of know now
intelligence about
and creativity problem
solving,
intelligence,
and creativity
Appendix 3.7

RUBRIC FOR LEARNING PROGRAM


NAMES:

Use this rubric as a guide to help you evaluate your work. Look at the rating system found on the right
columns. Your work should score at least in the Acceptable Achievement column as described by the
items in the left column. If your work does not score in the Acceptable column, revise your work until it
reflects the criteria. If you want a higher mark, have your work reflect the criteria in the High
Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
LEARNING Appropriate, Clearly described Vaguely described
DESIGN: adequate, and clearly objectives of the and/or
Objectives, described objectives learning program, inappropriate
Sample, Measures, of the learning sample, pretest and objectives of the
Data analysis program, sample, posttest measures, and learning program,
pretest and posttest data analysis. sample, pretest
measures, and data and posttest
analysis. measures, and data
analysis.
LEARNING Adequate, clear, and Adequate procedures Very minimal
DESIGN: detailed procedures for learning and/or vague
Procedure for for learning acquisition. description of
learning acquisition acquisition. procedures for
learning
acquisition.
RESULTS OF Adequate Adequate Inadequate
LEARNING implementation, implementation of the implementation of
PROGRAM appropriate analysis, learning procedure, the learning
and clear and presentation of procedure, with
presentation of results. inadequate
results. analysis of results.
DISCUSSION OF Adequate and clearly Some relevant Vague explanation
RESULTS explained results that explanation of results of results, without
are adequately is presented, without relating to
connected back to the making a clear objectives of the
objectives of the connection to the learning program.
learning program. objectives of the
learning program.
TOTAL
RATING
Appendix 4.1

PERSONALITY QUESTIONNAIRE

Instructions:
Prepare 3”x3” board cards on which to put your answers. Also have one plain white
letter envelope ready to put all the cards in. Answer each item by drawing an image or
symbol (or paste a cut-out image) on one side of the card; then write a brief description or
explanation of the image on the back of the same card. Put the item number on each card.
Your answers must not contain your name or any self-reference that can be easily traced
back to you. After your finish answering this questionnaire, place all the cards inside the
envelope, on which you should write a Code Name that will not be recognized by anyone
in class.

1. If I were an animal, I would be _____.


2. The color that best describes me is ______.
3. I prefer this type of friends: ______.
4. This is what I usually do when things don’t go my way: ______.
5. This is how I see myself in relation to others: ______.
6. I usually worry about this: ______.
7. This is what symbolizes my very core: ______.
8. For me, the future is _________.
Appendix 4.2

PERSONALITY INQUIRY WORKSHEET

1 2 3 4
Explanation for Assumptions about Kind of Knowledge What we learned
Morrie’s (or the Human Nature about Personality about the study of
main needed to personality
character’s) systematically
distinctive analyze a person’s
behavior personality
Appendix 4.3

RUBRIC FOR PERSONALITY ANALYSIS


NAME:
Use this rubric as a guide to help you evaluate your work. Look at the rating system found on the right
columns. Your work should score at least in the Acceptable Achievement column as described by the items
in the left column. If your work does not score in the Acceptable column, revise your work until it reflects
the criteria. If you want a higher mark, have your work reflect the criteria in the High Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
DESCRIPTION OF Adequate description Adequate description Very limited (one
PERSONALITY (with specific of characteristics and or two) and or
examples) of behaviors but vague description
characteristics and personality of the
behaviors, the development and characteristics and
development, and the motivation not clearly behaviors.
motivation of the delineated. Personality
personality. development and
motivation not
described.
PERSPECTIVES Thorough and clear A number of No clear
explanation of the perspectives (two or perspective is used
personality was three) are used to to explain the
made using all the adequately explain the personality and/or
perspectives in a personality. the perspectives
complex, and incorrectly explain
detailed manner. the personality.
EVALUATION OF Clear, appropriate, Appropriate and A vague,
PERSONALITY and adequate adequate evaluation of generalized
evaluation is made, personality, as evaluation of the
and supported by supported by personal personality is
concrete personal examples, and using made, with little
examples. All the one perspective only. support from
perspectives are personal
correctly applied. examples, and no
clear relation to
the perspectives.
TOTAL
RATING
Appendix 5.1

The Case of Marvin


Marvin, a 38 year-old-married man, is a successful advertising executive, able to generate
creative ideas and sell it to clients through his persuasive communication skills. He can work on
proposals and projects for a number of days with little sleep, eat less food, and yet still have a lot
of energy left over. However, he tends to become a little irritable, argumentative, and
unreasonable during this time. Outside work, he is charming, sociable, and the life of the party,
making him attractive to women. This makes his wife feel jealous. People around him benefit
from his generosity because he gives gifts and material things freely. After a period of high
energy, his energy shifts and becomes low. He does not work overtime; he simply puts in the
regular working hours. He turns down invitations of people to go out; instead, he prefers to stay at
home, which pleases his wife and children because they can spend more family time. He sleeps
longer hours, and eats more.
INQUIRY WORKSHEET

1 2 3 4 5
Is Marvin Behaviors to What questions Where do we What we
normal or justify our do we need to find the found out
abnormal? answer ask to verify our answers to our about our
answer? questions? answer in
column 1
and 2?
Appendix 5.2

RUBRIC FOR CASE FORMULATION/ANALYSIS


NAME DATE
Use this rubric as a guide to help you evaluate your work. Look at the rating system found on the right
columns. Your work should score at least in the Acceptable Achievement column as described by the
items in the left column. If your work does not score in the Acceptable column, revise your work until it
reflects the criteria. If you want a higher mark, have your work reflect the criteria in the High
Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
BACKGROUND Adequate and Adequate Not much
INFORMATION relevant information background
information are regarding the information is
given in possible given to help
understanding what predisposing factor understand the
predisposes the of the mental health possible cause of
individual to of the person is predisposing
behave in such a given. factor
manner. In addition,
specific details
about the behaviors
are mentioned and
given proper
importance.
Adequate behaviors Adequate number Very minimal
DESCRIPTION OF are described and of behaviors in (one or two) and
BEHAVIORS explained fully various areas of or vague
through specific functioning are description of
examples described the behaviors
PERSPECTIVE/ Thorough and clear A paradigm is used No clear
PARADIGM description of the to describe the case paradigm or
paradigm used and and explains the perspective (or
explained in an subject’s behavior. conflicting
interesting, paradigm) was
complex, and used to describe
detailed way the case
RECOMMENDATIONS Adequate and Some relevant Vague and
clearly explained recommendations generic
recommendations are given about the recommendation
are given to help presented behaviors s are given.
the person address Recommendatio
or deal with his or ns are not related
her situation to the paradigms.
TOTAL
RATING
Appendix 6.1

Pretend that you are a group of people in a radio station who give advice to
young people who have problems regarding love relationships. Today, you
received a letter from a college student. The letter goes like this:

Dear Love Counselor,

First of all, thank you for reading my letter. I’m deeply in love with my
best friend since first year but I never revealed to her my true feelings. I’m
already in my third year. We know each other very well because we always do
things together. I never thought of confessing my love for her because it might
ruin our friendship. Unfortunately, she fell for someone else. It is only now that I
realize how stupid I am for not taking the risk and how painful it is deal with the
situation. I’m sure my story sounds familiar and as you read this letter on air I
know a lot of the listeners can relate to my situation. There are a lot of Vincents
out there who are too afraid to take the risk. Right now, I am decided to pursue
her even if she is in a relationship. I cannot afford to lose her. Now, I am willing
to take the risk and I will face whatever consequences my action will bring. Do
you think I’m doing the right thing?

Sincerely,

Vincent
Appendix 6.2

RUBRIC FOR ASSESSING THE WHEEL OF INFLUENCE


NAME DATE
Use this rubric as a guide to help you evaluate your work. Look at the rating system found on the right
columns. Your work should score at least in the Acceptable Achievement column as described by the
items in the left column. If your work does not score in the Acceptable column, revise your work until
it reflects the criteria. If you want a higher mark, have your work reflect the criteria in the High
Achievement column.
HIGH ACCEPTABLE DEVELOPING RATING
ACHIEVEMENT ACHIEVEMENT
CONTENT Adequate and Several concepts The write-up
relevant concepts were applied and contains few
were applied and explained. concepts that are
clearly explained. It not clearly
is evident that the explained.
students have
understood well the
concepts.
The write-up contains The write-up contains The write-up
EXPLANATION very clear and logical clearer and more contains little
explanation on how logical explanation explanation on
the pictures are on how the pictures how the pictures
related to the are related to the are related to the
concepts. There is a concepts. The guide concepts.
good attempt to relate questions were
concepts with each adequately answered.
other. The guide
questions were all
answered.
CREATIVITY Pictures are well The presentation is Pictures are not
organized. Can be good. Pictures used quite relevant.
understood even are relevant and The presentation
without the write-up. appropriate in needs to be
It is evident that the applying the improved.
student dedicated concepts.
adequate time to
prepare the output.
TOTAL
RATING
Appendix 6.3

WHEEL OF INFLUENCE

People who influenced me

CULTURE

GROUPS

SIGNIFICANT OTHERS

SELF

People I influenced