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Office of Admissions

4101 University Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508

ALASKA PACIFIC UNIVERSITY
(907) 564-8248 • (800) Alaska-U
Email: admissions@alaskapacific.edu
www.alaskapacific.edu

2009-2010 Catalog

2009-2010
Expedition Glacier Travel
Cashman Pass above the Tazlina Glacier
Catalog
Photo by Heather Thamm
Alaska Pacific University

Catalog for the Academic Year
2009-2010

2009 Spring Graduation
Photo By Donna Dougherty

Alaska Pacific University 3
Alaska Pacific University

Table Of Contents

Message From The President 7
General Information 8
Mission Statement Of Alaska Pacific University 8
A Brief History Of Alaska Pacific University 8
Religious Heritage 8
The Main Campus 10
Campus Map 11
Academic Calendar 12
Degree Offerings 15
Undergraduate Policies And Procedures 16
Admissions 16
Financial Aid 22
Tuition And Fees 29
Housing And Meal Plan Costs 31
Academic Policies 33
Grading System 33
Enrollment And Registration 35
Academic Standing 41
Other Academic Policies 42
Undergraduate Programs 47
Campus Undergraduate Program 54
Campus Undergraduate 55
Student Milestones 55
Portfolio 56
Degree Completion Program 58
Rural Alaska Native Adult Program (RANA) 60
Online Courses for Undergraduates 61
Early Honors Program 62
Ecoleague Exchange Program 63
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 64
Business Administration Department 65
Associate of Arts - Business Administration 65
Bachelor of Arts - Accounting Information For Management 66
Bachelor of Arts - Business Administration And Management 68
Minor: Business Administration And Management 69
Bachelor of Arts - Health Services Administration 70
Counseling Psychology and Human Services Department 72
Associate of Arts - Human Services 72
Bachelor of Arts - Psychology 73
Minor: Counseling Psychology 74
Bachelor of Arts - Human Services 75
Minor : Human Services 76
Education Department 77
K-8 Professional Development Certificate 79
Bachelor of Arts - Education 81
Minor: Education 82
Environmental Science Department 83
Bachelor of Arts or Science - Earth Sciences 83
Bachelor of Arts or Science - Environmental Science 85
Minor: Environmental Science 87
Minor: Mathematics for Environmental Sciences 88
Bachelor of Arts - Environmental Policy and Planning 88
Bachelor of Arts - Environmental Studies 90
Bachelor of Arts or Science - Marine Biology 92
Minor: Marine Biology 93
Table of Contents 4
Alaska Pacific University
Liberal Studies Department 94
Associate of Arts - Career and Technical Education 94
Bachelor of Arts - Liberal Studies 95
Minor: Liberal Studies 99
Outdoor Studies Department 100
Bachelor of Arts - Outdoor Studies 101
Minor: Outdoor Studies 104
Undergraduate Academic Courses, Abbreviations,
and Course Descriptions 105
Graduate Policies And Procedures 167
Admissions 167
Financial Aid 170
Tuition And Fees 175
Housing And Meal Plan Costs 176
Tuition Refund Policy 177
Academic Policies 178
Grading System 178
Enrollment And Registration 180
Academic Standing 184
Other Academic Policies 184
Graduate Programs 188
Graduate Academic Degrees 189
Business Administration Department 189
Master Of Business Administration Programs 191
Executive Master Of Business Administration
in Information and Communication Technology 194
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Entrepreneurship 197
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Investments 197
Counseling Psychology and Human Services Department 198
Master Of Science in Counseling Psychology 198
Education Department 201
Master of Arts in Teaching 202
Certification Only-Option Program for teachers (CO-OP) 201
Environmental Science Department 203
Master Of Science in Environmental Science 203
Liberal Studies (Interdisciplinary) 206
Master of Arts 206
Outdoor Studies Department 210
Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental Education 210
Graduate Academic Courses, Abbreviations,
and Course Descriptions 211
University Directory 234
Administration 234
Faculty 235
Faculty Emeriti 239
Staff Emerita 239
Board Of Directors 240
APU Foundation 240
Appendix A 241
Appendix B 242
Appendix C 243
Appendix D 244
Student Right-to-Know Statement Inside Back Cover

Table of Contents 5
Alaska Pacific University

Graduation
Photo by Donna Dougherty

Crow Creek Pipes and Drums have led the graduation procession
at Alaska Pacific University since 1995. Crow Creek is Alaska’s
largest pipe band with over 100 members and they are the first,
and only, Alaska band to achieve the Grade III competition level.
In 2001 Crow Creek became the first Alaska pipe band to compete
at the World Pipe Band Championships in Glasgow, Scotland.

Alaska Pacific University 6
Alaska Pacific University

Message from the President
Welcome to Alaska Pacific University. When I first came to Alaska
Pacific I was struck by how
beautiful, personal and
genuine this university is. The
faculty really cares about
students; the students care
passionately about their
education and about the
world; the campus is utterly
spectacular. Alaska Pacific is
not a factory, churning out
one student after another
assembly-line fashion. It is
more like an intensively
cultivated garden,
personalized to allow each
student to reach his or her
full potential.
This catalog describes a
distinctive form of study, one
that extends respect, freedom
and responsibility to students.
Our premise is that today’s students need and deserve an active
education to prepare them for a dynamic and rapidly changing world. A
modern university, therefore, should teach students to think for
themselves, to set their own goals and accomplish them, and to work
creatively and effectively with others.
If you ask today’s social, business, or professional leaders what
society needs from higher education, they will tell you that we need
more people who are comfortable with creativity, innovation, and the
process of consistent change and improvement. There is not a single
arena of contemporary life that is not evolving rapidly. In such times,
everyone needs to be a leader at some level; at work, in the family, in
the community, in service to the world.
Alaska Pacific University’s distinctive form of education results in
graduates who have the advantages of a liberal arts education, a pre-
professional education, and leadership education, all delivered in an
integrated process of active learning.
In the following pages you will learn much about Alaska Pacific
University, its programs of study, and the people who live and teach
here. My congratulations to you for joining this unique community of
students, teachers and mentors. If you have questions about these
materials, ask your advisor or the Registrar. We are here to serve you
and help you grow.

Sincerely,

Douglas M. North

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Alaska Pacific University

GENERAL INFORMATION

Mission Statement of Alaska Pacific University
Alaska Pacific University is an intentionally small, private, independent
university devoted to innovative teaching and learning, where students
receive personal attention in small classes and acquire leadership
capabilities, moral character, and self-direction through active learning.
To achieve these educational goals Alaska Pacific University:
• Nurtures spiritual and moral values consistent with the
university’s Christian heritage while respecting the religious
convictions of all.
• Emphasizes personal growth through student-centered,
experiential education using Alaska, the Arctic, and the Pacific
Rim as laboratories for learning;
• Develops leadership for active service to society by encouraging
openness to positive change, environmental awareness,
innovation, and individual initiative;
• Promotes international and multicultural education while
welcoming learners of all ages: from Alaska, with a special
commitment to Alaska Natives; from other states of the United
States; and from the international community;
• Maintains academic excellence by combining the breadth,
integrative understanding, and critical thinking of the liberal arts
with practice and focused knowledge for professional careers.
(Adopted February 19, 2009)

A Brief History of Alaska Pacific University
Alaska Pacific University, chartered as Alaska Methodist University
by the Territory of Alaska in 1957, dedicated its campus on June 28,
1959, one day prior to Alaska achieving statehood. When the first
students enrolled in classes beginning October 1, 1960, campus facil-
ities consisted of Grant Hall, the academic and student center; and Gould
Hall, the student residence. As enrollments and programs grew signifi-
cantly, a student center, apartment, and residence hall complex was
constructed. This complex was later named Atwood Center. After a 1977
reorganization, academic programs were restructured, and in November
1978 Alaska Methodist University was renamed Alaska Pacific University
to better reflect its educational mission and geographical location. The
Ruth and Homer Moseley sports center was added to campus facilities in
1986, the Carr Gottstein Academic Center in 1992, and the Segelhorst
Residence Hall was opened in 2007.

Religious Heritage
Alaska Pacific University is the most recent of the more than 1200
United Methodist educational institutions founded in America over the
last 200 years. This emphasis on education has been vital to the denom-
ination since its founding by John Wesley in the eighteenth century.
Today 128 United Methodist-related schools and colleges exist in the
United States.
The mission of Methodism through its founding of these institutions
of higher learning has been to integrate faith and learning along with
knowledge and service so that the whole person and the world might
Alaska Pacific University 8
Alaska Pacific University

be transformed into a higher order of justice and love. Accordingly,
Methodist-related schools have always played a critical role in promoting
human rights and educational opportunities for all persons.
Although the university is firmly rooted in the Judeo-Christian
tradition of United Methodism, it espouses no narrow sectarian or
doctrinal creed and indeed welcomes in its community of learners and
teachers all who wish to engage in the search for truth. While faithful
to its tradition, APU celebrates diversity and pluralism. In 1991, the
university established the Cardinal Newman Chair of Catholic Theology
through an endowment from the Catholic Archdiocese. The Newman
Chair is a significant example of the university’s ecumenism.
Further, the university promotes the dignity of work and living
through love and respect for others. In this context, any labor performed
in the service of caring for God’s world and advancing the well-being of
the human family is considered a sacred calling.
The educational community that we seek to create should contribute
to all aspects of growth — intellectual, social, emotional, and physical
— resulting in a whole person who is educated for the whole world and
for all of life. This environment exists to enable all individuals to become
the most that they can and were meant to be. The community spirit
exists not only in classrooms and residence halls, but in offices and
board rooms as well.
Our mission, in addition, is to care creatively about the world and
its future. Moreover, we are here for the world, to help solve the world’s
overwhelming problems and to join in the task of building a more just
and humane society. Students, faculty, and staff alike are engaged in
applying values learned from the past in new ways to the continuing
challenges facing humankind.
These principles we believe and affirm and, we hope, live. As the
values inherited from our Judeo-Christian tradition infuse all that we do
at Alaska Pacific University, we are proud to offer special opportunities
for learning, service, faith, and community building.

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Alaska Pacific University

THE MAIN CAMPUS
The main campus of Alaska Pacific University sits on 170 heavily
wooded acres near the center of Alaska’s largest city, Anchorage. The
campus includes summer and winter recreational trails, state-of-the-art
facilities, and magnificent views of the surrounding mountains.

Atwood Center was designed by architect Edward Durell Stone
who also designed the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. This main
building serves as a hub of student activities and includes the dining
hall, indoor climbing wall, weight room, photography lab, bookstore, the
APU Chapel, Academic Support Center, computer lab, and offices of the
Dean of Students, Career Counseling, and University Chaplain. Atwood
South and Atwood North are residence halls.

Segelhorst Residence Hall opened in Fall 2007 to provide
apartment style living quarters for 24 students.

Grant Hall is the university’s original academic center, with class-
rooms, administrative offices, the beautifully renovated theatre and
Conoco Phillips Art Gallery. The BP Science Center on the third floor
sports state-of-the-art lab equipment, while the second floor classrooms
also offer technologically “smart” classrooms.

The Carr Gottstein Academic Center, constructed in 1992, is a
modern learning facility that features classrooms, faculty offices, seminar
and conference rooms, a lecture hall, and an art exhibition area.

Gould Hall, Grace Hall and Dr. Glenn Olds Hall houses the U.S.
Geological Survey offices and advanced mapping laboratories.

The Jim Mahaffey Trail System provides skiing, skijoring, running,
hiking, and bicycling opportunities through more than 4.5 km of trails
that connect with Anchorage’s city-wide trail system.

The Homer and Ruth Moseley Sports Center houses a swimming
pool, basketball courts, and outdoor program rentals. Campus recre-
ation is further enhanced by University Lake, a habitat to waterfowl and
other wildlife, and the Ross Olds Soccer Field, which is used for activities
such as softball, frisbee, and soccer.

The Anchorage Higher Education Consortium Library serves
university students and faculty. It is operated through an agreement
between Alaska Pacific University and the University of Alaska
Anchorage. Centrally located, the library contains more than 760,000
bound volumes including original government documents, sheet music,
non-print media, and a special Alaskana collection.

The Elmo Sackett Broadcast Center, housing KSKA and KAKM,
Anchorage’s public radio and public television stations, is located on the
APU campus.

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Alaska Pacific University

Campus Map

Alaska Pacific University 11
FALL 2009
Full Block Session Module I Module II
Section designation for specific terms F B S M1 M2
Residence Halls Open Aug 19 Aug 19 - - -
New Student Orientation Aug 19-21 Aug 19-21 - - -
RANA Residency Aug 18-20 - - - -
Registration 9am-5pm Aug 21 Aug 21 Sept 23 Aug 21 Oct 16
First Day of Classes Aug 24 Aug 24 Sept 24 Aug 24 Oct 19
Late Registration Aug 24-Aug 31 Aug 24-Aug 27 Sept 24 - Oct 1 Aug 24-Aug 31 Oct 19 - Oct 26
Census Date (course transcripted) Sept 1 Aug 28 Oct 2 Sept 1 Oct 27
Labor Day Holiday (Classes to make up time Sept 7 Sept 7 - Sept 7 -
Convocation "Campus Address"* - - Sept 23 - -
Mid-Term (Grades Due for Session & Full Semester Oct 16 - Nov 2 - -

2009-2010 Academic Calendar
Deadline for December degree candidates to submit
Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1
documentation for Credit by Exam or DEL credit
Spring Graduation Applications Due Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1
Pre-Registration (Spring 2010 & May Block) Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1 Nov 1
Last Day to Withdraw with "W" Grades Nov 18 Sept 15 Nov 24 Oct 1 Dec 2
Thanksgiving Holiday Nov 26-27 - Nov 26-27 - Nov 26-27
Senior Project Presentations ** Dec 1-2 - Dec 1-2 - Dec 1-2
Alaska Pacific University

Deadline for Tentative Grades - Fall Degree Dec 4 - Dec 4 - Dec 4
ACADEMIC CALENDAR

Last Day of Classes Dec 11 Sept 21 Dec 11 Oct 12 Dec 11
Fall Graduation Dec 12 - Dec 12 - Dec 12
Residence Halls Close Dec 12 - - - -
Final Grades Due in Registrar's Office 8:00 AM Dec 21 Oct 5 Dec 21 Oct 26 Dec 21
* Classes do not meet during Convocations/Assemblies and following community hour. Students are expected to attend. ** Class Day: Instructors will make appropriate attendance assignments.
NOTE: Registrar's Office will be open after 5:00 pm only by appointment. A $50 per week late fee will be assessed for registering after the published late registration dates.

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SPRING 2010
Full Block Session Module I Module II
Section designation for specific terms F B S M1 M2
Residence Halls Open Jan 8 Jan 8 Feb 10 - -
New Student Orientation Jan 8 Jan 8 Feb 10 - -
Registration 9am-5pm Jan 8 Jan 8 Feb 10 Jan 8 Mar 15
RANA Residency Jan 5-7 Jan 5-7 Jan 5-7 - -
First day of classes Jan 11 Jan 11 Feb 11 Jan 11 Mar 15
Late Registration Jan 11-19 Jan 11-14 Feb 11-18 Jan 11-19 Mar 15-22
Census Date (course transcripted) Jan 20 Jan 15 Feb 19 Jan 20 Mar 23
Martin Luther King Holiday (Classes make up time Jan 18 Jan 18 - Jan 18 -
Mid-term*** Mar 15 - Mar 30 - -
Deadline for Spring degree candidates to submit
documentation for Credit by Exam or DEL credit Mar 1 - Mar 1 - Mar 1

2009-2010 Academic Calendar
August Graduation Applications Due Mar 1 Mar 1 Mar 1 Mar 1 Mar 1
Spring Break Mar 8-12 - Mar 8-12 - Mar 8-12
Good Friday (afternoon holiday) Apr 2 - Apr 2 - Apr 2
Pre-Registration (Summer & Fall 2010) Apr 1 Apr 1 Apr 1 Apr 1 Apr 1
Last Day to Withdraw with "W" grades Apr 16 Feb 2 Apr 22 Feb 18 Apr 21
Senior Project Presentations ** Apr 26-27 Apr 26-27 Apr 26-27 Apr 26-27 Apr 26-27
Alaska Pacific University

Deadline for Tentative Grades - Spring Degree Apr 30 - Apr 30 - Apr 30
Honors Assembly* Apr 30 Apr 30 Apr 30 - -
Last Day of Classes May 7 Feb 8 May 7 Mar 1 May 7
Spring Graduation May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8 May 8
Residence Halls Close May 8 Feb 8 May 8 - -
Final Grades Due in Registrar's Office 8:00AM May 17 Feb 22 May 17 Mar 15 May 17
* Classes do not meet during Convocations/Assemblies and following community hour. Students are expected to attend. ** Class Day:
Instructors will make appropriate attendance assignments. *** Undergraduate midterm grades due for Session and Full Semester only.
NOTE: Registrar's Office will be open after 5:00 pm only by appointment. A $50 per week late fee will be assessed for registering after the

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published late registration dates.
SUMMER 2010
Block Session Module I
Section designation for specific terms B S M1
Pre-Registration Nov 1 Apr 1 Apr 1
Residence Halls Open May 10 May 10 May 10
First day of classes May 10 May 10 June 7

Late Registration May 10-13 May 10-17 Jun 7-14
Census Date (course transcripted) May 14 May 18 Jun 15
Memorial Day Holiday May 31 May 31 -
Mid-term*** - Jun 16 -
Deadline for Summer degree candidates to submit documentation for

2009-2010 Academic Calendar
Credit by Exam or DEL credit Jul 1 Jul 1 Jul 1
December Graduation Applications Due Jul 1 Jul 1 Jul 1
Independence Day Holiday - Jul 5 Jul 5
Last Day to Withdraw with "W" grades Jun 1 Jul 8 Jul 14
Senior Project Presentations ** Jul 14 Jul 14 Jul 14
Deadline for Tentative Grades - Summer Degree Candidates Jul 16 Jul 16 Jul 16
Alaska Pacific University

Last Day of Classes Jun 7 Jul 23 Jul 23
Summer Graduation Jul 24 Jul 24 Jul 24
Residence Halls Close Aug 14 Aug 14 Aug 14
Final Grades Due in Registrar's Office 8:00AM Jun 21 Aug 2 Aug 2
* Classes do not meet during Convocations/Assemblies and following community hour. Students are expected to attend. ** Class
Day: Instructors will make appropriate attendance assignments. *** Undergraduate midterm grades due for Session and Full
Semester only. NOTE: Registrar's Office will be open after 5:00 pm only by appointment. A $50 per week late fee will be assessed
for registering after the published late registration dates.

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Alaska Pacific University

DEGREE OFFERINGS

Associate of Arts Degrees
Business Administration
Career and Technical Education
Education
Human Services*

Bachelor of Arts Degrees
Accounting Information for Management
Business Administration and Management
Earth Sciences
Education
Environmental Policy and Planning
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Health Services Administration
Human Services
Liberal Studies
Marine Biology
Outdoor Studies
Psychology

Bachelor of Science Degrees
Earth Sciences
Environmental Science
Marine Biology

Master Degrees
Master of Arts
Master of Arts in Teaching
Master of Business Administration
Master of Business Administration with a
Concentration in Health Services Administration
Concentration in Finance
Executive MBA in Information and Communication Technology
Master of Science in Counseling Psychology
Master of Science in Environmental Science
Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental Education

Certificate Offerings
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Entrepreneurship [graduate]
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Investments [graduate]
K-8 Professional Development Certificate [undergraduate]
Teacher Certification Only-Option Program (CO-OP) [graduate]

* Pending approval

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Alaska Pacific University

undergraduate POLICIES
AND PROCEDUReS
ADMISSIONS
Alaska Pacific University has no rigid secondary school require-
ments but gives preference to students graduating from strong college
preparatory programs. This includes four years of English, at least two
years of a language other than English, three years of college prepa-
ratory mathematics, three years of laboratory science, and three years
of history or social science. Applicants planning to seek the B.S. degree
in environmental science or marine biology should complete four years
of high school mathematics and should be prepared to begin calculus
during their first year in college.
Some students do not display outstanding results as measured by
conventional academic measurements. However, many of these students
display an outstanding ability to adapt and thrive in the active learning
environment that is central to the mission of Alaska Pacific University.
The admissions committee works closely with candidates to ensure a
successful academic experience for all admissions candidates.

First Year Students
First year and transfer students who have earned fewer than 30
transferable college semester hours.

Admission Methods
Alaska Pacific University has adopted a modified rolling admission
procedure. This procedure will allow students to submit the admis-
sions application at any time during the admissions cycle. For priority
in financial assistance, however, students are encouraged to submit
application by February 1. Students are notified of admission decisions
immediately after an admissions committee concludes its assessment
of the completed application. It is requested that students respond to
offers of admission for Fall semester by or before May 1.
Students wishing to apply for admission must submit the following
to the Admissions Office:
1. Undergraduate application for admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
3. Official transcripts from all institutions attended. Note: Final
high school transcripts verifying graduation and final class rank
are required before the student may enroll as a degree-seeking
student.
4. Results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) or the American
College Test (ACT). Test scores will not be required for applicants
who have graduated three or more years prior to applying.
5. Two letters of recommendation. Recommendation letters may
be submitted by the applicant’s counselor, teacher, headmaster,
principal, or any individual qualified to comment upon applicant’s
academic/intellectual ability.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 16
Alaska Pacific University

6. A personal essay based on one of the discussion topics listed on
the application form.

Admission Standards
Completed application packages are reviewed by an admissions
committee. The decision to admit or deny an applicant is based on the
overall quality of the admissions package. Academic standards include:
1. A cumulative high school GPA of 2.75 based on a 4.00 scale.
Applicants who have earned a GPA less than 2.75 may be
considered for admission if they have submitted an otherwise
strong application. Such applicants may be invited for a personal
interview or asked to take courses in areas of weakness. Special
requirements will be communicated in the acceptance letter.
2. An SAT composite score of 970 or an ACT composite score of 20.
Applicants whose test scores do not meet these minimums may
be considered for admission if they have submitted an otherwise
strong application.
3. The admissions committee will consult with the Academic Dean
and appropriate department chair/program director when an
application is in question.

Transfer Students
Students are considered transfers when they have earned 30 or
more transferable college semester hours. Transfer applicants must
submit the following to the Admissions Office.
1. Undergraduate application for admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
3. Official transcripts from all institutions attended. High school
transcripts are not required for transfer applications. A transcript
is required from each postsecondary institution in which a
student has been enrolled, whether or not credit was earned.
Transcripts are considered official only if they are delivered in a
sealed envelope from the issuing institution.
4. Personal essay based on one of the discussion topics listed on
the application form.

A cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for transfer students. Students
with a GPA of less than 2.00 who otherwise demonstrate potential for
academic success at Alaska Pacific University may be considered for
admission. Such applicants may be invited for a personal interview or
asked to take courses in areas of weakness.
The Registrar’s Office will assess transfer credits earned by the
applicant and will mail an evaluation of the student’s transfer credit
prior to class registration. The evaluation will show total hours accepted
towards a degree at Alaska Pacific University. It will also show which
General University Requirements have been met.

Early Honors
Early Honors Students applying to Alaska Pacific University need to
submit the following information:

1. Early Honors application for admission
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks
payable to Alaska Pacific University
3. Official high school transcripts
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 17
Alaska Pacific University

4. 2 letters of recommendation
5. Personal essay about why you would like to attend Alaska Pacific
University’s Early Honors Program

Early Honors students are required to submit SAT or ACT test
scores after taking the test. These scores are not required for
Admissions but are helpful in determining Admission in some cases. If
you haven’t yet taken the exam prior to admission, please send the
score to APU when you do take the exam for our reporting purposes.
ACT reporting code is 0062, SAT reporting code is 4201.

International Students
International students are students who do not have United States
residency. International students wishing to apply for an undergraduate
program must submit the following to the Admissions Office:
1. Undergraduate application for admission. Follow the application
requirements in the Undergraduate application and submit
materials by the deadline stated in the application or the
following deadlines (whichever is earlier):
Fall Semester June 1
Spring Semester September 1
2. Supplemental application for International Student admission.
3. Supporting financial documentation. Present financial
documentation to support the information provided under
the Annual Budget Section of the supplemental application.
Supporting documents must be supplied for each person or
party who will be providing you with financial assistance. The
documents should reflect the individual’s financial history.
Examples of supporting documents include: several months’
bank statements, a letter from an employer stating period of
employment, planned continued employment and yearly salary,
tax returns, or a U.S. Immigration Form I-134 Affidavit of
Support (for students who have a financial sponsor in the United
States). All documents must be officially translated into English
and monetary amounts expressed in U.S. dollars. Students need
to keep a duplicate set of all documents. These documents will
be needed to apply for a student visa and to enter the United
States.
4. Foreign credentials evaluation (in addition to official transcripts).
All students with transcripts issued by universities and schools
outside the United States must send their transcripts to a
credentials evaluation service for evaluation and must request
that a copy of the evaluation be sent to the Admissions Office.
A course-by-course evaluation providing grade point average is
required. A list of agencies that provide this service is contained
in the Alaska Pacific University International Student Information
Packet.
5. All international students must submit official Test of English as
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. Alaska Pacific’s reporting
code is #4201. A score of 550 on the paper test or 79 on the
Internet based test is required for admission.

Degree Completion Program
The Degree Completion Program (DCP) features a competency-
based curriculum consisting of modules and a research project leading
to a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Accounting Information for
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 18
Alaska Pacific University

Management, Human Services, Business Administration and
Management or Health Services Administration.
Students wishing to apply for the Degree Completion Program must
submit the following to the Admissions Office:
1. Degree Completion Program application.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
3. Current resume.
4. Verification of current employment (for all majors) or verification
of volunteer employment.
5. Official transcripts from all institutions attended. A transcript is
required from each postsecondary institution in which a student
has been enrolled, whether or not credit was earned.Transcripts
are considered official only if they are delivered in a sealed
envelope from the issuing institution.

Additional Information
The Registrar’s Office will assess the transfer credit earned by the
applicant and will mail an evaluation of the student’s transfer credit
prior to class registration. The evaluation will show total hours accepted
towards a degree at Alaska Pacific University. It will also show which
General University Requirements have been met. Students with fewer
than 30 transferable college credits need to submit an official high school
transcript or copy of their GED.
A cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for admission to the Degree
Completion Program. Applicants with a GPA less than 2.00 who otherwise
demonstrate potential for academic success at Alaska Pacific University
may be considered for admission. Such applicants may be invited for a
personal interview or asked to take courses in areas of weakness.
Students must have at least 60 semester credit hours of college
credit or equivalent to enroll in upper division DCP coursework. Students
who wish to gain credit for life/work experience can do so through the
DCP’s series of Portfolio Development classes (GS 20500-GS 20700).
Students with extensive knowledge in a particular course may test
out of required classes through examination or CLEP testing. Students
who have not completed the 60 credits can enroll in General University
Requirement (GUR) courses or lower division DCP courses. Once 60
credits have been earned, students may register for DCP core classes.

RANA Distance Education Students
Students wishing to apply to the Rural Alaska Native Adult (RANA)
Distance Education Program must submit the following to the Admissions
office:
1. RANA application for undergraduate admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or,
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
3. Technology requirements. The technology assessment form and
requirements are included with the RANA application.
4. Written one to two-page statement of goals reflecting why the
student has selected APU and the RANA Distance Education
Program, why the student is a good candidate for a distance
delivery program, and how the degree being sought will help
achieve career goals.
5. Official transcripts from all institutions attended. High school
transcripts are not required for transfer applications. A transcript

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 19
Alaska Pacific University

is required from each postsecondary institution in which a
student has been enrolled, whether or not credit was earned.
Transcripts are considered official only if they are delivered in a
sealed envelope from the issuing institution.
6. Upon completion of application elements, an interview will
be conducted by the RANA administration to determine the
applicant’s ability to successfully navigate the challenges
presented by the distance-learning format of this program.
7. Students entering the Business Administration and Management
(BAM) and Health Services Administration (HSA) program must
show verification of employment. Form can be found (and
printed) from the RANA website: http://rana.alaskapacific.edu.
8. Education majors must demonstrate a professional relationship
with a school for their practicum.

A cumulative GPA of 2.00 is required for admission to the RANA
program. Students with less than a 2.00 GPA who otherwise demon-
strate potential for academic success at Alaska Pacific University may be
considered for admission.
The Registrar’s Office will assess the transfer credit earned by the
applicant and will mail an evaluation of the student’s transfer credit
prior to class registration. The evaluation will show total hours accepted
towards a degree at Alaska Pacific University. It will also show which
General University Requirements have been met.

Credit By Choice
Credit By Choice is a special program for exceptional high school
students who wish to enroll in college level coursework. The cost for
Credit By Choice is $200/credit hour. These students must apply for
admission to the Credit By Choice program. Applicants must submit the
following:
1. Credit By Choice application for admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
3. One letter from appropriate high school official approving Credit
By Choice admission.
4. Written consent from parent or guardian.
5. Official high school transcripts. Transcripts are considered official
only if they are delivered in a sealed envelope from the issuing
institution.

Financial aid is unavailable to Credit By Choice students. Students
must re-apply through Admissions if attending more than one academic
year or portion thereof as a Credit by Choice student. Credit By Choice
students who later decide to enter an Alaska Pacific University degree
program must reapply through the regular admission process.

Non-Degree Seeking Students
(Special Student Status)
Students who do not wish to pursue a degree program may attend
classes at Alaska Pacific University if they have completed the required
prerequisites. Such students are not required to submit application
elements other than the $25.00 application fee. The courses taken under
Special Student status may or may not be applicable to an Associate of
Arts or Bachelor of Arts program at a later date.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 20
Alaska Pacific University

Students in the Non-Degree Seeking category are not eligible to
receive financial aid.
If a Non-Degree Seeking student wishes to enter a certificate, under-
graduate, or graduate program, he or she must apply for admission by
following the application requirements of the program to which they
apply.
After two periods of enrollment within Non-Degree Seeking status,
an undergraduate student must apply for admission to enter a degree
or certificate program, or reapply to continue in Non-Degree Seeking
status. Continued enrollment in Non-Degree Seeking status will be
contingent upon review and approval by an admissions committee.
Students wishing to enter Undergraduate Non-Degree Seeking appli-
cations must submit the following to the Admissions office:
1. Application for Non-Degree Seeking admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.

Deferred Applicant Policy
All degree-seeking undergraduate applicants who have received full
admission may defer their start date for a period of up to one year.
The one-year period begins with the start date indicated on the original
application form. Fully admitted students who have chosen deferral
are eligible to register for classes for one year and do not need to
complete additional application requirements. Applicants who do not
register within the one-year eligibility period and wish to reactivate their
admission status must complete a new application form and complete
all requested documentation prior to being readmitted to the university.
An admissions officer will determine, on a case-by-case basis, what
additional documentation is required.

Admission Categories
Full Admission
Full Admission status is assigned to students whose completed appli-
cations meet the requirements for admission to the university. Financial
assistance can be disbursed to students who have been fully admitted
to the university.

Admitted Pending Final Documentation
Early Admission status is assigned to students whose applications
are complete enough to determine that they meet the requirements
for admission to the University, but are missing elements necessary for
completion of the admission process. Students in this status may not
register for classes and are not eligible for financial aid.

Admission Hold
Admission Hold status is assigned to students who have received
Early Admission status and wish to register for classes prior to
completion of their application. This status requires that the student
submit missing application elements within six-weeks of registration.
The Student Financial Services Office will hold all approved awards
until all application elements are received and student is granted Full
Admission status. Upon Full Admission, the Financial Aid department will
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 21
Alaska Pacific University

disburse approved awards. If the student does not meet the six-week
deadline, they may be withdrawn from their academic program pending
discussion with the Academic Dean or appropriate Program Directors
and placed in a Non-Degree Seeking program status. As a Non-Degree
Seeking student, the student will be required to pay full tuition in order
to remain registered. The student’s approved financial aid awards may
also be withdrawn. The Admissions Office will monitor and update the
application files.

Wait Listed
Wait Listed status is assigned to those students who apply to APU
and meet academic standards of the University but, due to circum-
stances such as lateness, need to be placed on an academic wait list by
the Admissions committee. This status is assigned only to candidates
applying for the Fall semester. Students who are Wait Listed will be
notified of their enrollment status by July 15.

Admission Denied
Admission Denied status is assigned to students whose applications
do not meet the minimum requirements for admission to the university.
Students who are denied admission may contest such decisions by
petitioning the Undergraduate Studies Committee.

Transcripts and Test Scores
All transcripts and test scores required for admission must be
official documents preferably sent directly from the high school, college,
university, or testing agency to the Alaska Pacific University Admissions
Office. Students must submit documents in a sealed envelope from the
issuing institution. Alaska Pacific University cannot accept student copies
of transcripts or test results as official.

FINANCIAL AID

Alaska Pacific University offers many opportunities for scholar-
ships, grants, and loans awarded through a variety of federal, state,
and university programs. Financial aid is considered a supplement to the
family’s monetary contribution; it is not intended to cover the complete
cost of attendance.
Institutional funds for students may be available from APU. Kinds
of aid for students enrolled full-time in the Campus Undergraduate
Program include:
1. Alaska Residents Award: Students who are paying the
consolidated tuition and who are Alaska residents may qualify
for this award.
2. Atwood Distinguished Scholarship: This is the top scholarship
awarded by APU and is given to the top applicants in each of
our majors. As an Atwood Scholar, you are required to write a
letter of appreciation to the Atwood family before funds will be
released. A quick note of thanks is fine as the family loves to read
them and know who they are helping with their education.
3. Trustee Scholarship: This academic scholarship is awarded to
transfer students (32 or more credits) who have good academic

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 22
Alaska Pacific University

records and show promise as future APU graduates. In order to
retain the scholarship, the following conditions must be met:
• Must maintain at least a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or
higher.
• If you fall below a 2.75, maintaining a minimum 2.50
cumulative GPA, the award will be reduced by $500
per year.
4. Presidential Scholarship: This academic scholarship was started
by APU in 2007 and is awarded to students who show academic
promise and have participated in community service throughout
high school. In order to retain the scholarship fore up to four
years at APU, the following conditions must be met:
• Must maintain at least a cumulative GPA of 2.75 or
higher.
• If you fall below a 2.75, maintaining a minimum of
2.50 cumulative GPA, the award will be reduced by
$500 per year.
5. APU Education Grants: these are based on need for qualifying
undergraduates enrolled in degree-seeking programs. Not a
guarantee each year, based on need.
6. Community Action Award: this award is available to students who
have demonstrated outstanding service to their communities.
7. Benefactor Scholarships: a variety of awards based on various
criteria. Students must submit required applications for these
awards. It is the student’s responsibility to submit the completed
applications prior to the deadline.
8. Air Force ROTC Scholarships: Students who are interested in
a career as an officer in the US Air Force may be eligible for
AFROTC scholarships through an agreement between Alaska
Pacific University, the University of Alaska, and the Air Force
Reserve Officer Training Corps. Under this agreement, fulltime
APU students may qualify for AFROTC tuition and living expense
scholarships by taking classes in military science at UAA in
addition to their major coursework at APU. See the APU website
for further information.

To receive institutional scholarships, students must file the current
year Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) which can be filed
at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Undergraduate students must be enrolled fulltime
in order receive Institutional Scholarships. Institutional Scholarships are
generally awarded only during the fall and spring semesters. Institu-
tional scholarships are renewable up to five years as long as the student
maintains the required grade point average and Satisfactory Academic
Progress.
Other significant sources of financial aid may be identified through
national scholarship databases. We emphasize that students who are
diligent in their scholarship searches through national scholarship
databases may find they receive enough funds to pay for the majority,
if not all, of their education at APU. These scholarship database lists
are available in the Student Financial Services Office or through diligent
search and consist of monies given upon the basis of major, heritage,
religion, need/non-need, membership, age, and even contests.

To be considered for financial aid, a student must comply with the
following requirements:
1. Student must be admitted to Alaska Pacific University as a
degree-seeking student.
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 23
Alaska Pacific University

2. Student must attend APU as a full time student. Exception: part-
time students may receive Stafford Loan, Pell Grant, SEOG, or
the Alaska Supplemental Loan.
3. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid, FAFSA, and
request the results be sent to APU, school code 001061. The
results must be received at APU from the federal government.
4. Student’s interested in alternative (private) loans must apply
directly through their chosen lender.
5. Submit a Master Promissory Note if accepting a Federal Stafford
Loan for the first time at APU. It is valid for 10 years.
6. Complete Loan Entrance Counseling if accepting a Federal
Stafford Loan for the first time at APU.
7. Comply with all application deadlines. Financial aid must be
reapplied for annually.
8. Respond to and complete all requests for documentation,
verification, corrections, and other information as requested by
the Student Financial Services Office or the agency to which you
apply.
9. Sign and return each Award letter to the APU Student Financial
Services Office by the required date and decline in writing any
portion of an award offered that is not desired. A financial aid
offer is not valid until the signed Award letter has been returned
to the APU Student Financial Services Office.
10. Notify the Student Financial Services Office in writing of any of
the following changes: course load, withdrawal, marital status,
residence, living arrangements, or aid received from outside
sources.
11. Maintain good academic standing and make satisfactory progress
toward completing an academic program in accordance with APU
Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

FAFSA Application Information
The FAFSA is the required application for the Pell Grant, the FSEOG
(grant), the Stafford subsidized and unsubsidized loans, the PLUS loan,
and the Alaska Supplemental Loan. The University also requires a
completed FAFSA on all students receiving aid. All institutional students,
both incoming and returning, requesting financial aid must file a FAFSA
no later than April 15 if the student expects consideration for assistance
during the academic year beginning the following August. After that
date, applications will still be accepted, but funds are limited to available
funds at that time. Early application increases a student’s chances for
assistance.
Submit the FAFSA electronically to www.fafsa.ed.gov. There are
definite limits to the annual amounts the federal and state aid provides.
Notification of the award offer may be delayed by a federally selected
verification of information process; please submit accurate information
on the FAFSA.

FLEX Plan
APU will award institutional aid up to 4 credits for a May block
course(s) or Summer semester Practicum or Senior Project for those
students who register and complete 12-17 credits in the spring semester.
The amount of aid will be up to 4 credits for students taking 12-14
credits, up to 3 credits for students taking 15 credits, up to 2 credits for

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 24
Alaska Pacific University

students taking 16 credits, and 1 credit for students taking 17 credits.
Registered hours are counted prior to any withdrawals.
Students who intend on taking a May block or summer course under
this plan are required to fill out an application form, available from the
Student Financial Services Office or SFS website and submit it to SFS
during the Spring term before the last day of class. It is important to
note that such a course(s) is in addition to Spring courses. Students may
not combine the block and session courses from different semesters and
receive aid, as this is not allowed by Federal Regulations. Students may
not count the May block as part of their Spring semester. (See Appendix
C).

Federal and State Financial Aid Disbursement Rules
Federal and state regulations require that a student must be in
attendance at least part-time (6 credits) or full-time (12 credits) before
APU can disburse federal and state aid. Adding and dropping classes
may affect the amount of federal/state financial aid a student receives.
Students who receive loans via paper check will be notified via the
student’s APU e-mail address to come by the Student Financial Services
Department to endorse the check. If a student fails to do this within 30
days, the funds will be returned to the lender. The student can reapply
for the loan, if needed. Once endorsed, the funds must be applied to the
student’s billing account.
All financial aid awarded, with the exception of Federal College Work
Study (FCWS), are credited to the student’s account.
Some students receive financial aid in excess of direct university
costs. In such cases, the portion exceeding direct costs is refunded to
the student as long as it does not exceed the cost of attendance. Federal
Guidelines allow institutions up to 14 days after receipt of federal funds to
process any applicable refunds. This allows APU adequate time to verify
the student’s enrollment and attendance in all classes. As mentioned
above, drops and adds affect the student’s eligibility for all types of
financial aid. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure they are
enrolled in the required number of credits for each type of aid they are
receiving; i.e.: Institutional awards require 12 or more; loans require
six credits or more and etc. Federal regulations require a 30 day hold on
all loan funds for first year undergraduates. Students must be enrolled
in at least six credits at the time their loan funds are disbursed.
Students who have a credit balance on their account after Federal
Aid is received may request a bookstore voucher for their books. The
cost of the books will be added the student’s account, thus reducing the
credit balance to be refunded.
If a student’s Federal Aid is applied to their account after the census
date and a credit balance is created, the refund will be processed within
14 days.
Refund checks will be disbursed from Student Financial Services
(SFS) and will require picture ID and student signature. If the student
is unable to pick it up in person, they will be required to provide written
authorization (e-mail is acceptable) for SFS to mail the refund check to
the address specified by the student.
If a student is enrolled in less than six credits at the beginning of the
Semester or block, and in more credits that begin at session, or module,
you will receive only half of your current semester loan disbursement
at the beginning of the semester, because you are not enrolled in at
least six credits at the beginning of the semester. The other half for

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 25
Alaska Pacific University

the current semester will be released approximately 14 days after the
beginning of the next term, which could be session or module.

Alaska Pacific University Interest-Free Monthly
Payment Plan
The Alaska Pacific University Interest-Free Monthly Payment Plan
administered by Tuition Management Systems is recommended to help
you budget for the payment of your educational expenses and limit your
debt.
The plan allows you to spread your annual balance out over 10
interest-free monthly payments for a small annual enrollment fee of
$65, which includes Education Payment Life Insurance. This insurance
benefit provides payment for the remaining balance in the event of the
death of the bill payer. For those graduating in December or beginning
their classes in the Spring semester, there are also semester plan options
available for a fee of $47.
Benefits of the Alaska Pacific University Interest-Free Monthly
Payment Plan include:
• No Interest associated with plan, helping limit your debt and
maximize savings
• Toll-free top-rated telephone service during extended personal
service hours at 1-888-356-0350
• Affordability Counseling with friendly and professional Education
Payment Partners
• A wide variety of payment methods including personal checks,
money orders, credit cards and automated payments from your
checking or savings account
• 24-hour access to account information at www.afford.com

We hope that you seriously consider the advantages of paying some
or all of your balance interest-free. This strategy is the most effective
means of limiting your debt. Feel free to contact Tuition Management
Systems for Affordability Counseling at 1-888-356-0350 from 8 a.m. to
10 p.m. weekdays, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

Discontinuance of Attendance
Students who drop classes may have their financial aid reduced
if they then fall below the full-time/part-time credit requirement for a
particular type of financial aid. Students who withdraw from APU must
notify Student Financial Services and the Registrar so that refund calcu-
lations or late disbursements may be made. Students who withdraw
from APU may be required to begin immediate student loan repayment.
Federal regulations require all student loan borrowers to participate in
Exit Loan Counseling whenever they withdraw or graduate from APU, for
students to understand their rights and responsibilities as borrowers. To
complete Exit Loan Counseling session online, go to www.mappingyour-
future.org.
Sharing Financial Aid Funds between Institutions
of Higher Learning
Federal financial aid cannot be divided between institutions unless
there is a consortium agreement between the institutions. The financial
aid will be processed at the institution where the student is pursuing
their degree, the home school. APU participates in a very limited number
of consortium agreements. The home school will process the federal
aid and any refund due to the student will be disbursed to the student
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 26
Alaska Pacific University

approximately 14 days after the beginning of the semester or receipt of
the funds, whichever is later. It is the student’s responsibility to pay the
tuition and fees at their other institution.
University awards from APU will not be divided between APU and
another institution of higher learning.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) and
Probation for Financial Aid
Federal Financial Aid regulations require Alaska Pacific University to
establish a Satisfactory Academic Progress policy for students receiving
financial aid. Further, APU must notify students of that policy and
monitor the progress of all students receiving financial aid to insure
their continued compliance with the policy. It is the responsibility of all
students receiving financial aid to familiarize themselves with the policy
and to insure that the standards are met. Failure to meet the Financial
Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress standards may place a student’s
financial aid in jeopardy. Summer courses may be used to fulfill the
yearly minimum hour requirement. Students must maintain a minimum
of 67% completion of attempted credits.

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) required
Attempted Hours Required GPA

0 - 29 1.75
30+ 2.00
Academic progress will be reviewed at the end of each semester.
Results of that review will be used to determine the subsequent semester
eligibility for financial aid.
Students are responsible to ensure that they maintain the minimum
semester and cumulative GPA and to ensure that they complete the
required minimum number of credits each academic year.
1. Probation: Students who fail to complete the required minimum
number of credits in a Fall semester or fail to meet the required
cumulative GPA will be placed on probation for their Spring
semester. The student will be eligible to receive financial aid
during their semester of probation. These students and their
advisors will see an alert message in the CAMS software warning
them of their probationary status. Failure to regain good standing
status within the one semester of probation will result in the
suspension of financial aid.
2. Grades of AU, F, I, W, WU, and NC indicate unsatisfactory
completion of courses for financial aid purposes.
3. First-time freshmen and transfer students with no prior academic
history at APU are considered to be making satisfactory academic
progress for the first semester of enrollment.
4. Satisfactory academic progress must be maintained even during
semesters in which aid is not received.
5. The maximum number of credits for which a student may receive
financial aid is 150% of the published credit requirements of his/
her educational program. Usually 192 credits for a bachelor’s
degree and 76 credits for an associate’s degree comprise 150%
of the basic graduation requirements. The clock starts from the
very first credit attempted, regardless of whether or not the

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 27
Alaska Pacific University

student received financial aid. Any course for which a student
receives credit, including transferred courses, repeated courses,
and challenged courses, are included in this calculation.

Incomplete Grades: Courses with incomplete (I) grades do not
count toward Satisfactory Academic Progress. It is the student’s respon-
sibility to notify the Student Financial Services Office of any changes in
grades as it could change the student’s eligibility for financial aid.

Repeat Courses: Repeated courses that are required for a student’s
degree program count toward the minimum credit hour load required
for aid during a given semester. Repeat courses also count toward the
150% rule under the SAP policy.

Review Coursework: Students who enroll in review coursework
(less than 10000 level) may receive financial aid. The federal government
allows students to receive aid up to a maximum of 30 credits in this level
of coursework.

Distance Delivered Courses: These courses count toward the
credit hour load and may be used to fulfill credit hour requirements for
financial aid if the courses are required for a student’s degree program.

NOTE: Students are still required to complete these classes within
the semester that they enroll.

Withdrawals: Students who totally withdraw from the university,
after receiving financial aid, may be suspended from receiving future
financial aid and could be liable for refunds and/or return of Title IV
funds (refer to the Financial Aid section of your campus’s course catalog
for information on refunds and return of Title IV funds).

Institutional Funds: Students receiving scholarships, grants, or
tuition waivers from APU are expected to meet the satisfactory academic
progress requirements listed in this document. Please be advised,
however, that some scholarships and waivers require a higher GPA for
continued receipt.

Other Sources of Aid: Students receiving scholarships or financial
aid from such sources as BIA, regional and village corporations, civic
groups, and private organizations are expected to meet the satisfactory
academic progress requirements of APU unless the agency or group
instructs the Financial Aid Office, in writing, to waive our requirements
for these specific funds.

Financial Aid Suspension
Financial aid suspension will result from failure to:
1. Complete of the minimum required percentage of credits
required during the academic year.
2. Maintain the required cumulative GPA based on the students
classification.
3. Graduate prior to exceeding the maximum number of hours.
4. Meet the requirements of an appeal approval. A student who
is suspended again after failing to meet these requirements
MUST attend on his/her own without financial aid and earn
the required cumulative GPA in order to regain eligibility (see
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 28
Alaska Pacific University

Reinstatement). Subsequent appeals may be considered if a
student has experienced unusual, extenuating circumstances.

Financial Aid Reinstatement:
1. Appeals: A student whose financial aid has been suspended may
submit a written appeal to Student Financial Services within 30
days of notification of his/her non-compliance. The appeal must
include any extenuating circumstances (such as student illness
or the death of an immediate family member). The student must
complete the APU Appeals Forms in full and submit all required
documentation required to be considered for reinstatement of
financial aid. Appeal forms are available in SFS.
2. Makeup: A student who does not wish to appeal or whose appeal
has been denied may regain eligibility the semester following the
completion of the required number of hours and the attainment
of the required cumulative grade point average.

TUITION AND FEES

Full-Time Consolidated Tuition
The Full-time Consolidated Tuition for the Campus Undergraduate
Program in the 2009-2010 academic year is $12,150 per semester. The
Full-time consolidated tuition covers 12-18 credits. All credits over 18 in
a semester are charged at the rate of $675 per credit hour and may be
taken only with the permission of the Academic Dean.

A student’s billing account is due in full by the end of the first
week of their first class.

If payments are missed, late fees will be charged and you will not
be allowed to register for the upcoming semester until the account is
paid in full.
Employer Reimbursements
Students must pay their billing account in full or set up a payment
plan through Tuition Management Systems (TMS). At the student’s
request, SFS will send a statement to the employer showing their billing
account has been paid in full allowing the student to be reimbursed.

Alaska Residents Award
Students in the Campus Undergraduate Program who are paying the
consolidated tuition and who are Alaska residents may qualify for the
Alaska Residents Award of up to $2100 per semester. (See Financial Aid
section for more information.)

Part-time Tuition
Part-time tuition (less than 12 credits in a semester) in the Campus
Undergraduate Program is $1000 per credit hour.

Early Honors Program
The cost of the Early Honors Program is a consolidated fee that
includes orientation, tuition, and activities. Books and lab fees are not
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 29
Alaska Pacific University

included. All credits over 18 in a semester are charged at the rate of
$390 per credit hour and may be taken only with the permission of the
Academic Dean.

Tuition $13,950 (year)
January Travel (approx.) $3,000
Student Association Fee $110 (year)

Degree Completion Programs $380 per credit hr

Credit By Choice Program $200 per credit hr

RANA Distance Education Program $380 per credit hr

Active Military (DCP/RANA) $250 per credit hr

Fees (all fees are nonrefundable)
Admission Application Fee $25
Advanced Tuition Deposit due May 1 $100
Audit for Noncredit Enrollment $200/credit hour
Late Registration (per week) $50
Late Payment Fee (per semester) $100
Tuition Management Services Enrollment
Year $65
Semester $47
Reinstatement Fee $25
(students/parents who have cancelled
or withdrawn from TMS)
Student Association Fee $55
Lab or Materials Fee
(charged for certain courses see course
schedule) varies
Credit by Examination $50
Documented Experiential Learning (DEL)
Portfolio Assessment/Credit Fees:
(available to enrolled students only)
Per credit transcripted $50
Per credit assessed $25
Graduation application fee $50
Transcript fee
Official copy $5
Unofficial copy $2
Expedited copy $10 for first
Transcript Evaluation Fee
(if separate from Admissions process) $10
Health Insurance variable

Note: The University reserves the right to withhold transcripts and
diplomas if a balance is outstanding.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 30
Alaska Pacific University

Housing and Meal Plan Costs
(2009-2010)
Effective August, 2009

Prices listed are for one semester (which includes 1 block and 1
session). There are two semesters in one academic year - Fall & Spring.
If you need housing or meal plan information for only a Block or only
a Session, please contact the Office of Housing and Residence Life for
pricing and availability.

Residence Hall Council Fee
Block Only $10
Session Only $15
Semester $25
South Atwood Hall Semester Cost
Triple bedroom in suite $1,700
Double bedroom in suite $1,800
Private bedroom in suite $2,100
North Atwood Hall Semester Cost
2 Room Suite: Shared Bedroom $1,950
2 Room Suite: Private Bedroom $2,200
1 Room Suite: Private Suite $2,300
University Village Semester Cost
Shared Bedroom $2,100
Private Bedroom $2,550
Segelhorst Hall Semester Cost
Private Bedroom $2,700

Meal Plan Cost Per Semester
Meal Plan $2,450

The meal plan includes breakfast, lunch and dinner, Monday through
Friday, and brunch and dinner on the weekends, holidays and non-class
days. Students living in South or North Atwood are required to be on
the Meal Plan.

Housing Deposit $400

Cancellation Fee (cancellation fee will be applied if you move out before
the end of your contract.)

Before occupancy $400
After occupancy $500

Note: All students living in university housing are required to show
proof of health insurance. See the Dean of Students for
information.
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 31
Alaska Pacific University

Tuition Refund Policy
To receive a tuition refund, students must follow either the Course
Add/Drop/Withdrawal Policy or Complete Withdrawal Policy, whichever
applies. See the Academic Policies section of the University Catalog.
Tuition refunds are based upon the date the student submits their
withdrawal notice to the Registrar’s Office, and are derived from federal
guidelines. Fees are not refundable except when a course is canceled by
the university.

100% Prior to the second day of classes
75% Second day to end of first week
50% Beginning of second week to end of second week
0% Beginning of third week forward

Directed and Independent study classes will be charged and
refunded based on the beginning date of the term in which the class
begins and dates of attendance are based on calendar days not atten-
dance.
Students who have received federal or state financial assistance
and have completely withdrawn from the university, as defined in the
Complete Withdraw Policy, are subject to the federal or state refund
regulations and must go to the Student Financial Services Office for
assistance.
When a student completely withdraws from the university and has
received federal or state financial aid, the school is required to apply a
withdrawal calculation based on either the federal or state laws. Federal
financial aid recipients, determined to be totally withdrawn are subject
to the Return of Title IV Funds calculation. Reduction in credits may
require an adjustment of the Pell Grant. A student may not withdraw
prior to the date of receiving a student refund.

Federal Refund Formula (Return of Title IV Funds)
Students receiving funds from various federal programs are subject
to the refund policy placed in effect in fall 2000 by the U.S. Department
of Education. The policy states that students withdrawing or ceasing to
attend classes on or before the 60-percent point of the semester has
been completed will be required to return the calculated unused portions
of the funds received, including loan funds. Failure to do so could result
in ineligibility for further aid consideration at any school as well as being
prevented from returning to Alaska Pacific University.

The Guaranteed Consolidated Tuition Plan
Full time, undergraduate, degree seeking students may qualify for
a Guaranteed Consolidated Tuition Rate. Students should complete the
consolidated plan with admissions during their first fall term. For those
students who qualify, tuition will be based on the consolidated rate in
effect at the time they sign the required contract. The student must be
enrolled full time.

The Consolidated Tuition Plan cannot exceed a period of five years.
First year up to five years
Transfer freshmen up to four years
Transfer sophomores up to three years
Transfer juniors and seniors - up to two years

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 32
Alaska Pacific University
The guaranteed rate will apply only for those semesters for which
students enroll full time and are actively pursuing an undergraduate
degree. Specific conditions for individual students will be documented in
a contract, which must be signed, by both the student and a university
official before the guaranteed rate is applied.

ACADEMIC POLICIES

Grading System
The following letter grade system is used:

LETTER TEXT GRADE
GRADE POINTS
A+/A Superior mastery of facts and principles; 4.00
demonstrated clear evidence that stated
A- Course objectives and requirements were 3.67
met by the student.

B+ Above average mastery of facts and 3.33
B Principles; above average evidence that 3.00
B- Stated course objectives and requirements 2.67
were met by the student.

C+ Average mastery of facts and principles; 2.33
C Average evidence that stated course 2.00
C- Objectives and requirements were met 1.67
by the student.

D+ Little mastery of facts and principles; 1.33
D Minimal evidence that stated course 1.00
D- Objectives and requirements were met 0.67
by the student.

F No mastery of facts and principles; 0.00
insufficient evidence that stated course
objectives and requirements were met
by the student.
CR/NC* Credit/No credit (see explanation)
I** Incomplete courses (see explanation)
W# Withdrawal (see explanation)

Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) *
Grades may be given when this type of assessment is a more logical
assessment method than traditional letter grades. Credit means the
student has satisfactorily completed the course with the letter grade
equivalent of at least a “C” (2.00). Courses that currently fit this category
include:
1. MT 09600 and MT 09700, and LL 09800.
2. Contract Learning.

Moreover, a student may, within the first two weeks of a semester
or equivalent, declare in writing to the Registrar that he or she wishes
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 33
Alaska Pacific University
to receive a CR/NC grade for any general elective course. A student may
exercise the CR/NC grade option for only one course (3 or 4 credits)
during any one enrollment period. Up to 16 credits of the 128 required
for graduation may be graded as CR/NC.

Incomplete Course Grades (I) **
An instructor may give an Incomplete grade (“I”) to a student only
when all the following conditions have been met:
1. The student has completed the majority of the work in the class
and with a passing grade, and
2. The student cannot complete the work by the end of the term
of enrollment for reasons beyond the student’s control (e.g.,
sudden illness, accident, or being sent out of town unexpectedly
by an employer, as examples).

Once an Incomplete has been granted, a student may not request
to drop/withdraw from the course.

Process for Incomplete:
• Student completes the form entitled Incomplete Grade
Request
o Student signature required (may substitute email
request for signature)
o Instructor signature required
o Academic Dean signature required
• Submit completed form to Registrar’s Office prior to Final Grades
Due Deadline, as denoted on the academic calendar
• Copy the student and the student’s advisor with the Incomplete
Grade Request form
• Incomplete timeline
o Student has no more than one semester to complete
coursework and submit to the instructor
o Instructor has two weeks from the assigned expiration
date to submit a final grade to the Registrar’s Office
through the Grade Change Request: Incomplete / In-
Progress Make-Up form
o An incomplete grade, when NOT made up by the
deadline, and/or NOT received from the instructor,
becomes an “F” grade
 Once an Incomplete expires and becomes
an F, the grade may not be changed back to
Incomplete without going through the Special
Consideration process
• Additional time may be requested (approval is not guaranteed)
through a Special Consideration Request form with a copy of the
initial Incomplete Grade Request form attached thereto

Withdrawal (W) #
Students who wish to withdraw from a course and receive a “W”
grade must drop the course prior to completion of 80% of the term
(See Academic Calendar for specific dates.) The “W” grade may not be
granted after that date unless the student files a Request for Special
Consideration and the “W” grade is approved.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 34
Alaska Pacific University

Grade Change Policy
Once an instructor submits a final grade to the Registrar, it may not
be changed except under the following circumstances:
1. Clerical Error Policy. An instructor may certify on a Request for
Grade Change form that the original grade was incorrect due
to a clerical error (e.g., points added incorrectly or term paper
turned in on time but overlooked). The error must be explained,
and the change justified on the request form. The request must
be approved and signed by the instructor’s department chair or
program director and by the Academic Dean.
2. Academic Appeal Policy. Alaska Pacific University academic
standards presume that the instructor of a course is the best
qualified person to evaluate the academic work of students
in that instructor’s course and is the best person to assign
grades to those students. For this reason grades submitted by
instructors are not normally subject to review by the University’s
administration. However, when a student believes that a
particular grade was assigned in a manner that was arbitrary or
capricious, or that crucial evidence was not taken into account,
the student may appeal the grade. In the case of such an appeal
by a student, the burden of proof shall be on the student. (See
grade change policy form on APU website.)

Semester Credit Hour
One semester hour represents what a typical student might be
expected to learn in one week (40-45 hours including class time and
preparation) of full time study.

ENROLLMENT AND REGISTRATION
Registration dates are on the academic calendar in the Catalog
and in the University Calendar online.

Academic Class Standing
Class standing is determined on the basis of total credits earned as
follows:
Classification Total Credits Earned
First Year 0-29
Sophomore 30-59
Junior 60-89
Senior 90 or more

Academic Advising
Each student is assigned an academic advisor. This assignment
is made according to a student’s area of study, special needs, and
interests.
The academic advisor provides the student with the intellectual
framework in which to make informed decisions regarding academic
pursuits at Alaska Pacific University.
During the first year and sophomore year, advising is designed
not only to offer guidance on course selection, but also to explore the
nature and importance of a university education. All students meet with
their advisors during orientation to plan their schedule and regularly
thereafter. Entering first year students meet with their advisors on a
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 35
Alaska Pacific University

more frequent basis, particularly during the first semester. Students are
encouraged to take advantage of early registration opportunities so that
they may be assured of their first choice of classes. After attaining junior
standing and declaring a major, upper division students are advised
by a faculty member within their major department. Transfer students
are assigned advisors according to each student’s academic interests.
Advisors help assess the student’s standing toward the degree in the
chosen discipline.

Advanced Placement
In recognition of the strength of many advanced programs in
secondary schools, students who obtain scores of 5, 4, and 3 on the
College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) Advanced Placement Tests
will be awarded degree credit in the number equivalent to an appro-
priate university course. Scores must be submitted to the Registrar’s
Office directly from the CEEB in order to receive credit.

Auditing
With permission of the instructor, certain courses may be audited
for non-credit. Auditing status provides the privilege of class attendance
only and does not include taking examinations or submitting papers.
Information about courses for audit is available in the Registrar’s Office.
If a course is filled with credit students, no audits will be allowed. Refer
to the Tuition and Fees section for audit costs.

Audits
• Must be requested within the first 7 days of the term
• Cannot be changed to credit, but credits can be changed to an
audit within the first 7 days of the term

Continuous Enrollment
Students who enroll, pay fees and attend classes at Alaska Pacific
University are in a continuous enrollment status for the current and
subsequent semesters. Reapplication to the University is required if
enrollment is interrupted for a period of greater than twelve consecutive
months (three consecutive semesters).

Course Add/Drop/Withdraw Policy
This policy applies when a student is adding, dropping, or changing
course sections. If a student is withdrawing from all courses at the
University, this is considered under the Complete Withdrawal Policy.

Adding Courses
Students may add courses through the late registration period
through one of the following methods:
• Student Portal
• Registrar’s Office, by:
o Completing the ADD section of the Change of Class
Schedule form
o E-mailing the Registrar’s Office via your APU E-mail
account

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 36
Alaska Pacific University

Term Late Registration Census Date
Time Frame
Block First 4 Days of Term 5th Day of Term
Full First 6 Days of Term 7th Day of term
Session First 6 Days of Term 7th Day of Term
Module First 6 days of Term 7th day of term

After the late registration period, students may add a course with
the approval of the instructor and their advisor.

Dropping Courses
Students must complete the DROP section of the Change of Class
Schedule (available at the Registrar’s Office) and promptly return it to
the Registrar’s Office for processing or request to drop via your APU
e-mail addressed to the Registrar’s Office. Please copy your advisor
and instructor with the request. Classes dropped after the late regis-
tration period of a class appear on the student’s academic record with a
withdrawal grade. The only exception to the policy is when the University
cancels a course. Under those circumstances the Registrar’s Office will
process a withdrawal for the affected classes.
The date the course will be dropped is the date the form is received
by the Registrar’s Office staff.
Students who wish to withdraw from a course and receive a “W”
grade must drop the course prior to completion of 80% of the term
(see academic calendar for specific dates). The “W” grade may not be
granted after that date unless the student files a Request for Special
Consideration and the “W” grade is approved.

Complete Withdrawal Policy
This policy applies when a student stops attending all courses at the
university. If a student is withdrawing from one or more courses, but is
still enrolled in other courses at the university, this is considered under
the Course Add/Drop Policy.
Students must complete the COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL form available
at the Registrar’s office or online through My APU. If the student is enrolled
in a degree program, the Dean of Student’s signature is required. If the
student has received federal or state financial assistance the Student
Financial Services Office signature is required. The completed form must
be promptly returned to the Registrar’s Office for processing.
The date of withdrawal will be the date the student completes the
withdrawal form or the date the student officially notified the Regis-
trar’s Office (this notification may take place via APU e-mail, letter, in
person).

Faculty-Initiated Drop
Prior to the published census date of a term, a faculty member
may administratively drop students from class when they fail to meet
published individual course requirements or fail to attend class.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 37
Alaska Pacific University

Double Majors
Baccalaureate degree-seeking students may apply to graduate
(during the same semester) with two majors. For example, a student
may select two areas from approved majors such as Psychology and
Business Administration.
Students must apply for and be accepted into each major. Students
may request a double major at the time of initial admission into Alaska
Pacific University, or add a major at a later date through the Registrar’s
Office. Forms are available in that office or online through My APU.
Students must satisfy the General University Requirements and both
sets of major program requirements. Students must also satisfy catalog
requirements in effect at the time of acceptance into the major(s),
or later catalog requirements in effect during the remaining periods
of continuous enrollment. The transcript and diploma will reflect one
degree and two majors.
Graduation Application
Students must apply for graduation as follows:
November 1 May graduation
March 1 August graduation
July 1 December graduation

This application is valid only for the graduation date specified. A
new application and application fee must be filed if the student does not
graduate as planned. All candidates for degrees must be approved first
by the faculty of Alaska Pacific University and secondly by the Board of
Trustees.

Graduation Honors
Alaska Pacific University grants the following graduation honors to
baccalaureate degree candidates. These designations are included on
transcripts.

Honor Cumulative GPA
Summa Cum Laude 3.90 or higher
Magna Cum Laude 3.75-3.89
Cum Laude 3.60-3.74

These GPAs are based on all college work attempted at Alaska Pacific
University.

Interruption in Enrollment
If enrollment is interrupted for a period of greater than twelve
consecutive months (three consecutive semesters), the student must
reapply for admission and meet admission and degree requirements in
existence at the time of his or her readmission, unless a request for a
Leave of Absence has been filed with, and approved by, the Registrar
prior to departure. Requests for a Leave of Absence are made by
completing a Request for Special Consideration form available from the
Registrar’s Office or online through My APU.

Leave of Absence
A granted Leave of Absence allows students to retain:
• their graduation catalog, and
• Guaranteed Consolidated Tuition Plan

If, during the leave of absence, the student plans to take course
work elsewhere and transfer the credits to Alaska Pacific University,
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 38
Alaska Pacific University

the request for leave must include specific information regarding the
planned program. To ensure that these credits are transferred to Alaska
Pacific University, the program must be approved by the student’s
Alaska Pacific University advisor and the courses must be completed
with a grade of “C” or better for an undergraduate program and a “B”
(3.00) or better for a graduate program. These courses cannot be taken
during the final 32 hours for the a bachelor degree or 16 hours for the an
associate degree unless the student requests a “waiver of the University
Residence Requirement” by submitting a Request For Special Consider-
ation form to the Registrar’s Advisory Committee.
Students whose absence from the university is less than 12 consec-
utive months are not required to reapply for admission; however, credits
taken at any other institution during the absence from Alaska Pacific
University will not be accepted for transfer unless permission to take
such courses was granted in advance, and appropriate grades have
been earned as described in the preceding paragraph.
Requests for a Leave of Absence are made by completing a Request
for Special Consideration form available from the Registrar’s Office or
through My APU.
Students not attending a summer semester are not required to
request a Leave of Absence.

Maximum Credits Per Term
Require Academic
Term Dean’s Approval Max/Ceiling
Block >6 7
Session >16 18
Semester >21 24

Off-Campus Enrollment
Once enrolled at Alaska Pacific University, students may not take
courses elsewhere and transfer them to Alaska Pacific University, unless
the arrangement is approved in advance. The advisor’s approval is suffi-
cient except when such an arrangement is to take place during the final
16 or 32 semester hours prior to receiving an associate or bachelor
degree. In the latter case, the student may request a “waiver of the
University Residence Requirement” by submitting a request form to the
Registrar’s Advisory Committee.

Placement
All students are required to take the writing and a math placement
exam before being eligible to register for certain classes. One exception
to this policy is students who have taken and successfully passed calculus
are exempt from taking the math placement exam.

Residency Requirement for Graduation
For the A.A. Degrees, the final 16 credit hours must be taken in
residence at Alaska Pacific University. For the B.A. and B.S. Degrees,
the final 32 credit hours must be taken in residence at Alaska Pacific
University. Exceptions are handled by appeals to the Registrar’s Advisory
Committee.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 39
Alaska Pacific University

Registration Requirements
Students are officially registered if registering through the Web
Portal or the Registrar’s Office. Undergraduate students are considered
fulltime if they are enrolled in 12 or more credits per semester (spring,
summer, fall).

Second Baccalaureate Degree
Students who have received a baccalaureate degree from Alaska
Pacific University and who wish to obtain another baccalaureate degree
must:
1. Meet admission requirements;
2. Complete at least 24 resident credits beyond the previous
baccalaureate degree(s);
3. Complete the major requirements, including any resident and/
or upper division requirements, for the second degree; and,
4. Maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 (C) at Alaska Pacific
in order to graduate.

Transfer students who have received a baccalaureate degree from
another regionally accredited college or university and who wish to
obtain a second baccalaureate degree from Alaska Pacific must:
1. Meet admission requirements;
2. Complete at least 24 credits at APU, including any General
University Requirements that were not completed for the first
baccalaureate degree, including senior level core courses;
3. Complete the major requirements, including resident and/or
upper division requirements, for the second degree; and,
4. Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.00 (C) at Alaska Pacific in order
to graduate.

Semester Information
Alaska Pacific University has three semesters per year: spring,
summer, and fall. Within a semester are multiple terms: Block, Session,
and Module. For specific semester and term dates, please see the
academic calendar.

F = Full Semester = 15 weeks
Summer = 14 or 15 weeks

B = Block = 4 weeks S = Session = 11 weeks (Summer = 10 weeks)
S1 & S2 = Sessions I & II in Summer only = 5 weeks

M1 = Module I = 7 weeks M2 = Module II = 7 weeks

Transfer Credit
Courses completed at other accredited institutions, when courses
are 10000 level or above, may be transferred to Alaska Pacific University
if the courses are applicable to the university undergraduate degree and
if the courses are completed with a “C” grade or better. No more than
12 semester hours earned through correspondence programs may be
transferred into Alaska Pacific University.
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 40
Alaska Pacific University

Coursework transferred into Alaska Pacific University is not calcu-
lated into the cumulative GPA. Residency Requirements and Upper
Division Credit Hour Requirements must be completed as outlined in the
Degree Requirements Section of this Catalog.
Currently enrolled students utilizing a Catalog prior to Fall 2006 may
request all transfer coursework be removed from their Alaska Pacific
University cumulative GPA by requesting the change in writing through
the Registrar’s Office.
Transfer of credit from one institution to another is at the discretion
of the receiving school and depends on the comparability of curricula
and accreditation. For this reason, no school, nor specific program, can
guarantee that credits are transferable to another institution.

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses
Students with senior standing may, during their senior year, enroll
in a maximum of six credit hours of graduate level courses and hold
these credits to apply later to an Alaska Pacific University graduate
degree. These credits may not be applied toward their baccalaureate
degree. Seniors wishing to take advantage of this opportunity must file
a Request for Special Consideration with the Registrar that has been
approved by the Program Directors of the graduate course(s) and the
student’s advisor. Tuition for graduate courses may not be included in
the consolidated undergraduate tuition.

ACADEMIC STANDING

Academic Good Standing
Undergraduate students are considered to be in academic good
standing when their cumulative grade point average (GPA) is 2.00 or
greater. Grade point averages are compiled at the end of the fall, spring
and summer semesters.

Academic Warning
Any undergraduate student whose GPA for a given semester (fall,
spring, summer) falls below 2.00, but whose cumulative GPA remains
above a 2.00, will receive an “Academic Warning Notice.” Upon receipt
of this notice students are required to meet with their advisors and Dean
of Students to make a plan to improve their GPA during the succeeding
semester. The Academic Warning Notice alerts students that their
“Academic Good Standing” may be in jeopardy and if their GPA falls
below a 2.00 they will be placed on Academic Probation.

Academic Probation
A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 and has been
placed on academic warning will be placed on academic probation.
A student on academic probation may not enroll for more than 14
semester credit hours in a regular semester and six hours in a summer
session without prior approval from the academic dean. In addition, the
student must continue to seek regularly scheduled advice and counsel
from an academic advisor. Notification of probation will appear on a
student’s general academic information within Web Portal. Regaining
a 2.0 cumulative GPA on course work will remove the student from
probation.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 41
Alaska Pacific University

Academic Suspension
A student on academic probation who fails to raise the cumulative
GPA to 2.0 and who fails to earn a semester GPA of 2.0 will be placed
on academic suspension. Notification of suspension will appear in
general academic information within Web Portal.

Once suspended, a student may:
• Appeal for reinstatement

Appeal for reinstatement, based on extenuating circumstances,
may be made to Undergraduate Studies Committee which will render
a decision on the matter. Undergraduate Studies Committee may, at
its discretion, impose conditions regarding course-load limits, specific
course enrollments, workload limits, counseling, etc.

• Continue as non-degree seeking but may not enroll for more
than 14 semester credit hours in a regular semester and six
hours in a summer session without prior approval from the
academic dean.

Student must submit a Request for Special Consideration to the
Registrar’s Advisory Committee to continue at APU as non-degree
seeking until such time the cumulative GPA is above a 2.0.

• Not attend APU for one semester, not including summer. Upon
return, student must submit a Request for Special Consideration
to the Registrar’s Advisory Committee for reinstatement. A
student who enters APU after having been suspended will be on
academic probation until the cumulative GPA is raised to 2.0.

Academic Semester Honors
Each semester, outstanding full-time undergraduate students with
a 3.75 grade point average for the previous semester are recognized
through inclusion on the Honors List. To be eligible, all course work must
be completed by the end of the semester (students with an incomplete
grade will not be considered). A minimum of nine semester hours must
be completed with letter grades.

OTHER Academic POLICIES

Address Changes
Updates to the Local, billing, or home (permanent) address, phone
or e-mail may be done (1) in person at the Registrar’s Office, OR (2) by
sending an email through student’s APU e-mail account to the Regis-
trar’s Office email with the change in information.

Class Attendance
The presumption is made that there are no unimportant class
periods. Therefore, students are expected to attend all classes. There
are, of course, legitimate reasons for students to miss class, but
absences totaling more than six hours of classes for a 15-week class or
equivalent will need an explanation. The individual faculty member is to
decide what action is to be taken in regard to academic progress, which
may affect continued financial aid.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 42
Alaska Pacific University

Competency Courses Minimum Grades
In order to demonstrate competency in the General University
Requirements (GUR’s) of written communication, speech communi-
cation, and quantitative reasoning a minimum grade of “C” (includes
C+, C, and C-) must be earned.

Contract Learning
Contract Learning may take the form of an independent study, a
collaborative project, a practicum experience, or a Senior Project. It
is seen as an important attribute of the active learner, to be carefully
developed under the supervision of the faculty.
An Independent Study course is a course which is listed in the
catalog but offered to an individual student who is unable to attend a
regularly scheduled course. A Directed Study course is not listed in the
catalog but deals with a special topic and is arranged on an individual
basis by a student and a faculty member.
Contract Learning makes education hands-on, experiential, and
relevant to real world problem solving. Students learn how to concep-
tualize, plan, carry out, evaluate, and present their own work while
learning about their own interests and special abilities. A maximum of
32 credit hours earned through Independent and/or
Directed Study courses may be applied to the B.A. degree.

Course Numbering System
00001 - 00099 REVIEW COURSES may NOT be used for the
Associate and Bachelor degrees
10000 - 19999 FIRST YEAR LEVEL
20000 - 29999 SOPHOMORE LEVEL open to qualified first year
students
30000 - 39999 JUNIOR LEVEL open to qualified sophomores
unless otherwise indicated
40000 - 49999 SENIOR LEVEL open to qualified juniors unless
otherwise indicated

Undergraduate students may not enroll in a course number beginning
at the 50000 level or higher without special permission.

Credit by Examination
A maximum of 45 semester hours may be earned through institu-
tional examination or the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and
applied toward a Bachelor of Arts degree, 22 semester hours may be
applied toward the Associate of Arts degree. Credits earned by exami-
nation are not counted as part of the Alaska Pacific University residency
requirement.
Students may petition to receive credit from CLEP examinations. A
maximum of 30 semester hours will be allowed for the general exami-
nation and 15 semester hours for subject examinations. In order to
qualify, the scores must be at the percentile determined by the appro-
priate academic department.
Some Alaska Pacific University courses, as approved by depart-
ments, may be challenged through Alaska Pacific University credit by
examination program (CEP). Appropriate forms are available from the
Registrar’s Office or online through My APU. Students pay a fee and are
given a grade for the examination.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 43
Alaska Pacific University

Documented Experiential Learning Credit
Students with prior learning experiences equivalent to those expected
in specific college level courses may apply for assessment through the
Documented Experiential Learning Program (DEL Folder).
In Portfolio Development (GS 20500, GS 20600 and GS 20700)
offered each semester, students prepare for documentation of work
experience, volunteer or military experience, and other experiential
learning. Up to 32 credits applicable to the bachelor degree and up to
16 credits applicable to the associate degree can be gained through the
DEL Folder process. (See Tuition and Fees section for costs involved.)

E-mail Address
All currently enrolled students will be given an Alaska Pacific
University e-mail address. This will be the student’s e-mail address for
the duration of time the student is at APU plus 12 months. This e-mail
address will be deemed the official means of communication with the
student.

Full-time Enrollment and Full-time Employment
Alaska Pacific University encourages the academic success of its
students. Because full-time academic study at Alaska Pacific University
requires considerable diligence, a course load exceeding 12 credits
is not recommended to students who are concurrently pursuing full-
time employment. Students who work full-time who wish to carry more
than the recommended credits are warned that, historically, such over
commitment has resulted in a greater incidence of lower academic
achievement than would be expected under normal circumstances.

Honor Policy
Alaska Pacific University is a community of learners and teachers
in which all enjoy freedoms and privileges based upon mutual trust
and respect as well as a clear sense of responsibility. This philosophy
forms the foundation of the academic and social environment at this
university.
In the academic arena, students are responsible for their own
learning while faculty members enhance these learning experiences.
Students are expected to do all work assigned, to do it honestly and
with integrity, and to ensure that the instructor has actually received
the work.
As noted in the Student Handbook, cheating on examinations,
plagiarism, or submitting the work of others as one’s own are specific
examples of prohibited conduct. Students who engage in such activities
will be subject to disciplinary measures, which may include failure in
the course or expulsion from the university. (See Student Handbook for
further information.)

Jury Duty
Students will be excused from class attendance for jury duty upon
presenting evidence of their summons. Students are expected to make
up missed class work expeditiously upon completion of their duty.

Meningitis, Alaska Postsecondary Immunization Act
In an effort to increase public awareness of meningococcal disease,
the Alaska Postsecondary Immunization Act was signed into law on May
18, 2005. This law requires that all educational providers give written
notice to each student regarding meningococcal disease as described
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 44
Alaska Pacific University

in statute. The educational provider must obtain a signature from each
student indicating that the student has either 1) received an immuni-
zation against the disease, or 2) received written notification informing
them of meningococcal disease.

Military Service/School Experience Credit
Undergraduate credit is allowed in accordance with the recommen-
dations contained in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experi-
ences in the Armed Services, published by the American Council on
Education, when the credit is considered appropriate to an Alaska Pacific
University degree.
Name Change
Students may initiate an official name change by presenting one of
the following:

Documents Establishing Identity (w/photograph) and Showing
Both Names
CURRENT Passport or Passport Card

CURRENT Permanent Resident Card or Alien Registration Receipt Card (Form
I-551)
—OR—
Select ONE from EACH column

Column 1 Column 2

Documents Establishing Documents Establishing
Identity Legal Name Change
CURRENT Driver’s license or ID card Marriage Certificate
issued by a State or outlying
possession of the United States
provided it contains a photograph or
information such as name, date of
birth, gender, height, eye color, and
address
CURRENT ID card issued by federal, Divorce Decree
state or local government agencies
or entities, provided it contains a
photograph or information such as
name, date of birth, gender, height,
eye color, and address
CURRENT U.S. Military card or draft Court Order
record
CURRENT Military dependent’s ID Social Security Account Number Card
card (name must match name from column
1 ID)
CURRENT U.S. Coast Guard Authorized Document Issued by the
Merchant Mariner Card Department of Homeland Security
CURRENT Driver’s license issued by
a Canadian government authority

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 45
Alaska Pacific University

Personal Information
All students must provide in the first month of attending Alaska
Pacific University the following additional information: date of birth,
gender, ethnicity, race and social security number. The age, ethnicity,
and race are used to report to the federal government, in aggregate
only, as is required in the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data
System (IPEDS). The social security number in combination with the
birth date is a means of identification and is required for those students
receiving federal moneys.

Prerequisites
Prerequisites are listed with the course descriptions in this catalog.
Prerequisites are designed to alert the student to the background
expected for the course. This ensures that the student can more fully
benefit from the course material. Instructor permission is required for
any student not having the prerequisites to enroll in a course. (See
individual departments for details.)
Social Security Number Corrections
A correction in social security number requires the student to bring
the social security card to the Registrar’s Office for verification.
Special Consideration
A student, whose circumstances may be exceptional, may file a
request for Special Consideration form to seek a waiver of an academic
policy. The form is available in the Registrar’s Office or online through
My APU. The specific request must be stated, along with supporting
facts and circumstances. All requests involving waivers of graduation
requirements are first considered by the Registrar, and then referred to
the appropriate department if a departmental requirement is involved
or to the Registrar’s Advisory Committee if the request pertains to a
university-wide requirement. The Registrar’s Advisory Committee
considers appeals to the Registrar’s decision. Automatic approval of
such requests should not be assumed. (See Appendix “B” for appeals
process.)
Student Records
The university maintains confidentiality of all student records. A
student may, however, obtain specific information contained in these
records as specified by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of
1974, Public Law 93-380. The annual notification of student rights under
FERPA is provided at the time of fall registration. Copies are otherwise
available from the Registrar’s and Dean of Students’ offices. Both official
and unofficial transcripts are available from the Registrar’s Office.

Student Risk Management Plan
Any student who plans to study independently in a foreign country,
do field work in a wilderness setting, or engage in a high-risk activity
during independent course work is required to submit a Student
Risk Management Plan (SRMP) to the Alaska Pacific University Risk
Management Committee (RMC). Students are advised to begin the
proposal at least 30 days in advance. Students may access information
about how to prepare such a plan on the APU Website. The approved
plan must be attached to the learning contract (i.e. Directed Study,
Practicum, Internship, Senior Project, or Thesis).

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 46
Alaska Pacific University

UNDERGRADUATE
PROGRAMS
The undergraduate “active learning” curriculum at Alaska Pacific
University (APU) includes both traditional and nontraditional features.
Combinations of class work and experiential learning—through individual
and group projects, practicum or work experiences, individualized study—
culminate in the senior project for all graduates. All undergraduate
programs lead to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees.
In addition, the Associate of Arts degree and Certificate programs are
available in some areas. The Associate and Bachelor degrees require 64
and 128 semester credits respectively.
Each degree requires work in a major, coursework rooted in the
liberal arts tradition, and electives chosen to broaden the student’s
areas of interest. These graduation requirements are described below.
Course requirements for the Associate and Bachelor degrees are listed
in the department sections of this catalog.

General University Requirements
Alaska Pacific University promotes the fullest development of its
students through student centered, experiential education. The educa-
tional goals state that the university “combines the breadth, integrative
understanding, and critical thinking of the liberal arts with practical and
focused knowledge for professional careers.” The General University
Requirements (GUR) are designed to help students develop the first half
of that combination: to develop mental skills and perspectives that will
expand their understanding of knowledge as an integrated whole and
the world as an interdependent community and will equip them to be
more effective learners in their major areas.
Breadth requirements are intended to encourage more compre-
hensive understanding by providing exposure to the disciplinary lenses
of natural science, social science, the humanities; examining ethical and
moral systems and explore questions of value; exposing students to the
affective and mental discipline of learning a second language in order to
enhance their appreciation for language as a system of symbols and as a
carrier of culture. Because the skills course requirements are designed to
assure certain levels of competency, some GUR’s may require successful
completion of prior coursework or placement by examination.

REQUIRED SKILLS AND BREADTH COMPETENCIES
1. Carrying out a Project
2. Written Communication
3. Speech Communication
4. Quantitative Reasoning
5. Scientific Reasoning
6. Humanities
7. Ethical and Religious Values
8. Social Science
9. Second Language

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Alaska Pacific University

All of the breadth competencies are met by courses or areas as
follows:

1. Introduction to Active Learning
Students learn to carry out a project. All first year students are
required to take a course designed to introduce them to collegiate
learning through project-based education and to other dimensions
of active learning. Different sections of this course focus on different
domains of learning, but in each section students undertake at least one
project. Learning objectives require students to:
• conceptualize, plan, carry out, evaluate, and present both
individual and group projects
• understand the importance of out-of-the-classroom activities
requiring group and individual discipline
• self-reflect and evaluate experiences, both individually and
collectively
2. Written Communication
Competency level courses focus on developing fluency in writing for
academic and a range of discipline-specific audiences. Learning objec-
tives require the student to:
• write soundly-reasoned and well-supported arguments
• use appropriate grammatical and stylistic conventions
• develop information literacy skills necessary to synthesize
retrieved information, understand the ethical, legal, and social
nature of that information, utilize it for specific purposes, and
document its origins appropriately
• understand and utilize stylistic conventions of a particular
discipline
• recognize that various disciplines disseminate and access
information differently
• be able to adapt the presentation of a topic to the full range of
an audience within ones discourse community, from academic to
popular
3. Speech Communication
Students may choose one course from a menu of selections to
enhance their understanding of the importance of effective oral commu-
nication. In order to help students develop oral communication skills to
a level that will enable them to function successfully in both professional
and personal contexts, each course provides students with the oppor-
tunity to:
• gain a greater understanding of self, society, and communication
processes
• understand the relationship between context, communication
purposes, and message production
• develop the ability to assess and improve one’s own
communication skills
4. Quantitative Reasoning
To prepare students to understand and participate in an increas-
ingly quantifiable and quantified society, culture, and world, students
may choose from a suite of quantitative skill choices including pure
symbolic logic, fundamental equation-based skills, and discipline-specific
statistics.
Students will be able to:
• understand the conceptual underpinnings of the operations they
perform
• manipulate data, equations, or other metrics symbolically,
numerically, and logically
Undergraduate Programs 48
Alaska Pacific University

5. Laboratory Science
The GUR in laboratory science exemplifies the epistemology of
the scientific method. Students choose one course from the natural
science disciplines that offer laboratory or field components, such as
biology, chemistry, geology, meteorology, oceanography, and physics.
These courses include those with the prefixes SC and MAR. Each course
provides students with the tools to:
• observe and document nature in a systematic and integrative
way in the context of discipline paradigms
• pose and test hypotheses
• learn and utilize standard formats used to communicate their
scientific observations and experiments in writing and in
speech
6. Social/Behavioral Science
The social/behavioral sciences focus on topics emerging from
empirical investigations of human social behavior and society. Students
may select a course from specific disciplines, such as psychology,
communication, political science, or linguistics, or they may elect instead
to take a survey course addressing the social scientific enterprise and
philosophical commitments more broadly. Courses fulfilling this GUR are
noted in the Catalog and in the course schedule for each term. For each
course will:
• situate the social/behavioral sciences in relation to other
traditions focused on the question of what it means to be
human
• understand the tools and ethical practices of a scientific study of
human social behavior
• consider the self as a member of a social community
7. Humanities
In courses drawn from history, literature, philosophy, and cultural
studies, students learn to analyze and ponder questions of value and
meaning from different perspectives through reading, writing, discussion,
listening, and seeing. They come to understand and experience the
importance of personal inquiry, artistic expression, and the role of art
in societies and lives. Courses in world language and religion, beyond
the initial semester of study required for the GUR in Language or Ethical
and Religious Values, also meet these objectives. Each course requires
students to:
• explore the scholarly tools used by a particular discipline
• explore questions of history and/or origin, cultural relevance,
and meaning of ideas and artistic creations
• understand the role of historical, literary, or artistic interpretations
in culture(s)
• increase appreciation for the ways in which interpretations of
the beautiful, the true, and the good in the past inform the ways
in which we understand these in the present.
8. Ethical and Religious Values
The purpose of the Ethics and Religion GUR is to provide a broad
view from which to consider more than one aspect of spiritual or ethical
traditions. The goal of these courses is for students to gain a greater
understanding of self and society by honoring spiritual and moral values
as a foundation for leadership and multicultural development. The objec-
tives of these courses are designed to:
• introduce premises concerning the human condition, social
reality, and the development of moral values

Undergraduate Programs 49
Alaska Pacific University

• situate students within a direct relationship with the absolute,
where students learn to begin the process that necessitates
their involvement with their own self creation
• emphasize the notion that either religion or ethics has long
been a tradition of a liberal arts education
9. Language
Students are required to take one semester of one foreign language,
a second language, American Sign Language or demonstrate compe-
tency at that level. Even this rudimentary study of a second language
is expected to introduce students to the discipline of second language
acquisition, promote multi- and intercultural awareness, and encourage
students to elect additional study of natural languages. This competency
may be demonstrated by scoring at the appropriate level on a placement
test in a language regularly taught at Alaska Pacific University, by
providing documentation of a foreign language or ASL proficiency (e.g.
serving as a translator or interpreter or attending a school where English
is not the medium of instruction), or by transferring four credits from
language or ASL courses taken at another accredited post-secondary
institution.
Students whose primary language is not English may use English
proficiency to meet the language requirement. In this case, the student
will be required to score at the appropriate level on a placement test in
English. Students wishing to earn credit for languages regularly taught
at Alaska Pacific University, without taking the courses, must follow the
procedures for Credit by Examination, or take one of the CLEP exami-
nations and score in the 50th percentile or above. The Credit by Exami-
nation option may be available only for languages in which Alaska Pacific
University faculty members have expertise. The chair of the Liberal
Studies Department will determine the appropriate examination.
Two years of high school language credit of “B” or better work meets
the GUR for foreign language. Such study does not convey credit towards
the degree, only satisfies the requirement. The learning objective for
the language GUR is to:
• develop introductory-level language skills in a second language

Practicum/Internship/Work Experience
APU’s active learning model takes students back and forth between
theory and practice. To gain experience involving real world issues in
the major, campus undergraduate program students enroll in either a
practicum or internship, typically in the junior year; Degree Completion
students are expected to be concurrently employed.

Senior Project
The undergraduate program at Alaska Pacific culminates in the
Senior Project, undertaken in a student’s major and related to post
graduation plans. The Senior Project builds upon, and further person-
alizes, the student’s education; it combines knowledge gained with the
ability to apply that knowledge to real situations. Whatever the project,
it will be an excellent stepping stone to graduate school or immediate
entry into the workplace. Students present their senior projects to the
campus community on designated days at the end of each semester.

Electives
Students are encouraged to broaden their knowledge of areas
of interest outside the major areas, either by focusing on a minor or
branching into new fields of study.

Undergraduate Programs 50
Alaska Pacific University

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS

Associate of Arts

General University RequirementS Credit Hours
Intro to Active Learning 3-4
GS 13500 Introduction to Active Learning (4cr.)*
DCP: IS 23300 Critical Thinking for Management (3 cr.)
Written Communication** 3-4
LL 10100 Argumentative Writing or equivalent
Speech Communication** 3-4
CO 10000 Fundamentals of Communication (4 cr.)
DCP: IS 20600 Organizational Communication (3 cr.)
Quantitative Reasoning 3-4
MT 10100, DCP: BAM 10500 or equivalent
Humanities 3-4
See course descriptions beginning with prefixes:
CS, HI, HU, LL, LS, PH, and RS
Laboratory Science 4
(See course descriptions beginning with prefixes:
MAR and SC)
Social/Behavioral Science 3-4
See course descriptions beginning with prefixes:
BA, BAM, PY, SC and SS
Ethical and Religious Values 3-4
PH 20200, RS 20100, RS 20200
DCP: IS 45300; HS 41800
TOTAL  ***25-32
Major Requirements varies
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 64

Undergraduate Programs 51
Alaska Pacific University

BACHELOR OF ARTS / BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

General University Requirements Credit Hours
Intro to Active Learning 3-4
GS 13500 Introduction to Active Learning (4 cr)*
DCP: IS 23300 Critical Thinking for Management (3 cr)
Written Communication** 3-4
LL 20100 Writing for Discourse Communities.
Transfer students may request special consideration
for combinations of courses that may meet this
requirement. The pre-requisite is LL 10100,
its transfer equivalent, or placement by exam
Speech Communication** 3-4
CO 10000 Fundamentals of Communication (4 cr)
DCP: IS 20600 Organizational Communication (3 cr)
Quantitative Reasoning 3-4
MT 12100 Pre-Calculus; MT 21000 Math
Concepts; MT 22000 Statistics; PY 23100 Statistics;
PH 20300 Logic; DCP: IS 24200 Statistical Methods in
Research. The pre-requisite is MT 10100 Intermediate
Algebra, its transfer equivalent, or placement by exam;
for DCP, BAM 10500
Humanities 6-8
See course descriptions beginning with prefixes:
CS, HI, HU, LL, LS, PH, and RS
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
See course descriptions beginning with prefixes:
MAR and SC
Social/Behavioral Science 3-4
See course descriptions beginning with prefixes:
BA, BAM, PY, SC and SS
Ethical and Religious Values 3-4
RS 20100 Topics in Religion (4 cr); two courses
selected from RS 20200 Foundations of a
Religion (2 cr); PH 20200 Introduction to
Ethics (4 cr); PY 33300 Psychology of Spirituality
and Religion (4cr.);
DCP: IS 45300 Values and Ethics in the
Workplace (3 cr); HS 41800 Values and
Ethics in Human Services (3 cr)
Sophomore Seminar
Each major has a course satisfying this requirement;
see the department sections for details
Practicum
See department section for details
Senior Project
See department section for details

TOTAL ***32-40
Major Requirements varies
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

Undergraduate Programs 52
Alaska Pacific University

*Required of entering first year campus undergraduate students.
May be waived by advisors for transfers entering as sophomores or
above.

Competency Courses
**Competency courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or
better.

*** The General University Requirements for the Associate of Arts
Degree is an eight (8) course requirement rather than a 32 credit hour
requirement; and for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science
Degrees it is a ten (10) course requirement rather than a 40 credit hour
requirement; e.g., many transfer “ equivalents”and DCP equivalents are
3 credit courses.

Minimum Graduation GPA Requirement
For both the Associate Degree and the Bachelor Degrees, the
minimum graduation GPA Requirement is 2.00 (C).

Minimum Major/Minor GPA Requirement
All majors and minors have a minimum GPA requirement of 2.00
(C).

Graduation Residency Requirement
For the A.A. Degree, the final 16 credit hours must be taken in
residence at Alaska Pacific University. For the B.A. and B.S. Degrees,
the final 32 credit hours must be taken in residence at Alaska Pacific
University. Exceptions are handled by appeals to the Registrar’s Advisory
Committee.

Upper Division Credit Hour Requirement
A minimum of thirty (30) credit hours must consist of 30000 and
40000 level courses for the B.A. and B.S. Degrees.

Undergraduate Programs 53
Alaska Pacific University

CAMPUS UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

Business Administration
Associate of Arts
Major: Business Administration

Counseling Psychology and Human Services
Associate of Arts
Major: Human Services *
Bachelor of Arts
Major: Psychology
Minor in Psychology

Education (K-8)
K-8 Professional Development Certificate
Associate of Arts
Major: Education
Bachelor of Arts Major
Major: Education (K-8)
Minor in Education (K-8)

Earth Sciences
Bachelor of Arts
Major: Earth Sciences
Bachelor of Science
Major: Earth Sciences

Environmental Studies
Bachelor of Arts
Major: Environmental Studies

Environmental Science
Bachelor of Arts
Major: Environmental Science
Major: Environmental Policy and Planning
Major: Marine Biology
Bachelor of Science
Major: Environmental Science
Major: Marine Biology
Minors in: Environmental Science, Marine Biology
Mathematics for Environmental Sciences

Liberal Studies
Bachelor of Arts
Major: Liberal Studies
Minor in Liberal Studies

Outdoor Studies
Bachelor of Arts
Major: Outdoor Studies
Minor in Outdoor Studies

* Pending approval.
Undergraduate Programs 54
Alaska Pacific University

Campus Undergraduate
Student Milestones
First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year
August November Submit GUR Apply for graduation
Students introduced Select Spring competencies in by midterm of the
to the portfolio courses Portfolio for semester before you
requirement during Consider Eco League Advisor’s review plan to graduate.
orientation option for spring of Apply  to grad
2nd year schools or begin job
October search; have
Begin portfolio Complete GUR’s recommendations
Make plans for junior written
November practicum: secure
Develop Educational Sophomore seminar: all signatures and Be sure that GUR
plan begin to address prepare any needed Portfolio has been
Select Spring Major competencies risk management approved by advisor
courses plan for submission before signing up for
Discuss Portfolio Consider using during the pre- senior project
progress and initial January block for registration period.
documentation field or travel Develop senior
Pre-registration experiences Participate in Eco- project, secure all
League options. required signatures,
and prepare and
submit any needed
risk management
plan during the pre-
registration period
for the final
semester.

December
Senior projects;
Graduation exercises
January January January
Advise new students Last semester for
Eco League visit
February/March February  February  
Select 2nd year Select 3rd year Select 4th year
courses courses courses
Consider Eco League Consider Eco League
possibilities for 2nd possibilities for 3rd
year year
March
Address GUR
competencies for
Portfolio
April April/May
Register for fall Register for fall Register for fall Senior projects
Graduation exercises
July/August
Senior projects
Graduation exercises

Undergraduate Programs 55
Alaska Pacific University

PORTFOLIO

In addition to meeting the General University Requirements for all
APU graduates, all campus undergraduate students who graduate from
APU must also compile and present to the faculty a Portfolio demon-
strating that they have acquired and possess these skills and under-
standings. Because students are expected to demonstrate integrative
knowledge, the portfolio asks students to bring to bear learning experi-
ences across the core and major curriculums, as well as elective choices.
Students are required to demonstrate their competency in each of these
areas--through narration and examples of work--in the first section of
the Portfolio.

The Portfolio
The Portfolio process begins when students enter APU. In Intro-
duction to Active Learning seminars, students prepare the introductory
materials: autobiography, goals statements, and resume. During the
next four semesters, students collect materials to be included in the
documentation for the junior year review. Transfer students who arrive
at APU with more than 32 credits are excused from the Active Learning
seminar and are encouraged to get started with the portfolio by enrolling
in GS 20500: Initial Documentation and GS 20600: Addressing the GUR
Competencies. Students may also elect to prepare the portfolio on their
own, consulting the Portfolio Development Guide. Sophomore seminars
in each discipline include components regarding the major area compe-
tencies.
The University has identified the competencies as skills and under-
standings it expects APU graduates as educated persons to have
developed. They are not ones that are necessarily developed in any
particular class, but rather by formal and experiential learning of a
variety of sorts.
Each department has developed an additional list of competencies
it expects from its majors. These are included in the Portfolio Devel-
opment Guide or available from departments.
The competencies include the General University Competencies and
Major Area Competencies. The General University Competencies are
congruent with but not identical to the General University Requirement
courses.

In the junior year, students address the general university required
competencies, documenting mastery or outlining a plan for acquiring
them before the end of the senior year. While the portfolio is a collection
of a student’s work and a series of essays assessing that work, in a fuller
sense, the term “portfolio” refers to the current product of an ongoing
process intended to encourage academic and personal growth through
reflection and self-assessment.
The portfolio is reviewed by the student’s major department and
is considered an essential tool for students and their advisors to chart
and carry out a plan for individualized learning. The GU section of the
portfolio must be completed before the student enrolls for the senior
project.
The Portfolio Development Guide, which details this process, is
available online.

Undergraduate Programs 56
Alaska Pacific University

Sophomore Seminar
In this course, students learn and put into practice the basic thought
processes, questions, and problem solving styles of the various academic
disciplines. Each department provides one sophomore-level seminar
course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental project
skills of real world professionals representative of that department.
This course teaches students how to frame a directed study that
is academically rigorous and how to design a project that yields clear
results, to evaluate those results, to manage time effectively, and to
critique one’s own work. The student will interact creatively with faculty
and peers, plan and carry out a basic but professional team project or
independent study, and critique the projects of other student teams.

Directed Study
Students are encouraged to design directed studies as opportunities
to make attachments across disciplines or to study in greater depth
areas of particular interest. Under the mentorship of a faculty member,
students pursue learning objectives they have set for themselves.

Junior Practicum
Each major offers a Practicum or Internship experience that adds
more refined and technical problem solving skills to the student’s profes-
sional repertoire. A significant part of the Junior Practicum is the planning
and execution of an individual project with greater complexity and
sophistication than projects attempted at earlier levels. The practicum
will provide experience involving real world issues in the major.

Senior Project
The undergraduate program at Alaska Pacific University culminates
in the Senior Project, undertaken in a student’s major and related to post
graduation plans. The Senior Project builds upon, and further person-
alizes, the student’s education; it combines knowledge gained with the
ability to apply that knowledge to real situations. Whatever the project,
it will be an excellent stepping stone to graduate school or immediate
entry into the workplace. Students present their senior projects to the
campus community on designated days at the end of each semester.

Undergraduate Programs 57
Alaska Pacific University

DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM
The Degree Completion Program (DCP) is designed for working adult
students who for personal and professional reasons want to return to
college to begin or complete a degree in the business or human services
fields. The program offers course work allowing students to complete
General University Requirements (GUR), requirements in the majors,
and electives to complete the Associate and Bachelor Degrees. Students
transferring in 60 or more college level credits are eligible to enroll in
upper level degree work. Students transferring in fewer than 60 credits
may earn those credits by enrolling in the Business Administration or
Human Services Associates Degrees or earning the additional credits
needed in the following ways:
• Degree Seeking students may enroll while completing the
General University Requirements and lower division classes in
the Degree Completion Program. These students may want some
time and experience in the academic environment to determine
the best degree choice for their career path.
• Credit for Prior Learning is a formal mechanism for reflecting on
a person’s work life and past experiences and then documenting
the learning based on competencies for specific topical areas.
Compilation of the portfolio takes the student though work
assignments, on-the-job training, volunteer work, military
service, travel, and other learning opportunities. Taking two
one-credit courses will guide you through the process: Initial
Documentation, GS 20500, Assessment for Credit of Prior
Learning, GS 20700.
• Challenge Coursework that is normally taught in regular classes
at Alaska Pacific University: Specific courses may be challenged
through credit by examination, examinations are administered
by APU.
• College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES allows
students to challenge subject areas by taking examinations.
Most tests require a score of at or above the 50th percentile.
The DCP program offers accelerated, seven-week modules (or
courses) available in the evenings or online once a week. DCP curricula
are designed to integrate theories and concepts learned within the
classroom to everyday work. Thus the program is for working (paid or
voluntary) adults. Methods of instruction reflect APU’s active learning
philosophy. Classroom learning experiences include attending classes,
engaging in independent research, participating in peer-group learning,
executing projects, writing and reflection, etc.
The DCP seeks to build a competency base that is relevant for
professional careers in management, health services, accounting, and
human services. The program goals prepare students to:
• Develop skill sets necessary to be successful in the work place
• Enhance/develop leadership skills
• Understand theoretical foundations that underlie the subject
disciplines
• Promote self direction through independent work
• Develop/enhance problem solving skills
• Gain a deeper understanding of ethical responsibilities of the
profession(s)
• Understand the discipline in the context of the larger natural,
cultural, social and ethical environments in which they operate

Undergraduate Programs 58
Alaska Pacific University

Business Administration
Associate of Arts
Major: Business Administration

Bachelor of Arts
Major: Accounting Information for Management
Major: Health Services Administration
Major: Business Administration and Management

Minor in Business Administration and Management

Counseling Psychology and Human Services
Associate of Arts
Major: Human Services

Bachelor of Arts
Major: Human Services

Minor in Human Services

Undergraduate Programs 59
Alaska Pacific University

RURAL ALASKA NATIVE ADULT
PROGRAM (RANA)

The RANA Distance Education Program is an innovative distance
learning initiative of Alaska Pacific University. RANA provides educa-
tional access and professional development for working adults from all
parts of Alaska who are unable to take advantage of campus-based
programs. The program is particularly committed to serving Alaska
Native communities in the effort to grow local leaders and professionals
from within Alaska.
Degrees and majors currently available online through RANA
include:

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT
Associate of Arts
Major: Business Administration

Bachelor of Arts
Major: Business Administration and Management
Major: Health Services Administration

Emphasis in Non-Profit Management

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPT
Associates of Arts
Major: Human Services *

Bachelor of Arts
Major: Human Services

Emphasis in Non-Profit Management

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
Associate of Arts
Major: Education (K-8)

Bachelor of Arts
Major: Education (K-8)

LIBERAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
Associate of Arts
Major: Career and Technical Education

RANA’s online degrees are offered through its successful and recog-
nized format of high interpersonal connectivity combined with high
technological delivery. Students initiate their studies each semester with
a brief, intensive residency on campus. At the residency, students meet
with advisors and instructors, receive orientation for online courses and
technologies, and become a part of the RANA community of learners.
Following residency, students complete the majority of their studies from
home. In this distance learning phase, students meet in weekly online

Undergraduate Programs 60
Alaska Pacific University

chats for each course, and continue to work closely with their instructors
and fellow students using web-delivered systems.
Coursework necessary to meet specific degree requirements is
outlined in the APU catalogue sections for Business Administration
Department, Counseling Psychology and Human Services Department,
Education Department, and Liberal Studies Department.

ONLINE COURSES
FOR UNDERGRADUATES
Many courses are available through distance education each
semester. Please check the schedule for “APU Online” offerings for any
particular term. The courses are available to all undergraduates under
the following conditions.

Online Courses at APU have Three Components
1. Required face-to-face orientation on campus—orientation takes
place during the week immediately preceding the start of the
semester. During orientation students meet one another and
the instructor, and review course expectations and learning
objectives.
2. Scheduled weekly “chats” which occur online—chats are
scheduled once a week in the evenings - some courses meet for
90 minutes.
3. Assignments and activities which are completed independently
and submitted via the Internet—you can expect to do the same
amount of homework for an online course as for a campus-
based course.

To Register for an Online Course:
• You must have your advisor’s approval
• You must be able to meet for the face-to-face course
orientation(s) and weekly chats
• You must have access to a computer, preferably one that is at
your home and no more than 2 years old
• You must have Internet access, preferably the equivalent of
“broadband”
• You must be familiar with all of APU’s technology systems,
including: Moodle, Elluminate, and MyAPU (APU information,
APU e-mail, and Student Portal).

* Pending approval.

Undergraduate Programs 61
Alaska Pacific University

EARLY HONORS PROGRAM
Alaska Pacific University offers an Early Honors Program for qualified
high school seniors. Early Honors students take a full year of classes at
APU, fulfilling remaining high school graduation requirements while also
earning transferable college credits. Students will gain an appreciation
of the arts and sciences, and will build and refine their analytical and
expressive reasoning powers.

During the first semester, Early Honors students enroll in a common
university-level curriculum designed with the intent to satisfy the senior
level requirements of the Anchorage and Mat-Su School Districts. The
September Block starts off with GS 13300 Critical Thinking and GS 10200
Fitness for Life. Students move into the Session in late September and
finish their semester by mid-December. During that time students enroll
in designated sections of LL 10100 Argumentative Writing. Placement
in math courses depends on prior coursework, and there are choices
among the science and social science courses offered.

In the second semester, many of the students elect to participate
in the Travel Abroad option for the January Block (see LS 20400 Travel
Course) but alternatives are available on campus. During the spring
Session, which begins in early February, students have the opportunity
to select courses from the Alaska Pacific schedule relevant to their
academic interests.

Early Honors mainly serves students from the Anchorage and the
Matanuska-Susitna Valley. Students living outside of the Anchorage area
may be eligible, provided they have family residing within commuting
distance or they live on campus in the Residence Halls. Outstanding
home-schooled students are also encouraged to apply.

Because Alaska Pacific University does not grant high school
diplomas, students who want to receive a diploma must work with their
high school guidance office to insure that they do so.

Undergraduate Programs 62
Alaska Pacific University

ECOLEAGUE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

OPPORTUNITIES
APU is a member of an inter-college exchange group called the Eco-
League. The Eco-League is composed of five colleges and universities,
all small, all with strong programs in Environmental Science, Environ-
mental Studies, Marine Biology, Outdoor Studies, and similar programs
(Alaska Pacific University, College of the Atlantic, Green Mountain
College, Northland College and Prescott College). Through this program,
APU students in their sophomore or junior years may elect to spend up
to two, non-consecutive semesters studying at one of the Eco-League
member institutions as part of their academic program. For more infor-
mation on how to participate, go to APU’s web site: www.alaskapacific.
edu/academics/ecoleague

PROCEDURES

Incoming Students to Alaska Pacific University (APU)
Students who will be attending APU for an Eco League semester
need to fill out the Registration Form. This form should be submitted
to the Office of Admissions at APU. Students planning on attending
APU for a semester would also check in with their home institution for
proper procedures. Go to APU web site for more information, forms and
deadline dates - www.alaskapacific.edu/academics/ecoleague

Outgoing Students
APU students planning on attending another Eco League Institution
need to fill out an Eco League Intent to Participate form and return it to
the Academic Dean’s office. You will also need to fill out the Registration
Form. The Registration form will need to be signed by your advisor and
returned to the Registrar’s Office. Please contact the Academic Dean’s
Office to find out who the contact person is for the Institution you plan
on attending. For more information, forms, and deadline dates go to the
APU web site - www.alaskapacific.edu/academics/ecoleague

Undergraduate Programs 63
Alaska Pacific University

UNDERGRADUATE
Academic
Degrees

Travel Argentina & Brazil-Literature & Culture: Rio de Janeiro
Photographer Unknown

Coastal Ecosystems: Ecuador
Photo by Javier

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 64
Alaska Pacific University

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT
Alaska Pacific University’s business administration degrees are
designed to support business and professional careers. These degrees
meet the educational needs of students by offering a curriculum rich in
active learning. At the undergraduate level the department offers an
Associate of Arts in Business Administration. The department also offers
Bachelor of Arts degrees in Accounting Information for Management,
Business Administration and Management, and Health Services Admin-
istration.

Associate of Arts
in Business Administration
The Associate of Arts major in Business Administration (BA) provides
a basic understanding of business principles and prepares the student
for entry-level positions in business. Associate of Arts Degree courses
can be applied toward a Bachelor of Arts Degree. This degree is offered
completely online and in the evening for the convenience of our adult
student population. Degree Completion students may want to obtain
this degree if they have less than 60 transfer credits.
Students in the Campus Undergraduate Program who are inter-
ested in a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration and Management,
Accounting Information for Management, or Health Services Admin-
istration may enroll in Degree Completion program degrees after
completing the requirements for the Associates of Arts degree. In this
event, students must meet the employment requirement and take
additional General University courses (GURs) to meet the Bachelor of
Arts Degree requirements.

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (IS 23300) 3-4
Written Communication (LL 10100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000, IS 20600) 3-4
Quantitative Reasoning (MT 10100, BAM 10500) 4
Humanities 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science (BAM 21600) <4>
Ethical and Religious Values 4
TOTAL 26-32

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
BA 10300 Foundations of Business 4
BA 20400 Survey of Accounting 4
BA 20600 Entrepreneurship 4
BA 20700 Marketing 4
BAM 21600 Survey of Economics * 4
IS 24200 Statistical Methods in Research 4
TOTAL 24
Electives varies
Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 64

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 65
Alaska Pacific University

* Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Accounting Information
for Management
Accounting Information for Management (AIM) offers a compe-
tency based curriculum designed to fit the needs of working adults.
The experiential and research based approach to the program prepares
students to:
1. Develop tools for acquiring in-depth knowledge in financial
accounting, management accounting, information systems, and
auditing.
2. Acquire in-depth knowledge in specialized areas such as
taxation, nonprofit, government, and international accounting
through elective courses and/or modules.
3. Develop ability to apply accounting knowledge to solving real
world problems.
4. Develop abilities to present, discuss, and defend views in
accounting effectively through formal and informal, written and
spoken language.
5. Understand the research process and its application in
accounting.
6. Develop intellectual skills such as abstract logical thinking,
inductive and deductive reasoning, and critical analysis.

The State of Alaska Board of CPAs requires that students wishing to
take the CPA exam have a minimum of 150 college credit hours. Accord-
ingly, graduates of this program, like those of any four-year accounting
program, must meet the additional credit hour requirements to qualify
for CPA exam candidacy.
Students are expected to be actively employed or have signif-
icant past experience in accounting or other areas in the business
field. Students entering the program should have proficiency in basic
accounting equivalent to at least one year (6 credit hours) of basic college
level accounting or earned credits through prior learning. The students
may be required to take an accounting placement exam to determine
this proficiency. In the absence of such proficiency the students will be
required to take all or a combination of BAM 20000, 20100, and 20200:
Accounting for Information Age I, II, and III, or equivalent as deter-
mined by the advisor prior to entering the program.
The major consists of twelve modules plus a 12 credit and senior
project.

Bachelor of Arts
in Accounting Information For Management
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (IS 23300) <3>
Written Communication (LL 20100) 3-4
Speech Communication (IS 20600) <3>
Quantitative Reasoning (IS 24200) <4>
Humanities 6-8
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 66
Alaska Pacific University

Social/Behavioral Science (BAM 21600) <4>
Ethical and Religious Values (IS 45300) <3>
TOTAL 21-37

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
AC 46000 Financial Accounting and Public Reporting I 3
AC 46100 Financial Accounting and Public Reporting II 3
AC 46200 Advanced Cost and Managerial Accounting 3
AC 46300 Accounting Information Systems 3
AC 46400 Financial Accounting and Public Reporting III 3
AC 46500 Auditing 3
AC 47000 Seminar in Taxation 3
BAM 21600 Survey of Economics * 4
BAM 30200 Business Finance 3
BAM 36100 Law & Citizenship 3

Choose one of the following three BAM: 3
BAM 45800 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
BAM 46200 Global Marketing Management
BAM 45400 Organizational Development

IS 20600 Organizational Communication* 3
IS 23300 Critical Thinking for Management* 3
IS 24200 Statistical Methods in Research * 4
IS 44500 Qualitative Research Methods 3
IS 45300 Values and Ethics in the Workplace* 3
AC 49700 Senior Project Proposal Seminar I 4
AC 49800 Senior Project Proposal Seminar II 4
AC 49900 Senior Project 4
TOTAL 62
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

* Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Note: A grade of “C” or better must be earned on all DCP modules
and the Senior Project. A course must be repeated if a grade
lower than “C” is earned.

Non-Profit Management Emphasis

A non-profit emphasis in management is available to students in the
AIM degree program. In addition to completing the requirements for the
major, students are required to take BAM 21000 before taking any of
the 40000 level elective courses. In addition to the required BAM 21000
course, students may select three elective courses from (BAM 42000,
42100, 42200, 42300 and IS 31100); a total of 12 credits is required to
earn the non-profit emphasis. All courses in this emphasis are offered
online.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 67
Alaska Pacific University

Business Administration
and Management
The Business Administration and Management (BAM) major includes
studies in leadership, organizational change and development, organi-
zational culture, organizational design, communication skills, quality
improvement, human resources, values and ethics, understanding
financial statements and accounting, and leadership. Research is an
integral part of the program and all participants complete a signif-
icant applied research project designed to assist them in their work
environment.
The program is for senior level managers from a number of fields,
middle managers, technical employees, and clerical personnel. Graduates
have used their degree to gain promotions, transfer to other opportu-
nities, start their own business, and go on to graduate school in such
diverse fields as teaching, health care administration, public adminis-
tration, human resource management, counseling, and business admin-
istration.
The following are the degree objectives for students in the Business
Administration and Management degree:
• Develop competencies to manage organizational changes
• Learn to identify different leadership styles and how they are used
to motivate employees and effectively manage organizations
• Understand human resource policies, procedures, and regulations
to effectively manage work force
• Develop written and oral communications skills for effective
performance in the work place
• Develop competencies in the methods of inquiry to solve
organizational problems
• Understand business financial management including financial
statement analysis, financing and investing
• Understand the law of contracts & legal and ethical issues
involved with management
Electives Available
For BAM students wishing additional experience in accounting and
finance, the program offers three electives in that field: BAM 20000,
20100, and 20200, Accounting for the Information Age I, II, and III.

Bachelor of Arts
IN Business Administration And
Management
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (IS 23300) <3>
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavior Science (BAM 21600) <4>
Ethical and Religious Values (IS 45300) <3>
Written Communication (LL 20100) 3-4
Speech Communication (IS 20600) <3>
Quantitative Skill (IS 24200) <4>
Humanities (2 courses) 6-8
Foreign Language 4
TOTAL 17-37

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 68
Alaska Pacific University

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
BA 20700 Marketing 4
BAM 21600 Survey of Economics * 4
BAM 25900 Financial Tools for Management 3
BAM 30200 Business Finance 3
BAM 36100 Law and Citizenship 3
BAM 45200 Operations and Quality Management 3
BAM 45400 Organizational Development 3
BAM 45600 Strategic Human Resource Management 3
BAM 45800 Organizational Behavior and Leadership 3
IS 20600 Organizational Communication * 3
IS 23300 Critical Thinking for Management * 3
IS 24200 Statistical Methods in Research * 4
IS 44500 Qualitative Research Methods 3
IS 45300 Values and Ethics in the Workplace * 3
BAM 49700 Senior Project Proposal Seminar I 4
BAM 49800 Senior Project Proposal Seminar II 4
BAM 49900 Senior Project 4
TOTAL 57
Electives varies
Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

* Also satisfies GUR’s.
** Students who transfer in as juniors and seniors (more than 64
transfer credits) will not be required to take IS 23300.
Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied by Major Require-
ments.

Note: A grade of “C” or better must be earned on all DCP modules
and the Senior Project. A course must be repeated if a grade
lower than “C” is earned.

MINOR in
Business Administration and Management
The Business Administration and Management minor is intended for
students majoring in other fields who wish to build the skills demanded
by businesses, public entities, and not-for-profit organizations.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
BA 10300 Foundations of Business 4
BA 20400 Survey of Accounting 4
BA 20600 Entrepreneurship 4
BA 20700 Marketing 4
BAM 30200 Business Finance 3
Electives-one 200-400 level BAM course 3-4
TOTAL 22-23

Non-Profit Management Emphasis
A non-profit emphasis in management is available to students
in the BAM degree program. In addition to completing the requirements
for the major, students are required to take BAM 21000 before taking
any of the 40000 level elective courses. In addition to the required BAM
21000, students may select three elective courses from (BAM 42000,
42100, 42200, 42300 and IS 31100); a total of 12 credits is required to
earn the non-profit emphasis. All courses in this emphasis are offered
online.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 69
Alaska Pacific University

Health Services Administration
The program in Health Services Administration (HSA) is for students
who have experience in the health services industry—both those with
clinical experience and others working in or in support of health services
organizations—and who wish to advance their careers. The program
provides an overview of health services systems, skills enhancement for
project and program management, and understanding of the business
functions necessary for providing services. The major consists of modules
that are delivered on-line.
Taught through the Degree Completion Program and RANA, the
curriculum is competency based and designed to use active learning to
enhance the current experiences and understandings students bring to
the classroom, to provide culturally appropriate models and concepts
that can be applied to students’ work environments, to enhance personal
growth and well-being, and to develop a professionalism that allows
students to become leaders in the health services community.

The following are the degree objectives for students in Health
Services Administration:
• Develop knowledge of the health services industry, its systems,
and its regulations
• Demonstrate skills in critical thinking, ethics, and information
literacy leading to better decision making
• Integrate knowledge of business practices that drive
health services reimbursement/revenues, human resource
management, and patient outcomes
• Collaborate within a community of health services managers
throughout the state to adopt innovative business practices

Bachelor of Arts
IN Health Services Administration
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (IS 23300) <3>
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (IS 20600) <3>
Quantitative Reasoning (IS 24200) <4>
Humanities 8
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science 3
Ethical and Religious Values (IS 45300) <3>
TOTAL 23-36

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
BAM 36100 Law and Citizenship 3
BAM 45600 Strategic Human Resource Management 3
HSA 30100 Health Services: Industry Overview/Current 3
Issues
HSA 30200 Systems in Health Services: Overview 3
HSA 30400 Health Care Marketing 3
HSA 41000 Health Care Finance & Accounting 3

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 70
Alaska Pacific University

HSA 42000 Health Care Policy and Economics 3
HSA 43000 Health Care Informatics 3
IS 20600 Organizational Communication* 3
IS 23300 Introduction to Active Learning * 3
IS 24200 Statistical Methods in Research* 4
IS 44500 Qualitative Research Methods 3
IS 45300 Values and Ethics in the Workplace* 3
HSA 49700 Senior Project Proposal Seminar I 4
HSA 49800 Senior Project Proposal Seminar II 4
HSA 49900 Senior Project 4
TOTAL 52
Other GUR’s and electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128
* Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Note: A grade of “C” or better must be earned on all DCP modules
and the Senior Project. A course must be repeated if a grade
lower than “C” is earned.

Non-Profit Management Emphasis
A non-profit emphasis in management is available to students in
the HSA degree program. In addition to completing the requirements
for the major, students are required to take BAM 21000 before taking
any of the 40000 level elective courses. In addition to the required BAM
21000, students may select three elective courses from (BAM 42000,
42100, 42200, 42300 and IS 31100); a total of 12 credits is required to
earn the non-profit emphasis. All courses in this emphasis are offered
online.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 71
Alaska Pacific University

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
AND HUMAN SERVICES
DEPARTMENT
The Department of Counseling Psychology and Human Services (PY)
is dedicated to the exploration and understanding of the art and science
of being human. The philosophical emphasis of the program is on positive
psychology as applied to counseling. The program provides you with a
solid foundation of knowledge blended with active/experiential learning
inside and outside the classroom. The curriculum allows you to choose
courses from a menu format to create your own specialty concentration
in counseling psychology. Possibilities for creative concentrations might
include, but are not limited to, ecopsychology and outdoor therapy,
counseling psychology and developmental studies. We challenge and
foster all of our majors to grow both personally and professionally, to be
leaders in the field, and to actively contribute to a better community and
world. Our program of study provides you with a theoretical and applied
foundation for launching you into a counseling career, further graduate
work, and lifelong learning.
As you pursue your own path of study, our goals are for you to
achieve the following competencies:
Creative Expression: demonstrates the ability to express one’s
passion in one’s own voice and/or define one’s self or world in unique
ways.
Self Understanding: demonstrates the ability to identify and value
one’s strengths as well as to identify and transform one’s weaknesses.
Critical Thinking: demonstrates the ability to analyze, synthesize,
and evaluate information and research, as well as to design, implement,
and evaluate projects.
Activism/Leadership: demonstrates the ability to create a signif-
icant positive influence on others and/or one’s environment.
Professionalism: demonstrates the ability to live the professional
ethical code of psychology by displaying behaviorally that one values
responsibility, public service, accountability, respect, excellence, and
compassion in one’s work.
Knowledge of Discipline: demonstrates the ability to identify,
interpret, and apply facts, terms, concepts, theories, and processes
germane to the field of psychology.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS
IN HUMAN SERVICES**
Associate of Arts in Human Services provides a basic understanding
of human service principles and prepares the student for entry level
positions in human services.

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (IS 23300) 3
Written Communication (LL 10100) 4
Speech Communication (IS 20600) 3
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 72
Alaska Pacific University

Quantitative Reasoning (MT 10100, BAM 10500) 4
Humanities 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science (PY 15000) <3-4>
Ethical and Religious Values 4
TOTAL 26-30

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
HS 11100 Human Services Practice and Policy 3
HS 21300 Human Services Care Coordination 3
PY 15000 Introduction to Psychology * 3
PY 21500 Lifespan Human Development 3
HS 28400 Human Services Portfolio/Field Exp 4
Focused Elective Coursework 8
(Advisor/Student Designed)
TOTAL 24
Electives: varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 64

* Also satisfies GURs. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements. **Pending approval.

Bachelor of Arts
in Psychology
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (PY 23100) <4>
Humanities 8
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science (PY 15000) <4>
Ethical and Religious Values 4
TOTAL 32-40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
PY 15000 Intro to Psychology: Adjustment and Change* 4
PY 21000 Sophomore Seminar: Introduction to 4
Professional Psychology
PY 23100 Making Sense of Statistics: 4
Applications to the Behavioral Sciences*
PY 30000 Methods of Investigation: 4
Research in Psychology
PY 38400 Junior Portfolio 1
PY 38500 Field Experience (Junior Practicum) 3
PY 49800 Senior Project Proposal 4
PY 49900 Senior Projects 8-12
Psychology Electives 16
TOTAL 48-52

Additional Electives from any department 36

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 73
Alaska Pacific University

* Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Note: Demonstrated competency in writing style of American
Psychological Association (satisfied by PY 21000 Sophomore
Seminar: Introduction to Professional Psychology or other
evidence as may be accepted by Department).

Psychology majors may select an area of concentration within
psychology offerings. This will require completion of four (4) credit-
courses (a total of 16 credits). Concentration areas include, but are not
limited to: ecopsychology and outdoor therapy, counseling psychology,
and developmental studies. The student’s academic advisor should be
consulted in the selection of concentration area courses.

minor in
COUNSELING Psychology
The minor can be tailored to individual interests and career direc-
tions. The student’s academic advisor should be consulted in the selection
of the most appropriate combination of courses and other academic
experiences.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
PY 15000 Intro to Psychology: Adjustment and Change 4
PY 30000-49200 Elective Courses 8
PY 10000-49200 Electives 12
TOTAL 24

Human Services
The Human Services (HS) major is designed to meet the educational
needs of adults working in the human services field who currently do
not have a Bachelor’s degree. Taught through the Degree Completion
Program and RANA, the curriculum is competency based and designed
to use active learning to enhance the current experiences and under-
standings students bring to the classroom, to provide culturally appro-
priate models and concepts that can be applied to students’ work environ-
ments, to enhance personal growth and well-being, and to develop a
professionalism that allows students to become leaders in the human
services community.

Graduates of this program are expected to:
1. Understand the scope and history of the human services field.
2. Acquire competencies required of human services professionals
in interviewing skills, care coordination, crisis intervention,
group facilitation, cultural competence, management, and
service documentation.
3. Understand and apply ethical principles of the profession.
4. Develop professional writing skills, including the ability to write
in APA format.
5. Understand and apply research principles to current professional
reading, evaluation, and other applied research needs of an
agency.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 74
Alaska Pacific University

Bachelor of Arts
IN Human Services

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (IS 23300) 3
Written Communication (LL20100) 3-4
Speech Communication (IS 20600) 3
Quantitative Reasoning 4
Humanities 6-8
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science (PY15000) <3>
Ethical and Religious Values (HS 41800) <3>
TOTAL 27-30

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
HS 11100 Human Services Practice and Policy 3
HS 21300 Human Services Care Coordination 3
HS 31000 Understanding Diversity 3
Self-Awareness, and Change
HS 31200 Counseling/Interviewing Skills 3
HS 31400 Group Process 3
HS 38400 Human Services Portfolio/Field Exp 4
HS 41800 Values and Ethics in Human Services * 3
HS 41900 Human Services Management 3
HS 44000 Crisis Intervention & Community Resources 3
IS or PY Research Methods Course 3-4
PY 15000 Introduction to Psychology * 3
PY 21500 Lifespan Human Development 3
PY 34000 Abnormal Psychology 3
HS 49800 Senior Project Proposal 4
HS 49900 Senior Project 4-8
TOTAL 49
Human Services Electives 3
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

* Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Note: A grade of “C” or better must be earned on all DCP modules
and the Senior Project. A course must be repeated if a grade
lower than “C” is earned.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 75
Alaska Pacific University

MINOR IN
Human Services
The Human Services Minor is intended for students majoring in other
fields whose personal or professional goals include training knowledge
and skills in the Human Services profession.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
HS 11100 Human Services Practice & Policy 3
HS 31000 Diversity & Self-Awareness 3
HS 31200 Counseling/Interviewing Skills 3
HS 41800 Values & Ethics in Human Services 3
PY or HS electives 6
TOTAL 18

Non-Profit Management Emphasis

A non-profit emphasis in management is available to students in
the Human Services degree program. In addition to completing the
requirements for the major, students are required to take HS 41900 or
BAM 21000 before taking any of the 400 level Non-Profit courses in the
emphasis. Students who take HS 41900 may select four elective courses
and students that take BAM 21000 may select three elective courses
from (BAM 42000, 42100, 42200, 42300 and IS 31100); a total of 12
credits is required to earn the non-profit emphasis. All courses in this
emphasis are offered online.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 76
Alaska Pacific University

EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT
The Education Department offers a major in K-8 Education (ED)
that prepares students for a career in teaching. The Teacher Prepa-
ration Program provides a strong background in the liberal arts as well
as professional education courses.
The Teacher Preparation Program at Alaska Pacific University carries
out the holistic philosophy of the university which stresses a commitment
to Alaska’s intercultural and international heritage. Participants in the
program may pursue study at either the undergraduate or graduate
level. The undergraduate program includes a K-8 Education certificate
(for teacher aides), an Associate of Arts Degree in Education, and a
Bachelor’s Degree in Education (K-8). For graduate-level coursework,
refer to the Master of Arts in Teaching section. Coursework is designed
to:
• Prepare qualified undergraduate students to become qualified
teacher aides and/or K-8 teachers.
• Prepare those who hold baccalaureate or masters degrees in
other fields for careers as K-8 teachers.

The Teacher Preparation Program of study and practical experience
is approved by the Alaska State Department of Education as well as
provisionally accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of
Teacher Education (NCATE). The university provides the Institutional
Recommendation for teacher certification, which is then issued by the
Alaska State Department of Education.
The Education Department at Alaska Pacific University is proud of
its professional team and the excellent program we have developed.
Students who join this exciting learning adventure will embark on a
journey that can lead to licensure as a teaching professional in the state
of Alaska.
Teaching is one of the most demanding and important professions
in society. As a teacher, one is expected to prevent ignorance, promote
intellectual health, and lay the foundations for continued learning. The
Teacher Preparation Program will challenge students to begin meeting
these expectations during the first education class in which they enroll.
The following can be expected from the Teacher Preparation
Program:
• Opportunities to work with students in grades K-8 in a variety of
settings.
• Opportunities to collaborate with rural and urban Alaska
teachers.
• 800-1000 hours of quality time in rural and urban Alaska
classrooms.
• Applications of theory into practice at the university and in
schools.
• Support and guidance from the first class through student
teaching.
• Opportunities for growth, transitioning from student to teaching
professional.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 77
Alaska Pacific University

Teacher as Professional
The Alaska Pacific University curriculum identifies five concepts
which require a broad range of knowledge and practice for development
and which serve to characterize the graduates of this institution. The
five concepts which form the basis of the curriculum are:
(1) Pedagogy
Teachers must plan, structure, and implement instruction and assess
student learning in an increasingly effective manner enabling students
to construct knowledge and to connect knowledge acquired at school
with knowledge acquired at home and in the community.
(2) Diversity
Teachers must be prepared to recognize, accept, and teach to
diversity, addressing both groups of students and individuals, recog-
nizing different perspectives and voices that represent various groups
and interests, and recognizing shared interests that create common
purposes for individuals and groups.
(3) Integrative Knowledge
Teachers must be prepared to teach central concepts, principles,
and processes of inquiry and structures of the discipline in ways that
make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students. Authentic
assessments of student abilities, attitudes, and understanding using
evaluations to determine the strengths and needs for improvement of
various educational programs and curricula are expected.
(4) Professionalism
Teachers must be prepared to search for the meanings and conse-
quences of their own knowledge and beliefs, their teaching, and schooling;
to seek out and engage in collaborative relationships-university-school
family-social and community agencies in order to provide students with
contextualized and experiential learning and to improve the professional
expertise.
(5) Technology
Teachers and other school personnel must be prepared to use educa-
tional technology to extend and enhance their ability to provide their
students with varied experiences and powerful tools for learning, as well
as preparing students for entry into a workforce that is becoming more
technologically sophisticated.

Goals and objectives identified for teacher preparation address
the State of Alaska Standards for Teachers and are framed into three
categories, using the acronym APU:

Attitudes, Behaviors and Dispositions
The teacher:
• Researches his/her own practice by reflecting critically, asking
questions, and seeking answers.
• Develops and describes his/her philosophy of education and
demonstrates its impact in the teaching and learning process
• Addresses the needs of all students with respect for their
individual and cultural characteristics.
• Encourages, creates, and maintains a learning environment in
which all students contribute and are actively engaged.
• Demonstrates the knowledge that teaching means continual
participation in and contribution to the teaching profession and
will risk engagement in the process of change to further the
improvement of the profession.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 78
Alaska Pacific University

• Models life long learning and understands that professional
growth is an important part of the life as a career teacher.
• Participates in personal wellness.
• Grounds him/herself in self-knowledge and self-acceptance that
leads to creation of open trusting relationships, and supports
the value of diversity within an inclusive community.
• Exhibits responsible, moral, and ethical professional behavior.

Participation and Skills
The teacher:
• Understands teaching and learning theory and applies that
knowledge to the instructional practice.
• Develops meaningful lessons that address the needs of students
with respect to individual and cultural characteristics.
• Uses his/her understanding of content to plan, structure,
facilitate, monitor, and implement instruction in the context of
continual assessment.
• Fosters, creates, and maintains a learning environment where
all students contribute and remain actively engaged.

Understanding and Knowledge
The teacher:
• Demonstrates an understanding of developmental and learning
theories, and applies that knowledge in the classroom.
• Understands the cultural characteristics and diversity of
students in the context of their individual differences.
• Knows the subject matter and how to integrate, plan and teach
instructional units in the context of practical experiences.
• Uses the knowledge gained from a strong liberal arts background
to develop and implement curriculum that is varied and
creative.
• Knows and uses the theories and research related to child
development and the development of young adolescents to
motivate and construct learning opportunities in support of
individual student development, and his/her acquisition of
knowledge.

K-8 Professional Development Certificate
The K-8 Professional Development Certificate is designed to assist
those who are currently teacher aides or who are interested in becoming
teacher aides to continue or begin course work that will assist them in
their professional development and preparation. The courses provide
content and skills that are immediately applicable in K-8 classrooms.
This course work may be transferred into the Associate Arts Degree
Program.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
ED 21400 Exploring the Learning Community * 2
(satisfies Sophomore Seminar)
ED 24100 Teaching Methods: Creative Expression* 4
GS 10000 Computer Applications 2
GS 13500 Introduction to Active Learning 4
LL Writing Composition Class level to be 4
determined by placement test (Minimum
LL 10000 level required, LL 20100 recommended)
MT 10100 Intermediate Algebra

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 79
Alaska Pacific University

OR
MT 21000 Math Concepts 3-4
PY 15000 Introduction to Psychology: 4
Adjustment and Change
Electives varies
TOTAL (minimum) 33

Note: Some courses taken for the Professional Development
Certificate may apply to the AA in Education. Courses
marked with a * require a classroom practicum component.
APU residency is required for the last 12 hours.

Associate of Arts
in Education
The Associate of Arts degree in Education is designed to provide
individuals who are interested in becoming teachers an opportunity to
progress toward the bachelor’s degree while working to fulfill under-
graduate requirements and completing introductory course work in the
Teacher Preparation Program. Those who are currently teacher’s aides
or are interested in becoming teacher’s aides will find the course work
listed very beneficial in developing their professional skills and informing
their practice.

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication 4
Math Concepts (MT 21000) 3
Humanities (HI 20101 recommended) 4
Laboratory Science (SC 10000 recommended) 4
Social/Behavioral Science (PY 15000 recommended) 4
Ethical and Religious Values 4
SUB-TOTAL(minimum) 31

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
ED 21400 Exploring the Learning Community* 2
(Satisfies Sophomore Seminar)
ED 21500 Classroom Leadership and Management* 2
ED 24100 TM: Creative Expression* 4
ED 31400 Differentiated Instruction in the K-8 Classroom* 4
ED 36300 Computers and Technology for Teachers* 4
GS 10000 Computer Applications 2
PY 21500 Lifespan Human Development*
OR 4
PY 22200 Roots and Wings: Conception through
Adolescence*
Fine Arts (2 courses taken from 2 areas:
art, drama, theater, music) 4
Physical Activity 1
Electives varies
TOTAL (minimum) 66

Note: Some courses taken for the A.A. may apply to the B.A. in
Education (K-8). Courses marked with an * require a
classroom practicum component.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 80
Alaska Pacific University

Bachelor of Arts
in Education

Admissions
Admission to the Bachelor of Arts Degree Teacher Preparation
Program involves several steps. The first step is admission to the
university. The second step is to meet the prerequisite coursework listed
below. Upon successful completion of ED 21400 and posting Alaska state
qualifying scores for Praxis I, or other State-approved qualifying exams,
the student submits an application for admission to the Teacher Prepa-
ration Program Committee.
K-8 classroom teachers require a broad liberal arts background and
preparation in their undergraduate coursework in a variety of content
areas; therefore, the Teacher Preparation Program is designed to build
on the prerequisite areas.
To be considered for acceptance to the Bachelor of Arts Degree
Teacher Preparation Program, a student must first meet the following
requirements:
1. Completion of 60 pre-acceptance credit hours including 9 courses
of the 10 course General University Requirements (GUR’s)
2. Completion of the major coursework with a grade of “C” (2.00
or better)
3. A cumulative grade point average of 2.75
4. Completion of the Praxis I, or other State-approved qualifying
exam meeting Alaska qualifying score requirements required for
certification

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) <4>
Written Communication (LL 20100) <4>
Speech Communication (CO 10000) <4>
Quantitative Reasoning (MT 21000) <4>
Humanities (HI 20100 and CS 22700) <4> 4
Languages (LL) <4>
Laboratory Science (SC 10000) <4>
Social/Behavioral Science <4>
Ethical and Religious Values <4>
TOTAL 4 -40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
CO 10000 Speech Communication* 4
CS 22700 History and Culture of Alaska Natives* 3
ED 21400 Exploring the Learning Community 2
(Satisfies Sophomore Seminar)
ED 21500 Classroom Leadership & Management 2
GS 10000 Computer Applications 2
(or demonstrated competency)
GS 13500 Introduction to Active Learning * 4
HI 20100 World History* 4
LL Foreign Language* 4
LL 20100 Writing for Discourse Communities* 4
MT 21000 Math Concepts* 3
PY 21500 Lifespan Human Developments 4
OR
PY 22200 Roots and Wings: Conception through
Adolescence
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 81
Alaska Pacific University

PY 15000 Introduction to Psychology: Adjustment
and Change* 4
RS 20100 Ethics and Religion* 4
SC 10000 Integrated Science* 4
ED 24100 TM: Creative Expression 4
ED 31400 Differentiated Instruction in the K-8 Classroom 4
ED 32000 TM: Literacy and Communication I (K-4)** 6
ED 32100 TM: Literacy and Communication II (5-8)** 6
ED 33000 TM: Science, Math, and Society I (K-4)** 6
ED 33100 TM: Science, Math, and Society II (5-8)** 6
ED 34400 TM: Health and Physical Movement Education 4
ED 34700 Evaluation of Student Learning 3
ED 36300 Computers and Technology for Teachers 4
ED 45300 Multicultural Education 3
ED 48500 Student Teaching (Senior Project)*** 12
Electives varies
Fine Arts (two areas) 4
Wellness 2
Physical Activity 1
TOTAL (minimum) 128

* Not required if used to satisfy requirements for acceptance into
the Teacher Preparation Program; may also satisfy GUR’s.
** Junior Practicum Courses.
*** Prior to Student Teaching, the Praxis II Elementary Education
Test: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment OR the Praxis II
Elementary Education Test: Content Knowledge must meet State score
requirements to become “highly qualified” as defined by the Alaska
Department of Education and Early Development.

Note: A GPA of 3.00 in professional education courses (ED prefix)
and 2.75 overall is required for admittance to student
teaching. Students must complete all methods courses with
a grade of “C” or better to be recommended for Alaska
Teacher Certification. Methods courses are not taught as
independent studies or by correspondence.

MINOR in
education
The minor in education for non-education majors will provide a
background for educational theory, different approaches and strategies
for instruction, and recognition of diverse learner needs. Practicum
component allows applications of theory into practice within a student’s
major field of study. Students seeking an education minor are not
required to apply for admission to the Teacher Preparation Program.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
CS 22700 History and Culture of Alaska Natives 3
ED 21400 Exploring the Learning Community 2
ED 21500 Leadership & Management 2
ED 31400 Differentiated Instruction in the K-8 Classroom 4
ED 45300 Multicultural Education 3
ED 38500 Practicum (education within the major area) 3
TOTAL 17

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 82
Alaska Pacific University

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT
The Environmental Science Department offers undergraduate
degrees in Earth Sciences (B.S., B.A.), Environmental Science (B.S.,
B.A., minor), Environmental Planning and Policy (B.A.), Environmental
Studies (B.A.), and Marine Biology (B.S., B.A., minor). These degree
programs focus on a firm, conceptual understanding of the natural
world in order to more clearly view human impacts on the natural world.
Course, lab, and field work cover topics in the natural sciences, conser-
vation, resource management, environmental policy, and quantitative
approaches. Concentrations within the Environmental Science Degree
include Earth Systems Science, Biological Science, and General Environ-
mental Science. The B.S. differs from the B.A. degree in that it requires
more physical science and quantitative courses. Students who have
graduated with degrees from the Environmental Science Department
have gone on to graduate school, or found employment with environ-
mental consulting firms, industry, non-government organizations, and
government agencies.
Graduates of the Environmental Science Department degree
programs:
• Have gained knowledge in a diverse array of natural and
management sciences
• Have completed significant environmental projects including
class exercises, internships, and field experiences, culminating
in a senior project
• Possess technical abilities in mathematics, statistics, GIS, as
well as field and laboratory practices to address contemporary
environmental and natural resource issues
• Have good oral and written communication skills

Earth Sciences
The Earth Sciences major provides an integrated curriculum in
geology, meteorology, and oceanography and a solid foundation in
laboratory and field techniques. The degree program is for students
interested in the physical aspects of the environment as well as climate
and climate change, water science and policy, and ocean science and
policy. The degrees prepare students to enter professional environ-
mental careers with private consulting firms and public agencies at
the county, state, and federal level. The degrees also equips students
with the natural sciences and quantitative methodologies necessary to
pursue graduate degrees in earth sciences.

Bachelor of Arts or Science
in Earth Sciences
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (met by MT 22000 or MT 23000) <4>
Humanities 8
Language 4
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 83
Alaska Pacific University

Laboratory Science (met by one of required lab courses) <4>
Social/Behavioral Science 4
Ethical and Religious Studies 4
TOTAL 32-40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
B.A. B.S.
SC 12000 Physical Geology 4 4
SC 15000 Introduction to Oceanography 4 4
SC 15500 Introduction to Meteorology 4 4
SC 17000 Principles of Chemistry I 4 4
SC 17100 Principles of Chemistry II 4 4
SC 20500 Intro to Environmental Science 4 4
SC 22000 Historical Geology 4 4
SC 36000 Introduction to GIS 4 4
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics 4 4
Choose one physics course: 4 4
SC 27000 General University Physics (BS only)
SC 25600 Environmental Physics (BA or BS)
Choose one (BA) or both (BS) of the following
two courses: 4 8
MT 22000 Applied Stats for Env Sci**
MT 23000 Calculus I**
MT 24000 Calculus II * 4
SC 38500 Junior Practicum 4 4
SC 49800 Research Methods 4 4
SC 49900 Senior Project 8 8
Policy Electives 8 *
Science Electives *** 8 16
TOTAL 76 84

Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied by Major Requirements.
* Not required by that degree.
** Also satisfies GUR’s.
*** SC 31000 (Environmental Assessment) can be counted as BS
Science Elective requirement < angular brackets > are satisfied by
major requirements.

Policy Electives Menu
SC 31000 Environmental Assessment
SC 40700 Water Resources Management
SC 41000 Natural Resource Planning and Politics
SC 46200 Land Use Planning

Science Electives Menu
SC 21500 Glaciology and Glacier Travel
SC 36500 Applied Geographic Information Systems
SC 37000 Principles of Hydrology
SC 42000 Environmental Geology
SC 42200 Soils and Geomorphology
SC 45500 Climate Change
SC 47000 Groundwater Geology
Upper division field geology course approved by advisor (#)

(#) May include geology field camps offered by other universities

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 84
Alaska Pacific University

Differences between the majors
The BS degree requires 8 more units than the BA degree. The
additional 8 units are accounted by for the BS requirement for Calculus
II (4 units) and BOTH Calculus I and Applied Stats (the BA requires
a student to choose only one of those two courses). These additional
course requirements increase the quantitative rigor of the BS and better
prepare students for advanced (graduate) work in the sciences. In
addition, the two majors differ in their electives menus. For the BA, 8
of the required 16 elective units must be chosen from a menu of policy-
oriented courses (the other 8 units are chosen from a science menu).
For the BS, all 16 elective units must be chosen from a science menu.
In this way, the BA prepares students for a broader range of possible
careers, while the BS prepares students for advanced work or study in
the sciences.

Environmental Science
The Environmental Science B.A. and B.S. degrees allow students
to focus on the natural sciences as they apply to the environment by
providing a solid foundation in laboratory and field techniques. The
B.A. in Environmental Science is tailored for students who wish to
enter the professional environmental field. The B.S. degree in Environ-
mental Science requires additional coursework in the natural sciences
and quantitative methods. This degree is especially useful for students
intending to pursue a graduate degree in environmental science or
related fields. Environmental science majors must complete the environ-
mental science Major Requirements and specify an area of concentration
in Earth Systems Science, Biological Science, or General Environmental
Science.
The Environmental Science minor offers students in other majors,
such as Outdoor Studies, Education, or Liberal Studies, an opportunity
to strengthen their analytic and scientific background.

Bachelor of Arts or Science
in Environmental Science
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (met by MT 23000 or MT 22000) <4>
Humanities 8
Language 4
Laboratory Science (met by one of required lab courses) <4>
Social/Behavioral Science 4
Ethical and Religious Studies 4
TOTAL 32-40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS B.A. B.S.
SC 12000 Physical Geology * 4
SC 16000 Principles of Biology * 4
SC 17000 Principles of Chemistry I 4 4
SC 17100 Principles of Chemistry II 4 4
SC 20500 Intro to Environmental Science 4 4
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 85
Alaska Pacific University

MT 22000 Applied Statistics for Env. Science** 4 4
MT 23000 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I ** 4 4
MT 24000 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II * 4
MT 32000 Advanced Statistics * 4
Select one of the following two courses: * 4
SC 25600 Environmental Physics
SC 27000 General University Physics I
SC 33000 Ecology * 4
SC 36000 Geographic Information Systems 4 4
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics 4 4
SC 38500 Junior Practicum 3 3
SC 49800 Research Methods 4 4
SC 49900 Senior Project 8 8
Concentration Area (courses below) 24 16
TOTAL 67 83
Electives varies varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128 128
* Not required by B.A. degree.
**Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Concentration areas for Environmental Science
B.S. and B.A. Degrees
Concentrations for Environmental Science Major include areas:
Earth Systems Science, Biological Science, or General Environmental
Science. Students seeking a B.A. degree select 24 credit hours in one of
these three areas; students selecting the B.S. degree select 16 credits.
In each case, at least 12 credits must be upper division.

Earth Systems Science Concentration B.A. B.S.
SC 31000 Environmental Assessment 4 4
Select two courses: 8 <8>
SC 12000 Physical Geology
SC 22000 Historical Geology
SC 25600 Environmental Physics

Select three courses: 12 12
MT 24000 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
SC 35000 Oceanography
SC 35500 Meteorology: Weather and Climate
SC 37500 Environmental Chemistry
SC 40700 Water Resources Management
SC 42000 Environmental Geology
SC 42200 Soils and Geomorphology
SC 46200 Land Use Planning
SC 39200 - SC 49200 Special Topics or
SC 38000 - SC 48000 Directed Studies as approved
by advisor
TOTAL 24 16

Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied by Major Requirements.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 86
Alaska Pacific University

Biological Science Concentration B.A. B.S.
SC 33000 Ecology 4 <4>
Select: 8 4
SC 14000 Introduction to Botany and Zoology
SC 16000 Principles of Biology <4>
SC 21000 Winter Ecology and Cold
Weather Physiology
SC 23000 Principles of Botany
SC 24000 Principles of Zoology
Select three courses: 12 12
MT 32000 Advanced Statistics
SC 30500 Winter Ecology with Statistics
SC 33100 Principles of Forest Management
SC 37500 Environmental Chemistry
SC 40000 Tropical Ecology
SC 43000 Conservation Biology
SC 46200 Land Use Planning
SC 39200 - SC 49200 Special Topics or
SC 38000 - SC 48000 Directed Studies as approved
by advisor
TOTAL 24 16

Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied by Major Requirements.

General Env. Science Concentration B.A. B.S.
B.A. Select one course
SC 31000 Environmental Assessment 4 4
SC 33000 Ecology - <4>
B.A. requires two additional Laboratory OR
Field Science courses 8 <8>
B.A. and B.S. require three additional upper division
courses in SC or MT 12 12
TOTAL 24 16

Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied by Major Requirements.

MINOR IN
Environmental Science
MINOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
SC 20500 Introduction to Environmental Science 4
Select one course: 4
SC 31000 Environmental Assessment
SC 33000 Ecology
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics
Select one course: 4
MT 22000 Applied Statistics for Env. Science
MT 23000 Calculus and Analytic Geometry
SC 17000 Principles of Chemistry I

Two Elective Lab or Field Courses 8
Elective Environmental Science Course 4
TOTAL 24

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 87
Alaska Pacific University

MINOR in
Mathematics for Environmental Sciences
MINOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
MT 32000 Advanced Statistics 4
MT 35000 Multivariable Calculus 4
Three courses (12 credits) from the list:
MT 35500 Introduction to Mathematical Proof 4
MT 36000 Differential Equations and Applications 4
MT 37000 Linear Algebra and Applications 4
MT 38000, 48000 Directed Study 4
SC 38500, 48500 Practicum as Math Tutor 4
TOTAL 20

Environmental Policy and Planning
The Environmental Policy and Planning major integrates natural
science with social and governmental processes. This combination
prepares students to respond effectively to environmental problems
and opportunities. The major provides a broad understanding of policy
and planning, including the concepts of ecosystem management
and sustainable development that actively link natural and social
systems. Students view environmental problems from a range of disci-
plinary perspectives, exploring the role of science in policy making,
analyzing social and cultural constraints, and examining methods for
conflict resolution. The interdisciplinary curriculum prepares students
for leadership positions by emphasizing management skills such as
geographic information systems (GIS), environmental and social impact
assessment, and economic analysis. Graduates are well prepared for
graduate or professional school, and environmental planning and policy
positions in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors.

Bachelor of Arts
in Environmental Policy and Planning

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (met by MT 22000) <4>
Humanities 8
Language 4
Laboratory Science (met by one of required lab courses) <4>
Social/Behavioral Science 4
Ethical and Religious Studies 4
TOTAL 32-40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
BAM 21600 Survey of Economics 4
MT 12100 Precalculus 4
MT 22000 Applied Statistics for Env. Science * 4
SC 20500 Introduction to Environmental Science 4
SC 31000 Environmental Assessment 4
SC 33000 Ecology 4

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 88
Alaska Pacific University

SC 34500 Ecological Economics 4
SC 36000 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 4
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics 4
SC 38500 Junior Practicum 3
SC 49800 Research Methods 4
SC 49900 Senior Project 8
Policy and Planning Electives 12
Resource Electives 4
TOTAL 67
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

* Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Policy and Planning Electives
Select three courses:
SC 36500 Applied Geographic Information Systems
SC 41000 Environmental Advocacy and Leadership
SC 41500 Natural Resource Planning and Politics
SC 43000 Conservation Biology
SC 43500 Environmental Law
SC 44500 Collaboration in Environmental Management
SC 46200 Land Use Planning

Resource Electives
Select one course:
MAR 33000 Human Impacts in Marine Systems
MAR 42000 Coastal Ecosystems
OS 40500 Recreation and the Public Land Resource
SC 24500 Sustainable Communities
SC 33100 Principles of Forest Management
SC 40700 Water Resources Management

Environmental Studies Major
The B.A. in Environmental Studies (ES) provides an interdisciplinary
major for students interested in social, historical, and artistic aspects of
the human place in the regional and global environment. Environmental
Studies majors develop basic competencies in the social, natural, and
physical sciences and a personal menu of courses to meet the academic
and career goals. A flexible major, it combines a core curriculum of lower
and upper division coursework and a menu of course concentrations,
including environmental nonprofit leadership, science and environment,
culture and environment, and communication and environment. Advising
may be coordinated with other departments as warranted by a student’s
particular interests.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 89
Alaska Pacific University

Bachelor of Arts
in Environmental Studies
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning 4
Humanities 8
Language 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science <4>
Ethical and Religious Studies 4
TOTAL 36 -40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
BAM 21600 Survey of Economics* 4
SC 20000 Introduction to Environmental Studies 4
SC 33000 Ecology 4
Field Course Elective 4
Directed Study 4
Research methods (SC 49800, OS 49800, 4
PY 30000, or IS 44500)
Junior Practicum (choose from departments) 3
Senior Project (choose from departments) 8
Concentration Courses 24
TOTAL 59
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

Field Course Electives
Select one course:
MAR 22500 Survey of Marine Biology
MAR 41000 Coral Reef Ecology
MAR 42000 Coastal Ecosystems
OS 30200 Wildland Ecosystems and Human Impacts
PY 25000 Nature and Psychological Well-Being
SC 11000 Natural History of Alaska
SC 14000 Introduction to Botany and Zoology
SC 21000 Winter Ecology
SC 24000 Principles of Zoology
SC 24500 Sustainable Communities
SC 30000 Tropical Natural History
SC 35000 Oceanography

Concentration Areas
Environmental Studies

At least 24 credits from the following courses are required with 12
credits or more at the upper division level. Choosing the coursework
from a single concentration area is not required but is recommended to
offer focus to the Environmental Studies degree.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 90
Alaska Pacific University

Environmental And Nonprofit Leadership Concentration
BAM 21000 Intro to the Nonprofit Sector
BAM 42000 Board and Volunteer Management
BAM 42100 Budget and Finance for Nonprofits
BAM 42200 Fundraising and Resource Development for Nonprofits
BAM 42300 Planning and Evaluation of Nonprofit Organizations
BAM 45800 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
OS 40100 The Business of Recreation
SC 34500 Ecological Economics
SC 41000 Environmental Advocacy and Leadership
SS 30500 Advanced Studies in Social Sciences

Science And Environment Concentration
MAR 33000 Human Impacts In Marine Systems
MAR 42000 Coastal Ecosystems Ecology
OS 30200 Wildland Ecosystems and Human Impacts
SC 11000 Natural History of Alaska
SC 14000 Introduction to Botany and Zoology
SC 21500 Glaciology and Glacier Travel
SC 25600 Environmental Physics
SC 35000 Oceanography
SC 35500 Meteorology
SC 40700 Water Resources Management
SC 42000 Environmental Geology
SC 42200 Soils and Geomorphology
SC 43000 Conservation Biology
SC 45500 Climate Change

Culture And Environment Concentration
CS 22700 History and Culture of Alaska Natives
GS 16000 Toward Sustainability:
Organic Gardening at Kellogg Farm
HI 30100 Advanced Studies in History
LS 20100 Liberal Studies Seminar I: Ways of Knowing
OS 30300 Applied Exercise Physiology
PH 20400 Philosophy of Science
PH 30400 Advanced Studies in Philosophy of Science
PY 25000 Nature and Psychological Well-Being
PY 35000 Psychotherapeutic Use of the Wilderness
SC 24500 Sustainable Communities
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics
SC 43500 Environmental Law

Communication And Environment Concentration
CO 20400 Print Journalism
CO 30400 Advanced Print Journalism
FP 30000 Advanced Studies In Fine Arts
HU 30000 Advanced Studies In The Humanities
LL 20200 Introduction To Creative Writing
LL 20300 Business And Technical Writing
LL 30200 Advanced Creative Writing
PH 20400 Philosophy Of Science
PH 30400 Advanced Studies In Philosophy Of Science

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 91
Alaska Pacific University

Marine Biology
The B.A. degree in Marine Biology (MAR) provides students with
expertise in the biological sciences applied to marine environments.
The B.S. degree in Marine Biology requires additional coursework in
the physical and natural sciences while maintaining the traditional B.A.
degree program focus on active learning and project-based learning
experiences. The B.S. degree is recommended for students who intend
to pursue a graduate degree or who intend to work professionally in the
field of marine biology. Marine Biology majors must complete 64 credit
hours in the Marine Biology Core (B.S.) and 16 credit hours of Marine
Biology electives.
The Marine Biology minor offers students in other majors, such as
Education or Liberal Studies, an opportunity to strengthen their analytic
and scientific background; and offers students in Environmental Science
an opportunity to learn applications of their field to marine systems and
resources.

Bachelor of Arts or Science
in marine Biology
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (met by MT 22000 or MT 23000) <4>
Humanities 8
Language 4
Laboratory Science (met by one of required lab courses) <4>
Social/Behavioral Science 4
Ethical and Religious Studies 4
TOTAL 32-40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS B.A. B.S.
MAR 22400 Marine Field Work 4 4
MAR 22500 Survey of Marine Biology 4 4
MAR 33000 Human Impacts in Marine Systems 4 4
MAR 49000 Seminar 4 4
MT 22000 Applied Statistics for Env. Science ** 4 4
MT 23000 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I ** 4 4
MT 24000 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II * 4
SC 16000 Principles of Biology 4 4
SC 17000 Principles of Chemistry I 4 4
SC 17100 Principles of Chemistry II * 4
SC 25600 Environmental Physics
OR
SC 27000 General University Physics I * 4
SC 33000 Ecology * 4
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics * 4
SC 49800 Research Methods 4 4
MAR 49900 Senior Project 8 8

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 92
Alaska Pacific University

MAR 38500 Junior Practicum 4 4
Marine Biology Electives (no more than 4 credits
Lower Division) 12 16
TOTAL 60 84
Electives varies varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128 128

* Not required by B.A. degree.
** Also satisfies GUR’s. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Marine Biology Electives (Lower Division)
SC 14000 Introduction to Botany and Zoology
MAR 21000 Aquarium Biology
MAR 25000 Marine Natural History

Marine Biology Electives (Upper Division)
MAR 31500 Invertebrate Zoology
MAR 32000 Ichthyology
MAR 32500 Ecological Physiology of Marine Organisms
MAR 33500 Seabirds & Marine Mammals
MAR 34000 Scientific Diving
MAR 41000 Coral Reef Ecology
MAR 42000 Coastal Ecosystems
PH 30400 Advanced Studies in Philosophy of Science
SC 35000 Oceanography
MAR 38000/48000 Directed Study (Marine Biology topic)
And/or 30000-40000 level Special Topics or Directed Study
courses as approved by advisor.

minor in
Marine Biology
MINOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
MAR 22500 Survey of Marine Biology 4
MAR 33000 Human Impacts in Marine Systems 4
SC 16000 Principles of Biology 4
Marine Biology Electives (Lower Division) 4
Marine Biology Electives (Upper Division) 8
TOTAL 24

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 93
Alaska Pacific University

LIBERAL STUDIES
DEPARTMENT
The Liberal Studies Department (LS) is designed for self-directed
learners interested in the liberal arts and social sciences. Since this
department is interdisciplinary, so too are the programs of study.
Students have a choice between following one of the concentrations
in writing, literature, religion studies, philosophy, or pre-law, outlined
below or creating an individualized concentration. We encourage
students to incorporate courses from other departments into their
program. In all of these, students work with their academic advisor to
plan courses, directed studies, internships, and projects that reflect the
student’s personal and professional goals. All academic plans culminate
in a senior project, which demonstrates the student’s learning, initiative,
and interests. A Liberal Studies degree can be excellent preparation for
graduate school, law school, and teaching credential programs.
Upon graduating with a degree in Liberal Studies, a student should
demonstrate:
• Understanding of the distinctive ways in which the Social
Sciences and Humanities approach knowledge
• Appreciation of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as liberators of the
mind and spirit from narrow thinking and ignorance
• Self-Understanding and Self-Direction that encourage
postgraduate pursuits in one’s interests and values
• Activism/Community Service that recognizes the interrelations
of education and citizenship

Associate of Arts
in Career And Technical Education
Associate of Arts Career and Technical Education (CTE) Degree is a
two-year distance education degree designed in conjunction with Alaska
Vocational Technical Center (AVTEC). It provides industry subject matter
experts with the academic background, technical knowledge, skills,
and experiences to become effective trainers for career and technical
education. The major requirements incorporate active learning and are
based on “train the trainer” models, covering learning theory, instruc-
tional media, curriculum design, and instructional strategy. As part of the
A.A. requirements, students also take General University Requirements
(GUR) reflective of a liberal arts education. Students complete 32 credits
of GUR coursework through the APU RANA Distance Education Program
and 32 credits of work in the major through APU/AVTEC-developed and
taught courses, principally through distance delivery. Associate of Arts
Degree coursework can be applied toward a Bachelor of Arts degree
at a later time. GURs: Courses are offered through distance delivery
(RANA).

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 10100) 4
Speech Communication 4
Quantitative 3-4
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 94
Alaska Pacific University

Humanities 4
Lab Science 4
Social/Behavioral 4
Ethic/Religious Values 4
TOTAL 31-32

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
CTE 10100 Foundations of Career and Technical Education 3
CTE 10200 Methods of Instruction 3
CTE 20100 Curriculum Development 3
CTE 20200 Project Planning and Management 3
CTE 20300 Workplace Safety 3
CTE 20400 Internet and Computing Core or
GS 10000 Computer Applications 2-4
CTE 20500 Instructional Technology or
CTE 21500 Introduction to Video Production for CTE 2-3
CTE 20600 Internship I 6
CTE 20700 Internship II 6
TOTAL 31-34

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 64

Bachelor of Arts
in Liberal Studies
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10000) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (MT 12100, 21000, 22000, or
PH 20300) 4
Humanities 8
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science 4
Ethical and Religious Values 4
TOTAL 40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
LS 20100 Liberal Studies Seminar I: 4
Ways of Knowing (Sophomore Seminar)
LS 20200 Liberal Studies Seminar II: Introduction to 4
Humanities
LS 20300 Liberal Studies Seminar III: 4
Introduction to Social Sciences
Directed Studies and Focused Elective 28
Coursework (Advisor/Student Designed)*
LS 38500 Junior Practicum 3
LS 49800 Senior Project Proposal (2-4 credits)
AND
LS 49900 Senior Project (3-10 credits) 12
TOTAL 55
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 95
Alaska Pacific University

* These two requirements must total 28 credits. Directed Studies
minimum = 4 credits, maximum = 12 credits; Focused Elective Course
Work minimum = 16 credits. At least four credits of directed study and
16 credits of focused elective coursework must be completed at the
30000-40000 level. At least 4 of the credits of focused coursework must
be completed at the 30000-40000 level in Liberal Studies offerings.

Optional Concentrations

Concentration in Literature
Statement of Purpose: The literature concentration is meant to help
students pursue their own paths of knowledge through the exploration
of great literature. Students will develop reflective self-knowledge,
creative expression and activism. This concentration will also help
students prepare for graduate work in the humanities.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
LS 20100 Ways of Knowing 4
LS 20200 Intro to Humanities 4
LS 20300 Intro to Social Sciences 4
LL 20600 Intro to Literature and Language 8
LL 40600 Adv. Topics in Literature and Language 16
Directed Studies 4
LS 38500 Junior Practicum 3
LS 49800 Senior Project Proposal (2-4 credits)
AND
LS 49900 Senior Project (3-10 credits) 12
TOTAL 55

Suggested Electives
GS 13300 Critical Thinking
LL 20200/30200 Creative Writing
LL 40600 Rhetoric
Second semester language

Concentration in Philosophy
Statement of Purpose: The philosophy concentration allows students
the opportunity to create a systematic program of study in how and why
we think about things the way we do. Pragmatically, it also increases
one’s critical and analytical abilities. Directed studies, the practicum,
and senior project offer students options of either breadth or depth in
particular fields of philosophy.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
LS 20100 Ways of Knowing 4
LS 20200 Intro to Humanities 4
LS 20300 Intro to Social Sciences 4
PH 20300 Symbolic Logic 4
OR
GS 13300 Critical Thinking
PH 20200 Introduction to Ethics 4
PH 20100 Introductory Topics in Philosophy 4
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 96
Alaska Pacific University

PH 20400 Philosophy of Science 4
PH 30100 Advanced Topics in Philosophy 8
AND/OR
PH 30400 Adv. Studies in Philosophy of Science
Directed Studies 4
LS 38500 Junior Practicum 3
LS 49800 Senior Project Proposal (2-4 credits)
AND
LS 49900 Senior Project (3-10 credits) 12
TOTAL 55

Suggested Courses
HI 20100 World History I
LL 40600 Rhetoric
RS 30100 Advanced Topics in Religious Studies
SS 10500 Intro to Anthropology, Sociology

Concentration in Pre-Law
Statement of Purpose: No specific undergraduate major is required
for admission to law schools, but students considering this profession, or
who want a rigorous and interdisciplinary curriculum, may find a prelaw
concentration attractive. The combination of GUR courses and these
listed below meet the recommendations of the American Bar Associa-
tion’s “Preparation for Legal Education.”

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
LS 20100 Ways of Knowing 4
LS 20200 Intro to Humanities 4
LS 20300 Intro to Social Sciences 4
GS 13300 Critical Thinking 4
PH 20200 Introduction to Ethics 4
HI 20100 U.S. Government 4
HI 30100 Constitutional Law 4
LL 40600 Rhetoric 4
PH 20300 Symbolic Logic 4
Upper Division Course 4
Directed Studies 4
LS 38500 Junior Practicum 3
LS 49800 Senior Project Proposal (2-4 credits)
AND
LS 49900 Senior Project (3-10 credits) 12
TOTAL 55

Recommended Courses
Select one course:
BA 21600 Survey of Economics
BAM 36100 Law and Citizenship
HI 20100 World History I, II
PY 15000 Intro to Psychology
SS 10500 Intro to Social Sciences

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 97
Alaska Pacific University

Concentration in Religion Studies
Statement of Purpose: Religion is one of the major forces that
shapes human culture, commitments and behavior. A Religion Studies
Concentration allows Liberal Studies Majors to focus their studies in the
humanities, social sciences, and cultural studies, to develop critical and
analytical skills, as well as to gain and demonstrate an understanding of
the methods and materials used in the academic study of Religion. The
concentration offers a broad background for graduate studies in religion,
ministry, history, as well as international studies or programs in the allied
fields. It is designed to integrate several fields of studies while learning
about religious communities, religious texts, theological discourse and
spirituality. It is also possible to develop a special emphasis within the
concentration such as Biblical Studies, the Philosophy of Religion, or
Catholic Studies.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
LS 20100 Ways of Knowing 4
LS 20200 Intro to Humanities 4
LS 20300 Intro to Social Sciences 4
PH 20100 Philosophy Topic 4
RS 20100 World Religions 4
OR
RS 20200 Foundations of Religion
RS 30100 Advanced Studies in Religion 4
RS 30300 Adv. Topics in Biblical Studies 4
OR
RS 30500 Adv. Topics in Catholic Studies
Directed Studies 4
LS 38500 Junior Practicum 3
LS 49800 Senior Project Proposal (2-4 credits)
AND
LS 49900 Senior Project (3-10 credits) 12
TOTAL 55

Suggested Courses
HI 20100 World History I. II
PH 20200 Intro to Ethics
SS 10500 Intro to Anthropology, Sociology

Concentration in Writing
Statement of Purpose: Writing well, whether for personal satisfaction
or professional purposes, is a fundamental ability. This concentration
offers students a liberal education in writing theory and practice. Students
will be well prepared for career opportunities and for graduate studies in
literature, rhetoric, linguistics, and creative writing programs.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
LS 20100 Ways of Knowing 4
LS 20200 Intro to Humanities 4
LS 20300 Intro to Social Sciences 4
Choice of: *20
CO 20400 Print Journalism
CO 30400 Advanced Print Journalism
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 98
Alaska Pacific University

LL 20200 Intro to Creative Writing
LL 20300 Business and Technical Writing
LL 20600 Intro to Literature and Language
LL 30200 Advanced Creative Writing
LL 40600 Advanced Studies in Literature
and Language
Directed Studies 4

LS 38500 Junior Practicum
LS 49800 Senior Project Proposal (2-4 credits)
AND
LS 49900 Senior Project (3-10 credits) 12
TOTAL 55

* At least 16 upper division credits.
Suggested Courses
GS 13300 Critical Thinking
LL 40600 Rhetoric
Second semester language

MINor in
Liberal Studies
A minor in Liberal Studies provides students with an opportunity to
participate in lively and open discussion of current philosophical, social,
and aesthetic issues, to pursue personal interests (including fiction
writing, photography, and theater) not addressed in more structured
programs of study, and enhance those skills (such as oral and written
communication) which employers identify as desirable in prospective
employees, and essential for increased mobility in organizations.
Because the minor in Liberal Studies gives wide latitude to students
in choosing their coursework, students need to meet with an advisor in
the Liberal Studies Department to set up the course of study. This plan
should be completed before beginning the senior year.
The minor will consist of a total of 20 hours of course work, excluding
those Liberal Studies courses that are counted toward General University
Requirements or first year language credits.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
Liberal Arts courses 16
(may include 4 credits of directed study)
Liberal Studies Seminar 4
(choose from LS 20100, LS20200, or LS20300)
TOTAL 20

Of the 16 credits of Liberal Studies coursework required for the minor
in Liberal Studies (4 of which can be directed study credits), a minimum
of 4 credits of focused coursework must be completed at 30000-40000
level.

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 99
Alaska Pacific University

OUTDOOR STUDIES
DEPARTMENT
The Outdoor Studies Department offers the following degree
programs:
Outdoor Studies, B.A., or minor
Optional concentrations offered in:
Outdoor Education, Wilderness Therapy,
Commercial Recreation/Tourism, or Land Management

Outdoor Studies (0S) prepares students for careers in outdoor recre-
ation and education through expedition and classroom learning. Students
may choose to pursue a concentration in outdoor education, wilderness
therapy, commercial recreation/tourism, or land management. Our
goal is to graduate students who are prepared to serve an increasingly
diverse outdoor constituency.
Alaska Pacific University’s (APU) block and session is an ideal
structure for active learning. The four week blocks allow students to
explore remote wild places with seasoned outdoor instructors that model
industry standards in an expedition setting. It is our expectation that OS
students will apply those guidelines in all their backcountry pursuits.
During the session students have the opportunity to experience a variety
challenging academic classes.

A graduate with a degree in Outdoor Studies is expected to:
• Design, implement, and evaluate indoor and outdoor recreational
programs
• Demonstrate the art of expedition leadership and related outdoor
skills
• Understand the significance of public lands to a culturally
diverse outdoor community
• Interpret natural history for educational curricula, and
• Articulate ethical principles and standards relevant to outdoor
recreation professionals.

Block courses require that students pay lab fees to help offset the
costs associated with the higher instructor student ratios necessary for
safe wilderness travel. Alaska Pacific University has arranged an articu-
lation agreement with the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS)
for applicable course work. APU courses use public lands including the
Chugach National Forest and Alaska State Parks.

Professional Expectations for Students
The Outdoor Studies faculty encourage students to fully develop
their knowledge and skills in outdoor leadership by capitalizing on the
social and natural opportunities unique to APU and Alaska.

Students are expected to:
• Practice what they have learned in class on their own time.
• Follow appropriate professional standards and behaviors.
• Use a conservative approach in their adventure pursuits.
• Take small, incremental steps to improve their skills.
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 100
Alaska Pacific University

• Know their own strengths and weaknesses, and recognize the
strengths and weaknesses of other group members.
• Communicate with group members to achieve common
understandings.
• Be in appropriate physical condition for activities they are
engaged in.
• Understand and accept the risks of each activity.

Bachelor of Arts
in Outdoor Studies
GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
Introduction to Active Learning (GS 13500) 4
Written Communication (LL 20100) 4
Speech Communication (CO 10001) 4
Quantitative Reasoning (MT 22000) <4>
Humanities 8
Languages 4
Laboratory Science 4
Social/Behavioral Science 4
Ethical and Religious Values 4
TOTAL 36 -40

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS CREDIT HOURS
OS 20000 Introduction to Outdoor Studies 4
(Sophomore Seminar)
OS 20100 Recreational Program Design 4
OS 20200 Wilderness First Responder 4
OS 37000 Risk Management for Outdoor Professionals 2
OS 38500 Junior Practicum 3-12
OS 47000 Advanced Topics in Outdoor Leadership 2
SC 40500 Environmental Ethics 4
Natural History requirement 8
Upper Division requirement 8
Expedition requirement 4
Applied Statistics for Environmental Science (MT 22000)* 4
OS Skill requirement 6
Research Methods requirement 4
OS 49900 Senior Project 8 or 12
TOTAL 65 -78
Electives varies

Minimum Graduation Credit Hour Requirement 128

* Also satisfies GURs. Credits in < angular brackets > are satisfied
by Major Requirements.

Natural History Requirement
Select two courses: 8
(May not use laboratory science course
used to satisfy GURs.)
MAR 22000 Diversity of the Fishes
MAR 23500 Seabirds and Marine Mammals
MAR 41000 Coral Reef Ecology
OS 21000 Snow and Avalanche Science for Professionals
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 101
Alaska Pacific University

SC 11000 Natural History of Alaska
SC 12000 Physical Geology
SC 14000 Introduction to Botany and Zoology
SC 15500 Introduction to Meteorology
SC 21000 Winter Ecology and Cold Weather Physiology
SC 21500 Glaciology and Glacier Travel
SC 24000 Principles of Zoology
SC 33000 Ecology
SC 34000 Animal Behavior
SC 35000 Oceanography
SC 35500 Meteorology
SC 40000 Tropical Ecology
SC 45500 Climate Change
Research Methods Requirement
Select one course: 4
OS 40400 Recreation Research Methods
PY 30000 Methods of Investigation: Research
in Psychology
SC 49800 Research Methods

Upper Division (30000/40000 level) Requirement
Select two courses: 8
OS 30300 Applied Exercise Physiology
OS 40200 Outdoor Education
OS 40300 Alaska Natural History Interpretation
OS 40500 Recreation and the Public Land Resource
OS 40100 The Business of Recreation
PY 35000 Psychotherapeutic Uses of the Wilderness
Expedition Requirement
Select one course: 4
OS 31000 Expedition Leadership
OS 31200 Expedition Mountaineering
OS 31300 Expedition Sea Kayaking
OS 31600 Expedition Glacier Travel
(All expedition and activity courses have additional costs and
fees.)
Outdoor Skill Requirement
Complete 6 credits from the following courses: 6
MAR 11000/11500 Scuba Diving (2)
MAR 34000 Scientific Diving (4)
OS 11000 Introduction to Wilderness Skills (4)
OS 11100 Dog Mushing (2)
OS 11200 Introduction to Winter Wilderness Skills (4)
OS 11300 Sea Kayaking (1)
OS 11400 Beginning Rock Climbing (2)
OS 11500 Beginning Ice Climbing (2)
OS 11700 Equipments Design and Repair (2)
OS 20300 Wilderness First Responder Refresher (1)
OS 20400 Leave No Trace Master Educator (1)
OS 21100 Backcountry Travel (4)
OS 21200 Backcountry Skiing (2)
OS 21400 Recreation, Culture, and Environment (4)
OS 21500 Rescue Methods on Land (2)
OS 21600 Search Methods on Land (2)
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 102
Alaska Pacific University

PE 10300 Run/Ski/Bouldering(1)
PE 20300 Skate Skiingn (1)
SC 21500 Glaciology and Glacier Travel (4)

Concentration Areas for
Outdoor Studies
Students may use classes to meet both the concentration and OS
core requirements where applicable.

Outdoor Education
ED 21400 Exploring the Learning Community 2
ED 24100 Creative Expressions 4
ED 45300 Multicultural Education 3
OS 40200 Outdoor Education 4
OS 40300 AK Natural History Interpretation 4
OS 40400 Recreation Research 4
PY 34000 Abnormal Psychology 3-4
SC 11000 Natural History of AK 4
ED/OS 38500 Practicum with Outdoor Education 3-12
concentration

Wilderness Therapy
PY 15000 Introduction to Psychology 4
PY 21500 Lifespan Human Development 4
PY 25000 Nature and Psychological Well-Being 4
PY 30000 Methods of Investigation: Research 4
Psychology
PY 30500 Individuality and Group Process 3-4
PY 33000 The Psychology of Substance Abuse 4
PY 34000 Abnormal Psychology 3-4
PY 35000 Psychotherapeutic Uses of the Wilderness 4
PY/OS 38500 Practicum with Wilderness Therapy 3-12
concentration

Commercial Recreation/Tourism
BA 10300 Foundations of Business 4
BA 20400 Survey of Accounting 4
BA 20700 Marketing 4
BAM 21600 Survey of Economics 4
BAM 30200 Business Finance 3
OS 40100 The Business of Recreation 4
OS 40400 Recreation Research Methods 4
OS 40500 Recreation and the Public Land Resource 4
BA/OS 38500 Practicum with Recreation and Tourism 3-12
concentration

Land Management
OS 40300 Alaska Natural History Interpretation 4
OS 40400 Recreation Research Methods 4
OR
SC 49800 Research Methods

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 103
Alaska Pacific University

OS 40500 Recreation and the Public Land Resource 4
SC 31000 Environmental Assessment 4
SC 36000 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 4
SC 43500 Environmental Law 4
SC 44500 Collaboration in Environmental Mgmt 4
SC 46200 Land Use Planning 4
OS/SC 38500 Practicum with Land Management 3-12
concentration

minor in
Outdoor Studies
The Outdoor Studies minor provides students the ability to customize
their major by gaining knowledge and experience of the outdoor recre-
ation profession. Some directed study course work may be applied to
the minor.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
OS 20000 Introduction to Outdoor Studies 4
OS 20200 Wilderness First Responder 4
SC Environmental Science elective 4
OS Outdoor Studies elective 4
OS Outdoor Studies Skill requirement 6
TOTAL 22

Travel Argentina & Brazil-Literature & Culture: Rio de Janeiro
Photo by Gina Miller

Undergraduate Academic Degrees 104
Alaska Pacific University

UNDERGRADUATE
ACADEMIC COURSES,
ABBREVIATIONS,
AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course/Subject Abbreviation
Accounting AC
Business Administration BA
Business Administration and Management BAM
Communication CO
Cultural Studies CS
Career and Technical Education CTE
Education ED/EDI
Fine Arts FP
General Studies (Liberal Studies) GS
Health Services Administration HSA
History HI
Human Services HS
Humanities HU
Interdisciplinary Studies IS
Language, Literature, and Writing LL
Liberal Studies LS
Marine Biology MAR
Mathematics MT
Outdoor Studies OS
Philosophy PH
Physical Education PE
Psychology PY
Religious Studies RS
Science SC
Social Sciences SS

AC – Accounting
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

AC 46000 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING AND PUBLIC REPORTING I (3)
The first in a series of 3 courses introduces students to the concepts
and practices of accounting and reporting financial transactions for
public companies. A study of the history of accounting profession and the
accounting standards setting process, in-depth review of the accounting
process and complex problem solving, accounting for current assets:
cash, receivables, inventory, and financial statement analysis. Offered
Fall.

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 105
Alaska Pacific University

AC 46100 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING AND PUBLIC REPORTING II (3)
This course will continue to build skills and knowledge necessary
to understand and apply Financial Accounting Standards in preparing
financial statements. Contents include: accounting for payroll, current
liabilities, long-term liabilities, and stockholders’ equity. Emphasis will
be placed on reporting issues and concepts. Topics also covered: contro-
versial issues in accounting for complex transactions such as stock
options, warrants, earnings per share, and financial statement analysis.
Offered Fall.

AC 46200 ADVANCED COST AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3)
Study of cost concepts and analysis for strategic planning and chain
analysis, profit variance analysis, cost analysis and control, and strategic
financial analysis for long-term major investments. Offered Spring.

AC 46300 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)
This course is designed to assist current and soon-to-be managers,
auditors, and accountants to become familiar with what makes an
accounting information system function. Offered Summer.

AC 46400 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING AND PUBLIC REPORTING III (3)
This course will continue to build skills and knowledge necessary
to understand and apply Financial Accounting Standards in preparing
financial statements. The course will specifically address financial
accounting standards related to income and expense recognition, invest-
ments, leases, pensions, deferred taxes, full disclosure of significant
financial transactions in financial statements, and financial statement
analysis. Offered Spring.

AC 46500 AUDITING (3)
This course describes the role of the auditor; professional standards
and ethics; organization, planning and execution of the audit; audit
programs and procedures for specific account balances and general
audit procedures; auditor’s report and other attestation and accounting
services; and internal, operational, and compliance audit. Offered
Summer.

AC 47000 SEMINAR IN TAXATION (3)
Seminar in Taxation develops a framework, which provides a method
to analyze the effects of tax rules on individual and corporate decision
making. The course involves the study of the development of tax laws,
their impact on economic policy, and special current topics in taxation.
Also, students select topics of interest to research. Offered Fall.

AC 49700 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR I (4)
This is the first of the three directed study courses focused on
the senior project. Students develop a plan of action with timeline
for completing senior project, select a topic, and defend it. Extensive
reading on the topic is required in this course. The paper must include
a description of the senior project, scope, purpose, and a review of the
literature. Senior project courses must be completed sequentially. The
student must complete work required in AC 49700 before beginning

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 106
Alaska Pacific University

work on 49800. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, and IS 44500.
Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

AC 49800 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR II (4)
This is the second directed study course focused on the senior project.
Students must complete AC 49700 before working on AC 49800. Revise
action plan developed in AC 49700 if necessary, and carry out the project.
The written paper must detail method of data collection and analysis.
If applicable the proposal must be approved by the Institutional Review
Board before data collection. Students must complete work required in
AC 49800 before beginning work on AC 49900. Senior project courses
must be completed sequentially. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, IS
44500 and AC 49700. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

AC 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (4)
Third and final directed study course focused on the senior project
requires completing the written paper and making an oral presentation
to the Senior Project committee. Students must complete AC 49800
before working on AC 49900. Senior project courses must be completed
sequentially. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, IS 44500, and AC
49800. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

BA - Business Administration
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

BA 10300 FOUNDATIONS OF BUSINESS (4)
This course will introduce students to the principles of accounting,
finance, marketing strategy, production, planning and teamwork. This
class provides the initial foundation for future classes in the Business
Administration course of study. Offered Fall/Spring.

BA 20000 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: RESEARCH METHODS AND
PROBLEM SOLVING (4)
Research methodology used in business and marketing research
beginning with problem formulation, determination of sources of
information, research design, data collection, analysis, interpretation
and preparation and presentation of research findings. Satisfies the
Sophomore Seminar GUR.

BA 20400 SURVEY OF ACCOUNTING (4)
This course provides an introduction to financial and managerial
accounting. Topics covered in the course include preparation and inter-
pretation of financial statements; concepts, principles, and assumptions
used in the preparation of financial statements; cost concepts, cost
determination and analysis; and budgeting. Offered Fall/Spring.

BA 20500 LEADERSHIP (4)
An experiential course applying leadership and group development
theory to personal and group awareness. Students will have the oppor-
tunity to examine and explore their own leadership styles, traits, and
behaviors. Students will work in groups in an experiential learning
laboratory format. Block course.

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 107
Alaska Pacific University

BA 20600 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (4)
This course will provide an overview of the basic concepts of entre-
preneurship focusing on the nature, environment, and risks of new
venture formation. Topics include: the entrepreneurial mindset, oppor-
tunity recognition, market assessment, feasibility plan, how to structure
a new venture, pricing strategies, financing the product or service
idea, legal structures, and harvesting of the new venture. Offered Fall/
Spring.

BA 20700 MARKETING (4)
This course covers consumer behavior, market research, strategy,
distribution, promotion, planning, pricing, and support. Students will
learn how to develop and evaluate market plans and assess interven-
tions aimed at managing customer value. Offered Fall/Spring.

BA 21500 STATISTICAL DATA ANALYSIS (4)
An introduction to the theory and practice of Statistics with an
emphasis on data mining and analysis. Topics will include a discussion
of descriptive statistics, the major discrete and continuous distributions
as they relate to business and financial data sets, parameter estimation,
hypothesis testing, and basic forecasting methods. Prerequisite: MT
10100 or equivalent. Satisfies the Quantitative Skills GUR.
BA 36000 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION TRAVEL COURSE (2-4)
Designed to enrich course work for upper division students in
business administration, this course provides the opportunity for travel
to relevant locations nationally and internationally.

BA 36200 INTERMEDIATE STUDIES IN BUSINESS (4)
This menu course is designed to provide students with interme-
diate level elective courses in business administration in two distinct
areas: Functional studies and Industry studies. Functional studies
include taking selected topics courses in subjects such as organiza-
tional behavior, management, finance, marketing, quantitative analysis,
accounting, law, international business, human resources, etc. Industry
studies include selected topics courses in arts, not-for-profit sector,
government, health care, non-governmental organizations, manufac-
turing, natural resources, tourism, etc.

BA 41000 ADVANCED STUDIES IN BUSINESS (3-4)
Students who want to further develop understanding gained in the
Intermediate Studies in Business may take advanced level courses in
the areas of Functional studies and Industry studies. Functional studies
include taking selected topics courses in subjects such as organiza-
tional behavior, management, finance, marketing, quantitative analysis,
accounting, law, international business, human resources, etc. Industry
studies include selected topics courses in arts, not-for-profit sector,
government, health care, non-governmental organizations, manufac-
turing, natural resources, tourism, etc. Prerequisite: Intermediate
Studies in Business or instructor permission.

BA 49700 SENIOR PROJECT/THESIS PROPOSAL I (4)
This is the first of the three directed study courses focused on
the senior project. Students develop a plan of action with timeline
Undergraduate Course Descriptions 108
Alaska Pacific University

for completing senior project, select a topic, and defend it. Extensive
reading on the topic is required in this course. The paper must include
a description of the senior project, scope, purpose, and a review of the
literature. Senior project courses must be completed sequentially. The
student must complete work required in BA 49700 before beginning
work on BA 49800. Prerequisites: LL 20100, BA 20000, BA 21500, and
senior standing.

BA 49800 SENIOR PROJECT/THESIS PROPOSAL II (4)
This is the second directed study course focused on the senior
project. Students must complete BA 49700 before working on BA 49800.
Revise action plan developed in BA 49700 if necessary, and carry out
the project. The written paper must detail method of data collection
and analysis. If applicable the proposal must be approved by the Insti-
tutional Review Board before data collection. Students must complete
work required in BA 49800 before beginning work on BA 49900. Senior
project courses must be completed sequentially. Prerequisites: LL 20100,
BA 20000, BA 21500, BA 49700, and senior standing.

BA 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (4)
Third and final directed study course focused on the senior project
requires completing the written paper and making an oral presentation
to the Senior Project committee. Students must complete BA 49800
before working on BA 49900. Senior project courses must be completed
sequentially. Prerequisites: LL 20100, BA 20000, BA 21500, BA 49800,
and senior standing.

BA 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study in a given business or management field under the
guidance of a faculty member.

BA 28500, 38500, 48500 PRACTICUM (1-4)
Practical work experience or other experiential opportunity to apply
learning in real world activity or work place. Guidance is provided by the
collaborative efforts of the student, faculty, and on-site supervisor.

BA 38600, 48600 INTERNSHIP (1-3)
All internships have two components: learning by doing and reflection.
Learning by doing is achieved through apprenticeship with an organi-
zation outside the university or the academic department. Reflection
includes reading and well thought out articulation of the outcome of
the internship. The intern will work under the supervision of the organi-
zational sponsor and a faculty member. The internship experiences
are completed with a reflection paper. A presentation of the internship
learning experience may be required. Co-requisite for BA 38600: BA
38700. Co-requisite for BA 48600: BA 48700.

BA 38700, 48700 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR (1)
All students are required to take an internship seminar along with
the internship; i.e. apprenticeship experience. The seminar will utilize
literature relevant to internship experience. Co-requisite for BA 38700:
BA 38600. Co-requisite for BA 48700: BA 48600.

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 109
Alaska Pacific University

BAM – Business Administration and
Management
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

BAM 10500 BUSINESS MATH (4)
This course provides students with basic algebra and mathematics
skills to solve business problems and also lay a foundation for the
advanced mathematical requirements found in college-level quanti-
tative business courses. Students will be exposed to the arithmetic
and algebraic principles underlying pricing, depreciation, investments
and insurance problems as relevant business topics utilizing such tools.
Word problems will be included in each of these topics so that students
can experientially relate to their real-world applications. Offered Fall/
Spring.

BAM 20000 ACCOUNTING FOR THE INFORMATION AGE I (3)
Introduction to financial accounting including principles and concepts
underlying financial accounting, uses and preparation of accounting infor-
mation, and examination of alternative accounting methods. (Elective
module that can be added to the regular BAM Program curriculum for
students wishing more experience in accounting.)

BAM 20100 ACCOUNTING FOR THE INFORMATION AGE II (3)
Building on BAM 20000, this course is designed to equip the student
with additional tools for using accounting information in a decision
making context. The objective is to provide students with an oppor-
tunity for an in-depth analysis of balance sheet accounts, how they
interrelate, and how they can be used in decision-making. There will be
a heavy emphasis on accounting information from the perspective of the
user. (Elective module that can be added to the regular BAM Program
curriculum for students wishing more experience in accounting.)

BAM 20200 ACCOUNTING FOR THE INFORMATION AGE III (3)
Assist current and soon-to-be managers, auditors, and accoun-
tants in becoming familiar with accounting analysis, design, and imple-
mentation of information systems. Prerequisite: BAM 20000 or equiv-
alent. (Elective module that can be added to the regular BAM Program
curriculum for students wishing more experience in accounting.)

BAM 21000 INTRODUCTION TO THE NON-PROFIT SECTOR (3)
This course will provide an overview of the not-for-profit sector, its
origins, tax and legal basis, and key trends impacting the sector and will
also examine the ethical standards observed in today’s not-for-profit
organizations. This course will also demonstrate the critical roles not-
for-profits play in society, describe the national tax and legal treatment
of the sector, and place Alaska not-for-profit sector in a national context.
Offered Fall.
BAM 21600 SURVEY OF ECONOMICS (4)
The study of individual decision making (households, firms, and other
organizations) and how markets mediate and aggregate such decisions.
Issues addressed will include the determination of prices, incomes, and
methods of production. Particular attention will be focused on “market
failures” where individual self-interested decisions can lead to perverse
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results (e.g., pollution, congestion, under-provision of socially desirable
goods). The consequences of government policies will be explored.
Satisfies the Social/Behavioral Science GUR. Prerequisite: BAM 10500
or MT 10100. Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 25900 FINANCIAL TOOLS FOR MANAGEMENT (3)
Students will learn to analyze financial statements using ratios.
Review of financial tools used to plan, measure, and manage internal
performances related to cost, efficiency, and profit. Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 30200 BUSINESS FINANCE (3)
An introduction to corporate finance including: discussion of the
commonly accepted tools used in financial planning and analysis,
the time value of money, discounted cash flow analysis, and capital
budgeting before and after taxes will be considered, as well as proper
financial decision making under risk and uncertainty. Prerequisite: BAM
25900 and (BAM 10500 or MT 10100). Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 31000 VENTURE MANAGEMENT (3)
This course immerses the student in the practical matters of venture
management. Students study the various stages of venture growth,
from the idea stage, to the problematic start-up phase, through the
crises stage of fast-growth to maturity. Students study the impact of
ebusiness on venture management and explore the full range of debt
and equity funding options available to the businessperson.

BAM 31500 TOURISM MANAGEMENT (3)
This course is an overview of tourism management. Students learn
the fundamentals of how each segment of the industry operates and
the interdependence between each segment. Students will examine
the phases of tour operations from concept design through logistics
management to marketing and tour operations management. Students
will also explore the unique and specific management, logistics, and
marketing challenges faced by managers in the event, incentive,
meetings, and conventions industries.

BAM 32000 FUNDAMENTALS OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS (3)
This course provides an overview of the basic technology of telecom-
munications.

BAM 32100 TELECOMMUNICATION POLICY AND REGULATION (3)
This course provides an overview of federal and state regulatory
policy and practice, with emphasis on the implementation of the Telecom-
munications Act of 1996 and the resulting migration from regulated to
emerging competitive markets. Appropriate regulatory strategies will be
introduced and analyzed.

BAM 33000 LABOR AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS (3)
An examination of employee relations within organizations concen-
trating on labor-management relations in a union environment. Alter-
native Dispute Resolution (ADR) and the National Labor Relations Board
(NLRB) will be examined.

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BAM 33100 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS IN THE WORKPLACE (3)
The materials contained in the course examine strategic choices
in managing compensations and benefits. Compensation theories and
models are discussed in relationship to current organizational realities
and practices.

BAM 36100 LAW AND CITIZENSHIP (3)
This course covers a survey of the major areas of law that are funda-
mental to our economic system and which influence business decision
making. The evolution and application of specific legal principles and
substantive rules that govern disputes and transactions are explored, as
well as court structures and procedures. Basic legal research skill and
knowledge are developed as part of the course. Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 42000 BOARD AND VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT (3)
This course will address key issues in recruiting, selecting and
managing volunteer human resources in nonprofit organizations. Prereq-
uisite: BAM21000. Offered Fall odd years.

BAM 42100 BUDGET AND FINANCE FOR NON-PROFIT (3)
The course is structured to illustrate the nonprofit fiscal management
cycle: planning, execution, recording, reporting, and monitoring. It
provides students with an understanding of the objectives of nonprofit
fiscal management and experience utilizing common tools to measure
progress toward achieving those objectives. Prerequisite: BAM 21000.
Offered Spring even years.

BAM 42200 FUNDRAISING AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (3)
A comprehensive fundraising course designed to provide a basic
foundation of fundraising knowledge and skills. This course covers all
the components of a successful fundraising program for non-profits and
addresses specific fund development issues in Alaska. Prerequisite: BAM
21000. Offered Fall even years.

BAM 42300 PLANNING AND EVALUATION OF NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATIONS (3)
This course provides an overview of how successful non-profit
organizations plan and evaluate their progress. Students will explore
the process of organizational change from an individual perspective
and develop an integrated model focused on each student’s sponsoring
organization. Prerequisite: BAM 21000. Offered Spring odd years.

BAM 43200 THE BUSINESS OF ENTERTAINMENT (3)
This course would examine the business economics, financing,
production, and marketing of entertainment in the United States and
overseas including: movies, music, television programming, broad-
casting, cable, casino gambling and wagering, publishing, performing
arts, sports, theme parks, and toys and games. This course would also
explore the economics of networks and advertising including policy
implications and box-office behavior. Offered Fall.

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BAM 43500 INTRODUCTION TO TELECOMMUNICATIONS (3)
Basic technology of telecommunications and how the twin forces of
technology and competition are correlated. (An elective BAM course for
those students interested in telecommunications management.)

BAM 45200 OPERATIONS AND QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3)
This course explores the major concepts and techniques used to
manage the operations function. The course considers both managerial
and analytical issued since an effective manager must be equally at
ease in both areas. Topics include production planning, total quality
management, the management of materials, and project scheduling.
Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 45400 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3)
Comprehensive study of organizational change theory and appli-
cation. Aspects of organizational design and structure explored. Partic-
ipation in exercises and methods for creative group problem solving.
Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 45600 STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)
Management role in strategic planning, development, and imple-
mentation of human resource capital and investment. Strategic HR
policies and issues are examined. Labor relations, Federal and State
interventions are examined. Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 45800 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND LEADERSHIP (3)
Examine leadership and organizational behavior theories and
practices as related to effective management in diverse organizations.
Offered Fall/Spring.

BAM 46200 GLOBAL MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)
Exposure to marketing management in an international market-
place with a focus on competitive strategies, economic indicators, and
marketing activities.

BAM 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3)
Develop knowledge and skills in a specific area of interest under
the guidance of the faculty. This is in addition to the regular BAM
curriculum.

BAM 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Review current issues in management in a seminar style, or offer
special topics of particular interest to BAM students. Such sessions are
in addition to the regular BAM curriculum.

BAM 49700 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR I (4)
This is the first of the three directed study courses focused on
the senior project. Students develop a plan of action with timeline
for completing senior project, select a topic, and defend it. Extensive
reading on the topic is required in this course. The paper must include
a description of the senior project, scope, purpose, and a review of the
literature. Senior project courses must be completed sequentially. The
student must complete work required in BAM 49700 before beginning

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work on BAM 49800. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, and IS 44500.
Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

BAM 49800 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR II (4)
This is the second directed study course focused on the senior
project. Students must complete BAM 49700 before working on BAM
49800. Revise action plan developed in BAM 49700 if necessary, and
carry out the project. The written paper must detail method of data
collection and analysis. If applicable the proposal must be approved by
the Institutional Review Board before data collection. Students must
complete work required in BAM 49800 before beginning work on BAM
49900. Senior project courses must be completed sequentially. Prereq-
uisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, IS 44500, and BAM 49700. Offered Fall,
Spring, Summer.

BAM 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (4)
Third and final directed study course focused on the senior project
requires completing the written paper and making an oral presen-
tation to the Senior Project committee. Students must complete BAM
49800 before working on BAM 49900. Senior project courses must be
completed sequentially. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, IS 44500,
and BAM 49800. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

BAM 19200, 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)
Offered as needed. Appropriate descriptions published when special
topic is offered.

CO – Communication
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

CO 10000 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION (4)
Introductory courses in communication that provide students with
an understanding and appreciation of basic cognitive, linguistic, and
sociocultural foundations of human communication processes in various
contexts: interpersonal, small groups, public speaking. This class empha-
sizes the practice and improvement of students’ communication skills.
Satisfies the Speech Communication GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course numbers range from CO 10001 to CO 10010 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Speech Communication Interpersonal Communication
Small Group Processes Public Speaking

CO 20400 PRINT JOURNALISM (4)
Introduction to the craft and practice of print journalism. Oppor-
tunities for publication will include the APU Journal. Prerequisite: LL
10100. Offered Fall/Spring.

CO 30400 ADVANCED PRINT JOURNALISM (4)
This course will offer students the opportunity to gain advanced
real-life journalism experience by working on Alaska Pacific University’s
student newspaper, “The APU Journal.” This course is responsible for
publishing the Journal, and all students in this course will work on the
school newspaper throughout the term. Through hands-on experience,
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the students, who will be referred to as “reporters,” will learn advanced
facets of newspaper reporting and writing, including interviewing,
feature and hard-news writing, editing and the editing process, revision,
editorial decision-making, newspaper layout and design, headline writing,
and finally, the economics of publishing a small press newspaper. This
class may also incorporate opportunities for students to spend time at
professional news organizations (such as the Associated Press offices
in Anchorage). Guest lectures, readings, handouts and other materials
will also be used in this course. Prerequisites: LL 10100 or CO 20400.
Offered Fall/Spring.

CS – Cultural Studies
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

CS 20100 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES (4)
Examination of culture as a field of mediation between people’s
everyday lives and the broad structures of the whole society, drawing
from the disciplines of communication studies, literary criticism, anthro-
pology, sociology, cultural history, women’s studies, political economy,
and others. Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course numbers range from CS 20101 to CS 20199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Middle East Literature & Film Narratives of Social Responsibility
Women’s Studies Alaska Last or Lost Frontier
America’s Native Heritage Cinema Sex
Cold War Studies Cultural Anthropology
Intercultural Communication Movie Hombres
Multiculturalism Mythology and Folklore
Northern Pacific Rim Culture Paranoid in Hollywood
Russian Culture Shamanism
Viewing Deadly Women & Film
The Lost Generation Human Landscapes-Cultural Ecology
Globalization and Its Discontents U.S. History at the Movies

CS 22700 HISTORY AND CULTURE OF ALASKA NATIVES (3)
A survey of Aleut, Yup’ik and Inupiat Eskimo, Athabascan, and
southeastern peoples and cultures. Entrance into Alaska, prehistory,
and traditional adaptations including economic, social, and ideological
components. Historic contact, culture change, contemporary position,
and ongoing concerns are also examined. Offered Fall/Spring.

CS 30100 ADVANCED CULTURAL STUDIES (4)
Focus on particular topics in cultural studies drawing on work from
the areas of communication, literary criticism, anthropology, sociology,
historical and women’s studies, and political economy. Satisfies the
Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course numbers range from CS 30101 to CS 30199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Middle East Literature & Film Narratives of Social Responsibility
Women’s Studies Eco-Feminism
Poetry Review Gender and Transgressions
Women and the Body Women’s Violence
Globalization and Its Discontents

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CTE - Career and Technical Education
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

CTE 10100 FOUNDATIONS OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION (3)
This course is an introduction to the historical, philosophical, socio-
logical, and political foundations of career and vocational education in the
United States as it relates to secondary and post-secondary education.
Offered Summer.

CTE 10200 METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce contextual teaching
and learning concepts and application of basic methods of instruction
to individuals with industry work experience, but little or no teaching
experience. Offered Fall/Summer.

CTE 20100 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (3)
This course is designed to help an instructor acquire the knowledge
and skills necessary to prepare and update curriculum for career and
technical education. Offered Fall.

CTE 20200 PROJECT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (3)
The course is an introduction to project management, with appli-
cation to career and technical education. Offered Spring.

CTE 20300 WORK PLACE SAFETY (3)
This course introduces workplace safety utilizing approaches
developed by industry apprenticeship programs. The course focuses on
governmental regulations and influences, hazard control, and accident
awareness and control. Offered Fall.

CTE 20400 INTERNET AND COMPUTING CORE (4)
The Internet and Computing Core Certification (IC3) program is a
global, validated, standards-based training and certification program for
critical computing and Internet knowledge and skills. IC3 ensures you
have the knowledge and skills required for effective use of computer
hardware, software, networks, and the Internet. Offered Spring.

CTE 20500 INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY (2)
This course focuses on the utilization of media and computers
in the teaching-learning process. Media technology is studied as a
means of enhancing and improving learning in the distance education
environment.

CTE 20600 INTERNSHIP I (6)
The internship is an opportunity to put into practice theories and
approaches explored during prior classes. Prerequisite: CTE 10100-CTE
10200, CTE 20100-CTE 20200, (CTE 20300-CTE 20500 can be taken
concurrently with Internship). Offered Fall/Summer.

CTE 20700 INTERNSHIP II (6)
The internship is an opportunity to put into practice theories and
approaches explored during prior classes. Prerequisite: CTE 10100-CTE
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10200, CTE 20100-CTE 20200, CTE 20600, (CTE 20300-CTE 20500 can
be taken concurrently with Internship). Offered as needed.

CTE 21500 INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO PRODUCTION FOR CTE
EDUCATORS (3)
This course is designed to provide the career and technology
educator with the tools to develop multimedia material to supplement
both classroom and laboratory training. The student will learn how to
manage a video project, utilize camera and lighting techniques, edit and
publish the final project into multiple formats. Offered Spring.

ED - Education
(Offered through the Education Department)

ED 21400 EXPLORING THE LEARNING COMMUNITY (2)
Designed for transfer students in education who have success-
fully completed courses in classroom management, school history, and
classroom observation. Allows students to incorporate prior knowledge
into new experiences while sharing with peers. Supervised classroom
experiences in K-8 classrooms and seminar classes on campus with
three (3) hours of classroom field experience weekly, are required.
Approval of the course instructor is needed. Satisfies the Sophomore
Seminar GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 21500 CLASSROOM LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT (2)
This course provides students interested in education continued
development of an education portfolio and the relationship educators
have to national and state standards. Effective processes and styles,
as well as current best practices, relating to classroom management
and the leadership exhibited by successful teachers receive focus.
Practicum, including some virtual experiences and a field placement,
will require students to assist and teach lessons. Prerequisite: Taking,
or have taken, ED 21400. Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 24100 TEACHING METHODS: CREATIVE EXPRESSION (4)
Exploration of the means of stimulating creative expression in
an educational setting. Art, music, dance, photography, and video
as expressive media are included as appropriate. Includes practicum
experience. Prerequisite: Two fine arts courses or permission of
instructor. Offered May Block, Spring online as needed.

ED 31400 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION IN THE K-8 CLASSROOM (4)
This course addresses the study of learners, learning theory, and
teaching practices within the regular classroom setting. Teacher candi-
dates will study learning theory and factors that have the greatest influ-
ences on the acquisition, storage, retention, transfer, and retrieval of
knowledge, focusing on teaching strategies and learning. Understanding
of and dealing with learning differences, the learning environment, social
interactions, assessment, communication, and collaboration as well as
reflection and self-assessment of their knowledge, skills, and dispo-
sitions for teaching diverse and special needs students in the regular
classroom are stressed. This course includes a practicum. Prerequisite:
ED 21400 or Permission of Instructor. Offered Fall Block, Fall online as
needed.
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ED 32000 TEACHING METHODS: LITERACY AND COMMUNICATION I
(6)
Development of knowledge, skills, and a positive attitude relating to
teaching reading, language arts, and children’s literature in grades K-
4. Extensive practicum/field placement requiring students to observe,
assist, and teach lessons in individual, small, and large group settings.
Includes Junior Practicum experience. Prerequisite: Formal admission to
the Teacher Preparation Program. Offered Fall.

ED 32100 TEACHING METHODS: LITERACY AND COMMUNICATION II
(6)
Development of knowledge, skills, and a positive attitude relating
to teaching reading, language arts, and adolescent literature in grades
5-8. Extensive practicum/field placement requiring students to observe,
assist, and teach lessons in individual, small, and large group settings.
Includes Junior practicum experience. Prerequisite: Formal admission to
the Teacher Preparation Program and ED 32000. Offered Spring.

ED 33000 TEACHING METHODS: SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND
SOCIETY I (6)
Experiences in teaching and learning science, mathematics, and
social studies in grades K-4. Methods and materials of instruction survey
focusing on integration of subject areas. Emphasis on implementing
National Science Education Standards, National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics (NCTM), National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS),
and Alaska Department of Education (ADOE) standards. Includes Junior
Practicum experience. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Teacher
Preparation Program. Offered Fall.

ED 33100 TEACHING METHODS: SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, AND
SOCIETY II (6)
Experiences in teaching and learning science, mathematics, and
social studies in grades 5-8. Methods and materials of instruction survey
focusing on integration of subject areas. Emphasis on implementing
National Science Education Standards, National Council of Teachers of
Mathematics (NCTM), National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS),
and Alaska Department of Education (ADOE) standards. Includes Junior
Practicum experience. Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Teacher
Preparation Program and ED 33000. Offered Spring.

ED 34400 TEACHING METHODS: HEALTH AND PHYSICAL MOVEMENT
EDUCATION (4)
Examination of the knowledge, behaviors, skills, and attitudes
necessary to teach Physical Movement Education in grades K-8. Emphasis
on content areas, teacher roles, methods of instruction, growth and
development issues, and the importance of comprehensive school
health education. A public school practicum/field placement provides an
opportunity to observe and participate in health and physical education/
movement. Prerequisite: ED 21400. Offered Spring: alternating years
online/on campus.

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ED 34700 EVALUATION OF STUDENT LEARNING (3)
Study of the theory and practice of educational evaluation with an
emphasis on knowledge and skills to construct and interpret teacher
made and standardized tests. Use of informal techniques to assess
the cognitive, affective, psychomotor, and social growth of students in
grades K-8. Includes Junior Practicum experience. Prerequisite: Formal
admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. Offered Fall: alternating
years online/on campus.

ED 36300 COMPUTERS AND TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHERS (4)
Introduction to the use of computers and other technology to
enhance teaching and learning. Topics include operating information,
current research regarding Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) and appli-
cations of technology in a learning community environment. Practical
field experiences are required. Prerequisites: GS 10000 or demonstrated
competency and ED 21400. Offered Spring.

ED 45300 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
Examination of the meaning of culture and the influences of culture
in education. Specific study of teaching, administration, and effec-
tiveness of schooling as they relate to multicultural student populations.
Practical field experiences are required. Prerequisite: ED 21400. Offered
January Block, Spring online as needed.

ED 48400 STUDENT TEACHING (12)
15-week practicum designed to progress through the full range of
teaching responsibilities in a school environment. Daily evaluation by
the supervising teacher, and periodic observations by a university super-
visor, assess student teaching progress. A weekly seminar conducted
by university faculty addresses meeting the challenges of the teaching
profession. Meets Senior Project and University Portfolio requirements.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all undergraduate coursework,
approval of the Teacher Education Committee, and, for those beginning
the program after 7/1/08, meeting Alaska scores on Elementary PRAXIS
II (either #10011 Elementary Education: Curriculum, Instruction, and
Assessment OR #10014 Elementary Education: Content Knowledge) or
on at least one Middle School content area of PRAXIS II. Offered Fall/
Spring.

ED 48600 ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN ELEMENTARY TEACHING (6)
Designed for individuals who have had extensive teaching experience.
This practicum stresses comprehensive classroom management skills to
assist the prospective teacher in developing all the competencies which
are normally a part of the student teaching experience. Documented
teaching experience along with advisor and director approval required.
Approval of Teacher Education Committee required. Offered as needed.

ED 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-12)
Designed for students who wish to pursue topics not available in
regularly scheduled classes. A plan of study is developed with the assis-
tance of a professor in the Education Department. Approval of advisor,
department chair, and Academic Dean required. Offered as needed.

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ED 28500, 38500, 48500 PRACTICUM (1-12)
Designed for students desiring additional field experience in K-
8 classrooms. Approval by advisor required. Cooperative guidance
provided by an Education Department faculty member and an on-the-
job supervisor. Offered as needed.

ED 29000, 39000, 49000 SEMINAR (1-3)
Designed to provide participants with in-depth studies of topics of
interest. Facilitated by Education Department faculty members. Offered
as needed.

ED 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Special topics in various fields are offered as needed. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered as
needed.

EDI 10100 INTRODUCTION TO STANDARD BASE SYSTEM (3)
This course is an overview of a standards-based system and how to
begin to implement the four key components in your classroom, school,
and/or district. Topics are based around the following four components:
Shared Vision, Leadership, Standards-Based Design (Balance Instruc-
tional Model, Standards, Assessments, Reporting) and Continuous
Improvement. Course materials include books, videos, and research-
based articles and publications. Students will utilize prior practice and
new knowledge and skills to improve current practice. A final project,
which includes application of the four components, will culminate the
course. Offered as needed.

EDI 20100 THE BALANCED INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL: READING
AND WRITING (3)
Participants will work in teams with high school students in reading
and writing. Master teachers will demonstrate exemplar lessons with
students by using the four strands of the Balanced Instructional Model
(Direct Instruction, Practical Application, Simulation, and Real-Life
Connection). These strands will be analyzed from research and appli-
cation perspective that includes classrooms with varying circumstances
and levels of students. Processes learned in the class will be evaluated
for implementation in rural Alaska. Offered as needed.

EDI 20200 THE BALANCED INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL: MATH AND
SCIENCE (3)
Participants will work in teams with high school students in math
and science. Master teachers will demonstrate exemplar lessons with
students by using the four strands of the Balanced Instructional Model
(Direct Instruction, Practical Application, Simulation, and Real-Life
Connection). These strands will be analyzed from research and appli-
cation perspective that includes classrooms with varying circumstances
and levels of students. Processes learned in the class will be evaluated
for implementation in rural Alaska. Offered as needed.

EDI 20300 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: SHARING A VISION OF
EDUCATION (3)
This course is designed for paraprofessionals to explore the concept
of Shared Vision and Community Involvement. This course will explore
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the basic question of “What do you want your kids to know, and why
should they know it?” The role of Shared Vision within a model for school
improvement will be discussed. Participants will examine the roles of all
stakeholders, processes for developing a shared vision and implications
for quality education. Offered as needed.

EDI 20400 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AT ALL LEVELS (3)
This course will provide participants with opportunities to explore the
qualities of effective leadership. Participants will examine how organi-
zations successfully address organizational values, performance expec-
tations while focusing on student learning, empowerment, innovation,
organizational learning, and relationships among all stakeholders. Partic-
ipants will explore concepts in relation to the Alaskan context. Offered
as needed.

EDI 20500 EXPLORING DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AND
ASSESSMENT IN ACTION (3)
This course will help participants determine what differentiated
instruction is, why it is appropriate for all learners, how to plan for it,
how to assist in management, how to help parents and students prepare
for the differentiated classroom and how to assist in the assessment of
student progress. Participants will assist in the development of appro-
priate lessons, projects and assessment components for classroom
application. Offered as needed.

FP - Fine Arts
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

FP 10000 INTRODUCTION TO FINE ARTS (2)
Students engage in activities customarily associated with the
practice of the particular art being offered in the menu. Through direct
experience, students are expected to develop aesthetic sensibility as
well as some technical proficiency. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course numbers range from FP 10001 to FP 10019 in schedule)
Selected Drama Topics:
Acting Production

(Topic course numbers range from FP 10020 to FP 10059 in schedule)
Selected Fine Arts Topics:
Ceramics Design
Digital Photography Drawing
Landscape Painting Nature Photography
Painting Photography
Sculpting Studio Arts
Visual Arts Workshop Digital Filmmaking

(Topic course number range from FP 10060 to 10099 in schedule)
Selected Musical Topics:
Guitar Musical Encounters
Orff Instruments Piano
University Ensemble Voice

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FP 20000 INTERMEDIATE STUDIES IN FINE ARTS (2)
Students will engage in the intermediate practice of studio arts.
Through direct experience, students will develop their aesthetic sensi-
bilities and technical proficiencies at the intermediate level. Offered Fall/
Spring.
(Topic course number range from FP 20020 to FP 20059 in schedule)
Selected Fine Arts Topics:
Photography Studio Arts
The Modern Portrait Digital Filmmaking

(Topic course number range from FP 20060 to FP 20099 in schedule)
Selected Musical Topics:
Guitar

FP 30000 ADVANCED STUDIES IN FINE ARTS (2-4)
Students will engage in the advanced practice of the particular art
being offered in the menu. Through direct experience, students will
continue to develop their aesthetic sensibilities and technical profi-
ciencies. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from FP 30001 to FP 30019 in schedule)
Selected Drama Topics:
Acting Production

(Topic course number range from FP 30020 to FP 30059 in schedule)
Selected Fine Art Topics:
Ceramics Design
Drawing Painting
Photography Sculpting
Studio Arts Digital Filmmaking

(Topic course number range from FP 30060 to FP 30099 in schedule)
Selected Musical Topics:
Guitar Piano
Recording Techniques University Ensemble
Voice

GS – General Studies
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

GS 10000 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (2)
Introduction to computers for the novice. Prepares the student for
the many courses that require computing skills to complete assign-
ments. Offered as needed.

GS 10100 WORKING WITH STUDENTS IN RESIDENCE HALLS (1)
Introduction to Student Development theory with major emphasis
on residence life community and the role of the Resident Advisor.
Required for students interested in becoming Resident Advisors. Offered
as needed.

GS 10200 FITNESS FOR LIFE (2-3)
Students learn the basics of exercise physiology, cardiovascular
and muscular conditioning, diet, nutrition and weight control, health
risk factors, and stress management. Emphasis is on self-evaluation
and personalized program planning to maintain fitness throughout life.
Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.
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GS 13300 CRITICAL THINKING (3-4)
Develops and sharpens the specific analytical thought tools that are
used in all academic disciplines, beginning with reading skills. Recog-
nition of argument forms and reasoning methods, and the ability to use
these constructively, will be practiced in written and verbal dialogue.
Offered Fall/Spring.

GS 13500 INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE LEARNING (4)
This course provides new students with an introduction to collegiate
learning and specifically to learning at APU. Students choose from a
variety of seminar topics, each of which fosters exploration of how the
individual’s development relates to the broader social context. Through
active and project-based learning as well as classic and contemporary
tools and sources of wisdom, students learn how to create personal
models of inquiry in order to pursue their passionate interests and to
empower them as active learners. Offered Fall.

GS 15000 WEB DESIGN (2-4)
A beginning course in HTML. This course will provide the student
with a foundation in the HTML language, a necessity for progressing to
more advanced web design tools and techniques. The course will cover
all vital aspects of HTML and basic web design, including page layout,
formatting, using images, links, lists, tables and frames, with an intro-
duction to forms and cascading style sheets. Offered as needed.

GS 16000 TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY: ORGANIC GARDENING AT
KELLOGG FARM (4)
This course will focus on sustainability and organic gardening by
researching, planning, and planting a garden at the Kellogg Farm.
Topics include: principles of food production, horticulture in Alaska, and
decision-making. Offered as needed.

GS 20500 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT: INITIAL DOCUMENTATION (1)
Preparation of a resume, autobiography, goals statements, and
educational plan. Optional class for students who are preparing the
portfolio for junior year review. Required for students who wish to
apply for Assessment for Credit of Prior Learning. Initial steps of both
processes are identical. CR/NC grades only. Offered Fall/Spring.

GS 20600 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT: THE COMPETENCIES (1)
Students developing their portfolios for junior year review by depart-
ments will receive guidance in addressing each of the GUR compe-
tencies, preparing essay (or other) responses, and selecting appro-
priate documentation. They will also address the major competencies
and update their own educational plan. When each of these has been
addressed, the portfolio will be forwarded to the respective major depart-
ments. CR/NC grades only. Offered Fall/Spring.

GS 20700 PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT: ASSESSMENT FOR CREDIT OF
PRIOR LEARNING (1)
For students who want to apply for assessment for credit of prior
learning with respect to one or more specific course(s). Assistance
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in how to demonstrate and document mastery of the objectives and
competencies expected in specific courses as laid out in their syllabi.
Students receive credit for this module upon completing the process
of assembling materials for at least one course. CR/NC grades only.
Offered Fall/Spring.

HI – History
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

HI 20100 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL STUDIES (4)
Introductory courses that provide the foundations for understanding
the evolution of cultures, societies, politics, and economies. Through
readings and projects, these courses develop awareness of the past,
of causes and effects, and of alternative interpretations. Satisfies the
Humanities GUR. * Denotes a Social Science GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from HI 20101 to HI 20199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
World History I World History II
American Government * Alaska’s History

HI 30100 ADVANCED STUDIES IN HISTORY (4)
In-depth courses, either focusing on particular areas of the world
(Latin America, Modern Europe, China) or with certain topics (U.S.
and Vietnam, Radical Politics in the U.S., Ancient Greece/Rome, Ethno
History). Projects will emphasize critical/analytical thinking and historical
research methods. Some classes may require prerequisites. All but aster-
isked classes satisfy the Humanities GUR. * Denotes a Social Science
GUR. Offered as needed.
(Topic course number range from HI 30101 to 30199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
US and Vietnam History: Ancient Greece
U.S. Environmental History * U.S. Constitutional Law *
Immigrant Nation The Roman World
Western Roots in Middle East

HS – Human Services
(Offered through the Counseling Psychology and Human Services
Department)

HS 11100 HUMAN SERVICE PRACTICE AND POLICY (3)
An overview of the history, theoretical perspectives, and target
populations of human services, as well as discussion of social policy,
current controversies, and trends. Extensive practice of the cognitive,
problem solving and APA writing style necessary for professional study.
Offered Fall.

HS 21300 HUMAN SERVICES CARE COORDINATION (3)
Identifies and examines the philosophy, process, and procedures
that form the basis for wraparound care. Emphasis is on responsibilities,
skills, and knowledge necessary for coordinating care for clients with
multi-service needs. Offered Fall.

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HS 28400 HUMAN SERVICES SOPHOMORE PORTFOLIO/FIELD
EXPERIENCE (4)
In this course the student will document professional experiences
such as training workshops and positions related to Human Services in a
portfolio which may be used for professional development. The student
will document current professional or volunteer work experience in a
Human Services agency and reflect on its relationship to coursework,
set academic and career goals and write a resume.

HS 31000 UNDERSTANDING DIVERSITY, SELF-AWARENESS, AND
CHANGE (3)
Examination of differing cultural worldviews and the impact culture
has on human perceptions, emotions, expectations, and values. Explores
the impact of minority status and discrimination on diverse populations.
Involves awareness, knowledge, and skill building to help human service
professionals be more sensitive to a multicultural clientele. Offered
Fall.

HS 31200 THEORY AND PRACTICE IN INTERVENTION: COUNSELING/
INTERVIEWING SKILLS (3)
Survey of counseling theories and practices. Provides basic knowledge
in helping relationship interviewing techniques and skills necessary for
human services practitioners. How diversity plays a role in interviewing
skills will be addressed, as well as interviewing techniques for a variety
of purposes. Offered Spring.

HS 31400 THEORY AND PRACTICE IN INTERVENTION: GROUP
PROCESS (3)
Introduction to the psychological nature of groups, emphasizing
group formation, structure, development, and dynamics within the
group process. Students will learn to facilitate groups as well as identify
problems and issues that may occur within the group setting. Offered
Spring.

HS 35000 HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY (3-4)
This course introduces the psychological, physical and environ-
mental factors influencing mental health. Topics include: biology, stress,
and behavior; nutrition, chronic and life threatening illnesses, and
treatment seeking; management of pain; complementary and alter-
native medicines; and developmental factors. Perceptions, beliefs, and
issues around healthcare will also be explored. Offered as needed.

HS 38400 HUMAN SERVICES PORTFOLIO/FIELD EXPERIENCE (4)
In this course the student will document professional experiences
such as training workshops and positions related to Human Services in a
portfolio which may be used for professional development. The student
will document current work experience in a Human Services agency
and reflect on its relationship to coursework, set professional goals, and
begin to plan the Senior Project. Offered Spring.

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HS 41800 ETHICS AND VALUES IN THE HUMAN SERVICES (3)
This course examines ethical theory and personal values as they
relate to the Human Services professional in the workplace. The goal
is to provide a body of information and to teach the student a critical
thinking process for resolving the basic issues faced throughout one’s
career such as accountability in government, human rights, and personal
and professional ethics. The ethics codes relevant to Human Services
are reviewed. This course is designed to allow the student the oppor-
tunity to understand, interpret and apply professional ethics. Satisfies
the Ethics and Religious Values GUR. Offered Spring.

HS 41900 HUMAN SERVICES MANAGEMENT (3)
The role of leadership and management skills in strategies planning,
program development, implementation, marketing, and financial
oversight of human service agencies. Offered Fall.

HS 42500 INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIORAL HEALTH (3)
This course provides an introduction to Behavioral Health and explores
Addiction Counseling as a specific area of practice within Psychology and
Human Services. Topics covered contain the required number of contact
hours for certification with the ACDCPC. Topics covered include Ethics (4
contact hours), Confidentiality (4), Documentation (8), Cross Cultural
Diversity (4), and Alaska’s History of Chemical Dependency (6). Offered
as needed.

HS 43500 ADDICTIONS AND CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS (3)
This course provides an introduction to Addictive Behaviors and Co-
Occurring Disorders. Topics covered contain the required number of
contact hours for certification with the ACDCPC and include Addictive
Behaviors (8 contact hours), Co-Occurring Disorders I and II (16), and
Cross Cultural Diversity (4). Offered as needed.

HS 44000 CRISIS INTERVENTION AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES (3)
Practical application of crisis intervention theories and skills in the
context of community resources. Domestic violence, sexual assault,
suicide prevention, wellness resources will be addressed, as well as
crises relating to substance abuse and physical/mental disorders. The
distinction between non-medical emergency responses and counseling
processed will be examined. Students will explore the resources available
in their own communities. Offered Fall.

HS 49800 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL (4)
Students determine their own senior project themes, scope, and
methods within the domain of Human Services theory and practice, with
assistance of the Human Services Senior Project Coordinator. Projects are
presented for approval, orally and writing, to a Senior Project Committee
including the Project Coordinator and two other faculty or community
members of the student’s choice, one from the Counseling Psychology
and Human Services department and the other as a content area
specialist, who may be from the faculty or a Human Services provider in
the field of study. Prerequisite: LL 20100 and Research course (IS 24200
or IS 44500 or PY 30000). Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

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HS 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (4-8)
Students implement and assess the activities specified in their senior
project proposals, and present completed projects, orally and in writing,
to their Project Committees and at a Human Services Student Colloquium.
Student must complete at least 8 hours of Senior Project coursework.
Prerequisite: HS 49800. Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

HS 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)
Special topics in Human Services related fields are offered as needed.
Appropriate course descriptions are published as topics are developed.
Offered as needed.

HSA – Health Services Administration
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

HSA 21700 ALASKA NATIVE HEALTH CONSORTIUM I (ANTHC/LEAD)
(3)
Administrative and managerial leadership skills within the Alaska
Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) in order to operate the growing
programs serving Alaska Natives. The LEAD program is designed to
assist Alaska Native and American Indian ANTHC employees in devel-
oping leadership excellence, knowledge, and skills. The LEAD program
objective is to build capacity for Native health professional development
for employment within the Alaska Tribal Health System. For students
enrolled in the ANTHC/LEAD program. By permission of instructor only.
Offered Fall.

HSA 21800 ALASKA NATIVE HEALTH CONSORTIUM II (ANTHC/LEAD)
(3)
Administrative and managerial leadership skills within the Alaska
Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) in order to operate the growing
programs serving Alaska Natives. The LEAD program is designed to
assist Alaska Native and American Indian ANTHC employees in devel-
oping leadership excellence, knowledge, and skills. The LEAD program
objective is to build capacity for Native health professional development
for employment within the Alaska Tribal Health System. For students
enrolled in the ANTHC/LEAD program. By permission of instructor only.
Offered Fall.

HSA 30100 HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION INDUSTRY
OVERVIEW (3)
Health care is the most highly regulated industry in the U. S. While
its products and services focus on health, one of life’s most highly
valued assets, its administration must manage resources for optimal
delivery of services while maintaining financial health. What affects use
of various health care services in today’s communities? Why is compli-
mentary and alternative health becoming a legitimatized option? In this
course, students examine the structures, functioning, and policies that
comprise the U. S. health care delivery system against the backdrop of
policy development and the historical events that shaped the current,
competitive environment. Offered Fall.

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HSA 30200 SYSTEMS IN HEALTH SERVICES OVERVIEW (3)
How is health care delivery like any other business? How is it unique?
In this course, the student will examine various systems (planning,
finance, human resources, legal, marketing, medical/other education,
material management, technology and clinical patient access, laboratory,
pharmacy, imaging, etc.) that comprise the business of health care.
This course moves from the macro perspective of the Health Systems
Overview course to the micro view by considering the major elements
within health care facilities. Offered Fall.

HSA 30400 HEALTH CARE MARKETING (3)
Health care is a competitive, heavily regulated, under-funded
industry, driven by technology and consumerism. To survive, providers
must compete by marketing effectively. Students will learn the basics
of marketing in the context of how to develop and evaluate a successful
marketing strategy for health care facilities or services. Projects will
focus on marketing plan development for providers and services in the
community. Offered Summer.

HSA 41000 HEALTH CARE FINANCE & ACCOUNTING (3)
This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the financial
structure, market forces, controls and techniques used in the health
care financial management and the perspectives of the various interest
groups involved (providers, insurers, policy makers, patients, and the
general public). It will also provide students with a foundation in the use
of financial tools and methodologies that will enable them to better under-
stand the health care financial literature and perform effective analysis
within the health care system on an as needed basis. This course will
provide students with both a macro overview of the principal financial
mechanisms in place across the U. S. health care industry and specific
insights into the critical issues the industry currently faces. Additionally,
the course will emphasize the development of practical financial analysis
skills that will provide students with a foundation for immediate appli-
cation within the health care industry and a better understanding of
course materials as presented. Training in use of these tools will include
use of several of the most important financial tools and methodologies
employed across the health care industry such as benefit/cost and cost
effectiveness analysis, ratio analysis, and others. Offered Spring.

HSA 42000 HEALTH CARE POLICY & ECONOMICS (3)
The student will consider the role of government and the private
sector in health care delivery; evaluate the value of economics in under-
standing matters of life, death, disability, and suffering; and examine
health policy and its economic implications. Offered Spring.

HSA 43000 HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS (3)
Informatics–the intersection of technology, information, and health
care–impacts health on national and local levels. Health care personnel
are developing ehrs (electronic health records), electronic billing
systems, patient and practitioner portals, and other manifestations of
the information age universally–yet few systems communicate with one
another. As informatics continues its consumption of resources both
human and monetary, all in the field of health care need to understand

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what it is, how it affects their services, and how to direct its efforts to
improvement of health care delivery. Offered Summer.

HSA 49700 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR I (4)
This is the first of the three directed study courses focused on
the senior project. Students develop a plan of action with timeline
for completing senior project, select a topic, and defend it. Extensive
reading on the topic is required in this course. The paper must include
a description of the senior project, scope, purpose, and a review of the
literature. Senior project courses must be completed sequentially. The
student must complete work required in HSA 49700 before beginning
work on HSA 49800. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, and IS 44500.
Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HSA 49800 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL SEMINAR II (4)
This is the second directed study course focused on the senior
project. Students must complete HSA 49700 before working on HSA
49800. Revise action plan developed in HSA 49700 if necessary, and
carry out the project. The written paper must detail method of data
collection and analysis. If applicable the proposal must be approved by
the Institutional Review Board before data collection. Students must
complete work required in HSA 49800 before beginning work on HSA
49900. Senior project courses must be completed sequentially. Prereq-
uisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, IS 44500, and HSA 49700. Offered Fall,
Spring, Summer.

HSA 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (4)
Third and final directed study course focused on the senior project
requires completing the written paper and making an oral presen-
tation to the Senior Project committee. Students must complete HSA
49800 before working on HSA 49900. Senior project courses must be
completed sequentially. Prerequisites: LL 20100, IS 24200, IS 44500,
and HSA 49800. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

HU – Humanities
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

HU 10000 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES (4)
Examines notable examples in the development of one of the arts.
Basic structural elements of the art and a study of factors, cultural and
historical, which have influenced the development of the form. Satisfies
the Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from HU 10001 to HU 10099 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Art History Community-Based Arts
History of Drama Introduction to Philosophy
Music Appreciation Music Theory for Non-Majors
Opera As Convergence World Music
World History Through Literature History of Rock & Roll

HU 30000 ADVANCED STUDIES IN HUMANITIES (4)
Advanced or specialized studies in one or more of the following
areas: Philosophy; Theatre; Music; Art; Cultural History; Literature in

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combination with one or more areas; Religion in combination with one
or more areas. Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered as needed.
(Topic course number range from HU 30001 to HU 30099 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
German Romantics History of Jazz Music
History of Rhythm & Blues Intro to Alaska Native Dance
Native Elders: Ways of Knowing Religion and Nature

IS – Interdisciplinary Studies
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

IS 20600 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION (3)
Principles of oral communication within the business environment
paying particular attention to work group and multicultural communi-
cation in the diverse work place. Satisfies the Speech Communication
GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

IS 23300 CRITICAL THINKING FOR MANAGEMENT (3)
Interdisciplinary and intercultural inquiry into the issues of human
consciousness and experience focusing on the integration of the issues
into a holistic view of the world. Ways to bring knowledge to bear on
critically analyzing social, economic, and business problems and issues.
Satisfies the Introduction to Active Learning GUR, GS 13500. Offered
Fall/Spring.

IS 24200 STATISTICAL METHODS IN RESEARCH (4)
The course will help students acquire an understanding of the
analytical methods of conducting scientific research especially in the
social, health and behavioral sciences. Topics covered include statis-
tical methods in empirical research, collection and presentation of
data, survey sampling, hypothesis testing, multiple regression analysis,
general linear model and its limitations, one-way ANOVA. MS-Excel will
be used as a data analysis tool. Prerequisite: MT 10100 or BAM 10500
Business Math. Offered Fall/Spring.

IS 31100 ESSENTIALS OF GRANT WRITING (3)
Introduction to the field of grant writing, providing the knowledge for
successful grant writing techniques and strategies used to develop grant
proposals for foundation, corporate and government funding agencies.
Prerequisite: LL 10100 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Offered
Spring.

IS 44500 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS (3)
Research methods and techniques of data collection and analysis
used in qualitative research designs. Topics include: methods of data
collection (interviews and focus groups), using secondary data, recording
and analyzing data qualitatively, verification vs. description, assump-
tions and limitations of qualitative designs, and narrative approaches to
writing the results. Prerequisite: LL 20100. Offered Fall/Spring.
IS 45300 VALUES AND ETHICS IN THE WORKPLACE (3)
Ethical theory and personal values examined including government
accountability, human rights, and ethics in business. Application of
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ethical decision making is practiced. Satisfies the Ethical and Religious
Values GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

LL – Language, Literature and Writing
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION
Some English Language Instruction (ELI) courses are offered on an
“as needed” basis for international students requiring additional English
language proficiency. These courses cover conversation and speaking
skills, listening and pronunciation, reading, grammar, and writing. Most
of the courses are numbered 70 through 99 and do not count toward
a degree. The courses are not listed in published course schedules, as
they are available only to those international students whose test results
indicate additional skills are required.

LL 09800 BASIC LANGUAGE SKILLS (4)
Extensive practice with the basics of English vocabulary, spelling,
grammar, usage, punctuation, and sentence development. Introduction
to pre-writing techniques and paragraph development. Some time will
be devoted to practice with reading college level tests. Placement by
examination. Credit may not be applied toward a certificate or degree
program. Offered Fall/Spring.

LL 10000 BASIC WRITING (4)
Practice in composing expository essays using a variety of modes
with attention to process: pre-writing, composing, revising, and
editing. emphasis on writing as a way of learning. Selected readings in
nonfiction. Prerequisite: LL 09800 or placement by examination. Offered
Fall/Spring.

LL 10100 ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING (4)
Communication approach to writing which focuses on logically
defining and supporting a thesis according to structures of argumen-
tation. Introduction to library research/term paper style format as a way
of providing support. Selected readings in nonfiction. Prerequisite: LL
10000 or placement by examination. Offered Fall/Spring.

LL 11001, 11002 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I, II (4,4)
An introduction to American Sign Language that provides students
with the foundation for understanding the development of ASL as a
culture as well as a form of communication. Students will learn the basic
signs and forms of ASL, when and where to use these forms and why.
11001 offered Fall/Spring. LL 11002 offered as needed.

LL 11011, 11012 CHINESE I, II (4, 4)
Introduction to reading and writing of contemporary Chinese with
standard Mandarin pronunciation, with an emphasis on conversational
skills in most useful situations while learning grammar, sentence struc-
tures, etc. Offered as needed.

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LL 11021, 11022 FRENCH I, II (4, 4)
Conversational French with an introduction to grammatical struc-
tures, reading, and writing. Offered as needed.

LL 11031, 11032 GERMAN I, II (4, 4)
Introduction to the German language, including its basic grammatical
components, with emphasis on listening, speaking, writing, and partici-
pation. At the end of German I, students will be able to engage in light
conversation about a variety of topics in the present tense. German II
builds on the foundation of first course, emphasizing verbal communi-
cation in the present and past tense, light reading, and active partici-
pation on a variety of relevant topics of day-to-day life. Accompanying
writing and listening exercises and activities continue to deepen the
language learning process. Adapted German readers may be included
for enhancement of reading comprehension and an introduction to
German literature. In both courses students are required to do research
for cultural projects regarding the history and geography of German
speaking countries. Offered as needed.

LL 11041, 11042 JAPANESE I, II (4, 4)
Introduction to contemporary Japanese with an emphasis on basic
conversation sounds of the language, the writing system, and basic
grammatical analysis. Offered as needed.

LL 11051, 11052 LATIN I, II (2, 2)
To acquire an elementary reading knowledge of Latin and the skills
to accomplish basic translations independently. Offered as needed.

LL 11061, 11062 RUSSIAN I, II (4, 4)
Introduction to spoken Russian with grammar study and an under-
standing of the Cyrillic alphabet for reading and writing. Offered as
needed.

LL 11071, 11072 SPANISH I, II (4, 4)
Focus on oral Spanish with grammatical foundations and practice
in reading and writing. 11071 offered Fall/Spring. 11072 offered as
needed.

LL 11081, 11082 YUP’IK I, II (4, 4)
Introduction to Yup’ik with emphasis on basic conversation, sounds
of the language, the writing of the system, and basic grammatical
analysis. Offered as needed.

LL 20100 WRITING FOR DISCOURSE COMMUNITIES (4)
Introduction to a variety of discourse communities and their
respective codes and conventions, with intensive work in a selected
area. Development of a personal bibliography which becomes the basis
of the student’s reading and research and provides a model for essays.
Rhetorical analyses of texts. Documented research project required.
Prerequisite: LL 10100 or placement by examination. Competency level
requirement for Writing GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

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LL 20200 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (4)
Investigation and practice of the genres, forms and techniques of
imaginative writing. Examination of important work by writers practicing
in the major genres. Relationship between writing and publishing.
Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from LL 20201 to LL 20299 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Drama Fiction
Journalism Nature
Non-Fiction Poetry
Screenwriting

LL 20300 BUSINESS AND TECHNICAL WRITING (4)
Study of the principles of written communication in general
business and professional activities, and practice in the preparation
of such documents as abstracts, proposals, reports, and correspon-
dence. Research paper required. Prerequisite: LL 10100 or placement
by examination. Competency level requirement option for Writing GUR
for business administration students only. Offered as needed.

LL 20400 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP (4)
An investigation of the creative writing process and its products,
with emphasis on the individual student’s development as a writer.

LL 20600 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE (4)
Examination of works of literature with attention to various genres
as well as literary techniques relevant social/cultural contexts and
prominent critical theories. Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/
Spring.
(Topic course number range from LL 20601 to LL 20699 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
American Journeys American Short Story
British Literature Contemporary Literature
Earth/Household Epic Journeys
Intro. to Literature & Language Intro. to Shakespeare
Literature of the Backcountry Medieval English Literature
Nature and Literature Survey of American Literature
The Eros of Everyday Life World Literature
Gothic Literature Literature and the Occult
Rhetoric Past and Present Shaman to Poet

LL 21021, 21022 FRENCH III, IV (4, 4)
A continuation of LL 11022 at a more advanced level. Intensive
practice in conversation, oral presentations, and in longer reading and
writing assignments. Prerequisite: LL 11022 Offered as needed.

LL 21041, 21042 JAPANESE III, IV (4, 4)
A continuation of LL 11042 at a more advanced level. Oral practice
and additional work in reading and writing. Prerequisite: LL 11042.
Offered as needed.

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LL 21061, 21062 RUSSIAN III, IV (4, 4)
A continuation of LL 11062 at a more advanced level. Oral practice
and additional work in reading and writing. Prerequisite: LL 11062.
Offered as needed.

LL 21071, 21072 SPANISH III, IV (4, 4)
A continuation of LL 11072 at a more advanced level. Practice in oral
use of language and the introduction of readings from modern standard
authors. Prerequisite: LL 11072. Offered as needed.

LL 30200 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING (4)
Investigation and practice at an advanced level of the genres, forms,
and techniques of imaginative writing. Works by established or experi-
mental writers in the genres will be examined, including their writings
about the creative process itself. A major project such as a chapbook of
poems, section of a novel, one-act play, etc., is required. Satisfies the
Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from LL 30201 to LL 30299 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Drama Fiction
Non-Fiction Poetry
Screenwriting

LL 40400 CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP (4)
An investigation of the creative writing process and its products,
with emphasis on the individual student’s development as a writer.
Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete menu course LL20200
or LL 30200 in his/her genre before taking this course at the 400 level.

LL 40600 ADVANCED STUDIES IN LITERATURE AND
LANGUAGE (4)
Advanced studies in literature are grounded in critical theory and
cultural and historical contexts. Studies of language rely on current
theories in the field. Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from LL 40601 to LL 40699 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Babes and Books Early English Literature
Love & Death in April Modern English Grammar
Rhetoric Past & Present Shakespeare
Shaman to Poet Women’s Voices A-Z
Gothic Literature Nature and Literature
British Literature

LS – Liberal Studies
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

LS 20100 LIBERAL STUDIES SEMINAR I: WAYS OF
KNOWING (4)
The Sophomore Seminar for the Liberal Studies Department is
designed for Liberal Studies majors (but is open for all students) to
introduce them to “ways of knowing” in the academy, focusing on
social scientific thought, the humanities, and the arts. Students design

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a project, which establishes connections, theory, and practice outside
the classroom. Requirement for Liberal Studies majors. Satisfies the
Sophomore Seminar GUR for Liberal Studies majors. Offered every third
semester.

LS 20200 LIBERAL STUDIES SEMINAR II: INTRODUCTION TO
HUMANITIES (4)
This seminar studies how the various disciplines which constitute the
humanities relate to one another and larger issues of human concern,
along with critical theories that affect how we regard these areas. Direct
experience with elements of cultures, including music, art, literature,
drama; reflection on the relevance of such direct knowledge in relation
to problems that humans continue to face. Requirement for Liberal
Studies majors. Satisfies the Humanities GUR for non-Liberal Studies
majors. Offered every third semester.

LS 20300 LIBERAL STUDIES SEMINAR III: INTRODUCTION TO
SOCIAL SCIENCES (4)
Survey of the history, development, and relationships between the
social sciences, including anthropology, communication, linguistics,
history, political science, and psychology. Methodologies of social
science research. Exploration of at least one discipline in greater depth.
Requirement for Liberal Studies majors. Satisfies the Social Science GUR
for non-Liberal Studies majors. Offered every third semester.

LS 20400 LIBERAL STUDIES TRAVEL COURSE (2-4)
This course combines classroom study with structured off-campus
experiences for lower division students in the humanities and social
sciences. Travel Fee. Academic themes and destinations vary. Offered
Spring. Offered Spring.

(Topic course number range from LS 20401 to LS 20499 in schedule)
For a list of topics see LS 40200

LS 18000, 28000, 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study under the guidance of a faculty member (by
permission only). Offered as needed.

LS 38500 JUNIOR PRACTICUM (3-12)
Practical work experience in an area related to the concentration
under the cooperative guidance of a faculty member and an on-the-job
supervisor. Offered as needed.

LS 40100 DIRECTED STUDIES SEMINAR (1-4)
Guided study of a topic (or topics) in the humanities or social
sciences in a group seminar format. Offered as needed.

LS 40200 LIBERAL STUDIES TRAVEL COURSE (2-4)
Parallel to LS 20400, this course broadens and deepens the academic
content of travel courses for advanced undergraduate students with the

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same structured off-campus experiences in the humanities and social
sciences. Travel fee. Offered Spring.
(Topic course number range from LS 40201 to LS 40299 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Britain France
Germany Greece & Turkey
Greece-Literature & Culture Italy
Rome Spain
Argentina & Brazil: Literature and Culture
Mediterranean Odyssey: Literature and Culture

LS 49800 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL (2-4)
Students prepare to undertake their major capstone project (LS
49900) by preparing a proposal which includes: the rationale for,
learning objectives, methods and outcomes of the senior project, an
appropriate literature review, and a timeline for completing the project.
The proposal will be presented orally and in writing for approval by
a senior project committee (the project coordinator/faculty advisor, 2
additional faculty members, once of whom must be a member of the
Liberal Studies Department) prior to beginning the project itself. This
proposal and a written self-assessment of learning will constitute the
written component of all LS senior projects, to be completed after the
student has presented the project to the APU community. Offered as
needed.

LS 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (3-10)
Students draw on interest and previous learning to create a product
that caps their APU experience. May range from an academic paper to
a film, collection of creative writings, etc. Students will work with one
or more Liberal Studies faculty members, as well as others inside or
outside the university community. Offered as needed.

LS 19200, 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)
Appropriate descriptions published when offered. Offered as
needed.

MAR - Marine Biology
(Offered through the Environmental Science Department)

MAR 11000 SCUBA DIVING (2)
Introduces skills for open water snorkeling and SCUBA diving.
Emphasizes selection and use of specialized equipment, hyperbaric
theory, proper planning, diving rescue skills, use of recreational dive
tables, and first-aid specific to the activity. Heavy emphasis placed on
hazard assessment and safety issues. Course meets Professional Associ-
ation of Diving Instructors (PADI) and National Association of Under-
water Instructors (NAUI) standards. Certification fees are not included
in course fees. Students are required to pay a dive-equipment fee; those
wishing certification may also need to rent or purchase additional gear
for practical sessions. Prerequisites: Swim four laps continuously (any
style, no time limit). Tread water for 10 minutes. Offered Fall.

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MAR 11500 ADVANCED OPEN WATER SCUBA DIVING (2)
Continued development of skills for open water SCUBA diving.
Emphasizes dive planning, risk recognition & management, selection and
use of specialized equipment and protective gear, hyperbaric theory, use
of recreational dive tables, and diving technique. Course meets Profes-
sional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) and National Association
of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) standards for Advanced Open Water
diving. Fee required. Certification fees are not included in course fees.
Students must provide their own dive gear including dry suit. Classroom,
pool and open water sessions. Prerequisite: Open water certification
(MAR 11000). Offered as needed.

MAR 21000 AQUARIUM BIOLOGY (4)
Fundamentals of aquarium science for the hobbyist or profes-
sional. Topics include basic lab techniques, chemistry of seawater, cell
function and biological filtration, aquarium design, engineering, theory
and practice, and culture of marine life. Laboratory work includes water
quality monitoring, care and maintenance of cold-water and tropical
systems and organisms, and an aquarium systems project. Lab included.
Lab fee required. Satisfies the Laboratory Science GUR. Offered Fall.

MAR 22400 MARINE FIELD WORK (4)
This course, a companion course to Survey of Marine Biology,
focuses on the handling of marine biological scientific records and data,
from study planning and design through field work to database entry
and descriptive analyses. These objectives are met through field and
lab studies in which students collect, organize and report on their own
data. Topics include marine biota & taxonomy, marine field methods
(specimen collection, identification and preservation, transect & quadrat
sampling, animal tracking, laboratory techniques, live animal handling,
diversity measurements, photographic sampling), record keeping, data
types, database organization and analyses, and data presentation
(graphical techniques, preparing a poster, talk or report). Includes
required overnight field trip or travel. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:
SC 16000. Offered Fall/Summer.

MAR 22500 SURVEY OF MARINE BIOLOGY (4)
A survey of the science of marine biology, providing an intro-
duction to coastal and ocean biota and their relationships to the marine
environment. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of North
Pacific systems, particularly those related to Alaska. Topics include
natural history, ecology and diversity of marine life and habitats, factors
regulating productivity, and world-wide threats to marine environments.
Prerequisite: SC 16000. Offered Fall.

MAR 24000 RESCUE DIVING (2)
Continued development of skills for open water SCUBA diving.
Emphasizes dive planning, risk recognition & management, selection and
use of specialized equipment and protective gear, hyperbaric theory, use
of recreational dive tables, and diving technique. Course meets Profes-
sional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) and National Association
of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) standards for Rescue Water Diving.
Fee required. Certification fees are not included in course fees. Students
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must provide their own dive gear including dry suit. Classroom, pool and
open water sessions. Prerequisites: Advanced Open water certification
(MAR 11500), CPR & First Aid. Offered Spring.

MAR 25000 MARINE NATURAL HISTORY (4)
A field-oriented block course that explores the natural history of
marine environments and organisms, focusing on the North Pacific. The
focus will be on using observations as a first step to learn about the
environment and develop questions for further investigation. Comparison
between observation and experimentation as methods of scientific
inquiry will be drawn. The readings for the course will include marine
natural history books for the area of travel and in-depth knowledge
of local marine species will be expected by the end of the course. The
course may travel throughout the Pacific region, including Mexico,
Hawaii, Palau, Southern California Bight, Vietnam. May require interna-
tional travel, exposure to harsh weather, and difficult conditions. Lab fee
required for covering travel costs (expected to range between $1000 and
$3000, depending on the destination). Prerequisite: SC 16000. Offered
Spring alternate years.

MAR 31500 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4)
A survey of invertebrate animal diversity and functional biology
in the class and laboratory. Animal phyla are examined with respect to
anatomy, systematics & evolutionary relationships, geographic distri-
bution, ecology, & behavior. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: SC 16000.
Offered Spring alternate years.

MAR 32000 ICHTHYOLOGY (4)
A field-oriented block course designed to give students an in-depth
understanding of the biology of the major groups of fishes. Emphasis is
placed on fauna of the Eastern North Pacific, but taxonomic groups from
all over the world will be considered. Topics include evolution, taxonomy,
behavior, anatomy and physiology, field identification, ecology, and
fisheries conservation. Lab included. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:
MAR 22500. Offered Fall.

MAR 32500 ECOLOGICAL PHYSIOLOGY OF MARINE ORGANISMS (4)
An in-depth examination of the major physiological adaptations of
marine organisms, including thermoregulation, respiration, circulation,
water balance, acid-base balance, metabolism and energetics. Emphasis
will be placed on how organisms are adapted to optimize physiological
function under a variety of environmental conditions. Laboratory
techniques for experimental and environmental physiology will be
covered in detail. Prerequisite: SC 16000, SC 17000 or permission of
instructor. Offered Spring.

MAR 32800 SCIENTIFIC DIVING (4)
Meets requirements for Scientific Diver under the guidelines of
Alaska Pacific University and the Association for Advancement of Under-
water Science. Topics may include data gathering techniques, collecting,
common biota, behavior, installation of scientific apparatus, site location
and relocation, organism identification, ecology, tagging, photog-
raphy, scientific dive planning, appropriate governmental regulations,
AAUS scientific diving regulations, research vessel diving, aquarium
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diving, and animal handling. A heavy emphasis is placed on dive
safety while conducting scientific work underwater. Lab included. Lab
fee required. Additional costs for travel are required of the student.
Students provide their own SCUBA gear (required). First aid certification
and open water dive certification required before a student’s first dive.
Instructor permission is required. Prerequisites: MAR 22500 and MAR
21500/31500; or OS 20000 and OS 20200. Offered Summer.

MAR 33000 HUMAN IMPACTS IN MARINE SYSTEMS (4)
This course introduces the physical processes that drive marine
productivity and the major human impacts on these systems (overfishing,
climate change, invasive species, pollution, disturbance and coastal
zone development) at local, regional, national and international scales.
Students learn the current state of impacts through readings of the
scientific literature and public policy documents (e.g., Pew Commission
report on the world’s oceans), are updated on current mitigation,
management, conservation and policy actions from local experts working
in the field and examine the challenges of balancing ecological impacts
with economic impacts and conflicts among stakeholders and policy-
makers through the completion of an in-depth dilemma based case
study. Prerequisite: MAR 22400 and MAR 22500. Offered Fall.

MAR 33500 SEABIRDS AND MARINE MAMMALS (4)
Designed to familiarize students with the biology and natural history
of seabirds and marine mammals. Emphasis is placed on fauna of
the eastern North Pacific, but species from all over the world will be
discussed. Topics to be considered include ecology, evolution, anatomy,
behavior, identification, and historical and contemporary conservation
problems. Students pursue two in-depth topics of their own choosing.
No lab. Prerequisite: MAR 22500. Offered Spring alternate years.

MAR 41000 CORAL REEF ECOLOGY (4)
A field-oriented block course that examines the ecology of coral
reefs and associated organisms, including reef building organisms,
organisms that live on or in the reef, and coral reef ecosystems. Topics
include coral taxonomy, reproduction, morphology and ecology, reef
structure and zonation, coral identification, symbionts on coral reefs,
and coral reef ecosystems. Students will spend substantial time in or on
the water (snorkeling). No SCUBA certification required. Lab included.
Lab fee required. Additional costs of travel to and within the tropics
are required of the student. Prerequisites: MAR 22500 and SC 33000.
Offered Spring.

MAR 42000 COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS (4)
Selected Topics: So. CA Bight, Gulf of AK, Bimini, Bahamas, Hawaii,
Galapagos. A field-oriented block course that explores the physical and
biological characteristics and processes of coastal ecosystems. Focus will
be on understanding the influence of bathymetry, climate and currents
on primary productivity and community composition and diversity.
Landocean interfaces and human dimensions will also be examined,
including marsh and estuarine dynamics and coastal development, land
use and conservation. May require international travel (passport, inocu-
lations required) and exposure to harsh weather and rugged conditions.

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Travel costs are expected to range between $1000 and $2000. Prerequi-
sites: MAR 33000 and SC 33000 or equivalent. Offered Spring.

MAR 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (1-12)
The senior project is the capstone of the student’s undergraduate
career. The goal of the course is to identify, plan, implement, and
evaluate a project that focuses the student’s skills and knowledge on his
or her professional interests. Projects may be planned individually or in
small groups. Students may register in increments of 2 or more credit
hours, not to exceed twelve. Offered Fall/Spring.

MAR 28000, 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a regular
faculty member and by permission only. Offered Fall/Spring.

MAR 18500, 28500, 38500, 48500 PRACTICUM (1-12)
Practical work experience in a given area of concentration under the
cooperative guidance of a faculty member and an on-the-job supervisor.
Offered Fall/Spring.

MAR 19000, 29000, 39000, 49000 SEMINAR (1-4)
Small groups which meet with faculty members for in-depth study
and discussion of particular topics, for example Top-down Control of
Marine Populations, Cephalopod Biology and Ecology, Ecology of Modular
Organisms, or Marine Research Methods. Appropriate course descrip-
tions are published as seminars are offered; student-initiated topics
welcome. Offered Fall/Spring.

MAR 19200, 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)
Special topics in various fields are offered as needed. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered Fall/
Spring.

MT - Mathematics
(Offered through the Environmental Science Department)

MT 09600 PRE-COLLEGE MATHEMATICS (3)
A review of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of
whole numbers through concepts in fractions, decimals, percents, ratios,
proportions, positive and negative numbers, and simple equations.
Includes an introduction to geometry. Credits may not be applied toward
a certificate or degree program. Offered Fall as needed.

MT 09700 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA (3)
Properties of real numbers, polynomials, factoring, exponents,
radicals, algebraic fractions, graphing, solving linear equations, systems
of linear equations, linear inequalities, absolute value equations, and
quadratic equations. Credits may not be applied toward a certificate or
degree. Prerequisite: MT 09600 or placement test. Offered Fall/Spring.

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MT 10100 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA (4)
Includes and extends topics covered in MT 09700. Covers properties
of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities; graphs, functions,
and their applications; systems of equations; polynomials and
polynomial functions; rational expressions, equations, and functions;
radical expressions, equations and functions; quadratic equations and
functions; exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: MT 09700
or placement test. Offered Fall/Spring.

MT 12100 PRECALCULUS (4)
Equations integrated with geometry, including linear, power,
polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric
functions and their inverses. Prerequisite: MT 10100 or placement test.
Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

MT 21000 MATH CONCEPTS (3)
Elementary set theory, the real number system, numeration systems,
algorithms of arithmetic, logic and geometry, the metric system, calcu-
lators, computer programming, and probability and statistics. Prereq-
uisite: MT 10100 or placement test. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning
GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

MT 22000 APPLIED STATISTICS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (4)
The fundamental principles of statistics including descriptive statistics,
probability, linear regression, inferential statistics with science applica-
tions, and an introduction to the interpretation of the output of statis-
tical analysis packages for microcomputers. Prerequisite: MT 10100 or
placement test. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning GUR. Offered Fall.

MT 23000 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I (4)
Differential and integral calculus of elementary algebraic and
transcendental functions including trigonometric, exponential, and
logarithmic functions with associated analytic geometry. Prerequisite: MT
12100, placement test or instructor permission. Offered Fall/Spring.

MT 24000 CALCULUS AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II (4)
Integration techniques and applications, infinite series, and
associated analytic geometry. Prerequisite: MT 23000 or placement
test. Offered Fall/Spring.

MT 32000 ADVANCED STATISTICS (4)
Practical application of both univariate and multivariate statistical
methods including linear regression, analysis of variance, and general
linear model. Design of research and evaluation of data. Prerequisite:
MT 22000 or equivalent. Offered Spring.

MT 35000 MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS (4)
Vectors, curves, surfaces, partial differentiation, and multiple
integrals, and an introduction to vector calculus. Prerequisite: MT 24000.
Offered Spring.

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MT 35500 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PROOF AND THEORY (4)
This course is an introduction to reading and writing mathematical
proof. This course will discuss the basic language of proof common to
all branches of mathematics with a concentration on discrete mathe-
matics. It will contain topics such as mathematical induction, set theory,
logic, divisibility, combinatorics, and cardinality. Prerequisite: MT35000
or permission of the instructor. Offered Spring.

MT 36000 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS AND APPLICATIONS (4)
Ordinary differential equations, elementary methods of solution,
linear differential equations, and systems of linear differential equations,
power series, and an introduction to dynamical systems, with appli-
cation to environmental sciences. Prerequisite: MT 24000. Offered Fall
as needed.

MT 37000 LINEAR ALGEBRA AND APPLICATIONS (4)
Linear algebra and its applications. The topics of linear transfor-
mations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and
eigenvectors, and orthogonality will be covered. Prerequisite: MT 24000.
Offered Fall as needed.

MT 28000, 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-5)
Individual study in math under the guidance of a faculty member
and by permission only. Offered Fall/Spring.

OS - Outdoor Studies
(Offered through the Outdoor Studies Department)

OS 11000 INTRODUCTION TO WILDERNESS SKILLS (4)
Introduction to the skills necessary for safe, efficient non-motorized
wilderness travel, including expedition planning, equipment, rations,
camping, wilderness travel on both water and land, and hazard recog-
nition. Students should expect to be in the field the majority of the class
traveling in remote, off trail terrain. Lab fee required, plus personal
food, equipment, and transportation costs. Offered Fall.

OS 11100 DOG MUSHING (2)
An in-depth introduction to dog powered sports. Topics include dog
sledding history, veterinary care, racing technique, and equipment. This
course builds student experience through hands-on field classes and
kennel visits, assisting with a dogsled race, and a dogsled/ski trip. Lab
fee required. Offered Spring.

OS 11200 INTRODUCTION TO WINTER WILDERNESS SKILLS (4)
Introduction to winter travel and camping, avalanche evaluation,
backcountry skiing, and basic winter natural history. Course includes an
Avalanche I curriculum. Lab fee required, plus personal food, equipment,
and transportation costs. Prerequisite: OS 11000. Offered Spring.

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OS 11300 SEA KAYAKING (1)
Fundamentals of sea kayaking. Topics include equipment selection
and use, wet exits and rescues, paddling strokes, wind and waves,
navigation, and seamanship. At least one weekend outing. Lab fee
required, plus personal food, equipment, and transportation costs.
Offered Summer.

OS 11400 BEGINNING ROCK CLIMBING (2)
Fundamentals of rock climbing including objective and subjective
hazard evaluation, movement, rope handling, dynamic and static forces,
fixed line ascension, belay escapes, knot passes, lowers, and change-
overs at the anchor. Lab fee required. Offered Fall.

OS 11500 BEGINNING ICE CLIMBING (2)
Fundamentals of ice climbing including objective and subjective
hazard evaluation, movement, rope handling, dynamic and static
forces, fixed line ascension, belay escapes, knot passes, lowers, and
changeovers at the anchor. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: OS 11400 or
instructor permission. Offered Spring.

OS 11700 EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND REPAIR (2)
This class addresses the wide range of problems associated with
maintaining outdoor equipment and introduces students to the funda-
mentals of equipment design and construction. Offered Fall.

OS 20000 INTRODUCTION TO OUTDOOR STUDIES (4)
Survey of the field of recreation and leisure services. As a required
course for all Outdoor Studies majors and minors, it serves as an orien-
tation to the profession. Satisfies the Sophomore Seminar GUR. Offered
Fall.

OS 20100 RECREATION PROGRAM DESIGN (4)
Prepares students to plan, conduct, lead, and evaluate programs in
the field of outdoor recreation and adventure education. Students will
analyze and review different styles and philosophies of local recreational
programs and develop their own program design. Offered Spring.

OS 20200 WILDERNESS FIRST RESPONDER (4)
Fundamentals of emergency care in a non-urban environment,
including physiology, injury assessment, short term care, anatomy, and
small group rescues. Certification fee required. Offered Fall.

OS 20300 WILDERNESS FIRST RESPONDER REFRESHER (1)
This course reviews and recertifies the Wilderness First Responder
standards of care in non-urban environments. Class consists of lectures,
hands on scenarios, and readings. Students must have a current WFR
certification. Certification fee required. Prerequisite: OS 20200 or
permission of instructor. Offered Spring.

OS 20400 LEAVE NO TRACE MASTER EDUCATOR (1)
A Leave No Trace Master Educator course is designed to give
students a comprehensive overview of Leave No Trace skills and ethics
through practical application in a field-based setting. The course empha-

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sizes the ability to teach ethics and skills to different audiences. The
course includes a minimum of four eight-hour days and at least three
nights camping in the field. Upon successfully completing the course,
the student will receive a LNT Master Educator certification that is recog-
nized in the outdoor industry internationally. Lab fee includes the certi-
fication fee. Prerequisite: OS 11000. Offered Fall.

OS 21000 SNOW AND AVALANCHE SCIENCE FOR PROFESSIONALS (4)
This course explores the properties of weather, terrain, and snow
pack that lead to snow avalanches. The course will also address avalanche
rescue techniques and career opportunities in the field of snow science.
Content covers avalanche level 2 curriculum. Prerequisite: OS 11200 or
instructor permission. Offered Fall.

OS 21100 BACKCOUNTRY SKILLS (4)
A menu course in backcountry skills that develops students’
expertise and knowledge of specific skill related to wilderness recreation.
Students will also gain the ability to plan, prepare for, and undertake
short recreational trips in the backcountry of Alaska and elsewhere.
For water courses students must be competent swimmers. Prerequisite
OS 11000 or instructor permission. Lab fee required, plus personal food,
equipment, and transportation costs. Offered Fall.
(Topic course number range from OS 21101 to OS 21110 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Packrafting Swiftwater
Traditional Climbing

OS 21200 BACKCOUNTRY SKIING (2)
A field-oriented course designed to prepare students to plan and
conduct safe backcountry skiing trips. Topics include alpine touring/
telemark skiing techniques, map reading and route finding skills, and
avalanche evaluation and rescue techniques. The course meets weekly
to tour outside Anchorage area culminating on a week-long intensive
over spring break. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: OS 11200, OS 21000.
Offered Spring.

OS 21400 RECREATION, CULTURE, AND ENVIRONMENT (4)
This course examines recreation in the context of culture and
environment. Students will explore the dynamic relationship between
how we recreate, where we recreate, and who our recreation impacts.
In addition to mastering the skills associated with a particular form of
recreation, students might study the local language, or interpret the
area’s cultural history, or compile a list of the region’s flora and fauna. Lab
fee required, plus personal food, equipment, and transportation costs.
Prerequisites: OS 11400 and instructor permission. Offered Spring.
(Topic course number range from OS 21401 to OS 21499 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Sport Climbing

OS 21500 RESCUE METHODS ON LAND (3)
This course provides an introduction to the technical skills required for
both improvised and organized rescues on steep terrain. The curriculum
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includes static and dynamic loads, technical rope skills, the tandem
prusik belay, pulley systems, highlines, and assorted single and double
rope rescue methods. Prerequisite: OS 11400. Offered Summer.

OS 21600 SEARCH METHODS ON LAND (2)
This course provides an introduction to search history, management,
planning, strategy, and tactics for finding lost or injured persons in forest
and alpine environments as well as in caves and avalanches. Offered
Fall.

OS 30200 WILDLAND ECOSYSTEMS AND HUMAN IMPACTS (4)
A field course for college students and professionals interested in
applied field research techniques. Students in this course travel by
nonmotorized methods such as sea kayaking while applying research
techniques used in measuring human impacts on remote ecosystems.
Course content includes temperate ecosystems; human use and
management; and field research techniques including water sampling
and radial transects. Class project will include entering and analyzing
data. Wilderness living, sea kayaking, and database skills are necessary,
instructor approval required. Lab fee required. Offered Summer.

OS 30300 APPLIED EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY (4)
This course is a survey of the scientific principles, methodologies
and research as applied to exercise and physical performance. The
emphasis is on physiological responses and adaptations to acute and
chronic physical exercise. Offered Spring.

OS 31000 EXPEDITION LEADERSHIP (4)
Expedition Leadership introduces students to the process of leading
wilderness expeditions. Students will assist in planning, organizing,
leading, and evaluating a twenty-one day expedition. Lab fee required,
plus personal food, equipment, and transportation costs. Prerequisite:
OS 11000 or instructor permission. Offered Fall.

OS 31200 EXPEDITION MOUNTAINEERING (4)
This class is an extended Alaskan mountaineering expedition.
Topics include glacier travel, winter camping, snow and ice climbing, ski
mountaineering, route finding, risk management, decision making, and
hazard evaluation. Lab fee required, plus personal food, equipment, and
transportation costs. Prerequisites: OS 11400, OS 11200 and instructor
permission. Offered Summer.

OS 31300 EXPEDITION SEA KAYAKING (4)
A two-to three-week sea kayaking expedition in the coastal
environment. In addition to practicing the skills of safe sea kayaking,
students will help organize and lead the trip. Topics include advanced
strokes, bracing, rescues in rough water, secondary stability, boat/
paddle selection, trip planning, minimum impact camping, and hazard
evaluation. Lab fee required, plus personal food, equipment, and trans-
portation costs. Prerequisites: OS11000 and OS11300 or instructor
permission. Offered Summer.

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OS 31600 EXPEDITION GLACIER TRAVEL (4)
Expedition Glacier Travel emphasizes the skills required for traveling
and climbing in Alaska’s heavily glaciated mountain ranges. Snow
camping, expedition behavior, crevasse rescues, snow and ice climbing,
route finding, peak ascents, and avalanche hazard evaluation will be
emphasized. Lab fee required, plus personal food, equipment, and trans-
portation costs. Prerequisites: OS 11400 and OS 11200; or instructor
permission. Offered Summer.
OS 37000 RISK MANAGEMENT FOR OUTDOOR PROFESSIONALS (2)
Risk Management for Outdoor Professionals will discuss and under-
stand the components of risk management in the outdoor profession.
Topics include risk management and emergency response planning, legal
and ethical responsibilities of risk management, and risk transfer topics
such as insurance and participant agreements. Students will develop
a risk management and emergency response plan. Prerequisite: OS
20100. Offered Fall.

OS 40100 THE BUSINESS OF RECREATION (4)
An investigation of the concepts and theories of administration
and management of recreational organizations. Theories, processes,
and legal concepts behind established and entrepreneurial recreational
organizations. Topics and projects include funding, incorporation,
personnel and fiscal management, community relations, and liability as
related to recreational services. Prerequisite: OS 20100. Offered Fall.

OS 40200 OUTDOOR EDUCATION (4)
Application of the theories and techniques of teaching in and
about the natural environment. This course will develop, implement,
and evaluate programs for local schools using standard environmental
curriculum. Offered Spring.

OS 40300 ALASKA NATURAL HISTORY INTERPRETATION (4)
This course explores the techniques and theories used by public
land administrators to interpret the Alaskan natural environment. Inter-
pretive trail alignment and displays, as well as oral and written inter-
pretive resentations are emphasized. Offered Fall.

OS 40400 RECREATION RESEARCH METHODS (4)
The growth of outdoor recreation in Alaska has created numerous
social and natural resource impacts and issues. This course introduces
students to the literature of recreation research and research design in
social and natural science methodology. Students will develop a research
proposal and implement a research project. Offered Fall.

OS 40500 RECREATION AND THE PUBLIC LAND RESOURCE (4)
Surveys the evolution of United States public land policy, the
agencies that manage public land, the relevant public land legislation,
and the people who recreate on public land. Offered Spring.

OS 47000 ADVANCED TOPICS IN OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP (2)
This class will cover trends, theories, and concepts related to outdoor
leadership and ethics. Topics include leadership theories and facilitation,
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ethical issues of outdoor activities, group dynamics and development,
and individual behavior and motivation. Offered Spring.

OS 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (3-12)
The senior project is the culmination of the student’s academic career.
The goal of the class is to help the student identify, plan, implement,
and evaluate a project that focuses the student’s skills and knowledge in
a way that demonstrates his or her professional interests. The class will
meet periodically during the semester. Offered as needed.

OS 18000, 28000, 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a regular
faculty member and by permission only. Offered as needed.

OS 18500, 28500, 38500, 48500 PRACTICUM (1-12)
The practicum is an integral part of the student’s pre-professional
preparation. It will help them identify career areas to pursue and network
with professionals in that field of work. Offered as needed.

OS 19200, 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Special topics in various fields are offered as needed. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered as
needed.

PE – Physical Education
(Offered through the Outdoor Studies Department)

PE 10300, 20300 BEGINNING, INTERMEDIATE, AND ADVANCED
LEVEL PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND OUTDOOR SKILL ACTIVITIES (.5-2)
Offered as needed.
(Topic course number range from PE 10301 to PE 10399 and PE 20301 to
PE 20399 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Advanced Alpine Skiing Advanced Cross-Country Skiing
Aerobic Conditioning Bouldering Circuit/Weight Training I
Crosstraining Lifetime Fitness
Physical Education Running & Circuit Training
Run/Ski Shoshin Ryu/Martial Arts
Skate Skiing Water Aerobics
Weight Training I Weight Training II
Yoga Swimming

PH – Philosophy
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

PH 20100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (4)
Introduction to basic elements of philosophy, its history, founda-
tional principles, theoretical and practical issues in the field of philosophy.
Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered as needed.
(Topic course number range from PH 20101 to PH 20199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:

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Love & Friendships Philosophy of History

PH 20200 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (4)
This course will be an introduction to the theoretical and practical
issues in the field of philosophical ethics. Satisfies the Ethics and Religious
Values GUR. Offered as needed.

PH 20300 SYMBOLIC LOGIC (4)
This course will introduce the student to the full spectrum of skills
in symbolic logic. This course will begin to make the student more
conscious of the process and techniques of how to solve problems. In
developing these skills, the student will have to begin to identify distinct
kinds of problem situations, recognize the general principles that control
the solution of the identified problems, and then choose and apply the
appropriate techniques for negotiating the identified solutions. Students
will also be expected to understand and develop skills involving the
proving of theorems. Prerequisite: MT 10100. Satisfies the Quantitative
Skills GUR. Offered as needed.

PH 20400 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (4)
Introductory topics in Philosophy of Science. Offered Spring.

PH 30100 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY (4)
Close study and critique of individual texts in philosophy, with
emphasis on understanding the work in the context of the tradition from
which they emerge. Prerequisite: Introductory course in Philosophy
or instructor permission. Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered as
needed.
(Topic course number range from PH 30101 to PH 30199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Philosophy of Mind Science of Mind

PH 30400 ADVANCED STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (4)
An advanced level course in philosophy of science will closely study
more difficult texts in careful attempt to work out the full complexity of
the author’s meaning. Students will be asked to engage in close study
and critique of individual texts in philosophy of science, with emphasis on
understanding the works in the context of the tradition from which they
emerge. Prerequisites: Introductory course in Philosophy or instructor
permission. Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered as needed.

PY – Psychology
(Offered through the Counseling Psychology and Human Services
Department)

PY 15000 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY: ADJUSTMENT AND CHANGE
(3-4)
How human beings adjust to the challenges of living as they grow,
learn, build relationships, develop careers, and search for personal
meaning. Study includes current concepts, theories, and research
regarding psychological effects of change, and useful strategies for

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dealing with the stresses of everyday life. Satisfies the Social/Behavioral
Science GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.

PY 20200 COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY (2)
Students will apply concepts of social psychology to living in a
communal setting. This course will explore the creative process as it
applies to building relationships, developing sustainable systems of
alternative living, understanding the interrelatedness of the Kellogg
Campus with other local community systems, and expressing oneself
within groups will be explored. Lessons from a wide variety of cultural
examples will augment the student’s campus living experience. Offered
as needed.

PY 21000 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR: INTRODUCTION TO
PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)
Exposure to a broad range of career directions available in psychology
as a profession, and extensive practice of the cognitive, problem
solving, and writing styles of modern, scientific psychology. Classroom
debates, guest speakers, field trips, and individualized projects are used
to expand students’ understandings of the diversity and challenges of
psychological science and practice. Offered Fall.

PY 21500 LIFESPAN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (3-4)
Introduction to basic concepts, theories, and issues of human lifespan
developmental psychology. Special attention given to the interrelat-
edness of physical, cognitive, personality, social, cultural, and spiritual
components of development. Partially fulfills admission requirements of
the APU Master of Science in Counseling Psychology Program. Satisfies
the Social/Behavioral Science GUR. Prerequisite: PY 15000 or instructor
permission. Offered Fall/Spring.

PY 22100 ECOPSYCHOLOGY (4)
An introduction to ideas, concepts, and the broad range of literature
in the interdisciplinary field of ecopsychology. Will include an exami-
nation of how humans and the larger environment interact with each
other. There will be an emphasis on helping students think about the
interplay of psychology and environment in their own lives. Offered
Spring even years.

PY 22200 ROOTS AND WINGS: CONCEPTION THROUGH
ADOLESCENCE (4)
Psychological, social, and physical development from early childhood
through adolescence, with emphasis on aspects of learning, thinking,
and socialization, which are of special importance to teachers and
caregivers. Prerequisite: PY 15000 or instructor permission. Offered Fall
odd years.

PY 22800 PSYCHOPATHOLOGY FOR MOVIE LOVERS (4)
This course is designed to help broaden a person’s knowledge
and conceptual understanding of abnormal psychology. In particular,
individual mental health problems will be explored in the context of
society. Two primary catalysts for class discussion and debate will be
the framework of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American
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Psychiatric Association and the media of movies and documentaries. The
course will help foster exploration regarding the issue of what is “normal”
vs. “abnormal,” along with investigating primary causes and effective
treatment approaches. Students are encouraged to examine their own
assumptions, beliefs, and fears about “abnormal” behavior. Readings
include a current text in abnormal psychology and a compendium of
stories regarding what it is like to have a disorder as well as live with
someone with a disorder. Prerequisite: PY 15000 or permission of
instructor. Offered Fall even years.

PY 23100 MAKING SENSE OF STATISTICS: APPLICATIONS TO THE
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (4)
This course provides an introduction to the statistics most commonly
used in the behavioral sciences. The basic principles of statistics to be
covered include sampling and probability, descriptive statistics, and
inferential statistics. Both parametric and nonparametric statistics will
be explored. This course also includes an introduction to the use of PC
statistical packages for the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: MT 10100
or placement test. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning GUR. Offered
Spring.

PY 23300 ART AND THERAPY (4)
This course provides an introduction to the creative process of art in
therapy and the use of that process in the development of self-awareness
and empathetic relationships with others. Ideally this will be a studio
based course. Beginner instruction with art materials applied to self
exploration for the development of individuals entering the psychology
field. It also includes discussion oriented toward growth-enhancing
exploration of the self through creativity.

PY 23500 CREATIVITY, MADNESS, AND SELF EXPRESSION (4)
What leads to that triumph of the human spirit we call creativity?
The psychology of creative self-expression will be explored by under-
standing the processes of inner passions and conflicts on self-expression.
Examples of some of the world’s greatest “mad” scientists and “crazy”
artists will be provided as case studies. Students will be given specific
techniques to recover their creativity from a variety of psychosocial
blocks so that they may be able to fully express the writer, poet, actor,
painter, musician, or scientist within themselves. Satisfies the Social/
Behavioral Science GUR. Offered Spring odd years.

PY 24200 LOVE, COUPLES, AND FAMILY (4)
Focuses on the stage of life in which major decisions are made
regarding marriage, children, and profession. Issues commonly
confronting mature, intimate relationships are addressed, including
human sexuality, gender roles, marital life styles, heterosexual and
homosexual relationships, changing marital patterns, and traditional
and contemporary work roles for women and men. Satisfies the Social/
Behavioral Science GUR.

PY 25000 NATURE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING (4)
Students will study the relationship between nature and the human
mind by exploring aspects of natural settings shown to be psycholog-
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ically restorative. Emphasis will be on personal reflection in outdoor
settings, as well as research within fields of environmental psychology
and wilderness therapy. Offered Fall even years.

PY 26000 INTIMACY, RELATIONSHIPS, AND SEXUALITY (4)
Explores the psychology of love, sex, and interpersonal relation-
ships. Issues of current interest including sexual orientation, the
abortion debate, reproductive technologies, safer sex practices, and
gender similarities and differences. Students are encouraged to apply
information from this course to the building and maintaining of healthy,
loving relationships. Satisfies the Social/Behavioral Science GUR. Prereq-
uisite: PY 15000 or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

PY 30000 METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: RESEARCH IN
PSYCHOLOGY (4)
Introduction to the common methods of research in the behavioral
sciences. Quantitative and qualitative approaches are examined along
with program evaluation and assessment techniques. Course activities
include the writing of a research proposal. Partially fulfills admission
requirements of the APU Master of Science in Counseling Psychology
Program. Prerequisite: two courses in Psychology or instructor
permission. Offered Fall.

PY 30500 INDIVIDUALITY AND GROUP PROCESSES (3-4)
Introduction to the psychological natures of groups, emphasizing
group formation, structure, development, and dynamics within and
between groups. Systematic examination of leadership theory as it
relates to development and integration of group processes. Partially
fulfills admission requirements of the APU Master of Science in
Counseling Psychology Program. Prerequisite: two courses in Psychology
or instructor permission. Offered Fall even years.

PY 31500 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN FOR MYSTERY LOVERS (4)
This course helps both male and female students to connect their
personal, gendered lives with the social and political world in which they
live. Students are also encouraged to look beyond the boundaries of
their own lives in order to understand (1) the complexity and diversity of
women’s experiences in terms of race, social class, sexual orientation,
age, and cultural differences, and (2) contemporary debate topics such
as the social construction of gender, women’s and men’s communication
styles, the earnings gap, sexual harassment, women in the military, and
feminist spirituality. Readings include a broad sampling of the wealth of
recent scholarship that addresses women’s development and women’s
mental health, as well as contemporary fiction by and about women.
Prerequisite: PY 15000 or instructor permission. Offered as needed.

PY 32000 PERSONALITY: THEORIES AND PERSPECTIVES (4)
An overview of historical and current models of human personality
structure and development, including representative theories from the
psychodynamic, type/trait, phenomenological, behavioral, and social-
cognitive perspectives. Considers implications for counseling and clinical
practice. Partially fulfills admission requirements of the APU Master of
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Science in Counseling Psychology Program. Prerequisite: PY 15000.
Offered Spring even years.

PY 32500 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)
A review of classic and more current social psychology research that
seeks to reveal patterns of human behavior that may not always be in
our conscious awareness. The class looks at issues such as conformity,
aggression, self-justification, prejudice, liking and loving, and social
cognition. Students will be given opportunities to consider implications
from the research discussed to their own particular areas of interest.
Students will have the opportunity to participate in social psychology
experiments/research. Prerequisite: two courses in Psychology or
instructor permission. Offered Spring odd years.

PY 32800 THERAPEUTIC MINDFULNESS: THEORY AND PRACTICE (4)
Using current research on the value of mindfulness exercises as
an adjunct to more mainstream therapies, students will examine the
use of mindfulness exercises from theoretical, practical, and experiential
points of view. The class will culminate in a weekend mindfulness retreat
at the Kellogg campus. Offered Fall odd years.

PY 33000 PSYCHOLOGY OF SUBSTANCE USE AND DEPENDENCY (4)
Cultural norms, values, and attitudes regarding chemical depen-
dency. Study of substance abuse in our society and how that abuse
impacts individuals, families, and communities. Prerequisite: PY 15000
or instructor permission. Offered Fall even years.

PY 33300 PSYCHOLOGY OF SPIRITUALITY AND RELIGION (4)
This course provides an introduction to the psychology of the spiritual
and religious life of the individual. The psychological nature and issues
involved in spirituality and religion will be explored as they are experi-
enced and expressed across the life span. Examples of issues and topics
covered include the nature of religion and spirituality, religious social-
ization, religious experience, morality and values, attitudes and outlook
on life, and the role of religion and spirituality in coping and adjustment
as well as mental health and counseling. Prerequisites: two courses in
Psychology or instructor permission. Satisfies the Ethics and Religious
Values GUR. Offered Spring odd years.

PY 33500 CREATIVITY, MADNESS, AND SELF EXPRESSION (4)
What leads to that triumph of the human spirit we call creativity?
The psychology of creative self-expression will be explored by under-
standing the processes of inner passions and conflicts on self-expression.
Examples of some of the world’s greatest “mad” scientists and “crazy”
artists will be provided as case studies. Students will be given specific
techniques to recover their creativity from a variety of psychosocial
blocks so that they may be able to fully express the writer, poet, actor,
painter, musician, or scientist within themselves. Satisfies the Social/
Behavioral Science GUR. Offered Spring odd years.

PY 34000 GOING TO EXTREMES: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-4)
Psychological, sociocultural, and biological factors related to dysfunc-
tional personalities and related behavioral pathologies. Historical and recent
definitions of, attitudes toward, and treatments of abnormality. Partially

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fulfills admission requirements of the APU Master of Science in Counseling
Psychology Program. Prerequisite: PY 15000. Offered Fall odd years.

PY 34500 DYNAMICS OF COUNSELING (3-4)
Survey of counseling theories and practices, as well as legal and
ethical issues related to the field. Provides basic knowledge and skills
necessary for entry-level practitioners and a foundation for graduate
level coursework in counseling psychology. Prerequisites: PY 15000 (or
demonstrated competency in writing). Offered Fall even years.

PY 35000 PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC USES OF THE WILDERNESS (4)
Understanding and critically evaluating the theories, techniques,
and practical applications of wilderness therapy; exploring ways in
which humans and the nonhuman natural world can interweave in order
to improve mental health. Prerequisite: PY 15000 and PY 25000, or
instructor permission. Offered Spring even years.

PY 35500 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (4)
Although the discipline of Positive Psychology was inaugurated as
recently as 1998, the study of psychological factors that make life “worth
living” is already flourishing. This course explores human strengths—
our own and others’. Human strengths are the qualities and processes
that promote life satisfaction and well-being while preventing dissatis-
faction and mental illness. Specifically, this course covers the role that
strengths play in a variety of areas, including personality, aging, gender
differences, intimate relationships, creativity, and decision-making, and
then relating personal well-being to global and societal issues. It also
includes constructive criticism and future directions for this emerging
discipline. Prerequisite: PY 15000. Offered Spring odd years.

PY 46000 INTIMACY, RELATIONSHIPS AND SEXUALITY (4)
Explores the psychology of love, sex, and interpersonal relation-
ships. Issues of current interest including sexual orientation, the
abortion debate, reproductive technologies, safer sex practices, and
gender similarities and differences. Students are encouraged to apply
information from this course to the building and maintaining of healthy,
loving relationships. Satisfies the Social/Behavioral Science GUR. Prereq-
uisite: PY 15000 or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

PY 49000 SENIOR SEMINAR: DIRECTED STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY AND
HUMAN SERVICES (4)
Individualized, concentrated study of topics in psychology. Students
conduct their own field and/or library investigations and participate
in weekly seminar presentations and discussions of their discov-
eries. Prerequisite: Senior status or instructor permission. Offered as
needed.

PY 49800 SENIOR PROJECT PROPOSAL (4)
Students determine their own senior project themes, scope,
and methods within domain of theoretical, applied, or experimental
psychology, with assistance of department Senior Project Coordinator.
Project proposals are presented for approval, orally and in writing, to
a Senior Project Committee including the Project Coordinator and two
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other faculty members of the student’s choice, one from Psychology and
the other from another department. Prerequisite: Senior status. Offered
Fall/Spring.

PY 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (4-12)
Students implement and assess the activities specified in their senior
project proposals, and present completed projects, orally and in writing,
to their Project Committees and at a Psychology Student Colloquium.
Student must complete at least 8 hours of Senior Project coursework.
Prerequisite: PY 49800. Offered Fall/Spring.

PY 18000, 28000, 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a regular
faculty member and by permission only. Offered as needed.

PY 38400 JUNIOR PORTFOLIO (1)
This seminar course provides the psychology student with assistance
in writing, compiling, creating, and producing their junior portfolio. This
course is to be taken during the junior year. Course goal: successful
completion of the junior portfolio. Course prerequisite: Junior standing.
CR/NC grades only. Offered Fall/Spring.

PY 28500, 38500, 48500 FIELD EXPERIENCE (1-12)
Practical work experience in a given area of concentration under the
cooperative guidance of a faculty member and an on-the-job supervisor.
Offered as needed.

PY 29000, 39000 SEMINAR (1-4)
Small groups meet with faculty members for in-depth study and
discussion of a specific topic of common interest. Appropriate course
descriptions are published as seminars are offered. Offered as needed.

PY 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)
Special topics in various fields are offered as needed. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered as
needed.

RS – Religion Studies
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

RS 10500 INTRODUCTION TO CATHOLIC STUDIES I, II, III (2
CREDITS EACH)
These courses provide a foundational survey of Roman Catholic
beliefs and practices. They represent a series of interrelated two credit
courses over three sessions. They will survey the Catholic Under-
standings of God, the Bible, the church, Mary, the saints, liturgy, sacra-
ments, devotions, as well as Catholic teachings pertaining to personal,
social, and ecological morality, and other issues. The courses are not
sequential. Offered Fall/Spring.

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RS 20100 TOPICS IN RELIGION (4)
The courses listed under this menu provide introductions to the
spiritual traditions of the world. Active learning projects are incorpo-
rated into the course requirements. Students are encouraged to explore
how these traditions influence political, economic, cultural, and social
forces in the contemporary world. Satisfies the Ethics and Religious
Values GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from RS 20101 to RS 20199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
World Religions Spiritual Environment
America’s Religious History

RS 20200 FOUNDATIONS OF A RELIGION (2)
The courses listed in this menu provide a detailed overview of
one religion. Each course will review origins and history and explore
the fundamental beliefs, practices, and various branches of a specific
religious tradition. Special attention will be given to the understandings
of contemporary adherents within the tradition. Each course may be
counted toward either the Ethics and Religious Values or the Humanities
GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from RS 20201 to RS 20299 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Buddhism Islam
Christianity Judaism
Foundations of Hinduism

RS 30100 ADVANCED STUDIES IN RELIGION (1-4)
These courses examine fundamental texts, history and past and/
or present concerns in religious experience, interpretation or specu-
lative thought. Each course will introduce students to the theoretical
approaches, forms of critical analysis, and research methods of their
respective content. The courses will engage students with basic critical
techniques and provide opportunities to explore relevant examples in
the national and local believing and scholarly communities. Specific
topics with course descriptions will be printed in class schedules for
the term in which the course is offered. Satisfies the Humanities GUR.
Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from RS 30101 to RS 30199 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Biblical Studies Christianity
Church East and West Creation: Myths and Hypotheses
Death of Jesus Feminist Theology
Jesus of History, Christ of Faith Luke-Acts
The Holocaust Travel and Study in Israel
The Old Testament The New Testament
Women in the Biblical World

RS 30300 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES (1-4)
These offerings provide advanced study of one or more biblical
texts. These courses generally presume that students have already
taken one of the following or similar courses: RS 30100 Biblical Studies,
Old Testament, or New Testament. Specific course descriptions will be

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printed in class schedules for the term in which the course is offered.
Satisfies the Humanities GUR. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from RS 30301 to RS 30399 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Colossians & Ephesians Corinthian Correspondence
Galatio Gospel According to Matthew
Gospel of Mark John
Luke Luke’s Sequel: The Book of Acts
Non-Canonical Gospels Old Testament
Pauline Epistles Revelations
Women in the Biblical World Paul’s Epistle to the Romans

RS 30500 ADVANCED CATHOLIC STUDIES (2-4)
These offerings provided by the Cardinal Newman Chair of Catholic
Theology examine history, doctrines, beliefs, practices, and expressions
of Catholicism. Some courses give special attention to the American
Catholic experience. Others will focus on individual thinkers or defining
moments in church history. Offered Fall/Spring.
(Topic course number range from RS 30501 to RS 30599 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
American Catholicism Catholic Beliefs, Practices & History
Catholics and Other Christians Lectionary
Non-Canonical Gospels Paul’s Life and Letters

SC – Science
(Offered through the Environmental Science Department)

SC 10000 INTEGRATED SCIENCE I (4)
Laboratory course tailored for non-science majors. Examination of
the development of major scientific concepts and theories which are the
basis of study in the distinct scientific disciplines. Scientific concepts
will be placed in a social context by exploring the relationships between
science, technology, and society. Lab included. Lab fee required. Satisfies
the Laboratory Science GUR. Offered Fall: alternating years online/on
campus.

SC 11000 NATURAL HISTORY OF ALASKA (4)
This is an introduction to the animals, plants, and geology of south-
central Alaska’s terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. The goal of the class
is to familiarize students with this area’s natural history sufficiently that
they can share their knowledge with others. As a field-based block class,
the class features a 1-2 week field trip that includes camping, day-hikes,
and a short backpacking trip suitable for beginners. Lab fee plus extra
costs including food and equipment for the field portion. Satisfies the
Laboratory Science GUR. Offered Fall.

SC 11500 BASICS OF WEATHER LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS (1)
General principles of weather presented through workbook and
Internet lab exercises. Includes reading of weather symbols and maps,
basic atmospheric physics, weather forecasting, Doppler radar, ENSO,
and severe weather. Examples incorporating Alaska weather are used
to illustrate principles. This course is for students who have completed
a general science course and only need to satisfy the laboratory
requirement. Prerequisite: 3 credit science GUR, student should have
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completed a science course and are only taking this course to acquire
the laboratory component. Offered Fall.

SC 12000 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY (4)
An introduction to the Earth, including earth materials (minerals,
rocks, and soils), the processes that control distributions and behavior of
those materials, and application of the scientific method to these topics.
Emphasis is placed upon plate tectonics as a unifying theme for under-
standing the rocks, volcanoes, mountains, glaciers, and earthquakes of
Alaska. Laboratory component emphasizes rock and mineral identifi-
cation, map interpretation, and field-trips to examine notable geologic
features in south central Alaska. Lab included. Lab fee required. Satisfies
the Laboratory Science GUR. Offered Fall as needed.

SC 14000 INTRODUCTION TO BOTANY AND ZOOLOGY (4)
Examination of the plant and animal kingdoms emphasizing struc-
tural, functional, and evolutionary relationships. Lab included. Lab fee
required. Satisfies the Laboratory Science GUR. Offered Fall.

SC 15000 INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY (4)
An introductory course in oceanography that examines the role of the
oceans in earth systems science. The interaction between the physical,
chemical, and biological aspects of the marine system will be examined.
Major topics include physical characteristics of the oceans, currents,
waves, tides, air-sea interaction, coastal processes, and sedimentation.
Major delivery of material is via web-based Internet activities. Offered
Fall.

SC 15500 INTRODUCTION TO METEOROLOGY (4)
An introductory course in meteorology that examines the role of the
atmosphere in earth systems science. Major topics include heat budget
of the atmosphere, weather systems, severe weather, climatology, and
weather forecasting. Major delivery of material is via web-based Internet
activities. Offered as needed.

SC 16000 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (4)
General introduction to the science of life and the fundamental
processes which govern and dictate the success of all organisms. Lab
included. Lab fee required. Satisfies the Laboratory Science GUR.
Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 17000 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (4)
Basic principles of chemistry including reactions, stoichiometry, ideal
gas law, atomic theory, and calculations. Lab included. Lab fee required.
Prerequisite: MT 10100. Satisfies the Laboratory Science GUR. Offered
Fall.

SC 17100 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (4)
Continuation of SC 17000. Study of chemical kinetics, equilibrium
theory, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Lab included. Lab fee
required. Prerequisite: SC 17000. Satisfies the Laboratory Science GUR.
Offered Spring.

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SC 20000 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (4)
Students will be exposed to general principles related to the
following topics: species and habitats of conservation concern, human
environmental history, environmental issues and environmental data
on the web, the economy and environment, and sustainability of one’s
personal life. Understanding within each area will be approached through
individual investigations within each topic, followed by presentations, in
written and oral formats, of each investigation’s results. Satisfies the
Sophomore Seminar GUR. Offered Spring.

SC 20500 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (4)
Major concepts of natural resource management including those in
agriculture, forestry, wildlife, fisheries, water, air, energy, mining, and
recreation. Consequences of the use and misuse of vital resources are
addressed. Satisfies the Sophomore Seminar GUR. Offered Fall.

SC 21000 WINTER ECOLOGY AND COLD WEATHER PHYSIOLOGY (4)
A definition of winter and the strategies organisms pursue to survive
it. Principles and processes of energy and biochemistry are briefly
reviewed in preparation for a survey of animal and plant adaptations
to cold stress. Interactions between populations in a winter context are
also covered. The course begins with a study of human responses to cold
and methods of staying warm. Lab fee required. Satisfies the Laboratory
Science GUR. Offered Spring.

SC 21500 GLACIOLOGY AND GLACIER TRAVEL (4)
The formation and behavior of glaciers in the context of their impact
on Alaskan landscapes with extended time spent living, skiing and
collecting data on glaciers. Techniques for safe research and travel in
glacial landscapes will be emphasized. Topics will include snow and ice
physics, mechanisms of glacier flow, sediment production and transport,
types of glacial landforms, and the relationship of glacier fluctua-
tions to climate change. Basic techniques for glacier travel, crevasse
rescue, hazard recognition and avoidance, snow camping, and glacio-
logical field research will be described and practiced. Lab fee plus extra
costs including food and equipment for the field portion. Satisfies the
Laboratory Science GUR. Offered Summer.

SC 22000 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY (4)
Investigation of the physical, chemical, and biological processes
that have produced the present Earth system, with emphases on the
evolution of Earth from the Hadean to the present and on the strati-
graphic principles that record that evolution. Dynamics of interac-
tions among the planet’s interior, crust, atmosphere, hydrosphere,
and biosphere will be explored in lectures, discussions, and laboratory
exercises. Lab included. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: SC 12000 or
permission of instructor. Satisfies the Laboratory Science GUR. Offered
Spring.

SC 23000 PRINCIPLES OF BOTANY (4)
This is a lecture and laboratory course that focuses on plant structure
and function. Structural adaptations to environment will be discussed
in the context of their function. This course will provide students with

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a working knowledge of how plants work and how they evolved to
specialized niches. Included in each lecture, where appropriate, will be
a discussion of what structural or functional features result in ethnobo-
tanically significant plants. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: SC 16000,
SC 14000, or SC 20500. Offered Fall.

SC 24000 PRINCIPLES OF ZOOLOGY (4)
This course introduces students to the Animal Kingdom in the
classroom, laboratory and field. Major and minor animal phyla (including
the protozoa) are examined with respect to anatomy, ecology, evolu-
tionary relationships among and within phyla, and relationships with
humans. Important classes within phyla will be emphasized as well
as important groups within classes. Field experience will be gained in
terrestrial, aquatic, and marine systems. A large portion of the course
will be field-based. Lab fee and travel costs required. Prerequisites: SC
16000, SC 14000, or SC 20500. Offered Spring.

SC 24500 SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES (4)
Using the unique setting of the Kellogg Campus, students will
explore concepts of sustainable communities through readings, guest
lectures, interviews with local residents, and field activities. The course
will integrate knowledge of historical, present, and future land use and
community development trends in the Mat-Su Valley. Students will work
closely with community residents engaged in planning and managing
growth, as they identify and enhance aspects of Mat-Su Valley life
important to a shared community vision. Offered as needed.

SC 25600 ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS (4)
This course is a study of the physical laws and processes that underlie
environmental phenomena. A primary emphasis in the class will be on
energy and related issues such as climate variability, conservation, and
alternative energy sources. Prerequisite: MT 12100. Offered Fall.

SC 26000 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)
(1)
This course is an introductory level class for students who wish to
learn the basics of the Global Positioning System (GPS). This class will
provide fundamental concepts of GPS, how to use GPS receivers, collect
and process data. No prior GPS experience is necessary; however, basic
computer skills are recommended. Lab fee required. Offered Fall.

SC 27000 GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I (4)
This course is the first semester of an introductory, calculus based
course in physics. Its primary focus is on mechanics, as well as the
physics of waves, sound, and thermodynamics. Satisfies the Laboratory
Science GUR. Prerequisite: MT 23000 (MT 23000 may be taken concur-
rently). Offered as needed.

SC 27500 GENERAL UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II (4)
A continuation of General University Physics I. Focuses on optics,
electromagnetism, modern physics and relativity. Lab included. Lab fee
required. Prerequisite: MT 23000 and SC 27000. Offered as needed.

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SC 30000 TROPICAL NATURAL HISTORY (4)
A field-oriented block course that travels to a tropical region and
explores the wildlife, natural history, and conservation concerns there.
This course requires difficult and uncomfortable traveling conditions.
Requires lab fee and air-fare expenses. Satisfies LAB GUR. Prerequisite:
Any of the following lab classes: SC 10000, 10100, 14000, 11000,
12000, 17000, 21000, 22000, 23000, or 24000 and permission of the
instructor. Offered Spring.

SC 30500 WINTER ECOLOGY WITH STATISTICS (4)
A definition of winter and the strategies organisms pursue to survive
it. Principles and processes of energy and biochemistry are briefly
reviewed in preparation for a survey of animal and plant adaptations
to cold stress. Interactions between populations in a winter context
are also covered. Includes a study of human responses and methods
of staying warm. This course requires students to apply statistics to
the data collected in the field during Winter Ecology and Cold Weather
Physiology (SC 21000). Lab and travel fees required. Prerequisite: MT
22000. Offered Fall.

SC 31000 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (4)
Examines Federal and Alaska environmental law emphasizing National
Environmental Policy Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response
Compensation and Liability Act. Further study of the Environmental
Impact statement process includes methods and procedures required
by NEPA regulations. The course details the requirements of CERCLA for
the Phase I Environmental Site Assessment focusing upon real estate
transactions. The contents of Phase II (Intrusive Studies) and Phase III
(Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Studies) are also presented, as
well as an introduction to risk assessment. Offered Spring.

SC 33000 ECOLOGY (4)
Introduction to the interactions between organisms and their
environment, both biotic and abiotic. Considers organisms, popula-
tions, communities, ecosystems and biomes, and lays the groundwork
for more advanced classes in ecology and conservation biology. Simple
mathematical models and their analyses are used. Prerequisites: 1 lab
science and Statistics, or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

SC 33100 PRINCIPLES OF FOREST MANAGEMENT (4)
Course introduces concept of forest management with emphasis
given to Alaskan forest ecosystems, both urban and rural. Topics include:
forest ecology, dendrology, entomology and pathology, inventory and
measurements, wood technology, soil science, forest products, policy,
and protection. Prerequisite: SC 33000. Offered as needed.

SC 33500 ORGANIC EVOLUTION (4)
This course examines empirical and theoretical evidence of evolu-
tionary patterns and processes. Emphasis is placed on the study of
contemporary processes, especially those most relevant to applied
conservation biology. Topics covered include: the macro and micro fossil
record, natural selection and other avenues of evolutionary change,
geomorphological and geochemical aspects of evolution, coevolution,
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adaptive radiation, divergence, speciation, and extinction. The study
of contemporary processes includes: concepts of minimum viable
population size, natural and artificial selection, and evolution on islands
and other isolated habitats. The course attempts to apply knowledge
gained through basic investigations in evolutionary science to contem-
porary problems, especially biodiversity crises. Prerequisite: SC 33000
or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

SC 34000 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (4)
This course introduces the science of animal behavior, with an
emphasis on an evolutionary understanding of behavior. Topics include:
approaches to animal behavior, evolution and genetics, mechanisms,
learning, behavioral ecology, communication, food and shelter, social
organization, mating systems, and animal experiences. No lab. Satisfies
the Social/Behavioral Science GUR. Prerequisites: SC 16000 or SC
14000, and a Sophomore Seminar course (SC 20000, or SC 20500 or
PY 21000 or ED 21400 or LS 20100 or BA 20000). Offered Fall.

SC 34500 ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS (4)
This course examines a transdisciplinary science that attempts to
work toward the efficient allocation of resources subject to and mindful
of ecological constraints. Unlike traditional neo-classical economics,
ecological economics recognizes that the economy is a sub-system
wholly contained and sustained by the global ecosystem, and like any
subsystem, is dependent on the system that contains it. We will focus on
issues at the interface of the human system and the biophysical system
that sustains it. We will study three interdependent goals of sustainable
scale, fair distribution, and efficient allocation and the economic tools
and policies necessary to create a sustainable economy. Prerequisite:
BAM 21600 or instructor permission. Offered as needed.

SC 35000 OCEANOGRAPHY (4)
The geological, physical, chemical, and biological factors that influence
the marine environment in an Earth Systems approach. Study of marine
resources and the role of the oceans to provide for global sustainability.
Major topics include ocean circulation, waves, tides, coastal processes,
and biological productivity. Prerequisite: One laboratory science course.
Offered Fall.

SC 35500 METEOROLOGY: WEATHER AND CLIMATE (4)
Composition and behavior of the air; energy as it relates to weather,
temperature, moisture, precipitation, pressure and winds; air masses,
fronts, and storms; weather predictions; and climate change and classifi-
cation. Use of Internet to examine real-time weather conditions. Offered
as needed.

SC 36000 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(GIS) (4)
This course is an introduction to the theory and use of Geographic
Information Systems, including the fundamental concepts of GIS,
capabilities of GIS, and applications for dealing with spatial data.
Key issues for discussion will include vector data input, data models,
database design and database queries, sources of spatial information,
spatial analysis, and cartographic display. These topics will be discussed
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within an environmental context using ArcGIS, a PC-based GIS software
package. The course is presented in a lecture/laboratory format. Lab fee
required. Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 36300 INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING (4)
This course introduces students to the principles and techniques
necessary for applying remote sensing to diverse issues within environ-
mental science. The course emphasizes a hands-on learning environment
with theoretical and conceptual aspects of satellite remote sensing.
Topics include digital image interpretation, analysis, and processing
within a GIS environment. Prerequisite: SC34100
SC 36500 APPLIED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS) (4)
This course is a second course in GIS concerned primarily with
spatial modeling. Topics include raster modeling, specifically hydrologic
and distance modeling, as well as surface interpolation. The course is
project-based with a lecture and laboratory component. Lab fee required.
Prerequisite: SC 36000 or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

SC 37000 PRINCIPLES OF HYDROLOGY (4)
This course presents the basic physical principles important in the
hydrologic cycle; including precipitation, snowmelt, infiltration and soil
physics, evapotranspiration, and surface and subsurface flow to streams.
Field-based projects will focus on watershed analyses including field
measurements and statistical analyses of hydrologic data. Prerequisite:
MT 23000 or concurrent registration. Offered as needed.

SC 37500 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (4)
Designed for Environmental Science majors. Survey of environmental
chemistry principles in preparation for additional work in the discipline.
Examination of the chemical basis of environmental issues. Introduction
to basic field techniques for environmental sampling and monitoring.
Lab fee required. Prerequisite: SC 17100. Offered as needed.

SC 40000 TROPICAL ECOLOGY (4)
A field-oriented block course that explores the ecology of a tropical
region. Emphasis on the structure, function, and biodiversity of natural
ecosystems, but logging, agriculture, sustainable development, and
conservation are also discussed. This course requires difficult and uncom-
fortable travel through underdeveloped rural and wilderness areas by
minibus, boat, and foot. Students are expected to have a passport,
necessary inoculations, and wilderness experience. Additional costs are
required of the student for travel to and from the destination countries.
Prerequisites: SC 33000, MT 22000 or equivalents and permission of the
instructor are required. Offered Fall.

SC 40300 TROPICAL CONSERVATION IN PRACTICE (4)
This course examines the relationship between environmental
systems and sustainable development through travel to the developing
world and service learning. We will explore, experience and learn about
the human causes of environmental degradation and critically assess
sustainable development alternatives in remote rural areas of the
developing world. These alternatives will be evaluated from ecological,
economic, and social and ethical perspectives. From a conceptual
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and operational point of view, we will explore the idea of sustain-
ability/sustainable development with an emphasis on community-
based sustainable development in and around protected areas. Service
learning will be integrated into the travel study. Cultural and natural
history will also be investigated as part of the curriculum. Prerequisites:
Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Lab fee required.
Offered Summer.

SC 40500 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (4)
Various perspectives and philosophies concerning the natural
environment and resource utilization are explored in order to give the
student a basis on which to develop his or her own ethical perspective.
The human factor in addressing environmental issues is emphasized.
Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 40700 WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (4)
Major concepts involved in water resources management. Basic
hydrology, water use, water rights, water quality, groundwater, planning,
floodplain management, and dams. Emphasis will be placed on the inter-
relationships among the technical, legal, economic, and political aspects
of water resources management by examining Alaskan water resources
laws and current issues. Offered Fall.

SC 41000 ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY AND LEADERSHIP (4)
Examines environmental interest groups and methods of advocacy.
Students learn the tasks of environmental and natural resource advocates,
such as how to start and organize an advocacy group, conduct an inves-
tigation of an issue, communicate with political representatives, effec-
tively participate in public hearings, develop a media campaign, and
engage in various fund-raising activities. Offered as needed.

SC 41200 SCIENTIFIC WRITING (4)
This course examines in depth the nature and scope of scientific
writing, including style, format, and conventions. Students will examine
the primary literature for examples of effective scientific writing, and
practice constructing various aspects of research papers, theses,
research proposals, and science journalism. Student evaluation is based
on homework, class participation and discussion, class critiques of
student drafts, and a writing portfolio. Students may incorporate compo-
nents of a senior project or graduate thesis into their portfolio for credit.
Prerequisite: LL 20100 or equivalent. Offered as needed.

SC 41500 NATURAL RESOURCE PLANNING AND POLITICS (4)
The relationship between the political process and natural resource
inventory, planning, development, management, and conservation.
Emphasis is placed on Alaskan renewable and nonrenewable natural
resources and the impact of local, state, and national legislation,
regulation, and political action. Offered as needed.

SC 42000 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY (4)
Focuses on the entire spectrum of possible interactions between
humankind and the physical environment. Topics include: earth materials,
natural hazards, hydrology, waste disposal and environmental health,

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minerals, energy, and an introduction to environmental law and land use
planning. Lab included. Lab fee required. Offered as needed.

SC 42200 SOILS AND GEOMORPHOLOGY (4)
This course examines the physical aspects of the land resource
including the soils and sediments that comprise the landforms of the
earth’s surface. The course presents detailed study of landforms and the
processes that control their formation, whether erosional, depositional,
tectonic, or volcanic. An introduction to land capability is included.
Laboratory work includes field-sampling techniques, analysis of soils,
and interpretation of landforms on air photos and topographic maps.
Lab fee required. Prerequisites: MT 12100 and SC 12000 or SC 42000.
Offered Fall.

SC 43000 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (4)
Introduction to the science of preserving biological diversity, its
principles, policy, and applications. Topics include: extinction, ecological
and genetical effects of habitat fragmentation, minimum viable population
analysis, reserve design and management, the Endangered Species Act,
and conflict mediation. Lab included. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: SC
33000. Offered Spring.

SC 43500 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (4)
Introduction to laws and regulations governing environmental and
natural resource management. Designed to introduce non-law students
to the legal process and the role of the judiciary in environmental and
natural resource management. Offered Spring.

SC 44500 COLLABORATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (4)
Theoretical and applied concepts of collaboration and conflict
resolution in both public and private sectors of natural resource and
environmental management, historical and legal mandates, government
agency responsibilities, applied methods and techniques, case studies,
and hands-on experience. Offered as needed.

SC 45500 CLIMATE CHANGE (4)
Causes and consequences of climate variability on a variety of
timescales will be addressed, with a primary focus on evidence for
natural and anthropogenic climate fluctuations in arctic regions. Topics
will include structure of the climate system, proposed mechanisms of
climate variability, techniques for paleoclimatic reconstruction, and an
overview of climate modeling and associated uncertainties. We will use
case studies to explore known and projected impacts of climatic changes
on Alaskan environments. Emphasis will be placed on the science of
climate change, but policy issues will be discussed. Offered Spring.

SC 46200 LAND USE PLANNING (4)
Overview of land use planning at the municipal, county, and state
levels and on public or private lands that have their own planning juris-
diction. Coverage of the history, legal framework, processes needed for
successful land use planning. Requires project-based exercise using
Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Lab fee required. Prereq-
uisite: SC 36000. Offered as needed.

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SC 47000 GROUNDWATER GEOLOGY (4)
This course includes the principles and processes of groundwater
occurrence and flow including aquifer properties, well pumping tests with
analyses, and groundwater development and management. The topics
include field methods with an introduction to geophysical techniques,
as well as pollution sources and contaminant migration and computer
modeling. Lab included. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: SC 112000 or
instructor permission; SC 17100; and MT 12100. Offered Spring.

SC 49800 RESEARCH METHODS (4)
Introduction to the process of research design and methods in
environmental science. Students will explore senior project interests,
exchange and critique project ideas, and formalize senior project
proposals. Offered Fall.

SC 49900 SENIOR PROJECT (1-12)
The senior project is the capstone of the student’s undergraduate
career. The goal of the course is to identify, plan, implement, and
evaluate a project that focuses the student’s skills and knowledge on
his or her professional interests. Projects may be planned individually or
in small groups. Students may register in increments of three or more
credit hours, not to exceed twelve. Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 38000, 48000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a regular
faculty member and by permission only. Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 18500, 28500, 38500, 48500 PRACTICUM (1-12)
Practical work experience in a given area of concentration under the
cooperative guidance of a faculty member and an on-the-job supervisor.
Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 19000, 29000, 39000, 49000 SEMINAR (1-4)
Small groups which meet with faculty members for in-depth study
and discussion of particular topics. Appropriate course descriptions are
published as seminars are offered. Offered Fall/Spring.

SC 19200, 29200, 39200, 49200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-4)
Special topics in various fields are offered as needed. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered Fall/
Spring.

SS – Social Sciences
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

SS 10500 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCES (4)
Survey course introducing the study of the social sciences those
disciplines that deal with all aspects of the group life of human beings
and that represent an extensive body of theory about the nature, growth,

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 165
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and function of human societies. Satisfies the Social/Behavioral Science
GUR. Offered as needed.
(Topic course number range from SS 10501 to SS 10599 in schedule)
Selected Topics:
Geography Sociology

SS 30500 ADVANCED STUDIES IN SOCIAL SCIENCES: SELECTED TOPICS
(4)
In-depth study of topics in the various social sciences. Methodol-
ogies used for quantitative and qualitative research are practiced in
research projects. Offered as needed.

Graduation: Faculty Hild and Munsch
Photo by Donna Dougherty

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 166
Alaska Pacific University

graduate policies and
procedurES
ADMISSIONS
Each Graduate program requires admission to the University as well
as to the program the student wishes to enter. Application documents
are collected by the Admissions Office and then sent to the appropriate
department for evaluation by the Program Director. When a decision is
made regarding admission, the applicant will be notified by the Graduate
Program Director and the Graduate Admissions Counselor.

Note: Each department has individual program requirements and
deadlines.

Students wishing to apply to a Graduate program must submit the
following to the Admissions office:
1. Application for Graduate admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
3. College transcripts. Official transcripts from the institution which
conferred the undergraduate degree. A transcript is required
from each postsecondary institution in which a student has
been enrolled, whether or not credit was earned. Transcripts are
considered official only if they are delivered in a sealed envelope
from the issuing institution.
4. Individual program requirements. Please see the Admissions
section under each individual program.

International Students
International students are students who do not have United States
residency. International students wishing to apply for a graduate program
must submit the following to the Admissions Office:
1. Application for Graduate admission. Follow the application
requirements in the Graduate application and submit materials
by the deadline stated in the application or the following
deadlines (whichever is earlier):
Fall Semester June 1
Spring Semester September 1
2. Supplemental application for International Student admission.
3. Supporting financial documentation. Present financial
documentation to support the information provided under
the Annual Budget Section of the supplemental application.
Supporting documents must be supplied for each person or
party who will be providing you with financial assistance. The
documents should reflect the individual’s financial history.
Examples of supporting documents include: several months’
bank statements, a letter from an employer stating period of
employment, planned continued employment and yearly salary,
tax returns, or a U.S. Immigration Form I-134 Affidavit of
Support (for students who have a financial sponsor in the United
States). All documents must be officially translated into English
Graduate Policies and Procedures 167
Alaska Pacific University

and monetary amounts expressed in U.S. dollars. Students need
to keep a duplicate set of all documents. These documents will
be needed to apply for a student visa and to enter the United
States.
4. Foreign credentials evaluation (in addition to official transcripts).
All students with transcripts issued by universities and schools
outside the United States must send their transcripts to a
credentials evaluation service for evaluation and must request
that a copy of the evaluation be sent to the Admissions office.
A course-by-course evaluation providing grade point average is
required. A list of agencies that provide this service is contained
in the Alaska Pacific International Student Information Packet.
5. All international students, who are non-native speakiers of
English, must submit official Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) scores. Alaska Pacific’s reporting code is #4201. A score
of 550 on the paper test, 213 on the computer test, or 80 on the
Internet based test is required for admission.

Non-Degree Seeking Graduate Students
(Special Student Status)
Students who do not wish to pursue a degree program may attend
classes at Alaska Pacific University if the required prerequisites have
been completed. The courses taken under Special Student status may
or may not be applicable to a Graduate program at a later date. Non-
Degree Seeking students are not required to submit academic transcripts
and standardized test scores, but must have departmental approval to
take a course.

Students in Non-Degree Seeking status are not eligible to receive
financial aid.

If a Non-Degree Seeking student wishes to enter a Graduate
program, he or she must apply for admission by following the appli-
cation requirements of the program they intend to apply to. After
completion of nine credit hours of course work, a Graduate student must
apply for admission to a degree program, or reapply to continue in Non-
Degree Seeking status. Continued enrollment in Non-Degree Seeking
status will be contingent upon review and approval by an admissions
committee. Only nine hours of post baccalaureate course work earned
prior to admission to a Graduate program may be accepted toward a
Graduate degree.
Students wishing to enter Graduate Non-Degree Seeking status
must submit the following to the Admissions Office:
1. Application for Non-Degree Seeking admission.
2. $25.00 non-refundable application fee. Please make checks or
money orders payable to Alaska Pacific University.
Admissions Standards
An admissions committee reviews completed application packages.
The decision to admit or deny an applicant is based on the overall quality
of the admissions package. Academic standards include:
1. A baccalaureate GPA of 3.00 if applying for the first Master’s
degree; or
2. If applying for an additional Master’s degree, a 3.00 GPA for the
last Master’s degree completed.

Graduate Policies and Procedures 168
Alaska Pacific University

Applicants with GPAs between 2.75 and 2.99 may be considered by
the appropriate Program Director. If an applicant’s GPA is below 2.75, the
Program Director will make a decision based on the recommendation of
the department in which the program is offered. The Program Director
has the option of seeking input from the Graduate Studies Committee
in uncertain cases. The Program Director will report the admission of
students with a GPA below 2.75 to the Graduate Studies Committee.

Graduate Deferred Applicant Policy
Fully admitted, degree-seeking graduate applicants may defer their
approved semester start date for up to one year with the approval of the
Program Director. Individuals who cannot gain approval for deferral must
reapply and submit additional admission documentation. The appro-
priate Program Director, in coordination with the Admissions Office,
will determine on a case-by-case basis what additional documentation
needs to be submitted.

Admission Categories
Full Admission
Full Admission status is assigned to students whose completed appli-
cation meets the requirements for admission to the university. Financial
assistance can be disbursed to students who have been fully admitted
to the university.

Early Admission
Early Admission status is assigned to students whose applications
are complete enough to determine that they meet the requirements
for admission to the university, but are missing elements necessary for
completion of the admission process. Students in this status may not
register for classes and are not eligible for financial aid.

Admission Hold
Admission Hold status is assigned to students who have received
Early Admission status and wish to register for classes prior to completion
of their application. This status requires that the student submit missing
application elements within six-weeks of registration. The Student
Financial Services Office will hold all approved awards until all appli-
cation elements are received and the student is granted Full Admission
status. Upon Full Admission, the Financial Aid Department will disburse
approved awards. If the student does not meet the six-week deadline,
they may be withdrawn from their academic program pending discussion
with the Academic Dean or appropriate Program Director and placed
in a Non-Degree Seeking program status. As a Non-Degree Seeking
student, the student will be required to pay full tuition in order to remain
registered. The student’s approved financial aid awards may also be
withdrawn. The Admissions Office will monitor and update the appli-
cation files.

Provisional Admission
Provisional Admission status is assigned to graduate students who
have been admitted but still need to complete program prerequisites or
remedial and/or tutorial work while enrolled at the University. This status
is granted by the appropriate Program Director. The time limit required
for completion of this work will be determined by the Program Director
Graduate Policies and Procedures 169
Alaska Pacific University

that grants this status. Students who have not satisfactorily completed
the specified requirements, within the prescribed time period, will have
their enrollment revoked.

Wait Listed
Waitlisted status is assigned to those students who apply to APU and
meet academic standards of the University, but due to circumstances,
such as lateness, need to be placed on an academic Wait List by the
program director.

Admission Denied
Admission Denied status is assigned to students whose applications
do not meet the minimum requirements for admission to the University.
Students who are denied admission may contest such decisions by
petitioning the Graduate Studies Committee.

Graduate Assistantships
Each graduate program offers a limited number of graduate assis-
tantships. The assistantships are available in the form of tuition waivers
for a specific number of semester hours of course work. Graduate assis-
tants provide research, instruction, or related project assistance for the
department. The Graduate Assistantship application and the application
procedures are included in the Application for Graduate Admission.

FINANCIAL AID

Alaska Pacific University offers many opportunities for scholar-
ships, grants, and loans awarded through a variety of federal, state,
and university programs. Financial aid is considered a supplement to the
family’s monetary contribution; it is not intended to cover the complete
cost of attendance.
Another significant source of financial aid is through national schol-
arship databases. We emphasize that students who are diligent in their
scholarship searches through national scholarship databases may find
they receive enough funds to pay for the majority, if not all, of their
education at APU. These scholarship database lists are available in the
Student Financial Services Office or through diligent search and consist
of monies given upon the basis of major, heritage, religion, need/
nonneed, membership, age, and even contests.
To be considered for financial aid, a student must comply with the
following requirements:
1. Student must be admitted to Alaska Pacific University as a
degree-seeking student.
2. Student must attend APU as a full time student. Exception:
part-time students may receive Stafford Loans or the Alaska
Supplemental Loan.
3. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
and request the results be sent to APU, school code 001061. The
results must be received at APU from the federal government.
4. Student’s interested in alternative (private) loans must apply
directly through their chosen lender.
5. Submit a Master Promissory Note if accepting a Federal Stafford
Loan for the first time at APU. It is valid for 10 years.
6. Complete Loan Entrance Counseling if accepting a Federal
Stafford Loan for the first time at APU.
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Alaska Pacific University

7. Comply with all application deadlines. Financial aid must be
reapplied for annually.
8. Respond to and complete all requests for documentation,
verification, corrections, and other information as requested by
the Student Financial Services Office or the agency to which you
apply.
9. Sign and return each Award letter to the APU Student Financial
Services Office by the required date and decline in writing any
portion of an award offered that is not desired. A financial aid
offer is not valid until the signed Award letter has been returned
to the APU Student Financial Services Office.
10. Notify the Student Financial Services Office in writing of any of
the following changes: course load, withdrawal, marital status,
residence, living arrangements, or aid received from outside
sources.
11. Maintain good academic standing and make satisfactory progress
toward completing an academic program in accordance with APU
Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

FAFSA Application Information
The FAFSA is the required application for the Stafford subsidized and
unsubsidized loans, and the Alaska Supplemental Loan. The University
also requires a completed FAFSA on all students receiving university aid.
All students, both incoming and returning, requesting financial aid must
file a FAFSA no later than April 15 if the student expects consideration
for assistance during the academic year beginning the following August.
After that date, applications will still be accepted, but funds are limited
to available funds at that time. Early application increases a student’s
chances for assistance.
Submit the FAFSA electronically to www.fafsa.ed.gov.
There are definite limits to the annual amounts the federal and state
aid provides.
Notification of the award offer may be delayed by a federally selected
verification of information process; please submit accurate information
on the FAFSA.

Federal and State Financial Aid Disbursement Rules
Federal and state regulations require that a student must be in
attendance at least part-time (6 credits), or full-time (9 credits) before
APU can disburse federal and state aid. Adding and dropping classes
may affect the amount of federal/state financial aid a student receives.
Students who receive loans from the federal government may need
to sign for the check in the Student Financial Services Office, though
most will be credited automatically via Electronic Fund transfer. The
student will receive written notice from the SFS Office that they need
to endorse their check. If the student does not sign within 30 days the
check will be returned to the lender. If the student still requires a federal
loan, the student must reapply for a new loan.
All financial aid awarded, with the exception of Federal College Work
Study (FCWS), are credited to the student’s account after the student
signs for the disbursement. (The student is responsible for finding the
work-study job through Career Services.) It is important that students
are prompt in signing for the checks since unsigned checks are sent
back to the disburser.
Some students receive financial aid in excess of direct university
costs. In such cases, the portion exceeding direct costs is refunded to
the student as long as it does not exceed the cost of attendance. Federal
Guidelines allow institutions up to 14 days after receipt of federal funds to
Graduate Policies and Procedures 171
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process any applicable refunds. This allows APU adequate time to verify
the student’s enrollment and attendance in all classes. As mentioned
above, drops and adds affect the student’s eligibility for all types of
financial aid. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure they are
enrolled in the required number of credits for each type of aid they are
receiving; ie: Institutional awards require 9 or more; loans require six
credits or more and etc. Federal regulations require a 30 day hold on all
loan funds for first year undergraduates. Students must be enrolled in at
least six credits at the time their loan funds are disbursed.
Students who have a credit balance on their account after Federal
Aid is received may request a bookstore voucher for their books. The
cost of the books will be added the student’s account, thus reducing the
credit balance to be refunded.
If a student’s Federal Aid is applied to their account after the census
date and a credit balance is created, the refund will be processed within
14 days.
Refund checks will be disbursed from Student Financial Services
(SFS) and will require picture ID and student signature. If the student
is unable to pick it up in person, they will be required to provide written
authorization along with a copy of some form of identification (e-mail
is acceptable) for SFS to mail the refund check to the address specified
by the student.

Alaska Pacific University Interest-Free Monthly Payment
Plan
The Alaska Pacific University Interest-Free Monthly Payment Plan
administered by Tuition Management Systems is recommended to help
you budget for the payment of your educational expenses and limit your
debt.
The plan allows you to spread your annual balance out over 10
interest-free monthly payments for a small annual enrollment fee of
$65, which includes Education Payment Life Insurance. This insurance
benefit provides payment for the remaining balance in the event of the
death of the bill payer. For those graduating in December or beginning
their classes in the Spring semester, there are also semester plan options
available for a fee of $47.

Benefits of the Alaska Pacific University Interest-Free
Monthly Payment Plan include:
• No Interest associated with plan, helping limit your debt and
maximize savings
• Toll-free top-rated telephone service during extended personal
service hours at 1-888-356-0350
• Affordable counseling with friendly and professional Education
Payment Partners
• A wide variety of payment methods including personal checks,
money orders, credit cards and automated payments from your
checking or savings account
• 24-hour access to account information at www.afford.com

Students are encouraged to seriously consider the advantages of
paying some or all of your balance interest-free. This strategy is the
most effective means of limiting your debt. Feel free to contact Tuition
Management Systems for Affordability Counseling at 1-888-356-0350
from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays.

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Discontinuance of Attendance
Students who drop classes may have their financial aid reduced
if they then fall below the full-time/part-time credit requirement for a
particular type of financial aid. Students who withdraw from APU must
notify the Student Financial Services Office and the Registrar so that
refund calculations or late disbursements may be made. Students who
withdraw from APU may be required to begin immediate student loan
repayment. Federal regulations require all student loan borrowers to
participate in Exit Loan Counseling whenever they withdraw or graduate
from APU, for students to understand their rights and responsibilities as
borrowers. To complete Exit Loan Counseling session online, go to www.
mappingyourfuture.org.

Sharing Financial Aid Funds between Institutions of
Higher Learning
Federal financial aid cannot be divided between institutions unless
there is a consortium agreement between the institutions. The financial
aid will be processed at the institution where the student is pursuing
their degree, the home school. APU participates in a very limited number
of consortium agreements. The home school will process the federal
aid and any refund due to the student will be disbursed to the student
approximately 14 days after the beginning of the semester or receipt of
the funds, whichever is later. It is the student’s responsibility to pay the
tuition and fees at their other institution.
University awards from APU will not be divided between APU and
another institution of higher learning.

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Probation for
Financial Aid
Federal Financial Aid regulations require Alaska Pacific University to
establish a Satisfactory Academic Progress policy for students receiving
financial aid. Further, APU must notify students of that policy and
monitor the progress of all students receiving financial aid to insure
their continued compliance with the policy. It is the responsibility of all
students receiving financial aid to familiarize themselves with the policy
and to insure that the standards are met. Failure to meet the Financial
Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress standards may place a student’s
financial aid in jeopardy. Summer hours may be used to fulfill the yearly
minimum hourly requirement. Students must maintain at least a 67%
completion of attempted credits.
Graduate students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade
point average of 3.0. Academic progress will be reviewed at the end
of each semester. Results of that review will be used to determine the
subsequent semester eligibility for financial aid.
Students are responsible to ensure that they maintain the minimum
semester and cumulative GPA and to ensure that they complete the
required minimum number of credits each academic year.

1. Probation. Students who fail to complete the required minimum
number of credits in a Fall semester or fail to meet the required
cumulative GPA of 3.00 will be placed on probation for their
Spring semester. The student will be eligible to receive financial
aid during their semester of probation. These students will
receive a letter notifying them of their probationary status.

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Failure to regain good standing status within the one semester
of probation will result in the suspension of financial aid.
2. Grades of AU, F, I, IP, W, and NC indicate unsatisfactory
completion of courses for financial aid purposes.
3. First-time students and transfer students with no prior academic
history at APU are considered to be making satisfactory academic
progress for the first semester of enrollment.
4. Satisfactory academic progress must be maintained even during
semesters in which aid is not received.
5. The maximum number of credits for which a student may receive
financial aid is 65 credit hours. The credit count starts from the
very first credit attempted, regardless of whether or not the
student received financial aid. Any course for which a student
receives credit, including transferred courses, repeated courses,
and challenged courses, are included in this calculation.

Incomplete Grades: Courses with incomplete (I) grades do not
count toward Satisfactory Academic Progress. It is the student’s respon-
sibility to notify the Student Financial Services Office of any changes in
grades as it could change the student’s eligibility for financial aid.

Repeat Courses: Repeated courses that are required for a student’s
degree program count toward the minimum credit hour load required
for aid during a given semester. Repeat courses also count toward the
150% rule under the SAP policy.

Remedial Coursework: Students who enroll in remedial coursework
(less than 100 level) may receive financial aid.

Distance Delivered Courses: These courses count toward the
credit hour load and may be used to fulfill credit hour requirements for
financial aid if the courses are required for a student’s degree program.
NOTE: Students are still required to complete these classes within the
semester that they enroll.

Withdrawals: Students who totally withdraw from the university,
after receiving financial aid, may be suspended from receiving future
financial aid and could be liable for refunds and/or return of Title IV
funds (refer to the Financial Aid section of your campus’s course catalog
for information on refunds and return of Title IV funds).

Institutional Funds: Students receiving scholarships, grants, or
tuition waivers from APU are expected to meet the satisfactory academic
progress requirements listed in this document. Please be advised,
however, that some scholarships and waivers require a higher GPA for
continued receipt.

Other Sources of Aid: Students receiving scholarships or financial
aid from such sources as BIA, regional and village corporations, civic
groups, and private organizations are expected to meet the satisfactory
academic progress requirements of APU unless the agency or group
instructs the Financial Aid Office, in writing, to waive our requirements
for these specific funds.

Financial Aid Suspension
Financial aid suspension will result from failure to:
1. Complete of the minimum required number of credits required
during the academic year.
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2. Maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00.
3. Graduate prior to exceeding the maximum number of hours.
4. Meet the requirements of an appeal approval. A student who
is suspended again after failing to meet these requirements,
MUST attend on his/her own without financial aid and earn
the required cumulative GPA in order to regain eligibility (see
Reinstatement). Subsequent appeals may be considered if a
student has experienced unusual, extenuating circumstances.

Reinstatement:
1. Appeals: A student whose financial aid has been suspended
may submit a written appeal to Student Financial Services within 30
days of notification of his/her non-compliance. The appeal must include
any extenuating circumstances (such as student illness or the death
of an immediate family member). The student must complete the APU
Appeals Forms in full and submit all required documentation required
to be considered for reinstatement of financial aid. Appeal forms are
available in SFS.
2. Makeup: A student who does not wish to appeal or whose
appeal has been denied may regain eligibility the semester following the
completion of the required number of hours and the attainment of the
required cumulative grade point average.

TUITION AND FEES

A student’s billing account is due in full by the end of the first
week of their first class.

Any account not paid in full by the due date, will be automatically
submitted to Tuition Management Systems (TMS) to set up a monthly
payment plan. If payments are missed, late fees will be charged and
you will not be allowed to register for the upcoming semester until the
account is paid in full.

Employer Reimbursements
Students must pay their billing account in full or set up a payment
plan through Tuition Management Systems (TMS). At the student’s
request, SFS will send a statement to the employer showing their billing
account has been paid in full allowing the student to be reimbursed.

Graduate Courses $630/credit hour
Full time enrollment is 9 or more credit hours

Master of Arts Program $545/credit hour

Fees (all fees are nonrefundable)
Admission Application Fee $25
Advanced Tuition Deposit due May 1 $100
Audit for Noncredit Enrollment $200/credit hour
Late Registration (per week) $50
Late Payment Fee (per semester) $100

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Alaska Pacific University

Tuition Management Services Enrollment
Year $65
Semester $47
Reinstatement Fee $25
(students/parents who have cancelled
or withdrawn from TMS)
Student Association Fee $55
Lab or Materials Fee
(charged for certain courses see course schedule)
Credit by Examination $50
In-Progress Cost equivalent to 1 graduate credit
Documented Experiential Learning (DEL)
Portfolio Assessment/Credit Fees:
(available to enrolled students only)
Per credit transcripted $50
Per credit assessed $25
Graduation application fee $50
Transcript fee
Official copy $5
Unofficial copy $2
Expedited copy $10 for first
Transcript Evaluation Fee
(if separate from Admissions process) $10
Health Insurance variable

Note: Student accounts carrying balances over 60 days will be
charged interest at an annual rate of 10.5%. The University
reserves the right to withhold final grade reports, transcripts,
and diplomas if a balance is outstanding.

Housing and Meal Plan Costs
(2009-2010)
Effective August, 2009
Prices listed are for one semester (which includes 1 block and 1
session). There are two semesters in one academic year. If you need
housing or meal plan information for only a Block or only a Session,
please contact the Office of Housing and Residence Life for pricing and
availability.
Residence Hall Council Fee
Block Only $10
Session Only $15
Semester $25

South Atwood Hall Semester Cost
Triple bedroom in suite $1,700
Double bedroom in suite $1,800
Private bedroom in suite $2,100

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Alaska Pacific University

North Atwood Hall Semester Cost
2 Room Suite: Shared Bedroom $1,950
2 Room Suite: Private Bedroom $2,200
1 Room Suite: Private suite $2,300
University Village Semester Cost
Shared Bedroom $2,100
Private Bedroom $2,550
Segelhorst Hall Semester Cost
Private Bedroom $2,700
Meal Plan Cost Per Semester
Meal Plan $2,450

The meal plan includes breakfast, lunch and dinner, Monday through
Friday, and brunch and dinner on the weekends, holidays, and non-class
days. Students living in South or North Atwood are required to be on
the Meal Plan.

Housing Deposit $400

Cancellation Fee (cancellation fee will be applied if you move out
before the end of your contract):

Before occupancy $400
After occupancy $500

Note: All students living in university housing are required to show
proof of health insurance. See the Dean of Students for
information.

Tuition Refund Policy
To receive a tuition refund, students must follow either the Course
Add/Drop/Withdrawal Policy or Complete Withdrawal Policy, whichever
applies. See the Academic Policies section of the University Catalog.
Tuition refunds are based upon the date the student submits their
withdrawal notice to the Registrar’s Office, and are derived from federal
guidelines. Fees are not refundable except when a course is canceled by
the university.

100% Prior to the second day of classes
75% Second day to end of first week
50% Beginning of second week to end of second week
0% Beginning of third week forward

Directed and Independent study classes will be charged and
refunded based on the beginning date of the term in which the class
begins and dates of attendance are based on calendar days not atten-
dance.
Students who have received federal or state financial assistance
and have completely withdrawn from the university, as defined in the
Complete Withdraw Policy, are subject to the federal or state refund

Graduate Policies and Procedures 177
Alaska Pacific University

regulations and must go to the Student Financial Services Office for
assistance.
When a student completely withdraws from the university and has
received federal or state financial aid, the school is required to apply a
withdrawal calculation based on either the federal or state laws. Federal
financial aid recipients, determined to be totally withdrawn are subject
to the Return of Title IV Funds calculation. Reduction in credits may
require an adjustment of the Pell Grant.

Federal Refund Formula (Return of Title IV Funds)
Students receiving funds from various federal programs are subject
to the refund policy placed in effect in fall 2000 by the U.S. Department
of Education. The policy states that students withdrawing or ceasing to
attend classes on or before the 60-percent point of the semester has
been completed will be required to return the calculated unused portions
of the funds received, including loan funds. Failure to do so could result
in ineligibility for further aid consideration at any school as well as being
prevented from returning to Alaska Pacific University.

ACADEMIC POLICIES
Grading System
The following letter grade system is used:

LETTER TEXT GRADE
GRADE POINTS
A+/A Above average mastery of facts and 4.00
principles; demonstrated clear evidence
that stated course objectives and requirements
were met by the student.
A- Course objectives and requirements were 3.67
met by the student.

B+ Average mastery of facts and principles; 3.33
B Average evidence that stated course objectives 3.00
B- And requirements were met by the student. 2.67

C+ Below average mastery of facts and principles; 2.33
C Scant evidence that stated course objectives 2.00
C- And requirements were met by the student 1.67

D Unacceptable 1.00
F Failure 0.00

CR/NC* Credit/No credit (see explanation)
I** Incomplete courses (see explanation)
IP*** In Progress (see explanation)
W# Withdrawal (see explanation)

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Alaska Pacific University

Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) *
Grades may be given when this type of assessment is a more logical
assessment method than traditional letter grades, for example in
thesis, directed study courses, and narrative transcript (MAP Program).
Credit means the student has satisfactorily completed the course with
the letter grade equivalent of at least a “B” (3.00).

Incomplete Course Grades (I) **
An instructor may give an Incomplete grade (“I”) to a student only
when all the following conditions have been met:
1. The student has completed the majority of the work in the class
and with a passing grade, and
2. The student cannot complete the work by the end of the term
of enrollment for reasons beyond the student’s control (e.g.,
sudden illness, accident, or being sent out of town unexpectedly
by an employer, as examples).
Once an Incomplete has been granted, a student may not request to
drop/withdraw from the course.

Process for Incomplete:
• Student completes the form entitled Incomplete Grade
Request
o Student signature required (may substitute email
request for signature)
o Instructor signature required
o Academic Dean signature required
• Submit completed form to Registrar’s Office prior to Final Grades
Due Deadline, as denoted on the academic calendar
• Copy the student and the student’s advisor with the Incomplete
Grade Request form
• Incomplete timeline
o Student has no more than one semester to complete
coursework and submit to the instructor
o Instructor has two weeks from the assigned expiration
date to submit a final grade to the Registrar’s Office
through the Grade Change Request: Incomplete / In-
Progress Make-Up form
o An incomplete grade, when NOT made up by the
deadline, and/or NOT received from the instructor,
becomes an “F” grade
 Once an Incomplete expires and becomes
an F, the grade may not be changed back to
Incomplete without going through the Special
Consideration process
• Additional time may be requested (approval is not guaranteed)
through a Special Consideration Request form with a copy of the
initial Incomplete Grade Request form attached thereto

In Progress (IP)***
The IP grade may be given to indicate that a graduate thesis is still
in progress if the student is making satisfactory progress. A continuation
fee, equal to the cost of one graduate credit, will be charged for each
semester the IP is extended.

Withdrawal (W) #
Students who wish to withdraw from a course and receive a “W”
grade must drop the course prior to completion of 80% of the term.
(See Academic Calendar for specific dates.) The “W” grade may not be

Graduate Policies and Procedures 179
Alaska Pacific University

granted after that date unless the student files a Request for Special
Consideration and the “W” grade is approved.

Semester Credit Hour
One semester credit hour represents what a typical student might
be expected to learn in one week (40-45 hours including class time and
preparation) of full-time study.

Grade Change Policy
Once an instructor submits a final grade to the Registrar, it may not
be changed except under the following circumstances:
1. Clerical Error Policy. An instructor may certify on a Request for
Grade Change form that the original grade was incorrect due
to a clerical error (e.g., points added incorrectly or term paper
turned in on time but overlooked). The error must be explained,
and the change justified on the request form. The request must
be approved and signed by the instructor’s department chair or
program director and by the Academic Dean.
2. Academic Appeal Policy. Alaska Pacific University academic
standards presume that the instructor of a course is the best
qualified person to evaluate the academic work of students
in that instructor’s courses and is the best person to assign
grades to those students. For this reason grades submitted by
instructors are not normally subject to review by the University’s
administration. However, when a student believes that a
particular grade was assigned in a manner that was arbitrary or
capricious, or that crucial evidence was not taken into account,
the student may appeal the grade. In the case of such an appeal
by a student, the burden of proof shall be on the student. (See
grade change policy form on APU website.)

ENROllMENT AND REGISTRATION

Registration dates are on the academic calendar in the Catalog
and in the University Calendar online.

Academic Advising
Each student is assigned an academic advisor by the graduate
program director. The academic advisor provides the student with the
intellectual framework in which to make informed decisions regarding
academic pursuits at Alaska Pacific University.

Continuous Enrollment
Students who enroll, pay fees and attend classes at Alaska Pacific
University are in a continuous enrollment status for the current and
subsequent semesters. Reapplication to the University is required if
enrollment is interrupted for a period of greater than twelve consecutive
months (three consecutive semesters).

Course Add/Drop/Withdraw Policy
This policy applies when a student is adding, dropping, or changing
course sections. If a student is withdrawing from all courses at the
university this is considered under the Complete Withdrawal Policy.

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Alaska Pacific University

Adding Courses
Students may add courses through the late registration period
through one of the following methods:
• Student Portal
• Registrar’s Office, by:
o Completing the ADD section of the Change of Class
Schedule form
o E-mailing the Registrar’s Office via your APU E-mail
account

Term Late Registration Census Date
Time Frame
Block First 4 Days of Term 5th Day of Term
Full First 6 Days of Term 7th Day of Term
Session First 6 Days of Term 7th Day of Term
Module First 6 Days of Term 7th Day of Term

After the late registration period, students may add a course with
the approval of the instructor and their advisor.

Dropping Courses
Students must complete the DROP section of the Change of Class
Schedule (available at the Registrar’s Office) and promptly returned to
the Registrar’s Office for processing or request to drop via your APU
e-mail addressed to the Registrar’s Office. Please copy your advisor
and instructor with the request. Classes dropped after the late regis-
tration period of a class appear on the student’s academic record with a
withdrawal grade. The only exception to the policy is when the University
cancels a course. Under those circumstances the Registrar’s Office will
process a withdrawal for the affected classes.
The date the course will be dropped is the date the form is received
by the Registrar’s Office staff.
Students who wish to withdraw from a course and receive a “W”
grade must drop the course prior to completion of 80% of the term
(see academic calendar for specific dates). The “W” grade may not be
granted after that date unless the student files a Request for Special
Consideration and the “W” grade is approved.

Complete Withdrawal Policy
This policy applies when a student stops attending all courses at the
university. If a student is withdrawing from one or more courses, but is
still enrolled in other courses at the university, this is considered under
the Course Add/Drop Policy.
Students must complete the COMPLETE WITHDRAWAL form available
at the Registrar’s office or online through My APU. If the student is enrolled
in a degree program, the Dean of Student’s signature is required. If the
student has received federal or state financial assistance the Student
Financial Services Office signature is required. The completed form must
be promptly returned to the Registrar’s Office for processing.
The date of withdrawal will be the date the student completes the
withdrawal form or the date the student officially notified the Regis-
Graduate Policies and Procedures 181
Alaska Pacific University
trar’s Office (this notification may take place via APU e-mail, letter, in
person).

Faculty-Initiated Drop
Prior to the published census date of a term, a faculty member may
initiate a drop from a class of a student who fails to meet published
individual course requirements or who fails to attend class.

Graduation Application
Students must apply for graduation as follows:
November 1 May graduation
March 1 August graduation
July 1 December graduation

This application is valid only for the graduation date specified. A
new application and application fee must be filed if the student does not
graduate as planned. All candidates for degrees must be approved first
by the faculty of Alaska Pacific University and secondly by the Board of
Trustees.

Interruption in Enrollment
If enrollment is interrupted for a period of greater than twelve
consecutive months (three consecutive semesters), the student must
reapply for admission and meet admission and degree requirements in
existence at the time of his or her readmission, unless a request for a
Leave of Absence has been filed with, and approved by, the Registrar
prior to departure. Requests for a Leave of Absence are made by
completing a Request for Special Consideration form available from the
Registrar’s Office or online through My APU.

Leave of Absence
A granted Leave of Absence allows students to retain their gradu-
ation catalog.
If, during the leave of absence, the student plans to take course
work elsewhere and transfer the credits to Alaska Pacific University,
the request for leave must include specific information regarding the
planned program. To ensure that these credits are transferred to Alaska
Pacific University, the program must be approved by the student’s Alaska
Pacific University advisor and the courses must be completed with a
grade of “B” (3.00) or better for a graduate program.
Students whose absence from the university is less than 12 consec-
utive months are not required to reapply for admission; however, credits
taken at any other institution during the absence from Alaska Pacific
University will not be accepted for transfer unless permission to take
such courses was granted in advance, and appropriate grades have
been earned as described in the preceding paragraph.
Requests for a Leave of Absence are made by completing a Request
for Special Consideration form available from the Registrar’s Office or
through My APU.
Students not attending a summer semester are not required to
request a Leave of Absence.

Graduate Policies and Procedures 182
Alaska Pacific University

Maximum Credits Per Term
Require Academic
Term Dean’s Approval Max/Ceiling
Block >4 6
Session >12 15
Semester >15 18

Off-Campus Enrollment
Once enrolled at Alaska Pacific University, students may not take
courses elsewhere and transfer them to Alaska Pacific University, unless
the arrangement is approved in advance.

Registration Requirements
Students are officially registered if registering through Web Portal or
the Registrar’s Office. Graduate students are considered full-time if they
are enrolled in 9 or more credits per semester (spring, summer, fall).

Second Masters Degree
Students who have completed one masters degree at an accredited
institution may, with the approval of the program director, obtain a
second masters degree at Alaska Pacific University with a minimum of
24 credit hours over and above those applied toward the first masters
degree. Individual Graduate Program Directors may approve a minimum
of 18 semester hours for those applicants who already hold a masters
degree in the same or closely related field.

Semester Information
Alaska Pacific University has three semesters per year: spring,
summer, and fall. Within a semester are multiple terms: Block, Session,
and Module. For specific semester and term dates, please see the
academic calendar.

F = Full Semester = 15 weeks
Summer = 14 or 15 weeks

B = Block = 4 weeks S = Session = 11 weeks (Summer = 10 weeks)
S1 & S2 = Sessions I & II in Summer only = 5 weeks

M1 = Module I = 7 weeks M2 = Module II = 7 weeks

Transfer Credit
Transfer courses must be graduate degree level with a grade of
“B” (3.00) or better. Please refer to Limitation of Time section of this
catalog up to (including) one-third of the credits required for a Master’s
degree at Alaska Pacific University will be allowed to come from other
accredited institutions. The program director will implement this policy
based upon which credits are appropriate for the program.
Graduate Policies and Procedures 183
Alaska Pacific University

Academic Standing

Academic Good Standing
Candidates for masters degrees are required to maintain a “B” (3.00)
average in all work completed at Alaska Pacific University, with no more
than two “C” (C+, C, and C-) grades. Grades of “D” are unacceptable.
A graduate student whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.00 in graduate
courses, will be placed on academic probation by the Registrar. To be
removed from academic probation, the student must bring his or her
cumulative GPA up to 3.00 within one semester, or he or she will be
removed from graduate degree-seeking status.

Academic Semester Honors
Full-time graduate students with a 4.00 average for the semester
are included on the honors list. To be eligible, a minimum of 9 semester
hours must be completed with letter grades. (Students with incomplete
or in progress grades are not considered).

Reinstatement to Graduate Degree Seeking Status
Graduate students may apply for reinstatement to graduate degree
seeking status after one calendar year from the semester in which they
are removed from a graduate program. Upon reapplying to graduate
study, it is the student’s responsibility to demonstrate his or her ability
to succeed in the graduate program. Reinstated students must reapply
for candidacy and must meet the program requirements that are in
effect at the time of reinstatement.

Satisfactory Academic Progress
Graduate students must complete 9 credit hours with a cumulative
GPA of 3.00, with no semester falling below 2.50. Completion of credit
hours is prorated for part-time students.

OTHER academic POLICIES

Address Changes
Updates to the Local, billing, or home (permanent) address, phone
or e-mail may be done (1) in person at the Registrar’s Office, OR (2) by
sending an email through student’s APU e-mail account to the Regis-
trar’s Office email with the change in information.

Comprehensive Examinations
Examination dates are available in the individual graduate program
offices.

Course Numbering System
50000 - 59999 POSTBACCALAUREATE credit (does NOT apply
toward a Masters Degree)
60000 - 69999 GRADUATE LEVEL

Graduate Policies and Procedures 184
Alaska Pacific University

E-mail Address
All currently enrolled students will be given an Alaska Pacific
University e-mail address. This will be the student’s e-mail address for
the duration of time the student is at APU plus 12 months. This e-mail
address will be deemed the official means of communication with the
student.

Honor Policy
Alaska Pacific University is a community of learners and teachers
in which all enjoy freedoms and privileges based upon mutual trust
and respect as well as a clear sense of responsibility. This philosophy
forms the foundation of the academic and social environment at this
university.
In the academic arena, students are responsible for their own
learning while faculty members enhance these learning experiences.
Students are expected to do all work assigned, to do it honestly and
with integrity, and to ensure that the instructor has actually received
the work.
As noted in the Student Handbook, cheating on examinations,
plagiarism, or submitting the work of others as one’s own are specific
examples of prohibited conduct. Students who engage in such activities
will be subject to disciplinary measures, which may include failure in
the course or expulsion from the university. (See Student Handbook for
further information.)

Independent/Directed Study
With the exception of MAP Students, enrollment in either Independent
or Directed Study courses is limited to nine or less credit hours per
student. See individual graduate program.

Jury Duty
Students will be excused from class attendance for jury duty upon
presenting evidence of their summons. Students are expected to make
up missed class work expeditiously upon completion of their duty.

Limitation of Time
All coursework must be completed within a seven-year period. The
date of entry into the first course of a student’s graduate program,
including work for which transfer credit is allowed, is viewed as the
starting point of the seven-year period. If a course taken to complete
the requirements for the master’s degree does not fall within the seven-
year period allowed for the degree, the course, with departmental
approval, may be retaken for credit. Otherwise, another course of equiv-
alent credit hours must be substituted in the program.

Meningitis, Alaska Postsecondary Immunization Act
In an effort to increase public awareness of meningococcal disease,
the Alaska Postsecondary Immunization Act was signed into law on May
18, 2005. This law requires that all educational providers give written
notice to each student regarding meningococcal disease as described
in statute. The educational provider must obtain a signature from each
student indicating that the student has either 1) received an immuni-
zation against the disease, or 2) received written notification informing
them of meningococcal disease.

Graduate Policies and Procedures 185
Alaska Pacific University

Name Change
Students may initiate an official name change by presenting of the
following:

Documents Establishing Identity (w/photograph) and Showing
Both Names
CURRENT Passport or Passport Card
CURRENT Permanent Resident Card or Alien Registration Receipt Card (Form
I-551)

—OR—
Select ONE from EACH column

Column 1 Column 2

Documents Establishing Documents Establishing
Identity Legal Name Change
CURRENT Driver’s license or ID card Marriage Certificate
issued by a State or outlying
possession of the United States
provided it contains a photograph or
information such as name, date of
birth, gender, height, eye color, and
address

CURRENT ID card issued by federal, Divorce Decree
state or local government agencies
or entities, provided it contains a
photograph or information such as
name, date of birth, gender, height,
eye color, and address
CURRENT U.S. Military card or draft Court Order
record
CURRENT Military dependent’s ID Social Security Account Number Card
card (name must match name from column
1 ID)
CURRENT U.S. Coast Guard Authorized Document Issued by the
Merchant Mariner Card Department of Homeland Security
CURRENT Driver’s license issued by
a Canadian government authority

Personal Information
All students must provide in the first month of attending Alaska
Pacific University the following additional information: date of birth,
gender, ethnicity, race and social security number. The age and ethnicity
are used to report to the federal government, in aggregate only, as
is required in the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System
(IPEDS). The social security number in combination with the birth date
Graduate Policies and Procedures 186
Alaska Pacific University

is a means of identification and is required for those students receiving
federal moneys.

Prerequisites
Prerequisites are listed with the course descriptions. Prerequisites
are designed to alert the student to the background expected for the
course. This ensures that the student can more fully benefit from the
course material. Instructor permission is required for any student not
having the prerequisites to enroll in a course. (See individual program
prerequisites.)

Social Security Number Corrections
A correction in social security number requires the student to bring
the social security card to the Registrar’s Office for verification.

Special Consideration
A student whose circumstances may be exceptional may file a
request for Special Consideration form to seek a waiver of an academic
policy. The form is available in the Registrar’s Office or online through
My APU. The specific request must be stated, along with supporting facts
and circumstances. All requests involving waivers of graduation require-
ments are first considered by the Registrar. The Registrar’s Advisory
Committee or the Graduate Studies Committee considers appeals to the
Registrar’s decision. Automatic approval of such requests should not be
assumed. (See Appendix “B” for appeals process.)

Student Records
The university maintains confidentiality of all student records. A
student may, however, obtain specific information contained in these
records as specified by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
of 1974, Public Law 93-380. (See Student Handbook for further infor-
mation.) Both official and unofficial transcripts are available from the
Registrar’s Office.

Student Risk Management Plan
Any student who plans to study independently in a foreign country,
do field work in a wilderness setting, or engage in a high-risk activity
during independent course work is required to submit a Student
Risk Management Plan (SRMP) to the Alaska Pacific University Risk
Management Committee (RMC). Students are advised to begin the
proposal at least 30 days in advance. Students may access information
about how to prepare such a plan on the APU Website. The approved
plan must be attached to the learning contract (i.e. Directed Study,
Practicum, Internship, Senior Project, or Thesis).

Graduate Policies and Procedures 187
Alaska Pacific University

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Business Administration
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Master of Business Administration Concentration
in Finance
Master of Business Administration Concentration
in Health Services Administration (MBA/HSA)
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Entrepreneurship
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Investments
Executive MBA in Information and Communication
Technology (MBAICT)

Counseling Psychology and Human Services
Master of Science in Counseling Psychology (MSCP)

Education
Teacher Certification Only-Option Program (CO-OP)
Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)

Environmental Science
Master of Science in Environmental Science (MSES)

Liberal Studies - Interdisciplinary
Master of Arts (MAP)

Outdoor Studies
Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental
Education (MSOEE)

Graduate Programs 188
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GRADUATE
ACADEMIC
DEGREES

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT

Alaska Pacific University offers a Master of Business Administration
(MBA), a Master of Business Administration with a concentration in
Finance, a Master of Business Administration with a concentration in
Health Services Administration (MBA/HSA), and an Executive MBA in
Information and Communication Technology (MBAICT). The department
also offers a Certificate of Graduate Studies in Entrepreneurship and a
Certificate of Graduate Studies in Investments. These options provide
the student with the management skills necessary to operate success-
fully at the executive level in today’s fast-paced, ever-changing, global
environment.

Master of Business Administration Programs
The following are the degree objectives for the Master of Business
Administration. Upon completion of the degree students will have:
• Gained an appreciation of the local, domestic, and global
environments as they relate to business management
• Enhanced their business judgment and identified sound
management methods including the ability to think critically and
strategically
• Attained an understanding of, and ability to appropriately
leverage, interpersonal relationships and team work
• Developed analytical expertise and functional frameworks drawn
from a broad range of managerial skills including accounting,
finance, economics, marketing, management, and law
• Acquired an ability to incorporate appropriate quantitative and
qualitative data, including an appreciation for the value and
costs of obtaining data, into management decisions
• Established outstanding, multi-method, communication skills
• Recognized the value of effective and ethical leadership so they
can manage themselves, others, and organizations

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Admissions
The general requirements for admission to graduate studies at APU
are found at the beginning of the section describing graduate programs.
In addition, there are several specific requirements for the MBA program,
and the MBA/HSA program as follows:
1. Resume. Submit a current resume.
2. Letters of Recommendation. Submit three current letters of
recommendation, using the Recommendation Forms in the
admissions packet.
3. Standardized Test. (Unless waived by the program director).
Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or the
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Alaska Pacific’s
GRE and GMAT reporting code is 4201. For more information on
score criteria please see below.
4. Official Transcripts. Submit official transcripts from the institution
which conferred the undergraduate degree. General graduate
admission standards for APU are a 3.0 or better for completed
baccalaureate work.
5. Essay. Please submit a 500-800 word essay addressing your
personal and professional goals as they relate to your motivation
to obtain an MBA or a MBA with a concentration in Health
Services Administration.
6. Admission Deadline. Application deadline: August 1 for Fall
semester, December 1 for Spring semester, and April 1 for
Summer semester.

Admissions decisions are generally based on academic records
of undergraduate, upper division, and graduate work, or alternative
indicators of success including innovative leadership or accomplishments
in a career field, civic activity, or professional achievement. Students
with otherwise strong applications who have GPAs below 3.0 and/or
standardized test scores below the 30th percentile (for either GRE or
GMAT at the time the test was taken) may be invited to interview with
the Program Director to complete the admissions process.

Prerequisites
Students are adequately prepared for MBA entry if they have a
bachelor’s degree in business or a related discipline which includes
courses in accounting, finance, economics, and management, with math
competency through algebra and statistics. The faculty encourages
students with a wide variety of undergraduate experiences to apply for
admission. Students with non-business majors are welcome. If, however,
a student’s undergraduate transcript does not demonstrate adequate
preparation in mathematics and business, the student may be admitted
and required to take prerequisite courses. Prerequisite courses do not
count toward the MBA MBA/HSA, or MBAICT degrees. Students may also
demonstrate that they have acquired prerequisite knowledge through
work experience or self-study.

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Alaska Pacific University

Master of business administration
Degree Requirements
All MBA students must complete a minimum of 24 credits of required
courses as follow:

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
MBA 61800 Accounting for Decision Making 3
MBA 66400 Leadership 3
MBA 69700 Capstone 3

Economics Menu
MBA 62400 Managerial Economics 3

Ethics and Law Menu (select one from the following
options)
MBA 64400 Health Services Ethical & Legal Issues 3
MBA 66200 Law and Corporate Leadership 3
MBA 66300 Business Ethics 3
MCT 66300 Telecommunications and Information 3
Policy and Regulation

Finance Menu (select one from the following options)
MBA 67000 Corporate Finance 3
MBA 67500 Investments 4

Marketing Menu (select one from the following options)
MBA 64200 Marketing Management 3
MBA 64300 Internet Marketing 3
MCT 66500 Technology and Intellectual Property 3
Marketing and Strategy

Quantitative Menu (select one from the following
options)
MBA 65200 Intermediate Statistics for Management 3
MBA 65300 Spreadsheet Modeling and Analysis 3
MBA 65400 Systems Thinking and Computer Simulation 3

I: Non-Thesis Option:
MBA Electives (May include MCT 66700 Technological
and Organizational Innovation or ES 66000) 11 or 12
TOTAL 36

II: Thesis Option
A Design and Principles of Research
(ES 60100 or PY 65500 may be taken with permission) 3
MBA 68100 Thesis 6
MBA Elective 3
TOTAL 36

MBA students may take up to six (6) credits of upper division under-
graduate course work in partial fulfillment of the degree requirements.
The student’s advisor and Program Director must approve the courses
in advance of enrollment.
Graduate Academic Degrees 191
Alaska Pacific University

Concentration in
Finance
For those interested in finance, the MBA with a Concentration in
Finance provides the breadth of the MBA with the depth required for a
career in finance. It also offers the opportunity to further learn about
securities, portfolio management, bonds, and investment theory, and to
gain hands-on experience managing the Student Fund. Requirements
for admission are the same as those for the MBA program.

MBA Required Courses
MBA 618 Accounting for Decision Making 3
MBA 664 Leadership 3
MBA 697 Capstone 3

Economics Menu
MBA 624 Managerial Economics 3

Ethics and Law Menu
MBA 663 Business Ethics 3

Finance Menu
MBA 616 Fundamentals of Financial Instruments
and Institutions 1
MBA 670 Corporate Finance 3
MBA 675 Investments 4
2 semesters of MBA 683 Fund Management Practicum 2

Finance Electives (select one from the following options) 2
MBA 623 Valuation
MBA 676 Risk Management and Derivatives
MBA 693 Special Finance Topics

Marketing Menu
MBA 642 Marketing Management 3

Quantitative Menu
MBA 652 Intermediate Statistics for Management 3
MBA 653 Spreadsheet Modeling and Simulation 3

TOTAL CREDITS 36

concentration in
Health Services Administration
Health Services Administration is a concentration within the MBA
Program at APU. This program builds foundational, analytical, and
integrated knowledge of the health service industry. The program is
aimed at current and future managers and administrators in organi-
zations involved with providing health services, major customers of
health service providers, and entities involved with developing and
implementing health service policies. The program is based on solid
business fundamentals with applications to a variety of health service
settings, including the private sector (both for profit and not-for-profit),
Graduate Academic Degrees 192
Alaska Pacific University
the public sector (local, state, and federal), and Native health service
providers. Courses are scheduled to accommodate the needs of working
professionals and can be completed in two years based upon a sustained
enrollment in 2 courses per semester (including summers and/or shorter
block courses).

The following are the degree objectives for Health Services Admin-
istration:
• Learn the business of health services such that its strategies
and growth are soundly based in effective leadership and other
business practices
• Enhance skills in critical thinking, ethics, and information literacy
leading to better leadership decisions
• Contribute to the community of health services administration
in Alaska while mastering business management skills
• Apply knowledge of systems to health services in Alaska,
relating it to the national and global markets as a business, and
to demographics as a provider of care to individuals
• Investigate technology options that increase the health
services administrator’s ability to provide services locally while
simultaneously participating in national initiatives of information
interoperability and security

Health services administration
Degree Requirements
MBA Health Services Administration students must complete a
minimum of 36 credits of required courses.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
MBA 616 Fundamentals of Financial Instruments
& Institutions 1
MBA 61800 Accounting for Decision Making 3
MBA 62400 Managerial Economics 3
MBA 63100 Human Resource Management 2
MBA 64200 Marketing Management 3
MBA 65200 Intermediate statistics for Management 3
MBA 66400 Leadership 3
MBA 69700 Capstone 3

AND

MBA/HSA Courses for Concentration
MBA 63500 Health Services Finances 3
MBA 63600 Health Services Systems & Policies 3
MBA 63800 Health Services Current Topics 3
(i.e. Telehealth, EPR)
MBA 63900 Health Services Evaluation & Outcomes 3
MBA 64400 Health Services Ethical & Legal Issues 3

OR

MBA/HSA Thesis Option
Replaces 9 credits of MBA/HSA courses (MBA 63600, MBA 63800, &
MBA 63900) with 9 credits of research preparation and thesis work. The
student takes the following:
Graduate Academic Degrees 193
Alaska Pacific University
ES 60100 Research Methods 3
MBA 63500 Health Services Finances 3
MBA 64400 Health Services Ethical & Legal Issues 3
MBA 69900 Thesis 6

EXECUTIVE
master of business administration
IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION
TECHNOLOGY
The only degree of its kind in the state of Alaska.

The Executive MBA in Information and Communication Technology
(MBAICT) combines an understanding of converged information and
communication technologies with the ability to develop and analyze
appropriate business strategies and public policies for this sector. Two
key principles underlie the curriculum. First, convergence has blurred
the historic boundaries that once separated telecommunications, infor-
mation, and entertainment. Second, globalization has impacted these
industries so that production of hardware and software, network
design and operation, customer delivery and service, and business
planning have become global activities. Deep and profound influences
are captured by globalization, and these involve diversity of thinking,
innovation, and unique modes of collaboration. This program has been
designed to incorporate significant global exposure and to encompass
the full array of information and communication industries.

The following are the degree objectives for the MBAICT program:
• A basic understanding of the major technologies currently in
use in the telecommunications and information industries,
including emerging developments. Included are circuit switched
technologies, packet switched technologies, both wireless
and wireline analog and digital services, LANs, WANs, WiFi,
WiMax, 1G, 2G, 3G, 4G, cable television, cable modems, radio
technologies, satellite, broadcast, internet, etc.
• An appreciation of the benefits and costs of using various
technologies to meet the needs of a variety of end-users
• An understanding of the major regulatory regimes that govern
each type of telecommunications service, including the rationale
for such regulations and a critical view of regulatory issues. This
includes an overview of how regulatory practice has evolved in
other countries
• A broad range of managerial skills including the importance and
practice of accounting, finance, marketing, management, and
law. Students will appreciate the importance of these functions
to the operation of telecommunications firms, as well as be able
to integrate these areas in the context of particular business
models
• Exposure to, and analysis of, a variety of strategic options,
including financial, technical, value chain, marketing, and
organizational dimensions
• An appreciation for the importance of, and boundaries for, ethical
management decisions
• An understanding of how globalization provides both opportunities
and constraints on stakeholders in the industry

Graduate Academic Degrees 194
Alaska Pacific University
• Students will also be effective communicators, quantitatively
literate, and effective team members and leaders

Admissions
The general requirements for admission to graduate studies at APU
are found at the beginning of the section describing graduate programs.
In addition, there are several specific requirements for the MBAICT
program as follows:
1. Resume. Submit a current resume.
2. Letters of Recommendation. Submit two current letters of
recommendation, using the Recommendation Forms in the
Admissions packet.
3. Work Experience. A minimum of 2 years appropriate managerial
experience required; 5 years preferred; or concurrent enrollment
in another APU MBA program.
4. Undergraduate work. Undergraduate degree or equivalent.
Submit official transcripts from all previous institutions.
5. Application Deadline. August 1 for Fall semester, December 1 for
Spring semester, and April 1 for Summer semester.

For international students either a Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) score or screening by one of our international partners
would be required for non-native speakers of English to ensure sufficient
ability to study in courses that will be delivered in English.
Enrollment will be limited. This is to ensure the quality of the small
class/personal experience and a reasonable parity with the numbers of
Asian and European students in the classes.
* For applicants lacking an appropriate undergraduate degree, at
least 60 credits of completed undergraduate work, 5 years of progres-
sively responsible administrative experience, GMAT test with a score of
at least at the 50th percentile, essay describing the applicants goals in
pursuing the degree, plus a successful interview with a departmental
admissions committee will be required. Admission of applicants lacking
an undergraduate degree will be reported to the Graduate Studies
Committee.

Prerequisites
Students are adequately prepared for MBAICT entry if they have
a bachelor’s degree in business or a related technical discipline, along
with managerial work experience in the telecommunications/infor-
mation technology sector. Coursework or work experience in accounting,
finance, economics, and management, with math competency through
algebra and statistics is expected. Students with non-business majors
are welcome, and the faculty encourages students with a wide variety
of undergraduate experience to apply for admission. If, however, a
student’s undergraduate transcript does not indicate adequate prepa-
ration in mathematics and business, the student may be admitted and
required to take some prerequisite courses. Students may also demon-
strate that they have acquired prerequisite knowledge through work
experience or self-study.

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Alaska Pacific University

MBAICT
Degree Requirements
Satisfactory completion of 36 semester hours to include 16 credits of
required MBA courses as follows:

REQUIRED MBA COURSES CREDIT HOURS
MBA 61600 Fundamentals of Financial Instruments 1
and Institutions
MBA 61800 Accounting for Decision Making 3
MBA 66400 Leadership 3
MBA 69700 Capstone 3

Finance Menu 3-4
MBA 67000 Corporate Finance
MBA 67500 Investments

Quantitative Menu 3
MBA 65200 Intermediate Statistics
MBA 65300 Spreadsheet Modeling and Simulation
MBA 65400 Systems Thinking and Simulation
Required MCT Courses 9
MCT 66100 Information and Communication Technology
and Theory
MCT 66300 Telecommunications and Information Policy
and Regulation
MCT 66500 Technology and Intellectual Property Marketing
and Strategy

Electives 11+
ES 66000 Introduction to GIS (Geographic Information
Systems)
ES 66500 Applied GIS (Geographic Information Systems)
MBA 62700 Entrepreneurship
MBA 62800 E-Business
MCT 66000 Overview of Information and Communication
Technology
MCT 66200 Managing Network Security
MCT 66700 Technological and Organizational Innovation
MCT 66900 Financial Technology and Systems
MCT 68000 Directed Study
MCT 68500 Internship
MCT 69200 Special Topics

Note: Completion of the 6 Information Technology Project
Management modules offered by Project Management
College will be accepted as 6 transfer elective credits.

Transfer Coursework from Regis University
By agreement between APU and Regis University, students admitted
to Alaska Pacific University’s Executive MBA in Information and Commu-
nication Technology (MBAICT) who are interested in graduate- level
technical coursework may, upon the recommendation of the MBAICT
Director, complete a certificate program in the School of Computer and
Information Sciences (SCIS) at Regis University. Up to 12 credits may
be transferred toward the MBAICT degree. For more information contact
the Director of the APU MBAICT Program.

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Alaska Pacific University

International Study
Several courses are available in two week blocks in Austria and
China. Check the website for current offerings and details.

MBA ICT students may take up to six (6) credits of upper division
undergraduate course work in partial fulfillment of the degree require-
ments. The student’s advisor and Program Director must approve the
courses in advance of enrollment.

CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATE STUDIES
IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This certificate program is designed for students who wish to
enhance their skills and knowledge of entrepreneurship but do not wish
to take all of the courses in business administration that are required
for the Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree. The certificate
is awarded to those students who complete the requirements in recog-
nition that they have attained an advanced level of competency in the
field of entrepreneurship. Requirements for admission to the Certificate
program are the same as those for the degree program.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
MBA 61600 Fundamentals of Financial Instruments 1
& Institutions
MBA 61800 Accounting for Decision Making 3
MBA 62300 Valuation 2
MBA 62700 Entrepreneurship 3
MBA 62800 E-Business 3
MBA 64200 Marketing Management 3
MBA 66400 Leadership 3
TOTAL 18

CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATE STUDIES
IN INVESTMENTS
This certificate program is designed for students wanting graduate
level expertise in investment strategies and mechanics. It can be pursued
independently of the MBA or as part of the MBA by using free electives
to fulfill the Certificate requirements. The theory behind investment
strategies will be developed and students will gain practical experience
through a full-year of management of the student fund. Requirements
for admission to the Certificate program are the same as those for the
degree program.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
MBA 61600 Fundamentals of Financial Instruments 1
& Institutions
MBA 61800 Accounting for Decision Making 3
MBA 65200 Intermediate Statistics for Management 3
MBA 67000 Corporate Finance 3
MBA 67500 Investments 4
2 semesters of MBA 68300 2
Plus one of the following electives:
MBA 67600 Risk Management & Derivatives 2
MBA 62300 Valuation 2
MBA 69300 Special Finance Topics 2
TOTAL 18

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Alaska Pacific University

COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
AND HUMAN SERVICES
DEPARTMENT
Master of Science
in Counseling Psychology
The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology (MSCP) is a
selective, rigorous program for the creative adult who plans to become
a mental health practitioner or enter a doctoral program. It is eclectic
in theoretical orientation and committed to celebrating diversity within
the range of professional mental health approaches and techniques.
While training students in a wide variety of counseling modalities, the
MSCP program also encourages students to explore and develop their
own special interests within the field, to formulate their own philosophy
of counseling, and to prepare for state licensure as a Professional
Counselor.
The following are the degree objectives for Master of Science in
Counseling Psychology:
• To have increased knowledge and understanding of subjects
across the breadth of the counseling field
• To have demonstrated professional level counseling skills in a
variety of counseling modalities
• To have developed a greater understanding and recognition of
their own passions and interests within the field of counseling
as well as recognition of their own strengths and weaknesses
related to the practice of counseling
• To have polished written and verbal communication skills to the
level of being able to conduct professional presentations; to
meet academic and internship requirements of licensure as a
Professional Counselor.

Admissions
The catalog section on Graduate Student admissions lists university
requirements. In addition, there are several specific requirements for
the MSCP program as follows:
1. Essay. Please address as completely as possible the following
areas:
a) What are your reasons for wanting to obtain an advanced
degree in Counseling Psychology?
b) What are your short-term and long-term goals, or how do
you see yourself as contributing toward the improvement
of a social or community problem in your area?
c) The MSCP Program is designed to be an academically
intense and experientially demanding program. If
admitted, we (the faculty) plan to create and maintain an
intellectually and personally challenging experience for
you. Therefore, please describe how you plan to balance
graduate school, work, and personal life (i.e.
relationships, family, etc.).

Graduate Academic Degrees 198
Alaska Pacific University
d) Please provide a one page biography. The purpose of this
application is to help us learn more about you. Please
share any other personal information which you would
like the Admissions Committee to take into consideration
during the interview process.
2. Letters of Recommendation. Submit three current letters
of recommendation, using the recommendation form in the
admissions packet.
3. Standardized Test (required unless applicant has a prior master’s
degree). Submit scores from the Miller Analogy Test (MAT).
Alaska Pacific’s reporting code is 1841.
4. Interview. Once your application is complete, the department
will contact you to set up a personal interviews.
5. Application Deadline. The deadline to submit an application is
February 1.

Prerequisites
Students must have met the following prerequisites before beginning
the MSCP program:

One of the following:
1. Abnormal Psychology
2. Personality Theories
3. History and Systems of Psychology

Each of the following:
1. Statistics
2. Research Methods or Experimental Psychology
3. Human Development (e.g., Child Development, Adolescent
Psychology, Life-span Development)

The program director will advise students who have questions on the
prerequisites whether their specific coursework is applicable. Students
may complete prerequisites at Alaska Pacific as non-degree seeking
students.

Note: If prerequisites are not completed at the time of the
interview, be prepared to outline a plan for completing
these. In all cases prerequisites must be completed prior to
the start of MSCP classes.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
PY 61100 Professional Orientation and Ethics 4
PY 61500 Professional Counseling: Theory, Skills, 4
and Practice I
PY 62000 Advanced Human Development 4
PY 62500 Professional Counseling: Theory, Skills, 4
and Practice II
PY 64000 Advanced Abnormal Psychology 4
PY 64300 Assessment in Counseling 4
PY 64600 Social and Cultural Foundations 4
in Counseling
PY 64900 Group Counseling 4
PY 65300 Couples and Family Therapy 4
PY 65500 Design and Principles of Research 4

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PY 65700 Brief Therapy 4
PY 66000 Career and Lifestyle Counseling 4
PY 69000 Professional Seminar 4
PY 69500 Counseling Internship 8
TOTAL 60

Admission to Candidacy
After the student has completed a full academic year (24 credits), a
first year evaluation will be conducted. The student must pass the first
year review and have received at least a ‘B’ in all coursework in order
to be admitted to degree candidacy. The student must be admitted
to candidacy before he or she will be approved for the internship and
subsequent completion of the Counseling Psychology program.

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education department
Certification Only – Option Program
Program Description
The Certification Only-Option Program for teachers (CO-OP) has
been designed for those individuals who have completed a bachelor’s
degree and wish to obtain their K-8 teaching certificate in the state of
Alaska. The program allows one to complete the 27 credits of training
and course work at his/her own pace to become licensure eligible. Candi-
dates gain valuable practical experience by completing structured and
supervised practicums in elementary and middle school classrooms and
environments.
The Certification Only-Option Program (CO-OP) leads to teacher
licensure. Students completing the program will meet the following State
of Alaska Department of Education and Early Development Standards
for teachers.

A teacher:
• can describe the teacher’s philosophy of education and
demonstrate its relationship to the teacher’s practice.
• understands how students learn and develop, and applies that
knowledge to the teacher’s practice.
• teaches students with respect for their individual and cultural
characteristics.
• knows the teacher’s content area and how to teach it.
• facilitates, monitors, and assesses student learning.
• creates and maintains a learning environment in which all
students are actively engaged and contributing members.
• works as a partner with parents, families, and with the
community.
• participates in and contributes to the teaching profession.
• knows technology and its educational utilization.

Admissions
1. Complete the Alaska Pacific University Graduate Program
application
2. Include transcripts from all universities attended
3. Pass the PRAXIS I or other state approved qualifying exam with
scores at or above the Alaska requirements
4. Provide a copy of an Alaska State Troopers Background Check to
the Education Department
5. Provide references from three (3) education professionals; at
least one must be a school Principal

Required CO-OP Courses credit hours
ED 60500 Educational Foundations & Classroom 3
Management
ED 61100 Early Literacy 3
ED 61600 Curriculum, Instruction & Evaluation (K-5) 3
ED 61700 Curriculum, Instruction & Evaluation (6-8) 3
ED 67600 Partnerships & Accountability 3
ED 67800 Differentiated Instruction, Theory and Practice 3
ED 68600 Internship in Student Teaching 9
TOTAL 27

Alaska Studies: State requirement for certification 3
Multicultural Education: State requirement for certification 3
Graduate Academic Degrees 201
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Examination Requirement
Meet Alaska scores on the Elementary PRAXIS II (either exam) and/
or on at least one Middle School content area PRAXIS II the semester
before student teaching

Master of Arts in Teaching

Program Description
This degree is specifically designed for people who have completed
the Certification Only Option Program for teachers (CO-OP). The MAT
Program provides optimal learning, as courses build upon the knowledge
and experience gained in preceding semesters, allowing the candidate
to research their own teaching practices in developing a research project
to be submitted at the end of the MAT program. This project must be
approved by the university’s Institutional Review Board and appropriate
school district where the research is conducted.

Admissions
The general requirements for admission to graduate studies at APU
are found at the beginning of the graduate program’s section. Up to
25% of the credits required for graduation may be transferred in at the
discretion of the MAT Program Director. In addition, there are several
specific requirements before a student may be admitted to the MAT
program:

Prerequisites: Students must complete all CO-OP courses with
at least “B” (3.00) or better before they are admitted to the
program as MAT candidates.
Essay: Write and submit a 3-4 page essay outlining your educational
philosophy and the research topic you wish to pursue.
Teaching Certificate/License: Submit a copy of your current
teaching certificate/license.
Interview: Interview with the Education Faculty.
Application Deadline: The deadline to submit an application is June
1 (Fall semester only.)

Research Project
Successful completion and presentation of an action research
project is required for graduation from the MAT program. Candidates
are expected to design an action research study that focuses on a
passionate educational interest. During the research project process,
they design, carry out, evaluate and critique their own learning and
teaching practices. By practicing action research in a classroom, candi-
dates apply a model of professional development and teacher inquiry
they may use to improve their own practices. This research model also
provides an opportunity to improve and better understand a particular
aspect of practice by applying qualitative and quantitative research
methods. Candidates discover that learning from teaching is inherent to
the teaching profession.

Required MAT Courses CREDIT HOURS
ED 67500 Research and Writing 3
ED 68200 Independent Research 3
ED 69700 Research & Data Analysis 3
TOTAL 9

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
DEPARTMENT

Master of Science
IN Environmental Science
Alaska Pacific University’s Master of Science in Environmental
Science (MSES) Program focuses on the relationship between (1) field
based environmental science and (2) the local, state, federal, and
international politics and economics that affect policies, with special
emphasis on Alaskan and northern issues. The science portion empha-
sizes both knowledge and practical field abilities in biology, chemistry,
and geology. The policy portion emphasizes the historical development
of current policies, agreements, laws, and regulations, as well as their
use and effects.
The following are the degree objectives for Master of Science in
Environmental Science:
• Increase knowledge of environmental science and policy by
articulating these concepts and understandings in field and
laboratory settings, both academic and applied
• Sharpen skills in written and oral communication to the level
of delivering professional presentations and crafting publishable
papers
• Apply analytic techniques including modeling, statistical
inference, and database management and display, in field and
laboratory settings, both academic and applied
• Design, undertake, analyze, write and defend an original
research project as a graduate thesis

Admissions
The general requirements for admission to graduate studies at
APU are found at the beginning of the section describing the graduate
program. In addition, there are several specific requirements for the
MSES program as follows:
1. Letters of Recommendation. Submit three current letters of
recommendation
2. Resume. Submit a current resume.
3. Standardized Test. Submit scores from the Graduate Record
Exam (GRE) general test which are no more than four years old.
Alaska Pacific’s reporting code is 4201.
4. Essay: Write and submit a 500 word essay outlining your
motivations for seeking the Master of Science in Environmental
Science Degree. Include your professional interests, career
goals, and research topic(s) you wish to pursue for your thesis.
Please note the faculty members whose research interests are
similar to your own.
5. Admission Deadlines: We recommend that students begin their
MSES in the Fall semester.
• Priority deadline Fall semester—February 15 (If you
are interested in receiving a graduate assistantship
Graduate Academic Degrees 203
Alaska Pacific University
your application must be complete by this date and
include an application for a graduate assistantship)
• Final deadline for Fall semester—June 1
• Final deadline for Spring Semester—November 1

Alaska Pacific University and Carroll University 3+2
program for Environmental Science
The 3+2 Environmental Science agreement between Alaska Pacific
University (APU) and Carroll University (CU) is an exciting opportunity for
both institutions allowing students to start at CU and end at APU. Three
years of undergraduate coursework are completed at Carroll University
followed by two years of graduate study at Alaska Pacific University.
The first year of APU courses transfer back to Carroll to complete the
Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science with a minor in
biology or chemistry. The agreement with APU specifies that students
should be able to complete the Master of Science degree after two years
of study in Alaska.
In preparation for this graduate program, students must complete
a minimum of 104 credits at Carroll and 36 graduate credits at Alaska
Pacific University. Students will be charged the graduate rate for all
courses taken at Alaska Pacific University.

MSES Degree Requirements
Each Master of Science in Environmental Science graduate is
required to:
1. Successfully complete six required courses and four elective
courses.
2. Successfully complete an individually designed research thesis.
3. Submit MSES thesis committee approval form to the Registrar’s
Office prior to graduation.

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
ES 60100 Research Methods 3
ES 60200 Quantitative Methods for 3
Environmental Sciences

Science Requirement - Select two courses: 6
ES 60000 Tropical Ecology
ES 61400 Riparian and Aquatic Restoration
ES 62000 Environmental Geology
ES 62200 Applied Geomorphology
ES 63000 Conservation Biology
ES 64000 Coastal Ecosystems
ES 64200 Coral Reef Ecology
ES 65500 Climate Change
ES 66100 Water Quality
ES 66300 Introduction to Remote Sensing
ES 66700 Groundwater Geology
ES 67500 Environmental Chemistry

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Policy Requirement - Select two courses: 6
ES 60500 Environmental Ethics
ES 60700 Water Resources Management
ES 60900 Global Resources and
International Conservation
ES 61000 Environmental Assessment
ES 61500 Natural Resource Planning and Politics
ES 63500 Environmental Law
ES 64500 Collaboration in Environmental Management
ES 65000 Human Impacts in Marine Systems
ES 66200 Land Use Planning
Electives 12
Thesis 6
TOTAL 36

Note: MSES students may take up to six (6) credits of upper
division undergraduate course work in partial fulfillment of
the degree requirements. The student’s advisor and Program
Director must approve the courses in advance of
enrollment.

Graduate Academic Degrees 205
Alaska Pacific University

LIBERAL STUDIES
INTERDISCIPLINARY

Master Of Arts

Program Description
Alaska Pacific University’s Master of Arts Program (MAP) is designed
specifically for the working professional who is interested in pursuing
advanced learning, but not interested in a traditional classroom
approach.
The MAP is a 36-credit, individualized contract-learning degree
program. Students typically complete the degree requirements in three
phases as self-directed learners, working with their academic advisors to
develop semester study plans that identify the learning goals, projects
to be accomplished, and methodology. Candidates must therefore
demonstrate their ability to work independently in their proposed field
of study.
Alaska Pacific University seeks creative people who are motivated
by the love of learning and the desire to discover.
Some students may be drawn to the program because of past
experience in the field and the desire to expand on their learning. Some
may wish to enhance some aspect of their professional or intellectual
background. Others may be looking for a career change or to contribute
to the body of knowledge in a particular area of interest. The MAP
provides the opportunity and flexibility to work closely with at least one
faculty advisor to design and implement a learning plan that will allow
the student to explore and discover new ideas and information in an
interdisciplinary environment that extends beyond the confines of the
classroom and traditional opportunities in graduate schools.
Faculty-supervised, self-directed learning may be complemented by
appropriate course work drawn from other relevant graduate learning
endeavors, including graduate-level work at Alaska Pacific University
and transfer credits from other graduate programs or learning venues.

Admissions
The General University Requirements for admission to graduate
studies at APU are addressed in that section of this catalog. In addition,
there are several specific requirements for the MAP. Please see the MAP
application brochure for full details. (Also available from our Admissions
Office, or on the APU website: www.alaskapacific.edu. Follow links to
Graduate Programs.)
The specific requirements for MAP are as follows:
1. Letters of Recommendation. Submit three references from
academic or professional sources, addressing your capability to
complete advanced work though a self-directed Master of Arts Program.
In addition, the letter must address your critical thinking, analytical and
communication skills. Recommendation letters must include the writer’s
address, telephone number, title, and relationship to you.
2. Standardized Test. Please see MAP Director for assistance in
determining which test (the Graduate Record Exam (GRE),
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Miller Analogies
Test (MAT), or PRAXIS II) would be best suited for your

Graduate Academic Degrees 206
Alaska Pacific University
application. Scores must have been within the past five years. In
certain circumstances, the testing requirement may be waived.
3. Personal Statement and Study Plan. As the central feature of
the application, these essays are reviewed by the Admission
Committee as a demonstration of your writing competence,
your ability to fully articulate your goals, the appropriateness of
a non-traditional program for attaining your goals, as well as a
measurement of your critical thinking skills. The Committee will
give considerable weight to the thoroughness and genuineness
with which you complete your Personal Statement as well as to
the specificity and relevance of your curriculum as defined by
your Study Plan. The MAP is writing intensive; therefore, the
samples should be your writing at its best.
4. Samples of Your Work (if applicable). Applicants are required
to submit examples of work completed with the portfolio.
Depending on the field of study these may include research
project narratives, manuscripts, creative writing samples,
articles, short stories, photographs or transparencies of artwork,
major papers, or other materials and documentation.
5. Application deadline. The deadline to submit a completed
application packet is four weeks before the semester start
date.

Academic Program
The MAP is a three-phase, 36-credit graduate program that includes
Research, Practicum experience, and a Project Demonstrative Mastery.
The program begins with an orientation course (MAP 60000) where all
new students have the opportunity to meet and share experiences with
peers and faculty. Study plans and curriculum are finalized during this
time. The semester-long MAP 60000 is designed to help all students get
up to running speed with their respective research.
Bi-monthly colloquia during the academic year provide all MAP
students with opportunities to network and to share their MAP learning
(progress, problems, discoveries, and more) both formally and infor-
mally. Students are required to make formal presentation here of their
MAP projects as a prerequisite to graduation. The colloquial gatherings
ensure that students receive peer support and offer individuals the
chance to demonstrate their progress.

Phase I Research
Under the supervision of the faculty advisor, the student’s obligation
in this phase is to discover and understand the best and most important
things that are or have been thought, said, and executed in their subject
area. Students take one required seminar (3 credits) to prepare them
for the journey ahead. Students may also take, with their advisor’s
approval, courses from the existing APU graduate curriculum that are
relevant to the course of study. They earn credits (3-9) by the successful
accomplishment of supervised independent learning contracts.

Phase II Practicum
Under the supervision of the faculty advisor, students in the Practicum
phase put into practice what they have discovered and articulated during
the Research phase. With the advisor’s approval, students may take
courses from the existing graduate curriculum that are relevant to the
study plan. Credits are earned by completion of advisor-directed study.

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Alaska Pacific University

Phase III Project Demonstrating Mastery
Under the supervision of the faculty advisor, students execute a
project demonstrating mastery in which they make their own significant
contribution to the field of study. The Project Demonstrating Mastery
represents the culmination of all the work accomplished by the student
and demonstrates the student’s mastery of the area of study. Students
submit a prospectus detailing the purpose, scope, theoretical underpin-
nings, and preliminary methods to be used in completing the project.
The final Project Demonstrating Mastery may be an academic
document, a creative product, a documentary, or a piece of research, but
it must represent significant synthesis of the knowledge the student has
gained from the MAP study. The academic advisor(s) and the Program
Director must approve the project proposal and sign off on its successful
completion. The project written document is submitted to the Program
Director prior to graduation.

Academic Study Plan
The semester study plan is used by the student and the advisor as
a guide for that portion of the student’s MAP Program. It is a dynamic
document, subject to modification as circumstance dictates. The study
plan must be approved by the student, the advisor or advisors, and the
Program Director. The semester study plan is a more fully developed
outline than that required by the application process and includes quanti-
fiable learning outcomes. This form can be found on the APU Website
under student forms.

Program Variations
While the program is designed to be a three-phase academic effort,
there may be variations on this model. Variations occur due to specific
circumstances that affect the overall goals and objectives of the study
plan. For example, a student may choose to pursue 12 credits one
semester (this is considered full-time study), and attempt 6 the next
because her or his work schedule-or other commitments-preclude the
pursuit of more. Students may wish to focus proportionately more credits
on their research than their practicum, or vice versa. Some students
may also need to acquire more than the 36 credits required by APU,
in the case of a certification requirement. It might also be appropriate
for the student to participate in outside seminars or trainings; some of
these may be included in the 12 transferable credits while others may
be additional activities.
The variations to the basic program are negotiated between the
student and the academic advisor while developing the study plan. It is
the responsibility of the advisor to assure that this process works effec-
tively.

Academic Advising
Typically the academic advisor will be a full-time faculty member at
Alaska Pacific University. Advisors need not be subject matter experts
in all of the areas in which the student seeks to increase his or her
knowledge, but they will be expert in the academic process of organizing
the learning program for the student. Students also work with mentors
who are experts within the field of study. Students are encouraged to
work with more than one mentor during their MAP programs and must
have a minimum of two committee members on their thesis committees.
(The additional member need not be a full-time APU faculty but his or

Graduate Academic Degrees 208
Alaska Pacific University
her qualifications for this service must be approved by the advisor and
the MAP Director.)

Student Evaluation
The MAP is not a traditional letter-graded academic program but
rather Credit/No Credit. “Credit” is understood to represent a grade of
B or better, for those whose employers or future learning institutions
require it. Students receive a narrative evaluation of their progress at
the end of each successful semester and these evaluations, in turn,
become part of the student’s official transcript.
Narrative evaluations include the ability for the advisor (and mentors)
to document and comment upon the student’s degree of success or
failure in accomplishing agreed-upon goals. In cases where a student
does not meet the academic standards of the university, no credit will
be awarded on the transcript.
Students are expected to perform at the graduate level and to
demonstrate written and oral communication, critical thinking and
analytical skills, as well as content knowledge and the ability to apply
theoretical concepts consistent with a graduate program.

Graduation: Faculty Members Georg, Sullivan, Faller, Sibbald and Coyne
Photo by Donna Dougherty

Graduate Academic Degrees 209
Alaska Pacific University

OUTDOOR STUDIES
DEPARTMENT
Master of Science
IN Outdoor And Environmental Education
The Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental Education
(MSOEE) provides graduate students training in outdoor and environ-
mental education literacy, pedagogy, and programming using APU’s
active learning model. The 36 credit degree program aims to develop
graduate level competencies by offering intense, hands on education
utilizing the Kellogg and APU Campuses. Students will finish their degree
by completing either a research or project-based thesis.
Student areas of focus have included Environmentally Responsible
Behavior, School & Community Gardens, Place Attachment, Place-Based
Learning & Curriculum Development.
Admissions
The general requirements for admission to graduate studies at APU
are found at the beginning of the section describing the graduate program.
Successfully complete twelve (12) semester credit hours of science or
natural history courses at the undergraduate level. In addition, there
are several specific requirements for the MSOEE program as follows:
1. Letters of Recommendation. Submit three current letters of
recommendation.
2. Resume. Submit a current resume.
3. Standardized Test. Submit scores from the Millers Analogy Test
(MAT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
4. Essay. Submit an essay (750-1000 words) outlining your their
interest in the program and professional goals.
5. Admission Deadline. The deadline to submit an application is
July 1 for Fall semester, November 1 for Spring semester. * Pre-
acceptance recommendation (see below)

MSOEE Degree Requirements
Each Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental Education
graduate is required to:

REQUIRED COURSES CREDIT HOURS
ES 60100 Research Methods 3
OEE 60100 Thesis Seminar I 1
OEE 60500 Outdoor and Environmental Education Literacy 2
OEE 60700 Teaching Methods for Outdoor & Envirov. Ed 4
OEE 60900 Assessment of Outdoor and Environmental Ed 1
OEE 61100 Curriculum Design for Experiential Educators 4
OEE 61300 Learning Theory in Outdoor Education 2
OEE 67500 Thesis Seminar II 1
OEE 68500 Practicum 1-3
Electives (at least two graduate science courses) 9
Upper level Science course may be approved
Thesis Research or Applied Project 6
TOTAL 36

* It is recommended that students complete a college level statistics
course prior to enrollment.
Graduate Academic Degrees 210
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GRADUATE
ACADEMIC COURSES,
ABBREVIATIONS,
AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Course/Subject Abbreviation
Education ED
Environmental Science ES
History HI
Master of Arts MAP
Business Administration MBA
Information and Communication Technology MCT
Outdoor and Environmental Education OEE
Psychology PY

ED – Master Of Arts In Teaching & Certification
Only Option Program for Teachers (CO-OP)
(Offered through the Education Department)

ED 60500 EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS & CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
(3)
An examination of historical philosophical theories and practices in
education with a focus on trends and current school policies in Alaska
and the nation. Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 61100 EARLY LITERACY (3)
How children become successful readers and writers including early
learning theory and practice, understanding of literacy development,
intervention methodologies, children’s literature, and design of the K-
5 literacy program. Practicum including some virtual experiences and a
field placement will require students to assist and teach lessons. Offered
Fall/Spring.

ED 61600 CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION I (3)
The primary focus of this course will be the integration of reading,
language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, health, physical
education, art, and music in both teaching and learning contexts in
kindergarten through fifth grade classrooms. Attention will also be
paid to the history and trends that have affected the field of education,
criteria for selecting appropriate teaching strategies and resources, and
appropriate assessments. Preservice teachers will develop guidelines
and assessments for analyzing and evaluating materials, resources and
teaching modalities. Practicum including some virtual experiences and a
field placement will require students to assist and teach lessons. Offered
Fall/Spring.
Graduate Course Descriptions 211
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ED 61700 CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION II (3)
The primary focus of this course will be the integration of reading,
language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, health, physical
education, art, and music in both teaching and learning contexts in sixth
through eighth grade classrooms. Attention will also be paid to the history
and trends that have affected the field of education, criteria for selecting
appropriate teaching strategies and resources, and appropriate assess-
ments. Preservice teachers will develop guidelines and assessments for
analyzing and evaluating materials, resources and teaching modalities.
Practicum including some virtual experiences and a field placement will
require students to assist and teach lessons. Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 65300 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (3)
Examination of the meaning of culture and the influences of culture in
education. Specific study of teaching, administration, and effectiveness
of schooling as they relate to multicultural student populations. Practical
field experiences are required. Offered January Block/Summer.

ED 67500 RESEARCH AND WRITING (3)
This course will provide a survey of educational research with an
emphasis on qualitative methods. Topics include theory, research design,
trustworthiness, questioning, qualitative data collection techniques, data
analysis, and outcome communications. Writing for publication using
the current American Psychological Association (APA) requirements
will be introduced and practiced. Students are expected to design an
action research study, complete a literature review, field test their data
collection techniques, and present a written synopsis of their results in
APA format. Offered Spring.

ED 67600 PARTNERSHIPS & ACCOUNTABILITY (3)
This course interconnects with the structures, theories, strategies
and practices of home, community and society with the educational
institution and processes for teaching, learning, evaluation and account-
ability. The class explores how to develop effective partnerships among
families and communities, examines research, projects and approaches
for working with students and their families, develops knowledge of
evaluation methodology and approaches for designing assessments
that meet classroom, school and community needs for accountability
in teaching. Practicum including some virtual experiences is required.
Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 67800 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION, THEORY AND PRACTICE
(3)
Designed for post-baccalaureate students seeking regular K-8
classroom certification, this course addresses the study of learners,
learning theory, and teaching practices within the regular classroom
setting. Teacher candidates will study learning theory and factors that
have the greatest influences on the acquisition, storage, retention,
transfer, and retrieval of knowledge. The course will specifically focus
on acquiring and practicing diverse teaching strategies and maximizing
learning in inclusive classrooms. Teacher candidates will demonstrate
understanding of and skill in addressing individual learning differences, the
learning environment, social interactions, assessment, communication,
and collaboration. Teacher candidates will engage in self-assessment
Graduate Course Descriptions 212
Alaska Pacific University

of their knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teaching diverse and
special needs students in the regular classroom setting and develop a
personal teaching philosophy to reflect this. A 20 hour practicum will
allow students to make connections between readings, seminar activ-
ities, and elementary classrooms, thereby deepening understandings.
This practicum includes both virtual and actual classroom based experi-
ences. Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (3)
Designed for students who wish to pursue topics not available
in regularly scheduled classes. A plan of study is developed with the
assistance of an MAT professor. Approval of advisor, program director,
department chair, and Academic Dean required. Offered as needed.

ED 68200 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3)
MAT candidates will design an action research project to be carried
out in a school setting, using the information and skills developed
during completion of a pilot project in the research and writing class. A
formal research proposal will be presented to the university’s Institu-
tional Review Board and the school district where the research will be
conducted. Offered Summer.

ED 68400 ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN TEACHING (6)
Designed for students with extensive teaching experience. This
course focuses on comprehensive classroom management skills devel-
opment normally addressed in the student teaching experience.
Documented teaching experience and approval of advisor, director, and
Teacher Education Committee are required. Offered as needed.

ED 68500 PRACTICUM (1-4)
Designed for students desiring additional field experience in K-8
classrooms. Cooperative guidance provided by an Education Department
faculty member and an on-the-job supervisor. Approval of advisor
required. Offered as needed.

ED 68600 INTERNSHIP IN STUDENT TEACHING (9)
A 15-week practicum designed to progress through the full range
of teaching responsibilities in a school environment. Daily evaluation by
the supervising teacher and periodic observations by a university super-
visor assess student teaching progress. A weekly seminar conducted
by university faculty addresses meeting the challenges of the teaching
profession. Prerequisite: All CO-OP/MAT coursework and approval of
the Teacher Education Committee. Meeting Alaska scores on either the
Elementary PRAXIS II (either exam) or on at least one Middle School
content area PRAXIS II.
CO-OP/MAT students who hold a State of Alaska Tier I teaching
certificate and are teaching full time in a K-8 program will be allowed to
fulfill student teaching requirements in their own classroom. Supervision
for student teaching will be provided by the APU education department
with school district coordination. Offered Fall/Spring.

ED 69200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Certain courses are designed to accommodate specific groups of
interested students. These courses are offered for one to three credits
Graduate Course Descriptions 213
Alaska Pacific University

depending on the amount of work and class meetings involved. Offered
as needed.

ED 69700 RESEARCH AND DATA ANALYSIS (3)
Data analysis is a process that involves identifying what the data
tells the researcher and then reporting those conclusions in a meaningful
way. A survey of quantitative and qualitative data analysis procedures
will be conducted. Students will select appropriate procedures for their
own collected data and complete the results and conclusion portions of
their research project/thesis. Offered Fall.

ES - MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
(Offered through the Environmental Science Department)

ES 60000 TROPICAL ECOLOGY (3)
A field-oriented block course that explores the ecology of a tropical
region. Emphasis on the structure, function, and biodiversity of natural
ecosystems, but logging, agriculture, sustainable development, and
conservation are also discussed. This course requires difficult and uncom-
fortable travel through underdeveloped rural and wilderness areas by
minibus, boat, and foot. Students are expected to have a passport,
necessary inoculations, and wilderness experience. Additional costs are
required of the student for travel to and from the destination countries.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission required. Offered Spring.

ES 60100 RESEARCH METHODS (3)
Application of the scientific method to environmental science and
natural resource research problems. Overview of research design and
methods appropriate to a wide variety of research settings. Emphasis on
student development of a thesis proposal containing problem statement,
hypotheses, research design, and methods. Offered Fall.

ES 60200 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL
SCIENCES (3)
Analytical, statistical, and research methods needed for exami-
nation of the social, political, and ecological aspects of environmental
issues and problems. Emphasis on practical application of univariate and
multivariate statistical methods including linear regression, analysis of
variance, and general linear model. Design of research and evaluation
of data. Prerequisites: A college level course in statistics and ES 60100.
Offered Spring.

ES 60300 TROPICAL CONSERVATION IN PRACTICE (3)
This course examines the relationship between environmental
systems and sustainable development through travel to the developing
world and service learning. We will explore, experience and learn about
the human causes of environmental degradation and critically assess
sustainable development alternatives in remote rural areas of the
developing world. These alternatives will be evaluated from ecological,
economic, and social and ethical perspectives. From a conceptual
and operational point of view, we will explore the idea of sustain-

Graduate Course Descriptions 214
Alaska Pacific University

ability/sustainable development with an emphasis on community-
based sustainable development in and around protected areas. Service
learning will be integrated into the travel study. Cultural and natural
history will also be investigated as part of the curriculum. Prerequisites:
Upper division standing or permission of instructor. Lab fee required.
Offered Summer.

ES 60500 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3)
Various perspectives and philosophies concerning the natural
environment and resource utilization are explored in order to give the
student a basis to develop his or her own ethical perspective. The human
factor in addressing natural resource issues is emphasized. Offered Fall/
Spring.

ES 60700 WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (3)
Major concepts involved in water resources management. Basic
hydrology, water use, water rights, water quality, groundwater, planning,
floodplain management, and dams. Emphasis will be placed on the inter-
relationships among the technical, legal, economic, and political aspects
of water resources management by examining Alaskan water resources
laws and current issues. Offered Spring.

ES 60900 GLOBAL RESOURCES AND INTERNATIONAL
CONSERVATION (3)
Examination of major global environmental issues using the science
of ecology as a framework for analysis. The interaction of cultural
practices, resource utilization, and economic development is empha-
sized. Offered Fall.

ES 61000 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: CASE STUDIES (3)
This course utilizes case studies to cover the assessment require-
ments of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Comprehensive
Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (Superfund).
Procedures and requirements of the Environmental Impact Statement
process controlled by NEPA regulations are included. Through case
studies the course details the requirements of CERCLA for the Phase
I Environmental Site Assessment. Phase II Site Characterization and
Phase III Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study are also intro-
duced. Offered Spring.

ES 61400 RIPARIAN AND AQUATIC RESTORATION (3)
Examination of the disciplines necessary to restore riparian and
aquatic habitats, assuring permanent improvement, and maximization of
biological productivity, aesthetics, recreation potential, and system cost
effectiveness. As part of the course a restoration plan will be developed
for a specific section of a spring fed stream in Anchorage. Offered Fall.

ES 61500 NATURAL RESOURCE PLANNING AND POLITICS (3)
Relationships between the political process and natural resource
inventory, planning development, management, and conservation are
covered in this course. Emphasis is placed on Alaska’s renewable natural

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resources and the impact of Alaska’s local, state, and national legis-
lation, regulation, and political action on those resources. Offered Fall.

ES 62000 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY (3)
Applied geology course that focuses on the entire spectrum of
possible interactions between people and the physical environment.
Topics include: earth materials, geologic hazards, hydrology, waste
disposal, environmental health, minerals, energy, and an introduction
to environmental law and land-use planning. Lab included. Prerequisite:
A course in geology or instructor permission. Lab fee required. Offered
Fall.

ES 62200 APPLIED GEOMORPHOLOGY (3)
This course examines the physical, environmental aspects of the land
resource including the soils and sediments that comprise the landforms of
the earth’s surface. The course presents the detailed study of landforms
and the processes that control their formation, whether erosional,
depositional, tectonic, or volcanic. An introduction to land capability is
included. Laboratory work includes field-sampling techniques, analysis
of soils, and interpretation of landforms on air photos and topographic
maps. Offered Fall.

ES 62800 SCIENTIFIC DIVING (3)
Meets requirements for Scientific Diver under the guidelines of
Alaska Pacific University and the Association for Advancement of Under-
water Science. Topics may include: data gathering techniques, collecting,
common biota, behavior, installation of scientific apparatus, site location
and relocation, organism identification, ecology, tagging, photography,
scientific dive planning, appropriate governmental regulations, AAUS
scientific diving regulations, research vessel diving, aquarium diving, and
animal handling. An emphasis is placed on dive safety while conducting
scientific work underwater. Lab included. Lab fee required. Additional
costs for travel are required of the student. Students provide their own
SCUBA gear (required). First aid certification and open-water dive certi-
fication required before a student’s first dive. Prerequisites: Instructor
permission. Offered Summer.

ES 63000 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (3)
Introduction to the science of preserving biological diversity, its
principles, policy, and applications. Topics include: extinction, ecological
and genetical effects of habitat fragmentation, minimum viable population
analysis, reserve design and management, the Endangered Species Act,
and conflict mediation. Lab included. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:
Ecology or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

ES 63500 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3)
Introduction to laws and regulations governing environmental and
natural resource management. Designed to introduce non-law students
to the legal process and the role of the judiciary in environmental and
natural resource management. Offered Spring.

ES 64000 COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS (3)
Selected Topics: So. CA Bight, Gulf of AK, Bimini, Bahamas, Hawaii,
Galapagos. A field-oriented block course that explores the physical and
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biological characteristics and processes of coastal ecosystems. Focus will
be on understanding the influence of bathymetry, climate and currents
on primary productivity and community composition and diversity.
Landocean interfaces and human dimensions will also be examined,
including marsh and estuarine dynamics and coastal development, land
use and conservation. May require international travel (passport, inocu-
lations required) and exposure to harsh weather and rugged conditions.
Travel costs are expected to range between $1000 and $2000. Prerequi-
sites: MAR 33000 and SC 33000 or equivalent. Offered Spring.

ES 64200 CORAL REEF ECOLOGY (3)
A field-oriented block course that examines the ecology of coral
reefs and associated organisms. Topics include: coral taxonomy, repro-
duction, morphology and ecology, reef structure and zonation, coral
identification, symbionts on coral reefs, and coral reef ecosystems. No
SCUBA certification required. Lab included. Lab fee required. Additional
costs of travel to and within the tropics are required of the student.
Instructor permission and a prior college-level course in ecology is
required. Offered Spring.

ES 64500 COLLABORATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (3)
Theoretical and applied concepts of collaboration and conflict
resolution in both public and private sectors of natural resource and
environmental management, historical and legal mandates, government
agency responsibilities, applied methods and techniques, case studies,
and hands on experience. Offered Spring.

ES 65000 HUMAN IMPACTS IN MARINE SYSTEMS (3)
This course addresses the major human impacts on marine
systems at local, regional, national, and international scales. Mitigation,
management, conservation, and policy actions are examined in the
context of balancing ecological with economic impacts and conflicts
among stakeholders and policymakers. Course includes an in-depth
dilemma-based case study. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered
as needed.

ES 65500 CLIMATE CHANGE (3)
Causes and consequences of climate variability on a variety of
timescales will be addressed, with a primary focus on evidence for
natural and anthropogenic climate fluctuations in arctic regions. Topics
will include structure of the climate system, proposed mechanisms of
climate variability, techniques for paleoclimatic reconstruction, and an
overview of climate modeling and associated uncertainties. We will use
case studies to explore known and projected impacts of climatic changes
on Alaskan environments. Emphasis will be placed on the science of
climate change, but policy issues will be discussed. Offered Spring.

ES 66000 INTRODUCTION TO GIS (GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
SYSTEMS) (3)
This course is an introduction to the theory and use of Geographic
Information Systems, including the fundamental concepts of GIS,
capabilities of GIS, and applications for dealing with spatial data. Topics
include vector data input, data models, database design and database
queries, sources of spatial information, spatial analysis, and carto-
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graphic display. These topics will be discussed within an environmental
context using ArcGIS, a PC-based GIS software package. The course is
presented in a lecture/laboratory format. Lab fee required. Offered as
needed.

ES 66100 WATER QUALITY (3)
This course examines fundamental concepts related to water quality
issues. An introduction and review of scientific principles necessary
to understand water quality issues (such as nutrient cycles), general
aspects of water legislation, and contemporary issues in the field.
Offered as needed.

ES 66200 LAND USE PLANNING (3)
Overview of land use planning at the municipal, county and state
levels and on public or private lands that have their own planning juris-
diction. Coverage of the history, legal framework, and processes needed
for successful land use planning. Requires project based exercise using
Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Lab fee required. Offered
Spring.

ES 66300 INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING (3)
This course introduces students to the principles and techniques
necessary for applying remote sensing to diverse issues within environ-
mental science. The course emphasizes a hands-on learning environment
with theoretical and conceptual aspects of satellite remote sensing.
Topics include digital image interpretation, analysis, and processing
within a GIS environment. Prerequisite: ES 64100.
ES 66500 APPLIED GIS (GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS) (3)
This course is a second course in GIS concerned primarily with
spatial modeling. Topics include raster modeling, specifically hydrologic
and distance modeling, as well as surface interpolation. The course is
project-based with a lecture and laboratory component. Lab fee required.
Prerequisite: ES 66000 or SC 36000 or permission of instructor. Offered
Spring.

ES 66700 GROUND WATER GEOLOGY (3)
Ground water occurrence, flow, aquifer relationships, well discharge
data, and aquifer yield. Introductions to field investigations including
geophysical methods. Other topics include containment migration and
groundwater modeling. Lab included. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: A
course in geology or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

ES 67400 SEMINAR READINGS IN MARINE BIOLOGY (1-3)
Small groups which meet with faculty members for in-depth study
and discussion of particular topics. Examples have included: Top-down
Control of Marine Populations, Cephalopod Biology and Ecology, Ecology
of Modular Organisms, and Marine Research Methods. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as seminars are offered; student
initiated topics welcome. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Offered
Fall/Spring.

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ES 67500 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3)
Extensive examination of the chemical aspects of environmental
issues. Presumes knowledge of kinetics, elementary thermodynamics,
and equilibria. The course is broad-based and interdisciplinary in
nature and touches upon topics such as water quality, air pollution, and
hazardous wastes. Prerequisites: Precalculus and a college course in
chemistry or instructor permission. Offered as needed.

ES 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a faculty
member and by permission only. Offered Fall/Spring.

ES 69900 THESIS RESEARCH (1-6)
Students perform a research project under the guidance of a 3-
member graduate advisory committee, involving an in-depth study
of a subject in the student’s area of professional interest. The project
includes, but is not limited to, a statement of the problem, data collection,
compilation, analysis and interpretation, and writing of a thesis, which
documents all aspects of the study. The thesis must be successfully
defended before the graduate advisory committee during an oral presen-
tation to the university community. Final approval of the written thesis is
required prior to graduation. Offered Fall/Spring.

ES 68500 PRACTICUM (INTERNSHIP) (1-12)
Practical work experience in a given area of concentration under the
cooperative guidance of a faculty member and an on-the-job supervisor.
Offered Fall/Spring.

ES 69000 SEMINAR (3)
Small groups which meet with faculty members for in-depth study
and discussion of particular topics. Appropriate course descriptions are
published as seminars are offered. Offered as needed.

ES 69200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Special topics in various fields are offered as needed. Appropriate
course descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered Fall.

HI – HISTORY
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

HI 62700 HISTROY AND CULTURE OF ALASKA NATIVES (3)
A survey of Aleut, Yup’ik and Inupiat Eskimo, Athabascan, and
southeastern peoples and cultures. Entrance into Alaska, prehistory,
and traditional adaptations including economic, social, and ideological
components. Historic contact, culture change, contemporary position,
and ongoing concerns are also examined. Offered as needed.

HI 69200 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)
Provide graduate level special topic courses. Appropriate course
descriptions are published as topics are developed. Offered as needed.

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MAP – Master Of Arts Program
(Offered through the Liberal Studies Department)

MAP 60000 GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR MASTER OF ARTS (3)
The initial course taken by all MAP students. Concepts and issues
covered include discussions and activities dealing with critical thinking,
research development concepts, and other issues involved in selfdi-
rected learning models and methods. Students who need additional
background in research methods, quantitative or qualitative methods,
writing methods, or other advanced skills needed to complete the
program may be advised to enroll in such courses or develop the skills
through independent study. Since the range of interests and skills in
the MAP may be broad and diverse, this course concentrates on the
development of the cohort and the critical analytical skills and abilities
needed. Offered Fall/Spring.

MAP 62000 CONTRACT LEARNING EXPERIENCES: RESEARCH (3-12)
Under the supervision of the faculty mentor, students acquaint
themselves with the best that has been (or is being) thought, said, or
done in their subject area. They will articulate the ways in which their
particular topic is embedded within at least one comprehensive area
of thought. Students may take, as an option and with their academic
advisor’s approval, courses from the existing graduate curriculum that
are relevant to their study plan or complete separate directed study
courses. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

MAP 64000 CONTRACT LEARNING EXPERIENCES: PRACTICUM (3-12)
Under the supervision of the faculty advisor, students engage in a
practicum experience in which they put into practice what they have
discovered and articulated during the MAP 62000 Research Phase.
Students may take, as an option and with the advisor’s approval,
courses from the existing graduate curriculum that are relevant to the
study plan or complete separate directed study courses. Offered Fall/
Spring/Summer.

MAP 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3)
Designed for students who wish to pursue topics not available in
regularly scheduled classes. A plan of study is developed with the assis-
tance of an appropriate regular or adjunct faculty member. Approval
of advisor, Program Director, Department Chair, and Academic Dean
required. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

MAP 68100 CONTRACT LEARNING EXPERIENCES: PROJECT
DEMONSTRATING MASTERY (3-12)
Under the supervision of the faculty advisor, students write or
otherwise complete a thesis or major product, in which they make an
original, significant contribution to the area of study. Students may take,
as an option and with the advisor’s approval, courses from the existing
graduate curriculum that are relevant to the study plan or complete
separate directed study courses. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

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Other Graduate Courses
Other graduate courses taken at Alaska Pacific University that are
part of the study plan’s 36 credit hours of requirements are listed in
this catalog and course schedules. Students as part of the study plan
may also be enrolled in graduate level course work at another school.
Prerequisite courses are not usually part of the 36-credit requirement.
In addition, depending on the study plan, students may enroll in more
than the 36-credit requirement in order to obtain additional learning
experiences.

MBA – Master Of Business
Administration
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

MBA 61000 GOVERNMENT AND NOT-FOR-PROFIT ACCOUNTING (3)
Governmental and not-for-profit entities utilize special accounting
rules and procedures. This course involves the study and research
of these special accounting rules and reporting practices set forth
by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board and other profes-
sional accounting organizations. Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate
accounting course or equivalent. Offered as needed.

MBA 61100 ACCOUNTING FOR EXECUTIVE ACTION (3)
Systems and procedures for budgeting and control, including cost
and profit planning, responsibility accounting, cost behavior patterns,
operating and capital budgeting, and accounting data for decision
making. Prerequisite: Introductory course(s) in accounting or equiv-
alent. Offered as needed.

MBA 61600 FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS & INSTITU-
TIONS (1)
This course will familiarize students with the fundamental concepts,
models and theories of financial markets, instruments and institutions.
Students will be provided a basic survey of (a) the nature and forms of
financial markets; (b) the financial instruments available for investing,
financing operations and managing various kinds of financial risk and the
markets which trade these instruments; and (c) the role and operation
of financial institutions and regulatory bodies. Offered Fall/Spring.

MBA 61700 ALASKA NATIVE TRIBAL HEALTH CONSORTIUM (ANTHC/
LEAD) (3)
This course is limited to those individuals within the Alaska Native
Tribal Health Consortium’s LEAD program. By permission of instructor
only. Prerequisite: LEAD Program Participation. Offered as needed.

MBA 61800 ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION MAKING (3)
This course will introduce students to the accounting concepts and
use of accounting information in decision making. Topics include basics
of financial statements, measurement of assets, equities and income,
financial statement analysis, cost behavior and measurement, cost and

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profitability analyses, long-term investment analysis, relevant cost, and
performance measures. Offered Fall/Spring.

MBA 62100 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3)
Focus on individuals and groups within organizational systems
including organizational dynamics, behavior, design, and other factors
impacting organizational success. Offered Spring.

MBA 62300 VALUATION (2)
This course will examine a variety of valuation methodologies,
including income approaches, asset-based approaches, and market
approaches. Specific focus will be on the discounted cash flow analysis
and selection of appropriate discount rates. Students will examine
concrete valuation cases to put valuation theory into practice. The
course will address both public and privately held companies. Prereq-
uisite: MBA61600. Offered Fall.

MBA 62400 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3)
This course will familiarize students with the fundamental concepts,
models and theories of economics with a focus on their relevance to
business decision making. The interaction of information, economic
incentives and market competition and how these interact to determine
prices, products available, profits, and patterns of trade and organi-
zation will be explored. At the end of this course, students should be
able to understand how basic economic reasoning can lead to improved
managerial decisions. Offered Fall.

MBA 62700 ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)
This course immerses students in the dynamic, cash driven
environment of the entrepreneur by studying case histories of lifestyle
ventures, smaller profitable ventures, and fast-growth ventures. This
comprehensive course focuses on new venture management and the
process of developing strategies and plans for successful entrepreneurial
operations. Offered Fall/Spring.

MBA 62800 E-BUSINESS (3)
The subject of E-Business is an exciting and cutting edge component
of entrepreneurial studies. This course is designed to educate the student
to the level whereby he or she will be able to plan for and implement
an e-business start-up or be able to lead the transition team of a tradi-
tional bricks and mortar business that is expanding to include e-business
solutions in its business strategy. Offered as needed.
MBA 63100 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)
Strategic planning, development, and management of human
resource capital focusing on both human and regulatory issues within the
organization. Title VII, labor relations, task and work analysis, perfor-
mance management, compensation, and other HRM topics examined as
they affect supervisors and managers. Offered Summer.

MBA 63200 THE BUSINESS OF ENTERTAINMENT (3)
This course would examine the business economics, financing,
production, and marketing of entertainment in the United States and
overseas including: movies, music, television programming, broad-

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casting, cable, casino gambling and wagering, publishing, performing
arts, sports, theme parks, and toys and games. This course would also
explore the economics of networks and advertising including policy
implications and box-office behavior. Offered Fall.

MBA 63500 HEALTH SERVICES FINANCES (3)
An examination will be offered of the challenges of how the US
health services systems function financially including private, insurance
coverage, and publicly funded programs that interface with non-profit,
private, and governmental service organizations. Contractual negotia-
tions that build the relationships among doctors, laboratories, clinics,
and hospitals, utilization review, coding, and billing will be discussed.
The Stark law and Anti-kickback Safe Harbors legislation will be brought
into the discussion of the financial limitations placed on some health
service entities. Prerequisites: MBA 61600 and MBA 61800. Offered Fall/
Summer.

MBA 63600 HEALTH SERVICES SYSTEMS & POLICIES (3)
Examines the structures, functioning, and financing of the US
Health services systems. Emphasizes foundational concepts of health
and illness; health care cost; quality, access, and utilization; workforce;
competition in health care markets; and supplier, provider, and payer
effectiveness and efficiency. Investigates consumer behavior, determi-
nants of demand for health services, determinates of costs in health
care organizations, the roles of competition and regulation, insurance,
financing, and looks at alternative approaches applied in other nations.
Reviews the current information management systems that are used to
coordinate services and administrate the various components of health
services systems. Offered Fall.

MBA 63800 HEALTH SERVICES CURRENT TOPICS (3)
Analyzes current information and management systems including
workforce planning and productivity, financial planning and monitoring,
quality assurance, staffing and scheduling, administrative information
systems, patient care systems, and legal/regulatory requirements for
security and confidentiality. Evaluates alternative uses of computer
technology in health services including telehealth and electronic patient
records. Tracks and provides supportive materials to address dynamic
shifts in contemporary health service administration and in such require-
ments as the Stark Law, Anti-kickback Safe Harbor, Medicare, and
Medicaid legislation. Offered Spring.

MBA 63900 HEALTH SERVICES EVALUATION & OUTCOMES (3)
Offers quantitative methods in health services management to allow
the administrator to evaluate programs and services for their effec-
tiveness and efficiencies. Topics include: cost-benefit analysis, activity
analysis, outcome assessment, designing of program evaluations, and
reporting results. Tools will be provided to measure the magnitude of
problems posed by different diseases, determine what health services
are affected by the problems, and identify ways to eliminate or mediate
the conditions while improving prevention and treatment. Prerequisites:
MBA 61800, MBA 62400 and MBA 65200. Offered Spring.

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MBA 64000 QUALITY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (3)
Practical applications of major quality management systems and
models focusing on the integration of a number of models and approaches
in order to ensure successful implementation.

MBA 64200 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)
Techniques and strategies for management of marketing in a global
environment. The course guides the student through the changing role
of marketing management from planning, pricing, promotions, and
product and brand management in the domestic environment to distri-
bution and channel strategies in international marketing. The course
focuses on developing the correct marketing strategy to match the
market opportunity. Offered Fall.

MBA 64300 INTERNET MARKETING (3)
Covers the various impacts of the expanded use of the Internet
on marketing. Includes the effects of Internet characteristics (connec-
tivity, interactivity, and essentially unlimited information capacity,
together with non-geographically contained reach) on the function of
current marketing media, evaluation of web page design criteria, and
the relation of the Internet to other aspects of the Marketing Mix, that is,
to physical distribution, product development, and pricing. Prerequisite:
MBA 64200 or permission of instructor. Offered as needed.

MBA 64400 HEALTH SERVICES ETHICAL & LEGAL ISSUES (3)
Explores the laws that govern US health services systems and the
inherent ethical issues involved in its delivery and development. Oppor-
tunities to gain certification for Institutional Review Board membership.
Review of key laws governing health services practices including ERISA,
COBRA, ADA, HIPAA, Medicare, Medicaid, Stark, antitrust, fraud, and
abuse. Offered Summer.

MBA 65200 INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS FOR MANAGEMENT (3)
An intermediate level course in statistics covering a review of point
and interval estimation type I and II errors and hypothesis testing, with
an extension to the analysis of simple survey designs, followed by a
rigorous development of simple and multiple regression, elementary
ANOVA, discrete data analysis, and nonparametric methods. Students
will learn to work with the MINITAB statistical package and other spread-
sheet programs. Offered Fall.

MBA 65300 SPREADSHEET MODELING AND SIMULATION (3)
This is a spreadsheet-based course in building decision models and
simulating the uncertainty inherent in decision-making. It will build on
basic statistical concepts in developing random simulations. Spreadsheet
tools for conducting simulation analyses will be covered. Integration of
data, modeling, and presentation of results will be stressed. Offered
Fall/Spring.

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MBA 65400 SYSTEMS THINKING AND COMPUTER SIMULATION (3)
Systems dynamics is a perspective and a set of conceptual tools
that enable you to understand the structure and dynamics of complex
systems. Systems dynamics is also a rigorous modeling method that
enables you to build formal computer simulations of complex systems
and use them to design more effective policies and organizations. The
goal of this course is to develop your intuition and conceptual under-
standing of business processes. Offered Summer.

MBA 66200 LAW AND CORPORATE LEADERSHIP (3)
Focus on understanding the legal environment in which managers
and executives operate, including broad legal principles involving
corporate legal issues. Offered Spring.

MBA 66300 BUSINESS ETHICS (3)
This course explores the ethical traditions of business including:
the relationship between capitalism, corporations, and ethics; issues
of justice and economic distribution; the relationship between business
ethics and the environment; and ethical issues and current challenges
in the workplace. Students will learn how to spot potential ethical issues
before they become problems. Offered Summer.

MBA 66400 LEADERSHIP (3)
An experiential course that enables the student to examine several
leadership styles, traits, and behaviors. The student will also discover
a variety of group creative problem-solving techniques and processes.
The students will examine their leadership role within a team-building
environment. Students participate in class exercises and in an outdoor
experiential lab environment. Offered Summer.

MBA 67000 CORPORATE FINANCE (3)
Students will gain knowledge of financial and economic needs and
processes within the organization, including financial needs and sources
of funds, behavior of the economy, institutional structures and markets,
internal financial decision making, performance and risk management
and measurement. Prerequisite: MBA 61600. Offered Spring.

MBA 67500 INVESTMENTS (4)
Course will cover return concepts, policy statements, investment
alternatives and historic returns, efficient markets theory, Markowitz
mean/variance portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model and
extensions, asset pricing theory, portfolio strategies, and performance
evaluation. Management of the student fund is an integral part of the
class. Prerequisite: MBA 65200 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall.

MBA 67600 RISK MANAGEMENT & DERIVATIVES (2)
This course will serve as an introduction to risk management
using financial tools. Students will learn about the derivative instru-
ments available, how they are traded and valued, and techniques for
using these instruments to manage different kinds of balance sheet and
corporate risk. Prerequisites: MBA 67500 or permission of instructor

Graduate Course Descriptions 225
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(in addition, MBA 65300 is recommended, but not required). Offered
Spring.

MBA 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a faculty
member. Offered as needed.

MBA 68300 FUND MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM (1)
This is a 100% practical, lab-based course offered in summer to
help students gain hands-on experience in applying the basic concepts
of equity securities selection and modern portfolio theory by managing
a real-life, institutional caliber equity portfolio. This course can be taken
up to 3 times for credit. Offered Fall, Spring, Summer.

MBA 68500 INTERNSHIP (1-6)
Practical work experience or experiential opportunity in a given
area of concentration under the guidance of a faculty member and on-
site supervisor. Completion of a written report or document. Offered as
needed.

MBA 69000 SEMINAR (1-3)
Small group meets with faculty member for in-depth study and
discussion of particular topics. Appropriate course descriptions published
when offered. Offered as needed.

MBA 69200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Examination or study of a special topic or area. Course description
published when offered. Offered as needed.

MBA 69300 SPECIAL FINANCE TOPICS (2)
Special topics offered depending on demand and program devel-
opment, these topics will include: The Art of Trading, Options, Deriva-
tives and Futures, Pensions, Commodities, and Managing the Student
Fund. Prerequisite: MBA 65200. Offered as needed.

MBA 69500 RESEARCH PROJECT (3)
Undertaking of major research project under guidance of a faculty
member. Involves in-depth study of a specific area. Quantitative or
qualitative research methods are used in the completion of the project.
Prerequisite: Recommend course in design and principles of research.
Offered as needed.

MBA 69700 CAPSTONE COURSE (3)
Integration and application of the skills learned in competitive
strategy, finance, human resource management, marketing, accounting,
operations management, and other functional areas through an inter-
active management simulation conducted in teams. This course is
normally taken in the last semester of the student’s enrollment in the
MBA, MBAICT or MGF program. Prerequisites: Completion of at least nine
(9) MBA, MCT or MGF courses representing a cross section of functional
management disciplines or instructor permission. Offered Spring.

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MBA 69900 THESIS (3-6)
Compilation, evaluation, interpretation, writing, and oral presen-
tation of significant research in a business or management area.
Research proposal and final product must be approved by the thesis
committee. Prerequisite: Recommend course in design and principles of
research. Offered as needed.

MCT – Executive MBA In Information
And Communication Technology
(Offered through the Business Administration Department)

MCT 66000 OVERVIEW OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION
TECHNOLOGY (3)
Overview of information and telecommunications technologies,
business models and public policy issues. The emphasis is on attaining
basic knowledge of voice and data communications, including circuit
switched technologies, data networks, wireless communications,
satellite communications, and convergence. Field visits will be utilized
for firsthand exposure to these technologies. Offered as needed.

MCT 66100 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY AND
THEORY (3)
This course provides an understanding of the technologies, standards,
and protocols used to provide digital communications services. It will
include both wired and wireless technologies. Topics include the OSI
model, layered communications protocols, packet switching, frame
relay, ATM, cable networks, satellite networks, local area networks, wide
area networks, broadband networks, licensed and unlicensed spectrum.
Emphasis will be on the cost, quality, and lifecycle dimensions and
tradeoffs of the various technologies. Offered as needed.

MCT 66200 MANAGING NETWORK SECURITY (2)
Practical and theoretical knowledge of network security. Topics
covered include security policies and their place in information technology
and business plans, virtual private networks, firewalls, public key infra-
structures, and intrusion detection. Emphasis will be placed on risk
analysis and network security strategies rather than detailed analysis
of “how to” provide network security. Prerequisite: MCT 66100. Offered
as needed.
MCT 66300 TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION POLICY AND
REGULATION (3)
The Telecommunications Act of 1996, along with parallel interna-
tional legislation and continued evolution of domestic and international
policies, form the basis for this course. Topics reviewed include: obliga-
tions and rights of common carriers; universal service in the infor-
mation age; market entry and exit; pricing rules; network access by
consumers, competing providers, and information providers; and strat-
egies for interacting with regulatory agencies. Offered Spring.

Graduate Course Descriptions 227
Alaska Pacific University

MCT 66500 TECHNOLOGY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY MARKETING
AND STRATEGY (3)
Rapid technological change, high investment costs, unique product
life cycles, and the central role played by intellectual property all pose
strategic marketing challenges to the information and communication
sectors. Topics studied include: information society demand drivers,
customer value expectations, the global networked society, conver-
gence, patent and copyright issues, and evaluation of competitive strat-
egies. Offered Summer.

MCT 66700 TECHNOLOGICAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL INNOVATION (2)
Innovation in the information and telecommunications industry is a
complex process that requires a constant stream of new ideas, technical
competence, appropriate organizational design, and “public places” that
facilitate the collaboration and discourse. Disruptive innovations pose
challenges for existing market leaders, while incremental innovations
appear to evade the grasp of market entrants (Christensen, The Innova-
tor’s Dilemma, The Innovator’s Solution). This course will explore how
innovation is fostered or hindered by the structure and interaction of
firms, consumers, regulators, and other stakeholders in the industry.
Case studies will be used to examine multiple aspects and applications
of the innovation process.

MCT 66900 FINANCIAL TECHNOLOGY AND SYSTEMS (2)
This course will introduce students to the challenging interface
between cutting-edge information and telecommunications technology
and financial systems and applications. The consolidated nature of the
financial services industry, involving banking, insurance and investment
services, has created an urgent need for customer relationship channels
across multiple products and brands. This course will expose students
to a variety of integrated e-CRM applications in the financial services
industry including web inquiry, online transactions and product recom-
mendations. Other facets of financial technology that will be covered
in the course include web and wireless-based information-processing
and transaction-enabling applications, secure on-line banking, smart
card devices, mobile networks, e-commerce and m-commerce systems,
electronic brokerage and program trading applications. Apart from the
technical insight required to comparatively appraise several “off-the-
shelf” applications that are currently available in the market, students
will also acquire the necessary decision-making skills in order to be
able to select the proper technology precisely suited for the job at hand
given organizational budget and resource constraints. Prerequisites:
MBA 61800 and MBA 67000. Offered as needed.

MCT 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3)
Individual study in a given field under the guidance of a faculty
member. Offered as needed.

MCT 68500 INTERNSHIP (1-3)
Practical work experience or experiential opportunity in a given
area of concentration under the guidance of a faculty member and on-

Graduate Course Descriptions 228
Alaska Pacific University

site supervisor. Completion of a written report or document. Offered as
needed.

MCT 69200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Examination or study of special topic or area. Offered as needed.
Course description published when offered, but examples include:
wireless data services, managing IT departments, telecommunications
contracting, etc. Offered as needed.

OEE – Master Of Science In Outdoor and
Environmental Education
(Offered through the Outdoor Studies Department)

OEE 60100 THESIS SEMINAR I (1)
This seminar is to be taken in the initial semester of MSOEE program
attendance, affording each student an opportunity to develop a thesis
topic. The seminar meets weekly in order to explore research and project
options, broaden participants’ understanding of current trends among
researchers and practitioners in the field and support the development
of a collaborative research environment within the cohort. The culmi-
nating paper will provide a working draft for the Thesis Proposal with
particular emphasis on the literature review. This may be a quantitative
or qualitative research proposal for the Research Thesis or a proposal
for an action project to be carried out for a Project Thesis. At the end of
the semester students present their work to invited peers and faculty.

OEE 60500 OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION LITERACY
(2)
This course will experience the wide variety of outdoor and environ-
mental curricula offered locally and nationally via readings on their
history, philosophy, methods, and issues. Field trips and trainings will
be utilized as appropriate to provide demonstration models and hands
on experience in diverse approaches to implementing OEE curricula.
The course will also explore certification and training options for the
students enrolled in the Outdoor and Environmental Education Graduate
Program.

OEE 60700 TEACHING METHODS FOR OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL
EDUCATION (4)
This course will cover in detail the theories and methods used in
outdoor and environmental education. Students will learn to integrate
the natural sciences into standard outdoor and environmental teaching
methods. The emphasis is on practical techniques utilized in both formal
and non-formal education in an environmental context.

OEE 60900 ASSESSMENT OF OUTDOOR AND ENVIRONMENTAL
EDUCATION (1)
This course will focus on the assessment and evaluation of environ-
mental and outdoor education programs, curricula, and materials by
using formal measures (e.g., rubrics and standardized tests) as well as
informal observational techniques. Emphasis will be on the design of
assessment and evaluation tools used to measure outcomes of environ-
Graduate Course Descriptions 229
Alaska Pacific University

mental and outdoor education programs at the elementary, middle, and
high school levels.

OEE 61100 CURRICULUM DESIGN FOR EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATORS (4)
This course will explore the role of the curriculum design as a
foundation of successful outdoor and environmental education by making
students familiar with the educational materials and curricula that are
offered nationally and locally. Focus will be on students’ ability to design
their own curriculum and to adapt it to different audiences.

OEE 61300 LEARNING THEORY IN OUTDOOR EDUCATION (2)
Outdoor Educators in both non-formal programs and experientially
grounded formal programs commonly rely on a distinct set of learning
theories. This course will introduce these approaches to learning and
help students to acquire a working knowledge of the most commonly
used theories in Outdoor & Environmental Education. These approaches
include Constructivism; Behavior Constraint; Diffusion Innovation;
Adaptive Dissonance; Place-Attachment; Optimal Arousal; Flow; Social
Learning; Expectancy, Self-efficacy and Locus of Control; and Effectance
and Competence Motivation. Students will gain an understanding of the
outdoor and environmental educator’s role in facilitating learning experi-
ences relying on each perspective.

OEE 67500 THESIS SEMINAR II (1)
This seminar is to be taken in the second semester of MSOEE program
attendance, affording each student an opportunity to fully engage his/
her thesis topic . The seminar meets weekly in order to share research
and project challenges and successes thus, broadening participants’
knowledge of the multiple approaches to research and project devel-
opment in this varied field. The culminating paper will be the Thesis
Proposal ready for review by committee members.

OEE 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3)
Designed for students wishing to learn about and experience new
topics not available in regular scheduled classes.

OEE 68500 PRACTICUM (1-3)
This course involves supervised fieldwork in a professional setting
with emphasis on organizing, leading, and assessing outdoor and environ-
mental education programs. Students will work with professional organi-
zations that deliver curriculum, assisting them with learning organiza-
tional and teaching techniques, and developing project and research
proposals.

OEE 69200 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)
Designed for faculty and students wishing to learn and experience
new topics not available in regularly scheduled classes.

OEE 69900 THESIS RESEARCH (1-6)
Students will study an area of their interest in outdoor and environ-
mental education, developing a research question, collecting, compiling,
Graduate Course Descriptions 230
Alaska Pacific University

and analyzing data, and writing a professional paper summarizing their
thesis. Work will be supervised by a thesis committee with a presen-
tation and defense of work, and approval of thesis before graduation.

PY – Psychology
(Offered through the Counseling Psychology and Human Services
Department)

PY 61100 PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION AND ETHICS (4)
This course provides an understanding of all aspects of professional
functioning, including history, roles, organizational structures, ethics,
standards, and credentialing. A special emphasis is given to providing a
solid foundation in professional ethics. Offered Fall.

PY 61500 PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING: THEORY, SKILLS, AND
PRACTICE I (4)
This course is designed to review, compare, and contrast prevailing
theories of counseling, to practice some of the basic methods of
counseling, and to develop skills necessary to enhance the counseling
relationship. Emphasis is upon communication, self-awareness of one’s
own behavior and its effect upon others, and the development of one’s
ability to accurately interpret the behavior of others. Under faculty
supervision, some limited opportunities are provided to practice these
skills. Offered Fall.

PY 62000 ADVANCED HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (4)
Exploration of significant issues within developmental psychology as
they relate to counseling, utilizing a life-span developmental perspective
is encouraged. Offered Fall.

PY 62500 PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING: THEORY, SKILLS, AND
PRACTICE II (4)
This course is designed to practice additional methods of counseling
and develop more sophisticated skills necessary to enhance the
counseling relationship. Emphasis is upon a variety of counseling
paradigms including RET, Behavior Therapy, Adlerian techniques, and
Gestalt processes. Under faculty supervision, opportunities are provided
to practice these skills. Students also begin to identify internship sites
during this course. Offered Spring.

PY 64000 ADVANCED ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)
Through this course, the student becomes familiar with current
psychological perspectives on pathological behavior. The conceptual and
structural models of the most current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual
of Mental Disorders (DSM) are emphasized. Offered Spring.

PY 64300 ASSESSMENT IN COUNSELING (4)
Foundation for conducting psychological assessments in the
counseling setting. Hands-on experience with testing and assessment
procedures common in the field. Administration of tests, such as the
TAT, MMPI-2, Wechsler series intelligence tests, etc. Offered Spring.

Graduate Course Descriptions 231
Alaska Pacific University

PY 64600 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF COUNSELING (4)
Exploration of a broad range of topics relevant to the mental health
practitioner. Of particular importance are cross-cultural counseling, drug
and alcohol issues, gender issues, geriatric issues, domestic violence,
and preventive models. Offered Summer.

PY 64900 GROUP COUNSELING (4)
Foundations of various methods of group therapy. Exploration of
individual, interpersonal, and group processes that occur within the
parameters of group counseling. Prerequisite: PY 62500. Offered
Summer.

PY 65300 COUPLES AND FAMILY THERAPY (4)
Introduction to current methods of couples and family therapy, e.g.,
structural, systems, behavioral, etc. The application and efficacy of
these methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: PY 62500. Offered Fall.

PY 65500 DESIGN AND PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH (4)
Quantitative and qualitative approaches to conducting research.
Foundation of concepts necessary for professional consumption of
research literature. Practice in requisite conceptual, speaking, and
writing skills for effective professional communication of ideas. Offered
Fall.

PY 65700 BRIEF THERAPY (4)
Introduction to the cooperative therapeutic model of solution
focused counseling and other brief therapy models. Includes various
application and intervention approaches used by the brief therapist.
Offered Spring.

PY 66000 CAREER AND LIFESTYLE COUNSELING (4)
This course provides a theoretical foundation and opportunities
for practical application of career and lifestyle counseling strategies. It
focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to provide professional
career counseling services to an adult population in a variety of transi-
tional life stages. Students will have an opportunity to examine major
theories of career choice and development, career assessment instru-
ments and their use, and the counseling models associated with these
theories and measurements. They will also explore lifestyle and career
needs of young, middle, and older adults. Offered Summer.

PY 68000 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4)
Individual study in a given field or topic area under the guidance of
a faculty member. Offered as needed.

PY 69000 PROFESSIONAL SEMINAR (4)
This seminar is taken in the final semester, affording each student
an opportunity to pursue a topic of special interest. The seminar meets
biweekly in order to discuss the problems and issues that arise in doing
one’s own work. The culminating professional paper may take many
forms. A traditional paper might be a quantitative or qualitative research
report. A nontraditional paper might be a description and evaluation of an
action project carried out during the semester or an interpreted debate
Graduate Course Descriptions 232
Alaska Pacific University

representing opposing points of view. Components might include video,
performance, or other creative formats. At the end of the semester
students present their work to faculty and peers. Offered Spring.

PY 69500 COUNSELING INTERNSHIP (8)
Experience as an intern counselor at a professional site in the
community. This involves at least 15 hours a week, including the course
meeting time, for a total of 600 hours over two semesters. The internship
site must be approved by the MSCP Director in advance. Prerequisite:
Admission to degree candidacy. Offered Fall/Spring.

Graduate Course Descriptions 233
Alaska Pacific University

UNIVERSITY DIRECTORY

Administration

President - Douglas McKay North

Academic Dean - Marilyn R. Barry

Dean of Administration & Finance - Deborah Johnston

Dean of Students - Kelly O’Brian Smith

Director of University Advancement - Ann Hale

Director of Distance Education Services and RANA -
Esther Beth Sullivan
Interim Registrar - Donna Dougherty

Director of Admissions – Jennifer Jensen

Director of Student Financial Services – Jo Holland

Director of Information Technology – Michael Baker

Facilities/Property Manager – Kathy Mincks

Director of Auxiliary Services – James Jordan

Alaska Pacific University 234
Alaska Pacific University

FACULTY

KAREN BAKER, Visiting Instructor in Education; B.S., University of
Maryland; M.Ed., University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

MARILYN R. BARRY, Professor of English; Academic Dean. B.A., San
Diego State College; M.A., Mills College; A.D. University of Oregon.

LINDA BLACK, Associate Professor of Education; B.S., Lewis & Clark
College; M.A., Washington State University; Ed.D., University
Southern California.

REGINA A. BOISCLAIR, Professor of Religious Studies; Cardinal
Newman Chair of Catholic Theology; B.A., Anna Maria College; M.S.,
Simmons College; M.Div, S.T.M., Yale University; M.A., Providence
College; M.A., Ph.D., Temple University.

JIM McCASLIN BROWN, Professor of Environmental Geology; B.S.,
M.S., University of Alaska Fairbanks; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin,
Madison.

ELLEN S. COLE, Professor of Psychology; Director, Master of
Science in Counseling Psychology Program; B.A. Boston University;
Ed.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., The Union Institute.

LESLIE CORNICK, Associate Professor of Marine Biology and
Statistics; B.A., University of California, San Diego; M.A., San
Francisco State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

AMANDA COYNE, Instructor of Writing; B.A., University of
Iowa; M.F.A., University of Iowa.

KATHLEEN CRONEN, Visiting Instructor of Health Services
Administration; B.S., Creighton University; M.S., University of LaVerne.

BEVERLY DENNIS, Assistant Professor of Business Administration;
B.A., Alaska Pacific University; MBA, Alaska Pacific University.

ROMAN J. DIAL, Professor of Biology and Mathematics; B.S., M.S.,
University of Alaska Fairbanks; Ph.D., Stanford University.

CLAUDETTE ENGBLOM-BRADLEY, Associate Professor of Education;
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.S., University of Connecticut; Ed.D.
Harvard Graduate School of Education.

MEI MEI EVANS, Associate Professor of English; B.A., Hampshire
College; M.F.A., Vermont College; Ph.D., University of Washington.

MARK FALLER, Associate Professor of Philosophy; Chair, Liberal
Studies Department; B.A. Harvard University; M.A., St John’s College,
Annapolis; Ph.D., University of Georgia.

SCOTT FREDRICKSON, Professor of Business Administration and
Entrepreneurship; A.A., Fullerton Community College; B.A., California

Alaska Pacific University 235
Alaska Pacific University

State University Fullerton; M.B.A., Pepperdine University; D.A.,
University of Northern Colorado.

JASON GECK, Instructor in Environmental Science; B.A.,
California State University, Sacramento; M.S., Alaska Pacific
University.

RENEE GEORG, Assistant Professor of Human Services; B.S.,
Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania; M.S., Alaska Pacific
University.

VIRGINIA G. GOLSAN, Associate Professor of Education; B.S.,
Trevecca University; M.Ed., University of Alaska Fairbanks; Ph.D.,
University of Wisconsin-Madison.

CARL M. HILD, Associate Professor of Health Services
Administration; Director of the Health Services Administration
Programs; B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., School of
Engineering, University of Alaska Anchorage; Ph.D., Saybrook
Graduate School and Research Center, San Francisco.

JEFFREY L. ICKES, Professor of Psychology; Chair, Department
of Counseling Psychology and Human Services; B.A., Grove City
College; M.Ed., Slippery Rock State University; Ph.D., Kent State
University.

VIRGINIA JUETTNER, Associate Professor of Education; Director,
Graduate Program in Education; B.S., University of South Alabama; M.
Ed., University of Arizona; Ph.D., University of Arizona.

MICHAEL KAPLAN, Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies; B.A.,
Reed College, Portland; M.A., University of Alaska, Anchorage; Ph.D.,
University of Washington, Seattle.

SCOTT KIEFER, Instructional Technologist; B.A., University of Alaska
Fairbanks; M.S. Library & Information, University of Illinois, Urbana
Champaign.

KIM S. KJAERSGAARD, Professor of Psychology; B.A., M.S.,
University of Alaska Anchorage; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (On
Sabbatical leave Fall 2009)

MEGAN BOLTWOOD KRUPA, Assistant Professor of Environmental
Studies and Policy and Planning; B.A., Prescott College; M.S. University
of Montana, Missoula; Ph.D., University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

ROBERT A. LANE, Associate Professor of Psychology; B.A., University
of Alaska Anchorage; M.S., University of LaVerne; Ph.D., The Union
Institute.

EEVA LATOSUO, Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies; B.S.,
Western Washington University; M.S., University of Helsinki, Finland.

DALE LEHMAN, Professor of Economics; Director, Executive MBA in
Information and Communication Technology Program; Director, MBA
Program; B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.A., Ph.
D., University of Rochester.
Alaska Pacific University 236
Alaska Pacific University

MICHAEL LOSO, Assistant Professor of Geology and Earth Science;
Director, Master of Science in Environmental Science; B.A., University
of California, Santa Barbara; M.S., University of Vermont; Ph.D.,
University of California, Santa Cruz.

CAROLE LUND, Assistant Professor in Business Administration;
Director, Degree Completion Program; B.A., Alaska Pacific University;
M.Ed., University of Alaska Anchorage; Ed.D., National Louis
University, Chicago, Illinois.

PAMELA A. MASLYK, Assistant Professor of Mathematics; B.A.,
Slippery Rock University, PA; M.S. University of Alaska Fairbanks.

GINA MILLER, Instructor of Writing, Director, Early Honors Program;
B.A., Washburn University; M.A., University of Alaska, Anchorage.

KAREN A. McCAIN, Assistant Professor of Education; Director,
Master of Arts Program; B.S., Towson University; M.A.T., Alaska Pacific
University.

ANN McCOY, Assistant Professor of Education; B.A., Humboldt State
University; M.A.T., Alaska Pacific University; PH.D., University of Idaho.

DAVID F. McGIVERN, Associate Professor of Outdoor Studies; Chair,
Outdoor Studies Department; B.A., M.A., University of Alaska
Anchorage.

STEPHANIE MORGAN, Visiting Instructor of Statistics in Business
Administration; B.A., University of Alaska Anchorage; M.S., Portland
State University.

THEODORE R. MUNSCH, Professor of Education; B.S., Eastern
Montana College; Ph.D., University of Idaho.

RICHARD L. MYERS, Professor of Environmental Science; B.S.,
University of Toledo; M.S., University of Alaska Fairbanks; Ph.D.,
Florida Institute of Technology.

DOUGLAS McKAY NORTH, Professor of Humanities; President; B.A.,
Yale University; M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of
Virginia.

ROSANNE PAGANO, Instructor in Writing; B.A. in English,
Albertus Magnus College; M.J. in Journalism, University of California
at Berkeley.

LYNN E. PAULSON, Professor of Communication; B.A., Pennsylvania
State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-
Champaign.

TIMOTHY M. RAWSON, Associate Professor of History; B.A., Luther
College; M.A., University of Alaska Fairbanks; Ph.D., University of
Oregon.

ERIC REDDING, Instructor of Music; B.S., University of Mary,
Bismarck; M.M., Central Washington University, Ellensburg.

Alaska Pacific University 237
Alaska Pacific University

STEVEN RUBINSTEIN, Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies;
Director, Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental Education.
B.S., Guilford College; M.S., Minnesota State University.

DAVID SCHEEL, Professor of Marine Biology; B.S., Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y.; M.S., Ph.D., University of
Minnesota, Minneapolis.

DOROTHY SHEPARD, Associate Professor of Human Services;
Director of Human Services; B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; M.A.T.,
Alaska Pacific University; Ed.D., Boston University.

STEVEN W. SHORE, Assistant Professor of Information Technology;
B.M.(Music), State University of New York; M.S., Long Island
University.

SHARON SIBBALD, Assistant Professor of Writing; Director of
Writing Program; B.A., University of Alaska, Fairbanks; M.A.,
University of California, Berkeley.

ANA SIROVIC, Assistant Professor of Marine Biology; B.A., University
of California, Santa Barbara; Ph.D., University of California, San Diego.

TRACY STEWART, Associate Professor of Leadership and Strategy;
Chair, Business Administration; M.S., Pepperdine University; M.A., Ph.
D., University of Virginia. (On Sabbatical leave Fall 2009)

ESTHER BETH SULLIVAN, Associate Professor Of Theater; B.A.,
Rocky Mountain College; M.A., Washington State University; Ph.D.,
University of Washington.

YASO G. THIRU, Associate Professor of Accounting and Management;
Institute of Chartered & Management Accounts, Great Britain; Master
of Accountancy, Bowling Green State University; Ed.D., Fielding
Graduate Institute.

NORA TOBIN, Instructor of Psychology; B.A., Hamilton College; M.S.
in Counseling Psychology, Alaska Pacific University.

STANLEY CARL TOBIN, Associate Professor of Environmental
Science; Chair, Environmental Science Dept., B.S., M.S., University of
Alaska, Fairbanks; Ph.D., Northern Arizona University.

PAUL F. TWARDOCK, Associate Professor of Outdoor Studies; B.S.,
Western Illinois College; M.B.A., Alaska Pacific University.

MARY WLADKOWSKI, Instructor in Finance; B.S., Northeastern
University, Boston; M.B.A., Argosy University.

ROBERT T. WILKINSON, Professor of Humanities; B.A., University
of Hawaii; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Washington State University.

Alaska Pacific University 238
Alaska Pacific University

FACULTY EMERITI

RAGHBIR S. BASI, Professor of Management, 1999

DIANA CALDWELL, Associate Professor of Education, 2005

ROBERT D. CRAIG, Professor of Social Sciences, 1998

JANE L. EVANSON, Professor of Education, 1995

CHARLES B. FAHL, Professor of Environmental Science, 2003

CHARLES C. FRISBEE, Professor of Education, 1968

ORCUTT W. (JACK) FROST, Professor of Humanities, 1991

JIM MAHAFFEY, Associate Professor, 1992

LUZ RIVAS McDADE, Assistant Professor of Human Services, 1996

LORETTA M. MILLER, Professor of Education, 1968

JANET L. PRANGE, Professor of Education, 1993

EDITH M. TAYLOR, Instructor of Management, 1998

JOHN PRICE WOODS, Professor of Physics and Mathematics, 1976

STAFF EMERITA
JEANETTE BROOKS, Registrar Emerita, 2006

Alaska Pacific University 239
Alaska Pacific University

Board of Directors
Officers FOR 2009-2010
Harry McDonald, Chairman
Trigg Davis, Vice Chairman
Dave Karp, Secretary
Jan Sieberts, Treasurer

Hugh Ashlock Robert Batch Mary Bettis
Carl Brady, Jr. Larry Cash Roger Chan
John Eng Charlie Fahl Katherine Gottlieb
Robert Gottstein Roberta Graham Patricia Brown Heller
Christopher Hodel Karen Hunt Francis Hurley
Donald Keil, Jr. Bonnie Mehner Lottie Michael
Teresa Nelson Liane Pelletier Edward Rasmuson
William Sheffield Dale Summerlin George Walton
Eric Wohlforth John Niles Wanamaker

Trustees Emeriti
Eunice Beene* Larry Carr Frederick Hood Jr., M.D.
V. Louise Kellogg* Arthur Kelly Frances Mlakar
John Overbey Robert Pease Leah Peterson *
Raymond Peterson Reverend A.C. Wischmeier*
John Seawell John Woods, MD Gordon Wear
Barbara Dadd Shaffer

Honorary Trustees
Robert Atwood* Joe Hays Harusuke Imamura
James Kross

APU Foundation
2009-2010 Board of Directors
Officers
Chris Swalling, Chairman
Larry Carr, Vice Chairman
David McGuire, M.D., Secretary
Jan Sieberts, Treasurer
Bonnie Mehner
Steve O’Hara
Harry McDonald
Eric Wohlforth
Roger Chan
* Deceased

Alaska Pacific University 240
TABLE OF SUBSTITUTIONS
General University Requirements Transfer Courses
A 3-4 credit hour natural science with a laboratory component. Common examples include
LABORATORY SCIENCE
biology, chemistry, and geology.

A 3-4 credit hour course in the social or behavioral sciences. Common examples include
SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, or history (political/social).

A 3-4 credit hour course in world religions, history of religion, or ethics that is non-
ETHICAL AND RELIGIOUS VALUES
denominational and inclusive, rather than narrow or specific.

A 3-4 credit hour writing course or combination of writing courses, which require researched,
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION

Alaska Pacific University
documented writing appropriate to the student’s discipline.

A 3-4 hour credit course in fundamentals of speech communications, public speaking, or small
SPEECH COMMUNICATION
group communication.

A 3-4 hour credit course as follows: Intermediate algebra for AA degree students. For BA and
QUANTITATIVE REASONING
BS degree students, college algebra, applied statistics, math concepts, or symbolic logic.

Two 3-4 credit hour courses in humanities; literature; cultural anthropology; history
HUMANITIES (2 courses)
(intellectual/cultural); philosophy; or the history of art, music, or drama.

ORIENTATION: INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE Required for all but senior transfer students but may be waived by advisor depending on
LEARNING SELF & SOCIETY IN CONTEXT individual students’ educational experiences.

A 3-4 credit hour course in a language that is not the primary language. An English proficiency
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Appendix A - Transfer Matrix

is required of students whose native language is not English.

Required for all but senior transfer students but may be waived by advisor depending on
SOPHOMORE SEMINAR
individual students’ educational experiences.

241
Final decisions on transfer credits are made by the Registrar
ACADEMIC POLICIES APPEALS PROCESS

Course related Academic Academic Challenge to the Waive undergraduate
problem Advising Dishonesty Registrar's university requirements and
transcript evaluation appeal registration policies
Instructor Advisor Instructor

Department Chair Department Chair Registrar's Advisory
Department Chair or Committee **
Graduate Program Director Academic Dean (Contact the Registrar)

Alaska Pacific University
University
Academic Dean Appeals Board

University Grievance Procedure
Definition of Terms:
Process

Student turns in written Waiver: To refrain from insistence that a student complete a specific assignment
grievance to the Dean of Students Equivalency: Consider a class as equal in value, measure or meaning to another class
Office within 15 days of Substitution: Allow a class to serve in place of another class
the incident
* Has authority to waive, substitute, and/or grant equivalencies within the department
Informal Conference boundaries. Decisions by department chairs should be stated on Substitution and/or
Equivalency Form with the original copy forwarded to the Registrar's Office for the
Students meets with inclusion in the student's file.
University Grievance Committee
(presiding officer, 2 faculty members, ** Has authority to waive specific university-wide graduation requirements for AA,
2 students) BA, and Master's candidates.
Appendix B - Academic Policies Appeal

242
If you have questions about the appeals process or need clarification, contact the Registrar, the Academic Dean, or the Dean of Students.
fleX PlAn mATriX
(Available to undergraduate full time students who pay consolidated full time tuition fee)
Institutional aid equal to 1 - 4 semester hours (S.H.) credit for May block course(s) will be awarded students who register and complete 12-
17 S.H. in the Spring Semester (January - April). The chart below provides examples of some variations for credit distributions. Students
who wish to carry more credits in the block than covered by the FLEX Plan Award may make up the difference out of pocket at the current
tuition rate. The FLEX plan does not apply to courses offered in Summer (except for students taking senior project or practicum), Full
Semestser, Session 1 and 2.

Keep in mind that the may block is nOT part of the spring semester. It is part of the Summer Semester and course work taken in
May does not count as hours taken and/or completed in the Spring Semester. (Example: Students who enroll full time for the Spring
Semester and who withdraw from enough courses so that their Spring Semester Course load is less than 12 semester hours may not use
the May Block course as hours completed in the Spring Semester for financial aid purposes.)

Alaska Pacific University
Students who intend on taking a May block or summer course under this plan are required to fill out an application form, available from the
Student Financial Services Office or SFS website and submit it to SFS during the Spring term before the last day of class.

Total spring s.h. eligible hours for Total hours
block + session + full semester Courses financial Aid spring semester and
min. of 12 s.h. - max. of 17 s.h. in the may block may block
1-4 s.h. may not exceed 18 s.h.

Example 1 4 S.H. in Jan Block + 8 S.H. in Session = 12 4 Total = 16

Example 2 4 S.H. in Jan Block + 12 S.H. in Session = 16 2 Total = 18

Example 3 4 S.H. in Jan Block + 3 S.H. in Full Semester + 8 S.H. in Session = 15 3 Total = 18
Appendix C - FLEX Plan Matrix

Example 4 2 S.H. in Jan Block + 8 S.H. in Full Semester + 8 S.H. in Session = 18 0 Total = 18

Example 5 2 S.H. in Jan Block + 6 S.H. in Full Semester + 8 S.H. in Session = 16 2 Total = 18

243
Example 6 4 S.H. in Jan Block + 13 Hours in the Session = 17 1 Total = 18
Appendix D - Financial Policies/Procedures Summary

Tuition Refund Policy
Prior to second day of classes 100%
Second day to end of first week 75%
Beginning of second week to end of second week 50%
Beginning of third week forward 0%

A student’s billing account is due in full by the end of the first
week of their first class.

If payments are missed, late fees will be charged and you will not
be allowed to register for the upcoming semester until the account is
paid in full.

Payment Collection
Payment in full or defined Tuition Management Systems (TMS)
payment plan arrangements are due by the end of the first week of
classes.
Payment in Full options: cash, personal or cashier’s check, money
order, VISA, MasterCard, Discover or debit.

Payment Plan Arrangement Options:
• Financial Aid/Scholarships (Contact Student Financial
Services)
• Tuition Management Systems (Request brochure from the
Student Financial Services Office, visit www.afford.com, or call
1-888-356-0350
• Sponsor Bill outs (Students must check in with the Student
Financial Services Office within the first week of classes and
provide documentation from the paying sponsor)
• Employer reimbursements (Restrictions apply - contact Student
Financial Services Office)

Accounts not paid in full by the end of the semester will be in
delinquent status and subject to collection efforts, including restriction
from registering for future semesters, transcripts and diplomas being
withheld until the debt is satisfied. Please note accounts are also put
on hold for delinquent library fines owed to UAA since the Consortium
Library is jointly owned by APU and UAA. After two official notifications
of delinquent status are sent, giving the student an additional 25 days
to resolve the payment issues, accounts without appropriate responses
are turned over to a Collection Agency.

Payment Options:
Students may pay their account balance with cash, personal check,
money order, cashier’s check, VISA, MasterCard, Discover or debit.

Pay in Person: Student Financial Services Office
Grant Hall #125
OR
Mail payments to: Alaska Pacific University
Attn: Student Financial Services Office
4101 University Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508

Credit Card payments: Call 1-800-252-7528 and ask for Student
Financial Services Office or in Anchorage call 564-8341

Alaska Pacific University 244
Appendix D - Financial Policies/Procedures Summary

Financial Aid
If you have expected financial aid, all paperwork should be filled
out and submitted well in advance of the beginning of the semester. To
receive financial aid checks you must have a valid picture ID. If you are
receiving scholarships, a copy of the letter/letters stating the amount
awarded must be submitted to the Student Financial Services when
making payment arrangements. Any remaining balance after expected
financial aid is determined, is due the first week of classes. Please
contact the Student Financial Services Office for any questions - 907-
564-8341 or sfs@alaskapacific.edu.

Tuition Management Systems Interest-Free Monthly
Payment Plan
Mail payments directly to TMS for processing:
Tuition Management Systems
Payment Processing Center
PO Box 842722
Boston, MA 02284-2722

Payments not received by the due date will be assessed a late fee
by TMS.

Employer Reimbursements
Students must pay their billing account in full or set up a payment
plan through Tuition Management Systems (TMS). At the student’s
request, SFS will send a statement to the employer showing their billing
account has been paid in full allowing the student to be reimbursed.

Emergency Student Loan
If a student has Financial Aid forthcoming, the student may borrow
up to $1,000 against the pending aid (provided expected tuition and fees
will still be covered once aid is received). If a student has already been
disbursed the financial aid, or does not have financial aid forthcoming,
a student may borrow up to $350. The application process begins with
the Dean of Students Office.

Special Consideration of Financial Policy
It is important to note that although a student may have been granted
a Request for Special Consideration of Academic Policy or In-Progress,
etc., a separate Request for Special Consideration of Financial Policy is
required to address waiver of any tuition and fees still due. Instructors,
academic advisors, etc., may make a recommendation regarding waiver
of fees associated with waiver of academic policy or in-progress work;
however, the applicable financial policy must be addressed separately.
These forms are initiated in the Business Office.
Contact the Student Financial Services Office with any payment
questions at 907-564-8341, toll free 1-800-252-7528 and ask for the
Student Financial Services office or by e-mail: sfs@alaskapacific.edu.
Scholarship Retension: See the Financial Aid Undergraduate section
for requirements, free application for Federal Student Aid, (FAFSA) is
required for all institutional awards.

Alaska Pacific University 245
Alaska Pacific University

Index
3+2 Program 204

A
Academic
Advising 35, 180
Calendar 12-15
Class Standing 35
Courses, Abbreviations, and Course Descriptions 105, 209
Degrees 64, 189
Good Standing 41, 184
Policies and Procedures 16, 167
Probation 41, 184
Program Variations 206
Semester Honors 42, 184
Standing 41, 184
Study Plan 206
Suspension 42
Warning 41
Accounting Course Descriptions 105
Accounting Information for Management Major 66
Adding Courses 36, 180
Additional Information 19
Address Changes 42, 184
Administration 232
Admissions 16, 167, 191, 201, 204, 208
Categories 21, 169
Candidacy 200
Denied 22, 170
Hold 21, 169
Methods 16
Pending Final Documentation 21
RANA Distance Education Students 19
Standards 17, 168
Advanced Placement 36
Alaska Residents Award 29
Anchorage Higher Education Consortium Library 10
APU Foundation 238
APU Interest-Free Monthly Payment Plan 26, 172
Associate of Arts OFFERINGS 15
Business Administration 65
Education 80
Human Services 72
Career And Technical Education 94
Atwood Center 10
Auditing 36

B
Bachelor of Arts offerings 15
Accounting Information For Management 66
Business Administration And Management 68
Earth Sciences 83
Education 81
Environmental Policy and Planning 88
Environmental Science 85
Environmental Studies 90
Health Services Administration 70
Human Services 75
Liberal Studies 95
Marine Biology 92
Outdoor Studies 101
Psychology 73
Bachelor of Science offerings 15
Earth Sciences 83
Index 246
Alaska Pacific University
Environmental Science 85
Marine Biology 92
Benefits of the APU Interest-Free Monthly Payment Plan 26, 172
Biological Science Concentration 87
Board of Directors 238
Business Administration Course Descriptions 107
Business Administration and Management Major 68
Business Administration and Management Minor 69
Business Administration Department 65, 189
Business Administration and Management Course Descriptions 110

C
Calendar 12
Campus Map 11
Campus Undergraduate Program Degree Offerings 54
Career and Technical Education Course Descriptions 116
Carr Gottstein Academic Center 10
Census Date 37, 181
Certificate Offerings 15
Graduate Studies in Entrepreneurship 197
Graduate Studies in Investments 197
Class Attendance 42
Commercial Recreation/Tourism 103
Communication and Environment Concentration 91
Communication Course Descriptions 114
Competency Courses 53
Competency Courses Minimum Grades 43
Complete Withdrawal Policy 37, 181
Comprehensive Examinations 184
Concentration Areas
Biological Science 87
Commercial Recreation/Tourism 103
Communication and Environmental Concentration 91
Culture and Environment 91
Environmental and Nonprofit Leadership 91
Earth Systems Science 86
Environmental Science 86
Environmental Studies 90
Finance 193
General Environmental Science 87
Health Services Administration 193
Land Mangement 103
Literature 96
Outdoor Education 103
Philosophy 96
Pre-Law 97
Religious Studies 98
Science and Environmental 91
Wilderness Therapy 103
Writing 98
Continuous Enrollment 36, 180
Contract Learning 43
Counseling Psychology and Human Services Department 72, 198
Course Add/Drop/Withdraw Policy 36, 180
Course Numbering System 43, 184
Course Descriptions 105, 209
Accounting (AC) 105
Business Administration (BA) 107
Business Adminstration and Management (BAM) 110
Communication (CO) 114
Cultural Studies (CS) 115
Career and Technical Education (CTE) 116
Education (ED) 117, 209
Environmental Science (ES) 212
Exectuive MBA in Information and Communication Technology (MCT) 225
Fine Arts (FA) 121
General Studies (GS) 122
History (HI) 124, 217
Human Services (HS) 124
Index 247
Alaska Pacific University
Health Services Administration (HSA) 127
Humanities (HU) 129
Interdisciplinary Studies (IS) 130
Language, Literature and Writing (LL) 131
Liberal Studies (LS) 134
Marine Biology (MAR) 136
Master of Arts Program (MAP) 136
Master of Business Administration (MBA) 218
Mathematics (MT) 219
Outdoor and Environmental Science (OEE) 140
Outdoor Studies (OS) 142
Physical Education (PE) 147
Philosophy (PH) 147
Psychology (PY) 148, 229
Religious Studies (RS) 154
Science (SC) 156
Social Sciences (SS) 165
Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) 33, 178
Credit By Choice 20
Credit by Examination 43
Cultural Studies Course Descriptions 115
Culture And Environment Concentration 91
Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) 27

D
Deferred Applicant Policy 21
Degree Completion Program 18, 58
Degree Offerings 15
DEL Folder 44
Departments 65-104, 189-208
Business Administration 65, 189
Counseling Psychology and Human Services Department 72, 198
Education 77, 201
Environmental Science 83, 203
Liberal Studies 94, 206
Outdoor Studies 100, 210
Directed Study 43, 57, 185
Disbursement Rules 171
Discontinuance of Attendance 26, 173
Documented Experiential Learning Credit 44
Double Majors 38
Dropping Courses 37, 181

E
Early Admission 169
Early Honors Program 17, 30, 62
Earth Sciences Major 83
Earth Systems Science Concentration 86
EcoLeague Exchange Program 63
Education Course Descriptions 117, 211
Education Department 77, 201
Electives 50
Elmo Sackett Broadcast Center 10
Email Address 44, 185
Employer Reimbursements 29, 175
Enrollment and Registration 35, 180
Environmental And Nonprofit Leadership Concentration 91
Environmental Policy and Planning Major 88
Environmental Science Major 85
Environmental Science Concentration Areas 86
Environmental Science Department 83, 203
Environmental Science Minor 87
Environmental Studies Concentration Areas 90
Environmental Studies Major 89
Environmental Science Course Descriptions 214
Ethical and Religious Values 49
Executive MBA In InformationAnd Communication Technology 194,227
Expedition Requirement 102

Index 248
Alaska Pacific University

F
Faculty 235
Faculty-Initiated Drop 37, 181
Faculty Emeriti 239
FAFSA Application Information 24, 171
Federal and State Financial Aid Disbursement Rules 25, 171
Federal Refund Formula (Return of Title IV Funds) 32, 178
Fees 30, 175
Field Course Electives 90
Finance 193
Financial Aid 22, 170
Reinstatement 29, 175
Suspension 28, 174
Fine Arts Course Descriptions 121
FLEX Plan 24, 243
Full-Time Consolidated Tuition 29
Full-time Enrollment and Full-time Employment 44
Full Admission 21, 169

G
General Environmental Science Concentration 87
General Studies 122
General University Requirements 47, 51
Glenn Olds Hall 10
Gould Hall 10
Grace Hall 10
Grade Change Policy 35, 180
Grading System 33, 178
Graduate
Academic Courses, Abbreviations, and Course Descriptions 211
Academic Degrees 189
Assistantships 170
Deferred Applicant Policy 169
Policies and Procedures 167
Programs 188
Graduation
Application 38, 182
Honors 38
Residency Requirement 53
Grant Hall 10
Guaranteed Consolidated Tuition Plan 32
GURs 51

H
Health Services Administration 70, 127, 192
History Course Descriptions 124, 219
History of APU 8
Homer and Ruth Moseley Sports Center 10
Honorary Trustees 240
Honor Policy 44, 185
Housing and Meal Plan Costs 31, 176
HSA Degree Requirements 70, 192
Humanities 49, 129
Human Services Major 74, 124
Human Services Minor 76

I
Incomplete Courses (I) 34, 179
Incomplete Process 34, 179
Independent Study 43
Interdisciplinary Studies 130
International Students 18, 167
International Study 198
Interruption in Enrollment 38, 182
Introduction to Active Learning 48
Investments Certificate 197
In Progress (IP) 179
Index 249
Alaska Pacific University

J
Jim Mahaffey Trail System 10
Junior Practicum 57
Jury Duty 44, 185

K
K-8 Professional Development Certificate 79

L
Laboratory Science 49
Land Management 103
Language Requirement 50
Language, Literature and Writing Course Descriptions 131
Leave of Absence 38, 182
Liberal Studies Course Descriptions 134
Liberal Studies Department 94, 206
Liberal Studies Minor 99
Limitation of Time 185
Literature Concentration 96

M
Main Campus 10
MAP Program Course Descriptions 220
Map of Campus 11
Marine Biology Major 92
Marine Biology Course Descriptions 136
Marine Biology Electives (Lower Division) 93
Marine Biology Electives (Upper Division) 93
Marine Biology Minor 93
Marketing Menu 193
Master Degrees 15
Master of Arts 206
Master of Arts In Teaching 202
Master of Science in Counseling Psychology 198
Master of Science in Environmental Science
Master of Science in Outdoor And Environmental Education 210
Master of Arts In Teaching & Co-Op Course Descriptions
Master of Arts Program Course Descriptions 220
Master of Business Administration Course Descriptions 221
Master of Business Administration Programs 191
Master of Science in Environmental Science Course Descriptions 214
Master of Science in Outdoor and Environmental Education 229
Mathematics 140
Mathematics for Environmental Sciences Minor 88
Maximum Credits Per Term 39, 182
MBA Course Descriptions 221
MBAICT Degree Requirements 196
MBA Degree Requirements 191
MCT Course Descriptions 227
Meningitis, Alaska Postsecondary Immunization Act 44, 185
Message from the President 7
Milestones 55
Military Service/School Experience Credit 45
Minimum Graduation GPA Requirement 53
Minimum Major/Minor GPA Requirement 53
Minors
Counseling Psychology 74
Education 82
Environmental Science 87
Human Services 76
Liberal Studies 99
Marine Biology 93
Mathematics for Environmental Science 88
Outdoor Studies 104
Mission Statement 8
MSES Degree Requirements 204
Index 250
Alaska Pacific University
MSOEE Degree Requirements 210

N
Natural History Requirement 101
Non-Degree Seeking Graduate Students 168
Non-Profit Management Emphasis 67, 69, 71, 76
Non-Thesis Option 191

O
OEE Course Descriptions 229
Off-Campus Enrollment 39, 182, 183
Online Courses 61
Optional Concentrations 96
Other Policies 42, 184
Outdoor Education 103
Outdoor Skill Requirement 102
Outdoor Studies 142
Outdoor Studies Department 100, 210
Outdoor Studies Minor 104

P
Part-time Tuition 29
Payment Collection 244
Payment Options 244
Payment Plan Arrangement Options 244
Personal Information 45, 46, 186
Phase III Project Demonstrating Mastery 208
Phase II Practicum 207
Phase I Research 207
Philosophy Course Descriptions 147
Philosophy Concentration 96
Physical Education 147
Placement 39
Policies and Procedures 16, 167
Policy and Planning Electives 89
Policy Electives Menu 84
Portfolio 56
Practicum/Internship/Work Experience 50
Pre-Law Concentration 97
Prerequisites 46, 192, 201, 187
Probation for Financial Aid 27, 173
Professional Expectations for Students 100
Programs 47, 188
Program Description 206
Program Variations 208
Provisional Admission 169
Psychology Course Descriptions 148, 231
Psychology Minor 74

Q
Quantitative Menu 193
Quantitative Reasoning 48

R
RANA 60
Registration and Enrollment 180
Registration Requirements 39, 40, 183
Regis University 198
Reinstatement 175
Reinstatement to Graduate Degree Seeking Status 184
Religion Studies Concentration 98
Religious Heritage 8
Index 251
Alaska Pacific University
Religious Studies Course Descriptions 154
Required MCT Courses 196
Research Methods Requirement 102
Resource Electives 89
Repeat Courses (Financial Aid) 174
Rural Alaska Native Adult Program (RANA) 60

S
Satisfactory Academic Progress (Financial Aid) 27, 173, 184
Science Course Descriptions 156
Science And Environment Concentration 91
Science Electives Menu 84
Second Baccalaureate Degree 40
Second Masters Degree 183
Segelhorst Residence Hall 10
Semester Credit Hour 35, 179
Semester Information 40, 183
Senior Project 50, 57
Sharing Financial Aid Funds Between Institutions 26, 173
Social/Behavioral Science 49
Social Sciences Course Descriptions 165
Social Security Number Corrections 46
Sophomore Seminar 57
Special Consideration 46, 187
Speech Communication 48
Staff Emerita 239
Student Evaluation 209
Student Records 46, 187
Student Risk Management Plan 46, 187
Suggested Courses 97

T
Thesis Option 193
Transcripts and Test Scores 22
Transfer Credit 40, 183, 198
Transfer Students 17
Trustees Emeriti 240
Tuition And Fees 29, 175
Tuition Refund Policy 32, 177

U
Undergraduate Academic Degrees 64
Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses 41
Undergraduate Policies and Procedures 16
Undergraduate Programs 47
University Directory 234
Upper Division Credit Hour Requirement 53

W
Waitlisted 170
Wait Listed 22
Wilderness Therapy 103
Withdrawal (W) 34, 179
Writing Concentration 98
Written Communication 48

Index 252
Catalog Statement
As the official course catalog of Alaska Pacific University (APU), this publication
lists all courses and programs in the current curriculum, graduation requirements,
and official academic policy effective for the 2009-2010 academic year. This catalog
is not a contract. APU reserves the right to change the policies, fees, and procedures
outlined in this publication, and to add, modify, or withdraw degree programs at any
time. However, when changes are made, advanced notice with effective dates will
be communicated to all concerned persons. Contingent upon continuous enrollment,
students have the right to complete any degree program offered by APU as of the
date of their first enrollment in the university. The university reserves the right to
ask students to withdraw for cause at any time.
APU makes available upon request, all consumer information required by the
U.S. Department of Education. Consumer information includes, but is not necessarily
limited to, the following: admissions catalog, academic programs, educational costs,
financial aid, academic progress requirements, student retention rates, and career
planning services. This information is available from the Office of Admissions (907)
564-8248. Documents describing university accreditation, licensure, and approvals
may be reviewed in the Office of the President.
APU policy requires all students enrolled to obtain an APU email address. All
official University communications are sent via APU email addresses. Grades are not
mailed but are available through the Student Portal.
APU is an Independent, Non-Profit Institution.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Notice
Annually, Alaska Pacific University informs students of the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended. This act, with which the
institution intends to comply fully, was designated to protect the privacy of education
records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education
records, to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data
through informal and formal hearings, and to submit an explanatory statement for
inclusion in the education record if the outcome of the hearing is unsatisfactory. Bull Moose behind Carr Gottstein
Students have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights Photo by Dan Gray
and Privacy Act Office of the Department of Education in Washington, D.C., concerning
alleged failures by the University to comply with the act. Written complaints should
be directed to: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office, Department of
Student Right-to-Know and Crime Awareness and
Education, Switzer Building, Room 4074, Washington, D.C. 20202 Campus Security Acts of 1990 as Amended

Nondiscrimination Policy Alaska Pacific University makes available to current students and,
APU is committed to providing equal opportunity for employment and upon request, prospective students, university policy concerning
educational pursuit. It does so by providing services and benefits to all students and campus security and the annual reports of criminal offense
employees without regard to religion, creed, race, color, disability, national origin, or
any other classification protected by law. The university will make reasonable
occurrences as well as information on drug and alcohol abuse
accommodations for qualified individuals as required by law unless doing so would education programs.
result in undue hardship to the university.
The university is regulated by Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of Contact:
1964, Title XI of the 1972 Amendments to Higher Education Act, Sections 799A and Dean of Students Office
845 of the Public Health Service Act, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the
Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, and other application federal regulations.
Alaska Pacific University
4101 University Drive
Accreditation Anchorage, AK 99508
APU is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (907) 564-8287
and is authorized as a university by the Commission on Postsecondary Education, (907) 564-8317 FAX
State of Alaska.
The APU Teacher Education Program (K-8) is approved by the National Council
for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Alaska State Department of Education. Graduation Completion Rate
The APU Education Department provides the Institutional Recommendation for Contact: Registrar’s Office
teacher certification, which is then issued by the Alaska State Department of Alaska Pacific University
Education. 4101 University Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508
(907) 564-8210
Front Cover Picture: Silvertip Creek, Alaska
Photo by Dan Gray (907) 563-5640 FAX
Office of Admissions
4101 University Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508

ALASKA PACIFIC UNIVERSITY
(907) 564-8248 • (800) Alaska-U
Email: admissions@alaskapacific.edu
www.alaskapacific.edu

2009-2010 Catalog

2009-2010
Expedition Glacier Travel
Cashman Pass above the Tazlina Glacier
Catalog
Photo by Heather Thamm
Catalog Statement
As the official course catalog of Alaska Pacific University (APU), this publication
lists all courses and programs in the current curriculum, graduation requirements,
and official academic policy effective for the 2009-2010 academic year. This catalog
is not a contract. APU reserves the right to change the policies, fees, and procedures
outlined in this publication, and to add, modify, or withdraw degree programs at any
time. However, when changes are made, advanced notice with effective dates will
be communicated to all concerned persons. Contingent upon continuous enrollment,
students have the right to complete any degree program offered by APU as of the
date of their first enrollment in the university. The university reserves the right to
ask students to withdraw for cause at any time.
APU makes available upon request, all consumer information required by the
U.S. Department of Education. Consumer information includes, but is not necessarily
limited to, the following: admissions catalog, academic programs, educational costs,
financial aid, academic progress requirements, student retention rates, and career
planning services. This information is available from the Office of Admissions (907)
564-8248. Documents describing university accreditation, licensure, and approvals
may be reviewed in the Office of the President.
APU policy requires all students enrolled to obtain an APU email address. All
official University communications are sent via APU email addresses. Grades are not
mailed but are available through the Student Portal.
APU is an Independent, Non-Profit Institution.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Notice
Annually, Alaska Pacific University informs students of the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended. This act, with which the
institution intends to comply fully, was designated to protect the privacy of education
records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education
records, to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data
through informal and formal hearings, and to submit an explanatory statement for
inclusion in the education record if the outcome of the hearing is unsatisfactory. Bull Moose behind Carr Gottstein
Students have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights Photo by Dan Gray
and Privacy Act Office of the Department of Education in Washington, D.C., concerning
alleged failures by the University to comply with the act. Written complaints should
be directed to: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office, Department of
Student Right-to-Know and Crime Awareness and
Education, Switzer Building, Room 4074, Washington, D.C. 20202 Campus Security Acts of 1990 as Amended

Nondiscrimination Policy Alaska Pacific University makes available to current students and,
APU is committed to providing equal opportunity for employment and upon request, prospective students, university policy concerning
educational pursuit. It does so by providing services and benefits to all students and campus security and the annual reports of criminal offense
employees without regard to religion, creed, race, color, disability, national origin, or
any other classification protected by law. The university will make reasonable
occurrences as well as information on drug and alcohol abuse
accommodations for qualified individuals as required by law unless doing so would education programs.
result in undue hardship to the university.
The university is regulated by Title VI and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of Contact:
1964, Title XI of the 1972 Amendments to Higher Education Act, Sections 799A and Dean of Students Office
845 of the Public Health Service Act, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the
Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, and other application federal regulations.
Alaska Pacific University
4101 University Drive
Accreditation Anchorage, AK 99508
APU is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (907) 564-8287
and is authorized as a university by the Commission on Postsecondary Education, (907) 564-8317 FAX
State of Alaska.
The APU Teacher Education Program (K-8) is approved by the National Council
for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the Alaska State Department of Education. Graduation Completion Rate
The APU Education Department provides the Institutional Recommendation for Contact: Registrar’s Office
teacher certification, which is then issued by the Alaska State Department of Alaska Pacific University
Education. 4101 University Drive
Anchorage, AK 99508
(907) 564-8210
Front Cover Picture: Silvertip Creek, Alaska
Photo by Dan Gray (907) 563-5640 FAX