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TERM PAPER

NAME-ANJALI AGRAWAL

ROLL NO-06

SEMESTER-V

COURSE: BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MENTOR: DR. OINDRILA CHAKRABORTY

TITLE: A STUDY ON CONSUMER PREFERENCES TOWARDS


CADBURY AND NESTLE CHOCOLATES IN KOLKATA REGION.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 19TH NOVEMBER,2018

Term paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the graduate


degree in

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION(HONOURS)

J.D.BIRLA INSTITUTE

AFFILIATED TO-JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY

KOLKATA.

SIGNATURE OF STUDENT SIGNATURE OF SUPERVISOR

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LETTER TO THE CONTROLLER

To,
The controller of examination,
Jadavpur university,
Kolkata

Respected Sir/ma’am,

I, ANJALI AGRAWAL, take full ownership of this work, titled “A study on consumer
preferences towards Cadbury and Nestle chocolates in kolkata region.”

All the references used are well acknowledged in the bibliography. The term paper is in
partial fulfillment of the requirements of Graduation Degree in Bachelors of Business
Administration(honours) awarded by Jadavpur University.

Yours Sincerely,

ANJALI AGRAWAL
Roll no: 06

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DECLARATION

I hereby declare the following:

The word count of the dissertation is 10,091 words approximately.

The material contained in this dissertation is the end result of my own work. Due
acknowledgment has been given in the bibliography and references to all sources used be
they electronic, personal and printed. I am aware that my dissertation may be submitted from
this institute or from any other institute.

In the event there is a high degree of similarity in content detected, further investigations may
lead to disciplinary actions including the cancellation of my degree according to Jadavpur
University rules and regulations.

I declare that the ethical issues have been considered, evaluated and appropriately addressed
in this research.

I agree to maintain an electronic copy or section of the dissertation to be placed on the e-


learning portal, if deemed appropriate, to allow future students the opportunity to see
examples of the past dissertation and to be able to print and download copies of they so
desire.

Signature:

Date: 19th NOVEMBER 2018

Name: ANJALI AGRAWAL

Roll no: 06

Mentor: Dr. Oindrila Chakraborty.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

A project caanot be completed as a supplementary, long term assignment necessitating


personal initiative that is planned,devised and contemplated by either an individual or a group
of individuals.
Hence, I take this opportunity to express my profound gratitude and deep regards to my
mentor, Dr.Oindila Chakraborty for her exemplary guidance, monitoring and constant
encouragement through the course of this project. The guidance given by her was of immense
help and the reason for successfully completing the project on time.
I would also like to convey my gratitude and regards to our Director,
Dr.J.N.Mukhopadhyaya for his encouragement.
It would be unfair not to acknowledge the help provided by a certain group of people during
the project. I would like to extend my deepest gratitude to my brither who was a constant
support and guide throughout the project helping me solve any problem arising while
carrying out the research.
I would also like to thanks my friends for their inputs and suggestions and for their
contribution to help me do my work perfectly.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

SR.NO CONTENTS PG.NO

1. INTRODUCTION 8-13

1.1 THE INDIAN CHOCOLATE MARKET CAN BE SLICED


INTO 4 SEGMENTS.

1.2 CONSUMER PREFERENCE.

1.3 INDUSTRY OVERVIEW

1.3.1 HISTORY OF CHOCOLATE.

1.3.2 FIRST CHOCOLATE FOR EATING.

1.3.3 CHOCOLATE AS WE KNOW IT TODAY.

1.3.4 CHOCOLATE INDUSTRY IN INDIA.

14-16
LITERATURE REVIEW
2.
2.1 REVIEW

2.2 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

17-21
ORGANISATION OVERVIEW
3.
3.1 NESTLE INDIA.

3.2 CADBURY INDIA.


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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
4.
4.1 RESEARCH DESIGN.

4.2 SAMPLE SIZE.

4.3 TYPE OF RESPONDENTS.

4.4 METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION.

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4.5 RESEARCH INSTRUMENT.

4.6 SAMPLING FRAME.

4.7 SAMPLING UNIT.

4.8 TENURE OF RESEARCH.

4.9 STATISTICAL TOOLS USED.

5. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION. 23-34

6. FINDINGS. 35-36

7. RECOMMENDATIONS. 37

8. LIMITATION OF THE PROJECT. 38

9. CONCLUSION. 39

10. CITATION. 40

11. BIBLIOGRAPHY. 41

12. ANNEXURE. 42-45

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ABSTRACT

Chocolate consumption is gaining popularity in India due to increasing prosperity coupled


with a shift in food habits, pushing up the country’s cocoa imports. Chocolate market in India
is pegged at Rs.2000 crores and is growing at the rate of 18-20 percentage per annum. The
global chocolate market is estimated around $80 billion. The Indian chocolate market is seen
growing at a compounded annual growth rate of 15-20% annum. The Indian chocolate market
is thought to be worth Rs.1500 crore and has been hailed as offering great potential for
western chocolate manufacturers as the market is still in its early stages. Chocolate market is
a highly concentrated market, with leading brands like Cadbury and nestle.

In this research I have survey the product performance and buying behavior or preferences of
two famous brands of chocolates Nestle and Cadbury, which are consumed by people of all
ages. During this research I have interacted with people of ‘Kolkata’. After this research I
came to know how people perceives these products on the variables like price, quality,
advertisement, satisfaction, taste, packaging, brand loyalty etc. I also came to know which
particular brand of chocolate is most preferred by people of different age groups. In this
research I have surveyed that how frequently and how much chocolate they consume,
whether they buy small, big or family pack.. In this report I have tried to explain the entire
research and facts product wise.

By doing the comparison between the top leading brands of chocolates, CADBURY AND
NESTLE it was found that majority i.e. 76% people free Cadbury as the most preferred brand
where as nestle only about 24%. Its also seen that people are too conscious and not ready to
sacrifice on factors like quality and taste and these factors are also the main reasons which
helps the companies to retain their customers. Its also seen after conducting the research that
chocolates are not eaten occasionally or when one is happy but it also helps people to come
out of sadness, depressions etc. Survey conducted also helps us to break the myth that
chocolates are made only for children.

After doing all the required analysis its seen that nestle is far behind Cadbury and in order to
capture the market it needs to work on various factors like advertising, promotional offers,
packaging, etc. Cadbury on the other hand stood out as the winner in the market by catering
to the needs of its customers. Therefore, its seen both the companies has tried their level best
to provide qualitative products, a very small fraction of respondents had any issues in terms
of quality.

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CHAPTER 1-INTRODUCTION

With the entry of multinationals and home companies sprucing up their act, the confectionery
market is booming. Till the eighties, the chocolate market was small and the product category
itself was fuzzy. In the eighties, Cadbury’s - the virtual monopolist had decided to focus its
efforts on making chocolates a distinct category with an identity of its own. And the marketer
had sharply positioned its product at children to do that. Hence, chocolates bore an Only for
kids´ tag, and kept adults at bay. By the end of the eighties, Cadbury’s still ruled the roost
with over 80 percent market share. And though several brands - like Amul and Campco -
tried to break into the market, none of them had succeeded in shaking the leaders grip. In fact,
Cadburys had become a brand virtually generic to chocolates. Then chocolates were used to
reward and reinforce positive behaviour and hence were categorized as a luxury reserved for
special occasions. This was, a stark contrast to the west where chocolates were snacked on,
eaten as mini meals or just to suppress pangs of hunger. But constant working by players like
Cadbury’s (re-launch of Cadbury’s Dairy Milk targeting adults and as a casual any-time buy)
and Nestle towards exploding the myth that chocolates are meant for children only, has
resulted in the segment booming.

1.1 THE INDIAN CHOCOLATE MARKET CAN BE SLICED INTO 4


SEGMENTS
1.MOULDED CHOCOLATE SEGMENT- Comprising slab chocolates like Dairy Milk
.These are made by pouring the chocolates into moulds.
2.COUNTLINE SEGMENT- Comprising bars like Bar-One, 5Star, Perk, Kit-Kat etc. These
have some other ingredients other than chocolate.
3.CHOCO-PANNED SEGMENT- Comprising chocolate forns like Butterscoth, Nutties,
Tiffins etc. Panned variety have different cores/centers which are covered by a layer of
chocolate.
4.SUGAR-PANNED SEGMENT- Comprising of Gems,Chocolate Eclairs etc. They
generally have a sugar couting outside.

1.2.CONSUMER PREFERENCE
All marketing starts with the consumer. So consumer is a very important person to a
marketer. Consumer decides what to purchase, for whom to purchase, why to purchase, from
where to purchase, and how much to purchase. In order to become a successful marketer, he
must know the liking or disliking of the customers. He must also know the time and the
quantity of goods and services, a consumer may purchase, so that he may store the goods or
provide the services according to the likings of the consumers.

Gone are the days when the concept of market was let the buyer’s beware or when the
market was mainly the seller’s market. Now the whole concept of consumers sovereignty
prevails. The manufacturers produce and the sellers sell whatever the consumer likes. In this
sense, consumer is the supreme in the market´. As consumers, we play a very vital role in the
health of the economy local, national or international. The decision we make concerning our
consumption behavior affect the demand for the basic raw materials, for the transportation,
for the banking, for the production; they effect the employment of workers and deployment
of resources and success of some industries and failures of others.

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Thus marketer must understand this.

Preference(or "taste") is a concept, used in the social sciences, particularly economics. It


assumes a realor imagined "choice" between alternatives and the possibility of rank ordering
of these alternatives, based on happiness, satisfaction, gratification, enjoyment, utility
they provide. More generally, it can be seen as a source of motivation. In cognitive sciences,
individual preferences enable choice of objectives/goals. The study of the consumer
preference not only focuses on how and why consumers make buying decision, but also
focuses on how and why consumers make choice of the goods they buy and their evaluation
of these goods after use. So for success of any company or product promotion it is very
necessary to depart its concentration towards consumer preference.

1.3 INDUSTRY OVERVIEW


1.3.1History of chocolate

The origin of chocolate can be traced back to the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations in
Central America, who first enjoyed “chocolaty” a much-prized spicy drink made from
roasted cocoa beans. Throughout its history, whether as cocoa or drinking chocolate beverage
or confectionary treat, chocolate has been a much sought after food.

Archaeological Evidence of Cacao in Mesoamerica:

The first example of chemically tracing cacao was in 1984, when a team of archaeologists in
Guatemala explored the Mayan site of Rio Azul. They discovered fifteen vessels surrounding
male skeletons in the royal tomb. One of these such vessels was beautifully decorated and
covered in various Mayan glyphs. One of these glyphs translated to "kakaw", also known as
cacao. The inside of the vessel was lined with a dark colored powder, which was scraped off
for further testing. Once the archaeologists took this powder to the Hershey Center for Health
and Nutrition to be tested, they found trace amounts of theobromine in the powder, a major
indicator of cacao. This cacao was dated to sometime between 460 and 480 AD.

Cacao powder was also found in beautifully decorated bowls and jars, known at tecomates, in
the city of Puerto Escondido. Once thought to have been a very rare commodity, cacao was
found in many more tecomates than once thought possible. However, since this powder was
only found in bowls of higher quality, it led archaeologists to believe that only wealthier
people could afford such bowls, and therefore the cacao. The cacao tecomates are thought to
have been a center piece to social gatherings between people of high social status.

The Mayan Empire:

The Maya people, (Guatemala), by contrast, do leave some surviving writings about cacao
which confirm the identification of the drink with the gods. The Dresden Codex specifies that
it is the food of the rain deity Kon, the Madrid Codex that gods shed their blood on the cacao
pods as part of its production. The Maya people gathered once a year to give thanks to the
god Ek Chuah who they saw as the Cacao god. The consumption of the chocolate drink is
also depicted on pre-Hispanic vases. The Maya seasoned their chocolate by mixing the

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roasted cacao seed paste into a drink with water, chile peppers and cornmeal, transferring the
mixture repeatedly between pots until the top was covered with a thick foam.

There were many uses for cacao among the Maya. It was used in official ceremonies and
religious rituals, at feasts and festivals, as funerary offerings, as tribute, and for medicinal
purposes. Both cacao itself and vessels and instruments used for the preparation and serving
of cacao were used for important gifts and tribute.Cacao beans were used as currency, to buy
anything from avocados to turkeys to sex. A rabbit, for example, was worth ten cacao beans,
(called “almonds” by the early sixteenth-century chronicler Francisco Oviedo y Valdés), a
slave about a hundred, and the services of a prostitute, eight to ten “according to how they
agree,”.The beans were also used in betrothal and marriage ceremonies among the Maya,
especially among the upper classes.
“The form of the marriage is: the bride gives the bridegroom a small stool painted in colors,
and also gives him five grains of cacao, and says to him “These I give thee as a sign that I
accept thee as my husband.” And he also gives her some new skirts and another five grains of
cacao, saying the same thing.”
Mayan preparation of cacao started with cutting open cacao pods to expose the beans and the
fleshy pulp. The beans were left out to ferment for a few days. In some cases, the beans were
also roasted over an open fire in order to add a smoky flavor to it. The beans then had their
husks removed and were ground into a paste. Since sweeteners were rarely used by Mayans,
they flavored their cacao paste with additives like flowers, vanilla pods, and chilies. The
vessel used to serve this chocolate liquid was stubbier by nature to help froth the liquid better,
which was very important to the Mayans. The vessels also tended to be decorated in intricate
designs and patterns, which tended to only be accessible by the rich.
The Aztec Empire:
By 1400, the Aztec Empire took over a sizable part of Mesoamerica. They were not able to
grow cacao themselves, but were forced to import it. All of the areas that were conquered by
the Aztecs that grew cacao beans were ordered to pay them as a tax or as the Aztecs called it,
a "tribute". The cacao bean became a form of currency. The Spanish conquistadors left
records of the value of the cacao bean, noting for instance that 100 beans could purchase a
canoe filled with

fresh water or a turkey hen. The Aztecs associated cacao with the god Quetzacoatl, whom
they believed had been condemned by the other gods for sharing chocolate with
humans.Unlike the Maya of Yucatan, the Aztecs drank chocolate cold. It was consumed for a
variety of purposes, as an aphrodisiac or as a treat for men after banquets, and it was also
included in the rations of Aztec soldiers.

Therefore ,“Chocolate”(in the form of a luxury drink) was consumed in large quantities by
theAztecs: the drink was described as “ finely ground, soft, foamy, reddish, bitter with
chiliwater, aromatic flowers, vanilla and wild bee honey.The dry climate meant the Aztecs
were unable to grow cocoa trees, and had to obtainsupplies of cocoa beans from “tribute” or
trade.

The Aztec’s regarded chocolate as an aphrodisiac and their emperor, Montezumareputedly


drank it fifty times a day from a golden goblet and is quoted as saying of xocolat: “the divine

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drink, which builds up resistance and fights fatigue. A cup of thisprecious drink permits a
man to walk for a whole day without food”

Don Cortes:

The Spanish invaded Mexico in the 16th century, by this time the Aztecs had created a
powerful empire, and the Spanish armies conquered Mexico. Don Cortes was made captain
general and governor of Mexico. When he returned to Spain in1528 he loaded his galleons
with cocoa beans and equipment for making the chocolate drink. Soon “chocolate” became a
fashionable drink enjoyed by the rich in Spain.

Chocolate In Europe:

Until the 16th century, no European had ever heard of the popular drink from the Central
American peoples. Christopher Columbus and his son Ferdinand encountered the cacao bean
on Columbus's fourth mission to the Americas on 15 August 1502, when he and his crew
seized a large native canoe that proved to contain cacao beans among other goods for
trade. Spanish conquistad or Hernán Cortés may have been the first European to encounter it,
as the frothy drink was part of the after-dinner routine of Montezuma.

Xocolat or chocolat or chocolate as it became known, was brought to Europe by Cortez, by


this time the conquistadors had learned to make the drink more palatable to European tastes
by mixing the ground roasted beans with sugar and vanilla ( a practice still continued today),
thus offsetting the spicy bitterness of the brew the Aztec’s drank. The first chocolate factories
opened in Spain, where the dried fermented beans brought back from the new world by the
Spanish treasure fleets were roasted and ground, and by the early 17 th century chocolate
powder – from which the European version of the drink was made- was being exported to
other parts of Europe. The Spanish kept the source of the drink- the beans- a secret for many
years, so successfully in fact, that when English buccaneers boarded what they thought was a
Spanish “ treasurer galleon” in 1579, only to find it loaded with what appeared to be “ dried
sheep’s droppings, they burned the wholeship in frustration. If only they had known,
chocolate was so expensive at that time, that it was worth it’s weight in silver (if not gold),
chocolate was treasure indeed! Within a few years, the cocoa beverage made from the
powder produced in Spain had become popular throughout Europe, in the Spanish
Netherlands, Italy, France, and Germany and – in about 1520 – it arrived in England. The
first chocolate house in England opened in London in 1657 followed rapidly by many others.
Like the already well established coffee houses, they were used as clubs where the wealthy
and business community met to smoke a clay pipe of tobacco, conduct business and socialize
over a cup of chocolate.

Back to the America’s:

Events went full circle when English colonists carried chocolate (and coffee) with them to
England’s colonies in North America. Destined to become the United States of America and
Canada, they are now the world’s largest consumers – by far – of both chocolate and coffee,
consuming over half of the words total production of chocolate alone.

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The Quakers:

The Quakers were, and still are, a pacifist religious sect, an offshoot of the puritans
of English civil war and pilgrim fathers fame and a history of chocolate would not be
complete without mentioning their part in it. Some of the most famous names in chocolate
were Quakers, who for centuries held a virtual monopoly of chocolate making in the English
speaking world – fry, Cadbury and row tree are probably the best known. It’s probably before
the time of the English civil war between parliament and King Charles 1st that the Quaker’s
who evolved from the puritans, first began their historic association with chocolate. Because
of their pacifist religion, they were prohibited from many normal business activities, so as an
industrious people with a strong belief in the work ethic (like the puritans); they involved
themselves in food related businesses and did very well. Baking was a common occupation
for them because bread was regarded as the biblical “staff of life”, and bakers in England
were the first to add chocolate to cakes so it would be a natural progression for them to start
making pure chocolate. They were also heavily involved in breakfast cereals but that’s
another story.

What is certain is that the fry, row tree and Cadbury families in England among others,
began chocolate making and in fact Joseph fry of fry &sons (founded 1728 in Bristol,
England) is credited with producing and selling the world’s first chocolate bar. Fry’s have
now all but disappeared (taken over by Cadbury) and row tree have merged Swiss company
nestle, to form the largest chocolate manufacturer in the world. Cadbury have stayed with
chocolate production and are now, if not quite the largest, probably one of the best-known
chocolate makers in the world.

1.3.2 First chocolate for Eating

Up until this point all chocolate recipes were based on plain chocolate. It was an English
doctor, Sir Hans’s Sloane, who- after traveling in south America- focused on cocoa and food
values, bringing a milk chocolate recipe back to England. The original Cadbury milk
chocolate was prepared to his recipe.

1.3.3 Chocolate as we know it today!

The first mention of chocolate being eaten in solid form is when bakers in England began
adding cocoa powder to cakes in the mid 1600’s. Then in 1828 a Dutch chemist, Johannes
van houten, invented a method of extracting the bitter tasting fat or “cocoa butter” from the
roasted ground beans, his aim was to make the drink smoother and more palatable, however
he unknowingly paved the way for solid chocolate as we know it.

Chocolate as we know it today first appeared in 1847 when fry & sons of Bristol, England –
mixed sugar with cocoa powder and cocoa butter (made by the van houten process) to
produce the first solid chocolate bar then in1875 a Swiss manufacturer, Daniel peters, found a
way to combine (some would say improve, some would say ruin) cocoa powder and cocoa
butter with sugar and dried milk powder to produce the first milk chocolate.

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1.3.4 Chocolate Industry in India

INDIAN CHOCOLATE INDUSTRY AT A GLANCE IN 2017-2018

India has one of the world’s fastest growing chocolate makers which posted a huge
13percent sales growth this year, according to a research. The research conducted by
London based global market firm Mintel states that while the chocolate sales in other nations
have stagnated, India consumed 228,000 tonnes worth of chocolate in 2017.
India’s chocolate confectionery market had a strong CAGR(compound annual growth rate)
of 19.9 percent ,in retail market value for the past five years and is expected to grow at a
CAGR of 20.6 percent from 2016-2020 as per the research.
Mondelez India(formerly Cadbury india) and Nestle India are the major players with a
colossal 92 percent of the total sales in 2014. Indian companies like Amul and ITC also
have a good share. The domestic chocolate market is estimated to be little more than Rs. 7000
crore. International brands like Mars and Ferrero India are also trying to gain grounds in the
market.

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CHAPTER 2- LITERATURE REVIEW
2.1 REVIEW
 Dr.Shendge (2012) on his study “A Comparative Study of Consumer Preference
towards Cadbury and Nestle Chocolates with Special Reference to Navi Peth Area in
Solapur City” viewed that Chocolate is liked and eaten by all age group of people.[1]
 Chakraborty (2010) in a study conducted in Hyderabad. In India he identified the
driving shopping, motives of Indian consumer. Factor analysis three shopping motives
two of which related to hedonic shopping motive and one of the utilitarian. The factor
were named as diversion, socialization and utilitarian. Other dimension are store
attributes, shopping outcomes and shopping perceived cost. The identified factor
could be the key for discount stores for understanding the shoppers.[2]
 Prof. R.C.S. Rajpurohit and Dr. M.L. Vasita (2011) on their study “consumer
preference and satisfaction towards various mobile phone service providers an
exploratory study in Jodhapur city, Rajasthan” conducted that on 250 mobile phone
users of various mobile phone service providers such as Airtel, Vodafone, BSNL,
Reliance, Idea and few other players. The result derived from this study indicate that
the factor induces the consumer to buy a particular mobile phone operator followed
by a network coverage and brand image. The finding derived from the study will be
helpful for mobile phone service provided for the promotion of mobile phone
service.[3]
 Anil Mathur (2001) on his study “A study of changes in brand preference “stated the
brand preference are usually studied by attempting to profile and understand royal
consumers. This paper presents a study of changes in brand preference. Theory and
research is used to proper and test a model based on proposition the changes in brand
preference and their development on the result of life event that service as marker of
life transitions. Changes are viewed to be result of adjustments to new life conditions
and changes in life time to cope with stressful life changes. The data support these
notions and suggest implications for consumer research.[4]
 Attiya Kanwal (2011) on his study “Consumer preference of International brands over
local brands” aimed at determining consumer preference of international brands
instead if national or local brands. Consumer evaluates products based on information
cues, which are intrinsic and extrinsic. If a consumer is satisfied with a product, he
will buy it again, become loyal and over time develop a relationship with the brand.
There are various factors which influence consumer purchase decision. The price of a
brand plays a fundamental role in the consumer’s choice of brand. If a brand is priced
too high then a consumer will avoid it. The price of a brand is an indication of the
quality of the brand as well. The country of origin of products is another cue used as a
sign of quality of a product. Products from developed countries are perceived to be of
better quality. Other factors include fashion, family and friends, brand name,
availability, advertising campaigns etc. The sample for this research is taken from
Islamabad and Rawalpindi. Simple random sampling was the technique used and the
sample size was 100. Data collected for research was through a questionnaire, which
was distributed among both males and females of various age groups and income

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levels. Calculations were then analyzed and interpreted using percentage of
respondents and frequency distribution. Consumers are seen to give preference to
international brands if asked to choose between an international brand and a national
brand. Consumers regard international brands to be of better quality, more durable
and reliable. Furthermore, they are more price and quality conscious and not very
brand loyal. Local companies need to emphasize on the quality of their products in
advertisements and their advertisements need to be more targeted and up-beat to
attract the younger market segment.[5]
 Dr. S. Subadra (2010) on their study “Consumer Perceptions and Behaviour: A Study
with special reference to Car Owners in Namakkal District” reviewed that the market
is now predominately consumer driver. The focuses shifting for product based
marketing to need based marketing. So it is important to study the consumer
perception and behaviour of the car owners which will give as feedback on how
marketing strategy can be worked. Namakal town in Tamilnadu, which is in the
southern part of India, which progressive and growing market for cars. The simple
random sampling technique was adopted in the study to select the sample
respondents. As the size of the universe is respected, the study has been conducted on
the respondents of all the segments of passenger cars. Cluster analysis has been used
to identify the consumer with similar taste and preference with respect to purchase of
car. This study is concluded that consumer behaviour plays a vital role in marketing
cars and there is more scope for extensive research in this area.[6]
 Usha.V (2007) in her study “A Study on Buying Behaviour of Consumers towards
Instant Food Products in Kolar District” stated that In India, majority of food
consumption is still at home. Nevertheless, out-of-home food consumption is
increasing due to increase in urbanization, breaking up of the traditional joint family
system, desire for quality, time which translates into an increased need for
convenience, increasing number of working women, rise in per capita income,
changing lifestyles and increasing level of affluence in the middle income group had
brought about changes in food habits. Hence, Instant Food Products came into light,
which originated in Japan with Instant noodles and had its beginning in India in 80’s,
are found today in the kitchen shelves of every Indian household. The advancement of
science and technology offered the people new foods processing vessels, equipment
and tools but still people were in search of new techniques to speed up the cooking
process in order to cope up with mechanical life, as they do not have sufficient time to
cook food in the conventional methods. Capitalizing this situation, business houses
ranging from small time manufactures to multinational corporations have started
innovating and commercializing “easy to cook food items” like noodles, vermicelli,
gulab jamun, instant idli, vada, dosa mix etc. that are otherwise called instant. The
instant food products are not only easy to cook but also have a significant role and
place in the celebration of the family functions and religious functions of the people.[7]

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2.2 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

This project is based on the comparative study consumer behavior towards Nestle
andCadbury chocolates. Objectives of the study are:
1.TO IDENTIFY CONSUMER PREFERENCES AND THE REASON BEHIND IT.
2.TO KNOW THE CUSTOMER SATISFACTION LEVEL ASSOCIATED WITH
THE PRODUCT.
3.TO KNOW THE CATEGORY OF THE CHOCOLATE THAT CONSUMERS
PREFER THE MOST AND TO DETERMINE THE REASONS AFFECTING THE
CHOICE OF THE PRODUCT.
4.CONSUMERS VIEW TOWARDS THE CHOCOLATE.
5.TO KNOW THE FACTORS AFFECTING THE CONSUMPTION PATTERN OF
CHOCOLATE AMONG THE PEOPLE.

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CHAPTER 3-ORGANISATION OVERVIEW

3.1 NESTLE INDIA


A)Company Profile:

Nestle’ India is a subsidiary of Nestle’ S.A. of Switzerland. With seven factories and a large
number of co-packers, Nestle India is a vibrant company that provides consumer in India
with products of global standard and is committed to long-term sustainable growth and
shareholder satisfaction.

The company insists on honesty, integrity and fairness in all aspects of its business and
expects the same in its relationships. This has earned them trust and respect of every strata of
the society that it comes in contact with and is acknowledged amongst India’s “ Most
Respected Companies” and amongst the “Top Wealth Creators of India”.

B) History

Nestlé was founded in 1867 on the shores of Lake Geneva in Vevey, Switzerland and its first
product was “Farine Lactée Nestlé”, an infant cereal specially formulated by Henri Nestlé to
provide and improve infant nutrition. From its first historic merger with the Anglo-Swiss
Condensed Milk Company in 1905, Nestlé has grown to become the world’s largest and most
diversified food Company, and is about twice the size of its nearest competitor in the food
and beverages sector.

Nestlé’s trademark of birds in a nest, derived from Henri Nestlé’s personal coat of arms,
evokes the values upon which he founded his Company. Namely, the values of security,
maternity and affection, nature and nourishment, family and tradition. Today, it is not only
the central element of Nestlé’s corporate identity but serves to define the Company’s
products, responsibilities, business practices, ethics and goals.

In 2004, Nestlé had around 247,000 employees worldwide, operated 500 factories in approx.
100 countries and offered over 8,000 products to millions of consumers universally. The
Company’s transparent business practices, pioneering environment policy and respect for the
fundamental values of different cultures have earned it an enviable place in the countries it
operates in. Nestlé’s activities contribute to and nurture the sustainable economic
development of people, communities and nations.

Nestlé’s relationship with India dates back to 1912, when it began trading as The Nestlé
Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company (Export) Limited, importing and selling finished
products in the Indian market.

C) Operation

Nestlé has been a partner in India's growth for over nine decades now and has built a very
special relationship of trust and commitment with the people of India. The Company's
activities in India have facilitated direct and indirect employment and provides livelihood to

17
about one million people including farmers, suppliers of packaging materials, services and
other goods.

The Company continuously focuses its efforts to better understand the changing lifestyles of
India and anticipate consumer needs in order to provide Taste, Nutrition, Health and
Wellness through its product offerings. The culture of innovation and renovation within the
Company and access to the Nestlé Group's proprietary technology/Brands expertise and the
extensive centralized Research and Development facilities gives it a distinct advantage in
these efforts. It helps the Company to create value that can be sustained over the long term by
offering consumers a wide variety of high quality, safe food products at affordable prices.

Nestle India manufactures products of truly international quality under internationally famous
brand names such as NESCAFE, MAGGI,MILKYBAR,KIT-KAT,BAR-ONE,MILKMAID,
and NESTEA in recent years the company also introduced products of daily consumption
and use such as NESTLE MILK, NESTLE SLIM MILK, NESTLE FRESH ‘N’ NATURAL
DAHI, and NESTLE JEERA RAITA. Nestle India is a responsible organization and
facilitates initiatives that help to improve the quality of life in the communities where it
operates.

D) Presence in India

Beginning with its first investment in Moga in 1961, Nestlé’s regular and substantial
investments established that it was here to stay. In 1967, Nestlé set up its next factory at
Choladi (Tamil Nadu) as a pilot plant to process the tea grown in the area into soluble tea.
The Nanjangud factory (Karnataka), became operational in 1989, the Samalkha
factory(Haryana), in 1993 and in 1995 and 1997, Nestlé commissioned two factories in Goa
at Ponda and Bicholim respectively. Nestlé India is now putting up the 7th factory at Pant
Nagar in Uttarakhand.

E) Brands

 MILK PRODUCTS AND NUTRITION


1. EVERYDAY DAIRY WHITENER
2. EVERYDAY GHEE
3. MILK
4. SLIM MILK
5. FRESH ‘N’ NATURAL DAHI
6. FRESH ‘N’ NATURAL SLIM DAHI
7. JEERA RAITA
8. MILK MAID FRUIT YOGHURT
9. MILKMAID
10. MILKMAID FUNSHAKES
11. NIDO
 BEVERAGES
1. NESCAFE CLASSIC
2. SUNRISE PREMIUM

18
3. SUNRISE SPECIAL
4. CAPPUCCINO
5. ICED TEA WITH GREEN TEA
6. NESTEA ICED TEA

 PREPARED DISHES AND COOKING AIDS


1. MAGGI 2 MINUTE NOODLES
2. VEG ATTA NOODELS
3. RICE NOODLES MANIA
4. CUPPA MANIA
5. SAUCES
6. PICHKOO
7. PIZZA MAZZA
8. MAGI CUBES
9. BHUNA MASALA
10. COCONUT MILK POWDER
11. HEALTHY SOUPS
 CHOCOLATES AND CONFECTIONARY
1. KIT-KAT
2. KIT-KAT CHUNKY
3. MUNCH
4. MUNCH POP CHOC
5. MILKYBAR
6. MILKYBAR CHOO
7. BAR-0NE
8. MILK CHOCOLATE
9. POLO

F) NESTLE AND COMMUNITY

NESTLE India has always focused on longterm,sustainable and profitable growth and helped
communities around its factories to improve their quality of life in a similar manner. Nestle
Agricultural Services has used the experience gained by Nestle across the world to setup a
system of direct and efficient contact with the farmers. Company veterinarians and
agronomist supervise the milk routes and advice farmers on various issues including proper
feed for the herds. Milk storage facilities have been set up close to the farmers. Veterinary
services are provided free, and medicines provided at wholesale cost. The company assits
farmers in artificial insemination programs for their cattle, provides subsidy and helps them
in procuring loans.

19
3.2 CADBURY INDIA
A)COMPANY PROFILE

In 1948, Cadbury India began its operations in India by importing chocolates. On 19 July
1948, Cadbury was incorporated in India. It now has manufacturing facilities in Thane, Induri
(Pune) and Malanpur (Gwalior), Hyderabad, Bangalore and Baddi (Himachal Pradesh) and
sales offices in New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata and Chennai. The corporate head office is
in Mumbai. The head office is presently situated at Pedder Road, Mumbai, under the name of
"Cadbury House". This monumental structure at Pedder Road has been a landmark for the
citizens of Mumbai since its creation. Since 1965 Cadbury has also pioneered the
development of cocoa cultivation in India. For over two decades, Cadbury has worked with
the Kerala Agricultural University to undertake cocoa research.

Currently, Cadbury India operates in five categories – Chocolate confectionery, Beverages,


Biscuits, Gum and Candy. Its products include Cadbury Dairy Milk, Dairy Milk
Silk, Bournville, 5-Star, Temptations, Perk, Eclairs, Bournvita, Celebrations, Gems,
Bubbaloo, Cadbury Dairy Milk Shots, Toblerone, Halls, Bilkul, Tang, and Oreo.
It is the market leader in the chocolate confectionery business with a market share of over
70percent the highest Cadbury brand share in the world! . On 21 April 2014, Cadbury India
changed its name to Mondelez India Foods Limited. In 2017, Cadbury/ Mondelez agreed to
pay a $13 million FCPA penalty for making illicit payments to government officials to obtain
licences and approvals to build a factory in Baddi.
Their flagship brand Cadbury Dairy Milk is considered the "gold standard" for chocolates in
India. The pure taste of CDM defines the chocolate taste for the Indian consumer. In the Milk
Food drinks segment their main product is Bournvita - the leading Malted Food Drink (MFD)
in the country. Similarly in the medicated candy category Halls is the undisputed leader.
The Cadbury India Brand Strategy has received consistent support through simple but
imaginative extensions to product categories and distribution. A good example of this is the
development of Bytes. Crispy wafers filled with coca cream in the form of a bagged snack,
Bytes is positioned as "The new concept of sweet snacking". It delivers the taste of chocolate
in the form of a light snack, and thus heralds the entry of Cadbury India in to the growing
bagged Snack Market, which has been dominated until now by Salted Bagged Snack Brands.
Byte was first launched in South India in 2003.
Since 1965 Cadbury has also pioneered the development of cocoa cultivation in India. For
over two decades, it has worked with the Kerala Agriculture University to under take cocoa
research and released clones, hybrids that improve the cocoa yield. Today, Cadbury is poised
in its leap towards quantum growth and new categories of business, namely gums, mints,
snacking and gifting It is a part of the Cadbury Schweppes Group, world's No.1
Confectionery Company.
B) CADBURY WORLD WIDE
Cadbury is the world's largest confectionery company and have a strong regional presence in
beverages in the Americas and Australia. With origins stretching back over 200years, today
their products -which include brands such as Cadbury, Schweppes, Halls, Trident, Dr Pepper,
Snapple, Trebor , Dentyne, Bubblicious and Bassett - are enjoyed in almost every
country around the world.

20
We employ around 60,000 people.Their heritage starts back in 1783 when Jacob Schweppes
perfected his process for manufacturing carbonated mineral water in Geneva, Switzerland.
And in 1824 John Cadbury opened in Birmingham selling cocoa and chocolate.
These two great household names merged in 1969 to form Cadbury Schweppes plc. Since
then they have expanded their business throughout the world by a programme of organic and
acquisition led growth.

Concentrating on their core brands in beverages and confectionery since the 1980s, they have
strengthened their portfolio through almost fifty acquisitions, including brand icons such as
Mott's, Canada Dry, Halls, Trident, Dentyne, Bubblicious, Trebor, Bassett, Dr Pepper, 7 Up
and Snapple.
It employs 60,000 people in over 200 countries
- Worlds No 1 Confectionery company
- World's No 2 Gums company
- World's No 3 beverage company.

C) BRANDS

 SNACKS
1.BYTES

 BEVERAGES
1.BOURNVITA

 CANDY
1.HALLS

 CHOCOLATES
1. DAIRY MILK
2. PERK
3. 5 STAR
4. CELEBRATION
5. TEMPTATION
6. ECLAIRS
7. GEMS.

21
CHAPTER 4- RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

After the detailed study, an attempt has been made to present comprehensive analysis of
consumption of Cadbury and nestle chocolates consumed by the people. The data had been
used to cover various aspects like consumption, consumer’s preference and customer’s
satisfaction regarding Cadbury and Nestle chocolates. In collecting requisite data and
information regarding the topic elected a questionnaire was formed and responses where
recorded accordingly.
4.1 RESEARCH DESIGN
For the purpose of the research, Convenience sampling was used. Convenience sampling is a
method of Non-probability sampling where the researcher selects the most accessible
members to interview and obtain information. Off all sampling types, convenience sampling
is the least time consuming and inexpensive method.

4.2 SAMPLE SIZE


A total of 100 respondents where reached in order to collect primary data for the study.

4.3 TYPE OF RESPONDENTS


For this research children, teenagers, youngsters and even adults were approached for their
feedbacks.

4.4 METHOD OF DATA COLLECTION


The data has been collected through PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES.
PRIMARY DATA has been collected through questionnaires sent to the target people or
sample.
SECONDARY DATA has been collected by the following sources:
 Company’s official websites
 Published research papers and articles
 Other websites like academia.edu, scribd, shodhganga etc.

4.5 RESEARCH INSTRUMENT


The research is carried out through self-administered questionnaire. The question included
where open ended and offered multiple choices.

4.6 SAMPLING FRAME


The sampling frame is restricted to Kolkata region.

4.7 SAMPLING UNIT


The sampling unit are individuals between the age group of 5-45 years.

4.8 TENURE OF RESEARCH


The tenure of my research was for about 10-12 days.

4.9 STATISTICAL TOOLS USED


The tools used for the analysis in this research study are:
 PIE CHARTS.
 BAR GRAPHS.
 PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS.
22
CHAPTER 5- DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

5.1GENDER

GRAPH-1 AND TABLE-1

NO OF
GENDER SL.NO GENDER RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1 MALE 39 39%
39% 2 FEMALE 61 61%
MALE TOTAL 100 100%
61%
FEMALE

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-1 and TABLE-1 it is concluded that I have surveyed


100 respondents out of which 39 are male and 61 are female.

5.2 AGE

GRAPH-2 AND TABLE-2


NO OF
AGE SL.NO AGE RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
1 BETWEEN 5-14 12 12%
BETWEEN 5-
2 BETWEEN 15-30 60 60%
4% 12% 14
3 BETWEEN 31-45 24 24%
24% BETWEEN 15- 4 ABOVE 45 4 4%
30
TOTAL 100 100%
60%
BETWEEN 31-
45
ABOVE 45

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-2 and TABLE-2 it is concluded that I have surveyed


100 respondents out of which
 12 belongs to age group between 5-14.
 60 belongs to age group between 15-30.
 24 belongs to age group between 31-45.
 4 belongs to age group above 45.

Therefore we can conclude that the myth that we used to hve that chocolate are meant for
children only as false because the maxium number of respondents almost 84% belong to the
tennage and adolescence group i.e. age group between 15-30 and 31-45.

23
5.3 BRAND PREFERENCE
GRAPH-3 AND TABLE-3

PREFERENCE OF BRAND
3% NO OF
1%
BRANDS RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
24% CADBURY CADBURY 72 72%
NESTLE NESTLE 24 24%
72% AMUL 3 3%
AMUL
CANDYMAN 1 1%
CANDYMAN TOTAL 100 100%

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-3 and TABLE-3


There are many brands available in the market. But the market leaders in India are Cadbury
and Nestle. According to survey –
 72 of the respondents prefer Cadbury brand of chocolate.
 24 of the respondents prefer Nestle brand of chocolate.
 3 of the respondents prefer Amul brand of chocolate.
 1 of the respondents prefer Candyman brand of chocolate.
There are many brands available in the market. But the market leaders in India are basically
two brands like Cadbury & Nestle. According to survey 72% of the market is captured by the
Cadbury and only 24% of the market is covered by the Nestle. To capture the market the
company should do more advertising and sales distribution. And also should maintain quality
of the product compare to the competitors.

5.4 PREFERENCE OF DIFFERENT BRANDS OF CADBURY


GRAPH-4 AND TABLE-4

CADBURY
6% 3% NO OF
SUB-BRANDS RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
14% DAIRY MILK DAIRY MILK 50 69%
8% 5 STAR 5 STAR 6 8%
69% PERK PERK 10 14%
CELEBRATION 4 6%
CELEBRATION
TEMPTATION 2 3%
TEMPTATION TOTAL 72 100%

INTERPRETATION:As per GRAPH-4 and TABLE-4 analysis of given sample of 72


respondents who eat Cadbury chocolates it is concluded that –

The sub-brand of the Cadbury is dairy milk, 5 star, perk, celebration and Temptation and
their consumption are like dairy milk 69%, 5 star 8%, perk 14%, celebration 6% and
Temptation 3%. According to the survey highest selling product is Cadbury dairy milk.

24
5.5 PREFERENCE OF DIFFERENT BRANDS OF NESTLE
GRAPH-5 AND TABLE-5

0%
NESTLE NO OF
SUB-BRANDS RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
0%
KIT-KAT 14 58.33%
8% KIT-KAT
MUNCH 8 33.33%
33% MUNCH
59%
MILKY-BAR 2 8.33%
MILKY-BAR BAR-ONE 0 -
BAR-ONE MILK-
MILK-CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE 0 -
TOTAL 24 100%

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-5 AND TABLE-5 analysis of given sample of 26


respondents who eat Nestle chocolates it is concluded that –
 14 of the respondents have preferred Kit Kat Chocolate more.
 8 of the respondents have preferred Munch Chocolate more.
 2 of the respondents have preferred Milky Bar Chocolate.
In this survey nestle it is seen that netsle five sub-brands like kit kat, Munch, Milky bar, Bar
one,milk chocolates and their consumption are like kit kat 58.33% ,munch 33.33% ,milky bar
8.33% . Its also seen that nestle doesn’t have any customer for two of its products bar-one
and milk chocolate.

5.6 FREQUENCY OF CONSUMPTION


GRAPH-6 AND TABLE-6
OPTIONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
ALWAYS 30 30%
SOME TIMES 42 42%
WHEN IM
SAD/DEPRESSED 7 7%
WHEN HAPPY 21 21%
NEVER 0 0%
TOTAL 100 100%

25
FREQUENCY OF HAVING CHOCOLATE
0%

21% 30% ALWAYS


7% SOME TIMES
WHEN IM SAD/DEPRESSED

42% WHEN HAPPY


NEVER

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-6 AND TABLE-6 it is concluded that –


 30 of the respondents eat chocolates always.
 42 of the respondents eat chocolates sometimes.
 7 of the respondents eat chocolates when they are sad o depressed.
 21 of the respondents eat chocolates when they are happy.
 0 of the respondents eat chocolates never.
According to the data there is no such person who doesn’t consumes or likes chocolate and
only 7% people have chocolates when they are depressed or sad.

5.7 SOURCE OF PURCHASING CHOCOLATES


GRAPH-7 AND TABLE-7

SOURCE NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE


RETAIL STORE 80 80%
SUPER MARKET 10 10%
DEPARTMENTAL STORE 9 9%
OTHERS(PAN DUKAN) 1 1%
TOTAL 100 100%

SOURCE
9% 1%
10%
RETAIL STORE
SUPER MARKET
80% DEPARTMENTAL STORE
OTHERS(PAN DUKAN)

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-7 AND TABLE-7 it is concluded that –


 80 0f the respondents buy from retail store.

26
 10 of the respondents buy from super market.
 9 of the respondents buy from departmental store.
 1 of the respondent buy from another source like pan dukan.

5.8 FORM OF CHOCOLATE


GRAPH-8 AND TABLE-8

FORM OF CHOCOLATE
NO OF
OPTION RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
12% 21% HARD
HARD 21 21%
NUTTIES NUTTIES 30 30%
37%
30% CRUNCHY CRUNCHY 37 37%
CHEWY CHEWY 12 12%
TOTAL 100 100%

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-8 AND TABLE-8


Every person have their own taste and preferences towards the eatable product in
chocolates .There are four varieties availabl e in the market among this 21% of the
consumer like hard chocolates, 30% of the consumer like nutties chocolates, 37%of the
consumer like crunchy chocolates & only 12% of the consumer like Chewy chocolates.

5.9 SIZE OF PACK


GRAPH-9 AND TABLE-9
OPTION NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
SMALL 16 16%
MEDIUM 60 60%
BIG 11 11%
FAMILY PACK 13 13%
TOTAL 100 100%

SIZE OF PACK

13% 16% SMALL


11%
MEDIUM
BIG
60% FAMILY PACK

INTERPRETATION: The chocolates are available in the market in different packaging like
small, medium, big, &family pack. From the survey we can say that the consumption of the
chocolates are more eaten by the teenage group and adults so they more prefer the medium

27
packaging because of its availability in market and most important thing is its very much
affordable.
As per GRAPH-9 AND TABLE-9 16% are using small pack, 60% are using medium pack of
the chocolates, 11% buy big pack,13% are consuming family pack because of its high price.
So we can easily see that the consumption of medium pack is having boom in the market
compare to other packaging. Parents basically make their kids buy small packs tso that they
don’t suffer from cavity problem, therefor this 16% small pack users are indicated to those
kind od consumers.

5.10 IMPORTANCE GIVEN TO VARIOUS FACTORS WHILE


PURCHASING CHOCOLATE
GRAPH-10 AND TABLE-10

IMPORTANCE OF FACTORS
VERY IMPORTANT IMPORTANT LEAST IMPORTANT
92 89
78
69

11 16 17 14
8 6
0 0

FLAVOUR QUALITY PRICE PACKAGING

VERY LEAST
SL.NO FACTORS IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT
1 FLAVOUR/TASTE 92 8 0
2 PRICE 78 16 6
3 QUALITY 89 11 0
4 PACKAGING 69 17 14
INTERPRETATION:
Whenever we are consuming any food product our main focus remains on the quality and
flavor in India there is more concentrating on the flavor of product rather than other
parameters of the product.In this survey I found that the basic concentration of the consumer
is on taste or flavour. As per GRAPH-10 AND TABLE-10 92% says that they purchase if
they like the taste of the product. If taste is good than price does not matter. 89% of the
consumer says that if they are getting best quality product at nominal price than the
packaging is least important. 89% says that they are mainly seeing the quality of the product
if the product is qualitative than they are ready
to pay any price for that product. Packaging compared to other factors are not considered so
much important factor while purchasing a chocolate.

28
5.11.SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS CADBURY
GRAPH-11 AND TABLE-11

NOT
FACTORS SATISFIED NORMAL SATISFIED TOTAL
FLAVOUR 66.67% 26.67% 6.67% 100.00%
QUALITY 67.78% 25.56% 6.67% 100.00%
PRICE 55.56% 34.44% 10.00% 100.00%
PACKAGING 52.22% 35.56% 12.22% 100.00%

CADBURY
NOT SATISFIED NORMAL SATISFIED

12.22%
PACKAGING 35.56%
52.22%
10.00%
PRICE 34.44%
55.56%
6.67%
QUALITY 25.56%
67.78%
6.67%
FLAVOUR 26.67%
66.67%

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-11 AND TABLE-11 it is concluded that –


1. In flavor/taste, 66.67% are satisfied and 26.67% are normal.
2. In price, 55.56% are satisfied, 34.44% are normal.
3. In quality, 67.78% are satisfied, 25.56% are normal.
4. In packaging, 52.22% are satisfied, 35.56% are normal.
Therefore, from the analysis conducted majority of the consumers are satisfied with the
product and some are not satisfied. Therefore in order to satisfy the non-satisfied consumers
the company can try to enhance its product features.

5.12 SATISFACTION LEVEL TOWARDS NESTLE


GRAPH-12 AND TABLE-12

FACTORS SATISFIED NORMAL NOT SATISFIED TOTAL


FLAVOUR 33.87% 50.00% 16.13% 100%
QUALITY 33.87% 50.00% 16.13% 100%
PRICE 32% 48% 19% 100%
PACKAGING 31% 50% 19% 100%

29
NESTLE
NOT SATISFIED NORMAL SATISFIED

19%
PACKAGING 50%
31%
19%
PRICE 48%
32%
16.13%
QUALITY 50.00%
33.87%
16.13%
FLAVOUR 50.00%
33.87%

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-12 AND TABLE-12 it is concluded that – In


flavor/taste, 16.13% are satisfied and 50% are normal. In price, 32% are satisfied, 48% are
normal and 19% are not satisfied. In quality, 33.87% are satisfied and 50% are normal. In
packaging, 50% are normal and 19% are not satisfied. Therefore, from the analysis conducted
50% of the consumers feel that the brand Nestle is normal in terms of different parameters
which shows that the company is not able to attract consumers towards its product therefore it
should concentrate on the major 4P’s of marketing to remain in the market. Only 30% of the
people are satisfied with the product.

5.13 FACTORS INFLUENCING PURCHASE


GRAPH-13 AND TABLE-13

FACTORS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE


ADVERTISEMENT 60 60.00%
ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY 20 20.00%
BRAND AMBASSADORS 4 4.00%
SUUGESTION FROM
FRIENDS 10 10.00%
DOCTORS ADVICE 0 0.00%
INGREDIENTS 6 6.00%
TOTAL 100 100%

30
FACTORS INFLUENCING PURCHASE
ADVERTISEMENT
0%

4% 10% 6% ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY

BRAND AMBASSADORS
20% 60%
SUUGESTION FROM
FRIENDS
DOCTORS ADVICE

INGREDIENTS

INTERPRETATION: As per GRAPH-13 AND TABLE-13 it is concluded that advertisement


is the best measure to attract customers to purchase more. Its impact is much more than other
factors. While suggestion from friends and families and attractive display also play a
significant role in this regard. 60% of the respondents say that advertisement affect their
purchase. 20% of the respondents say that attractive display affects their purchase.10%of the
respondents say that suggestion from friends and families of the chocolates affect their
purchase.

5.14 MEDIA INFLUENCE


GRAPH-14 AND TABLE-14

NO OF
SOURCE RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
TELEVISION 44 44%
NEWSPAPER 9 9%
MAGAZINES 13 13%
HOARDINGS 27 27%
DISPLAY 7 7%

31
SOURCES
NO OF RESPONDENTS

44
27

9 13
7

TELEVISION NEWSPAPER MAGAZINES HOARDINGS DISPLAY

INTERPRETATION: In today’s competitive market advertisement is the main tool for


selling the product because every single person is watching or reading the advertisement. So
it becomes easy to make people aware about the product. So companies are using
advertisement media like 67% of the television adds, 7% of the Hoardings, 3% of the
advertisement given on local as well as national newspapers, & 23% are using display ads.

As per GRAPH-14 AND TABLE-14 we can see that television ads affect or influences
44%of the population to go and purchase the products and 27% are affected by the hoardings
that are displayed by the companies along the road sides, back of different transports,
railways etc.

5.15 CONSUMERS BRAND LOYALTY


GRAPH-15 AND TABLE-15

BRAND LOYALTY
ACTION NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE
POSTPONE PURCHASE 7 7%
SWITCH TO ANOTHER
BRAND 10 10%
GO TO ANOTHER SHOP
TO BUY 83 83%
TOTAL 100 100%

BRAND LOYALTY ACTION


7% 10%
POSTPONE
PURCHASE
SWITCH TO
83% ANOTHER BRAND
GO TO ANOTHER
SHOP TO BUY

32
INTERPRETATION: Every person is having there own taste & preferences. Some consumer
are compromising with there taste and preferences and some are not. According to GRAPH-
15 AND TABLE-15 7% of the consumer are postponing the purchase of the product, 10% of
the consumer are switching over to any other product, & 83% will search the product at any
other place and they don’t compromise for the same.

5.16 PROMOTIONAL OFFERS


GRAPH-16 AND TABLE-16

PROMOTIONAL OFFERS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE


PRICE OFFERS 30 30%
BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 56 56%
GIFT OFFERS 14 14%
TOTAL 100 100%

PROMOTIONAL OFFERS

14% 30%
PRICE OFFERS
BUY 1 GET 1 FREE
56%
GIFT OFFERS

INTERPRETATION: To sell out the product there are many promotions activity conducted
by the company to face the competition. The offer given by the company are like free gift,
price offer, or buy 1 get 1 free. As per GRAPH-16 AND TABLE-16 In this 14% are attracted
by the free gift offer (scratch the card scheme), 30% are directly attracted by the price offer,
and 56% are attracted by the buy one get one free offer.
Therefore we can conclude that these promotional offers help the company to attract more
and more consumers towards it and create and enhance a good brand image for the company.

5.17 REASONS FOR CONTINUING THE BRAND


GRAPH-17 AND TABLE-17

REASONS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE


QUALITY 17 17%
PRICE 10 10%
TASTE/FLAVOUR 62 62%
PACKAGING 8 8%
INGREDIENTS 3 3%
TOTAL 100 100%

33
REASONS
3%

8% 17% QUALITY
10% PRICE
TASTE/FLAVOUR
62% PACKAGING
INGREDIENTS

INTERPRETATION:

1. As per GRAPH-17 AND TABLE-17 it is concluded that 62 respondents continue the


brand because of its flavour and 17 for its quality.
2. We can see after conducting the analysis that the price packaging or ingredients are not
considered so important factor by many respondents as the basis for continuing the same
brand.

34
CHAPTER 6- FINDINGS

PRODUCT RESEARCH

Under product research I came to know about the modification the consumers need in terms
of quality, flavour, packing, quantity etc.

ADVERTISING RESEARCH

Under this I have concluded that whether the advertisement appeals the consumers or not.

CONSUMER RESEARCH

Consumer research deals with consumer and their problems and solution to the problems. In this we
came to know about the consumers need and expectation levels regarding products and ascertainable
levels of consumer satisfaction.

MAJOR FINDINGS ARE:

1. Consumers are brand conscious and they prefer branded chocolates more than the
local once.(FROM ANALYSIS-3,AND INTERPRETATION-3)
2. By doing the comparative analysis of Cadbury and Nestle chocolate we can say
that the most preferred brand of chocolate in today’s date is Cadbury.(FROM
ANALYSIS-3, AND INTERPRETATION-3)
3. The market survey shows that CADBURY is dominating over NESTLE in terms
of sales as it has more customers.(FROM ANALYSIS-3,AND
INTERPRETATION-3)
4. Most selling product of CADBURY is DAIRY MILK.(FROM ANALYSIS-4,
AND INTERPRETATION-4)
5. Most selling product of NESTLE is KIT-KAT.(FROM ANALYSIS-5,AND
INTERPRETATION-5)
6. Through the research we have found that consumers are very conscious about the
flavour and quality of the product and they are not ready to compromise with it.
And we also found that both products qualitative.(FROM ANALYSIS-
10,11,12,AND INTERPRETATION-10,11,12)
7. It is seen that people are loyal toward the brand so if any product is not available
to them at a place instead of postponing or switching over to another brand they
would rather go to another place for purchasing it.(FROM ANALYSIS-15 AND
INTERPRETATION-15)
8. From the survey its clear that the consumption of chocolates are not restricted
only to children rather adults are also very fond of chocolates and its also seen

35
that there are no such person who never eats chocolate but yes it can be said that
if a person is sad or depressed then also they have cravings for chocolates to
come out of that state, its not that chocolates can be had only when you are
happy. But majority of the people have chocolates sometimes.(ANALYSIS-2,6
AND INTERPRETATION-2,6)
9. Both the companies most seeling packaging is medium size because of is
affordability and availability.(ANALYSIS-9 AND INTERPRETATION-9)
10. From the survey its also seen that people don’t switch over to another brand so
fastly and the factors that keep them loyal towards the brand is factors like
flavour, quality, price, packaging mainly but there are many more such factors
also.(ANALYSIS-17 AND INTERPRETATION-17)
11. It’s seen from the survey that majority of the people are satisfied with the brand
CADBURY OVER NESTLE in terms of flavour, price, quality etc.(ANALYSIS-
11,12 AND INTERPRETATION-11,12)
12. From the survey its also known that advertisement over televisions and hoardings
by the company are the main source after seeing which the customers go to buy
the product.(ANALYSIS-14 AND INTERPRETATION-14)
13. Its also seen that many promotional offers attract the consumer towards the
product and thereby increase the sale and customer base of the
companies.(ANALYSIS-16 AND INTERPRETATION-16)
14. Advertisement and hoardings are the major source of attracting consumers and
creating awareness about the product.(ANALYSIS-13 AND
INTERPRETATION-13)

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CHAPTER-7 RECOMMENDATIONS

 Companies can possibly concentrate on radio advertisements to create awareness


about their products as through television its always not possible to get the target
customers.(FINDING-14)
 As the consumers are attracted more with promotional offers company’s could think
of some attractive promotional offers especially during the festive
seasons.(FINDING-13)
 Nestle can probably try to take measures to promote its brands like bar-one, milk
chocolate etc as hardly anyone knows about it and this they can do by undertaking
different promotional strategies like providing these products as a free sample with
their most sold out products to make people aware about its product.(FINDING-5)

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CHAPTER-8 LIMITATION OF THE PROJECT

In attempt to make this project authentic and reliable, every possible aspect of the topic was
kept in mind. Nevertheless, despite of fact constraints were at play during the formulation of
this project. The main limitations are as follows-

 Due to limitation of time only few people were selected for the study. So the sample
of consumers was not enough to generalize the findings of the study.
 The main source of data for the study was primary data with the help of self-
administered questionnaires. Hence, the chances of unbiased information are less.
 Study is limited to Kolkata region only.
The chance of biased response can’t be eliminated though all necessary steps were taken to
avoid the same.

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CHAPTER 9- CONCLUSION

On the basis of analysis it is clear that Consumer’s taste and preferences are increasing
towards CADBURY branded products.

Due to sincereity and responsiveness, people have to become aware for the quality. The study
shows that if best quality and tasteful thing is provided price doesn’t affect so much to the
customers. Company should provide qualitative product to its customers.

Today the nation is passing through a phase of rapid transformation. Two forces are mostly
responsible for these type of drastic changes they are; explosive growth of trade and
international competition and other forces like technological changes. This new era has
witnessed remarkable advancement in the availability of information and a number of large
companies operation in such market where the principal of natural selection lead to the
survival of the fittest.

These two companies NESTLE and CADBURY have to improve a lot by providing new
range of chocolates, attaractive packaging and better promotional offers to withstand
international competition.

39
CITATION

1.
Dr.Shendge (2012) “A Comparative Study of Consumer Preference towards Cadbury
and Nestle Chocolates with Special Reference to Navi Peth Area in Solapur City”
Solapur University, Solapur.
2.
Chakraborty,(2010) “A study of selected discount stores retail in Hyderabad for the
purpose of identifying the factors in regards to shopping motives, store attributes,
shopping outcomes and perceived shopping cost”, International journal of global
business, 2010,3(1), P.P. No.1-19.
3.
Prof. R.C.S. Rajpurohit and Dr. M.L. Vasita (2011) “ Consumer Prefernce and
Satisfaction towards various mobile phone service providers an exploratory study in
Jodhpur city, Rajasthan” Gurukul Business Review(GBR) ISSN: 0973-1466,
Vol.7,pp. 1-11.
4.
Mathur Anil (2001) “A study of changes in Brand preference” Asia Pacific Advances
in consumer research, volume 4, pages 133-139.
5.
Kanwal Attiya (2011) “Consumer preference of International brands over local
brands” Field research U.P. Technical University, Lucknow.
6.
Dr. Subadra, (2010)“Consumer Perception and Behaviour. A study with special
reference to Car Owners in Namakal District” Sri Krishna International research &
Educational consortium. http://www.skirec.com ISSN 2229- 4104, Volume 1, issue 3.
7.
Usha.V (2007) “A Study on Buying Behaviour of Consumers towards Instant Food
Products in Kolar District” University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad-580 005.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

 WWW.NESTLE.IN
 WWW.CADBURYINDIA.IN
 WWW.WIKIPEDIA.ORG
 WWW.INDIANMIRROR.COM
 WWW.CHOCOLATEMONTHCLUB.COM
 http://companies-profiles.blogspot.com/2009/08/nestle-india.html
 WWW.BUSINESS.MAPSOFINDIA.COM
 WWW.SHODGANGA.IN
 WWW.SCRIBD.COM
 WWW.RESEARCHGATE.NET
 http://shodhganga.inflibnet.ac.in/bitstream/10603/44539/7/07_chapter%202.pdf
 http://www.indianmirror.com/indian-industries/chocolate.html

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ANNEXURE

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