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6-8th Lesson Plans for Week 1

Objectives:

• Explore fables and gain understanding of the story structure of fables

• Think critically about lessons/morals and set foundation for exploring theme in novels

• Expand processes of higher order thinking

• Gain appreciation of historical relevance of oral and written stories

• Explore summarization and expansion

• Retell story orally, in writing, or through additional creative means or create an original tale
that includes all elements of fable

• Share in community, support, encouragement, and constructive criticism of classmates and


group moderator

• Explore importance of author biographies and how life experiences relate to bias, theme,
setting or other literary elements

• Develop strategies for reading text carefully

- Introduce Myself

- Goals for the year:

• What does the group see as goals

• Read good books

• Learn and understand how to read carefully

• This will help you to be a better student all the way through college! If you can read
well, you can learn anything!

• Work together to help each other learn and support each other’s growth (including
mine)

• Expectations are that everyone will participate and always do your best work

- Introduce Theme for the year:

- Our theme this year will be “Telling Your Story.”

- All of the mini-units we explore and the books we read will be connected to the theme, so
look for those connections.

- We start today be discussing an early form of storytelling.

- Orally tell a Fable

• Tortoise and the Hare

• Does anyone know what kind of story that was? Anyone know who the story is attributed
to?

• Tell me what you already know about fables. (record on white board)

• What are you interested to learn about fables?

- Aesop

- We are going to take notes in our interactive notebooks. (SHOW EXAMPLE)

• Lived circa 620-564 BCE in ancient Greece

• His existence is unclear, but details from ancient sources (Aristotle, Socrates) say that he
was a slave who won his freedom through his cleverness and became an advisor to
kings. Some people believe he may have been a legend.

• No written record of his stories remains, but his stories have been passed on for
thousands of years orally and in writing.

• He was known as a “fabulist” and his style of writing is called a “fable”.

• Fable comes from the Latin word “Fabula” meaning “story, tale, or play” and in ancient
times probably meant one that was hard to believe

• Can you think any other words that might have the Latin root “fabula” in it?

• Fabulous

• Confabulate (talk informally)-“Talk story”

• Important to recognize Latin and greek roots! (RECORD EXAMPLES IN NOTEBOOKS)

- Read aloud 2 fables (ask for read aloud volunteers)

• Fox and the Billy Goat (p191 of Usborne)

• “sly as a fox”

• “look before you leap”—common sayings came from fables

• Onomatopoeia-p191 “splash”, “splosh”-means the imitation of a sound in writing

• Alliteration-a repeated use of the same sound to create a rhythm or mood. p193
“slipped and slithered”, p194 “sly smile”, p195 “silly billy”

• Grasshopper and the Ant-p12 Jerry Pinkney

- What do these stories have in common?

• Title

• simple plot (story)

• anthropomorphized characters (Ancient greek; anthropo=man, human


morphe=form, shape)

• a problem and solution

• moral/theme

- Work through graphic organizer on Mercury on the Woodmen

- Show summarization and amplification through story we read, example in Usborne (p243),
and handout

• You can use these skills to tell stories in a new way

• Summarization allows you to look at the “bones” of the story (the most important
elements) and tell the story simply or memorize to tell out loud

• Amplification (Usborne) allows you to add beautiful language and extra details about
characters, setting, and to use other literary devices. Can make it more pleasurable to
read.

- Why is it important for us to learn about this?

• Stories have been an important way for humans to connect, relate, and teach through
history.

• Fables help us learn the difference between right and wrong.

• Morals are also called proverbs and they help us to be wiser for the rest of our lives, if we
live by them.

• Stories are more fun than lecture and help us to remember the morals through characters

• Fables will help us as we go through the school year to look at the stories we are reading
and try to figure out what those authors are really trying to tell us (theme).

- Discuss assignments for next week

• Explain the Choice Board.

• Choose only ONE assignment!

• email me if you have questions reading@mhok.org

- To be successful:

- Your work will include all the elements of a fable.

- You will be evaluated on your presentation next week.

Assessment:

- This will be a formative assessment based on the presentations of the assignments during
the next class period, in one week.

- This school evaluates on meeting objectives, rather than on a traditional grading scale.

Assignment Choices for Week 2 (CHOOSE ONE)

1. Retell: Find a fable that appeals to you. Read through your choice a few times, even
over a couple of days. Identify the main elements of the fable and commit those to
memory. Now, practice telling the story out loud to yourself, classmates, or family.
Make sure you include the main elements, but feel free to use your own words to
expand the story. Prepare to tell the story, from memory, to reading group next
week.

2. Rewrite: Find a fable that appeals to you. Read through your choice a few times,
even over a couple of days. Identify the main elements of the fable. Now, retell that
story in your own way, using new characters and challenges, but illustrating the
same moral. Prepare to read your new fable to the group next week.

3. Rewrite: Read through a few different fables. With an understanding of the elements
that make up a fable, write your own original fable. You can even write a modern
day fable. Let your creativity shine! Prepare to share your fable with the group next
week.

4. Retell through Drama: Make a fable into a play or skit. Involve your classmates and
share in practicing (but it’s ok if it isn’t memorized!). Share your play in group next
week.

5. Retell through Art: Find a fable that appeals to you. Create an art project that
illustrates the elements of that fable. You can use whatever medium that is available
and appeals to you (draw, paint, clay, stop motion animation, photography, felt story
board), but please make sure you put forth your best effort. Prepare to present your
art project to group next week.

6. Technology: Create a Google Slides presentation on the elements of a fable. Please


choose a fable and incorporate your chosen fable into the presentation in relation to
each element. Prepare to present your slides in group next week.

7. Technology/History: Research and Create a Google Slides presentation about the


history of storytelling. Why are stories an important part of human history? In the
age of tv, video games, iPhones are stories still important? This is a one week
project and there is a lot of history, so please feel free to choose and focus on a
small segment of history.

Choice Board
Retell: Find a fable that appeals to you. Rewrite: Find a fable that appeals to
Read through your choice a few times, you. Read through your choice a few
even over a couple of days. Identify the times, even over a couple of days.
main elements of the fable and commit Identify the main elements of the fable.
those to memory. Now, practice telling Now, retell that story in your own way,
the story out loud to yourself, using new characters and challenges,
classmates, or family. Make sure you but illustrating the same moral. Prepare
include the main elements, but feel free to read your new fable to the group next
to use your own words to expand the week.
story. Prepare to tell the story, from
memory, to reading group next week.

Rewrite: Read through a few different Retell through Drama: Make a fable
fables. With an understanding of the into a play or skit. Involve your
elements that make up a fable, write classmates and share in practicing (but
your own original fable. You can even it’s ok if it isn’t memorized!). Share your
write a modern day fable. Let your play in group next week.
creativity shine! Prepare to share your
fable with the group next week.

Retell through Art: Find a fable that Technology: Create a Google Slides
appeals to you. Create an art project that presentation on the elements of a fable.
illustrates the elements of that fable. You Please choose a fable and incorporate
can use whatever medium that is your chosen fable into the presentation
available and appeals to you (draw, in relation to each element. Prepare to
paint, clay, stop motion animation, present your slides in group next week.

photography, felt story board), but


please make sure you put forth your best
effort. Prepare to present your art project
to group next week.

Technology/History: Research and INSTRUCTIONS FOR CHOICE BOARD:


Create a Google Slides presentation
about the history of storytelling. Why are Pick ONE assignment that you will enjoy
stories an important part of human and complete.

history? In the age of tv, video games,


iPhones are stories still important? This If you can think of something else that
is a one week project and there is a lot will show what you know about fables,
of history, so please feel free to choose talk to Mrs. Hensley.
and focus on a small segment of history.