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Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2

A Self-Help Guide
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property of their respective owners.
© 2005 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.
Introduction
TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome to “Color Workflows for Adobe® Creative Suite 2.” This guide is intended for
1 Introduction professionals in the visual communications industry who need a reliable approach to
3 Chapter 1: Getting Started achieving accurate and consistent color. Whether you are a new or experienced user
5 Chapter 2: CMYK Commercial Print of Adobe Photoshop®, Adobe Illustrator®, Adobe InDesign®, Adobe GoLive®, or Adobe
Workflow Acrobat® Professional, this guide provides the knowledge you need to effectively use
12 Chapter 3: Mixed RGB and CMYK Print new Adobe Creative Suite 2 features in your color workflow and achieve accurate and
Workflow consistent color.
22 Chapter 4: RGB Photo Print Workflow
It is often difficult to achieve accurate and consistent color because the two color models
27 Chapter 5: Internet Publishing RBG most often used to specify color appearance—RGB and CMYK—are device-specific or
Workflow
device-dependent. A monitor, scanner, and printer each produce a different color given
33 Chapter 6: Advanced Topics the same set of RGB or CMYK numbers because the color depends on the characteris-
39 Glossary tics of each device. For example, the color produced by a monitor depends on the color
of its red, green, and blue filters or phosphors. The color produced by a printer depends
on the type of paper, how it absorbs ink, and the colors of the cyan, magenta, yellow,
and black inks. The end result is that a scanned image doesn’t look like the original, and
the final copy printed on the printing press doesn’t look like the image you saw on your
monitor. These differences can lead to hours of lost productivity and revenue because of
numerous color corrections and trial and error prints.

When devices—such as a monitor, scanner and printer—receive the same color values, each device
produces a different color.
How does color management technology in Adobe Creative Suite 2
help?
The color management technology in Adobe Creative Suite 2 lets you achieve more ac-
curate and consistent color reproduction by performing two essential tasks:

➤ Identifies a specific color appearance for RGB or CMYK numbers in a document

➤ Maintains the color appearance by changing the color numbers needed by the target
device to produce the specified color appearance

Color management technology relies on profiles and a color management system (CMS).
Profiles give the CMS the information needed to maintain the color appearance when a
file is sent to a device. For example, if the color represented by the numbers R235, G56,
and B70 on a scanner is tomato red but looks closer to brick red on a monitor, the CMS
translates the RGB numbers to those needed by the monitor to preserve the tomato red
appearance. In this way, color management helps you reproduce consistent color—
independent of the unique color characteristics of a particular device.

Adobe Creative Suite 2 components include easy-to-use color management features and
tools to help you achieve consistent color without becoming a color management expert.
You will have the tools to view colors consistently across applications and devices, ensur-
ing more accurate color throughout your workflow—from edit to proof to final print.

New color features in Adobe Creative Suite 2


The following new features are designed to make your color management experience easier.

FE AT U R E W H AT I T M E A N S TO YO U
Updated Color Setting Files Color settings files (CSFs) control the behavior of an appli-
cation’s color management features. Adobe Creative Suite 2
comes with several preset CSFs—each based on a common
workflow, such as Web/Internet or Prepress—that users can
select from one central location in Adobe Bridge.
Adobe Bridge Adobe Bridge serves as an easy-to-use, central location for
selecting CSFs and then sharing those settings across all
Adobe Creative Suite 2 components.
Preserving CMYK color numbers Safe CMYK mode preserves CMYK color numbers in your
workflow using a new Color Management Policy called
“Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles)”.
Improved spot color handling Spot colors preview and proof consistently from Adobe
Illustrator CS2, Adobe InDesign CS2, and Adobe Photoshop
CS2. You also get better control over conversions from spot
colors to process colors.
Common color selection A common .ASE swatch book format lets you share colors
across Adobe Creative Suite 2 components.
Improved black viewing and You can choose how to view and print blacks in
printing Illustrator CS2 and InDesign CS2, as well as view and print
them more accurately.
Task-based print dialog boxes Simplified print dialog boxes make it easier to control color
management features whether printing a proof or a final
document.
Common interface for creating All Adobe Creative Suite 2 components have an easy-to-
PDF files use, common interface for generating Portable Document
Format (PDF) files and sharing PDF presets.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 2


Chapter 1: Getting Started
This guide includes a variety of workflows to help you effectively manage color appear-
ance. This chapter helps you select the workflow that suits your needs and introduces
Adobe Bridge. If you are not completely familiar with the color management terminol-
ogy, refer to the Glossary in this guide.

Which workflow is for you?


Chapters 2 through 5 describe how to use the new Adobe Creative Suite 2 color manage-
ment features in today’s common workflows. Use the table below to find the workflow
that is most relevant to you.

IF YOU AR E A… WORKING IN S E N D I N G TO T H E G O TO T H I S C H A P T E R
T H I S M A R K E T… FO LLOWING D E V ICE
Prepress Traditional and Printing press Chapter 2: CMYK Commercial
professional digital commercial (for example, offset, Print Workflow and Chap-
printing Flexo, or Gravure), ter 6: Advanced Topics.
digital printing press Users adding RGB to their
workflow should also see
Chapter 3.
Graphic designer Commercial printing, Printing press Chapter 2: CMYK Commercial
publishing Print Workflow
Internet publishing, On-screen display Chapter 4: Internet Pub-
web-based or com- lishing (RGB) Workflow
puter-based training
Digital photo Photography Photo lab, RGB printer Chapter 4: RGB Photo
professional Printing Workflow

About Adobe Bridge


Adobe Bridge component of Adobe Creative Suite 2 that serves as a central location
from which you can select CSFs with preset color management policies and default
profiles. Selecting a CSF in Adobe Bridge ensures that color is handled consistently
and that color displays and prints the same way from all Adobe Creative Suite 2
components.

The preset values in the CSF determine the color management behavior in all Adobe
Creative Suite 2 components, such as how embedded profiles are handled, what the
default RGB and CMYK working spaces are, and whether to display warnings when
embedded profiles are missing or don’t match the working space. Selecting the correct
CSF depends on your workflow.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 3


To select a CSF from Adobe Bridge:
1. Choose Edit > Creative Suite Color Settings.

2. In the Suite Color Settings dialog box, select the relevant CSF and then click Apply to
synchronize all Adobe Creative Suite 2 components to this CSF.

In Adobe Bridge, you can select the CSF that matches your workflow.

For more information about color settings, see Adobe Creative Suite 2 Help
documentation.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 4


Chapter 2: CMYK Commercial
Print Workflow
In the commercial printing and publishing industry, consistent color throughout the
workflow saves both time and money. Because print professionals want to ensure that
files produce the expected color results, many prepare artwork using CMYK values
created for a specific output device. This “safe” approach ensures that CMYK color
numbers specified anywhere in the workflow are delivered to the final output device
unchanged.

Adobe Creative Suite 2 protects against unwanted CMYK color conversions, so print
professionals can continue to work in their current workflow—safely. In addition,
Adobe Creative Suite 2 offers additional color management benefits, such as consistent
color viewing across applications, and accurate soft-proofing and hard-proofing.
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With Adobe Creative Suite 2, CMYK color values are preserved throughout the workflow to final press.
With the color appearance of CMYK fully defined, you’re able to view colors accurately on monitors
and proofers.

This chapter is intended for graphic designers and prepress professionals who are
responsible for building documents. It provides step-by-step descriptions for using
Adobe Creative Suite 2 to achieve more accurate color in a commercial print workflow.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 5


Initial setup
Before starting this color management workflow, be sure the North America General
Purpose 2 color setting is selected in Adobe Bridge. This color setting sets the default
CMYK working space color profile to U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2, preserves CMYK
values, and does not provide profile mismatch warnings. For information about mis-
matched profile warnings, see “Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

Be sure you select North America General Purpose 2 as the CSF in Adobe Bridge.

This CSF sets U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2 as the default CMYK working space and uses the CMYK
color management policy to preserve CMYK color numbers. Although you set the Color Settings file
in Adobe Bridge, this is how that setting appears in the InDesign CS2 Color Settings dialog box.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 6


Editing images in Photoshop CS2
When you open digital images in Photoshop CS2 for editing, they may be in a CMYK
or RGB color space. Photoshop CS2 makes it easy to bring those files into a color space
that is appropriate for print on a North American press using standard North American
printing conditions. You must convert images in an RGB color space to CMYK for
printing purposes.

To convert RGB images to CMYK for print:


1. Choose Image > Mode.

2. Select CMYK Color.

Note: Photoshop CS2 uses the default CMYK working space profile to convert RGB to
CMYK. RGB color spaces are typically larger than CMYK color spaces. The CMYK
image might appear slightly desaturated when viewed on your monitor. However, the
colors are now appropriate for printing on a typical offset press in North America.

Note the following when preparing CMYK images for print on a North American press:

• If the CMYK image was created in Photoshop CS2, the application automatically uses
the standard CMYK working space U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2 to define the color
appearance of the CMYK values. By default, Photoshop CS2 embeds this profile in
saved CMYK images so that the color appearance of the image remains consistent
throughout the workflow.

• If you open a CMYK image that is missing a profile, the General Purpose 2 CSF au-
tomatically preserves the CMYK numbers. Photoshop CS2 assumes that the CMYK
values are understood using the standard U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2 profile and
embeds that profile in the saved image file.

• If you open a CMYK image with an embedded profile that is not U.S. Web Coated
(SWOP) v2, contact the creator of the image to ensure that the CMYK numbers in the
image are ready to use on a North American press.

Creating or placing graphics in Illustrator CS2


When you create a new graphic in Illustrator CS2, you can choose RGB or CMYK as the
color model to work in. Choose CMYK. Illustrator CS2 automatically assigns the work-
ing space profile, U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2, to the document.

If you place CMYK graphics that are not in this color space into Illustrator CS2, it ap-
plies Safe CMYK mode to preserve the color numbers in the graphics. Illustrator CS2
interprets the appearance of the CMYK values using the Illustrator document’s color
profile, U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2.

Saving artwork in Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2


When you are ready to save the artwork for the commercial press, you can embed the
U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2 profile so another user can understand how the file was
created and the intended color appearance.

To save your artwork with an embedded profile:


1. Choose File > Save.

2. Select Embed Color Profile for these file formats:

• (Photoshop) .tif, .psd, .pdf, .eps, and .jpeg

• (Illustrator) .ai and .pdf

Note: In Illustrator CS2, you select Embed Color Profile after naming the .ai or .pdf file.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 7


Building an InDesign layout
Building an InDesign layout can include creating native content in InDesign, placing
artwork from Photoshop or Illustrator, and saving the file.

When a new document is created, the InDesign CS2 RGB and CMYK working spaces
are assigned to the document as document profiles. When creating color content in
InDesign CS2, everything built in CMYK automatically uses the document’s CMYK
profile. InDesign CS2 uses the same profiles as Photoshop CS2 and Adobe Illustrator CS2,
so content with the same CMYK values appears the same in each application.

Note: The CMYK policy, Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles), ensures that all
CMYK content uses the InDesign CMYK document profile. Using the same CMYK
profile helps prevent unwanted CMYK color conversions that were possible when Color
Management was selected in earlier versions of Adobe publishing applications.

When you save a file, InDesign automatically embeds the document RGB and CMYK
color profiles and the Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles) CMYK policy. That
way, any InDesign CS2 user will have the color data needed for accurate viewing and
color conversions the next time the file is opened.

Previewing for more accurate blacks


The improved black preview feature in Adobe Creative Suite 2 lets you choose how
to view and print black objects in Illustrator and InDesign. While you can still view
100% K objects as a dark, rich black (the default in earlier versions of InDesign and
Illustrator when Color Management was turned off), you can now also choose to view
black objects more accurately, seeing the difference between 100% K and rich black.

Note: You can still see the difference between 100% K black and a rich black in
Photoshop CS2.

To preview blacks more accurately in Illustrator CS2 or InDesign CS2:


1. In the Preferences dialog box, choose Appearance of Black from the list on the left.

2. For On Screen, select either Display All Blacks Accurately or Display All Blacks as
Rich Black.

Note: Display All Blacks Accurately shows you the difference between 100% K and
a rich black. If you keep the default selection, Display All Blacks as Rich Black, both
blacks appear the same.

In InDesign CS2, you can select how you want your blacks to appear on your monitor and when
printed to RGB composite printers.
Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 8
Previewing overprints accurately
Sometimes you might want to force inks to overprint on top of other inks instead
of knocking out the inks below, such as spot colors that overlap other spot colors or
process colors. It is also common to overprint black text to prevent trapping problems
because of misregistration on the press.

To preview overprinted colors more accurately, choose View > Overprint Preview.

Soft-proofing for more accurate viewing


With all files in CMYK and ready for output to press, you can preview the color on-
screen from any application to get a good idea of how the color will look when printed.
(Soft-proofing does not change the CMYK values in your document.)

Although color profiles give you a high degree of viewing accuracy in non-proofing
mode, you can use additional controls to help simulate the media and ink that you will
be using.

To soft-proof your images in any application:


1. Choose View > Proof Setup, and then click Custom.

Use the Customize Proof Condition dialog box to soft-proof your documents on-screen before printing.

2. Make sure the profile selected in the Device to Simulate menu is your document or
working space profile.

Note: The rendering intent selection does not affect color appearance in this workflow,
because there is no conversion to the color space of the device you are trying to simu-
late. All colors are already created for the final output device.”

3. Select Simulate Paper Color to simulate on-screen what the final colors will look like
on the paper you will use to print.

Note: The paper color specified by SWOP may be darker and more yellow than the paper
you will be using..

4. Click OK.

The display simulates how the document will appear on the final output device. If nec-
essary, make edits to adjust the color.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 9


Hard-proofing your InDesign document
Send your document to a local printer for a hard proof when you have finalized the lay-
out in InDesign. Hard-proofing provides a preview of how the document will print on
the final output device, without permanently converting the color values. For instruc-
tions on hard-proofing an InDesign CS2 document, see “Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

Sending files and printed proofs to a print provider


For more accurate color in the final output, deliver the printed proof as well as the
electronic files to your printer either as a PDF file or a native InDesign document.

To create a PDF file in which all content is CMYK, you might want to use the PDF/X-1a
standard, which does not include RGB content in PDF documents.

To create a PDF file from InDesign CS2:


1. Choose File>Export.

2. Select Format: Adobe PDF, and then click Save.

You can choose an Adobe PDF preset standard from the Export Adobe PDF dialog box.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 10


3. From the Adobe PDF Preset drop-down menu, select PDF/X-1a:2001.

The PDF/X-1a format converts all data contained in the document to CMYK. This conversion does not
impact the workflow, since all content in the InDesign CS2 document is already CMYK.

4. Choose Output. By default, Adobe Creative Suite 2 components set Color Conversion
to Convert to Destination (Preserve Color Numbers) and Destination to Document
CMYK—U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2.

Note: To preserve CMYK color numbers and avoid unwanted conversions, do not
change the default Output settings for the Color Conversion and Destination, which are
Convert to Destination (Preserve Color Numbers) and Document CMYK—U.S. Web
Coated (SWOP) v2.

Note: The PDF/X-1a standard does not permit embedded profiles in the body of the PDF
file. However, it does require that the CMYK profile used to create the document or a
reference to a standard printing condition be included in the Output Intent Dictionary
of the PDF file.

Package your InDesign CS2 document


If you are delivering native files along with the InDesign CS2 document for the printer,
select File>Package. InDesign CS2 collects all the images, graphics, and fonts, and
places them in a folder with the InDesign document.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 11


Chapter 3: Mixed RGB and CMYK
Print Workflow
Graphic professionals choose to specify colors using the CMYK color model for several
reasons: to specify CMYK color builds for colors that only use one or two of the CMYK
color components, make rich blacks, or to control the amount of black in drop shadows
or line art. To avoid unexpected color conversions, and to preserve the black without
introducing any other colors, it is important to have a safe approach.

However, with the increased availability of RGB content (from digital cameras to high-
quality stock image libraries), creative professionals are finding that designing with RGB
content has some advantages. One major advantage is that RGB content can be more
easily repurposed for different printing conditions because of its larger color gamut.

Adobe Creative Suite 2 provides a safe CMYK mode that protects against unwanted
CMYK color conversions, so print professionals can continue to use their current
CMYK workflow while gradually adding RGB content without affecting the CMYK
graphics. Adobe Creative Suite 2 also offers additional color management benefits
of soft-proofing and hard-proofing. When the final document is ready to print or
translated into a PDF file, RGB colors are converted to the same CMYK profile used by
the document.
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In this RGB and CMYK mixed workflow, Adobe Creative Suite 2 components preserve your CMYK
color values and enable the use of RGB content, which is converted to CMYK when output to a PDF
or PostScript® file.

This chapter describes a color-managed workflow using CMYK and RGB content that
achieves accurate and predictable color.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 12


Initial setup
Before starting this color workflow, select the North America Prepress 2 setting in
Adobe Bridge.

Be sure you select North America Prepress 2 color setting in Adobe Bridge.

North America Prepress 2 sets Adobe RGB and U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2 as your default RGB and
CMYK working spaces. Mismatched profile and missing profile warnings are turned on. Although you
set the Color Settings file in Adobe Bridge, this is how that setting appears in the InDesign CS2 Color
Settings dialog box.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 13


Collecting, capturing, and scanning images
This workflow begins by acquiring digital images or creating them in-house. If you take
photos with a digital camera, check the camera settings to see if you can save images
in the standard Adobe RGB color space or in RAW format. (For information on how
to use files saved in RAW formats, see Adobe Camera Raw in Chapter 4, RGB Photo
Workflow.) If you scan images, check to see if the scanner software can save images
using the Adobe RGB color profile or, if you prefer to work with CMYK files, the U.S.
Web Coated (SWOP) v2 color profile.

Editing images in Photoshop CS2 (RGB or CMYK)


Images that you open in Photoshop CS2 might be in a CMYK or RGB color space. If
you created or captured them using the settings described in “Collecting, capturing and
scanning images,” they are already using a standard color space. However, images from
other sources might not have embedded profiles, or the profile that is embedded might
not match the profile you are using in your workflow. If a Missing Profile or Profile
Mismatch dialog box appears when you open an image, ask the provider if the profiles
you have set in your workflow can be used. Use the warning dialog boxes to assign the
proper profile to your image.

For information about Missing Profile and Profile Mismatch warning dialogs, see
“Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

For information about relative color space sizes, see “Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

When opening an RGB image in Photoshop CS2 with North America Prepress 2 color
settings, a warning dialog appears if there is no profile embedded in the image or the
embedded profile is not Adobe RGB, the default RGB profile for this workflow. Use the
embedded profile in the RGB image. This is the profile used by the provider of the image
document before it was sent to you. This profile will be used when the RGB colors are
eventually converted to CMYK for printing.

You can use the embedded profile if it is a standard working space and not a device color space.

Using the embedded profile allows you to open the image and view the colors accurately
without converting the color values from one color space to another. For example, if you
open images with the embedded ProPhoto RGB or sRGB profiles, Photoshop CS2 pre-
views those files based on those color spaces. As a result, it is not necessary to convert
the image to the RGB working space.

Note: If the embedded profile is a device-dependent camera or scanner profile, you


might want to select Convert Document Colors to the Working Space in the Embedded
Profile Mismatch dialog box for two reasons. First, equal amounts of R, G, and B always
produce a neutral gray in working spaces, so standard working spaces give you more
predictable color that is easier to edit. Device-dependent profiles might not have this
attribute. Second, this working space profile file size is smaller than device-dependent
camera and scanner profiles.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 14


This embedded profile is a device scanner RGB profile and not a standard working space. Therefore,
you want to select Convert Document’s Colors to the Working Space.

Creating and placing graphics in Illustrator CS2 (RGB or CMYK)


When creating a new graphic in Illustrator CS2, you can choose RGB or CMYK as
the color model. When the document is created, Illustrator CS2 automatically assigns
the default RGB or CMYK working space profile to the document—in this case, either
Adobe RGB or U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2.

After you open a document with an associated color profile, all artwork you create in the
Illustrator CS2 document uses this document profile. If you embed content from other
sources, Illustrator CS2 uses the profiles in the placed content in the following ways:

• Placed CMYK is not converted. The document profile is used to define the appear-
ance of the CMYK color values.

• RGB content that does not have an embedded profile uses the RGB profile of the
Illustrator CS2 document.

• RGB content that has an embedded profile that differs from the document profile is
converted to the color space of the Illustrator document.

Saving artwork in Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2


When you are ready to save your artwork, embed the Adobe RGB or U.S. Web Coated
(SWOP) v2 profiles in your Photoshop CS2 or Illustrator CS2 document so another user
can understand how the file was created and the intended color appearance.

To save your artwork with an embedded profile:


1. Choose File > Save.

2. Select Embed Color Profile for these file formats:

• (Photoshop) .tif, .psd, .pdf, .eps, and .jpeg

• (Illustrator) .ai and .pdf

Note: For Illustrator CS2, you select Embed Color Profile after naming the file.

Building an InDesign layout


Building an InDesign layout can include creating native content in InDesign, placing
artwork from Photoshop or Illustrator, and saving the file.

When creating native color content in InDesign CS2, everything you build in RGB or
CMYK uses the document RGB profile or CMYK profile. These profiles are automati-
cally assigned to the document when it is created. Because the Adobe Creative Suite 2
components use the same profiles, content with the same RGB or CMYK values appears
the same in all applications.

All placed CMYK artwork uses the InDesign CS2 document CMYK color profile—U.S.
Web Coated (SWOP) v2—the same as native content, so the color numbers specified in
placed and native content have the same appearance and do not change when you print
or create a PDF.
Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 15
InDesign CS2 uses the embedded profiles of placed RGB content. If the placed RGB
content does not have an embedded profile, InDesign CS2 uses the document’s profile.
Colors created in Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2 match the color you see in
InDesign CS2.

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Using the safe CMYK mode, all CMYK content uses the document CMYK profile. RGB content uses the
document RGB profile except for placed RGB content with embedded profiles.

When saving a file, InDesign CS2 embeds the document RGB and CMYK color profiles
and the Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked) CMYK policy in the InDesign document.
That way, any Adobe Creative Suite 2 component has the color data needed for anyone
to view the colors as intended.

To save an InDesign file, choose File > Save.

Previewing more accurate blacks (Illustrator CS2 and InDesign CS2)


The improved black preview feature in Adobe Creative Suite 2 lets you choose how to
view and print black objects in Illustrator CS2 and InDesign CS2. While you can still
view 100% K objects as a dark, rich black (the default for earlier versions of InDesign
and Illustrator when Color Management was turned off), you can now choose to view
black objects more accurately, seeing the difference between 100% K and rich black.

Note: You can still see the difference between 100% K black and a rich black in
Photoshop CS2. However, to see the difference in all three applications, you’ll need to
change the default setting as described below.

To preview blacks more accurately in Illustrator CS2:


1. Choose Illustrator > Preferences.

2. Select Appearance of Black from the pop-up menu.

3. Select Display All Blacks Accurately from the On Screen menu.

Note: Display All Blacks Accurately displays the difference between a 100% K and a rich
black on-screen. If you select Consistent Blacks, both blacks appear the same.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 16


In Illustrator CS2, you can select how blacks appear on your monitor and when printed to RGB
composite printers.

To preview blacks more accurately in InDesign CS2:


1. In the Preferences dialog box, select Appearance of Black from the list on the left.

2. Select Display All Blacks Accurately from the On Screen menu.

Note: Display All Blacks Accurately shows the difference between 100% K and rich
black. Display All Blacks As Rich Black displays both blacks the same.

In InDesign CS2, you can select how you want your blacks to appear on your monitor and when
printed to RGB composite printers.

Previewing overprints accurately


Sometimes you might want to force inks to overprint on top of other inks instead of
knocking out the inks below, such as when spot colors overlap other spot colors or
process colors. It is also common to overprint black text to prevent trapping problems
because of misregistration on the press.

To preview how overprinted colors will look when printed, choose View > Overprint
Preview.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 17


Soft-proofing for more accurate viewing
Soft-proofing lets you preview the color that will result when a file is printed on the final
printing press. Soft-proofing is available in any of the Adobe Creative Suite 2 compo-
nents (except GoLive). Soft-proofing provides a simulation of the color of the RGB files
after they are converted to CMYK. This feature also give you greater control over how
the final CMYK values are represented on-screen. For the best soft-proof conditions,
make sure that the monitor has been calibrated.

To soft proof your images, choose View > Proof Colors. If you want more control of the
soft-proofing process, you can customize the settings to fit your needs.

To customize the soft-proofing settings:


1. Choose View > Proof Setup, and then click Custom.

To soft-proof your documents on-screen before printing, choose the device you want to simulate and
choose the Rendering Intent.

2. From the Device to Simulate drop-down menu, select the working/document CMYK
profile. This is the default selection. RGB content will be converted to this profile for
proofing. CMYK colors already use this profile so they will not be converted.

3. Select a rendering intent. This is the rendering intent used to convert your RGB con-
tent to CMYK for proofing.

Note: InDesign CS2 does not have a rendering intent choice in the Proof Setup dialog
box. The rendering intent is specified at the object/document level.

4. Select Simulate Paper Color to simulate on-screen how the final colors will appear on
the paper you will use to print.

Note: The paper color specified by SWOP may be darker and more yellow than the paper
you will be using.

5. Click OK.

The display simulates how the document will appear on the final output device. You can
make edits to adjust the color, as necessary.

Hard-proofing InDesign CS2 documents


Hard-proofing provides a preview of how the document will print on the final output
device, without permanently converting the color values. For instructions on how to
hard proof InDesign CS2 documents, see “Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 18


Sending files and printed proofs to a print provider
To help ensure more accurate color in the final output, give your print provider your
printed proof as well as your PDF file or native InDesign CS2 document.

To create a PDF file in which all content is CMYK, use the PDF/X-1a standard, which
converts all non-CMYK content to the document’s CMYK profile.

To create a PDF file from InDesign CS2:


1. Choose File > Export.

2. Select Format: Adobe PDF, and then click Save.

3. In the Export Adobe PDF dialog box, choose PDF/X-1a from the Adobe PDF
Preset menu.

You can choose an Adobe PDF preset standard from the Export Adobe PDF dialog.

Note: The PDF/X-1a standard does not embed profiles in the body of the PDF file.
However, it does require that the CMYK profile used to create the document, or a
reference to a standard print condition be included in the Output Intent Dictionary
of the PDF file.

4. To change the output settings, select Output. By default, the color conversion is set
to Convert to Destination (Preserve Color Numbers) and the destination profile to
Document CMYK—U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2. These defaults ensure that the
CMYK numbers do not change. However, all RGB content is converted to the docu-
ment CMYK color space as defined in the Destination pull-down menu.

Note: To preserve CMYK color numbers and avoid unwanted CMYK color conversions,
do not change these default settings.

To prepare a PDF file with both RGB and CMYK content, we recommend the PDF/X-3
standard.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 19


To create a mixed RGB and CMYK PDF file:
1. Choose File > Export.

2. Select the Adobe PDF format, and then click Save.

3. In the Export Adobe PDF dialog box, select PDF/X-3 from Adobe PDF Preset menu.

The PDF/X-3 format permits embedded profiles in the body of the PDF.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 20


4. To view the output options, select Output from the list on the left. By default,
InDesign CS2 automatically sets the color conversion to No Color Conversion. This
setting preserves content in the RGB and CMYK modes, without changing the color
numbers. Profiles for RGB and CMYK content are included in the PDF/X-3 file so
that the PDF file can be more easily repurposed to different output devices later in the
workflow.

PDF Export automatically sets Color Conversion to No Color Conversion.

For more information on PDF/X printing standards, see “PDF/X Files and Adobe
Creative Suite 2” (http://studio.adobe.com/us/print/main.jsp).

Package your InDesign CS2 document


If you are delivering native files along with the InDesign CS2 document for the printer,
select File>Package. InDesign CS2 collects all the images, graphics, and fonts, and
places them in a folder with the InDesign document.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 21


Chapter 4: RGB Photo Print
Workflow
Today, digital photographers typically control their photo output by performing a re-
petitive cycle that usually includes printing images, judging the color output, adjusting
the color in Photoshop, and reprinting. After several tries, the color might finally look
right. Without the benefits of accurate on-screen viewing or soft-proofing to simulate
the final output, a lot of time and media can be wasted trying to achieve a satisfying
result.

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You can edit your color in a standard RGB color space and take advantage of on-screen viewing and
soft-proofing to achieve more accurate, predictable color on final output.

This workflow is intended for digital photographers who need an efficient workflow that
offers more predictable color from capture to output.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 22


Initial setup
Before starting this color workflow, be sure the North America Prepress 2 CSF is
selected in Adobe Bridge.

Be sure you have selected the North America Prepress 2 color setting in Adobe Bridge.

For information on selecting a color settings file, see “About Adobe Bridge” in
Chapter 1.

The North America Prepress 2 uses these default settings. Although you set the Color Settings file in
Adobe Bridge, this is how that setting appears in the InDesign CS2 Color Settings dialog box.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 23


Capturing and scanning images
When scanning photos, check the scanner driver settings to see if you can save the
images in the Adobe RGB color space.

If you are using the Adobe Camera Raw plug-in for processing raw image data from a
digital camera, you can easily convert to a standard RGB working space while preserv-
ing as much color and tone information from the original capture as possible. Camera
Raw also controls how the raw data is rendered into a common format such as JPEG,
TIFF, or PSD.

The default color space that Camera Raw renders color into is Adobe RGB (1998). This is
the color space we will use for this workflow. To find out whether your camera works with
the Camera Raw plug-in, visit www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/cameraraw.html.

Camera Raw gives you the option of rendering colors into one of four color spaces.

For more information, about relative color spaces, see “Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

Saving images with embedded profiles


After editing in Photoshop CS2 for good overall color, save the image using the Adobe
RGB profile, so another user can understand how the file was originally created and the
intended color appearance.

To save files with an embedded profile:


1. Choose File > Save. You can save the file in .tiff, .psd, .pdf, or .jpeg format.

2. Select Embed Color Profile.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 24


Soft-proofing for more accurate viewing
Soft-proofing lets you preview the color. You can then make color adjustments, if
necessary.

To soft proof your images in Photoshop CS2:


1. Choose View > Proof Setup, and then click Custom.

Photoshop CS2 provides a user-friendly dialog for selecting soft proofing options.

2. In the Customize Proof Condition dialog box, select the profile that represents your
printer and media from the Device to Simulate menu.

3. Select a Rendering Intent.

Note: Relative Colorimetric, which is the default rendering intent, works well with
many types of imagery when Black Point Compensation is selected. Perceptual
Rendering Intent also provides good color mapping from the image’s color space to the
printer’s color space. When printing, use the same rendering intent as the one selected
for soft-proofing. For more information about rendering intents, see the Photoshop CS2
Help documentation.

4. To simulate the paper color of the media, select Simulate Paper.

5. If you want to reuse this custom setting, click Save and give the setting a file name.
The file will be listed in the Proof Setup menu.

6. Click OK. The display simulates how the document will appear on the printer. If
necessary, make edits to adjust the color.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 25


Printing images or preparing files for output at a photo lab
When satisfied with the color, you’re ready to print the images or prepare the files for
output at a photo lab. Both scenarios are described below.

To print images on a printer:


1. Choose File > Print with Preview.

Use the Print with Preview dialog box to convert to colors appropriate for your printer.
2. In the Print section, select Document.

3. In the Options section, do the following:

• For Color Handling, choose Let Photoshop Determine Colors.

• For Printer Profile, choose your printer and media profile.

• Choose a Rendering Intent.

Note: Choose the same rendering intent that you selected in the Customize Proof
Condition dialog box.

4. Click Print.

5. Select the proper media type and appropriate driver settings for your printer. For
more information about your printer’s driver settings, see the printer’s user guide.

Caution: Because you’ve selected Photoshop to determine color handling, disable the
color management feature in the printer driver. If you don’t, additional conversions and
unexpected color results might occur.

If you have files printed at a photo lab, make sure to save them with your working space
profile embedded so the lab can open your image on a calibrated monitor, see the color
as you intended and print the image to match the image you viewed on-screen.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 26


Chapter 5: Internet Publishing
RBG Workflow
Web designers need to view consistent and predictable color when they create artwork
that will be viewed with a browser. A common approach to preparing files for the
Internet is to display them on several types of monitors and operating systems.
However, reviewing files using these different viewing conditions often requires a
significant investment in time and energy. Fortunately, graphic designers can use
the sRGB color space, which provides a generic description of monitors used on the
Internet. The workflow described in this chapter relies on sRGB as a reference for color
created for publication on the Internet. Using sRGB lets the graphic designer create
colors to a specific standard and rely less on the unique color characteristics of the
different monitors used to preview designs.
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When you convert your artwork to the sRGB working space, the Adobe Creative Suite 2 components
can read, display, and prepare your artwork in a color space suitable for the Internet.

Files that come in from a variety of sources are converted to the sRGB working space,
and then prepared for the web using GoLive CS2. The step-by-step instructions for
achieving more accurate color for on-screen artwork are described below.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 27


Initial setup
Before starting this workflow, be sure that the North America Web/Internet CSF is
selected in Adobe Bridge. This selection sets the default RGB working space to sRGB
across the Adobe Creative Suite 2 components.

Be sure you select the North America Web/Internet color setting in Bridge.

In GoLive CS2, Use Standard Web Workflow (RGB) is selected by default. This setting ensures that the
RGB working space (sRGB) and RGB color management policy (Convert to Working RGB) are set cor-
rectly for web design.

Collecting and capturing images


Acquiring images might include gathering digital files from a photographer, taking
photos with a digital camera, or scanning images into a digital format. If you use a digi-
tal camera or scanner, check the settings to see if you can save the images in the sRGB
color space.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 28


Creating graphics in Illustrator CS2
When creating a new graphic in Illustrator CS2, choose RGB as the color space.
Any RGB graphics created in Illustrator CS2 will use sRGB as the color space. Since
both Illustrator CS2 and Photoshop CS2 use the same color settings, colors in your
Illustrator graphics will match the colors in your Photoshop digital images. Also, when
the Illustrator CS2 and Photoshop CS2 sRGB artwork is viewed on the Internet, the
colors appear consistent and are more likely to be seen as you intended.

Viewing and editing your artwork in Photoshop CS2 and


Illustrator CS2
If you open a digital file in Photoshop CS2 or Illustrator CS2 that contains an embedded
profile that is not sRGB, the Embedded Profile Mismatch dialog box appears asking you
whether you want to convert the document’s colors to the working space. Click OK.

For more information about Adobe Creative Suite 2 profile mismatch dialog boxes, see
“Chapter 6: Advanced Topics.”

Saving your artwork with embedded profiles


After editing in Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2 for good overall color, save the
image using the sRGB profile so another user will be able to understand how the file
was originally created and what the color appearance was meant to be.

To save your artwork with an embedded profile:


1. Choose File > Save.

2. Select Embed Color Profile if you are using one of the following formats:

• (Photoshop) .tif, .psd, .pdf, .eps, and .jpeg

• (Illustrator) .ai and .pdf

When saving images for future use, make sure you select Embed Color Profile.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 29


Preparing files for the web
Two different ways to prepare files for the web are described here. The first imports
Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2 artwork directly into GoLive CS2. The second
repurposes InDesign CS2 elements (also known as assets) for the web using the Package
for GoLive feature in InDesign CS2.

Adobe Creative Suite 2 makes it easy to import Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2 art-
work directly into GoLive CS2 and either save the artwork in a web-optimized format
(without embedding the sRGB Profile) or with an embedded profile. Because sRGB is
the standard color space for the Internet, embedding the sRGB profile is optional.

To import Photoshop CS2 and Illustrator CS2 artwork into GoLive CS2:
Use the smart object feature to place artwork into GoLive CS2.

1. Drag and drop the original document’s artwork (smart object) from either the file
system or from within the GoLive CS2 site window.

Note: GoLive CS2 creates a SmartObjects folder in the web-data folder in your site when
your site is created. This is a good place to store your smart objects. For more informa-
tion on smart objects see the GoLive Help documentation.

2. In the Save For Web dialog box, save your file in a web-ready format. Colors will be
converted from the color space assigned to your native file to sRGB.

Note: If you saved Illustrator files in .ai or .pdf format, or Photoshop files in .psd, .tif,
.pdf, or .eps format, GoLive automatically treats those files as smart objects when placed
in a GoLive HTML page. Smart objects are link-managed. If you change the original
file, the web versions are automatically updated. See the GoLive CS2 documentation
about placing other objects as smart objects in GoLive CS2.

The Save for Web dialog box lets you save your files so they are smaller and web-optimized.

You can repurpose InDesign documents for the web using the InDesign Package
for GoLive feature. All necessary color conversions from the legacy InDesign print
documents to sRGB will occur when you import the elements into GoLive CS2 from the
InDesign CS2 Package.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 30


To repurpose InDesign CS2 elements using GoLive CS2:
1. Open the InDesign CS2 document.

2. Choose File > Package for GoLive.

3. Click Save.

Select Original Images before packaging images, graphics, and layout for GoLive.

4. In the Package for GoLive dialog box, select Original Images.

Note: When you open the package in GoLive CS2, the original images become linked
objects, so if you edit the original image, the GoLive copy is automatically updated with
the changes.

5. Click Package. InDesign CS2 creates a series of folders that contain copies of the
original images, a PDF file of the layout, and an .idpk package file.

6. In the Save As dialog, do the following:

• Type a file name for the .idpk package.

• Save the package in the InDesign Packages subfolder of the website you’re working on.

7. Open your website in GoLive CS2.

8. With the Site window of your website open in GoLive CS2, double-click the package
in the Extras tab showing the InDesign layout and elements.

9. Click Assets.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 31


10. In the Assets tab, select the images you want to use.

In the GoLive Assets tab, select the graphic element and then choose a file format from the
Inspector palette.

11. In the Web Format pop-up menu in the Inspector palette, select the web-optimized
file format you want for each image. You can also use the S4W dialog box to define
the format of the web graphic in the HTML web page. The S4W dialog box appears
when the files are placed in the HTML page.

12. Drag and drop the images into the HTML window.

Note: The images are automatically converted to sRGB during this process.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 32


Chapter 6: Advanced Topics
This chapter provides advanced information for readers who are interested in more
information about color space sizes, profile mismatching, and hard-proofing documents.

About profile warning dialog boxes


You might receive files that have profiles that are different than your working space,
or have no embedded profiles. Depending on your CSF, you might receive a warning
if a profile is missing or mismatched. However, for some workflows, it is helpful to
receive these warnings so that you can make modifications. Warning dialog boxes are
enabled when you select the North America Prepress 2 CSF. Only the Embedded Profile
Mismatch warning is enabled when you select the North America Web/Internet CSF.

When opening artwork that is missing a profile, and the profile warnings are enabled,
the Missing Profile dialog box appears. The options are:

• Leave As Is—Use this only if the workflow is not color managed or if you need to keep
the file size slightly reduced by not embedding a profile.

• Assign Working Space—Interprets the color values in the file based on the current
working space. It does not convert the color values, only the intended appearance.
Use this option if you know that the file is actually in your working space.

• Assign Profile—Assigns a selected profile to the document. It does not convert the
color values. Assigning the correct profile provides the intended appearance.
Contact the file’s creator to determine the proper profile to select.

If a document contains an embedded profile that does not match the application’s
working space, the Embedded Profile Mismatch dialog box appears. You can handle the
mismatch in the following ways:

• Use the Embedded Profile—Assigns the embedded profile to the document instead
of using the current working space. It maintains the color values of the file but also
preserves its appearance on-screen and when printed.

Note: Generally, it is good practice to use the embedded profile in your workflow. For
CMYK documents, profiles provide useful information on the intended use of the file
and how it was created. For example, if a designer is creating a layout for a high-quality,
sheet-fed press, it is useful to know if the file was created for publication on newsprint.

• Convert the Document’s Colors to the Working Space—Changes the color values in
the file so they match the current working space, but also maintains the color appear-
ance of the file. Use this option to avoid having files that use different profiles.

• Discard the Embedded Profile—Removes the embedded profile from the document
and usually changes the document’s color on-screen. Use this option only if the
workflow is not color managed or to slightly reduce the file’s size by removing the
embedded profile.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 33


Hard-proofing documents
It is often beneficial for the designer to use a local printer to print a proof to check the
final color output. With Adobe Creative Suite 2 components, you can proof documents
by printing them on a printer that simulates standard press characteristics. If you use
one of these proofers, it is not necessary to use the hard-proof controls in the Adobe
Creative Suite 2 components. If you want to hard proof your document on a printer, you
need to set up your printer to simulate the final output device. The default color space
used for simulation is the document CMYK profile (InDesign) and the CMYK working
space (Photoshop and Illustrator). You can select a different simulation profile in the
Custom Proof Setup dialog box.

To set up your printer in InDesign CS2 to simulate the final output device:
1. Choose File > Print.

2. In the Print dialog box, select Color Management from the list on the left.

3. Choose the name of the desktop printer from the Printer menu.

4. For Print settings, select Proof.

5. In the Options box, choose the printer profile that represents the media and printer
you are using.

6. Many paper stocks used in commercial printing are relatively dull and have a yellow-
ish color. If you want to simulate this paper color in your proof, select Simulate
Paper Color.

In the Color Management pane, select options to proof colors on a local printer.

7. If you want more accurate simulation of spot colors, select Output from the list on the
left, and then select Simulate Overprint.

Note: Some proofers offer their own simulation of spot colors. If you want to use your
proofer’s spot simulation, deselect Simulate Overprint.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 34


In the Output pane, select Simulate Overprint for a more accurate preview of how your spot colors
will print on the press.

8. Click Printer and do the following:

• Deselect Color Management.

• Select the appropriate media for the proof.

To set up your printer in Photoshop CS2 to simulate the final output device:
1. Choose File > Print with Preview.

In the Photoshop Print dialog box, select options to proof color on a local printer.
Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 35
2. In the Print dialog box, select Color Management from the pop-up menu in the
middle of the screen.

Note: You can change the color space you are simulating by changing the simulation
profile in the Custom Proof Setup dialog box (View > Proof Setup > Custom).

3. In the Print box, select Proof.

4. For Color Handling, select Let Photoshop Determine Colors.

5. In the Printer Profile menu, select the color profile that represents the media and
printer you are using.

6. If you want to simulate the duller color of printing paper, select Simulate Paper Color.

To set up your printer in Illustrator CS2 to simulate the final output device:
Make sure the colors are already converted to the CMYK colors you will use on the final
output device.

1. Choose File > Print.

2. In the Print dialog box, select Color Management from the list on the left.

3. Select the name of your local printer from the Printer menu.

4. Select the printer profile that represents the media and printer you are using.

5. Select a Rendering Intent.

Note: If you want to simulate ink black, you must deselect BPC in the Color Settings
dialog box (Edit > Color Settings). To simulate ink black and the color of paper, choose
Absolute Colorimetric.

In the Color Management pane you can select options to proof CMYK colors on a local printer.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 36


6. If you want to more accurately simulate spot colors and overprint, select Advanced
from the list on the left, and then select Simulate from the Overprints menu.

In the Advanced pane, select Simulate from the Overprint menu for a more accurate preview of how
spot colors and overprint will print on the press.

7. Click Printer and do the following:

• Deselect Color Management.

• Select the appropriate media for the proof.

About relative color space sizes


Each International Color Consortium (ICC) profile, including those for standard
working spaces, defines a color gamut or set of reproducible colors. The larger the color
gamut, the more colors the color space can define.

Color gamuts can be defined using a CIE color model, which is a color-encoding model
based on human vision. Plotting a color space gamut in a horseshoe-shaped CIE chro-
maticity diagram shows its relative size, compared to other color spaces. Film scanners
often have gamuts much larger than printing presses. Large standard working spaces,
such as ProPhotoRGB, retain virtually all of the color available in most film types.
Adobe RGB is smaller, yet is designed to include all colors available on most standard
printing presses.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 37


The range of color reproducible on some printers and printing presses, however, is much
smaller than what people can see and what most scanners and digital cameras can
define. Adobe RGB has a color range larger than a press running at SWOP standards,
but sRGB does not. It’s important to consider the range of color, or gamut, of each of the
devices in your workflow and choose a working space that is appropriate.
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These color gamut plots show the relative sizes of some color device and standard working spaces.
Note that the scanner’s gamut is the largest, followed by Adobe RGB. The gamut of an inkjet printer
nearly equals that of Adobe RGB, while those of a SWOP printing press and newspaper press are much
smaller. To retain an image’s maximum color gamut for repurposing, keep the image in the largest
standard working space possible.

Adobe Creative Suite 2 components use working spaces that give users common ICC
profiles for storing and working with color data. To retain all of a photo’s original color,
a standard working space profile should accommodate as much of the original photo’s
color gamut as possible. When photos are converted to a smaller standard working
space or printer profile, some of the color gamut and impact of the photo is lost.

To maintain the closest appearance to the original, photos should be kept in a standard
working space that does not limit the range of color of your output device. For example,
the color gamut of Adobe RGB is larger than the gamut of most printing presses. If
ICC Profiles are used when printing, they intelligently reduce the range of colors in
the image to match the range of colors of the press. Consider a digital camera photo of
colorfully clothed people on a sunny beach. If the photo is published in a newspaper,
much of its colorfulness is lost because of the newspaper’s small gamut. The same photo
published on a website, however, can probably be displayed on monitors with most of
its original saturation. If the photo is kept in a larger space than the output device and
then converted separately for the newspaper press and for the web, each form of output
can take advantage of the full range of color of the specific device. However, if the photo
is first converted to newspaper CMYK and then converted to sRGB for the web, the
saturation lost to the press cannot be regained for the web. For this reason, it is best
to keep photos in a large standard working space as long as possible, converting color
at the time of output. This facilitates repurposing images, using the same image for
different types of output that have different-sized color gamuts.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 38


Glossary
This table contains definitions of key terms used in this guide.

TERM MEANING
Adobe RGB An RGB working space that provides a relatively large gamut of colors and
is well suited for documents that will be converted to CMYK.

Camera Raw A camera manufacturer’s proprietary format that captures all of the raw
camera sensor data, along with metadata, that describes the camera
settings.
CIE Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage. This committee developed a
color model based on human vision.
Color conversion The process of translating color values from one color space to another.
Color gamut The total range of colors produced by a device. A color is said to be “out
of gamut” when its position in one device’s color space cannot be directly
translated into another device’s color space. For example, the total range
of colors that can be reproduced with ink on coated paper is greater than
that for uncoated newsprint, so the total gamut for uncoated newsprint is
said to be smaller than the gamut for coated stock. A typical CMYK gamut
is generally smaller than a typical RGB gamut.
Color settings file A color settings file (CSF) controls the key aspects of each application’s
color management behavior. Adobe Creative Suite 2 comes with several
CSFs—each based on a common workflow—that offer preset color man-
agement policies and default profiles.
Color space A color space is a model for representing color in terms of intensity values;
a color space specifies how color information is represented. It defines a
one-, two-, three-, or four-dimensional space whose dimensions, or com-
ponents, represent intensity values.
Destination profile An ICC color profile representing the device or color space for which color
values are converted in order to preserve color appearance.
ICC International Color Consortium (ICC), the group established by eight indus-
try vendors (including Adobe Systems) for the purpose of creating, pro-
moting, and encouraging the standardization and evolution of an open,
vendor-neutral, cross-platform color management system architecture. For
more information, visit the ICC web site at www.color.org.
ICC profile A file describing the color gamut and reproduction characteristics of a
device, such as a scanner, monitor, or printer by mapping color values to a
device-independent color space like CIE XYZ or CIELAB.
Rendering intent The method used for mapping colors from one device’s gamut to that of
another. The four methods are Perceptual, Saturation, Relative Colorimet-
ric, and Absolute Colorimetric.
Source profile An ICC profile describing the color gamut and reproduction characteristics
of a device or color model from which images are captured, scanned, or
stored, such as a digital camera, scanner, or standard working space.
sRGB A standard working space developed by Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard
describing the color of the “average” or “standard” home computer
monitor.
U.S. Web Coated A CMYK working space profile based on the U.S. standard for publication
(SWOP) v2 printing presses, governed by the Specifications for Web Offset Publica-
tions (SWOP). This standard was developed in 1972 for publications such as
magazines and catalogs printed on offset presses.
Working space Default ICC profiles used by the application for the RGB, CMYK, or Grayscale
color models.

Color Workflows for Adobe Creative Suite 2 39