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TAB BOOKLET

JTC

JUST JAM:
BLUES FUNK
Chord Charts & Notes

A ROUGH GUIDE TO THE BACKING TRACKS

These chord charts apply to the LONG version of each track. You might find it easier to use
the long version first, to familiarise yourself with the sound of each section.

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CABIN FEVER (99 bpm)

Introduction [0:00]
A Dorian vamp (Am9, Am7, Am6)

Verse 1 (short) [0:15]


A Dorian vamp - 8 bars
Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | Am7 | Am7 |
Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | C7#5 E7 |
Am | G6 | D9 | Fmaj9 |
Am | G6 | D9 | Fmaj9 |
(short Am riff)

Verse 2 (long) [1:18]


A Dorian vamp - 8 bars
D9 | D9 | Am7 | Am7 |
D9 | D9 | Am7 | Am7 |
Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | C7#5 E7 |
Am | G6 | D9 | Fmaj9 |
Am | G6 | D9 | Fmaj9 |

Middle section [2:26]


A Dorian vamp (Am9, Am7, Am6)

Verse 1 (short) [3:14]


A Dorian vamp - 8 bars
Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | Am7 | Am7 |
Dm7b5 | Dm7b5 | Am7 | Am7 |
Am | G6 | D9 | Fmaj9 |
Am | G6 | D9 | Fmaj9 |

Ending [4:12]
A Dorian vamp (Am9, Am7, Am6)

The majority of this track is classic Dorian funk riffs, so you can solo freely using either A Dorian (A
B C D E F# G) or A minor pentatonic (A C D E G). A minor pentatonic will actually work for the whole
track, if you’re careful with note choices.

The exceptions are the Dm7b5 and Fmaj9 chords. For Fmaj9, you can still use A minor pentatonic,
but switch to Aeolian (A B C D E F G) instead of Dorian. And, as we always say, do try to build licks
from the underlying arpeggio notes (Fmaj9 = F A C E G).

For Dm7b5, the important note is Ab, the b5 in the chord name. You could simply add this note to
your A minor pentatonic licks (avoid Dorian here!) or play around the Dm7b5 arpeggio (D F Ab C) or
even use the full D Locrian #2 scale (D E F G Ab Bb C).

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FRISKY (106 bpm)

Introduction [0:00]
Abm7 vamp

Verse 1 [0:23]
Eb7 vamp (16 bars)
Bb7 | Bb7 | Abmaj7 | Fm7 C9sus4 |

Verse 2 [1:08]
Eb7 vamp (16 bars)
Ab7 | Ab7 | Eb7 | Eb7 |
Bb7 | Bb7 | Abmaj7 | Fm7 C9sus4 |

Middle section [1:53]


||: Ebmaj9 | Ebmaj9 | Cm7 | Abmaj7 Bb :|| x2

Verse 2 and a longer middle section repeat at [2:11]

End section [3:42]


Ebm7 vamp (8 bars)
Ebm | Cb | Abm | Db |
Eb7 vamp (to end)

The Eb7 vamp and the Ab7/Bb7 changes have a bluesy sound, so it’s best to play around the
chords, rather than using a single scale. Treat each chord change as a separate Mixolydian tonality...

Eb7: Eb Mixolydian (Eb F G Ab Bb C Db)


Bb7: Bb Mixolydian (Bb C D Eb F G Ab)
Ab7: Ab Mixolydian (Ab Bb C Db Eb F Gb)

And of course you can do all the usual blues tricks... use Eb minor pentatonic (Eb Gb Ab Bb Db),
adding the major 3rd (G) to resolve over the Eb7 chords.

The Abmaj7-Fm7-C9sus4 changes sound more modal, so it might work better to stay strictly within
Eb Mixolydian there.

The middle section switches to Eb major (Eb F G Ab Bb C D) and then the end section starts in Eb
minor (Eb F Gb Ab Bb Cb Db). Don’t be confused by Cb... it’s the same thing as B (it has to have a
different name here, for music theory reasons).

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JAM JAR (99 bpm)

Basic theme [0:24]


G7 | G7 | G7 | G7 |
C7 | C7 | G7 | G7 |
D7 | C7 | G7 | G7 ||

This one is structurally very simple, giving you loads of flexibility. It’s basically a straight 12-bar blues
in G, but the parts are then repeated in different ways, so listen out for the chord changes. There
are only three chords, so use your ears!

Sometimes the G7 chords are extended to G7#9. The #9 (A#) is the same note as the minor 3rd (Bb)
which gives the chord a major/minor ambiguity. Other times, a straight Gm7 is played. This means
you can experiment with the full range of G blues sounds... G Mixolydian (G A B C D E F), G major
pentatonic (G A B D E), G Dorian (G A Bb C D E F) and G minor pentatonic (G Bb C D F).

And of course, do try to play around the chord changes. Try playing C Mixolydian (C D E F G A Bb)
or major pentatonic (C D E G A) over the C7 chords.

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JELLYROLL (131 bpm)

Introduction [0:00]
D7 vamp

Main theme 1 [0:13]


D7 vamp (16 bars)
G7 | G7 | G7 | G7 | D7 | D7 | D7 | D7 |
A7 | A7 | Bb7 | Em7 A7 | D7 | D7 | D7 | D7 ||

Main theme 2 [1:22]


D7 vamp (16 bars)
G7 | G7 | G7 | G7 | D7 | D7 | D7 | D7 |
A7 | A7 | G7 | C7 | D7#9 | D7#9 ||

Intro repeat [2:31]


D7 vamp

Main theme 3 [2:49]


D7 vamp (16 bars)
G7 | G7 | G7 | G7 | D7 | D7 | D7 | D7 |
G7 | G7 | G7 | G7 | D7 | D7 | D7 | D7 |
A7 | A7 | G7 | Em7 A7 | D7 | D7 | D7 | D7 ||

(End on D7 vamp)

This is a “stretched” blues structure in D major, and as you can see, there are some variations
between the three repeats. This is another where you can use all the classic blues tricks. Treat the
overall tonality as D Mixolydian (D E F# G A B C) but remember that you can mix in notes from minor
pentatonic (D F G A C). That gives us both major 3rd (F#) and minor 3rd (F), essential for the major/
minor ambiguity of blues.

When the chord changes to G7, there’s long enough to treat it as a complete key change to G Mix-
olydian (G A B C D E F). And of course, you can then blend in the notes of G minor pentatonic (G Bb
C D F) making use of the major and minor 3rds (B and Bb).

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MIRROR (125 bpm)

Main theme 1 [0:00]


Cm7 vamp (16 bars)
Fm9 | Fm9 | Cm9 | Cm9 | Fm9 | Fm9 | G7 | G7 |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Dbmaj9 ||

Interlude [1:05]
Cm7 vamp (16 bars)

Main theme 2 [1:36]


Cm7 vamp (16 bars)
Fm9 | Fm9 | Cm9 | Cm9 | Fm9 | Fm9 | G7 | G7 |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Dbmaj9 |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Dbmaj9 ||

Main theme 3 [2:53]


Cm7 vamp (16 bars)
Fm9 | Fm9 | Cm9 | Cm9 | Fm9 | Fm9 | G7 | G7 |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Dmaj9 |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Bb |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Dbmaj9 |
Cm7 | Fm7 | Abmaj7 | Bb | Cm7 | Fm7 | Ebmaj7 | Dbmaj9 ||

This is an extended C minor blues structure, with slight variations between the three main themes.
The overall tonality is C Aeolian (C D Eb F G Ab Bb) although you may decide that C Dorian (C D Eb
F G A Bb) works better for the extended Cm7 vamps. Either way, minor pentatonic (C Eb F G Bb) will
work throughout.

The B section (Cm7-Fm7-Abmaj7) definitely needs either Aeolian or minor pentatonic, and then
you’ll need to switch briefly to Db Lydian (Db Eb F G Ab Bb C) for the Db chords.

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ONE TRICK PONY (90 bpm)

Introduction [0:00]
Am7 (4 bars)

Section 1 [0:24]
Am7 | Dm7 | Am7 | Dm7 |
Am7 | Dm7 | Am7 | Dm7 |
Em7 | Dm9 | Am7 | Em7 ||
Fmaj7 | G6 | Em7 | Am7 |
Fmaj7 | G6 | Em7 | Am7 |
Am7 | Am7 | Am7 | Am7 ||

(intro repeat)

Section 2 [1:28]
Am7 | D9 | Am7 | D9 |
Am7 | D9 | Am7 | D9 |
Dm9 | Dm9 | Am7 | Am7 |
Dm9 | Dm9 | Am7 | Am7 |
Em7 | Em7 | Dm7 | G |
Em7 | Dm9 | Am7 | Em7 ||
||: Fmaj7 | G6 | Em7 | Am7 :|| x4

(intro repeat)

Section 3 [3:25]
Dm7 | Am9 | Dm7 | Am9 |
Dm7 | Am9 | Dm7 | Am9 |
Am7 vamp (16 bars)
Em7 | Em7 | Dm7 | Dm7 |
Am7 | Am7 | Am7 | Am7 ||

Three variations on the A minor blues structure. With the alternating Am/Dm and the Fmaj7 in Sec-
tion 1, it’s a clear choice of either Aeolian (A B C D E F G) or minor pentatonic (A C D E G).

However, in the first two lines of Section 2, the alternating Am7/D9 is the classic Dorian sound (A
B C D E F# G). The Dm chords reappear later in that section (and in Section 3) so you then need to
switch back to Aeolian. You can of course play minor pentatonic through the whole track.

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ROLLER COASTER (142 bpm)

Introduction [0:00]
G minor pentatonic riff

Section 1 [0:17]
||: Fm9 | Gm9 | Fm9 | Gm9 |
Fm9 | Gm9 | Fm7 | Bb13 :|| x2

Section 2 [0:44, 1:51, second half only at 3:53]


C7sus4 | C7sus4 | C7sus4 | Gbmaj9 Dbmaj9 |
Fm9-Gm9 | ... | Fm9-Gm9 | ... |
D7sus4 | D7sus4 | C7sus4 | C7sus4 |
Fm9-Gm9 | ... | Fm9-Gm9 | Fm9-Dm9 ||

Section 3 [1:11, 3:13]


||: Fm7 | Gm9 | Fm7 | Gm9 |
Fm7 | Gm9 | Fm7 | Gm9 :||

Middle section [2:19-3:13]


Gm9 vamp (ending in Ebmaj9-Abmaj7 every 8 bars)

Ending [4:07]
Gm9 vamp

Let’s start with the middle section and ending. Here, you can stretch out with G minor pentatonic
(G Bb C D F), G Dorian (G A Bb C D E F) or G Aeolian (G A Bb C D Eb F). If you’re using full modal
scales, Dorian would be the more natural choice for a minor 7th or minor 9th chord, but your deci-
sion may be affected by the Eb-Ab change in the middle section. This requires a quick shift to Eb
major (Eb F G Ab Bb C D).

G minor pentatonic will also get you through the other sections, which are broadly in a G minor to-
nality. Using full scales is harder, because of the other chords. For example, you’d need to avoid the
A note (in G Aeolian or Dorian) over the Fm7 chords and that Bb13 in section 1. However, if you can
confidently hit Ab notes over these chords, you can open up some interesting melodic ideas.

The same goes for Section 2... use G minor pentatonic as your basic scale, and then add notes to
fit the chords. G Dorian will work fine over the C7sus4 and D7sus4, but avoid the A note over Fm9.
Also, try switching briefly to Db major (Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C) over the Gb-Db change.

As ever, it’s better to start with chord notes, connecting them with scale fragments, rather than start-
ing with scales and then worrying that they won’t fit all the chords!

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STARDUST (103 bpm)

Intro [0:00]
Bm7 | A7 | Bm7 | A7 |
Bm7 | A7 | Bm7 | A7 F#7 ||

Section 1 [0:24]
Bm vamp (16 bars)
Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 |
F#m7 | F#m7 | Em7 | G#7 ||

Section 2 [1:38]
Bm vamp (16 bars)
Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 |
F#m7 | F#m7 | Em7 | Fm6 ||

Middle section [2:34]


Bm7 | A7 | Bm7 | A7 |
Bm7 | A7 | Bm7 | A7 |
Bm7 | A7 | Bm7 | A7 F#7 ||

Section 3 [3:02]
Bm vamp (16 bars)
Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 |
Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Em7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 | Bm7 |
Bm vamp (to end) ||

Here’s another extended version of the basic minor blues, and this time we’re in B minor. You’ll be
able to solo over almost all the chords with B minor pentatonic (B D E F# A) and possibly also B
Aeolian (B C# D E F# G A). However, as we’ve said before, B Dorian (B C# D E F# G# A) will prob-
ably work better over those extended Bm7 vamps.

The intro and middle sections feature alternating Bm7 and A7, so you could either try playing B Aeo-
lian right through, or alternate between B Dorian and A Mixolydian (A B C# D E F# G - same notes
as B Aeolian).

For those surprising G#7 and Fm6 chords at the end of Sections 1 and 2, the best approach is to
try and land on a chord tone. G#7 contains the notes G# B# D# F# (B# is the same as C) and Fm6
contains F Ab C D).

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TRIGGER (115 bpm)

Intro [0:00]
Gm6 (8 bars)

Section 1 [0:21]
Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
D9 | D9 | Ebmaj13 | ... | Gm7 | Gm7 | D | Cm7 D ||

(intro repeat at 1:11)

Section 2 [1:28]
Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
Dm7 | Dm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | D7 | Cm7 ||

(intro repeat at 2:18)

Section 3 [2:34]
Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
D9 | D9 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | D7 | Cm7 |
Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 |
Dm7 | Dm7 | Cm7 | Cm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | D7 ||

Ending [3:58]
Gm6 vamp

Another extended minor blues, with some variations so you can work with different target notes.
We’re in G minor here, and the repeating Gm6 intros and ending require either Dorian (G A Bb C D
E F) or minor pentatonic (G Bb C D F).

For the main sections, it’s the same choice as before. The neatest fit for the Gm7-Cm7 changes
would be G Aeolian (G A Bb C D Eb F) but you might find that it doesn’t sound very “funky” or
“bluesy” when used for long periods, so the Gm7 and Cm7 really need different treatments in this
situation... G Dorian or minor pentatonic for the Gm7 chords, and then G Aeolian (same notes as C
Dorian) for the Cm7 chords.

The main difference between the section is whether there’s a Dm9 or D9 as the V chord. You don’t
actually need to worry about that, as you can play right through with your G Dorian licks or minor
blues licks. But we always recommend building your licks around the target notes of the underly-
ing chord, so try adding an F# note when there’s a D9 chord. You could even try playing G melodic
minor (G A Bb C D E F#).

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WHATEVER (145 bpm)

Intro [0:00]
||: Bb-Ab6-Gbmaj7 :|| x4
||: Bb-Ab6-Gbmaj7 -- Bb-Ab6-Ebm7 :|| x2

Section 1 [0:30]
Bbm riff x8
Eb riff x2
Bbm riff x2
Db riff x2

(intro repeat at 1:16)

Section 2 [1:42]
||: Bb9sus4 | Eb6 | Bb9sus4 | Eb6 :|| x4
Eb Db | Eb | Eb Db | Eb |
||: Db Ab/C | Eb6 | Db Ab/C | Eb6 :|| x3
Bb9sus4 | Eb6 | Bb9sus4 | Eb6 ||

(intro repeat at 2:42)

Section 3 [3:09]
Bb Mixolydian vamp

Ending [4:28]
||: Bb9sus4 | Eb6 | Bb9sus4 | Eb6 :||

Possibly the trickiest part here is the intro, where you’ll need to change chord every bar. Bb Mix-
olydian (Bb C D Eb F G Ab) will work for the Bb and Ab6 chords, but the Gbmaj7 and Ebm7 chords
need something else... the obvious choice is Gb Lydian (Gb Ab Bb C Db Eb F) which has the same
notes as Eb Dorian. You could also use Bb minor pentatonic here (Bb Db Eb F Ab); with careful note
choice, this scale could work for the whole intro.

Section 1 is a little like a 12-bar blues progression, but built from chord riffs entirely within Bb Dorian
(Bb C Db Eb F G Ab). Again, minor pentatonic and all your minor blues licks will work fine here. Sec-
tion 2 has a different structure, but is the same Bb Dorian tonality.

Section 3 is self-explanatory; Mixolydian and major pentatonic (Bb C D F G) will be the closest
match, but also try the bluesier sound of Dorian and minor pentatonic (see above).

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