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LEADERSHIP

DEVELOPMENT
Outcomes & Evidence
Progress Inventory*
MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES
Center for Student Leadership Development
Memorial Union
University of Rhode Island

Name: Jacqualine Cerbone


Date Enrolled: January 2019
Date of Graduation: May 2022

*The Outcomes & Evidence Progress Inventory is the intellectual property of the Center for Student Leadership Development (CSLD)
at the University of Rhode Island and cannot be reproduced in part, or in its entirety, without the written permission of the acting
Assistant Director of the CSLD.

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 1


CONTENTS
ABOUT THE MINOR & CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (information included)
• Center for Student Leadership Development Information
• Minor Information
• Developmental Model

ADVISING INFORMATION (students will include own documentation)


• Tracking Sheet / Advising Updates
• Syllabi of Minor Classes (Core and Electives)
• Internship
o Guidelines
o Syllabus
o Mid-term
o Final

OUTCOMES
• Outcomes (Self-Leadership, Interpersonal and Organizational, Leadership Theories, Inclusive Leadership,
Critical Thinking)
• Targeted Classes
• Experiences
• Evidence

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CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
Office: Memorial Union Room 210 Phone: (401) 874-2726 Fax: (401) 874-5317

CSLD Mission Statement


To enhance the mission of the University of Rhode Island, The Center for Student Leadership Development aims to:
• Provide developmental opportunities for all students to become informed, inclusive, effective, and ethical leaders in the global marketplace through the implementation of
learner-centered academic, experiential, and co-curricular programming.
• Engage in research, assessment, and advancement in order to positively impact the expanding field of leadership studies.

CSLD Vision Statement


The URI Center for Student Leadership Development will promote dynamic strengths-based leadership development through multiple delivery methods to prepare students to be
competitive in the work place and global marketplace. The CSLD seeks to progress as innovators for experiential engagement and enriching assessment.

CSLD Values Statement


Grounded in the Social Change Model of Leadership Development (Higher Education Research Institute), Relational Leadership Model (Komives, Lucas, & McMahon), and Servant
Leadership (Greenleaf), the URI Center for Student Leadership Development values:
• Engaged and experiential learning through a constructivist approach
• Inclusion, Social Justice, and Civic Engagement
• Ethical and Value-based Leadership & Relationship Building
• Innovative Assessment and Presentation Models

MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES


At URI, we are among only a handful of colleges and universities across the country that offers a Minor in Leadership Studies and one that is customized for each student. We
utilize a cross-disciplinary approach to leadership education designed to complement your academic studies. All courses utilize a variety of teaching methods but ultimately include
some form of experiential learning, practical application, and reflective learning. Employers, now more than ever, are seeking candidates with exceptional skills in the areas of
interpersonal and group management, problem solving, critical thinking and effective communication. We can help with all of the above.

GENERAL INFORMATION
• Regardless of your major, you can minor in Leadership Studies.
• Requirements may be satisfied by completing 18 or more credits related to leadership and offered by more than one department.
• Twelve (12) of the 18 credits must be at the 200 level of instruction or above. A course grade of “C” or better must be earned in each graded course. At least 12 of the credits
must be earned at URI.
• No course may be used to apply to both the major and minor fields of study. Courses in General Education or for other minors may be used for the minor* (*this does not
apply to students in the College of Business). With the exception of internship credit, all courses for the minor must be taken for a grade. The Introductory class must be taken
before the internship and the capstone course.
• Application for the minor must be filed in your academic dean’s office no later than the beginning of the final semester or term.
• Approval of the minor does not guarantee that the suggested courses will be available to you on a schedule correlated with your graduation plans nor guarantee space in any
required course.
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CORE REQUIREMENTS- 9 Credits
Required Element Class options Notes
Introductory Course HDF 190: FLITE Only offered in spring for first-year students
3 credits or
HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues Offered Fall and Spring for sophomores & juniors

Internship HDF 417: Leadership Internship Requires 40 hours/credit with a min. of 80 hours & a max. of 120 hours of documented
3 credits or internship experience for graded credit
Experience through Office of Experiential Learning & Community Engagement
or
Internship Class in Academic Major The only time the major and minor can overlap

Capstone HDF 412: Historical, Multi-ethnic & Alternative Leadership Offered only in the fall with preference given to seniors
3 credits or
COM 402: Leadership & Motivation Offered in the spring and summer with Dr. Leatham
or
BUS 441: Leadership Skills Development Offered in the fall and spring with Dr. Cooper
or
HPR 411/412: Honors Senior Seminar Must be in Honors or have GPA of 3.3

Portfolio HDF 492: Leadership Minor Portfolio Taken last spring semester of enrollment (some exceptions)
1 credit

MINOR ELECTIVES-9 credits


*Additional classes may be appropriate and therefore added to the list; see CSLD for the most updated list or bring a class that you think should be an elective

AAF 300: Civil Rights Movement in the US COM 402: Leadership and Motivation (capstone option) HDF 416: Leadership in Organizations
BUS 341: Organizational Behavior COM 407: Political Communication HDF 417: Leadership Minor Internship
BUS 342: Human Resource Management COM 415: The Ethics of Persuasion HDF 437: Law & Families in the U.S.
BUS 441: Leadership & Motivation (capstone option) COM 421: Advanced Interpersonal Communication HDF 450: Introduction to Counseling
BUS 443: Organizational Design & Change COM 422: Communication and Conflict HPR 118: Honors Course in Speech Communications
BUS 448: International Dimensions of Business COM 441: Race, Politics and the Media HPR 203: The Prepared Mind
BUS 449: Entrepreneurship COM 450: Organizational Communication HPR 412: Honors Seminar (capstone option)
COM 100: Communication Fundamentals COM 461/462: Managing Cultural Differences in Organizations MSL 101: Introduction to Military Leadership
COM 202: Public Speaking CSV 302: URI Community Service MSL 201: Leadership & Military History
COM 208: Argumentation and Debate GWS 150: Introduction to Women’s Studies MSL 201: Military Skills and History of Warfare
COM 210: Persuasion: The Rhetoric of Influence GWS 310: Race, Class, Sexuality in Women’s Lives MSL 202: Leadership & Team Building
COM 221: Interpersonal Communication GWS 350: International Women’s Issues MSL 301: Leadership & Management
COM 250: Small Group Communication HDF 190: First‐Year Leaders Inspired to Excellence (FLITE) PEX 375: Women in Sport ‐ Contemporary Perspectives
COM 302: Advanced Public Speaking (introductory course option) PHL 212: Ethics
COM 308: Advanced Argumentation HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues (introductory course option) PSC 304: Introduction to Public Administration
COM 322: Gender & Communication HDF 291: Rose Butler Browne Program Peer Mentoring Program PSC 369: Legislative Process and Public Policy
COM 351: Oral Comm. in Business & the Professions HDF 412: Historical, Multi‐Ethnic, & Alternative Leadership PSC 504: Ethics in Public Administration
COM 361: Intercultural Communication (capstone option) SOC300/WMS350: Women and Work
COM 383: Rhetorical Theory HDF 413: Student Organization Leadership Consulting THE 221: Stage Management
COM 385: Communication and Social Influence HDF 414: Leadership for Activism and Social Change THE 341: Theater Management
HDF 415: FLITE Peer Leadership
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BECOMING A POSITIVE LEADER THROUGH DEVELOPMENT & INVOLVEMENT
Wilson, 1998 (URI Memorial Union / Center for Student Leadership Development)
Revised after the publication of Exploring Leadership: for College Students Who Want to Make a Difference by Komives, McMahon and Lucas, 1998.

You need to have your own act together before you can lead others:

2. Lead Yourself

▪ Time management
▪ Organization
1. Know Yourself ▪ Self care
▪ Self discipline
Lead Others ▪ Strengths ▪ Perseverance
▪ Weaknesses ▪ Develop and maintain family,
▪ Values PROGRESS interpersonal, and intimate relationships
▪ Needs ▪ Academic, social, personal goals and
P ▪ Styles objectives
R o Learning
O o Teaching
G o Personality P
R o Membership R
E o Leadership O
S G
RE-EVALUATE R
S
former stages E
as you progress S
4. Develop and Refine
Skills S

▪ Leadership theory and


practice 3. Broaden Your Perspectives…
▪ Communication Understand others
▪ Group Development
▪ Inclusion ▪ Hierarchy of needs
▪ Citizen Activist Skills PROGRESS ▪ Racial, cultural, gender, sexual orientation,
▪ Critical Thinking religious, class, ability, etc. diversity and
▪ Teaching and Programming commonalities
▪ Power, privilege, oppression, liberation;
individual and institutional discrimination

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OUTCOMES
In this section, you will track your progress toward the outcomes. Each class in the minor targets different outcomes; all of the classes list these
outcomes on the syllabi (the words “goals” or “curriculum areas” may be used instead). In many of our classes, the assignments can serve as your
evidence. Periodically, and not less than at the end of each semester, you should update your outcomes progress. In the “additional experiences”
column, name additional classes or experiences that contributed to you becoming proficient in that outcome. As the semesters pass, you will think of
things from recent semesters and semesters further in the past, or people or jobs, etc. in your past that also influenced your progress on that outcome.
Do not let that ambiguity upset you. Reflecting on development is not a linear process, but it does help to reflect often. In the “descriptive notes”
column, share insights about your growth, lack of progress, successes, stumbling blocks, etc. At the end of each section, you need to include evidence
that supports your development toward the outcomes. Copies of papers, grading sheets, evaluation letters—anything that shows that someone has
determined that you have demonstrated proficiency (or not, or are making progress). Make sure to keep electronic copies of all your evidence to
include in your Portfolio.

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Outcome Category: Self-Leadership
Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
1. Student will demonstrate autonomy and a HDF 190 Leadership institute Throughout my time in HDF 190 and at the leadership institute, it was always expressed that it’s
minimized need for approval HDF retreat important to be yourself. Within the leadership minor, they stress the importance of finding yourself
WRT 106 and then being true to who you are. I learned that in HDF 190, to put myself out there and apply for
positions, and not care what others have to say as long as you try your best. I’ve applied this mindset
to my organization and classes on campus. In my WRT 106 class, Introduction to Research Writing,
my professor had allowed us to pick a topic of our choosing. Being that I am interested in criminals
and solving crimes, I unsurprisingly chose to research the criminal mind. At first, my teacher was very
skeptical of my choice and felt that it was not a steady and reliable topic. However, I went with my
instinct and decided that this was the only topic I was truly interested in. I know myself, and I know
when I am forced to write a paper on a topic that doesn’t interest or concern me, I do not produce my
best work. My first assignment regarding this paper, did not go as well as I had hoped. She assigned
me a B+, which was not the grade I was hoping for. She felt my topic was too broad and that I
needed change or tweak my topic. I refused to change my topic, so I decided focusing my topic was
my only option. After putting my mind to it, I was able to produce work I was proud of and work that
she also felt was A material. Although at first, she didn’t believe in my writing skills or topic, I was able
to ignore her critiques and stay true to myself, in regard to who I am as a writer.

Evidence #1- First essay and last essay in WRT 106


2. Student will demonstrate personal, HDF 190 In HDF 190, I completed the Gallup Strength Finder, and discovered my top strength to be achiever.
organizational, and academic examples of As an achiever, I constantly strive for excellence. I find that the harder I push myself the more
self-discipline success I will endure. I always put 100% into everything that I do, whether it be related to my
personal life, to my academics, extracurriculars, or service. I find my achiever strength most relevant
in my academics. For as long as I can remember I have always set goals for myself, regarding my
grades. I keep myself to a standard, and make sure I hold myself up to it. My mindset is that it’s one
thing to not understand something, but it’s another thing to ignore it and not do anything about it. If I
don’t understand something, I don’t let myself sit around, I go to office hours, the academic
enhancement center, or I get together with a group of people, so the subject manner is more easily
understood. I understand the importance of getting things done and getting them done thoroughly. I
know it’s important to be efficient, but I also understand it’s important to put all my effort into
everything I do, for it can only benefit me. I see my achiever strength present in my personal life upon
my arrival at college. I was very eager for a fresh start and was super excited to make friends. I
decided that I should get involved in order to meet people, and I find I had achieved this goal of a
fresh start, for I know many people on campus and I am involved in many organizations. I show my
achiever strength in organizational ways, by creating myself a goals list. I create a list for every day
within the week, and for the week itself. I find it helps me stay on top of everything and achieve all my
given assignments for that given week without overwhelming myself.

Evidence #2- Agenda


3. Student will demonstrate the ability to HDF 190 HDF 190 Retreat During the Leadership Institute and the HDF 190 retreat, my group and I had expressed a lot of
manage emotions emotions and feelings within the group. We discussed personal stories, views, and experiences,
which caused intense and uncomfortable situations. We discussed things like our views on gender,
economic status, and personal beliefs. Although conversations did get intense and emotional, I was
able to manage my emotions and be there for the person sharing the story. I knew I had to create a
non-judgmental environment, so people could feel comfortable in sharing their stories and so that I
could as well. Sharing my feeling was definitely hard at first, because I had to share my feelings with
people whom, at the time, I didn’t really know well yet. However, I was able to get past that and share
things I hadn’t really shared with others before. Yet, although it was scary and nerve-racking, I was
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able to get past those emotions and open up to the group, whom I am now incredibly close with. I feel
that I managed my emotions well, at both the leadership institute and the HDF 190. I feel, that with
my group members, we were able to create an environment where everyone was accepted, and it
gave those a platform to speak out on their past and how it has shaped them into who they are.

Evidence #3- My mosaic from institute


4. Student will demonstrate knowledge of URI 101 In URI 101, we spent an entire class discussing stress management and what we can do to manage
stress management methods our stress. My professor gave us many different techniques such as creating to do lists, releasing
stress my taking a walk or going to the gym, or giving yourself time to unwind. My professor greatly
stressed the importance of giving yourself time to unwind. He explained that it’s not healthy or
beneficial to keep your mind going 24/7. He explained that naps or watching TV for at least 20
minutes, allows your mind to reset and take on the rest of the day. He dictated that if your mind is
constantly going, then it will burn out and you will have a hard time retaining information. I was able to
take my professors advice. I give myself time throughout my day to decompress, whether it be going
to the gyn or chatting with friends after class. Although I don’t destress by napping or watching TV, I
find that going to the gym or hanging out with friends takes my mind of my responsibilities for a short
time and it allows me to relax. My most beneficial stress method would be creating lists. Within my
agenda, I have when all my assignments are due, and each class is color coated. In addition, I create
a list of daily goals and weekly goals. I find this to be extremely beneficial in making sure all my
assignments get done on time and efficiently. The satisfaction of crossing something out when
completing a task, is stress relieving to me.
Being involved in many things on campus, such as being a URI 101 mentor and an orientation
leader, puts a lot of stress on me, for the amount of time commitment both these organizations
withhold. However, being able to track my work and stay on the ball allows me to manage my stress
and be involved in such great organizations, like these.

Evidence #4- To do list


5. Student will demonstrate the ability to URI 101 Orientation Leader Training In URI 101 I learned how to manage stress. My Professor had taught me how to recognize stress and
manage stress then gave me suggestions on how to manage it. I recognize that I am under stress when I have a
drastic mood change or feel that I have a lot of weight on my shoulders. Some suggestions he gave
was making a list, planning out and establishing goals for the day, and giving yourself time to relax for
at least 20 minutes every day. In addition, I learned how to deal with stress through orientation leader
training. We had one training day designated to self-care. Someone had come in and helped us
identify our stressors and then provided us with tricks on how to deal with them. She focused heavily
on breathing. She taught us multiple types of breathing exercising like taking deep breaths or
partaking in the lions breathe. The presenter also allowed us to talk to those around us regarding
what they identify as their stressors and how they cope with stress. This was extremely helpful, for it
was nice to see that everyone is dealing with the same things I am and that there are many different
ways to cope. I chose to cope with stress by exercising, trying to get at least 6 hours of sleep, by
drinking enough water daily, by listening to music, allowing myself to rant/cry when necessary, and
allowing myself to take a break when I deem necessary. Stress is something I deal with daily, since
my work load and extracurricular activities are a lot to handle at times. However, through
presentations like the one I had in URI 101 and in orientation leader training I am able to learn about
stressors that I may not even know surround me and then apply the presenter’s suggestions to better
cope.

Evidence #5 - Orientation self-care test


6. Student will express a personal code of
leadership / membership ethics
7. Student will demonstrate practice of the
personal code of ethics

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8. Student will express a personal values HDF 190 In HDF 190, I completed the VIA character strength finder my top 5 values were determined to be
statement (Sources = VIA, values humor, perseverance, judgement, zest, and honesty. I believe these values make a lot of sense to
clarification exercises, etc.) who I am as a person. Humor shows my ability to see the light side and things and be able to bring a
smile to others on a gray day. In addition, I feel my perseverance and zest speak to my desire to be
successful and to always approach things with 100% effort. I always find myself approaching life with
excitement and energy and never find myself doing things half way, which I feel speaks to my values
of zest and perseverance. In addition, I feel my judgement and honesty strength go hand in hand.
When approaching a situation, I examine the problem from all sides, rather than from one side. I then
approach the same problem with and honest and genuine solution. I think it’s important to not jump to
conclusions, and then when you come to a conclusion to approach it with sincerity and responsibility.
The combination of my values has enabled me to create my personal value statement; I believe that
hard work and honesty are the key to success. This is because success isn’t achieved over night, so
you must be honest with yourself about the challenges you may face in order to achieve true
success.

VIA

Evidence #6 - VIA Results


9. Student will demonstrate practice of the HDF 190 CHM 191 In HDF 190, according to the VIA character strengths quiz, one of my top values is zest. Based on
personal values statement my personal statement, I find that I value zest and honesty and use it in my daily life. My personal
statement is that hard work and honesty are the key to success. I feel I live by this statement with my
desire to be the best student I can possibly be. Last semester, I was in a very intensive and
challenging Chemistry class. The professor expected a lot from first-year students and had a tough
time “dumbing down” the material enough for us to understand it. After taking the first quiz in the
class and getting a grade that I did not deem well enough for me, I was able to honest with myself
and knew that this class would require a lot of work on my end to get the grade I desired. I was able
to push myself to go to office hours, the Academic Enhancement Center, and organize study groups
in order to better understand the material. I would study weeks prior to an exam and did a lot of work
outside of class to ensure I knew the material. My value statement of hard work and honesty leads to
success, was definitely shown within my experiences in this class. Honesty is not simply telling the
truth but being 100% honest with yourself. If I wasn’t honest with myself, I would have never gotten
the grade I had gotten in that class. In addition, I wouldn’t have used my zest value to its full potential.
I fully believe that my values have made a huge impact on me and my life and have caused me to
create my current mindset and allowed me to reach my full potential.

Evidence #7- Second chemistry quiz and last chemistry quiz


10. Student will demonstrate the ability to
lead a project from start to finish (follow-
through)
11. Student will describe goals and objective URI 101 Orientation Leader In URI 101, it was made clear that even though you are a first-year, don’t be afraid to step out of your
statements regarding personal issues, comfort zone and apply for positions that may be deemed “too hard for a first-year to get.” One goal I
career issues, and community issues had for myself was becoming an orientation leader. I applied as a first-year student and I was
nervous, but excited for the interview process. I went through the first-round interview, which was a
group interview. I talked to different people and different tables and participated in a lot of different
activities. Unfortunately, I did not receive the orientation job; instead, I was offered an alternate
position. At first, I was upset, but I was also proud of myself for getting as far as I did in the process,
considering the job is a very competitive job on campus. Yet, a month later I received an emailing
inviting me to join the team. I happily accepted the position and am currently an orientation leader for
the summer of 2019. My goals for being an orientation leader are to create a sense of comfort for my
students. I want them to know that they can come to me whenever they may be struggling or need
advice. I want them to feel comfortable at URI and know that this is their home as much as it is mine.

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Evidence #8- Orientation Leader alternate position email and acceptance letter
12. Student will show evidence of goals and URI 101 Leadership Institute In URI 101, my professor stressed the importance of setting goals and making a game plan to
objectives that were planned and achieve them. I listened to what he had to say and knew that I needed to set goals for myself and
achieved figure out ways I could achieve them in my 4 years. This was also instructed to me at Leadership
Institute. At institute, the peer leaders made it clear to us that it’s important to put yourself out there
when we got back to college. They explained the importance of getting involved, making friends, and
finding your place here. I knew going into institute, I was very interested in leadership positions when
I got to URI. I was very involved in high school and wanted to continue the same trend in college. At
institute, when given the chance to write down our future goals, I wrote down that my main goal was
to succeed academically and get involved as much as I can. I applied for tour guiding, orientation
leader, URI 101 mentor, and leadership institute, all throughout my first year at URI. I wasn’t entirely
confident in my leadership abilities, but I knew that applying could only push me out of my comfort
zone and allow me to better my leadership qualities. I would say I achieved my goals, for I am
presuming the role as orientation leader and leadership institute peer leader this summer, as well as,
URI 101 mentor this coming fall. In additon, I feel that I achieved my goal as succeeding
academically, for I was able to make the Dean’s List, in my first semester.

Evidence #9- Leadership Institute personal letter


13. Student will show knowledge of the
“Hierarchy of Needs” theory by Maslow
14. Student will show application of Maslow’s
theory to own life
15. Student will show knowledge of the theory
of Superleadership by Manz & Sims
16. Student will show application of Manz &
Sim’s theory to own life
17. Student will describe StrengthsQuest HDF 190 In HDF 190, I took the Gallup StrenghtsQuest to find out my top five leadership strengths. My
Signature Themes, shadow side of strengths are: achiever, woo, communication, learner, and focus. I see that I am an achiever because
Strengths and/or weaknesses, and I strive to do my best in everything that I do, for I constantly strive for excellence. I find that the harder
examples of application (Source = Gallup) I push myself the more success I will endure. I always put 100% into everything that I do, whether it
be related to my personal life, to my academics, to my extracurricular activities or to my service
projects. I see my Woo strength when put into a situation where I don’t know many people or in a
situation where I must get others to openly participate in an activity. I would describe myself as an
extremely outgoing person, who likes the challenging of meeting and creating relationships with new
people. In leading, I think my woo strength is most present, for I find that when I lead I am okay with
embarrassing myself to win others over and to participate in the activity we are trying to accomplish
I see my communication when I am put in front of a crowd and told to share information. Public
speaking is not something that I view as a challenge. I would definitely say there are aspects that I
can improve on, but I wouldn’t categorize public speaking as a stressor. I also see my communication
strength at use, when working in a group. I am not afraid to talk when put into a new situation and I
find I am able to pull ideas out of people and enable others to communicate with each other.
I find that my learner strength is always in use. I feel that one is always learning, no matter the age. I
would describe myself as inquisitive because I am always seeking new ways to develop my
knowledge. I find that I approach life with an open mind, ready to indulge in more knowledge, so that I
am able to share my knowledge to people in the future. I am always asking questions and I love
learning things that may be irrelevant but could be fun to know. I think I relate to my focus strength
extremely well. I am very driven and whatever I put my mind to gets 100% of my effort. I set goals,
whether it be academic goals, career goals, or personal goals; and I also have day goals, week
goals, and ultimate goals. I focus on these goals, to stay on top of my activities and make sure I act in
the most efficient and effective way possible. I am very focused on my goas and I find a lot of what I
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do, is my way of preparing for my future. I find that all my strengths attribute to who I am as a person;
therefore, I think my five strengths are very accurate for me. Although I find that my strengths are
strong and present in my daily life, I have also noticed I lack some qualities. At times I find I’m not a
good listener, because of my top strength of achiever. I am always trying to achieve my goal and can
fail to listen to directions. I think I also lack mindfulness because of my strengths of achiever and
focus. I find that I am too focused on the future to live in the moment and really appreciate all that is
around me.

Gallup

Evidence #10- Gallup


18. Student will describe personal leadership
style and/or personality style including
strengths and weaknesses and examples
of application (Sources = Leadership style
inventories, the L.P.I., Type Focus
(MBTI), LAMP, DISC, and other career
inventories, etc.)

Outcome Category: Leadership Theories


Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
19. Student will show knowledge of the
“Authority and Bureaucracy” theory of
leadership Weber
20. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Weber)
21. Student will show knowledge of the
“Scientific Management” theory of
leadership by Taylor
22. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Taylor)
23. Student will show knowledge of the
“Management by Objectives” theory of
leadership by Drucker
24. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Drucker)
25. Student will show knowledge of “Theory
X and Theory Y” theory of leadership by
MacGregor
26. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (MacGregor)
27. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 Rotaract In HDF 190, I learned about the Servant Leadership model by Greenleaf. According to Robert K.
“Servant Leadership” theory of leadership Greenleaf, a servant leader is someone who puts service first, for they have a natural feeling to serve.
by Greenleaf This natural desire to serve, leads one to have a natural desire to lead. Servant Leadership challenges
participants to help, not fix, those they are serving and then inspire them to become servant leaders
themselves. Servant leadership is composed of ten characteristics: listening, empathy, healing,
awareness, persuasion, conceptualization, foresight, stewardship, commitment to growth of people,
and building community. These characteristics are qualities of servant leaders. It is not necessary to
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possess all these qualities, and all servant leaders may have a different combination of these
characteristics; however, everyone approaches service differently and new characteristics can be
adapted through practice. Listening is the ability to listen to others and get in touch with your inner
voice, empathy is the ability to listen and feel for others, healing is the knowing how to heal yourself or
others. In addition, awareness is understanding the world around you, persuasion is the ability to
convince others, and conceptualization is the ability to think beyond the day to day realities. Also,
foresight is the ability to foresee the future, stewardship is the commitment to serving others and being
open to other opinions, commitment to the growth of people is being there to support others
development, and building a community is the ability to work with others to better develop a
community.

“What Is Servant Leadership?” Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership,


www.greenleaf.org/what-is servant-leadership/.

Evidence #11- Servant Leadership speech outline


28. Student will describe personal application HDF 190 Rotaract In HDF 190, I have learned about Servant Leadership. Servant leadership is the natural desire to serve
of the above theory (Greenleaf) Rhody Ambassadors others and is explained with the use of ten characteristics. I show my Servant Leadership at URI by
Orientation Leader being involved in Rotaract. Rotaract is all about putting service above self, which is the true definition of
Servant Leadership. Rotaract has participated in events like a campus clean up and holiday drive, and
many other events involved with putting service above self. I have demonstrated servant leadership by
participating in Rotaract events. Being able to give back to the community is something I enjoy doing;
therefore, I would describe myself as a servant leader because I have a natural desire to serve. I have
also been involved in Rhody Ambassadors and have helped at an open house. Although it was raining
and a long day, I felt it was important to go out and help in order to provide a service and assistance to
prospective students. I feel there are many opportunities to strengthen my servant leadership qualities
at URI and I’m excited to get more involved.
I feel It's important to use my privilege and free time to serve others. I am doing this by staying involved
in Rotaract and Rhody ambassadors and also hopefully becoming involved in more clubs and
organizations. I am going to develop my servant leadership qualities as I take on the position of
orientation leader this summer. I'm excited to learn from the past leaders and learn about the qualities
that make me a leader. It's going to be an amazing experience to serve the incoming first years. I also
plan to apply as an institute peer leader, where I will also be given the opportunity to expand my
leadership skills and be a servant leader to the incoming first years.

“What Is Servant Leadership?” Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership,


www.greenleaf.org/what-is servant-leadership/.

Evidence #12- Picture of Blaine and I at a Rotaract event


29. Student will show knowledge of the
“Principle Centered Leadership” theory by
Covey
30. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Covey)
31. Student will show knowledge of the “14
Points / TQM” theory of leadership by
Deming
32. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Deming)
33. Student will show knowledge of the
“Visionary Leadership” (now often cited
as “Transformational Leadership”) theory
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 12
by Sashkin
34. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Sashkin)
35. Student will show knowledge of the
“Individuals in Organizations” leadership
theory by Argyris
36. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Argyris)
37. Students will demonstrate knowledge of HDF 190 In HDF 190 I learned the “4 V’s theory” of leadership by Bill Grace. This theory includes, values,
the “4 V’s” theory of leadership by Grace virtues, vision, and voice. My values are my core identities which I then integrate into my choices on a
(Center for Ethical Leadership) personal and civic level. Vision is the ability to frame my actions, in order to serve others in the future.
In addition, voice is my ability to articulate my vision to others, to then inspire them to act. Lastly, Virtue
is the understanding that I become what I practice; thus, it’s important that I practice good and right
behavior to have a good virtue. Another part of the 4V model is service, polis, and renewal. Service
connects your values and vision. When doing service your vision can be tested, for challenges that
may be presented when applying service to values can alter your vision. Polis is a term referring to the
ability to express our voices. Polis is an English root for politics, and it is said that once we figure out
how to use our voices, we will be able to express our visions and absorb in politics. Finally, renewal is
when our voice is changed to values. In renewal it’s important to act congruently with our visions and
values. By practicing values, virtue, vison, and voice—ethical leadership will be achieved.

Center for Ethical Leadership. (2007). The four –v model. Retrieved from
http://www.ethicalleadership.org/philosophies/ethical-leadership

Evidence #13 - Ethical Leadership crest


38. Student will describe personal application HDF 190
of the above theory (Grace)
39. Student will show knowledge of the
“Situational Leadership” theory by Hersey
& Blanchard
40. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Hersey & Blanchard)
41. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 In HDF 190, I learned about the Relational Leadership model by Komives, Mcmahon, and Lucas.
“Relational Leadership” model by Relational Leadership refers to a model of leadership that deals with the ability of a leader to create
Komives, McMahon & Lucas positive, and thus effective, relationships within the organization. The Relational Leadership model
follows three basic principles: “knowing,” “being,” and “doing.” “Knowing” mainly focuses on the
perspective you have on yourself. It’s important to know yourself as a person, or more specifically as a
leader, before you try to start leading others. As a leader it’s important to know how change occurs and
how others may have a different view on a situation in comparison to your own. Whereas “being” refers
to your mindset during leadership. As a leader, it’s important to approach a situation with an open-mind
and maintain an ethical, caring, and inclusive mentality. Lastly, “doing” relates to how you act while
partaking in leadership. In “doing,” relational leaders stress that it’s important to act in a responsible
and consistent manner. In addition, you must also act in a way to reflect your community and your own
commitments and passions. A Relational Leader focuses on equality within the group. Leaders view
group members as co-leaders and co-creators; therefore, the hierarchical pyramid that can form within
a group is avoided and everyone is viewed as an equivalent. After analyzing and understanding
Relational Leadership, I find that the mindset surrounding this model is that no matter your position or
power everyone in the group is both a leader and a learner; therefore, everyone is seen as equal and
has the opportunity to hone their leadership skills and develop as a more well-diverse and experienced
leader. Relational leadership also consist of five components: inclusive, empowering, purposeful,
ethical, and process-oriented. These five key components of leadership can be applied to any
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 13
organization and can be contributed to that organization’s success. When approaching a service trip,
for example, it’s essential to have commitment and a common goal between group members in order
to enable a positive change. It’s also vital to be inclusive and listen to what everyone has to say, for
everyone comes from different backgrounds and as a group everyone can benefit from multiple
perspectives. Being ethical in leadership, is a huge component in any project you partake in. If one isn’t
being ethical and true to themselves, then nothing will truly be gained from the experience. Lastly, to be
process-oriented refers to how the people within the group work together to achieve change.

Komives, S. R., Lucas, N., & McMahon, T. R. (2013). Exploring leadership: For college
students who want to make a difference. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Evidence #14- Relational Leadership Essay


42. Student will describe personal application HDF 190 Rotaract I have seen the Relational Leadership model effectively in action through Rotaract. Rotaract is a
of the above theory (Komives et al) service organization focusing on the mantra “service above self.” I find that this organization follows the
three basic principles of “knowing,” “Being,” and “doing” and the five key components: “inclusive,
empowering, purposeful, ethical, and process-oriented. I find inclusiveness relevant in the club, for
everyone has the opportunity to share their ideas, for example what service projects people want to
see done in the future, and everyone has the equal opportunity to get involved and participate in the
events. I also find that diverse perspectives are encouraged within the club, for differences are
celebrated—which is extremely empowering to all members. In additon Rotaract has so much purpose.
Everyone in the room is passionate about service and are willing to put service before themselves, in
order to benefit someone else. I find that my feel my woo strength and zest value relate to this specific
mindset of Rotaract, for like all the members, I never approach life halfheartedly and I enjoy the
challenge that comes with making people feel welcomed and appreciated. I’m content with putting
myself other there in order to make those around me feel comfortable and ready to share their ideas.
Rotaract shows the ethical component by participating in events like clean-ups, drives, and fundraisers.
Rotaract provides me with the opportunity to participate in service events, which enables me to use my
learner strength and honesty value. In any situation I am always trying to grow and become a better
leader and person, then I was when I started; therefore, I credit my openness to new experiences to
my learner strength. I am also very intact with my values and principles and I am someone that cares
deeply about remaining honest with people in a group in order to stay on track and remain helpful and
fair. Rotaract embodies the ideology of being process-oriented, for it is encouraged that everyone gets
to know one another and that everyone participates in the events. I am able to practice my achiever
and perseverance strength within Rotaract. I bring a lot of energy needed to perform the task and am
always prepared for a challenge. I find these two strengths of mine allow me to put the 100% effort
needed to complete a service project to the best of my ability.

Evidence #15- Rotaract group picture


43. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 EDC 102 In HDF 190, we learned about constructivism. Constructivism is a theory regarding how people learn
concept of constructivism and is based on scientific study and observation. Within Constructivism, individuals are responsible for
building their own knowledge through experiences and reflections. Constructivism emphasizes that the
addition of new knowledge, allows for a more educated individual, since individuals are able to apply
their newly found knowledge to their old knowledge and experiences. Constructivist also encourage
that individuals should constantly be re-evaluating what they know. If individuals ask questions,
research, and explore—they will only better their understanding and wisdom. Constructionist focus on
learning new knowledge and integrating it to old knowledge. Constructivism is a student-centered
philosophy. Constructivism focuses on hands on and activity-based teaching and gives students the
freedom to create their own thoughts and opinions. Constructivists encourage critical thinking and the
understanding of big ideas; however, they do not require the mastery of factual information, for they
feel the understanding of big ideas will better suit them in the future. In a constructivist’s classroom,
student voices are heard, questions are asked, and problem-based learning is used to develop

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 14


individual understandings. Constructivist care greatly about students creating personal meaning about
the world around them.

Barth, D., et al. “Constructivism.” Funderstanding Education Curriculum and Learning Resources, 14
Apr. 2011, www.funderstanding.com/theory/constructivism/.

Evidence #15- EDC 102 Essay


44. Students will describe personal examples HDF 190 EDC 102 Constructivism eliminates standardized curriculum and instead promotes curricula customized to
of implementing constructivism students’ prior knowledge. I find that the elimination of standardized curriculum is beneficial to student
learning. All throughout my educational career, I felt like I was being taught to take a test. In elementary
school and middle school, I was trained to take the New York State Test in English Language Arts and
Mathematics; yet, these grades did not reflect who I was as a student in any way. The tests were used
to evaluate the efficiency of the school and teachers and determined if a student required assistance in
a subject area. In third grade I remember being called out of class and told that I was now in AIS for
reading. I was distraught and confused by this and I recall that after the first class the teacher told me
that I did not need to come anymore. Not only did this test take me out of class and hinder my learning
on another subject, but it had misjudged my abilities, for I had graduated at the top of my class come
senior year. In addition, I was required to participate in the same kind of test in high school with the
New York State Regents Exams or with Advanced Placement Exams. Unfortunately, I have always felt
that I was never truly learning for myself, but instead to perform well on the required exams. By taking
the pressure of exams off students, I believe students will enjoy going to school, will learn more, and
become better informed overall. Constructivism also promotes hands-on problem solving.
Constructivist find that students are more engaged and focused when working on hands-on projects.
Hands-on activities engage kinesthetic learners, auditory learners, visual learners, and social learners;
therefore, it can be concluded that hands-on learning works and benefits all. When deciding on what to
major in, I reflected on my experiences within the American education system and what I found to be
most beneficial to my academic development up until this point. I found that I always learned best when
it was something I was interested in, rather something I was forced to know. I find that I learn best
when I can relate what I’m learning to something that has happened in or is currently happening in my
life. By drawing a comparison to my life, I can better understand the material and remember it when I
am asked to apply it to a paper or during a test, for example. Therefore, I decided to major in STEM,
where I can get a career that is hands on, so I can get the most benefit.

Evidence #16- EDC 102 Essay


45. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the Experiential Learning Model (Kolb)
46. Student will describe personal application
of the Experiential Learning Model (Kolb)
47. Student will show knowledge of the HDF 190 In HDF 190, we learned about the Social Change Model of Leadership Development. The Social
“Social Change Model of Leadership Change Model begins by defining social change as something that is collaborative, not simple, and
Development” by Astin et al addresses the root causes of problems. This model examines leadership from three different
perspectives: the individual, the community, and the group. Within these, it incorporates the Seven C’s
for Change: Consciousness of Self, Congruence, Commitment, Collaboration, Common Purpose,
Controversy with Civility, and Citizenship. Citizenship, a community value, focuses on allowing
individuals to view themselves as part of a larger organization, rather than just an individual.
Collaboration, a group value, focuses on the group as a whole and how working together and
capitalizing on strengths can lead to an achieved goal. Common purpose, another group value, aims to
highlight the values and goals of a group. In additon, Controversy with Civility is a group value, that
focuses on listening to everyone’s opinion because the inevitability of conflict within a group.
Consciousness, congruence, and commitment are referred to as individual values. Consciousness of
self aims to remind individuals of their own beliefs, values, attitudes, and emotions. Congruence

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 15


focuses on making sure your actions match your values. Finally, Commitment aims make sure the
individual stays focuses, passionate, and involved in the given project. The model allows for the values
to be used in any order. When using these three components of individual values, group values, and
community values a tremendous impact may be made. Great change can be achieved, and the group
is one step closet to social change.

Higher Education Research Institute (HERI). (1996). A social change model of leadership
development: Guidebook version III. College Park, MD: National Clearinghouse for Leadership
Programs

Evidence #17- Diagram of Social Change Model


48. Student will describe personal application HDF 190 Beach Clean up In HDF 190, I applied the Social Change Model of Leadership Development to by participating in a
of the above theory (Astin et al) beach clean up with my small group. For the project, we cleaned Narraganset Beach. My group and I
spent about two hours on the beach, where we picked up about five bags of trash. My group and I
deemed ourselves successful in the beach cleanup, for the amount of trash we were able to collect.
After our beach cleanup, we all discussed how we utilized our strengths. I am seen as the influencer in
a group and my strengths of communication and woo relate to my influencing quality within a group. I
find that I am the individual in the group that listens to everything everyone has to say and then am
able to relate it to the group’s idea. I am comfortable with taking charge and speaking up in a group,
but in doing so I am still mindful of everyone's ideas, opinions, perspectives, and experiences. I was
able to join everyone’s ideas together and come up with the idea of the beach clean-up. Overall, our
group was able to join together, as a team, and collect a lot of trash. Initially, we had a hard time finding
trash; yet, during our work down the beach we found areas where there was an unhealthy amount of
trash. Just the seven of us were able to make a difference and a positive change for the Narragansett
community. Through this project, we had the opportunity to grow as a small group and contribute to
social change. While we made a successful contribution, we know that there is more work to be done
to address this environmental problem.

Evidence #18- Group picture from beach clean-up


49. Students will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Leadership Identity Development
Model” by Komives et al
50. Students will describe personal
application of the above theory. (Komives
et al)
51. Students will demonstrate knowledge of
the Strengths-Development Model by
Hulme et al
52. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Hulme et al)
53. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
behavior theories of leadership from
Michigan and Ohio State
54. Student will describe personal application
of the above theories (Michigan & Ohio
State)
55. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Charismatic leadership
56. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory
57. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 16
contingency approach to leadership by
Fiedler
58. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Fiedler)
59. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Path-Goal theory by House
60. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (House)
61. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leader Member Exchange (LMX) theory
by Dansereau, Graen & Haga; Graen &
Cashman; Graen
62. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Dansereau, Graen &
Haga; Graen & Cashman; Graen)
63. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Leadership Substitutes Theory
64. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory
65. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Models of leader emergence
66. Student will describe the impact of traits
on leadership emergence and
performance
67. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
Chaos approach to leadership by
Wheatley
68. Student will describe personal application
of the above theory (Wheatley)

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 17


Outcome Category: Inclusive Leadership / Diversity and its Application to Leadership
Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
69. Student will demonstrate how cultural
anthropology / paradigms relate to
leadership
70. Student will describe personal example
of using cultural anthropology /
paradigms as a leader
71. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Cycles of Socialization” (Harro)
theory and its uses in leadership
72. Students will demonstrate personal
application of the “Cycles of
Socialization” (Harro)
73. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Cycles of Liberation” (Harro) theory
and its uses in leadership
74. Student will demonstrate personal
application of the “Cycles of Liberation”
(Harro)
75. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Configuration of Power” (Franklin)
and its relationship to leadership
76. Student will demonstrate personal
application of the “Configuration of
Power” (Franklin)
77. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
racial identity development (Cross &
Fhagen-Smith; Rowe, Bennett &
Atkinson; Ferdman & Gallegos; Kim;
Horse; Renn etc.)
78. Student will demonstrate personal
application of model(s) of racial identity
development above
79. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
models related to gender / identity /
gender identity development (Lev;
Bussey; Bussey & Bandura; Bilodeau;
Gilligan; Belenky et al; etc.)
80. Student will demonstrate personal
application of model(s) of gender identity
above
81. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
additional social identity development
model(s): Sexual ID, Faith & Spirituality,
Disability, Social Class (Dillon et al;
Fowler; Parks; Astin et al; Peek; Smith;
Johnstone; Gibson; Forber-Pratt &
Aragon; etc.)
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 18
82 Student will demonstrate personal
application of additional social identity
development model(s) above
83. Students will demonstrate knowledge of
McIntosh’s theory of privilege and its
relationship to leadership
84. Student will demonstrate personal
application of McIntosh’s theory
85. Student will describe the differences and
similarities of individual and institutional
oppression and relationships to
leadership (Source = Three-Dimensional
Matrix of Oppression)
86 Student will demonstrate knowledge of
relevant laws and policies related to
issues of equity and its relationship to
leadership (i.e., Title IX, Affirmative
Action, Protected Classes, etc.)
87. Student will show knowledge of effective
leadership as it relates to change agency
88. Student will describe personal examples
of being a change agent
89 Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the “Model of Intercultural Sensitivity” by
Bennett and its uses in leadership
90. Students will demonstrate personal
application of the “Model of Intercultural
Sensitivity” by Bennett
91. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
the ally Action Continuum by Griffin &
Harro
92 Student will demonstrate personal
application of the Action Continuum by
Griffin & Harro
93. Student will show knowledge of the
Multicultural Organizational Development
Model (Jackson)
94. Student will show personal application of
the Multicultural Organizational
Development Model (Jackson)
95. Student will show knowledge of the
Multicultural Change Intervention Matrix
(Pope)
96. Student will show personal application of
the Multicultural Change Intervention
Matrix
97. Student will create a personal code of
inclusive leadership

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 19


Outcome Category: Critical Thinking
Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
98. Student will show knowledge of principles of
critical thinking and fallacies (logic is used
in this minor)
99. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
critical thinking
100. Student will show knowledge of
metaphorical analysis to critically analyze
self and leadership situations
101. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
metaphorical analysis to critically analyze
self and leadership situations
102. Student will show knowledge of at least five
decision making methods
103. Student will describe personal examples of
having used five decision making methods
104. Student will show knowledge of at least five
problem solving / conflict management
methods, as well as understanding the
roots of conflicts
105. Student will describe personal examples of
having used five problem solving / conflict
management
106. Student will demonstrate the ability
to synthesize multiple knowledge
perspectives (course work), competencies
(communication, writing, information literacy
or mathematical/statistical skills) and
responsibilities (global, diversity & inclusion
or civic knowledge)
107. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
leadership that is used in crisis (i.e., James
& Wooten; Garvin; Covey; Frohman;
Lalonde; Schoenberg; Joni; Braden et al;
etc.)
108. Student will describe examples of
leadership in crisis situations (i.e.,
application of James & Wooten; Garvin;
Covey; Frohman; Lalonde; Schoenberg;
Joni; Braden et al; etc.)

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 20


Outcome Category: Interpersonal and Organizational Concepts & Skills
Outcome Target class Additional Experiences Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice
109. Student will demonstrate knowledge of HDF 190 HDF 190 Retreat
active listening techniques
110. Student will describe examples of using HDF 190 HDF 190 Retreat
active listening skills
111. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
functions of group communication by
Hirokawa
112. Student will describe personal application
of functions of group communication
(Hirokawa)
113. Student will show knowledge of techniques
regarding giving and accepting of feedback
114. Student will describe examples of giving COM 100H In COM 100H, we were required to give three speeches throughout the semester. However, during our
and accepting feedback. speeches the rest of the class was required to grade and write comments about what they enjoyed and
didn’t enjoy. In doing this, I learned how to receive feedback in a positive way. When giving my speech,
the class was to listen and then provide me with feedback on the content and delivery of my speech.
Their feedback was very helpful. I was confident in my public speaking abilities prior to this class, but
after reading what my classmates had to say, I was able to notice things that I had no idea I did when
in front of a crowd. I was open to their suggestions. They had mainly suggested that I pay attention to
my speaking pace, filler words, and body movements; which I then applied to future speeches within
the class. By accepting and then applying their feedback I was able to improve my public speaking
skills and get better grades on my latter speeches. In addition, I learned some tips for giving feedback.
I learned how to give constructive criticism and be honest in a fair and nice way. I was able to remain
honest, even if it was my friend I was critiquing. I felt it was fair to give them solid constructive criticism,
so they could benefit from the experience—like I had. I felt when giving criticisms it was important to
not only talk about what they could improve on, but also what I thought they did well on. By giving them
feedback in a positive and negative light, I felt it could help them play to their strengths and be aware of
their weaknesses in future speeches. I strived to give them the best feedback I could, so they were
able to benefit and then apply it to future speeches. Overall, COM 100H allowed me to effectively give
and receive feedback in a positive way.

Evidence #19- COM 100H critique sheets


115. Student will show knowledge of the 7D
coaching model (Knott)
116. Student will demonstrate personal
application of the 7D Model (Knott)
117. Student will show knowledge of elements
of a Crucial Conversation and steps to
maintain dialogue and move to action
(Patterson, McMillian & Switzler)
118. Student will describe examples of
engaging in a Crucial Conversation
119. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
facilitation techniques
120. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
facilitation techniques

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 21


121. Student will demonstrate knowledge of de-
briefing techniques
122. Student will demonstrate proficiency of de-
briefing techniques
123. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
framing based on psychology and its use in
group facilitation
124. Student will demonstrate proficiency of
framing based on psychology and its use in
group facilitation
125. Student will demonstrate knowledge the
four frames of organizations, and the
meaning of reframing by Bolman and Deal
126. Student will describe personal application
of organizational analysis using the four
frames of organizations, and breaking the
frame / reframing (Bolman and Deal)
127. Student will show knowledge of organizing
meetings / setting agendas / and leading
meetings
128. Student will describe personal examples of
organizing meetings / setting agendas /
leading meetings
129. Student will show knowledge of
Parliamentary Procedure
130. Student will show knowledge of techniques
for working with difficult people
131. Student will describe personal examples of
using techniques to work effectively with
difficult people
132. Student will show knowledge of the stages
of group development (Tuckman/Tuckman
& Jensen, Bennis or others)
133. Student will describe personal examples of
group development in use
(Tuckman/Tuckman & Jensen, Bennis or
others).
134. Student will show knowledge of group roles
and how they contribute to group dynamics
(Johnson & Johnson; Benne & Sheats;
Knowles & Knowles; etc.)
135. Student will describe personal examples of
group roles and how they contribute to
group dynamics (Johnson & Johnson;
Benne & Sheats; Knowles & Knowles; etc.)
136. Student will show knowledge of effective
memberships skills in groups
137. Student will describe personal examples of
membership skills in use
138. Student will show knowledge of the
Challenge and Support theory by Sanford,
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 22
and its relationship to organizations
139. Student will describe personal examples of
using the theory of Challenge and Support
(Sanford)
140. Student will show knowledge of the COM 100H
construction / elements of informative and
persuasive speeches
141. Student will demonstrate proficiency in COM 100H
informative and persuasive public speaking
142. Student will show knowledge of planning
and conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)
143. Student will describe personal examples of
planning and conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)
144. Student will show knowledge of preparing HDF 190 Orientation Leader
for and effective answers in interviews (as URI 101 Mentor
the interviewee)
145. Student will describe personal examples of
preparing for and being interviewed
146. Student will show knowledge of effective
collaboration / coalition building (Sources:
Cilente/Komives et al; NCBI; etc.)
147. Student will describe personal examples of
working in collaboratives/coalitions
148. Student will demonstrate knowledge of
techniques to communicate and engage in
difficult dialogues related to diversity and
inclusion.
149. Student will demonstrate proficiency in
communicating and engaging in difficult
dialogues related to diversity and inclusion.
150. Student will describe ways to maintain
accountability in leadership / member
relationships
151. Student will describe personal examples
related to maintaining accountability as a
leader
152. Student will describe ways to build
relationships between leaders and
members
153. Student will describe personal examples of
building relationships with members as a
leader
154. Student will describe how credibility applies
to leadership, as well as the characteristics
and skills of a credible leader
155. Student will describe personal examples of
building, maintaining, and repairing his/her
own credibility as a leader
156. Student will describe ethical standards in
Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 23
influence
157. Student will describe influence applies to
leadership
158. Student will describe principles of effective
mentoring, as well as problems particular
to the mentoring relationship
159. Student will describe personal examples of
mentoring and being mentored
160. Student will describe principles of effective
peer leadership, as well as problems
particular to peer leadership
161. Student will describe personal examples Orientation Leader
related to be a peer leader and being led
by peers

Leadership Inventory Revised 08/22/2017 24