LTSP Catalog 2006-2008 | Student Financial Aid In The United States | University And College Admission

The Catalog

2006-2008

The Catalog / 2006–2008 

Founded 1864 A Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Mailing Address:

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia 7301 Germantown Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19119-1794 215-248-4616 or 800-286-4616 215-248-4577 www.Ltsp.edu mtairy@Ltsp.edu (general) admissions@Ltsp.edu (admissions)

Phone: Fax: Web Site: Email:

September 2006 This catalog is a statement of the policies, personnel, programs, and financial arrangements of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia as projected by the responsible authorities of the seminary. The seminary reserves the right to make alterations without prior notice, in accordance with the seminary’s institutional needs and academic purposes.

The Catalog / 2006–2008

The Catalog September 2006
This catalog is a statement of the policies, personnel, programs, and financial arrangements of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) as projected by the responsible authorities of the seminary. While every effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this catalog is correct at the time of publication, it is not intended that the Catalog establish a contractual relationship. The seminary reserves the right to make alterations without prior notice, in accordance with the seminary’s institutional needs and academic purposes. The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia is fully accredited by the Association of Theological Schools, 10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1103, the major accrediting agency of theological seminaries in the United States and Canada. It is also fully accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-2680. The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia is one of eight seminaries affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), a denomination with over 10,500 congregations in the United States and nearly five million baptized members. The seminary is specifically related to the synods of ELCA Region 7 and relates also to Regions 8 and 9 through its participation in the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries. The Eastern Cluster, formed in 1995, is a cooperative theological venture of LTSP, the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, PA, and Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary, Columbia, SC. The partnership seeks to share resources and utilize the strengths of each institution to enhance the opportunities for theological education for the students of all three seminaries. LTSP students are encouraged to consider spending some time in courses offered by the other Cluster seminaries. The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia admits qualified students of any age, sex, race or color, national or ethnic origin, or physical challenge to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities available to students at the seminary. It does not discriminate on the basis of the aforementioned categories in administration of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other seminary-administered programs. A statement on “Rights, Responsibilities and Freedoms of Students” is printed in the Student Handbook. The seminary is an equal opportunity employer. The seminary is in the process of creating a campus that is freely accessible to all staff, students, and guests. Due to age, however, current facilities vary widely as to their accessibility to persons with motor disabilities. Persons for whom this is a concern are encouraged to consult the Admissions Office and visit the campus when applying for admission to LTSP and/or its classes. The contents of this Catalog, as well as other information about the seminary, may be viewed on the seminary’s Web site at www.Ltsp.edu. 

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Table of ConTenTs

Table of Contents

Academic Calendar .................................................4-5 Introduction ................................................................ 6 Mission Statement..................................................... 8 Admissions and Financial Aid Admission Procedures ....................................... 13 Tuition and Fees.................................................. 15 Program Overview ............................................... 16 Housing................................................................ 20 Food Services ...................................................... 20 Health Insurance................................................. 21 Community Life .................................................. 21 Educational Program The First Professional Program ......................... 23 Admission Requirements .................................. 23 Master of Divinity Degree (M.Div.) .................... 24 Degree Requirements.................................... 25 Contextual Education ................................... 27 Concentrations............................................... 28 Master of Arts in Religion Degree (MAR) ......... 29 Degree Requirements.................................... 30 Specializations ............................................... 32 Joint MDiv/MAR Degrees.................................... 33 Non-Degree Academic Opportunities Certificate Programs ...................................... 34 Non-Matriculant Study ................................. 34 Auditors .......................................................... 34 Academic Policies and Procedures ................... 35 (First Professional) ELCA Candidacy, Affiliation, Lutheran Year .... 38 Advanced Degree Programs (Graduate School) Master of Sacred Theology (STM) ................ 41 Doctor of Theology (ThD) ............................. 42 Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)........................... 43 General Studies.............................................. 45 Non-Matriculant Study ................................. 45 Auditors .......................................................... 45 Academic Policies and Procedures.............. 45 (Graduate School) 

General Academic Policies and Procedures The Curriculum.................................................... 49 Registration ......................................................... 49 Administrative Policies ..................................... 5 Learning Resources Inter-Institutional Relationships....................... 55 Academic Support Services ............................... 56 Special Programs and Emphases ..................... 57 Learning Communities ...................................... 59 Faith and Life Institute ........................................ 59 Theological Education with Youth.................... 60 Course Offerings First Professional Program ................................ 61 Graduate School................................................. 8 Faculty ....................................................................... 85 Administration and Governance ............................ 95 Register of Students ................................................ 99 Index ....................................................................... 107

The Catalog / 2006–2008

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THe CalenDaR foR 2006–2007 The 143rd Year PROLOG August 19–20 Sat–Sun 21–9/1 Mon–Fri 28–9/1 Mon–Fri FALL SEMESTER September 5 Tuesday 6 Wednesday 13 Wednesday October 16–20 Mon–Fri 16–21 Mon–Sat 24 Tuesday November 19–26 Sun–Sun December 3 Sunday 8 Friday 12 Tuesday 13–21 Wed–Thurs 21 Thursday 22 Thursday JANUARY TERM January 3 Wednesday 8–11 Mon–Thur 15 Monday 15–19 Mon–Fri 16 Tuesday 22–26 Mon–Fri 29–2/2 Mon–Fri February 1 Thursday 2 Friday 3 Saturday SPRING SEMESTER February 5 Monday 12 Monday 16 Friday 27 Tuesday March 12–16 12–18 24 4–10 11 Mon–Fri Mon–Sun Saturday Wed–Tues Friday Saturday Mon–Wed Thur–Tues Sunday Tuesday Monday Mon–Fri Mon–Fri Mon–Wed Thur–Fri Mon–Fri Friday

Residence Hall opens for studio residents Prolog ThD Orientation Opening Convocation Begin Fall Semester classes Fall Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline Graduate Intensive Session Fall Reading Period (no regular classes through 10/22) Midpoint of Fall Semester (withdrawal deadline) Thanksgiving vacation Advent Vespers Registration deadline for Jan/Spring, all programs (tentative) Last day of Fall Semester classes Fall Reading/Examination Period End of Fall Semester Christmas Vacation (through 1/2) January Term classes begin DMin Collegial Seminar Martin Luther King Day (no first professional classes) 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 1 Deadline for ThD applications for 2005-06 admission 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 2 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 3 STM Thesis/DMin Project Deadline End of January Term First Professional Workshops Spring Semester classes begin Spring Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline First Professional Workshops (classes postponed to 5/14, if needed) Hein-Fry Lectures (classes postponed to 5/15; student attendance at lectures expected) Preaching with Power (tentative) 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session Spring Reading Period (no full-semester classes) Midpoint of Spring Semester (withdrawal deadline) Easter Break Registration Deadline for Summer, all programs (tentative) Registration Deadline for Fall, MDiv/MAR/Spcl (tentative) End Spring Semester classes Make-up days for Spring classes, as needed Spring Reading/Examination Period Commencement End of Spring Semester Begin MDiv/MAR Summer Session* 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 1 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 2 DMin Colloquium I DMin Colloquium II 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 3 End MDiv/MAR Summer Session (approx.)

April May

12 14–16 17–22 20 22 SUMMER TERM June 4 4–8 11–15 18–20 21–22 25–29 29

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

The Calendar 2006-2007, 2007-2008

THe CalenDaR foR 2007–2008 The 144th Year AUGUST (dates tentative) August 18–19 Sat–Sun 20–31 Mon–Fri 27–31 Mon–Fri FALL SEMESTER September 4 Tuesday 5 Wednesday 12 Wednesday October 15–19 Mon–Fri 15–20 Mon–Sat 23 Tuesday November 18–25 Sun–Sun 26 Monday December 2 Sunday 7 Friday 11 Tuesday 12–14 Wed–Fri 17–21 Mon–Fri 21 Friday 22 Saturday JANUARY TERM January 2 Wednesday 7–11 Mon–Fri 14–17 Mon–Thurs 14 Monday 15 Tuesday 21–25 Mon–Fri 28–2/1 Mon–Fri February 1 Friday 2 SPRING SEMESTER February 4 11 15 19 March 10–14 15 19–25 13–20 14–18 9 Saturday Monday Monday Friday Tuesday Mon–Fri Saturday Wed–Tues Sun–Sun Mon–Fri Friday Saturday Mon–Wed Thur–Tues Sunday Tuesday Monday Mon–Fri Mon–Fri Mon–Fri Mon–Fri Friday

Residence Hall opens for studio residents Prolog ThD Orientation Opening Convocation; Evening classes begin Begin daytime Fall Semester classes Fall Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline Begin 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session Fall Reading/Prep Break (no regular classes through 10/21) Midpoint of Fall Semester (withdrawal deadline) Thanksgiving Vacation Resume classes Advent Vespers (tentative) Registration Deadline for Jan/Spring, all programs (tentative) End Semester classes Make-up Days for Fall Classes (as needed) Reading/Examination Period End of Fall Semester Christmas Vacation (through 1/2) Begin January Term 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 1 DMin Collegial Seminar Martin Luther King Day (no first professional classes) Deadline for ThD applications for 2007-08 admission 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 2 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 3 STM Thesis/DMin Project Deadline End of January Term First Professional Workshops Begin Spring Semester classes Spring Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline First Professional Workshops (classes may be postponed to 5/12) Hein-Fry Lectures (tentative) (classes postponed to week of 5/12; student attendance at lectures expected) Preaching with Power (tentative) (evening classes may be postponed to week of 5/12) Midpoint of Spring Semester Easter Vacation Spring Reading/Prep Break (no regular classes) 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session Registration Deadline for Summer, all programs (tentative) Registration Deadline for Fall, MDiv/MAR/Spcl (tentative) End Spring Semester classes Make-up Days for Spring Classes (as needed) Spring Reading/Examination Period Commencement End of Spring Semester Begin MDiv/MAR June Session 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 1 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 2 DMin Colloquia 5-Day Graduate Intensive Session 3 End MDiv/MAR June Session
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April May

10 12–14 15–20 18 20 SUMMER TERM June 2 2–6 9–13 16–20 23–27 27

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America is furnished with eight theological seminaries, each one fully accredited and staffed by professors trained in major universities and experienced in the faith and practice of the church. The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia is one of these schools and shares in the Lutheran tradition of rigorous preparation for leadership in the mission of the church. Since it is not good for Christians of different traditions to be ignorant of one another, we welcome and include students who are not Lutherans, and we do share in programs that include area seminaries and universities. Because we live in a world grown small, we provide immersion experiences abroad and regularly bring some of the world’s leading scholars for on-campus lectures. Thus at the core we are a Lutheran school that is thoroughly ecumenical, missional, urban, and inclusive. We provide an urban setting that is a destination site with attractive shops, restaurants, and cultural attractions. The campus has modern buildings, including a new residence hall and a newly renovated chapel surrounded by lovely gardens and groves. A state-of-the-art learning center and student center, designed by brilliant Philadelphia architect George Yu, opened in 2005. The seminary’s community is rich with people of different races, ethnicities, ages, and cultural backgrounds who together embrace both the hard questions of contemporary culture and the promise of the Gospel, and together learn to identify the bridges between the two. The school serves as a public leader in the community and also a place for quiet retreat, scholarship, and meditation. Moreover, we attend to regular worship in Word and Sacrament for our strengthening. We do not expect classroom competence alone. We do expect, and welcome, students who are alive to God’s presence in Jesus Christ, who long for opportunities to grow in understanding, and who have the courage which all learning and mission requires. We hope that the pages that follow will provide you with an overview of what we are and do. Better still, we hope that you will come to the campus so that we may respond to your questions and become acquainted with you. Welcome. 

Philip D. W. Krey President of the Seminary

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

HIsToRY The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) is one of eight seminaries of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. LTSP is proud of the Lutheran confessional tradition that inspired its founding in 1864 by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, the oldest Lutheran synod in America. Its first classes were held in facilities on North Ninth Street in Philadelphia. In 1872 the Ministerium of New York joined in support of the seminary by endowing a professorship and receiving representation on the Board of Trustees. In 1889 the seminary was relocated northwest to the Mt. Airy section of Philadelphia, a section of the city nationally regarded today for its rich history of multicultural diversity and cooperation. The 14acre campus has historic importance as well. The first shots of the American Revolution’s Battle of Germantown were fired on land that later became its campus. The Refectory, where thousands of seminarians have enjoyed meals and conversation, dates to 1792. The Hagan Administration Center incorporates the mansion from the former Gowen estate, owned by the family that operated the Reading Railroad. Four buildings on the campus were designed by Reading Railroad architect Frank Furness, one of Philadelphia’s most famous architects. In 1903 the Board reorganized to include representatives of what was then known as the Pittsburgh Synod and the Synod of New York and New England. In 1950, the Synod of New Jersey was formed, and its representatives also began serving on the Board. Since the formation of the Lutheran Church in America (LCA) in 1962 and subsequently of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) in 1988, the seminary has been administered by a Board of Trustees elected by those synods assigned to it by the Church as supporting synods with additional Trustees elected by the Church Council of the ELCA. An important moment in the development of LTSP occurred in 1979, when the LTSP Board of Directors authorized the establishment of the Urban Theological Institute (UTI) as a program of the seminary. The vision for the UTI originated with the Revs. Randolph L. Jones and Andrew H. Willis, who dreamed of a program with full academic integrity that would provide a theological degree through classes in the evenings and on Saturdays. Intended particularly for students from African American churches and worship traditions, the degree program was designed with a focus on ministry

Introduction 

in the urban context. The first UTI students began their studies in 1980. Today many UTI graduates hold outstanding leadership roles in various denominations and are actively involved in their communities, and the UTI continues to sponsor the annual Preaching with Power series, featuring sermons in actual congregational settings by renowned African American preachers of the United States. Thus, while strongly rooted in the confessional Lutheran tradition of its origin, LTSP has established a record of distinguished service to a variety of other traditions that form the pluralistic texture of the northeastern United States. Students from more than 40 denominational backgrounds have studied here. The seminary enjoys United Methodist certification and prepares diaconal students for the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania. It offers Black Church, Latino, multicultural, and metropolitan/urban concentrations in recognition of its context and of today’s evolving ministry needs. The Advanced Degree program offers professional leaders continuing education toward the Doctor of Ministry, Master of Sacred Theology, and Doctor of Theology degrees. Having graduated nearly 4,000 church leaders, the seminary is now in the midst of an ambitious
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campus renewal initiative. The state-of-the-art Brossman Learning Center opened in Fall 2005 and quickly became the new hub of the campus, housing Enrollment Services offices and a number of learning resource centers, as well as hightech classrooms, seminar and study rooms, a great hall, mail center, and common rooms. The Schaeffer-Ashmead Chapel has been renovated to accommodate more varied worship styles. The Wiedemann Center, dedicated in 1998, provides contemporary housing for seminarians and their families and accommodates the Augsburg Fortress bookstore and a fitness center. The seminary also sees several new initiatives as part of its mission to prepare leaders for the Church in the new century. They include its Theological Education with Youth (TEY) outreach, funded by the Lilly Endowment Inc., which encourages high school youth to fall in love with theology by taking part in a Summer Theological Academy or by studying as part of a Counselors-in-Training program. The Faith and Life Institute provides lifelong learning opportunities to both laypersons and rostered leaders, including events both on and off-campus, on-line education, and reproducible study guides MISSION STATEMENT The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, a school of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, is committed to preparing ordained and lay ministers of the Word as leaders for the mission of the Church in the world.

This seminary, a community centered in the gospel, assists persons • To understand more fully the triune God revealed in Jesus Christ; • To grow in the trust of God within the Christian community by the power of the Holy Spirit; and • To articulate the content of the faith and to witness to the gospel in word and deed. A Summary of the Vision* A diverse, academically rigorous, worshiping community that forms leaders for public ministry in a distinctive metropolitan and multicultural context Centered in the Gospel of the crucified and risen Christ, Firmly committed to Scripture and the Lutheran Confessions With an intentional openness to theological education that is inter-confessional, inclusive, and cross-cultural • A theological school with a commitment to mission, rooted in and responsive to a distinctive metropolitan and multicultural context, nurturing learners and forming faithful and skilled leaders who will commit their lives to the evangelical mission of the Church through biblical, confessional, and liturgical renewal of congregations and social justice • A leadership center for the Church, particularly in the Eastern United States, identifying and addressing emerging congregational and community needs while reaching out to equip and invigorate the Church’s lay and rostered leaders • Committed to growth, having begun with a renewed campus that already includes modern student housing, a renovated chapel, and a technologically enhanced Learning Center with outstanding Student Commons areas, and expanding the number and variety of course offerings and the days and times courses are taught to assist in growing the student body in the first professional, advanced level and ThD programs and educational programs of faith and life. • Forging strong connections with the synods, colleges, camps, social ministry organizations, congregations, and leaders of Region 7 of the ELCA, the seminaries of the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries in particular and the other seminaries of the ELCA, ecumenical providers

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

of theological education in the northeastern United States and the local religious community of Philadelphia. • Moving forward with confidence, not in our own abilities but in the power of Christ to sustain us, renewed by the Spirit with a sense of mission for service through the Church while we await the final blessing of God’s new day.
*The Vision Document of 1995 and any summary of it serves as a commentary on the Mission Statement.

Introduction

affIlIaTIon
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia is one of eight seminaries affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), a denomination with about 10,500 congregations in the United States and nearly 5 million baptized members. The seminary is specifically related to the synods of ELCA Region 7 and relates also to Regions 8 and 9 through its participation in the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries. The Eastern Cluster, formed in 1995, is a cooperative theological venture of LTSP, the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, PA, and Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary, Columbia, SC. The partnership seeks to share resources and utilize the strengths of each institution to enhance the opportunities for theological education for the students of all three seminaries. LTSP students are encouraged to consider spending some time in courses offered by the other Cluster seminaries.

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aCCReDITaTIon
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia is fully accredited by the Association of Theological Schools, 10 Summit Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15275-1103, the major accrediting agency of theological seminaries in the United States and Canada. It is also fully accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market St., Philadephia, PA 19104-2680.

The Catalog / 2006–2008

STUDENTS AT THE LUTHERAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY AT PHILADELPHIA Enrollment in 004-05 Master of Divinity Master of Arts in Religion Master of Sacred Theology Doctor of Ministry Special Students Affiliated Students Non-Matriculated Students Total Students’ Religious Affiliation in 004-05 1st-Prof Grad African Methodist Episcopal-Zion 1 0 African Methodist Episcopal 28 3 American Baptist Churches USA 16 2 Anglican Church of Kenya 0 1 Assemblies of God 0 2 Christian and Missionary Alliance 0 2 Church of God (Anderson, IN) 2 0 Church of God in Christ 5 1 Church of South India 1 2 Church of the Nazarene 0 2 Disciples of Christ 1 0 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 174 128 Independent/Other Baptist 6 2 Independent Methodist 1 0 Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod 0 4 National Baptist Convention 0 1 North American Baptist Convention 1 0 Nondenominational/Other/Unknown 8 4 Other Lutheran 0 2 Other Presbyterian 0 3 Pentecostal 2 0 Presbyterian Church (USA) 5 4 Progressive National Baptist 3 0 Rabbinical Assembly 0 1 Reformed Episcopal 0 1 Roman Catholic 2 7 Seventh Day Adventist 0 1 Syrian Orthodox 0 1 The Episcopal Church 22 9 United Church of Christ 5 1 United Methodist Church 9 11 Total 291 195 Students’ Religious Affiliation in 005-0 1st-Prof Grad African Methodist Episcopal - Zion 0 1 African Methodist Episcopal 20 3 American Baptist Churches USA 10 2 Anglican Church of Kenya 0 1 Assemblies of God 0 1 Christian and Missionary Alliance 0 1 Church of God in Christ 6 1 Church of South India 1 1 Church of the Nazarene 0 2 Cooperative Baptist Fellowship 0 1 Disciples of Christ 1 0 Eastern Orthodox 0 1 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 183 139

204 31 62 113 10 25 41 486*

*Students who begin graduate study concurrently with a first professional degree program and those who begin a second advanced level degree concurrently with the first are listed for only one program each, the earlier in sequence. 0

Gender Female Male Ethnicity African American Asian Hispanic/Latino International White Unknown Enrollment in 005-0 Master of Divinity Master of Arts in Religion Master of Sacred Theology Doctor of Ministry Doctor of Theology Special Students Affiliated Students Non-Matriculated Students Total

231 255 118 4 13 11 334 6 177 38 69 108 3 15 22 53 485*

*Students who begin graduate study concurrently with a first professional degree program and those who begin a second advanced level degree concurrently with the first are listed for only one program each, the earlier in sequence.

Gender Female Male Ethnicity African American Asian Hispanic/Latino International White Unknown

227 258 96 4 13 13 352 7

Additional information on the 2005-2006 student roster may be found on pages .
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Independent/Other Baptist Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod Missionary Baptist National Baptist Convention Nondenominational/Other Other Lutheran Other Presbyterian Pentecostal Presbyterian Church (USA) Progressive National Baptist Rabbinical Assembly Reformed Episcopal Roman Catholic Seventh-Day Adventist The Episcopal Church United Church of Christ United Methodist Church Total

4 4 1 4 1 0 0 1 2 9 2 2 1 0 1 1 5 5 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 7 0 1 19 11 5 1 12 6 277 208 

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

Introduction 

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

admissions & financial aid

ADMISSION PROCEDURES The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia is a professional school at the postbaccalaureate level, offering the following degrees: • The Master of Divinity (MDiv) Degree requires three years of full-time academic study, plus any additional ecclesiastical requirements. It requires that the student hold a bachelor’s or equivalent degree. • The Master of arts in Religion (MaR) Degree requires two years of full-time academic study and requires that the student hold a bachelor’s or equivalent degree. • The Master of sacred Theology (sTM) Degree can be completed in one to two years of fulltime study and requires that the student hold an MDiv or equivalent degree involving at least 60 semester hours of study. • The Doctor of Ministry (DMin) Degree expects the student to engage in both academic study and professional ministry over at least a threeyear period. The student must hold an MDiv or equivalent degree involving at least 90 semester hours of study. • The Doctor of Theology (ThD) Degree requires two years of full-time residency at LTSP, followed by comprehensive examinations and preparation of a dissertation. The student must hold an MDiv or equivalent degree. The admissions office is available to assist prospective students with information regarding the application process, degree programs, the particular attributes of LTSP and the Philadelphia area, and student life. The seminary encourages and invites all prospective students to visit campus and participate in chapel, classes, and community life. Application for admission to first professional degree programs (MDiv and MAR degrees) should be made three to nine months in advance of one’s expected entrance. The Admissions Committee receives and makes decisions on applications throughout the year, but early decisions are advisable in order to establish eligibility for financial aid and campus housing. Those whose applications are complete by April 15 (for Fall enrollment) receive priority in housing and financial aid considerations. Advanced level (STM and DMin) applicants who intend to be part-time students should begin the application process three to six months in advance. ThD applicants must complete their applications for admission no later than midJanuary of the year in which they hope to begin in 

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

aDMIssIons anD fInanCIal aID

the Fall. The academic program of the seminary makes it advisable for full-time first professional students to enter in the August Term, which begins in midAugust. Students who enter during January Term or the Spring Semester are unable to take the required Bible sequence and thus may find it more difficult to schedule needed courses in subsequent terms. Such MDiv students should plan on at least five semesters of academic work prior to internship (if internship is required). Admission standards for each academic program are listed separately within the description of each program. For all degree programs, however, the following general materials must be submitted for a complete application: • Application form. This may be obtained from the Admissions Office, downloaded from the seminary’s Web site (www.Ltsp.edu), or completed on-line • A $35 nonrefundable application fee • References as described in the particular application form instructions • An essay addressing the areas described in the application instructions • Official transcripts of prior academic work sent directly from the issuing institution to the Admissions Office. Student copies and other third-party copies are not acceptable. Current undergraduate applicants who have not yet received their degrees may submit transcripts of their programs in progress; any admission is subject to review following completion of the degree and submission of an official final transcript. • Applicants whose first language is other than English are expected to submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) results from within two years of the application. Test results must be sent directly from the Educational Testing Service; photocopies will not be accepted. A minimum score of 523 (193 on the computer-based test, 70 on the Internet-based test) is expected for first professional applicants. Advanced level (nonThD) applicants should achieve scores of at least 550 to 570 on the paper-based test (213 to 232 on the computer-based test, 80 to 89 on the Internet-based test). ThD applicants are expected to achieve minimum scores of 570 to 583 on the paper-based test (232 to 237 on the computer-based test, 88 to 92 on the Internetbased test). LTSP’s institution code is 2371. Testing information is available at the following 

4

address: TOEFL/TSE Services P. O. Box 6151 Princeton, NJ 08541-6151 USA Web address: www.toefl.org LTSP reserves the right to require additional credentials in any particular case, including an interview, and to solicit information from anyone in a position to evaluate an applicant’s qualifications. The seminary may refuse admission to any applicant for any justifiable reason. While “firmly committed to Scripture and the Lutheran Confessions,” LTSP is intentionally open to “theological education that is inter-confessional, inclusive, and cross-cultural.” The students at LTSP thus represent a wide range of Christian traditions. ADVANCE DEPOSIT Each student who is offered admission for study at the seminary is required to submit a signed letter of commitment, along with a $100 advance deposit, no later than April 15 preceding a fall admission, or within 30 days of receiving notice of admission if after April 15. The deposit is applicable toward total student expenses but is not refundable if the student withdraws or fails to register. While the student should submit applications for housing or financial aid and registrations for classes according to the deadlines for those materials, his/her application or registration will not be considered complete until the student has submitted both the letter of commitment and the advance deposit. A student admitted to affiliated status (see Affiliation, page 39) will be billed for the Affiliation Fee and must pay by the stated deadline. If the student is subsequently admitted to a degree program, he/she will be required to submit a new letter of commitment and the $100 advance deposit. INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS LTSP is authorized by the US Department of Homeland Security to issue visa applications for non-immigrant international students who have been admitted to the seminary. Normally, such students are admitted to the MAR program or to advanced level (STM, DMin, ThD) programs. A limited number may be admitted for a year of study as special (non-degree) students. Applicants must meet the general requirements specified for admission to the degree but additionally must meet the following requirements in order to receive a visa application: • Submission of an international student application, available from the Office of
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Admissions • A letter of endorsement or recommendation from the head of the applicant’s home church, from a competent ecclesiastical authority, or from a religious institution • Certification of the applicant’s ability to meet the financial costs of round-trip travel, tuition, housing, and personal expenses. Student visas cannot by US federal law be approved without guarantee of ability to pay all costs. LTSP normally does not provide scholarships to international students, except as noted below. • Scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Information is available at www.toefl.org. • For advanced level students, scores for the Test of Written English (TWE) in addition to TOEFL, along with a letter from a professor or other qualified person certifying the student’s ability to read technical material in English and to write in English at a level suited to advanced level study. • Checks submitted in payment of application fees and deposits must be payable in US dollars, drawn on a US bank, with the bank’s computer code located in the lower left corner of the check. Checks not meeting these requirements will be returned, which may delay admission. • International students are responsible for payment of the SEVIS (Student and Exchange Visitor Information System) fee upon application for an F-1 visa. Applicants should note that the seminary does not generally provide financial assistance to international students other than those officially sponsored by their churches through the Scholarship Program of the ELCA/Lutheran World Federation/World Council of Churches. International students must seek other means of support. International students on F-1 visas need to be enrolled full-time in the Fall and Spring semesters, according to US government policies. TRANSFER STUDENTS A student wishing to transfer from another ATSaccredited seminary must file an application for admission, submit an official transcript of seminary work completed, and present a letter of honorable dismissal from the dean or president of the school he/she is currently attending. ELCA students are also directed to provide evidence of current candidacy status.

At least one full year must be spent in residence at LTSP in order to qualify for a degree, and students should not expect that all prior coursework will be accepted in transfer. See the rules governing transfer credits on page 37 (first professional) or page 46 (advanced degrees). AFFILIATED STUDENTS OF THE ELCA AND “LUTHERAN YEAR” See the special section (page 39) dedicated to this topic for a description of these distinctive categories. Admission requirements may vary according to the specific form of study for an individual student.

Affiliation fee (one-time) Late Affiliation fee Vehicle Registration Fee (per semester)1 Payment Plan application fee Returned check fee Collection agency fee2 Transcript fee Rush transcript Housing Studio (comprehensive room/board fee)3

$ 500 $ 600 $ 35 1 $ 90 $ 35 $ 250 2 $ 5 $ 10

TUITIon anD fees
Fees listed are for the 2006-2007 academic year, through June 2007. The seminary reserves the right to make adjustments without notice to any of its fees or financial procedures as may be required for the prudent fiscal management of the institution. First Professional (MDiv, MAR, Special) Tuition per course unit $ 1,200 Test-out fee $ 250 Internship fee $ 1,000 Graduation fee (MDiv, MAR) $ 200 Graduation fee (certificate) $ 75 Student Body dues (per semester) $ 20 Seminary Services fee (per semester) $ 150 Advanced Level (STM, DMin, General Studies) Tuition per course unit $ 1,270 ELCA tuition after scholarship $ 1,020 Grad School Program Continuation $ 200 Grad School Program Extension $ 200 STM thesis/DMin project fees $ 550 DMin Colloquia fees: Colloquium I $ 300 DMin Colloquia fees: Colloquium II $ 200 Graduation fee (STM, DMin) $ 375 Graduation fee (certificate) $ 75 Seminary Services fee (per semester) $ 50 Doctoral Level (ThD/PhD) Tuition per year (full-time students) $12,600 Tuition per course (non-matriculants) $ 1,940 Audit tuition per course $ 735 Continuation fee (per year after second year) $ 600 Seminary Services fee (per semester) $ 50 Other Fees, All Levels Application fee $ 35 Late registration fee $ 50 Late course cancellation fee (per course) $ 20 Seminary Services fee, non-admitted students $ 50 Audit fee (per course) $ 500 Senior Citizen reduced audit fee $ 250 Late audit registration fee $ 15

$ 7,5403,4 Apartment monthly rents3,4 One bedroom Perimeter (average) $ 620 Bagger $ 630 Two bedrooms Perimeter (average) $ 780 Bagger $ 710 Three bedrooms Perimeter (average) $ 810 Bagger $ 885 Commuter “crash” rooms (per night) $ 20 Guest studios (per person per night) $ 45 Board Plan (required for students living singly in apartments) 3 $ 2,985 3 Health insurance (required for all students taking over 2.5 units/semester) Basic mandatory student coverage5 $ 2,871 5 Waiver of coverage (for eligible students) $ 250 Spouse (optional) $ 3,110 Children (optional, total for any number) $ 1,988 Out-of-program (e.g., leave of absence) (2005-2006 rate) $ 2,632
NOTES: 1 Vehicle registration is required to facilitate campus security procedures. Registration confers the right to park on campus when space is available but does not guarantee a parking space. 2 Fee applies to those students who have been previously placed in collection and who, having satisfied their indebtedness, have reapplied for admission. 3 Individual/single students living in campus housing do so with the understanding that their lease or contract requires participation in the on-campus food service. While the board plan is separately assessed, it is not optional and cannot be waived for any reason. 4 Rents shown do not include a 5% utility surcharge. Food plan, if applicable, is also in addition to rent shown. Apartments are unfurnished but include refrigerator and range. 5 Individual student health insurance. The coverage and fee are mandatory at all ELCA seminaries for all students enrolled more than half-time (for more than 2.5 units in any semester), including interns, except that, for a fee of $250, a waiver can be granted to a student who is covered under another group coverage plan (e.g., via spouse). This community access fee helps to ensure access to health insurance for all students and also ensures the paying student’s ability to opt back into the plan should his/her group coverage end. 

5

PAYMENT OF FEES Students taking courses for credit or audit who have not been admitted to the seminary are required to pay all tuition and fees at the time of registration. Payments may be by check (payable to
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“LTSP”) or by credit card (Visa/Mastercard), either in person or by completing a Credit Card Charge Authorization form. Students admitted to a degree or certificate program are encouraged to pay tuition and other fees at the time of registration or as soon as possible following registration. Since the Business Office cannot issue statements until after the late registration (drop/add) deadline for each term, students are expected to calculate what they will owe according to the official fee schedule. All charges and fees are due and payable upon receipt of the statement from the Business Office. However, the seminary permits matriculated students to make voluntary installment payments without interest or penalties until approximately one month prior to the end of each semester (the “accounts penalty date”). After the penalty date, the Business Office will assess a penalty of ten percent of any remaining balance. A complete billing calendar with details on payment plans and penalties is provided in the annual Student Handbook. For students interested in calculating and making payments over the course of the entire year, the seminary can arrange a monthly payment plan. Information concerning this option is available from the Business Office. Failure to pay one’s account in full by the end of a semester results in the student’s being unable to register for subsequent terms and the withholding of grade reports, transcripts, and diploma. The student is responsible to clear his/her account with the Business Office and then to request from the Registrar’s Office any withheld documents. Student accounts are maintained in the Business Office. All payments and inquiries should be directed to the staff of that office (telephone 215248-7311). REFUNDS In cases of withdrawal from classes, withdrawal from seminary, dismissal, suspension, or leave of absence, tuition will be refunded on a prorated basis up to the midpoint of the semester or term, but there will be no refunds for any reason after the midpoint. The midpoint of each term is specified in the official calendar of the seminary as published in the specific term supplements of The Catalog. The effective date for any refund is the date on which the Dean receives formal, written notification by the student of his/her withdrawal or on the official date of any action taken by the seminary. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of various withdrawal deadlines and the financial implications
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

of withdrawal. The seminary is not responsible for refunds if a student fails to give timely written notice to the Dean. Student Body dues, Seminary Services fees, and other non-tuition fees are not refundable after the semester has begun. Federal Refund Policy For Stafford Loan borrowers who withdraw from all classes, a federally mandated schedule applies for the return of loan funds:
Percent completed School retains Student’s charges adjusted by

0% 0% 100% 1%--10% 10% 90% 11%--20% 20% 80% 21%--30% 30% 70% 31%--40% 40% 60% 41%--50% 50% 50% 51%--59% 60% 40% For students who withdraw/terminate after completing at least 60% of the enrollment period, there will be no refund of tuition. Room and board fees will be refunded as follows: 51%--60% 60% 40% 61%--70% 70% 30% 71%--80% 80% 20% 81%--90% 90% 10% 91%--100% 100% 0% If a student is eligible for a refund due to Title IV programs, refunds will be distributed in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan 2. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan 3. Other federal, state, private, or institutional grant assistance 4. The student (The amount of refund allocated to FFEL programs will be returned to the lender within 60 days after the student’s withdrawal.) FINANCIAL AID Tuition and fees charged to students at LTSP represent only a fraction of the total education costs. The remainder is paid by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and its synods and congregations; gifts and bequests from alumni/ae and other individuals; income from an endowment created over the years by Lutheran and other donors; and other miscellaneous sources. Every effort is made to provide a quality theological education while minimizing the cost to students. However, the seminary expects students to make every reasonable effort to finance the balance of their educational expenses from

Estimated 00-00 First Professional Expenses (full-time students)
These estimated costs are for the nine-month academic year and are based on enrollment in 10 total units during the Fall, January, and Spring terms (normal load for fulltime students is 9 to 11 units). These costs do not include expenses associated with admission. standard expenses single Married1 Tuition $ 12,000 $ 12,000 Housing 7,654 2 7,4413 Insurance 2,871 5,9814 Seminary Services Fee 300 300 Student Body Dues 40 40 Books (estimate) 1,000 1,000 ToTal $ 23,865 $ 26,762
1 Assumes both partners living on campus, only one partner attending school. 2 Based on studio apartment accommodations; includes utility surcharge and board plan. 3 Based on average two-bedroom rental rate, plus utility surcharge. (See housing rental rates above.) 4 Includes spouse added to policy; add $1,988 if including children (one fee covers all children). 

personal resources, including home congregations and judicatories, family members, part-time employment, and private grants and loans. While the primary responsibility for financing his/her seminary education belongs to the student, the seminary strives to help students locate all possible sources of financial assistance. Information and consultation concerning financial aid and other options are available throughout the year. ELIGIBILITY AND DEADLINES All half-time students admitted to a degree program and demonstrating satisfactory academic progress are eligible for financial aid if they show evidence of financial need. “Need” is defined as the difference between the student’s total cost of attendance and the non-seminary resources available to meet those expenses (including student and spouse earnings and savings and congregational and synodical assistance). Students must submit a full application each year that they seek financial aid. Students seeking financial aid are required to file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and complete an LTSP Financial Aid Application. Paper copies of the FAFSA are available from the Financial Aid Office; application may also be made on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov. LTSP’s institution code is G-03292. Applicants are encouraged to file their FAFSA’s by February 1 or as soon as they have prepared their tax forms for the prior calendar year. LTSP Financial Aid Applications will be reviewed

on a rolling basis, with applications completed and received by April 15 receiving preferential consideration. A completed application includes the LTSP application form, along with any required supporting documents, and the completed FAFSA. Applications will continue to be accepted until July 1 if grant funds remain available. Students seeking mid-year admission should be advised that seminary grant aid may not be available until the following academic year; such students should consult the Financial Aid Officer when making application. Students who apply too late to receive grant funds may nonetheless apply for any loans for which they are eligible. An LTSP financial aid package may consist of scholarships, grants-in-aid, federal work study, loans, or a combination of those resources. THE STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM This program provides loans from private lenders, such as banks and insurance companies, with relatively favorable interest rates because their loans are guaranteed against loss by the Federal government. As long as a borrower is enrolled at least half-time, repayment of principal can be deferred. Depending on a student’s financial need as determined by the FAFSA application (see above), up to $8,500 annually may also qualify for government subsidy of interest payments while the student is enrolled at least half-time. The annual maximum principal available to seminary students is $18,500. Lenders are required to deduct an origination fee of approximately three percent of the principal from each disbursement of the loan.

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8

Details are available from the Financial Aid Officer. The seminary cautions students about excessive reliance on loans, which must be repaid shortly after graduation at a time when other financial obligations and starting salary levels often limit one’s resources. However, Stafford Loans are the principal source of funds for meeting any financial need remaining after all resources, including other forms of financial aid, have been accounted for. GRANTS-IN-AID More than 70 percent of full-time first professional degree students receive grant assistance from the seminary. Grant awards are based on a combination of the student’s demonstrated financial need and his/her student status. Seminary grants are funded from endowment earnings and annual gifts restricted to this purpose by their donors. A listing of the endowments and regular annual contributors is printed at the close of this Financial Aid section. FEDERAL WORK STUDY The seminary participates in the Federal Work Study program, a federally subsidized program to provide qualifying students with jobs of substance, either on campus or in the local community. Eligibility is determined through the regular financial aid application process, and students notified of eligibility must then apply and interview for designated employment positions posted in the Financial Aid Office. Full-time students may not work more than 15 hours per week. FIRST PROFESSIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS • Philadelphia Scholarships are awarded to incoming first professional students who possess outstanding academic credentials, who write well, and who demonstrate exceptional potential for ministry. These scholarships provide full tuition plus a book allowance and required fees, including health insurance for the individual student. They are renewable for up to six semesters with maintenance of a 3.5 cumulative grade-point average. • John Cole Gulick Memorial Scholarships are awarded to incoming students who demonstrate exceptional potential for ministry. They provide full tuition and are renewable for up to six semesters with maintenance of a 3.3 cumulative grade-point average. • Presidential Scholarships are awarded to incoming first professional students whose strong potential for ministry is demonstrated by a record of service to church and/or community.
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Scholarships range from $500 to $4,000, are awarded at the discretion of the Financial Aid Committee, and are not renewable. Full-time first professional students who have completed at least one semester of study become eligible for other merit awards. Each year the Financial Aid Committee or the Dean nominates students from among whom the Faculty selects recipients of the following scholarships (there is no student application for these awards): • The Ted C. Womer Leadership Award, one award annually with possibility of renewal. Recipients shall demonstrate exceptional dedication and commitment to the Church, outstanding leadership qualities, and academic ability. Funded by earnings from an endowment established by St. John’s Lutheran Church, Stamford, CT. • The Dr. and Mrs. William Reifsnyder Leadership for Mission Endowed Scholarship Fund, one award annually to a first-year student with a B+ or better prior academic record and exceptional leadership potential. • The Roy L. Winters and Sarah Stober Winters Scholarship, one award annually to a member of the first-year class. Consideration is given to academic merit, promise for ministry, and financial need. • The Traci L. Maul Awards, one or more awards annually to a student or students who have finished the first year of study and who exemplify the qualities of Pastor Maul: outstanding leadership potential for ministry, active contribution to seminary community life, and academic strength. Funded by earnings from an endowment created in memory of the Rev. Traci L. Maul, MDiv 1995. • The Karl Elser Wurster Memorial Award, one award annually to a member of the second-year class. Consideration is given to academic merit, promise for ministry, and financial need. • The Paul J. Hoh Awards, four awards annually to Lutheran students, two from the secondyear class and two from the final-year class. Consideration is given to academic merit and promise for ministry. • The Atonement, Asbury Park Preaching Award, one award annually to a senior student selected by a faculty committee for exceptional potential in the field of Homiletics and Preaching, and having financial need. • The Dr. LeRoy Aden Scholarship in Pastoral Care, one award annually to a senior student (normally in the MDiv program). The student is to be nominated by the Integrative Area and approved by the Faculty as having outstanding

financial aid & student services

potential in the area of pastoral care. Black Church (UTI) Concentration students are eligible for a number of scholarships particular to that area of study. They include: • UTI Book Awards provide $100 per semester to those UTI or Black Church concentration students who have completed a minimum of ten academic units with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 and who completed a minimum of two academic units in the previous semester. Awards are automatically credited to the accounts of qualifying students after each semester’s grades have been posted. • The UTI Academic Award is given each Fall to the African-American UTI or Black Church concentration student preparing for ordained ministry who has achieved the highest cumulative grade point average and who has completed at least ten total academic units. A student may receive this award only once in his/ her seminary academic career. • UTI Merit or Financial Aid Scholarships are awarded to UTI and Black Church concentration students having a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.5, who have completed at least ten academic units, and who are registered in the current academic year for at least two academic units per semester. Students interested in these scholarships must submit a written request to the Financial Aid Officer and complete the regular LTSP financial aid and FAFSA forms. The number and value of awards made are determined by the funds available in the Joseph Quinton Jackson scholarship fund and other designated funds. ADVANCED LEVEL SCHOLARSHIPS The Anna C. Robertson Scholarship and the Benjamin Sadtler Memorial Scholarship are awarded on nomination by the Faculty for study in the STM program. Alumni/ae of all Lutheran seminaries are eligible for appointment, but preference is given to graduates of LTSP. Each award provides a cash stipend and a waiver of tuition for a year of full-time resident study. The holder may be invited to do such work of elementary instruction as the Faculty may designate. Depending on the nature of such instructional responsibility, an additional stipend may be paid. The John Cole Gulick Memorial Scholarship Fund makes the following advanced level scholarships possible. Additional details are available from the Director of the Graduate Program. • Two scholarships, not exceeding $9,000 each, provide tuition support for one year to entering

full-time ELCA STM students whose MDiv grade-point averages were at least 3.7. At least one of the two scholarships is to give preference to Latino/a students or students of color. Qualifying students must submit applications by April 30 of the preceding year. • Four scholarships, not exceeding $2,000 each, provide tuition support for one semester of full-time study to ELCA advanced level students whose first professional grade point average was at least 3.7 or whose current GPA in the LTSP graduate program is at least 3.7. Applications must be submitted by May 31 for the Fall Semester or November 30 for the Spring Semester. • Tuition aid may be granted to ELCA students with grade point averages of at least 3.6 in their MDiv or current LTSP graduate programs and who are registered for at least two advanced level courses in a Fall-January or Spring-Summer period. Application is to the Financial Aid Committee with supporting documentation as required by the committee. ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF SUPPORT Congregational and Synod Support For students of the ELCA in particular, the candidacy registration process is an opportunity to seek support from both the congregation and the synod. The ELCA Division for Ministry encourages congregations and synods to budget approximately $1,000 per candidate for seminary student aid, though synods vary in their capacity to meet that guideline. Students should consult their synods prior to each year of enrollment to be clear about the process of application and disbursement for that year. Veterans’ and G.I. Benefits The seminary is approved for students receiving educational benefits under provisions of the G.I. Bill and as current active or reserve duty military personnel. Employment Part-time employment is available on the seminary campus, the principal employers being the Refectory, the Library, and facilities management. Departments do their own hiring. The prevailing wage is $8.50 per hour, with supplements for those in certain leadership positions. The seminary also posts announcements of job opportunities off campus as they become known. The Faculty expects that full-time students will not work more than 15 hours per week when classes are in session. Students are warned that appeals for extensions or other special academic consideration
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are not to be made on grounds of employment. SOURCES OF SEMINARY FINANCIAL AID FUNDS Endowments
Charles Freihofer Fund, Samuel Lentz Fund, Andrew Johnson McCreary Foundation, Clarence E. McElwee Fund, Norristown Conference Fund, Rahn Foundation, Clara C. Reeb Fund, William Ashmead Schaeffer Fund, The Rev. Charles Jerome and Frances May Shimer Memorial Fund, Coe K. Stough Fund, William L. Stough Fund, S. Frederick Telleen Fund, Charles C. Wiebking Fund, Karl Elser Wurster Memorial Fund, St. Paul’s of Bayonne Fund, The Rev. and Mrs. Stephen Ruzsa Fund, S. Frank Doherty Fund, Daniel I. Kline Scholarship Fund, C. Stuart Burns III Memorial Fund, The Rev. Mont O. Bowser Loan Fund, Carl Eduard Poensgen Fund, Alice and Arthur Schoenhals Fund, The Rev. Fred K. Vogt Memorial Fund, Roy and Sarah Winters Fund, Class of 1962 Fund, Emma and John Young Fund, The Rev. Dr. Heinrich Emil Schneider Memorial Fund, Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd (Brooklyn, NY) Fund, Kifer Student Loan Fund, W.A.C. Mueller Scholarship Fund, Kathryn C. Nitchkey Fund, Christ Church (Johnstown, NY) Loan Fund, Grace and Leona Becker Fund, Lawrence S. Engelhard Fund, James and Verna La Pella Fund, Carl John Sutter Fund, Amelia R. Weaver Fund, Ellen D. Zimmermann Fund, Eunice K. Seitz Fund, Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd (Scarsdale, NY) Fund, Melenbacker Scholarship Fund, The Rev. Archibald E. Deitz Memorial Fund, Dorothy and Elmer Ortner Memorial Fund, Slovak Zion Lutheran Church of the Holy Trinity (Phila.) Fund, Dr. Walter Wagner Fund, Clarence and Katharine Lee Global Scholarship Fund, Lorean K. Robinson Fund, James T. and Elizabeth H. Powers Fund, Harold and Harriet Clayton Fund, Rev. Maxwell Walton Fund, John and Christina Shintay Fund, St. John’s Lutheran Church (Reading, PA) Fund, William E. and Martha F. Nye Student Aid Fund, Thomas R. and Constance B. Mathias Fund, Rev. Gerhard Gotthelf Dietrich Student Aid Fund, Pauline A. Wilson Fund, Eleanor B. Spencer Fund, The Markel Trust, Walker Scholarship, Roth Scholarship, Heim Scholarship, Ken and Roselee Feinour Scholarship, Dr. and Mrs. William Reifsnyder Leadership for Mission Scholarship Fund, Ted C. Womer Leadership Award, The Rev. Ralph Steinhauer Student Aid Fund, Joseph and Helen Stankus Student Aid Fund, Joseph and Veronica Vallone Student Aid Fund, Kenneth and Eleanor Smith Scholarship Fund, Annette R. Painter Scholarship Fund, Richard Palmer Scholarship Fund, Traci Maul ‘95 Scholarship Fund, Leroy Aden Scholarship in Pastoral Care, Keevill Fund for International Students, Atonement Lutheran Church (Asbury Park, NJ) Preaching Award, Redeemer Lutheran Church (Irvington, NJ) Student Aid Fund, Michael Möller Fund, Michele Robinson Student Aid Fund, Joseph Q. Jackson UTI Scholarship Fund, The Rev. George and Tupper Bierkoe Scholarship fund, The Rev. Willard and Cleonice Weida Student Aid Fund, Jane Cooper/Upper Dublin (PA) Lutheran Church Fund, Mr. and Mrs. John Cole Gulick Memorial Scholarship Fund

sTUDenT seRVICes
CAMPUS HOUSING Whenever possible, full-time students, other than those on internship, are encouraged to take advantage of on-campus housing to facilitate their faith development within a community setting. Seminary accommodations include approximately 35 one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments and 36 studio apartments. Married students and single parents have priority in the assignment of apartments; single students and those who are “resident commuters” (living alone on campus during the week and returning to a permanent resident on the weekend) are generally assigned to studios. All students living without family members on campus are required to participate in the Refectory food services plan as part of their lease or contract. Housing fees are as shown on page 15. A utility surcharge equal to five percent of rent covers all utilities except telephone. Apartments are unfurnished; studios include a kitchenette, bed, dresser, desk, and other basic furnishings. In general, pets, other than aquarium pets and seeing-eye dogs, are not permitted in campus housing. However, students coming to campus with no more than two cats may be permitted to keep them in one of the perimeter apartments by certifying that the cats have been de-clawed, spayed/neutered, and vaccinated and by paying a $250 registration fee for each cat. All students living in campus housing are required by Pennsylvania state law to show verification that they have received a one-time meningococcal vaccination. Students who choose not to have such a vaccination are required to submit a signed waiver form. FOOD SERVICES To enhance the sense of community on the seminary campus, fourteen meals per week are provided in the seminary’s Refectory while classes are in session during the academic year (excluding Summer Term). Lunch and dinner are served at prescribed times, beginning with community announcements and with prayer offered by individuals on behalf of the assembly. Food service is managed by a professional food service company under contract with the seminary. A board contract that includes all meals is mandatory for all students living singly on campus. Other students, Faculty, and staff are encouraged to eat at the Refectory as well, with meals available by advance ticket purchases at subsidized rates. 

0

Other Sources
ELCA Fund for Leaders, Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, The Friends of The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, Aaron L. Dettra Fund, Frederick C. Mohrfield Trust, Epiphany Lutheran Church (Phila.), Prince of Peace Lutheran Church (Phila.), Rev. Richard W. Lundin Fund, Chaplain and Mrs. Thomas J. Richter Fund, Sharon Lutheran Church (Selinsgrove, PA), Naomi Hazell Scholarship Fund, The Kuemmerle Fund and general support from Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pleasantville, NJ), Clyde H. Kelchner Fund, Yocum Family Perpetual Charitable Trust, Jacob Esser Fund, Daniel Payne Book Fund (UTI), Mosser Trust, Möller Student Family Fund, Calvary Lutheran Church (West Chester, PA), Matthew and Charles Stewart Scholarship Fund, W. Gordon and Natalie E. Dunning Scholarship Fund

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE All eight ELCA seminaries participate in a Seminarian Group Health Insurance Plan, negotiated by the Board of Pensions and the Vocation and Education Program Unit of the ELCA and approved in a referendum of students in 1992. All students registered more than half-time in the Fall or Spring Semester are required to pay the health insurance fee, except that students covered by another eligible group plan may waive the seminarian plan coverage by paying an annual Community Health Access fee of $250 (see Note 5 on page 15). Coverage is for the student only, but optional coverage is available, at additional cost, for dependents and for catastrophic illness. Details of the plan are published annually in a plan brochure available from the Business Office. STUDENT COMPUTING CENTER The Information Systems department provides three computers and a printer for the use of seminary students. The computing center is located on the third floor of The Brossman Center.

CoMMUnITY lIfe
WORSHIP According to Dr. Gordon Lathrop, Charles A. Schieren Professor Emeritus of Liturgy: “This community is a school. But by God’s mercy proclaimed in word and sacrament in our assembly, this school is also sometimes formed into people of God. Be welcome. Let that assembly and mercy be yours, at the heart of your studies and your life. The rare mercy is that now, for a while, we have each other as bodily signs of Christ.” Chapel services are held Sunday through Friday, according to the schedule announced each term. The Eucharist is celebrated every Wednesday of the Fall and Spring Semesters at 9:30 am, with community coffee following. Offerings made at chapel are given to Lutheran World Relief and the Philadelphia Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. All services are open to all interested persons. A schedule assigning students and Faculty to a week of chapel leadership and inviting such persons to the Chaplain’s Table for planning is circulated early in each semester. THE SEMINARY CHOIR The Seminary Choir, directed by Mark Mummert, Seminary Musician, is open to all in the seminary community, regardless of musical training. Informal auditions for section placement are held during Orientation and at various other times during the year, and rehearsals are held weekly in the chapel

when classes are in session. Those who are available during the weekday are asked to volunteer to sing in a chapel choir on a rotating basis. This extension of the seminary choir sings regularly at Wednesday Eucharist and a few other chapel liturgies throughout the year. The full choir presents a Hymn Festival, the annual and much-loved Advent Vespers in December, and Easter Vespers. In addition, the seminary choir sings for Commencement in May and a few other programs during the year, arranged in consultation with the choir members. THE STUDENT BODY First professional students are organized into an association, the Student Body, with elected officers and standing committees. Through this association, the students, in cooperation with the Faculty and administration, organize details of their life together and care for such issues as may arise in the seminary community. The two standing committees of the student body are 1) Worship and Community Life and 2) Education, Witness and Service. The former oversees worship and devotional life, social and athletic activities, and addresses concerns of students regarding campus facilities, while the latter deals with educational, witnessing and social ministry issues and oversees all student body publications. COMMUNITY SERVICE Each year, members of the LTSP community participate in providing shelter and meals through the Interfaith Hospitality Network, provide community service on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and support local benevolent causes through chapel offerings. Students respond generously with time and talent to meet other community needs on a regular basis. SOCIAL EVENTS Orientation and Opening Day picnics offer an opportunity for the members of the community to gather for fun and fellowship. The Student Body organizes trick-or-treating for children of the community each Halloween and also sponsors a Martin Luther Birthday Bash, Christmas caroling, Fastnacht activities and other events from time to time. Community coffee takes place each week following Eucharist. ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL FITNESS The multi-purpose room in Hagan Center is home to informal basketball and volleyball games and, occasionally, more formal student vs. faculty/ staff contests.
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An annual flag-football game (the Luther Bowl) takes place against the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg and other seminaries as well. Other athletic activities occur from time to time as organized by the Worship and Community Life Committee. The fitness room in the Wiedemann Center is open to members of the LTSP community who are 18 or older. The room includes a weight-training machine as well as several stationary bicycles and treadmills. SEMINARY PUBLICATIONS PS The award-winning PS is published quarterly to keep alumni/ae and friends of the seminary in touch with the life and work of the institution, and informed as to its ideals and plans. Copies are also made available to all on-campus, intern, and prospective students. Parish Practice Notebook PPN contains brief articles of interest to pastors in active parish service. It is written and edited by members of the faculty and administration. It is published periodically and sent free of charge to all alumni/ae and to Lutheran clergy in the northeastern United States. Copies of this publication are also provided to all students. The Seminarian The Seminarian, the student body newspaper, is published by students and contains articles written by various members of the seminary community. It serves as a conduit for the flow of information and ideas, seeks to facilitate better communication among the community and provides a place where students and Faculty may clearly articulate their thoughts for community consideration and discussion. Student Handbook The Student Handbook is published annually. It includes important academic and campus life regulations, current information concerning various campus services, and selected policy statements pertinent to student life. The Connection The publication of the seminary’s Alumni/ae Association, The Connection contains information of particular interest to LTSP alums, including information on the annual Convocation. Home Page (Web site) The seminary’s home page contains updated
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

news from the seminary, events, resources, faculty, and admissions information. It may be found at www.Ltsp.edu. SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS These organizations provide support for and interest in various aspects of student life. An awareness of the existence and activities of these groups becomes highly important after graduation if they are to continue their vital work in aiding the total seminary program. Seminary Friends Successor to the Auxiliary of the Seminary, the Seminary Friends volunteer to share the story of the seminary, coordinate special events, and inspire support of our students, especially with gifts for student financial aid. The Alumni/ae Association Since its organization in 1870, the Alumni/ ae Association has made many important contributions to the life of the seminary. Especially noteworthy have been the establishment of endowments for the purchase of books for the library, assistance in underwriting part of the cost of several seminary publications, its contribution to the seminary’s Leadership Fund, and its conduct of an annual Convocation. In recent years two subsets of LTSP alumni/ae have emerged as formal groupings, the Urban Theological Institute Alumni/ae (UTIA) and the Episcopal Alumni/ae, both of which promote the wellbeing of students in their respective categories.

first Professional Program

PRoGRaM oVeRVIeW
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS In addition to the application elements listed on pages 13-15, admission to all programs (degree and non-degree) at the first professional level requires the following: 1. Bachelor’s degree. A baccalaureate degree or its equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university is required. In extraordinary cases, a student lacking a bachelor’s degree but having the support of his/her denominational judicatory and demonstrated academic ability may be admitted as a special student and, upon successful completion of all requirements with a grade point average of at least 3.5, may be awarded the MDiv or MAR degree by unanimous vote of the Faculty. 2. Demonstrated academic ability. Normally, a cumulative grade-point average of “B” (2.8 or above on a 4.0 scale) at the undergraduate level is expected. However, admission decisions also take into account • patterns of progress in an applicant’s academic history • the degree of difficulty of the undergraduate program • the standards of the school attended • performance in coursework most relevant to theological studies • writing ability • academic letters of reference • success in other graduate programs • performance in career life • other measures such as Graduate Record Exams and the Test of English as a Foreign Language, where these become a factor 3. Academic readiness. While LTSP does not require a particular type of undergraduate preparation, it is generally beneficial to applicants to have attained a broad background in the liberal arts, including such courses as English, history, modern languages, philosophy, Greek, communications, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. It is expected that applicants have achieved the ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly as well as to think critically and reflectively. Competence in a second language is helpful. 

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THe fIRsT PRofessIonal PRoGRaM (MDIV/MaR/ CeRTIfICaTe/sPeCIal)

4. Ecclesiastical readiness. Applicants are expected to demonstrate through essays and references the following personal qualifications: • A commitment to Christ, an openness and willingness to serve in response to the needs of the Church, a life consistent with the Gospel, leadership abilities, and competency in interpersonal relationships. • Active membership in a Christian congregation. It is expected that a Lutheran applicant will have been a member in good standing of a Lutheran congregation for at least one year, in accordance with the ELCA candidacy policy. • A basic acquaintance with the scriptures and statements of belief associated with one’s own tradition. ELCA candidates, for example, should have a working familiarity with such Lutheran faith statements as the catechism. 5. Approval of denomination or judicatory. Unless applicants have no intention to pursue ordained or rostered lay ministry in their denominations, they are expected to have consulted officers or agencies appropriate to their traditions prior to applying for admission to seminary. ELCA applicants for rostered ministry, in particular, need to have a Positive Entrance Decision from their synodical candidacy committees not later than the end of the first semester of studies; the process toward getting this decision can often take a year or more. For more detailed information about the ELCA Candidacy process, see page 38. Students without ecclesiastical approval may nonetheless complete degrees so long as they meet all other seminary standards. Admission to and/or award of a degree by LTSP does not guarantee ordination or approval for rostered ministry. Approval for rostered ministry is the responsibility of appropriate officials of the student’s denomination (synodical candidacy committees in the case of ELCA students; see the section on ELCA candidacy). 6. Background clearance. Upon admission all first professional degree students are required to submit to criminal background and child abuse checks. Such clearance must be certified no later than October 15 of the student’s first semester, or any contextual education experience for which the student is registered will be voided. ELCA candidates for rostered ministry who have completed these background checks for their entrance processes are exempted from having to complete these requirements for the seminary. 

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ENTERING STUDENTS All students admitted to first professional programs are expected to attend the first available Prolog, held annually in August. This two-week intensive course for credit offers students an introduction to theological education, multicultural awareness, and public theology. At the Prolog new students will meet seminary faculty and personnel, along with their fellow students, and learn about the life of the seminary. An Orientation Fair permits students to inquire into numerous seminary programs through informal conversation. Students admitted at mid-year are expected to participate in the Prolog the following August. Because good writing skills are essential to success in graduate studies and ministry, entering students whose writing skills are judged to need strengthening will be required to participate in a non-credit Writing Skills Workshop during their first year at seminary. Such judgment may be made on the basis of the student’s application essay or upon evaluation of various writing samples submitted by the student during the Prolog. Other students are encouraged to take the workshop electively to improve their own writing skills. SPECIAL NEEDS If you have any disability requiring special attention, you must submit to the Director of Student Services documentation of your disability, along with details on specific needs to be accommodated, at least sixty days prior to matriculation. Requests for accommodations are not to be addressed directly to instructors or other staff without the guidance of the Director of Student Services. FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING Students have a number of scheduling options for completing their degrees: • Full-time residential students live on campus and can choose from among all courses offered, both weekdays and evenings/weekends, six days a week. • Full-time commuters live off-campus but close enough to avail themselves of all course options. • Resident commuters live on campus three to four days per week and then return home for a long weekend. • Part-time day students take one or more classes each week, commuting from their places of residence. • Part-time evening/weekend students take courses in the evenings or on Saturdays. Students in this category can, by attentive
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scheduling, complete an MDiv degree in an average of five to six years, an MAR degree in less time. Evening/weekend students may find it impossible to complete an entire degree within the timeframes they set for themselves. Whenever possible, MDiv students are encouraged to commit themselves to at least one year of full-time, daytime study. The seminary presumes that full-time students (those who take 4 or more units a semester) will not work more than 15-20 hours per week while taking classes and that such students will therefore be able to avail themselves of the full range of seminary courses, both weekday and evening/ weekend. Students who work full-time and cannot take weekday courses must recognize that courses may not always be available when they want or need to take them, and this may lengthen their time of study. INDEPENDENT STUDY First professional students who have completed a minimum of ten units may seek to engage in independent reading and research on topics of particular interest to them, which may include an elective course that is not being offered in a term when the student is in residence. Independent studies must be registered in the Fall, Spring or Summer Terms (subject to instructor availability) and are normally limited to one unit per student per term. Independent study proposals require the approval of the LTSP Faculty or of the Dean acting on behalf of the Faculty. An independent study may normally not be used to satisfy a degree requirement or option requirement without the prior written approval of the Dean. If a study is to satisfy a degree requirement and the proposed study supervisor does not regularly offer an LTSP course meeting that requirement, the prospectus must also have the approval of the instructor or area responsible for the requirement. All work for an independent study is to be completed by the last day of the term, or the normal rules concerning extensions and lateness apply. Students considering an independent study for a future term should obtain the independent study guidelines and registration form from the registrar’s office or from the Academics portion of the LTSP Web site.

first Professional Degrees

The Master of Divinity degree serves in the ELCA and many other denominations as the basic degree to prepare for ordained ministry in congregations and other settings. The degree program includes both academic studies and practical learning experience. Students seeking ordination must be careful to satisfy both degree requirements and any parallel ecclesiastical expectations. It is important that applicants considering ordained ministry make early contact with appropriate officials of their synods or other church bodies, both to ensure that they have met those requirements that precede entrance into the seminary and to ensure that they understand any special academic requirements they may be expected to fulfill. THE PROGRAM For a traditional (full-time, daytime) student the MDiv degree program normally requires three years of full-time study (see the chronological sequence on page 27). Students who cannot follow the standard full-time chronological sequence are considered “nontraditional,” and the duration of studies varies considerably for such students. Advisors may assist students to tailor programs according to the student’s academic strength and personal needs. The degree is to be completed within ten years from the onset of the first course at LTSP that is applied to the degree program, although the Faculty at its discretion may grant program extensions upon written request by the student. Because the MDiv is part of a dual set of requirements for ordination in the ELCA, the typical ELCA student’s seminary program includes two additional ecclesiastical requirements: Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE), normally pursued during the summer following the first year; and a 9- to 12month internship, usually pursued between the second and third academic years. The seminary program for such students consequently has a normal duration of four years. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 1. A bachelor’s degree or its equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university. 2. Satisfactory completion of 30.5 course units. One unit is equivalent to three semester hours. These 30.5 course units are to include • A minimum of 7.0 units in the Bible and biblical languages. Students are expected to complete the required introductory courses in Greek and Hebrew prior to or 

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The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

MasTeR of DIVInITY DeGRee (MDiv)

concurrently with the related introductory biblical courses. A student who cannot do so must follow up the language course with a demonstration of exegetical competency in the language by taking a readings course, by making arrangements to satisfy the exegetical requirement through an appropriate upperlevel Bible elective, or by informal submission of exegetical work to an LTSP instructor of that language. • A minimum of 3.0 units in Church history, including at least 1.0 unit in the history and polity of the student’s own tradition. Students from some traditions may have to take this course elsewhere for transfer into their LTSP degree programs. • A minimum of 3.0 units in systematic theology, including the foundational course, one course in Christology, and one in ethics. • A minimum of 7.0 units in integrative theology, including 1.0 unit of contextual education. Note that additional non-credit contextual experience is required for students in ELCA candidacy and for other students as determined by their judicatories (see “Contextual Education”, page 27) • A minimum of 4.0 units in interdisciplinary/ integrative courses, including the Prolog, Formation Groups, global, ecumenical, and interfaith courses, and a senior seminar on public theology. Students who have completed internship are required also to complete a half-unit course reflecting on the internship experience. 3. Satisfactory completion of the following noncredit requirements: • Completion of the ATS Profiles in Ministry, Stage 1, evaluation. • Participation in anti-racism/multicultural awareness training, as offered annually at the seminary. • Eight hours of training in the areas of sexual ethics, boundaries, and wellness. Students may participate in seminary-provided programs, offered annually, or submit proof of having completed equivalent training through a qualified institution or agency within three years of entering seminary. 4. A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above. 5. Minimum residence at LTSP of one year. Residence of less than three academic years in the MDiv program is permitted only when candidates are admitted to advanced standing by transfer

from other recognized seminaries, or with Faculty approval of an accelerated program of study for qualified candidates. Residence is defined as the satisfactory completion at this seminary of at least ten units of required and elective courses. Courses for which credit is earned through test-out do not count toward the residency requirement.

The course requirements of the MDiv degree follow in two formats: 1) Courses grouped by academic area and department (below). 2) A chronological sequence of a typical fulltime traditional student on the next page.

Degree requirements for the MDiv degree (by area)
Course ID Units Biblical Languages (prior to or concurrent with Bible courses) Greek BBG100 or BBG110 1.0 Hebrew BBH100 or BBH110 1.0 Bible Introduction to the Old Testament 1 and 2 (with Hebrew) BOT100 and BOT1011 2.0 Introduction to the New Testament 1 and 2 (with Greek) BNT100 and BNT1011 2.0 Biblical Option (excluding language courses) B_____ 1.0 Church History History of Christianity HCH100 1.0 Denominational History and Polity Option2 HCH20_ 1.0 American/World Christianity Option HCH23_ 1.0 Systematic Theology Thinking about God HTH100 1.0 Christology Option HTH20_ or as announced 1.0 Theological Ethics Option HTH25_ or as announced 1.0 Integrative Field Education (see page 27) IFE___ 1.0 Introduction to Christian Assembly 1 ICA100 1.0 Introduction to Christian Assembly 2 ICA101 1.0 Introduction to Christian Education ICE100 1.0 Church in Society ICS100 1.0 Introduction to Pastoral Care IPC100 1.0 Parish Practice/Leadership Option IPP20_ 1.0 Interdisciplinary/Special Global Option As announced 0.5 Ecumenical Option As announced 0.5 Interfaith Option As announced 0.5 Formation Groups SGN110 and SGN111 0.5 [Pastor as Theologian—students w/internship only] IPP500 [0.5]3 Prolog: Theology, Ministry, Contexts SGN100 1.0 Senior Seminar in Public Theology As announced 1.0 Free Electives Remaining Units 6.0 [6.5]3 Non Credit Anti-racism/multicultural awareness training Non-credit 8-hour professional ethics and boundaries training Non-credit Greek and Hebrew exegetical competency1 Non-credit Total Units 30.5 Notes: 1Students who complete Old or New Testament without Hebrew/Greek respectively (BOT110/111 or BNT110/111) must demonstrate exegetical competence following completion of the language requirement, per instruction of the Biblical Area. 2Course is to be in the history and polity of student’s own denomination or tradition. 3Those students who are not required to do internship will complete an additional .5-unit elective rather than Pastor as Theologian.
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia 

first Professional Degrees

[Standard course sequence for traditional students. (Note that in any given year the sequence may be adjusted to meet distinctive calendar or personnel needs.) The sequence of nontraditional students will vary from student to student.] FIRST (Junior) YEAR (10.5-11 units) AUGUST TERM Prolog (1) JANUARY TERM Global/ecumenical/ Interfaith option (.5) [Elective (.5)]

FALL SEMESTER Hebrew or Greek (1)1 old or new Testament 1 (1)1 History of Christianity (1) Thinking about God (1) field education 1a (.25)

SPRING SEMESTER old or new Testament 2 (1)1 [Denominational Polity (1)] Pastoral Care (1) Christian assembly 1 (1) field education 1b (.25)

SUMMER TERM [Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE)2] FALL SEMESTER Hebrew or Greek (1)1 old or new Testament 1 (1)1 Christian education (1) Christian assembly 2 (1) field education 2a (.25) formation Group 1 (.25) SECOND (Middler) YEAR (9.5-10 units) JANUARY TERM Global/ecumenical/ Interfaith option (.5) [Elective (.5)] SPRING SEMESTER old or new Testament 2 (1)1 Church in society (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) field education 2b (.25) formation Group 2 (.25) 

[Summer Term elective option] [THIRD (Internship) YEAR2] FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER [Pastor as Theologian (.5) 3] Public Theology seminar (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) Elective (1) Core courses are printed in boldface above. 1 Students may elect to begin with either Hebrew/Old Testament or Greek/New Testament, reserving the remaining biblical sequence for the second year of study. 2 Clinical Pastoral Education and Internship are not requirements for the degree, but they are ecclesiastical requirements of the ELCA and some other denominations. 3 Those students who are not required to do internship will complete an additional .5-unit elective rather than Pastor as Theologian. Terms in which particular courses are offered may vary in any given year; students should consult the fullyear schedule of course offerings when planning their programs. CONTEXTUAL EDUCATION With the goal of “hands-on” training in a reallife, off-campus ministry situation, MDiv students participate in contextual education. For most MDiv students this includes field education; many will also take part in Clinical Pastoral Education and/or Internship. Field Education The typical MDiv student undertakes a field education assignment for each of four semesters (the first two years of a full-time program). The normative expectation is that the first two semesters of field education be experienced via a “rotational model,” in which students visit a number of
The Catalog / 2006–2008

FOURTH (Senior) YEAR (9.5-10 units) JANUARY TERM Global/ecumenical/ Interfaith option (.5) [Elective (.5)]

section Title

Degree requirements for the MDiv degree (by chronology) 

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different congregations to compare and contrast ministry styles, and that the last two semesters be experienced through placement at a single congregational or institutional site. In consultation with the Director of Contextual Education, however, a student may be permitted to engage in field education via placement at a designated site for all four semesters, or a student with significant prior parish experience may be able to gain credit for prior experience. The practicum of a site assignment consists of working a limited number of hours each week in a congregation or agency under the guidance of an approved supervisor. Students participate in worship planning, leadership, spiritual formation, visitations, and Christian education activities. In consultation with the Site Field Education Coordinator, students are assigned sites most appropriate to their discerned calls. Concurrent with the first year of field education practicum, whether rotational or at a site, is weekly participation in a field education ministry reflection group. Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is an ecclesiastical (not academic) requirement for ordination by the ELCA and some other denominations. Designed to provide an intensive pastoral care experience coupled with deep reflection and discernment, CPE offers students the opportunity to hone their listening and caregiving skills in critical care facilities under qualified supervision. One quarter (12 weeks) of CPE is normally taken during the summer between the first and second academic years. Exceptions to this schedule (i.e., CPE taken concurrently with an academic semester) require judicatory and Faculty approval for students in ELCA candidacy. Internship Internship is not an academic requirement for the MDiv degree but is an ecclesiastical requirement for ordination by the ELCA and some other denominations. It places the student under the direct supervision of an experienced pastor/ supervisor in a congregation or a Church-related agency. Intern placements are usually clustered in order to provide maximum interchange among students and supervisors. The traditional internship consists of a nineto twelve-month ministerial practicum, normally between the second and third academic years of an MDiv program. In consultation with a student’s advisor, the Director of Contextual Education, the Dean, and his/her candidacy committee, however, a student may determine early in his/her first year whether an exception to the normal practice may
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be feasible. For selected students the Faculty may approve a “concurrent” internship, a seminary-based extension of the final academic year over two years on a part-time basis, correlated with the internship extended over that same period, the total program remaining four years in length. The ELCA student planning to do an internship needs to have received a positive endorsement from his/her candidacy committee (see ELCA Candidacy, pages 38-39). No student may begin an internship if his/her cumulative grade point average is below 2.0. Also, no student may begin an internship if he/she has failed to complete satisfactorily all required courses included in the first and second years of the curriculum. When an “F” or “W” occurs in a required course in the semester immediately preceding the internship, the Dean in consultation with the Director of Contextual Education must determine whether the internship is to be terminated, continued, or revised in its nature (e.g. changed to a part-time internship). When an “I” occurs in a semester immediately preceding the internship, the deficiency must be removed within six weeks of the conclusion of the semester or the internship will be terminated, continued, or revised as in the case of an “F” or “W.” Students from non-Lutheran denominations seeking internship are treated on an individual basis, taking into account any special educational needs or other requirements pertaining to the denomination. LTSP’s goal is to provide flexibility in length, sequence, and character of the internship for the non-Lutheran student. The internship program is served ably each year by intern supervisors and leaders of Intern Clusters; these persons supplement the regular faculty in training, mentoring, and evaluating candidates for ministry. Intern supervisors for 2005-06 are listed on page 93. MDIV ConCenTRaTIons The black Church (UTI) Concentration A concentration within the MDiv degree program to equip persons for ministry in a Black Church context leads to an Urban Theological Institute (UTI) Certificate of Black Church Ministry at graduation for those completing the requirements. Oversight is provided by the Director of the UTI. Admission to the Concentration Interested students should indicate their interest in the concentration on their application for admission to the seminary or by written notice to the registrar no later than January Term of the first year for full-time students or upon completion of 4.0 course units by part-time students.

first Professional Degrees

Requirements of the Concentration • Five course units as negotiated with the Director, which may include the following: a. One Bible course designated for the concentration (suffixed “B”) b. HCH232B, African American Church History (also fulfills American Religious History requirement for students in concentration) c. HTH335B, African American Theology d. ICA150B, Worship in the Black Church (also fulfills Christian Assembly 1 requirement for non-ELCA students in concentration) e. ICA320B, Preaching in Black Church Contexts f. Other courses as designated by the Director The latino Concentration A concentration within the MDiv degree program to equip persons for ministry in a Latino context leads to a Certificate of Latino Ministry at graduation for those completing the requirements. Oversight is provided by the Director of the Instituto de Teología y Pastoral. Admission to the Concentration Interested students should meet with the Director of the Instituto as early as possible in their programs, preferably in advance of entrance. Application for admission to the concentration is filed with the registrar no later than January Term of the first year for full-time students or upon completion of 4.0 course units by part-time students. The sole criterion is proficiency in the Spanish language as determined by the Director of the Instituto. Requirements of the Concentration • Two quarters of field education in a Latino context or an internship in a Latino or urban context. • Five course units as follows: a. HTH328L, U.S. Latino/a Theology and Ministry b. Either HTH315L, Latin American Theology, or HTH209L, Readings in Christology (Latino) c. Three units selected from among the following offerings: HTH209L, HTH315L, ICA100L, ICA101L, SIS300L (an independent study proposed in consultation with the Director of the Instituto), or one course from among

the offerings of the Metropolitan/Urban Concentration (suffixed “C”), or from any other new courses which might be designated from time to time. The Metropolitan/Urban Ministry Concentration The Metropolitan/Urban Ministry concentration is for those students within the MDiv program who are interested in specializing in metropolitan or urban ministry. It leads to a Certificate of Metropolitan/Urban Ministry at graduation for those completing the requirements. The goals of this concentration are: • to introduce students to the wide variety of gifts and challenges for ministry that the city offers; • to teach theological and practical skills for an metropolitan/urban vocation; and • to provide creative and effective models of mission. Admission to the Concentration The criteria for admission include a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or better and the support of one’s synod (or denomination). Application to the program is filed with the program advisor in the first year of study. Requirements of the Concentration Students work with the faculty advisor of the program to devise an individual learning contract, which normally includes: • First-year field education via the rotation model and participation in the attendant ministry reflection group; • Subsequent metropolitan/urban placements in field education, CPE (or its community equivalent), and internship; • One ten-day training event; • Any two of the following core courses: ICS250C, The Church in the City; ICS251C, Understanding the City; ICS252C, Models of Urban Ministry; • Two additional courses in consultation with the program advisor, which may include offerings of the Instituto de Teología y Pastoral (suffixed “L”) or the Black Church (UTI) Concentration (suffixed “B”); and • ICS520C, Issues in Urban Ministry, a halfcredit course for seniors. The Multicultural Ministry/Mission Concentration A concentration within the MDiv degree program to equip persons for ministry in a multicultural congregational (African/African American, Asian or Latino) and/or multicultural
The Catalog / 2006–2008 

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section Title 

0

locational context leads to a Certificate of Multicultural Ministry and Mission at graduation for those completing the requirements. Oversight is provided by the Director of the Multicultural Mission Resource Center (MMRC). Admission to the Concentration Interested students should meet with the Director of the MMRC as early as possible in their programs, preferably in advance of entrance. Application for admission to the concentration is filed with the registrar no later than January Term of the first year for full-time students or upon completion of 4.0 course units by part-time students. Previous exposure, experience and engagement in a multicultural situation is desirable but not mandatory. Requirements of the Concentration • Two quarters of field education in a multicultural context or an internship in a multicultural context; • ICS323, The Challenge of Race in Church and Society; • HCH235, World Christianity or another course in mission and cultures; • A course in Black, African American, Asian, or Latino Theology; and • Two additional courses selected in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor and Director of the MMRC. oRDInaTIon anD PlaCeMenT Ordination and placement of MDiv graduates in the ELCA (as in most other Church bodies) are functions reserved to itself by the Church and not functions of the seminary. However, both faculty and staff are prepared to assist candidates in the process. The campus also hosts the office of Region 7 of the ELCA, where there is a deployed ELCA staff member trained to help ELCA candidates find calls and secure ordination.

MasTeR of aRTs In RelIGIon DeGRee (MaR)
The Master of Arts in Religion degree is intended for students seeking a basic understanding of theological disciplines for further graduate study or general educational purposes. The MAR serves in the ELCA as a basic degree for recognition as diaconal minister (see page 39), associate in ministry, or deaconess. THE PROGRAM Duration of this program for a full-time student is normally two years. Models of part-time study vary

considerably. The degree is to be completed within ten years from the onset of the first course at LTSP that is applied to the degree program, although the Faculty at its discretion may grant program extensions upon written request by the student. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 1. A bachelor’s degree or its equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university. 2. Satisfactory completion of 20 course units. One unit is equivalent to three semester hours. These 20 course units are to include • A minimum of 4.0 units in the Bible, including Old and New Testament 1 and 2 • A minimum of 2.0 units in Church history, including at least 1.0 unit in the history and polity of the student’s own tradition • A minimum of 2.0 units in systematic theology, including the foundational course and one course in Christology • A minimum of 1.5 units in integrative theology, including a half unit of contextual education and one from among the following: Christian Assembly 1 and 2, Christian Education, Pastoral Care, and Church Administration • A minimum of 3.0 units in interdisciplinary/ integrative courses, including the Prolog, formation groups, one course that is global, ecumenical, or interfaith in focus, and a senior seminar on public theology • A minimum of 5.0 units constituting a specialization in line with the student’s particular interests and goals (for sample specializations, see pages 32-33). Courses fulfilling other degree requirements may be used toward the specialization With the exception of CPE and internship, the same academic/ecclesiastical interrelationships and functions apply in the case of commissioning or consecration as are described for ordination. 3. Satisfactory completion of the following noncredit requirements: • Completion of the ATS Profiles in Ministry, Stage 1, evaluation • Participation in the anti-racism/multicultural awareness workshop offered annually at the seminary • Eight hours of training in the areas of sexual ethics, boundaries, and wellness. Students may participate in seminary-provided programs, offered annually, or submit proof of having completed equivalent training through a qualified institution or agency within three years of entering seminary

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

first Professional Degrees

4. A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above. 5. Minimum residence at LTSP of one year. Residence of less than two academic years in the MAR program is permitted only when candidates are admitted to advanced standing by transfer from other recognized seminaries. Residence is defined as the satisfactory completion at this seminary of at least ten units of required and elective courses. Courses for which credit is earned through test-out do not count toward the

residency requirement. The requirements of the MAR degree follow in two formats: 1) Courses grouped by academic area and department (below). 2) A chronological sequence of a typical fulltime student is shown on page 32. In any given year, the sequence may be adjusted to meet distinctive calendar or personnel needs. (The sequence of part-time students of either

Degree Requirements for the Master of arts in Religion Degree (by area)
Course ID Bible Introduction to the Old Testament 1 BOT100 or 110 1.0 Introduction to the Old Testament 2 BOT101 or 111 1.0 Introduction to the New Testament 1 BNT100 or 110 1.0 Introduction to the New Testament 2 BNT101 or 111 1.0 Church History History of Christianity HCH100 1.0 1 Denominational History and Polity Option HCH20_ 1.0 Systematic Theology. Thinking about God HTH100 1.0 Christology Option HTH20_ or as announced 1.0 Integrative Theology Integrative Option I_____2 1.0 3 Ministry Action/Reflection IFE160/161 0.5 Interdisciplinary/Special Prolog: Theology, Ministry, Contexts SGN100 1.0 Formation Groups SGN210/211 0.5 Global or Ecumenical or Interfaith Option as announced 0.5 Senior Seminar in Public Theology as announced 1.0 Free Electives 7.5 Total Units 20 Notes: At least five courses are to form an area of specialization, according to the student’s educational and vocational goals. 1Course is to be in the history and polity of student’s own denomination or tradition. 2May include ICA100, ICA101, ICE100, IPC100, or IPP201. 3IFE160/161 Ministry Action/Reflection is defined by a contract negotiated among student, contextual education office, and a supervisor or mentor in the student’s proposed ministerial context. It is a combination of contextual education and Practicum with supervision and disciplined reflection. Normally, it is to be completed within the first year of a full-time program, or in a two-year period within an extended part-time program. (As appropriate to a specific program, a substitute may be Ministry Action/Reflection for Musicians—IFE170/270—or traditional Field Education—IFE100/101 or 110/111 and IFE200/201.) 

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section Title

Degree requirements for the Master of arts in Religion Degree (by chronology)
FIRST YEAR AUGUST TERM Prolog (1) FALL SEMESTER (4.25 units) old or new Testament 1 (1)1 History of Christianity (1) Thinking about God (1) Elective/Option (1) Ministry action/Reflection 1 (.25) JANUARY TERM Elective(s) (1) SPRING SEMESTER (4.25 units) old or new Testament 2 (1)1 [Denominational Polity (1)] elective/option (1) elective/option (1) Ministry action/Reflection 2 (.25)

SECOND YEAR FALL SEMESTER (4.25 units) JANUARY TERM SPRING SEMESTER (4.25 units) old or new Testament 1 (1)1 Elective(s) (1) old or new Testament 2 (1)1 formation Group 1 (.25) formation Group 2 (.25) Elective/Option (1) seminar in Public Theology (1) Elective/Option (1) Elective/Option (1) Elective/Option (1) Elective/Option (1) Core courses are printed in bold face above. At least five courses are to form an area of specialization, according to the student’s educational and vocational goals. Such courses may also fulfill other degree requirements. 1 Students may elect to begin with either Old Testament or New Testament, reserving the remaining biblical sequence for the second year of study. Terms in which particular courses are offered may vary in any given year; students should consult the fullyear schedule of course offerings when planning their programs. curriculum will vary from student to student.) MaR sPeCIalIZaTIons Pastoral Care specialization The pastoral care specialization is intended to equip persons for specialized ministry in pastoral care, including parish-based pastoral care specialists; Diaconal Ministers/Deacons, Associates in Ministry, and Deaconesses with a particular vocation in pastoral care; and persons wishing to gain a strong foundation for professional training in chaplaincy or pastoral counseling. The Director is the Professor of Pastoral Theology. Completion of the MAR degree with this specialization, together with 3 years of subsequent professional ministry experience, may be used to support an application for membership as a Pastoral Care Specialist in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors. Students may choose to develop a further focus within the specialization (e.g., ministry to older persons, addictions, domestic violence), based upon relevant coursework and contextual education. Admission Requirements 1. Application filed with the registrar no later than January Term of the first year 2. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.4 3. Interview with the Professor of Pastoral Theology Specialization Requirements 1. Two units of CPE, preferably including at least one parish- or community-based site with a pastoral care focus. (Equivalency may be granted for an appropriate non-CPE site for the second unit.) 2. At least two quarters of contextual education must include supervised pastoral care experience 3. IPC100, Introduction to Pastoral Care (must be taken at LTSP) 4. IPC301, Death, Dying, and Bereavement 5. IPC302, Relationships, Marriage, and Family 6. Two additional courses in pastoral theology (IPC___). With approval of the Professor of Pastoral Theology, another integrative course (ICA, ICE, ICS, or IPP) or another course relevant to the student’s particular pastoral care focus may be substituted. The black Church (UTI) specialization 

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

first Professional Degrees

At least five courses by contract with the Director, which may include the following: One Bible course designated for the concentration (suffixed “B”) 1.0 African American Church History HCH232B 1.0 African American Theology HTH335B 1.0 Worship in the Black Church ICA150B 1.0 (also fulfills integrative option requirement for students in concentration) Preaching in Black Church Contexts ICA320B 1.0 The latino specialization (for admission requirements, see MDiv concentration, page 29): Two quarters of field education in a Latino context IFE___ 0.5 U.S. Latino/a Theology and Ministry HTH328L 1.0 Latin American Theology HTH315L or Readings in Christology (Latino) HTH209L 1.0 Two courses from among the following: HTH315L, HTH209L, ICA100L, ICA101L, SIS300L (an independent study proposed in consultation with the Director of the Instituto), or from among the offerings of the Metropolitan/Urban Concentration (ICS250C, ICS251C, or ICS252C), or from any other new courses which might be taught from time to time elCa Diaconal Ministry The ELCA’s Diaconal Ministry Formation event serves as one of the courses of the specialization; it is received as a transfer credit. Students may petition to apply up to two units of postbaccalaureate coursework by transfer from nontheological curricula when those courses relate to the field in which the student expects to engage the world on behalf of the church (e.g., business, psychology, education). The specific specialization will be appropriate to the ministry goals of the candidate. The episcopal Diaconate The Diocese of Pennsylvania of the Episcopal Church has designated a set of 14 courses, completion of which will serve as the credential for ordination as permanent deacon. Course requirements include: • Bible: BOT110, BOT111, BNT110, BNT111, and one other Bible elective • History: HCH100, HCH202 • Systematic Theology: HTH100 or HTH253 or HTH310 or HTH311 • Integrative Theology: IFE160, IFE161, ICA101, IPC100, and SGN110/111 • Liturgics: ICA100 and HTH322

• Public Theology: SGN100 or ICS100 or a senior seminar in public theology Students in this program are encouraged to continue on toward a Master of Arts in Religion degree, in which case special foci within this specialization can reflect the ministerial goals of the individual student (e.g., pastoral care, education). Examples of other possible specializations and specific requirements for them •Bible Units Greek BBG100 1.0 Hebrew BBH100 1.0 Old Testament 1 and 2 BOT100 and BOT101 2.0 New Testament 1 and 2 BNT100 and BNT101 2.0 Bible electives B______ 2.0 •Systematic Theology Thinking about God HTH100 1.0 Christology Option HTH20_ or as announced 1.0 Ethics Option HTH25_ or as announced 1.0 Theology Electives HTH___ 2.0 •Liturgy and Music Introduction to Christian Assembly 1 ICA100 1.0 Introduction to Music in the Church ILM100 1.0 Liturgical Ensemble ILM110-113 1.0 Liturgical Music Leadership ILM120-123 1.0 Ministry Action/Reflection for Musicians IFE170 and IFE270 1.0 •Christian Education Christian Education ICE100 1.0 Christian Education electives ICE___ 4.0 •Integrative Theology At least three units from among the following— ICA100, ICA101, ICE100, IPC100, IPP101, IPP102, IPP103—plus two other integrative theology electives •Other specializations in consultation with the student’s advisor 

JoInT MDiv/MaR DeGRees (ConCURRenT oR seQUenTIal)
A student with a prior earned MAR degree from LTSP or any other fully accredited graduate institution may petition to transfer up to one half of the credits required for the MAR degree (up to the equivalent of ten LTSP units) for advanced standing in the MDiv program. A student with a prior earned MDiv degree who seeks to specialize in an academic discipline either for professional development or to prepare for later graduate work may choose to transfer up to 10 units for advanced standing in the MAR program. All other provisions of course transfer described above apply.

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Students seeking to earn both degrees simultaneously may apply up to 10 units to both degrees. Such a student can thus complete requirements in four years, excluding any internship year.

sPeCIal non-DeGRee aCaDeMIC oPPoRTUnITIes
CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS A limited number of students may be admitted each year for special non-degree programs; they may be awarded a certificate to attest to completion of the program pursued. Applications are available from the Admissions Office. However, as “Special Students” represent a variety of backgrounds and goals, not all of them in the traditional form, such students should consult with the Director of Admissions about appropriate amendments to normal admission requirements. Admission to a Certificate Program is in no way an indicator of future admission to any degree program. Students in the Certificate Program are not eligible for financial aid, except in the cases of fulltime ELCA students meeting requirements for TEEM candidacy and international students admitted through specific ELCA or exchange programs. In most cases, international students, other than those just noted, cannot be granted visas for participation in this program. Certificates of Theological Study Students who desire first professional-level courses for credit but do not desire to enter a degree program may choose instead to take a more limited program leading to a Certificate of Theological Study. The Certificate will be earned after the successful completion of at least 8.0 course units for credit with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. All courses in the Certificate Program are to be taken at LTSP; that is, no courses will be received by transfer from or cross-registration at other institutions. The particular program of courses will be chosen in consultation with faculty from the student’s area of interest as noted in his/her application. Certificate in Social Ministry and Church The seminary offers a Certificate in Social Ministry and Church to persons who complete a set of eight courses at the seminary and who have also completed a degree of Master of Social Work (MSW). The Certificate may also be completed by those who can document some combination of academic credits toward an MSW and experience working in the field of social work. This study is intended to equip persons serving in the field of social work with
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the tools of theological critique and insight, which enhance their ministries in daily life. The Certificate may be pursued either concurrently with study for an MSW degree or subsequent to such study. Normally, Certificate study is pursued part-time. Requirements are as follows: • New Testament 1 and 2 • Old Testament 1 and 2 • HCH100 History of Christianity or HCH230 American Religious History • HTH100 Thinking about God • HTH25_ Any theological ethics course • One elective determined in consultation with the Certificate advisor. Special Certificates of Study Additional students may be awarded certificates attesting to completion of other special short programs. Students in this category may be studying at the behest of an ELCA synod overseeing their preparation for ordination because their MDiv degrees were/will be earned at non-ELCA seminaries (see “Affiliation,” page 39). Others are studying at the behest of an ELCA synod despite not having the educational background normally required for entrance to a degree program. Others, notably some international students, are engaged in study for the enrichment of both the student and the student’s program of study in the home country, even though the study here may not be applicable to a degree elsewhere. NON-MATRICULANT STUDY A limited number of persons each year may be permitted to study for credit without having completed an application for admission. Such persons must present an official transcript of a bachelor’s degree, and they are limited to a total of six courses; to go further they must complete an application and be admitted to a certificate or degree program. Non-matriculants are admitted to specific courses, not programs, and may enter that enrollment process directly with the Registrar. Fees of such students must be paid in full at the time of registration. AUDITORS According to instructor judgment and permission, a small number of persons may be permitted to participate in courses as auditors (not for credit) without admission to a program. Normally, auditors are not permitted in introductory language courses. Evidence of an undergraduate college

first Professional Degrees

education is expected. Normally, the expectations of such students include completion of reading assignments and participation in all classes, but do not include papers or examinations. No grade is assigned, but certification of Continuing Education Units is available on request at the rate of 3.5 units for a full course or one unit for each 10 contact hours in other study programs. Special provision is made to encourage lifelong theological education by providing a fifty-percent reduction of the audit fee for persons aged 60 and older. Spouses of current degree students are also permitted to audit classes with a fifty-percent reduction in the audit fee. Auditors are admitted to specific courses, not programs, and may enter that enrollment process directly with the Registrar. Fees of such students must be paid in full at the time of registration.

aCaDeMIC PolICIes sPeCIfIC To THe fIRsT PRofessIonal PRoGRaM
STUDENT STATUS For purposes of classification, all students, whether full-time or part-time, may need to be categorized according to “year of program”. For these purposes first professional students may be classified as follows: • Juniors – MDiv and MAR students who have completed fewer than 10 units for credit toward the degree; traditional students in their first year of study • Middlers – MDiv students who have completed at least 10 units but fewer than 20 units for credit toward the degree; traditional MDiv students in their second year of study • Interns – MDiv students completing an internship for denominational candidacy purposes, often in the third academic year • Seniors – MDiv students who have completed 20 or more units for credit toward the degree; MAR students who have completed 10 or more units. Note that some upper-level or advanced level courses open to seniors may specify that the student be a “final-semester senior,” one who has four or fewer units remaining in his/her MDiv/MAR degree program. PROGRAM LIMITS Degree requirements for the Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Religion degrees shall be completed within ten years from the onset of the first course at LTSP that is applied to the degree program. Upon receipt of a written request from the student, the Faculty at its discretion may grant program extensions on an annual basis, either with or without credit for courses taken more than

ten years previously. Any student granted such a program extension shall pay an extension fee of $200 for each year of extension in order to remain in the program. A student who transfers from one degree program to another is nonetheless bound to a limit of ten years from inception of the first course taken in the original program that contributes to the final degree program, owing to the expiration of courses after ten years. ACADEMIC PROBATION AND DISMISSAL A student in the first professional program whose cumulative grade point average falls below 2.0 prior to having completed 12 units for credit toward the degree/certificate shall be placed on academic probation. The student is expected to consult regularly with his/her academic advisor, who may counsel with the student concerning the limitation of his/her extracurricular activities, the limitation of his/her academic workload, and the possible extension of his/her program beyond the normal term of studies. Probation shall continue until the cumulative average rises to 2.0 or the student is dismissed (see below). Dismissal for academic deficiency – Cumulative GPA A student in the first professional program is subject to dismissal whose cumulative grade-point average falls below 1.60 at a point when 4.0 or more graded units have been attempted, below 1.80 when 8.0 graded units or more have been attempted, or below 2.00 when 12.0 or more graded units have been attempted. Such a student is to be promptly interviewed by the Dean, his/her records shall be reviewed by the Faculty, and the student shall normally be dismissed from the seminary. After consideration of all extenuating circumstances, the Faculty may either encourage the dismissed student to apply for readmission after at least one year has passed or to engage in other pursuits. Dismissal for academic deficiency – Cumulative F’s and W’s Any student on the roll of the seminary who accrues a critical sum of failing grades (“F,” “fail”) and/or withdrawals (“W”), regardless of grade point average, shall be dismissed by reason of academic deficiency. The critical sum is defined as a cumulative index of three (3.0) as determined by the following point values: Failing grade = 1.0 point per course unit with grade of “F” or “fail” Withdrawal = 0.5 point per course unit with grade of “W” Additional provision is made that a total of
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3.0 course units graded “W” in any one semester shall result in mandatory review by the Dean for recommendation to the Faculty concerning retention or dismissal. Academic Standing and Internship A student’s academic standing and accumulation of grades of “F”, “W”, or “I” in the semester prior to internship can disqualify the student from beginning internship. See Internship, page 28. READMISSION FOLLOWING DISMISSAL Any student dismissed for academic or disciplinary reasons shall not be considered for readmission until a full academic year has passed since the conclusion of the term in which dismissal occurred. The Director of Admissions will determine which elements of the admission application are required to be submitted. Readmission requires the approval of the Faculty. ACADEMIC HONORS Students who achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.75 after having completed at least eight graded units will be recognized after any academic year in which they take four or more units for credit by inclusion on the Dean’s List. A letter of commendation will be issued to the student by the Dean, and the achievement will be noted on the student’s transcript. A number of scholarship awards are made each year by the Faculty to students of both high academic ability and promise for ministry. These are listed in the Financial Aid section of this Catalog. The Faculty may decide to award honors to certain students of outstanding merit at graduation. The criteria for such honors are entirely at the discretion of the Faculty. Any honors so awarded will be noted on the student’s diploma or an accompanying certificate and on his/her transcript. NORMAL COURSE LOAD The expected course load for a full-time first professional student is generally ten course units per year, taken at the rate of four to five units per full semester and between one and two units during the January or Summer Terms. Students must take at least 4.0 units per semester or 8.0 units per academic year (August through May, excluding Summer Term) to be considered full-time for financial aid purposes. Students whose cumulative GPA is 2.75 or lower are strongly advised, and may be required by their advisors and/or the Faculty, to carry lighter course loads. OVERLOADS

Students seeking to take more than five course units in a semester, or two units in a short term, must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 along with permission of the advisor and Faculty (or the Dean on behalf of the Faculty). Any student carrying an extension (“incomplete”) from a prior term is ineligible to register for an overload and may be required by his/her advisor or by the Faculty to take a reduced load in the subsequent term. EXTENSIONS (Incompletes) An instructor has the right to decide whether he/she will accept late submissions of coursework or entertain requests for extensions of time in which to complete coursework. The instructor may grant extensions (or not) at his/her own discretion but not to extend beyond two weeks after the end of the term. A student seeking an extension must submit a request in writing to the instructor prior to the end of the term, and the instructor must approve it in writing, specifying the exact date by which the work is to be submitted. Failure of the instructor to respond in writing to a request for extension is to be interpreted by the student as a denial of the request. A student who anticipates needing an extension of more than two weeks beyond the end of the term must submit a Request for Extension form to the instructor no later than three days prior to the end of the term, specifying the date by which he/she intends to submit the coursework. Such date may not be more than three months after the end of the term, except in cases of prolonged medical leave. Late requests for extensions will not be accepted. The request, if approved by the instructor, requires the review and approval of the Dean. Normally, a grade reduction will be imposed, as described below. Except in cases such as the birth or death of an immediate family member or if the student suffers a serious illness confirmed by a professional, a student seeking an extension beyond two weeks after the end of term is to accept a grade reduction penalty of one-third letter grade or more per month of extension. A student with an approved extension per above who fails to complete the work within the time allowed will receive a grade based upon work already completed and turned in during the term, with missing coursework factored as an “F” (zero points). A student who fails to seek an official extension or whose request for extension is denied is obligated to submit all coursework by the originally prescribed dates. If the student fails to

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

first Professional Degrees

do so and if the instructor is willing to accept late assignments, grade reductions will be imposed on late submissions at the rate of one-third letter grade (A to A-, A- to B+, etc.) per two days of lateness or fraction thereof. Work that would have earned a grade of “A” will be reduced to “F” after 18 days. A student with more than one outstanding extension may not register for a subsequent term. A student with any outstanding extensions may not begin an internship. A student on Academic Probation may not seek an extension. During January and Summer Terms the end of the term for a particular course is defined as the date by which the instructor expects all coursework to be completed. In no case may that date be beyond the end of the following semester (Fall or Spring). INACTIVE STATUS, REMOVAL FROM THE ROLL A first professional student who has completed no courses for credit in three consecutive semesters or the intervening short terms is presumed inactive and removed from the roll. SWITCHING DEGREE PROGRAMS Because each degree program has its own integrity, transfers between the MDiv and MAR programs must be approved by the Faculty, and credit for courses taken in the first program may be applied to the second only with the approval of the Dean. Students seeking to change programs should submit a written request to the Dean and Registrar for presentation to the Faculty. A student changing from one degree program must abide by the catalog requirements of the new program at the time of transfer. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION (“TEST-OUT”) A student who believes he/she has mastered the equivalent of a core or required course may consider seeking credit-by-examination. Students seeking such a “test-out” will file a request with the appropriate instructor using a form provided by the Registrar, forwarded to the instructor by the Registrar. If the instructor is willing to offer test-out opportunity (this is at instructor discretion), the instructor will set the date and time for examination and indicate this information on the form. Competency is established by achievement of a grade of B or better on the examination. In the case of seeking test-out credit for field education or other units for which a portfolio of evidence is presented as a basis for the decision, the date to be indicated is that by which supporting documentation must be

submitted. The Registrar will enter the transaction as a special registration, assess the test-out fee, and forward copies of the form to student and instructor. Satisfactory performance in the examination yields an entry of “credit” on the transcript, not a grade (though the instructor may assign a grade as part of the evaluation). In no case shall a student be permitted to receive more than five course units through credit-by-examination. Course credits earned through credit by examination do not count toward a student’s residence requirement. The sequence of the process is not date specific, except that: a. In the case of attempts to test out of courses being offered in the term current to the test-out, the examination must occur no later than the end of the first week of the term if the student wishes to pay only the test-out fee and not full tuition. b. No student will be permitted to seek credit by examination for a course in which the student had been registered in a prior term, whether that registration had been for credit or audit. WAIVER OF REQUIREMENTS Students with undergraduate coursework similar to coursework in the MDiv or MAR curricula may petition for waiver of specific comparable courses at LTSP. Waiver of a requirement is without credit; that is, the student must substitute an equivalent number of elective units. The approving faculty member may specify the course or area of study in which the elective is to be taken. Petition is by an “Application for Program Credit by Course Transfer or Waiver,” filed with the Registrar and approved by the appropriate faculty member(s) and the Dean. TRANSFER CREDITS The acceptance for transfer of previously earned credits from other graduate institutions is not automatic. Credits will be accepted only upon consultation with appropriate LTSP faculty members and the Dean. To be eligible for transfer toward the MDiv or MAR degree, a course completed at another school shall meet the following minimum requirements: • The course was taken at a fully ATS-accredited seminary or other graduate institution. • The course was taken at the graduate or first professional level. • The student had completed a baccalaureate degree before taking the course. Courses shown on an undergraduate transcript, even if taken at a post-baccalaureate level, are not eligible for transfer.
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• The course is clearly relevant to the student’s seminary degree program. • The course was taken within ten years prior to the student’s admission to the seminary degree program. • The course was not previously credited toward another master’s degree, either received or anticipated, unless the Dean believes there to be reason to permit its transfer. • The student received a grade equivalent to a C or better (“pass” in the case of a pass/fail course). Any student wishing to have a course transferred in fulfillment of a degree requirement, rather than as a free elective, shall file an “Application for Program Credit by Course Transfer or Waiver” with the Registrar. The student should be prepared to submit a course description, syllabus, bibliography, and/or sample coursework upon request. The appropriate instructor and/or area will adjudicate the request and may grant full credit toward a core or option requirement or partial credit, requiring that the student take additional work in that field. Not more than 20 units in the MDiv program or 10 units in the MAR program may be fulfilled through transfer credits. TAKING OF COURSES AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS Any student wishing to take for credit toward his/her seminary degree program a course offered by another institution must have advance permission in writing from the Dean. Requests to take courses elsewhere in fulfillment of LTSP degree requirements will not generally be approved. All courses to be offered via distance education require the prior written approval of the Dean. PLACEMENT For students seeking placement in a church subsequent to graduation, such placement is the responsibility of the denomination or judicatory and not of the seminary.

elCa CanDIDaCY, affIlIaTIon, lUTHeRan YeaR, DIaConal MInIsTRY
THE ELCA CANDIDACY PROCESS Candidacy in the ELCA is the churchwide process of discernment, preparation, and formation leading to rostered ministry. The ELCA has four distinct rostered ministries: • ordained ministry of Word and Sacrament (pastors) • commissioned associates in ministry (AIMs) • consecrated deaconesses
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

• consecrated diaconal ministers Candidacy involves the partnership of candidate, ELCA synod candidacy committee, ELCA seminary, and the ELCA Vocation and Education unit. The candidacy committee, composed of clergy, laity, and seminary faculty, has the basic responsibility for the process. Establishing and maintaining an ongoing relationship with a candidacy committee is the responsibility of the applicant. Doing so can help ensure that the student does not spend years in preparation only to be denied approval near the time of graduation. It is possible to earn a degree from this seminary without being a candidate for rostered ministry. However, since most ELCA students are candidates and since the process is closely related to the programs of the seminaries, that candidacy process and its relationship to the seminary’s program are outlined here. Normally, candidates are expected to attend one of the ELCA seminaries, but an alternative is available through “affiliation” (see below). In any case, there are three steps in the candidacy process, each requiring a positive decision by the individual’s candidacy committee: Positive Entrance decision: ELCA students are strongly encouraged to have a positive entrance decision prior to beginning seminary study. This decision assesses the individual’s readiness to begin theological study and formation for ministry. It is made by the student’s synod candidacy committee and does not directly involve the seminary. Steps to entrance normally include a minimum of one year of active membership in an ELCA congregation, application for candidacy to the home synod, registration with the home congregation, an initial candidacy interview, psychological and career evaluation, and entrance interview. This seminary makes its decisions regarding admission to a degree program separate from the candidacy process. However, in the absence of a positive entrance decision prior to inception of seminary study, a candidate is well advised not to begin study without some consultation with his/ her synodical officials so as not to jeopardize the process to follow. Students who have begun study without a positive entrance decision will be able to complete the degree if a subsequent entrance decision is negative, but eligibility for LTSP financial aid will be reduced. Endorsement decision: Scheduled for fall of the fulltime student’s second year, this decision reviews the individual’s candidacy in light of the first

first Professional Degrees

year of theological study (and, typically, Clinical Pastoral Education). The endorsement decision is made by the candidacy committee, but it is informed by an essay submitted by the student and the recommendation of an endorsement panel composed of one member of the LTSP faculty and two members of the student’s candidacy committee. Endorsement is required before the candidate may begin the ELCA’s required internship. Students whose endorsement is denied or postponed will be able to complete the degree, but eligibility for LTSP financial aid will be reduced. Approval decision: This final action concerning candidacy occurs in the fall of the student’s final year of study. The process includes the writing of an essay and an interview conducted by the candidacy committee. The decision is made by the candidacy committee in light of a recommendation by the LTSP Faculty. Such recommendation is based upon a faculty panel’s review of the student’s record, approval essay, and interview. AFFILIATION ELCA candidates for ordination who attend non-ELCA seminaries must engage in all three of the candidacy steps described above. They are also required to “affiliate” with an ELCA seminary, normally prior to enrollment in the non-ELCA school. They should be certain to discuss their options and receive permission from the candidacy committee. They are responsible for maintaining ongoing contact with the ELCA seminary. Affiliation with The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia begins with submission of an admission application and the $500 ELCA affiliation fee to the seminary (failure to affiliate in the first year of full-time seminary study or equivalent will result in the assessment of a $600 late affiliation fee). Forms and information are available from the Director of Admissions. When the application has been approved, the seminary Dean will assign an LTSP faculty advisor. The Dean and the advisor are available for consultation concerning course planning. The seminary’s Director of Contextual Education is available to assist in planning for internship and CPE, which are required of all candidates for ELCA ordination whether or not those programs are degree requirements at the student’s own institution. LUTHERAN YEAR A year in residence at an ELCA seminary (sometimes called the “Lutheran Year”) is required of each affiliated candidate. The term “residence” refers to a student’s year-long attendance at the

seminary rather than their actual physical address. Synods, not the seminary, initially set the expectations for this year and normally inform the seminary in writing of those expectations. The student and the candidacy committee plan together when the Lutheran Year is to be completed and what courses would be helpful in light of developmental goals related to candidacy. Typically, Lutheran Year students take courses to enhance their work in biblical exegesis (including Greek), Lutheran confessional theology and identity, Lutheran systematic theology, and Lutheran worship and preaching. Options for the Lutheran Year may include work for transfer back to the home institution for credit toward the MDiv degree, special student status (non-degree) culminating in a Certificate of Study at LTSP, or work toward a Master of Sacred Theology degree in the Graduate School. In some cases, students transfer credits from the non-ELCA institution and fulfill Master of Divinity degree requirements at LTSP. Any student considering this option needs to be especially conscientious in consulting his/her LTSP advisor concerning course selections. ELCA DIACONAL MINISTRY Diaconal ministers in the ELCA are part of the official lay roster. Preparation for this form of service can be through the MAR degree program at LTSP (see page 33). The regular candidacy process outlined above is followed with the student’s home synod. Diaconal ministers carry out a public ministry of service and witness. With demonstrated competence and expertise in a particular discipline, diaconal ministers may serve both within and outside of congregational settings, in each case bearing responsibility for making the linkages between Church and world. The setting of LTSP has abundant opportunities for a student in the area of contextual field education. The metropolitan Philadelphia area can provide the student with first-hand exposure and hands-on experience in almost any service area in which the student may be interested. A variety of major university and federal offices adds to the effectiveness of the seminary as a setting for those wishing to pursue preparation for Diaconal Ministry. The Dean and the Director of Contextual Education will provide specific guidance and support to students who have been admitted to the MAR program. 

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The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

advanced Degree Programs

The term “Graduate School” serves to distinguish the advanced level degree programs of Master of Sacred Theology (STM), Doctor of Theology (ThD), and Doctor of Ministry (DMin) from the first professional programs of Master of Divinity (MDiv) and Master of Arts in Religion (MAR). This School was established to encourage and assist men and women who are already graduates of a seminary or divinity school to pursue advanced study, oriented toward theological research and teaching, through the STM and ThD degree programs and to enhance ministerial practice through the DMin degree program. In addition to these three degrees, the Graduate School offers an advanced graduate certificate and a program of general studies, both of which enable seminary graduates to stay abreast of current developments in theological studies by taking courses without pursuing a formal degree. The programs of the Graduate School, whether academic or professional in their nature, are designed to aid in the development of a more effective ministry and to engage the student in academic reflection and research.

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MasTeR of saCReD THeoloGY DeGRee (sTM)
The Master of Sacred Theology degree (STM) emphasizes academic accomplishment. It is course/ seminar/research-oriented and offers a broad exposure to all theological disciplines, but it also provides a more focused examination of a particular discipline than is provided at the MDiv level through its requirements of a designated major field of study and of either a thesis or an integrative oral examination. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS In addition to the standard application elements listed on pages 13-14, admission to the Master of Sacred Theology degree program requires the following: • A bachelor’s or equivalent degree from a regionally accredited college or university. • A Master of Divinity degree or another master’s degree in a theological discipline earned in a program that requires at least 60 semester hours or the equivalent. The granting institution must be fully ATS or regionally accredited. • A cumulative grade point average in the MDivlevel program of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. • Depending upon the major field selected, a working knowledge of one language in

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THe aDVanCeD DeGRee PRoGRaMs (GRaDUaTe sCHool)

addition to English. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Students may choose to pursue an STM with thesis or with oral examination. Students make an initial selection at the time of matriculation, but the initial selection may be revised at any time by submission of a new selection form. With thesis The program consists of eight units/courses of credit, of which half shall be in the candidate’s major (or related) field. No more than four courses will be permitted in transfer from other fully accredited graduate schools and then ordinarily only with advance permission. (See note under “General Studies” below concerning courses completed at this seminary prior to entry into a degree program.) To be in good standing, a student must maintain an overall average of not less than 2.75, with at least a 3.0 average in his/her major field. A thesis must be prepared under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The STM Manual includes detailed guidance for preparation of the thesis and is available from the Graduate Education Office. The candidate shall defend his/her thesis before a faculty panel of two to three persons. The panel, after examining the candidate and his/her academic record, recommends to the Faculty whether the candidate shall be approved for the degree. Both part-time and full-time study is available, the full-time program normally taking up to two academic years, the first in course work, the second in thesis preparation. All requirements shall be met within six years. Extensions of program beyond six years are possible with annual Faculty approval and payment of the annual extension fee (see page 47). Note, however, that completed courses normally cease to be applicable to the degree after 10 years. With integrative oral examination (no thesis) The program consists of 10 units/courses of credit, of which half shall be in the candidate’s major (or related) field. No more than four courses will be permitted in transfer from other recognized graduate schools and then ordinarily only with advance permission. (See note under “General Studies” below concerning courses completed at this seminary prior to entry into a degree program.) To be in good standing, a student must maintain an overall grade point average of not less than 2.75, with at least a 3.0 average in his/her major field. Preparation for the oral examination occurs under the supervision of a faculty advisor. A

detailed guide for this preparation is available from the Associate Dean of Graduate Education. The candidate shall be examined by his/her faculty advisor and one additional member of the Faculty. The panel, after examining the candidate and his/ her academic record, recommends to the Faculty whether the candidate shall be approved for the degree. Both part-time and full-time study are available, the full-time program normally taking one and onehalf academic years. All requirements shall be met within six years. Extensions of program beyond six years are possible with annual Faculty approval and payment of the annual extension fee (see page 47). Note, however, that completed courses normally cease to be applicable to the degree after ten years.
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DoCToR of THeoloGY DeGRee (ThD)
The ThD program at LTSP equips persons for vocations of teaching and research and for the scholarly enhancement of ministerial practice in accord with the standards of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). The overall thrust of the program is public theology – that is, theological discourse in the public arena. In each field of study or concentration, the candidate is asked to consider the mutual, interdisciplinary interaction between theology and public life. Hence, this program values interdisciplinary work and practical/social ethical reflection where appropriate. Each student selects a major field and a minor field from among the following concentrations or fields of study: • Scriptural theology includes historical and literary approaches to biblical texts and associated literatures and reflections on the hermeneutical principles guiding interpretation and public proclamation. • Historical theology includes theology of the early Church, the Reformation, and American religious history. • Contemporary theology includes doctrinal, systematic, and constructive theology. • Theology for ministry/mission includes theology of communicating the Word of God, liturgical theology, pastoral theology, theology of social ethics, and theology of mission. These areas are the focus of the two-year residency on the LTSP campus (the first two years of the program) and of the student’s dissertation. The ThD provides grounding in the content and methods of theological studies in general as a basis for the development of specialized competence in the above fields.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS In addition to the standard application elements listed on page 13, admission to the Doctor of Theology degree program requires the following: • A bachelor’s or equivalent degree from a regionally accredited college or university. • An MDiv or equivalent graduate theological degree or the educational equivalent from ATS-accredited theological institutions with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.7. Qualifying degrees must be completed prior to matriculation in the ThD program. • Submission of scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), sent directly from the Educational Testing Service. For information about the administration of the GRE, see the test Web site at www.gre.org or write to ETS, P.O. Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-6000, telephone 1-866-473-4373 (U.S. and Canada) or 1-609-771-7670 (all other locations). The LTSP institution code is 2371. • Demonstrated fluency in English. All applicants whose language of origin is not English and/or whose previous instruction is not in English, including all applicants from abroad, must present scores of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Written English (TWE), as described on pages 13-14. The student must also submit a letter from a professor (or similar person) that vouches for the quality of the student’s ability to read technical material and to write in English at a level suited for study in doctoral degrees. In addition, applicants must pass an examination in English comprehension and composition administered by LTSP. Although a student may apply to the program while arrangements for the English composition examination are being made, the student will not be admitted until all English language requirements have been met. • Satisfactory scores on language comprehension and translation exams in one ancient language (normally Greek, Hebrew, or Latin) and two modern languages (normally French, German, and/or Spanish), administered by LTSP. One ancient and one modern language exam must be completed successfully prior to beginning the first year of residence. The second modern language requirement must be completed successfully before the beginning of the second academic year of residence. Students are strongly

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

advanced Dergree Programs

encouraged to complete all language requirements before entering the program so they can use these languages throughout their program. Note: Other languages may be required according to the student’s dissertation topic. International students whose native language is other than English may use their native language as one research language, provided the language is relevant to the student’s chosen area of study. Judgment on fulfillment of these requirements rests solely with the Graduate Studies Committee of LTSP, which is the admitting body for the ThD program. ADMISSION PROCEDURES The deadline for applications in any year is January 15 (or the following Monday, should January 15 fall on a weekend). Admission is for Fall Semester only; applicants will not be permitted to begin the program in mid-year. If successful, the applicant must respond within 30 days of receiving notice of admission. THE PROGRAM The program includes residency on the campus of LTSP for the first two years of the program. During the residency students take thirteen seminars/courses—three for each of two semesters in the first two years of the program, plus a pass/fail teaching seminar in January of the first year. Normally, at least two and no more than three of these courses will be taken at other institutions, including at least one at the University of Pennsylvania. The remaining outside courses may be taken at the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, Princeton Theological Seminary, or Westminster Theological Seminary. Required courses include Research Methods, Seminar in Public Theology, Teaching Seminar, and an independent study in the area of the dissertation. The nine elective courses depend on the student’s dissertation area and preparation for comprehensive exams. In a student’s overall program, five of the courses/seminars must be taken in the major field and three in the minor field; these may include reading seminars to prepare for comprehensive exams. Additionally, the program requires at least three experiences as a teaching assistant, along with the development of a teaching portfolio. Four comprehensive examinations are taken after the second year but no later than December of the third year, at the discretion of the student’s advisor. They consist of examinations in the major field, the minor field, public theology, and the

dissertation area. During the third year the student develops a dissertation proposal. The student’s advisory committee approves the topic and proposal. An oral defense follows the submission of the dissertation proposal. The dissertation is expected to be an original contribution to the field of scholarship in the major field chosen by the student. Normally, the length should be between 225 and 275 pages. A final oral examination/defense of the dissertation completes the program. SUPERVISION The student will have an advisory committee of three faculty members, one in the student’s major field (Advisor), one in the minor field, and one other. LENGTH OF PROGRAM Normally the length of the ThD program is four years (2-year minimum residence; comprehensive exams in third year; writing and defense of dissertation in fourth year). Extension is limited to a total of eight years in the program.

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DoCToR of MInIsTRY DeGRee (DMin)
The Doctor of Ministry (DMin) is an advanced professional degree designed to enhance the practice of ministry. Participants are normally men and women in the ordained ministry of the Church. Admission requires both the completion of a Master of Divinity degree or its equivalent, and at least three years of experience in ministry subsequent to the first graduate theological degree. It is generally expected that enrolled students be actively engaged in professional ministry. They must show evidence of capacity for an advanced level of competence and reflection. The candidate for this degree is expected to demonstrate achievement at a level significantly beyond the expectations of first-degree programs with respect to four goals: • To develop an advanced understanding and integration of ministry in relation to theological disciplines; • To formulate a comprehensive and critical understanding of ministry in which theory and practice inform and enhance each other; • To develop skills and competencies and appropriate research methods that are required for pastoral leadership at the most mature and effective level; • To contribute to the understanding and practice of ministry through the completion of
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a doctoral-level project in ministry. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS In addition to the standard application elements listed on page 13, admission to the Doctor of Ministry degree program requires the following: • Normally, a bachelor’s or equivalent degree from a regionally accredited college or university. • The Master of Divinity degree or another master’s degree in a theological discipline earned in a program that requires at least 90 semester hours or the equivalent. The granting institution is to be fully ATSaccredited. • A cumulative grade point average in the master’s level program of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Exceptions may be made by the Admissions Committee for good cause. • A minimum of three years in the professional ministry of the Church after receiving the MDiv degree or its equivalent. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The DMin program is constituted by a learning contract negotiated between the candidate and the seminary. This contract varies according to the context and the goals of each candidate. A supervisory committee, appointed by the Faculty, assists and directs the candidate in preparing the contract and fulfilling it. The following elements are part of the contract: (a) 50 hours in colloquia with peers and faculty members; (b) eight courses; (c) four dossier papers and an on-site visit to the place of ministry; and (d) an independent project in which the candidate devotes intensive study to some task or issue in his/her ministry. To be in good standing, a student must maintain an overall grade point average of not less than 3.0. TRANSFER CREDITS AND ADVANCED STANDING As many as four of the eight courses required may be satisfied by transfer credit, but the total of transfer credit and “advanced standing” cannot exceed four courses. Credit for up to two courses may be given by “advanced standing,” a category of credit awarded by the Faculty upon recommendation of the student’s DMin committee. Transfer credit will represent academic work completed for credit at another accredited institution; “advanced standing” may be based on structured study without formal academic credit, usually augmented by a document
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

of critical reflection. Courses completed at the other seminaries of the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries are accounted for within this allowance for transfer credit. (See note under “General Studies” below concerning courses completed at this seminary prior to entry into a degree program.) CANDIDACY A student’s participation in the program is provisional until the achievement of candidacy, which may be granted upon the completion of four courses with a 3.0 average and satisfaction of the other candidacy requirements specified in the DMin Manual. Approval for candidacy is by the Faculty upon the recommendation of the student’s DMin committee. A DMin student who has not achieved candidacy after completing nine courses for credit shall be dismissed from the program. The student may be awarded an advanced graduate certificate if he/she has satisfied the requirements for such a certificate. LENGTH OF PROGRAM Normally, participation in the DMin program is part-time, given the requirement of concurrent full-time, active ministry. Because of the program’s focus on growth in ministry, it is intended that students take sufficient time for self-assessment and reflection. Consequently, a minimum of three years and a maximum of six years are limitations for completing the program. Completed courses normally cease to be applicable to the degree after ten years. FOCI The DMin student must choose a focus within a field of ministry or an area of concentration. A focus can be a chosen area of ministry (e.g., metropolitan/ urban ministry, evangelism, preaching, worship, counseling, Christian education, communication, etc.) to which some of the student’s courses and the final project pertain. The program also allows for special foci that may include resources beyond the LTSP faculty. A focus in Town and Country Ministry may include graduate course credits earned at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg. The Center for Spirituality at Chestnut Hill College offers a variety of graduate courses in spirituality. Moravian Seminary and other graduate institutions in the Delaware Valley offer additional offerings in pastoral care. Up to four courses in the DMin program may be earned at other accredited institutions.

advanced Dergree Programs

Courses may be taken for credit by qualified students who do not intend to pursue a formal degree or whose credentials are not sufficiently strong in the judgment of the Admissions Committee for admission to one of the degree programs. A General Studies student may seek to pursue an Advanced Graduate Certificate (see below). Courses taken in the LTSP Graduate School prior to admission to one of the degree programs, whether in General Studies or in non-matriculant status, may be applied to a graduate degree program upon application of the student. For the STM degree the student will list in writing to the Registrar the specific courses for which credit is sought. For the DMin degree the student will ask his/her DMin committee for approval to count the prior courses for credit toward the degree. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS The applicant shall have received a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university and a first professional degree in theology from an ATS-accredited theological school or cluster. Transcripts of previous work must be submitted, together with academic, ecclesiastical, and peer references. aDVanCeD GRaDUaTe CeRTIfICaTe The Advanced Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for those in chaplaincy ministry (military, hospital, hospice, college, school, etc.), permitting the candidate to follow his/her first theological degree (MAR or MDiv) with serious study in applied theology. It may be combined with study for either the STM or DMin degree. The certificate requires completion of eight STM/DMin-level courses in applied theology with a grade point average of at least 2.75. Courses will be in such areas as worship/liturgy, preaching, education, ethics, public theology, world religions, administration, evangelism, pastoral care, communication, collegial ministry, church and society, and stewardship. Students are to complete requirements for the certificate in no more than 6 years. non-MaTRICUlanT sTUDY It is possible to complete up to two courses for credit without having completed an application for admission. Such non-matriculated study requires a simple enrollment and registration form (no application fee), available from the Registrar’s Office, and the submission of an official transcript of the record of a Master of Divinity degree (or

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aCaDeMIC PolICIes sPeCIfIC To THe GRaDUaTe sCHool
Academic regulations and procedures applicable to all LTSP students, including those of the Graduate School, may be found on pages 49-54. The procedures and regulations below are those specific to and frequently encountered in the course of Graduate School study. Full details of advanced level program procedures and regulations are available in program manuals, the Faculty handbook, and specific policy documents. Consult the Associate Dean of Graduate Education. COURSE SCHEDULING The Graduate School makes regular use of the course format of “one-week intensives” for all programs except the ThD program (which is in residence). One-week intensives are scheduled during the Fall and Spring Semesters (usually one each semester), in the January Term, and in the Summer Term (June). Each Fall and Spring Semester, additional designated STM/DMin courses are scheduled in fullsemester format, typically one from each curricular area. These courses may be available at various times but are most typically offered on Thursday morning or afternoon and Friday morning. ThD and STM/ThD courses are scheduled in full-semester
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acceptable equivalent) before the end of the term in which the registration occurs. To pursue more than two courses for credit, students must normally complete an application and be admitted to one of the Graduate School programs above. (Exceptions to this rule are commonly made for students in degree programs at other institutions who are taking LTSP courses for transfer elsewhere.) Courses taken on a nonmatriculant basis may be applied within one of the degree programs after admission, subject to the specific course requirements of the program. aUDIToRs According to instructor judgment and permission, a small number of persons may be permitted to participate in courses as auditors (not for credit) without admission to a program. Evidence of a first professional theological education is expected. Normally, the expectations of such students include completion of reading assignments and participation in all classes but do not include papers or examinations. No grade is assigned, but certification of Continuing Education Units is available on request at the rate of 3.5 CEU’s for a full course or 1 CEU for each 10 contact hours in other study programs.

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format and are available at various times during the week. In addition, some courses at the first professional level may, with instructor permission, be upgraded by individual students for STM/DMin credit (limit of two per student except for “Lutheran Year” STM majors). Advanced level courses are announced in the separate registration materials and brochures published annually for that purpose. Course content and pedagogy are appropriate for the advanced level degree programs, and course numbers are identified by numbers of 600 or above and by the suffix “G.” One or two courses at the STM/DMin level annually may be “cross-listed” for registration by both advanced level students and students of the first professional programs, usually those in the area of urban ministry or distance learning. Courses are measured in “units” of credit, one unit (the measure of a full course) being the equivalent of three semester hours in systems using such notation. ADVISING AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT A faculty advisor for each student assists the student in developing his/her program and in assessing the student’s readiness for advancement from one stage of the program to the next. Faculty advisors, as well as additional members of STM panels and DMin committees, are appointed by the Associate Dean of Graduate Education, who serves as the advisor until a student is ready to identify a prospective major or concentration (STM program) or focus (DMin program). ThD committees are appointed by the Associate Dean in consultation with the Graduate Studies Committee. The Associate Dean serves as advisor to all Advanced Graduate Certificate and General Studies students. GOOD STANDING A student in the STM program is in good standing whose overall cumulative grade point average for the degree program is 2.75 or above and whose grade point average is at least 3.00 in the major field. A student in the DMin program is in good standing whose overall cumulative grade point average for the degree program is 3.00 or above. A DMin student who has not achieved candidacy after completing nine courses for credit shall be dismissed from the program. The student may be awarded an advanced graduate certificate if he/she has satisfied the requirements for such a certificate. An advanced level student on financial hold who has not taken courses or otherwise been active for
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

two academic years shall be removed from the roll. Such a student may apply for readmission once his/ her student account is clear. GENERAL STUDIES ACTIVE STATUS The definition of “active enrollment” in the General Studies Program is the completion of at least one course for credit each academic year. Students deciding to discontinue their studies are encouraged to communicate their withdrawal from the program in writing to the Registrar. In the absence of such a communication and when no study for credit has been pursued for one academic year, the student will be removed from the active roll. A written request to the Registrar for reinstatement to active status within one year following removal from the roll is sufficient for resumption of study. After two years without study for credit, resumption of study requires a new application for admission (consult the Director of Admissions). TRANSFER CREDITS FOR STM/DMin PROGRAMS The acceptance of transfer credits from other graduate institutions is not automatic. To be eligible for transfer toward the STM or DMin degree, a course completed at another school shall meet the following requirements: • The course was taken for credit at a fully accredited seminary or other graduate institution. • The course was taken at the STM or DMin level or the equivalent. • The student had completed the appropriate basic-level theological degree of his/her advanced level program before taking the course. • The course is clearly relevant to the student’s LTSP degree program and is approved by the student’s advisor or DMin committee. • The course was taken within ten years prior to the student’s admission to the advanced level LTSP degree program. • The student received a grade equivalent to a B or better (“pass” in the case of a pass/fail course). Not more than four units toward the STM and DMin degrees may be fulfilled through transfer of credits. TRANSFER OF COURSES TAKEN THROUGH DISTANCE EDUCATION Any student wishing to take for credit toward his/her seminary degree program a course offered by another institution via distance education must

advanced Dergree Programs

have advance permission in writing from the Dean. TRANSFER OF COURSES FROM PRIOR CONFERRED DEGREES Up to four courses of a conferred STM degree (or equivalent) may count toward a DMin degree, and up to four courses of a conferred DMin degree (or equivalent) may count toward an STM degree, provided that the STM major requirements are satisfied. No credit is given towards the ThD program for previously conferred degrees. COURSE EXTENSIONS The instructor of a Graduate School course is entitled to formulate his/her own policy regarding whether or not extensions will be granted, the duration of the extension period, and the conditions under which an extension is granted. In no event shall the extended deadline for completion of the coursework be more than six months beyond the end of the semester/term for which the course is registered. Requests for extensions beyond six months after the end of a semester/term must be submitted in writing to the Dean and will be approved in consultation with the Associate Dean for Graduate Education only in extreme circumstances when clear need is demonstrated. PROGRAM CONTINUATION FEE In both the STM and DMin programs, a Program Continuation Fee is assessed at the conclusion of any academic year in which (1) no course is completed for academic credit and (2) no STM Thesis Proposal Registration, Oral Examination Registration, or DMin Project Registration is filed. (The academic year is defined as August through June, and these assessments are made after June.) Failure to pay this fee results in removal from the roll as such a student is then presumed to be inactive. This fee is assessed in addition to the Program Extension Fee (see following entry) when both conditions apply concurrently. In the ThD program a continuation fee is assessed for each year following the two years of residency. PROGRAM EXTENSION AND FEE In both the STM and DMin programs, the maximum period within which the degree may be earned is six years from the date of admission to study in a degree program. Requests for extension of the six-year limit are addressed to the Faculty through the Associate Dean of Graduate Education; extensions must be requested annually, and, when granted, require payment of the annual Program

Extension Fee. This fee is assessed in addition to the Program Continuation Fee (see above) when both conditions apply concurrently. In the ThD program, the maximum period within which the degree may be earned is eight years from inception of study. THESIS, PROJECT, AND DISSERTATION The STM thesis, the DMin project, and the ThD dissertation represent significant research embodied in a paper developed with the guidance of each student’s advisor or project director. The program manuals provide detailed instructions for their development. A one-time Thesis/Project Fee is assessed at the point of approval of a proposal (see “Fees”). Note: a student planning to complete all requirements in time for award of a degree at Commencement in May of a given year will have to submit the complete text of a thesis, project, or dissertation by February 1 of that year. FIRST PROFESSIONAL COURSES ThD students will not receive credit for any first professional-level course work. STM and DMin students, with approval of the instructor and with additional work beyond the requirements for first professional degree students, may enroll in a first professional-level course for graduate credit (limit of two except for Lutheran Studies majors). Normally, this provision for “upgrade” applies to elective courses in the first professional program, but it may be applied when a core course does not represent work already addressed in the student’s first professional program. The Faculty has established the following additional expectations for upgrading first professional courses: • Upgraded courses may not have been used for credit toward another degree. • The Faculty of the curricular area and the Dean must approve such upgrades before the course is taught. • Upgrades are appropriate only in courses taught by Faculty with a PhD degree or nearing the completion thereof. • The Faculty member must send notification of additional requirements to the Deans, including a bibliography of at least ten books and the equivalent of a 30-to-35-page paper. GRADING PRACTICES Consult the grading practices description on page 50. In the case of first professional courses taken by a graduate student but not upgraded for
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graduate credit, no quality points are assigned, and the grades are not included in computation of the average. Courses for which the student receives a grade of “F” remain on the student’s record and are computed in the student’s grade point average; the student shall take at least one additional course to acquire both the necessary course units and the minimum grade point average required for the degree. The ThD program has its own grading practices; see the ThD Manual.

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The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

THe CURRICUlUM The curriculum at The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia serves the seminary’s mission of preparing ordained and lay ministers of the Word for the mission of the Church in the world. Our curriculum aims to form, in and for the Christian community, leaders who are marked by these characteristics: 1. Deep grounding in the central symbols of the Christian faith, particularly the faithful reading of Scriptures in community; the practice of Word and Sacrament; and public confessing and proclaiming of the faith guided by the historic witness of the Church. 2. Sensitivity to the diverse contexts of ministry and to the opportunities for mission in these contexts. 3. Personal and professional integrity, including the integration of faith and theological exploration. 4. Commitment and skills to equip all the baptized for ministry. 5. Critical and self-critical engagement with society in the service of peace and justice, and lives of public witness to the Gospel in its wholeness. In order to accomplish these objectives, the curriculum deepens the emphases in three areas: • Global, ecumenical, and interfaith studies. • Theological education for public witness (“public theology”). • Integration (a) between the classical disciplines of theological study and (b) between classroom studies and congregational, multicultural, and urban contexts of ministry. CALENDAR The academic year generally runs from August through June. A two-week August Prolog, required of all first professional (MDiv, MAR, and Special) students, introduces these students in the early stages of their studies to theological education at LTSP. During the August Term there is also a oneweek orientation for all incoming ThD students. The 13-week Fall Semester begins after Labor Day and ends before Christmas. The Spring Semester, also 13 weeks, begins in February and ends in May. There is also a four-week January Term and a four-week Summer (June) Term (though occasional summer

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offerings may extend into July or even later). Throughout the year, but especially during January and Summer Terms, one-week intensive courses are held at the STM/DMin level. CoURse foRMaTs Most courses are worth one unit, the equivalent of three semester hours. A few half-unit courses are offered at the first professional level, and contextual education is generally taken in quarter-unit segments. Day-long ministry seminars (required in the pre-2004-05 MDiv curriculum) are credited at one-sixth (.17) unit; that is, three such seminars total one-half unit. Some semester-long courses—primarily first professional, introductory-level courses—meet on a “split-rostered” schedule, requiring that students attend one or more plenary sessions plus an additional section each week. Most electives and semester-long, advanced level courses meet on a “block-rostered” schedule—one three-hour class meeting per week. Additional regular course formats include a “modified block-rostered” schedule (one plenary plus one section all on the same day); two-week intensives (mornings or afternoons Monday through Friday for two weeks); and one-week intensives (all day Monday through Friday, including one or more evening sessions, and sometimes including a oneday follow-up session six to eight weeks later). The intensive formats generally require the student to do advance reading and preparation, as well as follow-up papers and/or presentations. Access to the Internet and email is generally expected of students in all seminary courses. Additionally, the seminary offers occasional courses that can be taken exclusively through distance education. ReGIsTRaTIon All students on the seminary rolls automatically receive registration materials, including course schedules, for each term. Deadlines for registration are set by the Registrar and are noted in those materials. Tentative deadlines are shown in the calendars on pages 4-5. Students who have not received registration materials at least three weeks prior to the announced deadline are responsible for contacting the Registrar’s office to obtain them; failure to receive registration materials does not excuse a student’s late registration. Registration is by mail or in person at the Registrar’s Office during business hours. Registration for a given term is possible after the “Registration Deadline” until the “Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline” with payment of the

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Late Registration Fee. No registration is permitted after the Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline. Late registration for intensive sessions may require instructor approval because of pre-session reading requirements. Students whose student accounts are in arrears will not be permitted to register without clearance from the Business Office. Students with more than one outstanding extension (incomplete) from the prior term may not register until all coursework is submitted. In both cases, late registration fees may be incurred as a result. First professional students are required to consult with and obtain the approval of their assigned faculty advisors for all course registrations. However, it is the student’s responsibility to monitor his/her progress in meeting degree requirements. The Registrar will provide both the student and the advisor an unofficial degree audit during each semester, but the seminary does not accept responsibility for inaccuracies in the degree audit that the student fails to catch. ReGIsTRaTIon CHanGes anD laTe ReGIsTRaTIon After filing an initial registration, a student may add or change courses (or switch between credit and audit) at any time through the Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline without penalty. The student may drop a course (if not adding another) through the Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline with payment of the course cancellation fee. The Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline is as announced in the Academic Calendar but is generally at the close of the first week of extended semester courses, or at the end of the first day of intensive courses. Notification to the Registrar’s Office shall be in writing via fax, mail, email, or the Change of Registration form available in the Registrar’s Office. Termination of study in a registered course after the Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline no longer constitutes a drop, but a withdrawal (see below). A student filing her/his initial registration after the announced deadline will be assessed a late registration fee. Class aTTenDanCe Students enrolled in courses are expected to attend class. When absences occur, as in the case of illness or other legitimate extenuating circumstances, students should share the reasons for these absences with their instructors. When possible, these reasons should be shared in advance. In courses for credit, unexplained and/or
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

illegitimate absences from class will be taken into account in the determination of course grades, and chronic absence from class will constitute a sufficient basis for failure in a course. Instructors shall clarify expectations concerning class attendance at the beginning of each academic term. It is also important that expectations regarding class attendance and participation be established at the beginning of the academic term for students taking the course on an audit basis. This is particularly important in instances when the student seeks Continuing Education Units (for which instructors must certify satisfactory participation). WITHDRaWal fRoM CoURses Following the Registration Change (Drop/Add) Deadline each term, any course for which a student has registered remains on the student’s permanent record; however, a student may request the Dean to permit him/her to withdraw from a course without prejudice up to the mid-point of the term. Withdrawal by the mid-point is recorded on the transcript as a “W” and is not included in calculation of the grade point average. Withdrawal from a required course after the mid-point of a term shall be recorded as an “F” (failure). In the case of an elective course, a withdrawal after the mid-point of any term shall be recorded as an “F” (failure) unless the student has a “passing” record in that course and the Dean permits the course to be recorded as an “audit.” The mid-point of each term is specified in the official calendar of the seminary as published in the specific term supplements of The Catalog. Note that any student on the roll of the seminary who accrues a critical sum of failing grades (“F,” “fail”) and/or withdrawals (“W”), regardless of grade point average, shall be dismissed by reason of academic deficiency. Note also that a total of 3.0 course units graded “W” in any one semester shall result in mandatory review by the Dean for recommendation to the Faculty concerning retention or dismissal. See Academic Probation and Dismissal, page 35. eValUaTIons anD GRaDInG Each instructor evaluates the competence, strengths, and weaknesses of all students in his/ her course, using written and/or oral evaluation methods. Though letter grades are important, they are not the sole indicators of progress and achievement. For this reason, peer evaluation and/ or critical self-reflection is encouraged in order to further a student’s self-evaluation in conjunction with the course work. The evaluation of students’ competence in the following courses may be indicated on a “pass/fail”

basis: • Pass/fail versions of Introductory Greek and Hebrew • Pass/fail versions of Greek and Hebrew readings • Ministry Seminars • Global/ecumenical travel seminars • Contextual Education (field education or Ministry Action/Reflection) • Formation Groups • Clinical Pastoral Education, basic quarter (MAR pastoral care majors only) • Pastor as Theologian With the exception of those courses listed above, the following letter grades shall be given in all other credit courses: • A Excellent Mastery of a particular subject and a degree of independent thought and attainment • B Good A degree of competence in a given course, free from obvious deficiencies • C Adequate Adequate competence in a particular course • D Poor Poor competence in a particular course, which nevertheless should enable the student, in spite of obvious deficiencies, to carry on a process of theological growth in a particular area • F Failure Requires repetition of the course in the case of required courses or the taking of equivalent course work in the case of elective courses • I Incomplete Indicates that the instructor has granted an extension of time for the completion of work in a particular course • W Withdrawal Indicates that the student withdrew from the course prior to the mid-point of the term The following quality points are assigned per course unit for each letter grade, as shown on the student’s permanent transcript: A 4.0 C+ 2.3 A3.7 C 2.0 B+ 3.3 C1.7 B 3.0 D+ 1.3 B2.7 D 1.0 F 0.0

The grades of “pass”, “fail”, “W”, and “I” bear no quality points and are not calculated in grade point average. A student’s cumulative grade point average shall appear on the student’s transcript. The student’s class standing is normally regarded as privileged information available only to the Faculty for internal usage. Distribution of that information may be authorized as an exception by the student and the Faculty to meet the request of responsible academic or other agencies. laTe sUbMIssIon of CoURseWoRK Except where the student has received permission in advance to submit coursework after the announced deadline, coursework that an instructor agrees to receive late will ordinarily be penalized with grade reductions at the rate of onethird letter grade for each two days of lateness. That is, work that would receive a grade of “A” will be reduced to an A- after the initial deadline, to a B+ after two days, to a B after four days, etc., being reduced to an “F” after 18 days. It is up to each instructor whether or not to accept late submissions of coursework. eXTensIons (InCoMPleTes) The rules governing requests for extensions of time in which to complete coursework vary between the first professional and advanced level programs. In both cases, the instructor has the discretion as to whether he/she will or will not entertain such requests. For specific guidelines concerning course extensions, see the sections on academic policy specific to the first professional and advanced level programs. CoMPUTeR lITeRaCY anD oWneRsHIP In order to ensure that all students are capable of utilizing the enhanced technologies that are incorporated into many of the seminary’s courses, as well as to facilitate communications with students through email communications and course Web sites, it is a requirement of students matriculating at LTSP that they have regular access to appropriately equipped computers. Therefore, a student who is admitted to a program at LTSP who does not own such equipment is strongly advised to purchase an appropriate computer system (laptop preferred) and appropriate software, according to the suggested guidelines published annually in June by the Information Systems staff (contact helpdesk@ltsp.edu). The student is invited to include computer hardware and software expenses in his/her cost of attendance for purposes of seeking financial aid and/or federal student loans.
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First professional students lacking basic computer skills (especially in word processing, email, and Internet use) will find some supportive documents in materials shared during the Prolog. Further assistance may need to be found by remedial help in these areas at their own expense. Seminary helpdesk support is limited to the software and hardware specifications issued each June. eleCTRonIC sUbMIssIons of CoURseWoRK Each faculty member may decide whether to accept on-line submissions of homework or papers. Students who submit papers by email may receive comments from the instructor by email; it is not the seminary’s responsibility to print hard copies of papers. It is the student’s responsibility to submit work on time and in a form readable by the instructor. A paper that arrives late or in unreadable form will be considered late for grading purposes. VolUnTaRY WITHDRaWal fRoM THe seMInaRY A student in good standing may voluntarily withdraw from the seminary at any time upon written notification to the Faculty through the Dean and the Registrar. The effective date of withdrawal for refund and loan deferral purposes is that of receipt of the request by the Dean and Registrar. Before taking such action, the student is encouraged to confer with the Dean, his/her faculty advisor, and appropriate ecclesiastical officials. If a withdrawn student is later readmitted, he/she will be subject to the graduation requirements in effect at the time of readmission. TUITIon RefUnDs In THe eVenT of WITHDRaWal In cases of withdrawal (see above), dismissal, suspension, or leave of absence, tuition will be refunded on a prorated basis up to the mid-point of the semester or term, but there will be no refunds for any reason after the mid-point. The mid-point of each term is specified in the official calendar of the Seminary as published in the specific term supplements of The Catalog. A separate table of refund calculation applies when the student has received a Stafford Loan for the term in progress; see page 16. leaVe of absenCe A student in good standing may request the Faculty through the Dean (or Associate Dean of Graduate Education) to grant a leave of absence. When approved, a leave is normally for the balance of the then-current academic year with the option to request renewal for not more than one additional year. If the student decides not to resume the
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program upon the expiration of the leave, he/she has the option to withdraw voluntarily; otherwise, he/she is removed from the roll. The student continues to be assessed the appropriate Student Services Fees during the leave period. If a student who has been removed from the roll is later readmitted, he/she will be subject to the graduation requirements in effect at the time of readmission. Students should be aware that the limit for deferral of federal loans is 180 days, assuming the one-time grace period has not already been used. InaCTIVe sTaTUs, ReMoVal fRoM THe Roll A first professional student who has completed no courses for credit in three consecutive semesters or the intervening short terms is presumed inactive and removed from the roll. An advanced level student on financial hold who has not taken courses or otherwise been active for two academic years shall be removed from the roll. Such students may subsequently apply for readmission and will be subject to the degree requirements in effect at the time of their readmission. TRansCRIPTs A transcript of each student’s record will be supplied without charge upon the student’s graduation or withdrawal from the seminary if the student has no outstanding obligations to the Seminary. Additional transcripts will be furnished only upon the signed, written request of the student and payment of appropriate fees. Under no circumstances will transcripts be released if the student or former student has outstanding financial obligations to the seminary. eXPIRaTIon of CoURse CReDITs A completed course may be applied toward degree requirements until ten years have elapsed since its completion. Exception requires Faculty approval.

aDMInIsTRaTIVe PolICIes
sTUDenT DIsabIlITIes The seminary is committed to providing an environment in which all students have full access to educational opportunities and community life. In order for the seminary to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations to students with either short- or long-term disabilities, documented evidence of the disability and of the required accommodation is needed. For further information on the documentation and accommodation of disabilities, contact the Director of Student Services. Students seeking

academic and/or physical modifications or accommodation must contact the Director at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the semester or term. sTUDenT RIGHTs anD ResPonsIbIlITIes A complete statement on the Rights, Responsibilities and Freedoms of Students may be found in the Student Handbook. DIsCIPlInaRY aCTIon anD DIsMIssal In all areas of community and personal life, students are expected to live with Christian integrity and to be governed by such rules and regulations as the Board of Trustees or the Faculty may from time to time adopt and publish. It is the prerogative of the President of the seminary (or the Dean, acting on behalf of the President) to take emergency action to suspend or dismiss a student from the institution, or to impose a lesser disciplinary action, when, in that officer’s judgment, the welfare of the seminary, or the safety of persons or property, may be in jeopardy. The seminary also reserves the right to dismiss or exclude at any time, by action of the Faculty, students whose academic performance is substandard or, after consultation when appropriate with ecclesiastical authorities concerned, whose conduct is judged to be detrimental to the welfare of the Seminary. Such action may be deemed necessary, for instance, if the student exhibits behaviors that have a significant disruptive effect on the general welfare of the community, or in cases of cheating, plagiarism, or other violations of trust and mutual respect. A written statement from the Faculty setting forth the reasons for the dismissal shall be provided upon the written request of the student. If a dismissed student is later readmitted, he/she will be subject to the graduation requirements in effect at the time of readmission. Process for Redress Any student who believes that these standards, definitions, and/or practices have done him/her an injustice in a particular circumstance may petition the Dean for redress. If the Dean determines that the petition has merit, it shall be placed before the Faculty for decision. Appeals of the Faculty decision shall be heard by the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, and its decision upon the matter shall be final. sTUDenT CoMPlaInT anD GRIeVanCe PRoCeDURe The seminary supports the right of students to have an academic environment conducive to learning. A student who wishes to formally pursue

a complaint against a member of the faculty regarding any matter adversely affecting his/her academic course work or learning conditions may follow the procedures published in the Student Handbook. seXUal HaRassMenT The seminary and its student body support the rights of all its members to pursue their work in an environment free of harassment - sexual, racial, or general physical and verbal harassment. A full statement of policy and the procedures for addressing violations of these rights is published in the Student Handbook. However, nothing in that statement shall be construed to abrogate or abridge the right of the President or the Dean to take emergency action as described above in “Disciplinary Action and Dismissal.” DRUG PReVenTIon PRoGRaM The seminary is concerned about the effects of substance abuse on individuals, families, the Church, and the community. It seeks to be preventative and healing in its orientation rather than punitive. A statement of this concern and related policies is published in the Student Handbook. InClUsIVe lanGUaGe This seminary commits itself to the use of language that does not exclude people on the basis of gender, age, race, ability, sexual orientation, or class. Recognition of the full humanity of all people should prompt an attempt to speak and think in ways which include all human beings and degrade none. Similarly, our language about God should reflect our understanding that we are all created in God’s image. A statement on the use of inclusive language is included in the Student Handbook. PlaGIaRIsM Academic integrity requires that all ideas and materials quoted, borrowed, or paraphrased, whether from print or electronic media, be given proper citation both when and where cited (either in the text or in a note) and in a bibliography. Unacceptable practices include the deliberately false citation of a source, the submission of work done by someone else, and the unauthorized submission of work to meet more than one academic requirement. Should an instructor ascertain that plagiarism has been committed, the instructor will first consult with the student and the Dean before making a determination of the penalty. The first offense of plagiarism will be penalized either by the failure of the assignment (in the case of a minor assignment) or by the failure of the course (in the case of a major
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assignment). In addition, in the case of plagiarism on a major assignment, the failure of the course will also lead to the student being placed on academic probation for the next semester of study. A second offense will normally be penalized by dismissal from the seminary. The full statement on plagiarism and its consequences is published in the Student Handbook. STUDENT RECORDS The seminary accords to all students the rights under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended. This Act protects the privacy of education records, affirms students’ right to inspect and review their records, and provides guidelines for correcting inaccurate or misleading data. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act Office. Directory information which the seminary may give out at its discretion includes the student’s name, spouse’s name, home and school addresses, home and school telephone numbers, email address, photograph, church affiliation, degree program, citizenship, degrees earned, and dates of attendance. Students may withhold directory information from being released outside of the seminary community by notifying the Registrar within the first two weeks of the Fall Semester. A student may also authorize release of certain additional information by writing to the Registrar. Other information from students’ education records is confidential and available only on a needto-know basis to faculty, administrative officers, and certain other seminary staff with specifically designated responsibilities. The information may be available as well as to persons from accrediting agencies, persons with a judicial order, and persons requesting information in an emergency to protect the health or safety of students or others. Under the Act, these persons are permitted access to particular information as needed. Students are encouraged to sign a limited waiver at entrance permitting release of certain specified items of information to officials responsible for the ecclesiastical candidacy process in the student’s denomination. Absent that release authorization, the student needs to provide a signed, written request on each occasion such information is required in the candidacy process. Additional information concerning retention of student records may be found in the Student Handbook. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT Seminary students are expected to participate
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fully in the courses for which they register and to keep up on all assignments. To this end, it is generally assumed that full-time students (those who take 4 or more units a semester) will not work more than 15-20 hours per week while taking classes and that such students will therefore be able to avail themselves of the full range of seminary courses, both weekday and evening/ weekend. Students who work full-time and cannot take weekday courses recognize that courses will not always be available when they wish or need to take them, and this may lengthen their time of study. A student’s advisor may, on the basis of cumulative GPA, repeated extensions (“incompletes”), and/or other evidence, require the student to choose between reducing employment and reducing his/her course load. A student may appeal the advisor’s decision in writing to the Dean, who, after consulting the advisor, can validate or overrule the decision or place it before the Faculty for a decision. Full-time students whose required reduction in course load negatively impacts their financial aid eligibility may petition the Financial Aid Committee to extend the student’s eligibility for aid beyond the normal 6 semesters to a maximum of 8 semesters. If the petition is approved, the total amount of aid the student would have received for one semester or one year may be distributed to the student over two semesters or two years. CAMPUS SECURITY INFORMATION Consistent with the College and University Security Information Act, the Seminary’s Security Department each year informs the Seminary of crime statistics for the preceding calendar year. This report is made via the Safety and Security area of the LTSP Web site: www.Ltsp.edu/safety. INSURANCE LIABILITY AND PERSONAL PROPERTY The seminary’s liability insurance provides compensation for injury to persons participating in on-campus programs of the seminary. Nonseminary groups using seminary facilities and seminary personnel and students hosting nonseminary events on campus need to provide a certificate of insurance attesting to adequate coverage from other carriers. Students living in seminary housing need to be aware that their personal property is not covered for damage or loss by the seminary’s insurance. They should arrange for coverage via a rider on a family policy or via a dedicated household contents policy of their own.

InTeR-InsTITUTIonal RelaTIonsHIPs The Seminary’s educational programs are enhanced through several important institutional relationships that enable the student to maximize educational resources available in the larger community. All students should be advised, however, that, depending upon the requirements in their particular degree programs, exchange programs anywhere may have the result of delaying completion of their degree programs. Additionally, students who participate in exchanges with institutions offering pass/fail courses should understand that they are to choose the graded option, if it is available. THe easTeRn ClUsTeR of lUTHeRan seMInaRIes Formed in 1994, this partnership makes the resources of three ELCA seminaries (LTSP, the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, PA, and Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary in Columbia, SC) more accessible to the students at each individual seminary. LTSP administers the DMin program on behalf of the cluster. First professional students enrolled at one of the three institutions share opportunities for exchange semesters (semesters spent studying on one of the other two campuses) and faculty exchanges. The academic Deans are committed to working closely with students who desire to register for courses at another school so that they are not penalized in completing the degree requirements for the home seminary. Full-time first professional students attending another Cluster institution on exchange remain eligible for health insurance and Stafford loans through their home institutions. However, costs for tuition, room, and board are paid at the rate of the seminary the student is attending for the exchange period. Students interested in this program are encouraged to plan ahead for such study by contacting the Dean of the Seminary, Dr. J. Paul Rajashekar. Yale DIVInITY sCHool An agreement between Yale Divinity School and the Seminary provides for exchange of faculty and students from one to the other. A full year of study can be undertaken at either institution on a crossregistration basis. Students remain eligible for health insurance and Stafford loans through their home institutions. Room and board, if needed, are arranged with the host institution.

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THe InTeRseMInaRY seMInaR Since 1959 six seminaries in eastern Pennsylvania have conducted this ecumenical venture (listed as course SGN501 at this Seminary), which involves the presentation and discussion of student papers on a theological topic. Enrollment is limited to four specially invited LTSP seniors and their LTSP supervisor. Class meetings are held at the various seminaries, including supper at the host school. CRoss-ReGIsTRaTIon Formal agreements offer additional study opportunities with: • Palmer Theological Seminary • Reconstructionist Rabbinical College • Temple University Graduate School of Religion • Westminster Theological Seminary • University of Pennsylvania (select departments - ThD only) For more information concerning courses available, contact the registrars of each seminary or school for schedules and registration materials. CHesTnUT HIll ColleGe sPIRITUalITY PRoGRaM An agreement with Chestnut Hill College provides a Doctor of Ministry degree with a focus in spirituality at the seminary, which integrates courses from the seminary and the college and allows for cross-registration of master’s degree-level students from the two institutions. InTeRnaTIonal RelaTIonsHIPs LTSP students are encouraged to consider taking a term or a year of their studies at institutions in other countries. Exchange agreements providing for waiver of student tuition have been forged with • The Collegium Oecumenicum (Munich, Germany) • The University of Leipzig (Germany) • The Evangelical Theological Faculty of Comenius University (Bratislava, Slovakia) • The Lutheran Theological Seminary in South Africa (at Umphumulu) • The United Theological College (Bangalore, India) • The Lutheran University in El Salvador Transfer of credit is permissible with selected institutions. Some exchange programs have language prerequisites. Students interested in such

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study should contact the Dean for more information. UPsala/WaGneR PRoGRaM This program, originally between Upsala College and the Seminary, was assumed by Wagner College, Staten Island, NY, when Upsala closed. The program is designed to identify and support the development of persons of color or whose primary language is other than English as candidates for ordained ministry in the ELCA. This partnership is based upon the work of congregations, clergy, and synods, all of whom cooperate to identify prospective candidates for nomination to the special program. The program itself includes a set of counseling, placement, and other support services, and servicerepayable grants from the college and the seminary to enable candidates to pursue their undergraduate degree at Wagner College and theological studies at this seminary. ePIsCoPal DIoCese of PennsYlVanIa A distinctive relationship exists between LTSP and the Diocese of Pennsylvania of the Episcopal Church. Through the establishment of a Chair in Anglican Studies and the longstanding generosity of the Booth-Ferris Foundation, the seminary offers regular courses in Anglican studies. The Diocese also locates its training program for permanent deacons at the Seminary. Such students take a set program of fourteen courses, which may be applied toward the MAR degree (see page 33). Guidance and support are provided by an Anglican Program Advisory Committee, an Anglican students’ advisor, and the Office of Contextual Education. sT. JoHn’s (sUMMIT) VIsITInG PRofessoRsHIP In 1994 St. John’s Lutheran Church, Summit, NJ, endowed a visiting professorship which brings to campus each year a leading scholar who assists the seminary in further strengthening its Lutheran confessional and ecumenical orientation. oTHeR CHRIsTIan CHURCH oRGanIZaTIons Courses in history and polity are offered for students of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the United Methodist Church, the Episcopal Church, the United Church of Christ, the Church of God in Christ, and the Baptist and Pentecostal traditions. The Seminary also enjoys United Methodist certification.

aCaDeMIC sUPPoRT seRVICes
leCTUResHIPs • Under a grant established as a memorial to Carl Christian Hein, first president of the American Lutheran Church, and Franklin
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Clark Fry, first president of the Lutheran Church in America, an annual series of lectures is held at the Seminary. Franklin Clark Fry graduated from LTSP in 1925. • In 1992 Emma Shearer established The Rev. Dr. Francis A. Shearer Endowment for Social Ministry and Aging Ministry, providing for courses, conferences, and lectures. • In 1962 a bequest was received from the estate of Kathryne M. Fisher endowing the John C. and Kathryne M. Fisher Fund to support lectures and convocations. • Each spring, the annual Alumni/ae Convocation offers a series of provocative lectures by distinguished persons of the Church. • In 1994 St. John’s Lutheran Church, Summit, NJ, endowed a visiting professorship which each year brings to campus a leading scholar who presents a public lecture in the spring, in addition to offering courses for both first professional and advanced level students. THe KRaUTH MeMoRIal lIbRaRY The heart of the Seminary’s educational program is the Krauth Memorial Library. Appropriately, it is located at the focal point of the campus. The Library houses over 200,000 items and is one of the finest scholarly collections in any Lutheran institution in America. A staff of professionally trained persons is available for consultation and assistance. Group and individual bibliographic instruction is provided by the staff and is also available online. During the academic year the Library is open weekdays and evenings as well as weekends. During the summer, hours are normally confined to weekdays only. Consult the Library office or the Library portion of the Seminary’s Web site for exact hours. The Library is a member of PALINET/OCLC, a computer network serving all types of libraries in the United States and abroad. As part of the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries, the Krauth Memorial Library is partnered with the libraries of Gettysburg and Southern Seminaries and has constructed a common database of holdings to serve its constituencies better. The Cluster’s integrated computer system, “ECCO,” provides access to over 400,000 items in the three libraries and is searchable through the internet. A link to “ECCO,” as well as remote access to other relevant databases, is on the seminary’s Web page. THe lUTHeRan aRCHIVes CenTeR The Lutheran Archives Center at Philadelphia

is the Northeast Regional Archives Center (Region 7) for the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). It is part of a network of nine regional archives programs and national-level (churchwide) archives in the ELCA. The archives of five of the seminary’s supporting synods are housed at LTSP. In 2005 they moved to their new quarters in The Brossman Learning Center, where a new reading room, processing workroom and exhibition area make the archival materials more accessible to historians and other interested persons. Archives staff are available for consultation on a limited schedule. THe MeDIa CenTeR The Media Center provides multimedia, video and audio production capabilities, both in its studio and on location. The Center produces and maintains an extensive library of audio and video recordings of seminary events and significant external programs and presentations, and provides and manages media resources for faculty use in the classroom. The media center supports equipment for classroom and other public presentations which is requested and managed by the LTSP Help Desk. THe lTsP HelPs CenTeR The Helps Center, located in the Library, provides a variety of resources to assist students who need to increase their knowledge and/or enhance their skills in order to take maximum advantage of their seminary education. THe aUGsbURG foRTRess seMInaRY booKsToRe The campus bookstore, managed by Augsburg Fortress, serves students, faculty, and the larger community with an inventory of books, ecclesiastical clothing, gifts, and supplies.

and Saturday classes. Graduates of UTI programs represent various denominations and are actively involved in their churches and the community. For details on the Black Church (UTI) concentration/specialization, refer to the sections of this catalog related to the MDiv and MAR programs. For information on the Certificate in Church Leadership, contact the UTI Program Director. PReaCHInG WITH PoWeR Each spring the UTI sponsors Preaching with Power, a weeklong forum on Black Preaching and Theology. Dynamic pastors and theologians from the Black Church offer sermons and lectures both on the seminary campus and at area churches. Preaching with Power celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2007. MeTRoPolITan/URban MInIsTRY Metropolitan/Urban Concentration This program enables interested students to focus on metropolitan and urban ministry within their MDiv or DMin programs, and to better prepare for calls in metropolitan areas. Its goals are to introduce students to the wide variety of gifts and challenges for ministry that the city offers, to learn theological and practical skills for a metro/urban vocation, and to experience creative and effective models of mission. Requirements for MDiv students include special courses, a senior research seminar, urban field placements and internship, “10-day training” in faith-based community organizing, regular discussion of issues at the urban table in the Refectory, and weekend immersions. For more information, see page 29. Philadelphia area Ministries Partnership PAMP began as the Philadelphia Urban Ministry Coalition with the benefit of a Pew Foundation grant. This ongoing conversation brings together the presidents and deans of four Philadelphia seminaries, the Center for Urban Theological Studies, and African American Interdenominational Ministries, Inc. of Philadelphia for the purpose of coordinating urban ministry training and for interaction with urban Church leadership. The present focus is a core of Afro-centric first professional courses at the seminaries. InsTITUTo De TeoloGÍa Y PasToRal The Instituto de Teología y Pastoral seeks to promote the development of skills for ministry in the Hispanic or Latino context, particularly through a concentration/specialization available to interested MDiv and MAR students. The concentration/specialization program includes Spanish language study, specially focused
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sPeCIal PRoGRaMs anD eMPHases
THe URban THeoloGICal InsTITUTe The Urban Theological Institute (UTI) was founded in 1980 under the leadership of the Rev. Dr. Andrew Willis and the late Rev. Dr. Randolph Jones. The UTI promotes accredited, postbaccalaureate theological education with a focus on ministry in the Black Church context. The UTI does this work through the Black Church concentration in the MDiv program and the Black Church specialization of the MAR program. The UTI also offers a Certificate in Church Leadership program. The UTI provides advice and resources for the Black Church concentration/specialization within the MDiv and MAR degree programs. Concentration students may pursue their degrees through evening

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courses, special Latino tutorial sections of regular introductory courses, and field education and/or internship placements in Latino contexts. For more information, see pages 29 (MDiv) and 33 (MAR). The Instituto is also a resource for congregations and other church constituents for the education and training of lay and clergy alike in matters pertaining to Latino culture, ministry, and theology. Global, eCUMenICal anD InTeRRelIGIoUs ConCeRns Institute for Ecumenical and Interreligious Dialogue The Institute has three interrelated objectives: a) Academic - to educate persons concerning the history, theology, and current developments of the ecumenical and inter-religious movements; b) Professional - to equip congregational leaders to minister in a challenging, multi-religious, multidenominational context; c) Dialogical - to encourage and facilitate conversation and communication among persons of different traditions in order to promote understanding. The Director is LTSP Professor and Dean J. Paul Rajashekar. Multicultural Mission Resource Center The Multicultural Mission Resource Center (MMRC) was founded in 2003 to develop resources and train clergy and laity for leadership in the Northeastern U.S., which in recent decades has undergone a significant demographic change through immigration and the growth of minority communities. The MMRC goals include: • Documenting multicultural ministry and mission initiatives • Networking with multicultural ministry and mission partners in the Northeast • Involving ethnic leaders in planning and implementing MMRC programs • Organizing leadership training opportunities both for clergy and laity to work among culturally diverse communities • Offering degree and non-degree programs with a multicultural focus • Providing internet and web resources A faculty position, the H. George Anderson Chair of Mission and Cultures, is related to the MMRC. For information on the Multicultural Ministry MDiv concentration, see page 29. Other Programs and Services Co-sponsored Student Scholarships. Each year the seminary joins with the ELCA Global Mission International Scholarship Office in co-sponsoring one or more new advanced level students for study
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at the seminary, typically for two years each. Campus Services. The Faculty’s Globalization Committee guides programs and services. An international student support group regularly meets over meals. Additionally, supplies of clothing and household articles are collected and maintained on campus for international students. Travel Seminars. Global awareness travel seminars conducted since 1990 have reached four continents and included Board members, faculty, students, pastors and ELCA staff (and spouses of each). The goal is for participants to gain an understanding of the religious, cultural, economic, and political dynamics of the host countries and to struggle with the implications for ministry both onsite and at home. These rigorous trips emphasize pre-trip orientation, education, and team building and follow-up experiences. Visiting Faculty and Scholars. The seminary regularly invites visiting international scholars and professors to campus to serve as resources to both faculty and students. The seminary’s own faculty members are encouraged to include global dimensions in sabbatical proposals. Scholarships. Several endowed scholarship funds support study by international students at LTSP or study by LTSP students in other countries: • The Clarence and Katharine Lee Global Scholarship Fund. An endowed fund dedicated to support study in Africa and third-world countries or to support study by persons from such nations at LTSP. • The James T. and Elizabeth H. Powers Fund. A gift designated by the seminary Board of Trustees for support of international students in the cooperative program with the ELCA’s Division for Global Mission. • The Kelchner Fund. An endowed fund in custody of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod, ELCA, but directed to the seminary to support development of persons to minister in Asia and for the support of visiting scholars from Asia. • The Kathryn C. Nitchkey Fund. An endowed fund to support study in Israel. • The Kevil Fund. An endowed fund for the support of international students. soCIal MInIsTRY anD aGInG MInIsTRY Thanks to significant support from the Rev. Dr. Francis A. Shearer (’27) and his family, a variety of experiences are offered in the areas of social ministry and aging ministry. Each year selected

students are encouraged to participate in work with Lutheran advocacy ministries. Additionally, program support is provided for the annual Lutherhostel program offered on campus. Conferences on topics relating to social ministry and aging ministry are also periodically offered. leaRnInG CoMMUnITIes LTSP offers first professional students the opportunity to apply for acceptance into one of two Learning Communities sponsored by the seminary: Youth and Justice. • The Youth Learning Community seeks to cherish youth in all their depth and complexity by fostering conversation, discernment and practice for the formation of leaders who engage in ministries and public witness with youth in multicultural settings. • The Justice Learning Community seeks to engage the suffering of the world and to work and advocate for justice, fostering conversation, discernment and practice for the formation of faithful and effective leaders in multicultural settings. Members of each learning community seek to live out the particular purpose of their group by gathering in community via regular shared meals and conversation with a mentor, by planning and leading one event per semester that relates to and facilitates the learning of the community and to which the larger community is invited, and by oneon-one conversations with the mentor. They also engage in intentional reflection and conversation related to their congregation or ministry context, seeking to learn from and strengthen the congregation’s ministry as it relates to their arena of ministry. It is hoped that members of the communities will also engage in a core course related to their area, take opportunities to intensify existing seminary electives and/or arrange for independent studies related to their area, and will explore ways to communicate new and innovative ideas that they develop along the way. faITH anD lIfe InsTITUTe The seminary’s focus on mission includes the Faith and Life Institute, an initiative designed to provide lifelong learning opportunities for both ordained/rostered leaders and laypersons. Some of these programs better prepare people for service to the Church, while others focus on personal enrichment and growth. The overall aim of Faith and Life programming is to support congregations by equipping individuals for their ministry in the Church and the world. Available resources and programs include:

• Free Items: Brief studies that may be downloaded free from the seminary Web site (www.Ltsp.edu) • Reproducible Studies: Complete reproducible teacher’s guide and participant worksheets for five sessions. Designed for Lenten series, adult forums, retreats, etc. • On-line Theological Study for Laity: On-line courses for equipping individual Sunday Church School/Confirmation teachers, worship assistants, council members, youth ministry leaders, synodically authorized leaders, etc. • Faith and Leadership Academy: A six-session Academy for developing faith and leadership among the laity • Men in Mission: One-day events filled with fellowship and education for men • Rest, Refreshment and Renewal: One-day events featuring activities and education for women • Health Ministry: One-day events for persons interested in the changes and challenges in health ministry • Lutherhostel: An annual June activity focusing on a theme of timely interest to people of faith aged 55 and older, both clergy and lay • The Mt. Airy School of Religion: Occasional special events and courses on topics of timely interest • Faith at Work: A series of seminars on values and ethics for the professions • Faculty-in-Residence: With assistance from the Director of Admissions, congregations and synods may arrange for members of the seminary Faculty to lead a variety of workshops and studies on location • Pastor-in-Residence/Missionary-in-Residence: Clergy, particularly those in mission fields, and rostered leaders may arrange to stay on campus with apartment or studio accommodations for periods of a few days up to a week at modest cost. These visits are designed by the participants and are usually a combination of study, research, quietude and conversation—opportunities for renewal. Direct inquiries to the Director of Admissions. For more information contact Mark A. Staples, Director of the Faith and Life Institute, or check the complete listing on the seminary Web site (www. Ltsp.edu/faithandlife).

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THeoloGICal eDUCaTIon WITH YoUTH The ministry called Theological Education with Youth (TEY) is a creative partnership between LTSP and the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg, along with congregations, youth ministries and synods of ELCA Regions 7 and 8. TEY has touched the lives of over 600 young people since its inception in 2000. The ministry seeks to inflame the faith and witness of high school-age youth through intensive theological and vocational exploration in four meeting places: • Affirmation of Baptism Festivals, one-day formation events which welcome up to 100 ninth-grade youth to the campuses of each seminary yearly. Designed to augment the confirmation practices of congregations and to gather young people for a unique experience of the body of Christ, these events focus on the personal and corporate dimensions of baptism and on the baptismal callings to serve and witness in God’s world. • A seven-day Crossroads Event for up to 36 rising juniors (those who have just completed their tenth-grade year), inviting youth to travel to a variety of places where the gospel intersects with and transforms the world. Ministries and ministers of advocacy and prophetic witness, diaconal service, international relief and development are encountered in this pilgrimage, centered at LTSG as host site. Theological foundations, experiential learning, testimonies, and dialogue on vocation are at the heart of the event. • A two-week Summer Theological Academy for up to 30 rising seniors (those who have just completed their eleventh-grade year), hosted at one of the regional Lutheran colleges. The Academy is an intentional Christian community of worship, high quality theological seeking and questioning, vocational conversation, servant learning, and arts. • One-week biblical and theological conversations with high school-age Counselors-in-Training and other youth leaders, held at outdoor ministry centers (church camps) of ELCA Regions 7 and 8. More information is available on-line: tey.easterncluster.org. PRoJeCT ConneCT Project Connect: Calling Faithful Leaders for a Changing World is an initiative of the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries, funded by a $3 million grant from the Lilly Endowment Inc. It is intended to strengthen the ecology of call in the East through

an organizing and enthusiastic network of partners who work together to provide theologically sound vocational discernment programs for young adults under the rubrics of “Identify,” “Nurture” and “Sustain.” “Identify” programs are broad in scope and focus, raising general questions of vocation with as many young adults as possible and creating entry points for other programs. “Nurture” programs extend, deepen and focus these efforts. “Sustain” programs provide profound experiences in congregational ministry. nConnect is intended to create a dynamic, resilient and growing network that supports increased numbers of young adults entering seminary with a vocational commitment to and aptitudes and foundations for public ministry. More information is available on-line: www.projectconnect.org.

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

The courses listed below are divided into two sets: • The first Professional Program • advanced Degree Programs (Graduate school) (restricted to Advanced Degree students, marked with suffix “G”)

Key to course numbers:
Each course number consists of a three-letter prefix and a three-digit course number. The three-letter prefix identifies the curriculum area in which the course is offered: BBG Greek BBH Hebrew BBS Biblical Studies BBT Biblical Theology BNT New Testament BOT Old Testament HCH History of Christianity HLG Non-Biblical Languages HTH Theology ICA Christian Assembly ICS Church in Society IFE Contextual Education IPC Pastoral Care IPP Parish Practice ILM Liturgy and Music SDM SGN SIS Special/Undesignated—DMin Special/Undesignated—General Special/Undesignated—Independent Study

bbG110 Introduction to Greek (pass/fail). BBG100 but pass/fail. electives bbG300 Greek Readings: General (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBG100) As announced bbG310 Greek Readings: General (pass/fail). BBG300 but pass/fail. bbG301 Greek Readings: epistles (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBG100) As announced bbG311 Greek Readings: epistles (pass/fail). BBG301 but pass/fail. bbG302 Greek Readings: Gospels (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBG100) As announced bbG312 Greek Readings: Gospels (pass/fail). BBG302 but pass/fail. bbG320 Intermediate Koine Greek: Greek Grammar beyond the basics (1 unit) The course will systematically work through an advanced Greek textbook (Daniel B. Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics), as well as engage in close readings of selected New Testament texts. The focus of the class will be on gaining knowledge of Greek vocabulary and syntax that will facilitate the careful exegesis of biblical texts. (Pre-requisite: Introduction to Greek, or equivalent) Dr. Heen 

The three-digit course numbers identify the level at which the course is offered: 100’s –200’s Foundational first professional-level courses; may have prerequisites or corequisites 300’s First professional electives; likely to have prerequisites 400’s [As needed; currently identify one-day ministry seminars] 500’s For first professional seniors or advanced level students 600’s STM/DMin offerings 700’s DMin offerings 800’s STM/ThD offerings 900’s ThD offerings

BIBlE: HebReW
MDiv Core Requirement (also required for MaR bible specialization) bbH100 biblical Hebrew (1 unit) An introduction to biblical Hebrew, with particular attention to grammatical forms, syntax, and basic vocabulary. Students will be introduced to Biblia Hebraica and to print and electronic resources that enable the use of Hebrew for translation, exegesis, and access to secondary literature. As announced bbH110 biblical Hebrew (pass/fail). BBG100 but pass/fail. electives bbH300 Hebrew Readings: General (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBH100) As announced

THe fIRsT PRofessIonal PRoGRaM
BIBlE: GReeK
MDiv Core Requirement (also required for MaR bible specialization) bbG100 Introduction to Greek (1 unit) A basic introduction to Koine Greek morphology and syntax that facilitates the exegesis of Greek biblical texts. The elements of Greek covered are the alphabet and pronunciation;

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the noun system (first, second, and third declensions); the thematic and athematic verbal systems (including indicative and nonindicative moods); participles; and infinitives. The student is expected to internalize core vocabulary and nominal and verbal paradigms. The course integrates exercises in Bible software applications. As announced

Course offerings

bbH310 Hebrew Readings: General (pass/fail). BBH300 but pass/fail. bbH301 Hebrew Readings: Pentateuch (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBH100) As announced bbH311 Hebrew Readings: Pentateuch (pass/fail). BBH301 but pass/fail. bbH302 Hebrew Readings: Prophets (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBH100) As announced bbH312 Hebrew Readings: Prophets (pass/fail). BBH302 but pass/fail. bbH303 Hebrew Readings: Psalms, Wisdom (1/2 unit) Reading and detailed exegesis of selected passages. (Pre-requisite: BBH100) As announced  bbH313 Hebrew Readings: Psalms, Wisdom (pass/ fail). BBH303 but pass/fail. bbH320 Intermediate Hebrew: beyond Jots and Tittles (1 unit) An intermediate study of biblical Hebrew for sermon and congregational Bible study preparation, as well as for personal Bible study. Students will read Ruth in its entirety in Hebrew in order to expand their knowledge of biblical Hebrew vocabulary and syntax that will facilitate the careful exegesis of other biblical texts. (Pre-requisite: BBH100 or equivalent). Dr. Gafney

BIBlE: bIblICal THeoloGY
electives bbT311 biblical Theology of the old Testament (1 unit) Theological issues and themes in the Bible, and their relevance for faith (Pre-requisite: Old Testament and New Testament, or permission of the instructor). As announced bbT312 biblical Theology of the new Testament (1 unit) Theological issues and themes in the New Testament, with consideration of their relationship to similar themes in the Old Testament, and the relevance of this witness for faith. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament and New Testament, or permission of the instructor) As announced bbT313 sex and scripture: feminist Issues in Interpretation (1 unit) A consideration of the major methodological and textual issues of biblical hermeneutics raised by feminism and feminist interpretation of the New and Old Testaments. Issues addressed include the nature of the divine, the roles of women as religious authorities and believers, the nature of blessedness and evil. Attention is given to the impact of these issues on contemporary believers and religious institutions. (Prerequisite: Old Testament and New Testament, or equivalent) Dr. Mattison bbT314 apocalyptic Thought and literature (1 unit) A survey of the major apocalyptic passages of the Bible, with their theme of the “end times,” and their social world and literary genre. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament and New Testament, or equivalent) As announced bbT315 father, Children, Home (1 unit) A study of the employment of metaphors of family life for ordering both the divine and human realms in the Bible. Students will learn to analyze themes and images in biblical texts from both sociological and literary perspectives, and compare the use of these images between Old and New Testaments. Students will also learn how to employ these thematic resources in preaching. (Prerequisite: Old Testament and New Testament, or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Mattison bbT316 biblical authority (1 unit) An exploration of biblical authority in the Church and in Christian life. Issues include modes of biblical authority; a range of biblical perspectives on selected themes; inner-biblical authority issues within and between testaments; contemporary congregational, denominational, and ecumenical issues relating to biblical authority. (Pre-requisites: Old Testament and New Testament, or equivalent) As announced bbT317 The Hermeneutics of faith: biblical Interpretation and the north american Church (1 unit) An examination of the resources provided by critical biblical methodologies for parish ministry. The course is grounded in a historical review of the role of the Bible

BIBlE: bIblICal sTUDIes
electives bbs301 Intertestamental literature (1 unit) Studies of the literature developed between the closing of the Hebrew canon and the introduction of the apostolic writings. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament 1 and 2) As announced bbs304 biblical Models of society (1 unit) An attempt at a biblical understanding of the nature of society through exegesis of pertinent biblical passages and reflection on the work of contemporary social ethicists. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament 1 and 2 and New Testament 1 and 2, or equivalent) Dr. Robinson bbs305 skepticism and the Quest for Meaning (1 unit) Job finds God unjust and Qohelet brands all life vanity. A close examination of both books prompts reflection on skepticism as a religious response. (Prerequisite: Old Testament 1 and 2) Dr. Robinson bbs320 Introduction to Rabbinic literature An introduction to some of the sacred literature of Rabbinic Judaism. Class will study selections from texts of the Ta’anitic period (1st-4th centuries C.E.), including the Mishna, Babylonian Talmud, and Midrashim. Students will be introduced to several systems of biblical interpretation, narrative, and legal discourses, and evolution of liturgy. (Pre-requisite: BNT100/101 or BOT100/101; prior knowledge of Hebrew helpful, but not required) Dr. Gafney
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

in North American culture as well as the rise of critical biblical scholarship. This review provides the basis for an analysis of the popular understanding of the Bible in the contemporary Church as well as models for theologically informed and culturally sensitive appropriations of current styles of higher criticism. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Heen bbT318 sin and Cinema: Pauline Theology Goes to the Movies (1 unit) A variety of Pauline texts and contemporary films are brought into dialogue with social scientific criticism in order to a) understand better Pauline theology and b) apply Paul’s theology, in both its constructive and its critical aspects, to narratives of contemporary North American culture. Two works of Robert Jewett, Saint Paul at the Movies: The Apostle’s Dialogue with American Culture (1993) and Saint Paul Returns to the Movies: Triumph over Shame (1999), provide the course’s methodological starting point. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Heen bbT319 biblical Prayer and Christian Prayer (1 unit) A study of prayer texts in the Bible and the theological claims implicit in them, with reflection on the use of biblical prayers as sources and models for prayers in the Church’s liturgy and Christian devotional life. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament) As announced bbT320 living scripture: The bible in the Christian life (1 unit) The Christian life is the proper interpretation of scripture, according to Søren Kierkegaard. The course will consider the power of scripture to shape the faithful life. Topics taken up will include conceptions of scriptural authority, reading with ethical and religious seriousness, biblical ethics, the power of scripture mediated through the liturgy, reading by the rule of faith, and the multiplicity of the Christian life. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament and New Testament, or permission of the instructor). Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Robinson bbT321 Prophets on the Margins (1 unit) Explores the evolution of prophecy in the Hebrew Scriptures by studying prophetic characters included in the canon, but whose ministries are preserved in texts that are not attributed to them. Their narratives support and enrich the narratives of more dominant characters. Betterknown prophets such as Miriam and Nathan, Elijah and Elisha will be studied, along with lesser-known prophets such as the woman with whom Isaiah fathered a child and Zedekiah the Canaanite. Students will prepare weekly exegetical notes and one exegetical paper. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament. Hebrew helpful but not required.) Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Gafney bbT322 Heroines, Harlots, and Handmaids: The Women of the Hebrew scriptures (1 unit) The literature and ancient cultural contexts of the Hebrew Bible in their contemporary canonical shape and status as the scriptures of Christian (Orthodox, Roman Catholic and

Protestant) and Jewish (Judean and Samaritan) communities. Specific focus on the narrative portrayal of women, women’s stories, rituals and legislation pertaining to gendered subjects, and interpretation of biblical texts about women and by women. Utilizes the interdisciplinary tools of literary analysis, cultural anthropology, sociology, archaeology, and critical inquiry to analyze the roles and status indicators of ancient Israelite women and the impact of interpretive practices on contemporary secular and religious communities. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament) Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Gafney bbT325 Women’s Word as World Witness: Global feminist biblical Interpretation (1.0 unit) An exploration of the ways in which women understand, interpret, and apply the biblical text, with particular attention to the readings of women of color outside the continental United States. Feminist perspectives include Jewish, Latin American, Korean Min-yung, and continental African postcolonial feminism. Implications for sermonic and didactic exegesis in multicultural parish contexts will be drawn. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament or New Testament) Dr. Gafney bbT351 Mission in the new Testament (1.0 unit) Explores the understandings and practices of the mission of the Church according to the writings of the New Testament. The influence of cultural and political as well as theological factors will be considered. The course will also guide and challenge students to consider the understanding and practice of mission in the churches today in light of the New Testament witness (Pre-requisite: New Testament) As announced 

BIBlE: neW TesTaMenT
MDiv Core Requirements (also required for MaR bible specialization) BNT100 and BNT101 together fulfill the New Testament requirement for all MDiv students. Students seeking the MDiv degree who have received credit for New Testament 1 and 2 without having had Greek are required to complete Greek Readings or an exegetical New Testament elective subsequent to completion of BBG100. bnT100 new Testament Introduction 1: Gospels, acts, and Johannine literature (with Greek) (1 unit) An introduction to the narrative literature of the New Testament: Mark, Matthew, Luke, John, Acts, and the Johannine epistles. Content will accent the four Gospels. Methodological foci will include the historical material on second-temple Judaism, source, form, redaction, sociological, and literary criticisms. Hermeneutical foci will include canonical and 21st-century reader-response interpretations. Sections will engage the Greek text in an intentional manner. (Pre-requisite or co-requisite: Greek) As announced bnT101 new Testament Introduction 2: epistles and Revelation (with Greek) (1 unit) An introduction to the New Testament epistolary literature and the
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Book of Revelation. The epistles studied are the seven undisputed Pauline letters (Romans, 1 & 2 Cor, Gal, Phil, 1 Thess, Philemon); the Deutero-Pauline (Eph, Col), the Pastoral (1 & 2 Tim, Titus) and Catholic Epistles (James, 1 & 2 Peter, Jude); 2 Thess, and Hebrews. The content focus of the course will be on the seven undisputed letters of Paul. Methodological foci include Greco-Roman background material; text, rhetorical, social-scientific, canonical, and 21st-century reader-response criticisms; and the use of the LXX in the New Testament. Hermeneutical foci include the role of Revelation in millenarian discourse; the relation of Paul to second-temple Judaism; and the protestant appropriation of Pauline theology in areas such as Justification, Law/Gospel, and the Theology of the Cross. Sections will engage the Greek text in an intentional manner. (Pre-requisite: Greek, New Testament 1) As announced 4 MaR Core Requirements BNT110 and BNT111 together fulfill the New Testament requirement for MAR students, except that MAR students having a Bible specialization are to complete BNT100/101. bnT110 new Testament Introduction 1: Gospels, acts, and Johannine literature (without Greek) (1 unit) The same course as BNT100, but with separate sections that do not use Greek in exegetical assignments. Offered as an option for MAR students who are not Bible majors. As announced bnT111 new Testament Introduction 2: epistles and Revelation (without Greek) (1 unit) The same course as BNT110, but with separate sections that do not use Greek in exegetical assignments. Offered as an option for MAR students who are not Bible majors. (Pre-requisite: New Testament 1) As announced new Testament electives bnT310 The Gospel of Matthew: lectionary Year a (1 unit) A study of the Gospel of Matthew focused in particular on the vocation of believers, the nature of religious authority, and the use of language for God in relationship to Matthew’s community. Includes consideration of exegesis and preaching concerns. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT330 The Witness of luke (1 unit) A study of the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT340 The Gospel of John (1 unit) An introduction to the Fourth Gospel in terms of its historical origin, literary nature, and theological teaching. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Heen bnT350 The sermon on the Mount (1 unit) A detailed consideration of chapters 5-7 in the context of the Gospel of Matthew, with attention to origins, history of interpretation, and use today. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) As announced

bnT351 Gospel Parables (1 unit) A study of the form and character of parable stories in the Synoptic Gospels. Comparative materials from the period will help to provide literary, historical, sociological, and theological perspectives on these narratives. Class will seek to appreciate the diverse aspects and uses of these biblical narratives in order better to understand what they can tell us of Jesus’ ministry, the ongoing interpretations of the churches, and their use in contemporary ministry. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) As announced bnT352 Matthew and Mark: obedience to the Gospel (1 unit) Mark’s believer belongs to no Church and follows Jesus to the cross as God’s reign brings the end-time. Matthew’s believer is a Church member, studying Jesus’ words, acting rightly for the Father’s glory forever. These strikingly different views of obedience will be examined. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT353 Discipleship and the Gospels (1 unit) The Gospels are traditionally read to provide descriptions of the person and mission of the historical Jesus. They can also be read to provide models of how contemporary disciples are to conduct the mission Jesus has entrusted to believers. This course teaches students to explore each Gospel text in both ways. Texts to be studied are chosen from call and controversy stories, parables, miracles and passion narratives. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT360 Romans (1 unit) A close reading of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans by means of historical, rhetorical, literary, and social scientific criticisms. The course will also explore the relationship between the “New Perspective on Paul” in New Testament scholarship and “traditional Lutheran” interpretations of the “law” and “justification” language in Paul’s letters. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Heen bnT361 The Corinthian Correspondence (1 unit) An exegetical study of Paul’s letters to the Church in Corinth. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT363 I Thank God for You: a study of Discipleship and Community in Paul’s letters (1 unit) In a world alien to Christians and hostile to Jews, Paul was highly effective at making disciples for Christ. How did he do it? How might you? Amid strong social inequities and in constant peril of death, he persuaded new believers to form solid, enduring communities who shared the mind of Christ. How did he do it? How might you? We will study the patterns of Paul’s faith and mission behavior that undergird his public witness for the sake of developing and strengthening the student’s own public witness and skill at community development. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT369 The epistle to the Hebrews (1 unit) A close reading of the Epistle to the Hebrews by means of his-

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

bnT380 book of Revelation (1 unit) An exploration of the apocalyptic literature and thought of early Christianity as reflected in a close reading of the Apocalypse of John. In addition to historical-critical and literary-critical examination of the Apocalypse, contemporary interpretations that reflect the ongoing North American interest in premillenialism are engaged. (Prerequisite: Greek and New Testament) Dr. Heen bnT390 The Historical Jesus (1 unit) A survey of the “Quest for the Historical Jesus” before and since the work of Albert Schweitzer, with analysis of trends in scholarship and their relation to faith. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Heen bnT391 birth and Death of the Messiah (1 unit) A comparative study of the beginnings and endings of the four gospels focusing on the origin and work of Christ and their relation to the vocation of believers then and now. (Pre-requisite: Greek and New Testament) Dr. Mattison bnT392 Healing and Miracle in new Testament Times (1 unit) A study of the healing and miracle stories in the gospels. Examines sickness, healing and miracle in Hellenistic and Jewish contexts and among early Christians in order to gain literary, historical, sociological, medical and theological perspectives on these narratives and reflect on their significance for contemporary ministry. (Pre-requisite: Greek and New Testament) Dr. Borsch

MaR Core Requirements BOT110 and BOT111 together fulfill the Old Testament requirement for MAR students, except that MAR students having a Bible specialization are to complete BOT100/101. boT110 Introduction to the old Testament 1 (without Hebrew) (1 unit) The same course as BOT100, but without use of Hebrew in exegetical assignments. Offered as an option for MAR students who are not Bible majors. As announced boT111 Introduction to the old Testament 2 (without Hebrew) (1 unit) The same course as BOT101, but without use of Hebrew in exegetical assignments. Offered as an option for MAR students who are not Bible majors. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament 1) As announced old Testament electives boT301 Genesis Interpreted (1 unit) An exploration of the different ways Genesis has been heard by the community of faith from the biblical period to the present. Cultural and theological factors receive particular attention. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament) Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Robinson boT302b exodus in african and african american Interpretation (1 unit) Biblical interpretation of the Book of Exodus for congregational proclamation in the contemporary post-colonial world. Readings of Exodus by African and African American biblical scholars and theologians will be accompanied by those from Native American, Latin American, Palestinian, Jewish, and Asian liberationist, womanist and feminist perspectives. Explores themes of conquest and colonization through the lenses of science fiction authored in conversation with Mormon and African American Baptist religious experiences. Students use written reflections to formulate a hermeneutical approach to Exodus. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament. Hebrew helpful but not required.) Dr. Gafney boT305 exegetical Preaching from the book of numbers (1 unit) Focuses on the Book of Numbers for congregational proclamation. Explores the literary, socio-religious, cultural/historical and canonical context of Numbers, as well as textual, translation, and interpretive issues in the book. Examines lectionary texts in Christian and Jewish tradition exegetically and herThe Catalog / 2006–2008 

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BIBlE: olD TesTaMenT
MDiv Core Requirements (also required for MaR bible specialization) BOT100 and BOT101 together fulfill the Old Testament requirement for all MDiv students. Students seeking the MDiv degree who have received credit for Old Testament 1 and 2 without having had Hebrew are required to complete Hebrew Readings or an exegetical Old Testament elective subsequent to completion of BBH100. boT100 Introduction to the old Testament 1 (with Hebrew) (1 unit) An introduction to the first five books of the Bible , together with the books known in Jewish tradition as the Writings, containing such diverse books as Psalms, Proverbs, Job, and Chronicles. The course also introduces scholarly methodologies critical to understanding these books, including source criticism, form criticism, redaction criticism, and several recent literary approaches. Important theological concepts such as the authority and inspiration of scripture receive extensive attention. (Pre-requisite or co-requisite: Hebrew) As announced

section Title

torical-critical, literary, and social-scientific criticism. Foci of the seminar are the book’s Christology, soteriology, and use of scripture (LXX). Particular attention is also paid to the early Christian interpretation of the epistle. (Pre-requisite: New Testament) Dr. Heen

boT101 Introduction to the old Testament 2 (with Hebrew) (1 unit) An introduction to the former prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) and the latter prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Hosea through Malachi). Highlighted methods include rhetorical criticism, tradition history, and social scientific approaches. There is some attention to intertestamental texts, the Septuagint, and early rabbinic readings, and an emphasis on the relation between the Old and New Testaments. (Pre-requisite: Hebrew and Old Testament 1) As announced

Course offerings

meneutically, with students studying sermons from the Numbers corpus as well as preparing their own. (Pre-requisites: Old Testament and Homiletics. Hebrew helpful but not required.) Dr. Gafney boT330 The book of Psalms (1 unit) An exploration of the poetry and theology of the Psalms and their relevance for Christian ministries, emphasizing careful studies of Psalm texts as well as comparison with other poetic texts within the Hebrew Bible, and later texts in the Psalms tradition (Apocrypha, Qumran, New Testament, Christian liturgy and hymnody). (Pre-requisite: Old Testament or consent of instructor) As announced boT340 The Wisdom literature (1 unit) Interpretation of the wisdom literature of the Bible, with an emphasis on Old Testament texts (Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes) and some attention to texts in the apocrypha, wisdom themes in the New Testament, and extrabiblical wisdom. The texts are approached both in their ancient contexts and as resources for Christian theology and ministries. (Prerequisite: Old Testament or consent of the instructor). As announced boT350 The book of Isaiah (1 unit) Exegesis of texts from the book of Isaiah, with emphasis on the relation of various parts of the book of Isaiah to one another, and the implications of Isaiah for contemporary theology and practice. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament or consent of instructor) As announced boT370 The Minor Prophets (1 unit) The “Book of the Twelve” contains visions, comedy, ethical teaching, and some of the most profound reflection on God’s relation to God’s people in the Bible. This seminar probes each of the twelve books, seeking to hear clearly each distinctive message. Study will focus on both literary structure and historical setting. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament or permission of the instructor.) Dr. Robinson boT390 History of Interpretation of the old Testament (1 unit) Art, music, and liturgy as well as more formal exegesis are part of the tradition of biblical interpretation. An introduction to that heritage of vital dialogue with the Bible and to its relevance to contemporary interpretation. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament) Dr. Robinson boT391 old Testament Poetry (1 unit) Reading of poetic texts from throughout the Hebrew Bible, with particular attention to the relation between form and theological meaning. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament or consent of instructor) As announced boT392 narrative in the old Testament (1 unit) An examination of the themes and structure of Old Testament narratives. Modern literary theory provides a theoretical base, and theological reflection on the narratives is the goal of the exegesis. (Pre-requisite: Old Testament) Dr. Robinson

HISTORY AND SYSTEMATIC THEOlOgY:
HIsToRY of CHRIsTIanITY Required HCH100 Introduction to the History of Christianity (1 unit) A survey of the significant issues and trends in the history of the Christian church from its beginnings to the dawn of modernity. As announced Denominational Polity option Student selects the option appropriate to his/her tradition to fulfill the requirement. Additional courses may be taken as free electives or to fulfill the ecumenical requirement. Students of traditions other than those listed below may take courses elsewhere for transfer or fulfill requirement through independent study. HCH201 The lutheran Confessions (1 unit) An analysis of the history and development of the theology of the documents comprising The Book of Concord with a view to establishing the importance of their contents for the ministry of pastors, teachers, and congregations. (Prerequisite: HCH100 or an Early Church course and/or HTH100) Dr. Wengert HCH202 essentials of anglicanism (1 unit) An introduction to the origins and major developments of Anglican theology, spirituality, and ecclesiology, from ancient Celtic roots, through Henry VIII and the Elizabethan Settlement, to the American Episcopal Church and the worldwide Anglican communion today. Students trace the “via media” of Protestant and Catholic roots of the Anglican tripod of scripture, tradition and reason, and the Book of Common Prayer. Expressions of Anglican spirituality in literature and the arts are considered. As announced HCH203 Denominational Polity: african Methodist episcopal (1 unit) HCH204 Denominational Polity: baptist (1 unit) HCH205 Denominational Polity: Church of God in Christ (1 unit) HCH206 Denominational Polity: Pentecostal (1 unit) HCH207 Denominational Polity: Presbyterian (1 unit) HCH208 Denominational Polity: United Church of Christ (1 unit) HCH209a Methodist Polity and Doctrine (1 unit) A study of United Methodist Book of Discipline and of Wesleyan theology; the first of two courses required to fulfill Disciplinary requirements for ordination and Conference membership in the United Methodist Church. As announced. HCH209b United Methodist Church History (1 unit) A study of the basic structure, mission, and theological standards of the United Methodist Church; the second of two courses required to fulfill Disciplinary requirements for ordination and Conference membership in the United 

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american Church History/Global Christianity option. The MDiv degree requires completion of at least one of the following. Additional courses in this category may be taken as electives. HCH230 american Religious History (1 unit) A look at the American religious scene. Important historical events and trends are analyzed. American Lutheranism is examined in its ecumenical setting. Dr. Pahl HCH231 american lutheranism (1 unit) A survey of significant persons, issues, events, and controversies in American Lutheranism against the background of American Christianity. Dr. Pahl HCH232b african american Church History (1 unit) A review of the historical development and current state of the African American Church. Through a close reading of texts of the movement and a review of the social context within which it arose, seminar participants will be invited to a full engagement with this ecclesial tradition. It will be our purpose to identify not only the discrete contours of the African American Christian movement, but also to identify its place in the larger sweep of Christian history in the United States. Dr. Ray HCH235 World Christianity (1 unit) A survey of the history of Christianity in Africa, Asia, Caribbean, Latin America, and Pacific from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Close attention will be given to the mission methods, current state of the churches, and major concerns of the Christian communities in those regions and to the challenges those concerns pose for global relationships and cooperation among churches. As announced Church History electives HCH103 Creeds and Councils (1 unit) An on-line course, examining the early creeds and selected councils through the 15th century, with a focus on their claims upon our present faith and their relevance to the parish ministry. Fulfills the History of Christianity requirement for students of the pre-2004-05 curriculum and for other students by permission. Dr. Krey HCH303 augustine and the augustinian Tradition (1 unit) An examination of the life, thought, and influence of Augustine of Hippo. Special attention is paid to the Confessions, the anti-Pelagian writings, and City of God. (Pre-requisite: HCH100 or equivalent) Dr. Krey HCH306 History of Christian spirituality to the Reformation (1 unit) An examination of the spiritual disciplines of the major monastic movements in the western church through their writings. Special attention will be given to the influence of their social and cultural context. The Reformation critique and inheritance of these same monastic traditions will also be addressed. (Pre-requisite: HCH100 or equivalent) Dr. Krey

HCH320 luther and the law (1 unit) The social consequences of justification by faith alone as understood from Luther’s perspective. Particular attention is paid to Luther’s understanding of vocation, his view of civil authority, and his role in the Peasants’ War. (Pre-requisite: HCH201 or equivalent) Dr. Wengert HCH321 luther the Pastor (1 unit) An examination of the ways in which a Lutheran pastoral tradition emerged in the 16th century, using the sermons, letters of counsel, and devotional writings of Luther. Critical evaluation is made of the ways in which this tradition may be appropriated today. (Pre-requisite: HCH201 or equivalent) Dr. Wengert HCH322 The Catechisms of luther (1 unit) An exploration of the background of Luther’s catechisms and implications for parish life. Participants are encouraged to develop new ways in which these resources could be used in teaching, preaching, pastoral care, and leadership training. (Pre-requisite: HCH201 or equivalent) Dr. Wengert HCH326 lutherans and Jews (1 unit) Attitudes of 16th-century Lutherans towards the Jews are analyzed in their own context and in the light of later developments. Special attention is paid to the writings of Martin Luther. (Prerequisite: HCH201 or equivalent.) Dr. Wengert HCH330 lutheran spirituality (1/2 unit) Examines a spirituality for the Christian life based on the Lutheran Confessions and the writings of major figures in the Lutheran theological tradition. Explores the connections between the devotional life and the Christian’s ministry in the world, and considers the impact of spiritual renewal on parish life and pastoral ministry. Dr. Wengert HCH340 History and Theology of Mission (1 unit) Explores some of the major developments and shifts in theologies and methods of mission from the New Testament period to the present time. Following the investigation of the biblical and theological foundations for mission, special attention will be given to some of the significant contemporary issues in mission at the global and local settings. As announced HCH345 Gospel and Cultures (1 unit or 1/2 unit as announced) Aims to enhance awareness to challenges in communicating the gospel in today’s multicultural situation. Through an analysis of the select examples of the relationship between gospel and cultures in the mission expansion of the Church since the 16th century, the course explores the basic dimensions of cross-cultural communication of the gospel. Biblical texts, historical and contemporary perspectives are emphasized.
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Methodist Church. As announced

HCH308 History of eschatology (1 unit) A survey course of “The Last Things” as understood in the Church’s theological and/or biblical interpretations since the end of the first century. (Pre-requisite: HCH100 or equivalent) Dr. Krey

Course offerings

The case study method is used in order to learn how Christians and churches cope with issues which arise in the encounter of the gospel and cultures. Fulfills the global option requirement. As announced HCH364 Violence and Religion in america (1 unit) A critical study of selected primary texts and significant events related to the history of violence in American religious history, informed by and with contextual analysis of the theory of Rene Girard. Enrollment limited to 20. Dr. Pahl HCH365 Youth and Violence (1 unit) A study of the ways young people have been implicated in violence in U.S. history and ways the Church has intervened or failed to do so. Sources include social, scientific, theological, and practical resources, along with a novel or two. Dr. Pahl 8 HCH370 Women and Religion in the United states (1 unit) Throughout U.S. history, the majority of participants in virtually every religious tradition have been women. This course is a historical survey of women and religion in America, with an emphasis on Christianity. Topics include women’s roles in revivalism, missions, and new religious movements; and the impact of religious experience on women’s identities. As announced HCH371 Youth Ministry in america (1 unit) Intensive study of the history and practice of youth ministry in the United States. Course readings and discussions acquaint students with both practical resources for conducting youth ministry in contemporary contexts and tools for analysis of contextual factors such as violence, sexuality, drugs, popular culture, and other issues of public life. Dr. Pahl HCH380 Grace and Place: location and Proclamation in america (1 unit) A survey of selected historical and cultural practices regarding space and place in American religious history, with attention to the social, theological, and pastoral issues raised. Dr. Pahl HCH381 faith and film in america: Resources for Using Movies in Parish Ministry (1 unit) According to some observers, film is religion in America; seeing is believing. At the least, films interact with faith traditions to represent, expose, critique, extol, and shape them. This course examines the interactions between movies and religions in the United States from the early 20th century to the present, bringing to bear tools from the disciplines of cultural studies, history, and theology, among others. Viewing of five films is accompanied by close readings and discussion of them, in conjunction with key secondary sources and reviews. Students post their own “reviews” of each film to a class Web page and produce a final paper on a film or topic of their choice. Dr. Pahl

HISTORY AND SYSTEMATIC THEOlOgY: nonbIblICal lanGUaGes electives HlG100l spanish for beginners (1 unit) Development of basic skills in reading, translation, and conversation in Spanish. Students of varying proficiency may take the course, but prior knowledge or training in Spanish is not required. Elements of Latino culture will be introduced through music, poetry, and other short writings. Dr. Rivera HlG322 Theological German (1 unit) An introduction to the language with emphasis on the grammar and vocabulary required to read academic theology. No prior knowledge of German required. As announced HlG330l spanish for Ministry (basic) (1/2 unit) Development of the basic skills of reading, writing, and conversation in Spanish. The main focus is provision (especially to students interested in the practice of ministry among Spanish-speaking people) of opportunities to practice reading the Scriptures and to gain familiarity with liturgical texts in Spanish. Dr. Rivera HlG331l spanish for Ministry (Intermediate) (1/2 unit) Further development of the skills of reading, writing, and conversation in Spanish. Students of varying levels of Spanish language proficiency can take this course. Besides the provision (especially to students interested in the practice of ministry among Spanishspeaking people) of opportunities to practice conversation and reading publicly liturgical texts, cultural elements are introduced through music, poetry, and other short writings. Dr. Rivera

HISTORY AND SYSTEMATIC THEOlOgY:
sYsTeMaTIC THeoloGY Required. The MDiv and MAR degrees require completion of one of the following. HTH100 Thinking about God (1 unit) An introduction to the sources, method and language of theology. Acquaints students with the Christian tradition, especially the doctrines of God, creation, and theological anthropology. These classical theological themes will be evaluated and discussed in the context of contemporary challenges and understandings. As announced HTH103 Thinking about God (1 unit) On-line version of HTH100 with special provision for diaconal ministry students. Enrollment limited to 15. Dr. Hoffmeyer Christology option. Students select one course from those below to fulfill requirement. HTH200 Issues in Christology (1 unit) An overview of the doctrine of Christ from traditional dogmatic statements to current-day perspectives. Explores the possibilities for translating classical concepts into contemporary theological language. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

HTH201 Major Doctrines (1 unit) An overview of the traditional tenets of the major doctrines, assessed from modern-day perspectives. Focus is on the doctrines of Christ, the Church, and the sacraments, though soteriology will be inevitably part of the content of these teachings. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As announced HTH203 Christology and salvation (1 unit) A systematic analysis of the doctrine of the person and work of Christ in the contemporary context of secularism and pluralism. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rajashekar HTH205 Images of Jesus in Contemporary Cultures (1 unit) An examination of the relationship between Gospel and culture with special reference to how Jesus is perceived and portrayed in African, Asian, Latin American, feminist, and African American theologies. Non-Christian understandings, especially Jewish and Islamic, are also explored. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rajashekar HTH209l Readings in Christology (1 unit) A study of a number of contemporary writers in Christology, especially from Latin America. The scope is ecumenical, including Roman Catholic and evangelical theologians. The approach is both critical and comparative with an emphasis on Latino perspectives. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rivera ethics option. The MDiv degree requires completion of one of the following. HTH250 Introduction to Christian ethics (1 unit) An introduction to the practice of Christian ethical reflection. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Hoffmeyer HTH251b Christian social ethics (1 unit) A sociological analysis of selected problems or issues in society, with the application of sound biblical exegesis and the ethics of historical and/or contemporary theologies to such issues. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As announced HTH253 anglican social ethics (1 unit) An exploration of Anglican approaches to ethical issues as these are demonstrated in the development of social policies and programs, with special attention to the Episcopal Church and its evolving attitudes about economic systems, racism, sexism, and human sexuality. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As announced HTH254 Christian Discipleship in a Consumer society (1 unit) Explores trinitarian perspectives on living in a consumer society. Attention will focus on issues of time, desire, material reality, and sacrament. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Hoffmeyer electives HTH300 Trinitarian Theology (1 unit) An examination of the classical development and contemporary revitalization of the doctrine of the Trinity, with an emphasis on using the doctrine of the Trinity as a lens for focusing

HTH304 eschatology (1 unit) An examination of the Church’s teaching on last things. Topics like death and resurrection, judgment and eternal life, and the end of the world are examined in their relevance for preaching the Gospel today. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As announced HTH305 Theology of Time and space (1 unit) A trinitarian approach to how the categories of time and space function in contemporary North American society. Among the issues addressed will be (a) time and space in mass consumer society; (b) space-time in relativistic cosmology; (c) the transformation of time and space in an electronic culture; (d) alternative constructions of space and time as forms of practical theological contestation; (e) space, time, and liturgy. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Hoffmeyer HTH307 Theology and sciences (1 unit) Developments in modern science will be examined for their theological relevance. Possibilities of dialogue between science and theology (e.g. in cosmology, physics, and biology) will be discussed. Topics will be studied from a historical perspective, as well as for their relevance for public discourse. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rivera HTH309 Human being in black: Theological anthropology from a black Perspective (1 unit) An exploration of what theological anthropology “looks” like when the explicit starting point is Black existence in America. The thesis of this project is that there will be a substantially different account that emerges about what it means to be human if the referent point is located in the experience of Black persons. Seminar engagements will include reflections on theological texts, as well as literary and philosophical works. (Pre-requisite: HTH100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Ray HTH310 Modern anglican Theology (1 unit) A study of post-Enlightenment Anglican theological responses to Christian discomfort about the nature of faith in the face of the challenges of “modernity,” including the “conservative” Anglo-Catholic (“high Church”) theology of the Oxford Movement and the “secular” Liberal Catholic (“broad Church”) theology occasioned by historical criticism of the Bible and scientific Darwinism. The work of 19th- and 20th-century figures is traced. Throughout, the focus is the contribution of Anglican theology to that faith seeking understanding in the midst of “modern” times. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As announced HTH311 Poets, Mystics, and Theologians (1 unit) From Julian of Norwich to Desmond Tutu and Rowan Williams, through Richard Hooker, George Herbert, John Milton, Jeremy Taylor, William Law, John and Charles Wesley, William Gladstone, William Porcher DuBose, Evelyn Underhill, T.S. Eliot, William Temple, C.S. Lewis, 

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theological and ethical reflection in the context of ministry. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Hoffmeyer

Course offerings

Austin Farrer, and many another, the course engages the writings of these “Anglicans” in a survey of the tradition and their search in different and similar words for the presence of God and holiness. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Borsch HTH314 The Theology of Gustavo Gutiérrez: liberation, language, solidarity (1/2/ unit) Selected writings of Liberation theologian Gustavo Gutiérrez are examined for his contributions to theological method and discourse as well as for his assessment of the human situation. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rivera HTH315l latin american Theology (1 unit) A reading of the main writings of Latin American theologians with the major focus on the works of Gutiérrez, Sobrino, and Ivone Gebara. Liberation theology is the major component of reading assignments, but other issues explored include spirituality, ministry, dogmatics, and the phenomenon of postmodernism in religion and theology. (Pre-requisite: HTH100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Rivera HTH317 black Theology (1 unit) A review of the historical development of the Black Theology movement that arose during the 1960’s as a theological response to the Black Power movement. We will read texts of the dominant voices in this movement, including James Cone, J.Deotis Roberts, Dwight Hopkins and others. We will also become familiar with movements such as Womanist Theology that emerged from, and in response to, the Black Theology movement. A major goal of this class is to trace Black Theology’s development as a distinct form of liberation theology in the American contexts. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Ray HTH318 Theology and Praxis of Martin luther King, Jr. (1 unit) Engagement with the work of Martin Luther King, Jr., with specific reference to his witness as a praxiological theologian. The working thesis of this course is that particular insight can be gained by approaching King as primarily a pastor/theologian engaged in the work of discipleship. Our engagement with King will begin with the proposition that neither he, nor his work, can be adequately understood apart from a multilayered analysis of his sermonic, theological, political and economic interventions. Consequently, the course will explore King’s legacy by reading his works and listening to his sermons. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Ray HTH320 The authority of scripture (1 unit) This interdisciplinary course examines traditional ways of defining the authority of scripture, and looks at factors in the study of scripture, systematic theological reflection, intellectual history, and cultural criticism which have brought scriptural authority into question in modern times. The course also explores contemporary proposals aimed at redefining scripture, its use in theological reflection, and its function in the life of the Church. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Drs. Rajashekar and Robinson
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

HTH322 Theology of the book of Common Prayer (1 unit) A study of the history, development, and contemporary significance of the Anglican prayer book. As announced HTH323 Issues in Contemporary ecclesiology (1 unit) A re-examination of the doctrine of the Church in light of contemporary ecumenical, missiological, and sociocultural developments. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rajashekar HTH325 20th- and 21st-Century Theology and Implications for Ministry (1 unit) An exploration of the methodologies of several 20th- and 21st-century theologians and the implications for parish practice. Selections from Barth, Tillich, Niebuhr, Bonhoeffer, Bultmann, Ebeling, Moltmann, Pannenberg, Rahner, and from liberation, African American, feminist, and Asian theologies and post-modern theologians. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Krych HTH328l U.s. latino/a Theology and Ministry (1 unit) A survey and study of theological literature by and about Latinos/as in the United States. Utilizes different tools and perspectives in the analysis of selected writings and looks at the social and ecclesiastical experiences behind them. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Rivera HTH331l elements of luther’s Theology (latino) (1 unit) A critical analysis of a number of Luther’s theological and exegetical writings. Selection of texts focuses on those topics still relevant to contemporary discussion on Luther’s life and thought as well as to our ecumenical context. (Pre-requisites: Spanish reading proficiency, HTH100 and HCH100 or HCH210) Dr. Rivera HTH332l Theology of the lutheran Confessions (spanish) (1 unit) An introduction to the Book of Concord through the critical reading of its documents, both in their historical context and with a view to their relevance for contemporary church life and mission as well as for current ecumenical dialogues. Available for on-line participation. (Pre-requisites: Spanish reading proficiency, HTH100, and HCH100) Dr. Rivera HTH334 Theology of Paul Tillich (1 unit) An extended introduction to the thought of Paul Tillich, one of the more influential theologians on the American scene during much of the 20th century. The course objectives are: 1) to become familiar with the broad outlines of Tillich’s project, 2) we will review the method Tillich deployed in order to accomplish his work, and 3) to begin to explore the content that Tillich gives to the traditional Christian doctrines of God, Christology, Anthropology, and Ecclesiology. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Ray HTH334a Tillich’s Theology and Parish Practice (1/2 unit) An examination of Paul Tillich’s theological method of correlation and its application in Tillich’s systematic theology and proposals for teaching and preaching. 

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HTH335b african american Theology (1 unit) A look at the origins and development of African American theological tradition with reference to the writings of prominent African American theologians in the history of the Church and in modern times. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Fulfills Christology requirement for students in the Black Church concentration. Dr. Ray HTH337 schleiermacher and Modern Theology (1 unit) The theology of the German ecumenical theologian, Friedrich Schleiermacher, as articulated in his major work, Christian Faith, and its use in considering major questions and themes in modern theology. Using the presupposition that an understanding of such questions and themes is integral to constructive theological work in contemporary, so-called postmodern contexts, the course aims to equip students for theological leadership in today’s churches. (Prerequisite: HTH100) Dr. Hoffmeyer HTH338 Theology of Reinhold niebuhr (1 unit) An extended introduction to the thought of Reinhold Niebuhr, one of the more influential ethicists on the American scene during much of the 20th century. We will be concerned to trace not only the development of his theology, but also to place it in the larger Protestant tradition of modernity. Another aim of our inquiry is to understand his social theory, its relationship to the Augustinian tradition of social theory and its implications for contemporary theological work. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Ray HTH339 The bonhoeffer seminar (1 unit) Periodic seminars considering various aspects of the life, ministry, and theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. The specific focus is announced in registration information. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) As announced HTH341 lutherans in ecumenical Dialogue (1 unit) A review of Lutheran involvement in various bilateral conversations with other Christian communions (Roman Catholic, Reformed, Episcopal, Orthodox, Methodist, etc.), both at the international level and in the United States. Through a thematic analysis of such dialogues and the agreed statements they have produced, the course aims to identify the emerging Lutheran profile in the ecumenical scene, as well as to explore the implications of these dialogues for redefining Lutheran identity and ministry. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Fulfills ecumenical option requirement. Dr. Rajashekar HTH343 The ecumenical Movement (1 or ½ unit as announced) The vision, history and mission of the ecumenical movement as embodied and facilitated through the World Council of Churches. Contemporary ecumenical issues/concerns, such as inter-church cooperation, church unity, cultural and religious plurality, justice and ecology will be discussed. Fulfills

HTH345 ecumenism: Prayer and Theology (1 unit) A study of the ecumenical movement through its history and theology, both within and outside institutional manifestations. Particular attention will be given to contemporary ecumenical concerns seen through the lens of worship and theology in conjunction with justice and ecology. The course engages the question how ecumenism may redefine Christian identity and ministry. Fulfills ecumenical option requirement. Dr. Lange HTH350 Understanding Mission Today (1 unit) The nature and function of the Church’s mission are examined in light of the history and theology of Christian missions. Contemporary issues and challenges in Christian mission are analyzed with a view to formulating new styles of confessing Christ today. As announced HTH360 World Religions (1 unit) A broad overview of major world religions is indispensable for those engaged in Christian ministry. In addition to introducing the historical origins, beliefs, and developments in each religious tradition, the course will focus attention on the self-understanding of the various religious communities as expressed in their sacred stories, their basic ideas about life, and their ritual and ethical practices. Fulfills the interfaith option requirement. Dr. Rajashekar or as announced HTH362 Christian encounters with other faiths (1 unit) An examination of the contemporary challenges involved in relating the Christian faith to other living faiths. Biblical perspectives on other faiths, the nature and scope of inter-religious dialogue, and selected issues in the light of contemporary efforts in dialogue receive attention. The implications of religious pluralism for pastoral ministry and Christian mission are explored. (Pre-requisite: HTH360 or permission of the instructor) Fulfills the interfaith option requirement. Dr. Rajashekar HTH363 Issues in Interreligious Dialogue (1/2 unit) An examination of theological issues in Christian witness and dialogue with people of other religious traditions in the context of contemporary religious pluralism. Fulfills the interfaith option requirement. Dr. Rajashekar HTH364 scriptures of the World: authority and Hermeneutics (1 unit) An exploration of the authority, exegesis, and hermeneutics of Scriptures, sacred texts, and holy books of major world religions from phenomenological, cross-cultural, and theological perspectives. (Pre-requisite: HTH360 or permission of the instructor) Fulfills the interfaith option requirement. Dr. Rajashekar HTH371 Jewish-Christian Relations (1 unit) An examination of the history of Jewish-Christian encounters and the emerging theological stance of Churches on Jews and Judaism in the post-Holocaust era. Fulfills the interfaith option requirement. As announced HTH373 Islam and Muslim-Christian Relations (1 unit) An introduction to the world of Islam, and an
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(Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Krych

ecumenical option requirement. As announced

Course offerings

exploration of the interactions between Christians and Muslims in history. The implications of presentday Islamic revival for Christian-Muslim relations also receive attention. Fulfills the interfaith option requirement. Dr. Rajashekar HTH380 Introduction to Process Theology (1 unit) An introduction to the 20th-century theological movement known as Process or Relational theology. Through a close reading of early texts of the movement and a review of the social context within which it arose, seminar participants will be invited to a full engagement with this theological tradition. The purpose will be to identify not only the discrete contours of the movement, but also its place in late 20th-century theological discourse. (Pre-requisite: HTH100) Dr. Ray  HTH386 Religion and Holocaust (1 unit) An attempt to interpret the ways that the Christian faith both participated in and resisted two instances of holocaust in modernity: the conquest of the New World and the assault on the Jews by the Nazi regime. Dr. Ray HTH390 spiritual autobiography (1 unit) From Paul and Augustine to Thomas Merton and Frederick Buechner through Teresa of Avila, George Herbert, Gandhi, Dorothy Day, Dag Hammarskjold, C.S. Lewis, Simone Weil, R.S. Thomas, the course instructor and others, we shall reflect on the interior life, prayer and sense of the Spirit of God as well as the life circumstances of these figures and ask questions about their spirituality and theology and our own. Dr. Borsch

Christian assembly electives ICa304 narrative and Imagination in Preaching (1 unit) Why are some sermons never too long? This course will expand the preacher’s sensibilities about how a sermon might approach beauty as defined by economy, tension, and elegance. Readings will include at least one novel. Students will be expected to preach. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Quivik ICa305 liturgical Preaching (1 unit) Preaching exists in a context situated within and defined in part by the liturgical year and the 3-year Revised Common Lectionary. We will explore how the year, the texts, the sermon shape, and the contemporary situation inform each other in theory and in practice. Students will be expected to preach. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Quivik ICa310 Purposes of Preaching (1 unit) Why preach? How has the Church answered that question, and what have different denominations and congregations practiced? This course examines the history and theology of the various aims for preaching—biblical and philosophical. Students will be expected to preach. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Quivik ICa311 Preacher as Theologian (1 unit) The role of the pastor as theologian, as interpreter and translator of Christian doctrine, will be the focus of this course. Special attention will be given to “practical theological thinking” that identifies the relationships between theology and daily human experience. Literature will be one vehicle that will be used to consider how theology becomes embodied. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Lange ICa320b Preaching in black Church Contexts (1 unit) Orientation and introduction to the theology, method, and practice of the oral communication of the Gospel in the contemporary Black Church. Exploration of the development of hermeneutical homiletic practices for which the Black Church has a long and storied history. Students will hear sermons from that historical past and develop their own manuscripts for classroom delivery. As announced ICa330 Preaching law and Gospel: luther on baptism and eucharist (1 unit) A close study of Luther’s preaching on both baptism and the eucharist. Particular attention will be given 1) to the ways in which Luther accesses the distinction between Law and Gospel and 2) to Luther’s re-writing of subject and context (life’s narrative) in his preaching on the sacraments. Students will also be engaged in the practice of sermon preparation and delivery. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Lange

INTEgRATIvE: CHRIsTIan asseMblY
MDiv Core Requirements ICa100 Introduction to Christian assembly 1 (1 unit) The theology of Word and Sacrament, its sources and practices. An introduction to enacted Christian symbols, exploring early documents and more recent ecumenical sources for liturgical renewal. As announced ICa101 Introduction to Christian assembly 2 (1 unit) The theology of Word and Sacrament, its sources and practices, with a focus on the proclamation of the Word through presiding and preaching. (Pre-requisite or corequisite: BNT101 or BNT111) As announced MDiv students of the Black Church (UTI) concentration may take the following course in lieu of ICA100. ICa150b Worship in the black Church (1 unit) Explores the history of worship in the Black Church, from slave narratives to rural and town-and-country settings to the contemporary experience of urban America. The development of worship styles for congregations with deep history and the planning for worship services to address the needs of an unchurched society will be a part of this course. As announced.

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ICa331 Preaching Resurrection (1 unit) What is the gospel? What is the resurrection? How do preachers express the promises of the crucified and resurrected Christ to a world that loves the law? This class will pay close attention to biblical and theological writings about resurrection, theories of atonement, and careful attention to sermon language. (Pre-requisite: IHM100 or ICA101) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Quivik ICa332 Preaching the Three-Day feast (1 unit) This class will explore the specific theological and ritual characteristics of this core liturgical event for Christian life. The passion, death and resurrection of Christ are at the heart of Christian life. What is proclamation during these days? How is preaching on Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, the Easter Vigil unique and yet connected? (Prerequisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Lange ICa355 life Passages and liturgy (1 unit) Funerals, weddings, healing, and reconciliation liturgies. Using theoretical readings, examination of liturgies, and preaching, the class will explore how and on what bases these liturgical events are planned, conducted, and preached. Students will be expected to preach. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 or equivalent) Enrollment limited to 12. Dr. Quivik ICa356 baptism and Initiation (1 unit) A study of the history, meaning, and congregational practice of rites for entrance into the Christian community. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 or equivalent) Dr. Quivik / Dr. Lange ICa360 sources for liturgical Renewal: Readings in the History of the liturgy (1 unit) An exploration, through a re-reading of primary, historical liturgical texts, of how different communities have searched for a language to witness to the Christ event and of what that witness means for our liturgical celebrations today. (Prerequisites: ICA100 or equivalent) Dr. Lange ICa361 bible and liturgy (1 unit) The scriptural origins of Christian liturgy and of the role of the Bible and biblical imagery in the liturgy are examined. Subjects of study include liturgical typology, liturgical hermeneutics, the history and structure of the lectionary, and the ministry of reading. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 or equivalent) Dr. Lange ICa363 lectionary and liturgical Year (1 unit) By studying historical and liturgical documents, this course will explore how the lectionary developed, how the lectionary is related to liturgical time, and how time and its uses influence theological, liturgical, and pastoral conceptions. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 or equivalent) Dr. Quivik ICa370 liturgy in luther’s Writings (1 unit) A look at how Luther frames theological debate for his time through liturgical language and how that trace can influence current understanding of liturgical theology and

ICa371 eucharistic Hermeneutics (1 unit) This course will explore the genealogy of the Eucharistic in western and eastern spiritual and liturgical discipline. Special emphasis will be given to Luther’s radical departure in eucharistic hermeneutics—a departure echoed in postmodern philosophy. Questions pertaining to postmodern liturgy will also be approached. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 or equivalent) Dr. Lange ICa374 liturgical aesthetics (1 unit) A look at how the Sunday morning experience has been interpreted theologically throughout the church’s life, and an examination of questions of liturgical interpretation today through a lens that deals with sign and participation of the interpreter in the creation of meaning. (Pre-requisites: ICA100 and 101 or equivalent) Dr. Quivik ICa510 Prayer and Resistance. (1 unit) A look at daily public prayer as a form of resistance to oppression, whether visible or hidden. Particular attention will be given to the work of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Oscar Romero, and others, who have engaged in liturgical resistance. Specific examples of resistance through prayer will also be studied. What form can such a prayer take in our current situation? (Open to seniors only; satisfies the senior seminar in public theology requirement of the new curriculum) Dr. Lange 

INTEgRATIvE: CHRIsTIan eDUCaTIon
MDiv Core Requirement (also required for MaR Christian education specialization) ICe100 Introduction to Christian education (1 unit) A basic introduction to the theological foundations of Christian education (particularly those of the ELCA), teaching methods, curriculum content, and the relation of developmental theory to Christian education. Basic theory is related to practical aspects of educational ministry in the Church today. Curricula of all denominations represented in the class are covered. Dr. Krych Christian education electives ICe301 Preschool education in the Congregation (1 unit) Reading and reflection on nursery school and daycare in the congregation together with observation and participation in an approved preschool program. (Prerequisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych ICe302 educational Ministry with Children (1 unit) An examination of the Church’s ministry with children, including theological basis, advanced developmental theory, advanced methods, development of balanced parish programs, first communion, worship with children, special education, and incorporation of children into the life of the congregation. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych

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liturgical practice. (Pre-requisite: ICA100 or equivalent) Dr. Lange

Course offerings

ICe303 Confirmation and Youth Ministries (1 unit) A study of theological foundations of confirmation and youth ministry, teaching and catechetics, psychology of adolescence, theory and practical guidance in ministries to, with, and by youth. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych ICe304 Confirmation Ministry (1 unit) An examination of the Lutheran understanding of confirmation, psychological development of junior high youths, and the content and methods of catechetical instruction. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych ICe306 Christian education for Children and Youth with special needs (1 unit) Addresses those children and youth related to a congregation who exhibit “precarious to problematic behaviors” or “special needs”. Includes techniques and methodologies for promoting spiritual development within the child/youth’s life experience. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) As announced. ICe310 educational Ministry with adults (1 unit) A consideration of various aspects of educational ministry with adults, including theological foundations, learning settings, learning theory, stages of adulthood, methods, and group dynamics. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych ICe320 educational Practice in the Parish (1 unit) An examination of the purpose, possibilities and problems of the various forms and activities of educational ministry in the local congregation, with a view to creative planning, administration, and evaluation of a comprehensive parish education program. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych ICe321 advanced Teaching Methods (1 unit) An examination of a variety of teaching methods and procedures which can be used in Christian education. Observation of methods in a variety of school systems. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych ICe322 Curriculum Development (1 unit) Basic theory in developing curriculum for Christian education, including overall planning, unit planning, developing courses, writing materials, and evaluating curricula. (Pre-requisite: ICE100 or permission of instructor) Dr. Krych

to a social analysis of some of the complex issues confronting the Church and our society. Dr. Day Metropolitan/Urban Ministry Concentration Courses ICs250C The Church in the City (1 unit) Drawing on all the disciplines—biblical, historical, practical, and theological—this course is designed to develop an understanding of the Church’s vocation in the urban context. Dr. Day and Staff ICs251C Understanding the City (1 unit) An examination of how cities work and the systems that drive them: economic, political, cultural, public and private interests. The role of the Church in effecting change is an overarching theme throughout the course. Dr. Day and Staff ICs252C Models of Urban Ministry (1 unit) An examination of a variety of theoretical and practical approaches to ministry in the city which matches contexts, issues, and needs with the particular resources of congregations and their leadership. Dr. Krey and Staff ICs520C Issues in Urban Ministry (1/2 unit) An integrative seminar for seniors, which gives the opportunity to pursue and share research in a particular area of interest. (Seniors only) Dr. Day Church in society electives ICs304 economic ethics (1 unit) An examination of the economics, experience, and meaning of work in our society. The role of the Church as it ministers with employed and unemployed workers, works for economic justice, and appropriates a meaningful “Theology of Work.” Dr. Day ICs323 The Challenge of Race in Church and society (1 unit) Explores the current state of multicultural social relations in the U. S. and examines different approaches to building communication and healing conflict between racial groups, including faith-based efforts which incorporate political mobilization and organized volunteerism. Dr. Day ICs502 sociology of Religion (1 unit) An exploration of the ways in which religion functions within society from both theoretical and sociological perspectives. Particular attention will be given to the contemporary realities of multi-cultural and religious pluralism, class stratification, and individualism. Students pursue individual research on an issue of particular interest. (Finalyear students only) Dr. Day ICs503 Current Trends in Religious Research (1 unit) An intensive seminar which explores recent findings in sociological research of Church growth, “Baby Boomers,” African American Churches, and social ministries. How do these current research trends fit into the field of sociology of religion? What do they tell us about the future of the Church? Class presentations are required, as is a paper in a particular area of interest. (Final-year students only) Dr. Day 

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INTEgRATIvE: CHURCH In soCIeTY
Required ICs100 The Church in society (1 unit) At the beginning of the new millennium, the relationship between religion and society has re-emerged as a critical social dynamic, both globally as well as in North American culture. This course will lay the foundations for a critical understanding of this relationship from a faith perspective. Drawing on both theological and sociological sources the course will move from theoretical constructs

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

INTEgRATIvE: ConTeXTUal eDUCaTIon
MDiv Core Requirements first-Year field education (Rotation): Students observe parish life in a variety of urban/suburban congregations, exploring all facets of parish and/or institutional ministry, including public worship, models of pastoral leadership, models of evangelism, stewardship, role of the laity, decision-making styles, social ministry, and ministry in various contexts. Each student is assigned to a group that attends designated parishes/ministries together and meets with a facilitator for reflection each week. Requires satisfactory participation in Sunday morning worship experiences and in a Field Education Reflection Group. Ife100 field education 1a, First Year, First Semester (1/4 unit) Ms. Bell Ife101 field education 1b, First Year, Second Semester (1/4 unit) Dr. Leonard first-Year field education (site): With permission of the Director of Contextual Education, particular students in unusual circumstances may be assigned to designated parishes or institutions for supervised experience in ministry to persons through public worship and visitation. Student may or may not serve in the same assignment for both years of field education experience. Requires concurrent satisfactory participation in a Field Education Reflection Group. Ife110 field education 1a, First Year, First Semester (1/4 unit) Mr. Bugno Ife111 field education 1b, First Year, Second Semester (1/4 unit) Mr. Bugno Ife112 field education 1, First Year, double credit (1/2 unit) With permission, selected students may be able to complete two quarters of Field Education within one term, including Summer Term. Mr. Bugno Ife150 field education equivalency (1 unit) Credit may be issued to MDiv students who have served fulltime in parish ministry for at least three to five years. Requires that the student submit to the Contextual Education Office documentation of his/her ministry experience by no later than one week prior to the beginning of a semester in which the student would otherwise register for field education. Consult the Director of Contextual Education for details. Ms. Bell second-Year field education: Supervised experience in congregations and institutions focusing on participation in worship leadership, preaching, pastoral care, youth ministry, parish education, congregational decision-making, and social ministry. Weekly theological reflection

Ife200 field education 2a, Second-Year, First Semester (1/4 unit) Mr. Bugno Ife201 field education 2b, Second-Year, Second Semester (1/4 unit) Mr. Bugno Ife202 field education 2, Second Year, double credit (1/2 unit) With permission, selected students may be able to complete two quarters of Field Education within one term, including Summer Term. (1/2 unit) Mr. Bugno MaR Core Requirements Ife160 Ministry action/Reflection, First Semester (1/4 unit) The standard contextual education requirement in the MAR program, this is defined by a contract negotiated among student, advisor, and a supervisor or mentor in the student’s proposed ministerial context. It is a combination of contextual education and practicum with supervision and disciplined reflection. Dr. Leonard Ife161 Ministry action/Reflection, Second Semester (1/4 unit) Continuation of IFE160. Dr. Leonard MaR liturgy and Music specialization Requirements Ife170 Ministry action/Reflection for Musicians (first Year) (1/2 unit) Supervised experience in congregations, focusing on musical leadership of congregational song and the role of instruments and voices in the liturgy. With permission, may be satisfied in the congregation of the student’s employ or call. Mr. Mummert Ife270 Ministry action/Reflection for Musicians (second Year) (1/2 unit) Supervised experience in congregations, focusing on building clergy/musician relationships that lead toward careful planning of parish liturgies and fostering pastoral leadership of the musician in the life of the congregation. Placement may be in the congregation of the student’s employ or call. Mr. Mummert 

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INTEgRATIvE: lITURGY anD MUsIC
MaR specialization Core Requirements IlM100 Introduction to Music in the Church (1 unit) An initial study of Christian ritual music through the ages. Mr. Mummert liturgical ensemble (1/4 unit) Participation in a musical ensemble serving the seminary’s Chapel liturgies. The class includes a weekly evening rehearsal. Open for credit only to MAR students in the Liturgy and Music concentration. Mr. Mummert IlM110 liturgical ensemble Ia, First Year, First Semester.

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ICs505 Current ethical Issues (1 unit) A seminar for selected students in cooperation with the School of Social Work, University of Pennsylvania. (Final-year students, by invitation only) As announced

with the supervising pastor is required. All students must make arrangements through the Contextual Education Office for site assignments, and all site assignments must be approved by the Faculty. Learning covenants are required prior to beginning the course.

Course offerings

IlM111 liturgical ensemble Ib, First Year, Second Semester. The second year of ensemble includes conducting instruction and opportunities with the seminary’s ensembles. IlM210 liturgical ensemble IIa, Second Year, First Semester. IlM211 liturgical ensemble IIb, Second Year, Second Semester. liturgical Music leadership (1/4 unit) Weekly 45-minute individual private lesson on the student’s principal musical instrument or voice with attention toward leading congregational song and providing appropriate musical environment to the liturgy. Open for credit only to MAR students in the Liturgy and Music concentration. Mr. Mummert IlM120 liturgical Music leadership Ia, First Year, First Semester. IlM121 liturgical Music leadership Ib, First Year, Second Semester. IlM220 liturgical Music leadership IIa, Second Year, First Semester. IlM221 liturgical Music leadership IIb, Second Year, Second Semester. electives IlM301 Musical Resources for the Congregation (1 unit) A practical survey of the resources available for the practice of Christian ritual music in a broad ecumenical context. Special attention is paid to ordering ritual music around the principal patterns of Christian liturgy, the lectionary, and congregational pastoral concerns. Mr. Mummert IlM302 The Development of Christian Hymnody (1 unit) An historical study of the hymnody of the Church with particular attention to the selection and use of hymns in the congregation. Resources for the cultivation of a diverse and musically developed congregational repertoire are explored. Mr. Mummert IlM304 Musical and Theological aspects of bach Church Cantatas (1 unit) Through listening to and analyzing selected sacred cantatas of Johann Sebastian Bach, this course builds an appreciation of music as a resource of the Church and consider Bach’s contribution as the culmination of a musical era. The study of Bach’s use of the musical language to convey theological concepts creates an understanding of the importance of this period of the Church. Mr. Mummert IlM305 lutheran Hymnody (1/2 unit) An examination of the particular contribution that Lutheran hymns and songs have made to the history, theology, and music of the Church. Attention will be given to the historical origins of such hymns, to the development of the
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chorale, and to contemporary congregational singing. Dr. Wengert and Mr. Mummert

INTEgRATIvE: PasToRal THeoloGY
MDiv Core Requirement IPC100 Introduction to Pastoral Care (1 unit) An introduction to the fundamentals of pastoral care, including how to respond in common pastoral, sacramental, and crisis situations. Students develop a theological framework for understanding their own pastoral identity, the meaning of care of persons, and the pastoral role of Christian community. Attention is given to professional ethics, making appropriate referrals, and the spiritual importance of self-care and boundaries. Weekly sections focus on practicing specific listening and responding skills. Dr. Cooper-White or as announced Pastoral Theology electives IPC200b Clinical Practicum (1 unit) Pastoral care in a clinical (hospital) setting. Open only to students of the pre2004-05 UTI curriculum. As announced IPC301 Death, Dying, and bereavement (1 unit) An in-depth exploration of the physical, emotional, and spiritual dimensions of death and dying, and the process of bereavement, in the context of pastoral theology. Students explore the skill and art of ministering to the dying and the bereaved, and develop their own theological framework for understanding and facing terminal illness, life-threatening violence, and death. How to pastor to diverging beliefs about evil, suffering, and life after death is considered. (Pre-requisite: IPC100 or equivalent) Dr. Cooper-White or as announced IPC302 Relationships, Marriage, and family (1 unit) Pastoral care of persons in the context of intimate relationships, marriage, and family. Practical skills include premarital preparation, parent guidance, and crisis intervention with couples and families. Through readings, case studies, and personal reflection, students gain an understanding of intergenerational family dynamics as they impact individuals, couples, families, and congregations, and articulate a theological framework for addressing issues of intimacy and family life. (Pre-requisite: IPC100 or equivalent) Dr. Cooper-White IPC314 Human Development in faith Perspective (1 unit) An introduction to human development, particularly as it shapes and undergirds faith and belief systems. This course is designed to equip students to attune preaching, teaching, small group ministries, and pastoral care to the individual faith journeys of parishioners. Participants learn to assess developmental “growing edges” and to foster conditions within a community to support growth in faith in a postmodern context. Students will explore how development influences theological conviction and the developmental aspects of faith positions, including their own. (Pre-requisite: IPC100 or equivalent) Dr. Cooper-White 

IPC320 Pastoral Care with Women (1 unit) The importance of gender-sensitive pastoral care has been increasingly recognized as basic to pastoral competency. Students explore both cultural/social/ political contexts of women’s reality, and inner dimensions of women’s experience, spirituality and “women’s ways of knowing.” Special topics include women’s life cycle, balancing work and relationships, responding to violence against women, depression in women, and the pastoral impact of theological issues such as sacrifice, forgiveness, empowerment and liberation. (Pre-requisite: IPC100 or equivalent) Dr. Cooper-White IPC370 Psychopathology and the Parish Pastor: Pastoral assessment (1 unit) An introduction to psychopathology as it affects parish life and pastoral care. Students become familiar with the major diagnostic categories of psychological and emotional disease, with a view toward making appropriate pastoral interventions, and knowing when and how to refer to community resources. Crisis intervention and the role of psychopathology in parish conflict are also considered. (Pre-requisites: IPC100 or equivalent and CPE; some pastoral experience preferred) Dr. Cooper-White

IPP203 stewardship (1 or 1/2 unit, as announced) Exploring the patterns of voluntary support of American Christianity, students look at the teaching methods used by congregations in encouraging support of the ministry of local congregations. The biblical basis for that teaching comprises much of the course content. Mr. Stewart Three ministry seminars, totaling ½ unit, are required of each MDiv student of the pre-2004-05 curriculum. They may be taken as free electives by other first professional students. IPP400 Ministry seminars (1/6 unit) Each six-hour seminar addresses a topic of concern specific to the practice of ministry, e.g. the new pastorate, leadership styles, conflict resolution, stewardship. Seminar leadership is provided by teams of seminary faculty and parish practitioners. Some advance reading and a brief reflection paper are required. As announced Seminars offered to date have included the following: IPP401 Dynamics of Congregational Process IPP404 Church Growth IPP406 Using the Web for Parish Communications IPP407 Prison Ministry IPP408 skills for Productive Conflict IPP412 Youth Ministry IPP413 Church leadership IPP415 Market and Technology in the Church IPP420 Weddings and funerals IPP499 Ministry seminar: Independent Project Because dialogue with colleagues is an important dimension of ministry seminars, the normative expectation is registration for the scheduled offerings each year. Occasionally, however, a compelling case can be made by an individual student to adapt a distinctive structured experience as a seminar. Application must be made to the Dean in advance of the project. This provision does not allow for retroactive adoption of previous experience. Parish Practice electives IPP310 Personal and Church finances (1 or 1/2 unit, as announced) Students are assisted in coming to an understanding of Christian stewardship. Particular emphasis is placed on budgeting, fund raising, deferred giving, and managing one’s personal finances. Mr. Stewart 

INTEgRATIvE: PaRIsH PRaCTICe/leaDeRsHIP
MDiv Core Requirement One of the following courses is required of all ELCA students returning from internship. IPP500 The Pastor as Theologian (1/2 unit) The internship, required by the ELCA, is utilized for focused learning and to set the stage for the final seminary year. The course builds on the sharing of specific internship situations or special field education settings, moves into case studies arising out of this contextual educational experience, engages in theological and practical reflection, and works toward developing vision and strategies for ministry. Mr. Stewart et al. IPP502 The Pastor as Theologian (1 unit) A full-unit version of IPP500 specifically for students of the prior curriculum. Mr. Stewart et al. Parish Practice options. The MDiv degree requires completion of one unit from among the following courses. IPP201 Church administration (1 unit) The focus of the course is on the preparation for the administration of a congregation, particularly the identification of shared leadership with laity for evangelism, stewardship, and for program planning, execution and evaluation. Pastoral responsibilities for priority setting, church and personal finances, and identification of skills among the laity are emphasized. Mr. Stewart IPP202 evangelism (1 or 1/2 unit, as announced) Evangelism is the heart of sharing the Gospel. In this course, personal witness, biblical motivation, and congregational participation are viewed through readings

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and assigned visitations. As a structured part of the course, students research, analyze, and observe styles of evangelism in congregational life in contemporary America. Mr. Stewart

Course offerings

IPP315 The Church and Money: a Theology of stewardship and fundraising (1/2 unit) A comprehensive discussion of stewardship of resources in a congregation with a focus on the biblical and theological understandings of God’s abundant gifts to us and our Christian freedom to give in response. The class will not look at particular methods but at approaches and styles, focusing on how one helps a congregation and individuals grow in their stewardship to the mission of the congregation and the church. Other issues will include how one conducts a congregational campaign, how one cultivates planned and deferred gifts, and the role of a congregational endowment. Dr. Krey et al. IPP340 Communications and the local Congregation (1 unit) An exploration of the current images of the Church and the media. The course focuses on the development of images of how local congregations can be involved in using the mass media, newspapers, radio, television, and cable. Participation may include attendance at a communication conference, if available. Mr. Stewart IPP341 Media literacy (1 unit) A study of the interplay between entertainment environment, the culture of our society, and of Christianity with those who struggle to live faithful lives. Music, movies, television, and interactive media will be parts of the learning areas explored. Available to distance learners when offered. Mr. Stewart IPP360 Theology for Ministry with Youth (1 unit) An examination of the diverse theological resources for ministry with young people, primarily those of high school age. Starting from the assumption that young persons are theological agents, the course will survey some of the best recent writing on teens—and some by teens!—from various developmental, cultural and theological perspectives. In engagement with these texts we will seek to develop theological approaches to ministry with youth that value, challenge, and nurture young persons as fellow witnesses to the gospel. (Note: This course is not just for those with extensive youth ministry experience or those preparing for specializations in youth or educational ministry.) (Prerequisite: HTH100) Dr. Hoffmeyer/Mr. Bixby sPeCIal/UnDesIGnaTeD Required sGn100 Prolog (1 unit) An integrative introduction to seminary studies focusing on how to “think theologically” in the present context of cultural diversity and religious pluralism. Sessions are designed to facilitate transition to theological education, to assist in vocational discernment, and to provide exposure to various aspects of Christian public witness in today’s world. Staff All new first professional students are required to participate in the Prolog, and the expectation is that students will adjust their schedules to take the entire two-week program. For those students for

whom the two-week seminar poses an extreme hardship, however, it is possible to obtain credit by taking the Prolog in two segments, as follows. sGn100a Introduction to Theological education and seminary life (1/2 unit) sGn100b Public Witness in a Pluralistic Context (1/2 unit) formation Group The purpose of formation groups is to provide a setting for the nurturing of intentional spiritual disciplines and health and wellness priorities. They serve as a model of the small group process and as a safe place where questions of spirituality, discernment, and vocation can be explored. Integration of classroom learning, field education, and community life into ongoing vocational reflection is also a goal of these groups. The program is two semesters in length, normally in a full-time student’s second year of study or after a part-time student has completed at least ten units of study. sGn210 formation Group 1, first semester (1/4 unit) As announced sGn211 formation Group 2, second semester (1/4 unit) As announced senior seminars in Public Theology: special Topics (1 unit) A seminar in which selected students address a topic in the life of the Church by combining critical analysis with participation in a conference or field practicum. Enrollment limited to 10 final-year students. In 2006-07 the seminars will be: HTH534 Tillich and Public Theology An extended introduction to the thought of Paul Tillich, one of the more influential theologians on the American scene during much of the 20th century. The seminar will pay particular attention to Tillich’s legacy as a public theologian in times of global chaos and reconstruction. Dr. Ray ICs323 The Challenge of Race in Church and society Explores the current state of multicultural social relations in the U. S. and examines different approaches to building communication and healing conflict between racial groups, including faith-based efforts which incorporate political mobilization and organized volunteerism. Dr. Day IPP520 a Multicultural society engaging a Monocultural Church An exploration of the present state of multiculturalism in our churches and the impact of an increasingly multicultural society on the future of the church. Looking at a number of congregations that claim to be multicultural, students will ask, “What is a ‘multicultural’ congregation?” “What are the challenges of multiculturalism in the areas of worship, community, and parish practice?” Dr. Leonard 

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Global/ecumenical/Interfaith options. The MDiv degree requires completion of one-half unit in each of these three areas. The MAR degree requires completion of one-half unit in at least one of the three areas. Course offerings vary each year, and other courses in the Catalog may be designated to fulfill various of these requirements. The following courses may be expected to be offered on a regular basis. Additional such courses include many among HTH341-375 and others as announced each year. sGn150 Global Travel seminar (1 or 1/2 unit) The seminary offers at least one global immersion trip or other significant cross-cultural experience each year. A fifty-percent tuition reduction partially offsets the cost of the trip. As announced sGn151 ecumenical Travel seminar (1 or 1/2 unit) Participation in a travel experience to gain ecumenical insights. A fifty-percent tuition reduction partially offsets the cost of the trip. As announced sGn152 Interfaith Travel seminar (1 or 1/2 unit) Participation in a travel experience to gain interfaith insights. A fifty-percent tuition reduction partially offsets the cost of the trip. As announced sGn501 Interseminary seminar (1 unit) Selected topics for students in the final year are pursued along with students from other area seminaries. Satisfies the ecumenical requirement. (Final-year students by invitation only) As announced electives sGn001 academic Writing Workshop (Non-credit) A workshop to enhance skills in academic research and writing. May be required for selected students. sIs300 Independent study (1 unit) Individually supervised study of special problems, limited to students who have previously completed at least 10 units. May not be used to complete core degree requirements. Requires advance submission of a proposal, accompanied by special Independent Study registration form. Coordinated by the Dean. In consultation with directors of concentrations/specializations, may be designed to fulfill concentration/specialization requirements, registered as follow: sIs300b Independent study (black Church) sIs300l Independent study (latino) Additional courses are available through cross-registration agreements with Palmer Theological Seminary, the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, the Temple University Graduate School of Religion, and Chestnut Hill College (Graduate Division).

The following courses are scheduled to be offered in 2006-2008 or are offered regularly in the Graduate School. Unless otherwise indicated, all are worth one unit of credit, the equivalent of three semester hours.

sTM/DMin offerings
bbT670G spiritual autobiography and biblical Texts An examination of Biblical texts and supplemental material from the perspective of life-stage development issues in laity and rostered leaders. Dr. Mattison (June 2007) bnT651G Parables and the Parish A study of the Synoptic parables in their single, double, and triple traditions from a literary and structural perspective. Attention will be paid to sociological context and the potential of parables for teaching and preaching. Dr. Mattison (Fall 2007) bnT660G The letter to the Romans and the new Perspective on Paul A close reading of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans by means of historical, rhetorical, literary, and social scientific criticism. Explores the relationship between the “New Perspective on Paul” in New Testament scholarship and “Lutheran” interpretations of the “law” and “justification” language in Paul’s letters. Requires email and Internet access, CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Heen (Spring 2009) bnT661G 1 Corinthians and Galatians: Two letters, Two Pauls? Different issues, different language, different cultural and geographic locations…what can we learn about Paul as pastoral theologian from these canonical letters? What ways might we learn about our callings as pastoral theologians to imagine our own contexts “in Christ”? Dr. Henrich (June 2008) boT602G The exodus An exploration of the two major phases of the Exodus story recorded in Exodus and Numbers. This rich story of the Israelites’ formative encounter with their God uses fire and cloud, blood and water, ritual and worship to deal with calling and ordination, community and individual response to divine providence, stewardship and personal piety. Lectionary texts in Christian and Jewish tradition, as well as a sampling of story and saga will be examined exegetically and hermeneutically for their literary, socio-religious, cultural/historical and canonical contexts and for textual, translation, and interpretive issues. Prior knowledge of Biblical Hebrew is helpful but not required. Dr. Gafney (Spring 2008) boT670G The Minor Prophets The “Book of the Twelve” contains visions, comedy, ethical teaching, and some of the most profound reflection on God’s relation to God’s people in the Bible. This seminar probes each of the twelve books, seeking to hear clearly each distinctive message. Study will focus on both literary structure
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Course offerings

and historical setting. Dr. Robinson (not yet scheduled) boT671G Prophetic Constructions: Internal biblical Witness Explores the evolution of the prophetic vocation in the Hebrew Scriptures by studying prophetic characters whose ministries are preserved in texts that are not attributed to them. Better-known prophets such as Miriam and Moses, Elijah and Elisha will be studied, along with lesser-known prophets such as the woman with whom Isaiah fathered a child and Zedekiah the Canaanite. Dr. Gafney (not scheduled) HCH603G first Theologians: african Guides on the Christian Way African-based thinkers and doers were the first theologians and key leaders in early Christianity. Controversial in their time, they influence and speak to us now. Their personalities, struggles and theological work mapped the Christian path through the centuries. They thought through, acted out, and sometimes paid for the routes they took. Our course will look at their lives, ideas, opponents, and the questions they pose to us as we seek to walk in the Christian Way. Among the themes we will follow are: The Quest for Moral Purity and Church Holiness, The Problem of Sin and Grace, and the Dilemma of Being Christian in Changing Societies. We will focus on Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Tertullian, Cyprian, Athanasius, and Augustine. Dr. Wagner (Spring 2009) HCH610G Medieval spirituality An examination of the spiritual disciplines of the major monastic movements in the western church through their writings. Special attention will be given to the influence of their social and cultural context. Other expressions of medieval piety will also be examined, along with the Reformation critique and inheritance of these traditions. Dr. Krey (not scheduled) HCH611G augustine and His Influence A look at this African theologian in his original context and at his subsequent importance for Christians of all times. Dr. Rusch (June 2007) HCH620G lutheran Confessions for Parish Practice Intended to increase student knowledge of the Lutheran confessions in comparison to other confessional options of the sixteenth century and to offer opportunity for reflection on the relation of these documents to contemporary life in the parish and the Church. (Pre-requisite: HCH201 or equivalent) Dr. Wengert (January 2008) HCH660G Dreams and Defenses: Religion in northeast Usa Explores the development of the American churchscape north of the Potomac and east of the Mississippi Rivers and examines the migration experience to the United States at the turn of the 20th Century, immigrant spirituality, and the development of the ethnic parish in Orthodox, Catholic, and Protestant communities. In addition to reading about immigration and immigrant spirituality, a major objective of the course is to develop the capability to “read experience” and understand how religion was lived by “people in
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

the pew.” Requires email and Internet access, CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Krueger (Spring 2009) HTH615G Where Is God? Christian Responses to evil and suffering The continual presence of evil and suffering poses a challenge to Christian affirmations about God’s power and caring. This course explores the complex relationship between human suffering and the Christian notion of evil. Through reading stories of human suffering caused by the experience of evil we will seek to assess traditional Christian accounts of the character and consequence of evil—with the aim of articulating an account of evil that takes seriously real stories of human suffering. Dr. Ray (Spring 2007) HTH630G 20th- and 21st-Century Theology and Implications for Ministry An exploration of the methodologies of several 20th- and 21st-century theologians and the implications for parish practice. Selections from Barth, Tillich, Niebuhr, Bonhoeffer, Bultmann, Ebeling, Moltmann, Pannenberg, Rahner, and from liberation, African American, feminist, and Asian theologies and post-modern theologians. Dr. Krych (Fall 2008) HTH635G Thinking Differently: Theology in a Postmodern Context An investigation of the philosophical character, context and challenges that postmodernism provides for theology, ethics and hermeneutics. The course will examine key postmodern thinkers (e.g. Jacques Derrida) and the impact they are having on theology. Dr. Collins (Fall 2006) HTH640G Theological engagements with anthropology Debates about the meaning of being human will be analyzed for their philosophical, scientific, and religious claims and assumptions. Perspectives from the Christian tradition will help in the theological assessment of contemporary views. Dr. Rivera (Fall 2006) HTH645G Creation, evolution, and our Idea of God How to think about God, nature and humanity in light of the basic tenets of evolutionary theory. Examines the contributions to evolutionary thinking of key figures from theology, philosophy of science, and evolutionary biology. Dr. Rivera (Spring 2008) HTH661G Theology from a Third-World Perspective An introduction to theological voices from Asia, Latin America, Africa, and Palestine, with a focus on what we in North America can learn. Requires email and Internet access, CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Baker (Fall 2007) HTH670G ecumenical lutheranism Examines the debates among Lutherans about Lutheran merger and involvement in the ecumenical movement during the twentieth century. Dr. Erling (January 2007) HTH680G Dietrich bonhoeffer: life and Thought A reading of Bonhoeffer’s writings in his context as a basis for discussion of their meaning in our context. Dr. Rasmussen (Spring 2007)

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ICa605G Revitalizing Your Preaching Has your preaching become stale? Do people listen to your sermons politely, while their hearts and lives seem untouched? Learn to sharpen the hearing of those whose ears have been dulled by many sermons. Participants will preach, rework, and re-preach a single sermon, while beginning to master specific strategies and tactics for reconnecting with God’s people. Dr. Hughes (June 2008) ICa620G Preaching the Gaps Explores the role of the imagination in preaching: how ideas are formed, the structure of a sermon’s moves, and the necessary theological and semiotic tensions, with an ear to how hearers hear what the preacher says. Dr. Quivik (June 2007) ICa634G Rhetoric in Preaching From Plato and Aristotle to Chomsky, secular ideas about crafting messages have been informing preaching. Classical philosophers and modern communication scientists will be surveyed for application to the preaching situation. Requires email and Internet access; CD-Rom drive and sound card. Dr. Levering (Fall 2006) ICa653G liturgy and origins: sources for Renewal Through a re-reading of primary, historical liturgical texts, we will explore how different communities have searched for a language to witness to the Christ event and ask what that witness means for our liturgical celebrations today. Dr. Lange (not scheduled) ICa655G luther and liturgy: Demolishing the Tower of babel Traces Luther’s wide and varied use of liturgical language (both direct and indirect references) in order to approach the role of Word and sacrament in disrupting the medieval church’s attempt (and, in fact, every generation’s attempt) to build a tower of Babel. Dr. Lange (January 2007) ICa680G spirituality An examination of the spiritual traditions and devotional literature of Lutheranism and the ELCA’s official ecumenical partners - the Anglican/ Episcopal, Moravian and Calvinist traditions. Personal responses to the literature, music, and programs of the various communions will be shared asynchronously within a weekly schedule. Requires email and Internet access, CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Wartluft (Spring 2008) ICe600G Confirmation and Youth Ministries A study of theological foundations of confirmation and youth ministry, teaching and catechetics, psychology of adolescence, theory and practical guidance in ministries to, with, and by youth. Requires email and Internet access, CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Krych (Spring 2007) ICe610G educational Ministry with adults A consideration of various aspects of educational ministry with adults, including theological foundations, learning settings, learning theory, stages of adulthood, methods, and group dynamics. Requires email and Internet access,

ICe620G educational Practice in the Parish An examination of the purpose, possibilities and problems of the various forms and activities of educational ministry in the local congregation, with a view to creative planning, administration, and evaluation of a comprehensive parish education program. Requires email and Internet access, CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Krych (Spring 2008) ICs620G Research Methods for studying Congregations An introduction to both quantitative and ethnographic research methodology with application for congregational and community studies. The course will draw on the rich reservoir of theoretical models and research in religion which provide the basis for the research design each student will produce. Dr. Day (Fall 2007) ICs680G being the Church in a Global Communion How thinking of and experiencing ourselves as local churches in a global horizon brings new kinds of relationships, practices, and accountabilities into the heart of what it means to be North American churches. Dr. Bloomquist (June 2008) IPC600G advanced Pastoral Care seminar A case conference in which students with significant professional pastoral care experience share specific cases from their own ministry with a view toward deepening their theological understanding of those whom they serve, honing pastoral assessment skills, evaluating their interventions and enhancing their pastoral skills, and planning next steps for their own learning and for continued pastoral intervention with the case, as appropriate. Readings and theological reflections are integrated with specific case material. Students may take the course twice for credit, bringing both new and ongoing case material for continued consultation. (Pre-requisites: MDiv or equivalent, CPE, and at least three years of professional pastoral experience) Dr. Cooper-White (Fall 2008) IPC601G a Pastoral approach to the Dying and the bereaved Facing death or dealing with grief is a struggle with faith as much as it is a struggle with emotions. This course brings to this belief personal, pastoral, and theological considerations in the hope of making our approach to those who grieve more helpful. Dr. Aden (January 2008) IPC630G Ministry with older Persons Deals with the attitudes, sensitivities, and knowledge necessary for an effective ministry with older persons in the congregation and the community. Dr. Jorgenson (Spring 2007) IPP640G Communications and the local Congregation An exploration of the current images of the Church and the media. The course focuses on the development of images of how local congregations can be involved in using the mass media, newspapers, radio,
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CD-ROM drive and sound card. Dr. Krych (Fall 2006)

Course offerings

television, and cable. Mr. Stewart (not scheduled) IPP651G Gearing Up for Mission Over time, congregations tend to lose focus on their mission and become stagnant. This course will prepare participants to lead the renewal process. Learn how to establish a sense of urgency, undertake a visioning process, and assist the congregation to become re-rooted in its local and broader communities. Dr. Hughes (Fall 2007) IPP653G Transforming the Church for Mission: Theology, Theory and Practice for Congregational Renewal in the 21st Century Examines new emphases in mission theology and applies these to the church’s mission through congregational renewal, church planting and multiplication. Dr. Daubert (January 2007) IPP655G Discerning Theologies in Congregations A look at the challenges to recognizing theological work in congregations, recent insights for doing this more reliably, and how this can contribute to congregational wholeness. Dr. Nieman (January 2008)

HCH810G History of Interpretation of the bible: Pauline exegesis Traces the Pauline themes of nature and grace, justification, law and gospel, spirit and letter, and faith, from the Gnostics to the late medieval period. (Knowledge of Greek and Latin helpful) Dr. Krey (not scheduled) HCH812G saint augustine An examination of the life, thought, and influence of Augustine of Hippo. Each seminar will focus on a specific text. Dr. Krey (not scheduled) HCH820G Readings in Reformation History and Theology An analysis of a major figure (e.g. Luther, Melanchthon, Calvin, Zwingli, Bucer), event (e.g. Peasants’ War, 1530 Diet of Augsburg), and/or movement (e.g. late-medieval scholasticism, Anabaptism, confessionalization) of the Reformation. Students will be encouraged to link their research to the historical, theological, and social contexts of the time. Dr. Wengert (Spring 2008) HCH823G Melanchthon’s Theology An investigation of the thought of Philip Melanchthon as reflected in his theological writings, with a special focus on his Loci communes. Dr. Wengert (Spring 2007) HCH830G american Religious History An opportunity for the student to explore in depth an area of particular interest in primary sources, while reading recent secondary works in American religious history that examine the interface of events, trends, eras, movements, nations, cultures, and traditions in the United States. Attention is given to discourse, practices, communities, and institutions, and to historiographical questions. Dr. Pahl (Spring 2007, 2009) HTH820G Trinitarian Theology An examination of the classical development and contemporary revitalization of the doctrine of the Trinity, with an emphasis on using Trinitarian approaches to address a broad range of contemporary issues in theology and ethics. Dr. Hoffmeyer (Spring 2009) HTH823G Thinking spirit: G. W. f. Hegel and Contemporary Theology G.W.F. Hegel understood his work as a philosophical explication of the doctrine of the Trinity, and focused his Trinitarian philosophy on Spirit. His emphases on process, historicity, relationality, and non-foundationalism make him our contemporary, even though he lived two centuries ago. Although the textual focus will be Hegel’s own writings, we will read them in relation to their appropriation and misappropriation by later theologians. Our fundamental concern will be critical engagement with Hegel’s thought for constructive theological work today. Dr. Hoffmeyer (Fall 2006) HTH832G Contemporary neo-liberal Theologians Readings from several generations of theologians who may loosely be termed “neo-liberal,” including Sally McFague, Douglas John Hall, Serene Jones, and others.

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DMin offerings
sDM701G DMin Colloquium I (Non-credit) Addresses the issues of individual program formation in the DMin program, including a review of some of the key categories of academic theology and biblical studies and the practice of ministry. Staff (June 2007, 2008) sDM702G DMin Colloquium II (Non-credit) Research methods and practical guidance to help prepare for development of DMin projects. Staff (June 2007, 2008) sDM703G DMin Colloquium II equivalency (Noncredit) Alternative registration for DMin students who have successfully completed SGN603G Research Methods. Involves payment of Colloquium II fee only; participation in Colloquium II is waived. NOTE: Colloquia above are not formal courses; they are required collegial events of two to four days each, offered in June, during which students address matters of the program and their progress. sDM710G DMin Collegial seminar A seminar for DMin students in which case studies are used to explore theological and pastoral issues in ministry. Dr. Wagner (January 2007, 2008) sIs700G Independent study Individually supervised study of special problems, as approved by student’s supervising committee. Requires advance submission of a proposal, accompanied by special Independent Study registration form. Coordinated by the Dean, in consultation with Associate Dean of Graduate Education.

ThD/sTM offerings
bbT840G new Testament Christologies A study of how the earliest Christian communities presented and revered Jesus, with reviews of some of the considerable literature on the subject. Particular attention will be paid to the Son of Man designation. Dr. Borsch (Spring 2007)
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

HTH890G Theology of Religions A critical examination of contemporary theological approaches to religious pluralism, especially as they relate to biblical and historical responses to the problematic of world religions. Selected theological approaches from a variety of traditions from the late-19th century to the present will receive attention. Perspectives from other living faiths will also be addressed in this seminar. Dr. Rajashekar (Fall 2007) ICa804G Communicating the Word of God Exploration of theologians of the 20th and 21st centuries who focus on communication of the Word of God through preaching and teaching, with implications for and relation to contemporary theory and practice of homiletics and education. Team-taught (not yet scheduled) ICs820G Religion and social Change The role of religion within social movement theory. An analytical examination of various social movements will explore how faith functions either to facilitate or to inhibit social mobilization at all levels, from congregations to global communions. What then are the implications for our theological understanding of both Church and spirit? Dr. Day (Spring 2008) IPC860G Pastoral Theology of Good and evil Pastoral care-givers in situations of suffering frequently encounter the question, “How could God allow such evil to happen?” This seminar will explore the classic and contemporary doctrines of theodicy in relation to pastoral care in contexts of suffering, pain, and evil. Dr. Cooper-White (not scheduled) sGn803G Research Methods A thorough examination of the variety of research methodologies available for STM theses and ThD (PhD) dissertations in scriptural/ theological/historical/social-ethical disciplines. Special attention is given to the actual theses and dissertations being proposed by the participants. Dr. Krey et al. (Fall 2006, 2008) sIs800G Independent study (sTM) Individually supervised study of special problems by the STM student, as approved by student’s advisor. Requires advance submission of a proposal, accompanied by special Independent Study registration form. Coordinated by the Dean, in consultation with Associate Dean of Graduate Education.

bbT923G The Heritage of Reformation Hermeneutics: from biblical Theology to biblical Criticism and back again An examination of biblical theologies of churches that are heirs of the Reformation through various pre-modern (e.g. protestant orthodoxy), modern (e.g. the literalism of common sense realism, neo-Lutheranism), and post-modern (e.g. readerresponse) configurations. Attention will be given to the effect of larger shifts in scientific, academic and popular culture upon the understanding of the nature and role of Scripture in the theological enterprise. The rise of higher criticism, especially historical-criticism, and its effect upon the discipline of biblical theology is assessed as well as possibilities for a reconfiguration of the role of biblical studies for the public work of the church in the twenty-first century. Dr. Heen (Fall 2007) ICe900G ThD Teaching seminar (Non-credit) Explores methods of teaching in higher education settings, such as colleges and seminaries. Prepares students for teaching assistant responsibilities that are a required part of the ThD program. Non-credit monthly workshops will follow to continue reflection on teaching throughout the rest of the first and the second years. Dr. Krych et al. (January 2007, 2008) IPC940G Correlational Theology A seminar in theological method for ministry. Using a close reading of texts and case material, students will engage the task of bringing the discipline of theology into dialogue with other disciplines relevant to ministry in a postmodern context, such as psychology and the social sciences, gender theory, and postmodern cultural studies. Both historical and contemporary theological texts will be examined as examples of correlational impulses and methods. Dr. Cooper-White (Spring 2007) sGn900G seminar in Public Theology The public aspect of the various disciplines - history, Bible, theology, ministry - will be related to issues arising from the analysis of the contemporary public situation. The seminar will cover such issues as communicating theology in the public arena, theology and social ethical issues, practical application of theology in everyday life and in contemporary society, relation of theology to other disciplines, theology and culture, engaging other religious traditions, etc. Team-taught (Spring 2008)

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ThD offerings
bbT910G scriptural Theology seminar Describing writings as scripture signifies a special status and function for those works within communities of faith. This course will examine the historical development of doctrines of scripture, the various ways in which the authority of scriptural writings has been understood, the implications of scriptural status for strategies of inter-

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Dr. Ray (Fall 2007)

pretation, and the relationship between the authority of the scripture within a community of faith and within the larger realm of public discourse. Primary focus will be on the biblical tradition, but other scriptural traditions will be considered as well. Dr. Robinson (Fall 2006, 2008)

Course offerings

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The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

The Rev. frederick Houk borsch, PhD
Professor, new Testament; Chair of anglican studies (2003) BA, Princeton University, 1957; BA, Oxford University, 1959; MA, Oxford University, 1963; STB, The General Seminary, 1960; PhD,The University of Birmingham (England), 1966 Prior to his appointment to the new Chair of Anglican Studies at LTSP, Dr. Borsch was Interim Dean of the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale University and Associate Dean of the Yale Divinity School. He is the retired Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. In addition to holding teaching posts in England and at Seabury-Western and The General Theological Seminaries, Dr. Borsch was formerly Dean, President, and Professor of New Testament at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, and Dean of the Chapel with rank of Professor of Religion at Princeton University where he taught in the Program in the History, Archaeology and Religions of the Ancient World. From 1988 to 2000, he was Chair of the Theology Committee for the House of Bishops of the Episcopal Church. Contributor of essays, articles and poetry to a number of journals and newspapers, he is the author or editor of 18 books, and has been a conference leader and given university and seminary lectures at a number of institutions in the U.S. and abroad. In 1985 he was the preacher for The Protestant Hour for 13 weeks.

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The Rev. Katie Day, PhD
Charles a. schieren Professor, Church and society (1985) BA, Wheaton College, 1973; MDiv, Gordon-Conwell Seminary, 1977; STM, Union Seminary (NY), 1982; PhD, Temple University, 1996; Pastorates in Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, 1977-81, 1983-85. Dr. Day came to LTSP with unique pastoral, community organizing, economic development and research experience. She brings this depth to the area of Church and Society, teaching courses on urban ministry, the social sciences, social ethics, and economics as they relate to the church. An ordained pastor in the Presbyterian Church, her longterm ecumenical relationships with African American congregations make her well qualified as the Director of the Metropolitan/Urban Ministry Concentration. Dr. Day’s research into the recent wave of church burnings prompted the Lilly Foundation to award her and the Seminary a $312,000 grant to explore this phenomenon. Dr. Day’s most recent book, Difficult Conversations: Taking Risks and Acting with Integrity (Alban Institute, 2001), invites congregations into the challenging and rewarding task of discussing serious social issues.

The Rev. Pamela Cooper-White, PhD
Professor, Pastoral Theology (1999) BMus, Boston University, 1977; MA, Harvard University, 1980; MDiv, Harvard Divinity School, 1983; PhD, Harvard University, 1983; MA, Holy Names College (Oakland, CA),1994; Ph.D., Institute for Clinical Social Work, 2001; Pastorates in Massachusetts, California, Illinois, Pennsylvania 1979-present. Recipient of the American Association of Pastoral Counselors’ 2005 “Distinguished Achievement in Research and Writing” award, Dr. Cooper-White is the author of four books: Many Voices: Pastoral Psychotherapy in Relational and Theological Perspective

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faCUlTY

(Fortress, 2006); Shared Wisdom: Use of the Self in Pastoral Care and Counseling (Fortress, 2004); The Cry of Tamar: Violence Against Women and the Church’s Response (Fortress, 1995), which won a 1995 Top Ten Books award from the Academy of Parish Clergy; and Schoenberg and the God Idea (UMI Research Press, 1985). She has also authored a small-group resource book entitled Women Healing and Empowering (ELCA Publishing) and numerous chapters and articles on aspects of pastoral theology, women’s development, and pastoral care of post-traumatic stress. She is the former Director of the Center for Women and Religion at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California. An Episcopal priest and pastoral psychotherapist, she is certified as a clinical Fellow in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors and serves as Co-Chair of the Person/Culture/Religion Group of the American Academy of Religion. Dr. Cooper-White teaches courses on pastoral care and counseling, pastoral theology, and Anglicanism.

facu;ty

The Rev. Wilda C. M. Gafney, PhD
associate Professor, old Testament and Hebrew (2003) BA, Earlham College, 1987; MDiv, Howard University School of Divinity, 1997; Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies, Duke University, 2000; PhD, Duke University, 2006. The first African American woman scholar to serve on the LTSP faculty, Wilda Gafney is a third-generation soldier who served for five years as a chaplain in the Army Reserves as pastor to a hospital congregation and provided psychiatric pastoral care. Baptized in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, she belonged to a non-denominational congregation as a teen, attended a Baptist school during her junior high years, went on to a Catholic high school, and earned a BA in biology at Earlham, a Quaker college. Dr. Gafney began her career as a research biologist, concentrating on immunology and biological defense, but later experienced a renewal of faith and entered Howard Divinity School. She received a pastoral appointment in the AME Zion Church in 2001. She is now a member of the Episcopal Church (USA) and shares in the teaching/preaching ministry of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, the first African American Episcopal church in the U.S., founded in 1792. Professor Gafney is also a member of the Dorshei Derekh Reconstructionist Minyan and has a particular interest in how Christians read and interpret the Hebrew Scriptures. She has numerous scholarships, awards and fellowships to her credit, including doctoral and dissertation fellowships from the Fund for Theological Education, a Vernon Johns preaching award and a Duke University Women’s Studies Graduate Fellowship. She recently published a series of Bible studies on Genesis in Abingdon’s Pastor’s Bible Study, Volume 3. Her current projects are an exploration of motherhood in messianic genealogies in Ruth and Matthew for Semeia and a commentary on the book of Numbers in the African Women’s Bible Commentary.

erik M. Heen, PhD
Professor, new Testament and Greek (1996) AB, Harvard College, 1973; MDiv, Harvard Divinity School, 1982; MTh, Luther Theological Seminary, 1990; MPhil, Columbia University, 1993; PhD, Columbia University, 1997. Dr. Heen teaches New Testament courses, including the core introductions, individual book electives, and Greek. Dr. Heen is interested in how the Bible is being read in parishes and homes in the United States today, and seeks innovative approaches to parish-based Bible study, including those that explore the use of film. Dr. Heen’s current New Testament exegetical interests include Pauline theology, the Gospel of John, and how social-scientific criticism can provide insights into the interaction of early Christians with the larger Hellenistic world. Dr. Heen’s current hermeneutical interests include the understandings of Scripture during the period of Lutheran Orthodoxy and the rise of historical-criticism, the history of the use of the Bible among Lutherans in North American in the 19th and 20th centuries, and contemporary “Lutheran” understandings of Scripture. He edited, along with Philip Krey, the Hebrews volume in the Ancient Christian Commentary series (InterVarsity Press, 2005). He is a member of the ELCA consultation on Scripture and part of an ELCA planning group to develop a multi-year emphasis called “Book of Faith: Lutherans Read the Bible.”

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The Rev. John f. Hoffmeyer, PhD
associate Professor, systematic Theology (1998) BA, Haverford College, 1980; CATS, Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1991; PhD, Boston College, 1991. Theological and philosophical studies at Institut Supérieur Libre de Théologie et de Philosophie Religieuse, Paris, 1986, and Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (1982-84). Dr. Hoffmeyer’s work draws upon diverse traditions of theological and philosophical reflection for the purpose of critical, constructive, and transformative engagement with contemporary questions and challenges. His own theology is a Trinitarian elaboration of the biblical promise/command: “Do not be afraid.” He teaches courses in dogmatics, constructive theology, ethics, and youth ministry. He has served as

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

The Rev. elizabeth f. Huwiler, PhD
Professor, old Testament and Hebrew (1996) On leave in 2006-07 BA, Carroll College, 1973; MDiv, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, 1980; PhD, Duke University, 1988. Pastorate in Illinois, 1980-83. Dr. Huwiler is interested in women and the Bible (both women in biblical texts and women’s interpretation of the Bible). Biblical poetry and wisdom are other long-standing areas of study. A particular focus on the Song of Songs has led her to explore issues of human sexuality in the Bible. Dr. Huwiler’s book, Biblical Women: Mirrors, Models, and Metaphors (United Church Press, 1993) proposes how biblical stories and images of woman can serve as models of faithfulness. Her commentary on “Ecclesiastes” and “Song of Songs” has been published in Hendrickson’s New International Bible Commentary Series. Dr. Huwiler’s current research emphasis is biblical authority, especially in an ecumenical and interfaith context. Having taught at a United Church of Christ seminary for several years, she is particularly invested in the ELCA’s ecumenical agreements, especially with the Reformed denominations. Judaism is another area of interest, and she is exploring ways that Christians can learn from Jewish spirituality and worship. Dr. Huwiler is currently on ecclesiastical leave while serving as a parish pastor in Poland.

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Karl Krueger, PhD
Director of the Krauth Memorial library; associate Professor, History of Christianity (2003) BS, Philadelphia College of Bible, 1974; MDiv, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 1980; MA, Russian and East European Studies, University of Michigan, 1987; Ph.D., History, University of Michigan 1992; M.L.S., Drexel University 1996; Theological Studies at the Kirchliche Hochschule Wuppertal, 1976-1977; Summer Session, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, 1983. Pastorates in Pennsylvania and Ontario, Canada, 1980-83, 1986-92. Karl Krueger’s fascination with the role of religion in the immigrant experience led him to study history at the University of Michigan and write a dissertation on the congregations of the Polish-speaking Lutheran Mazurians in East Prussia and the United States. He has created an online graduate course that explores the religious history, piety, and migration experience of East Europeans to the United States. Before coming to the Krauth Memorial Library, Dr. Krueger worked in the Rare Book Room of the University of Michigan and as Public Services Librarian at the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies, a library and museum that was dedicated to American Ethnic Life and Immigration History. Dr. Krueger has attended the Rare Book School at the
The Catalog / 2006–2008

The Rev. Philip D. W. Krey, PhD
Ministerium of new York Professor, early Church History; President and Chair of the faculty (1990) BA, University of Massachusetts, 1972; MDiv, Gettysburg Seminary, 1976; MA, Catholic University of America, 1985; PhD, University of Chicago, 1990. Fulbright Fellow, University of Munich, 1988-89. Pastorates in Maryland, Illinois, and Pennsylvania, 1976-85, 1987-88, 1990-99. Dr. Krey, the current president of LTSP, brings a blend of interests, including urban parish leadership, the history of biblical interpretation in the early and medieval church, medieval theology, and a special fascination for the history of the interpretation

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a Visiting Professor at the University of Heidelberg and has worked with the Lutheran Church of El Salvador. He is currently working on the question of how a Trinitarian and sacramental theology can provide resources for responding in critical and constructive ways to the problems of a consumer society.

of the Book of Revelation. His literary credits include a translation of a Revelation Commentary by the medieval Franciscan Nicholas of Lyra. With Lesley Smith of Oxford, he co-edited a book for Brill on Nicholas’s commentary on the whole Bible (2000). He edited, along with Erik Heen, the Hebrews volume in the Ancient Christian Commentary series (InterVarsity Press, 2005). He has also translated and edited, along with Thomas Izbicki and Gerald Christianson, selected letters of Aeneas Piccolomini (Pope Pius II) for Catholic University Press (2006). He has translated and edited, along with Peter D. S. Krey, Luther’s Spirituality (Classics of Western Spirituality) for Paulist Press (2007). He is also the coeditor along with Lawrence Bond and Thomas Ryan of a series by Eerdmans Publishing Co., The Bible and Tradition. Co-founder of the Inner City Ministers’ Guild, Dr. Krey teaches courses on the ecumenical creeds, early and medieval church history, spirituality, and urban ministry. He serves as the executive director of the Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries from 2006-2008, is a member of the board of Lutheran World Relief, and serves as an ELCA delegate to the Faith and Order Commission of the National Council of Churches (USA).

faculty

University of Virginia and mounted several exhibits featuring the treasures of the Library in the Main Rotunda. He is the curator of a new permanent exhibit of the history of American Lutheranism in The Brossman Center.

The Rev. Dirk G. lange, PhD
assistant Professor of Christian assembly (2005) BA, University of Winnipeg, 1979; STM, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (2001); PhD (with distinction) in Theological Studies with a concentration in Liturgical Theology, Emory University, 2005. Brother of Taizé, 1979-1998; pastorate in Georgia, 2001-2005. Dr. Lange’s ministerial experience has covered a wide spectrum of activities, but all under one umbrella: liturgy in the lives of people. During the 1980’s, as a brother of Taizé, he worked with church leaders and many lay people involved with the prayer groups in the Eastern European underground. During the early 1990’s he was engaged with the prayer and songs of Taizé. After leaving Taizé, he came to LTSP to study under Gordon Lathrop and then went on to do doctoral work under Don Saliers and Mark Jordan at Emory. He is editor and contributor of Ordo: Bath, Word, Prayer, Table (OSL, 2006), an introduction to liturgical theology and festschrift in honor of Dr. Lathrop. With Luther and Derrida as dialogue partners, Dr. Lange queries theology, its disruption and its re-writing, through the lens of the liturgy. He has been involved with the Renewing Worship project of the ELCA, serving on the editorial board for Daily Prayer as well as participating on the development panels for Holy Communion and the Psalter. He has published several articles in the liturgical journal, Worship, as well as in several other scholarly journals. He is a member of the North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) and founder and convener of the seminar group on Liturgy and Postmodern Questions. He is also a member of American Academy of Religion (AAR), Societas Liturgica and the Academy of Homiletics.

The Rev. Margaret a. Krych, PhD
Charles f. norton Professor, Christian education and Theology; associate Dean of Graduate education; Director, Doctor of Ministry Program, eastern Cluster of lutheran seminaries (1977) BA, University of Western Australia, 1963; BD, Melbourne College of Divinity, 1966; DipEd, University of Western Australia, 1968; ThM, Melbourne College of Divinity, 1970; PhD, Princeton Seminary, 1985; Pastorate in Australia, 1966-67. A native Australian, Dr. Krych has two passionate interests in teaching and writing: Christian education and twentieth- and twenty-first-century systematic theology. She teaches courses in Christian education, youth ministry, and contemporary systematic theology, coordinates the DMin colloquia, and directs the teaching component of the ThD program. She teaches both in the classroom and by means of distance learning. Dr. Krych has written a number of books, including Teaching the Gospel Today and has also written a monograph and contributed chapters to eleven additional books. Five of these books were written jointly by the Christian Education professors of the ELCA seminaries, including The Ministry of Children’s Education: Foundations, Contexts and Practices (Fortress Press, 2004), which she jointly planned and to which she contributed the Introduction and two chapters, and Christian Education as Evangelism, edited by Norma Cook Everist (Fortress Press, planned for 2007). Dr. Krych has also authored some thirty articles, primarily in Christian Education and theology, and has conducted educational seminars nationally. As Associate Dean for Graduate Education, she directs the seminary’s STM, ThD, and DMin programs. She is an ordained pastor of the ELCA and serves on the denomination’s Board of Publication (Augsburg Fortress Publishers).

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Director of Contextual education (1997) BS, Pennsylvania State University, 1971; MDiv, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 1976; ThM, Princeton Theological Seminary, 1978; DMin, Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1983; MEd, Columbia University, 1992; EdD., Columbia University, 1997; Pastorates in Pennsylvania, 1976-93. Dr. Leonard came to LTSP with a background in overseas missionary work, urban congregation leadership, and college chaplaincy. His interests and research are in the areas of leadership development, church administration, church growth, and the general practice of ministry. As Associate Professor of Practical Theology, he teaches courses in urban ministry with a particular emphasis on the “practice of ministry.” With his extensive knowledge of area congregations and their leaders, Dr. Leonard is instrumental in assisting students in finding appropriate ministry sites for pursuing internships. He spends much of his time guiding and supporting students during their practical training, assisting them to do theological reflection and advising them concerning their vocational discernment.

Professor, History of Christianity in north america (2000) BA, Valparaiso University, 1980; MTS, Trinity Lutheran Seminary, 1983; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1990. Dr. Pahl teaches courses on American religions, Lutherans in America, sacred places, and violence and religion. His first book, Paradox Lost: Free Will and Political Liberty in American Culture, 1630-1760, investigates the formative importance of theological debates over the freedom of the will in colonial New England. Dr. Pahl’s research also includes attention to the history of youth, including Youth Ministry in Modern America: 1930-the Present. In his most recent work, Shopping Malls and Other Sacred Spaces: Putting God in Place, Dr. Pahl explores the theological significance of a wide variety of places in American culture. He is completing a new book entitled Violence and the Sacred in America: A History of Innocent Domination.

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The Rev. Melinda a. Quivik, PhD
assistant Professor of Christian assembly (2005) BA, St. Olaf College, 1972; MA, Columbia University, Teachers College, 1977; MDiv, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 1994; PhD in Worship, Proclamation, and the Arts, Graduate Theological Union, 2003; pastorates in Montana (199398) and Minnesota (2002-05). Dr. Quivik, along with Dr. Lange, teaches a new integration of the fields of liturgy and homiletics, called Christian Assembly. She also teaches electives in both fields. Dr. Quivik’s research interests include the construction of meaning in the assembly and the use of image and imagination in preaching. Her book, A Christian Funeral: Witness to the Resurrection (Augsburg Fortress, 2005) is part of the Worship Matters series, utilizing research from her PhD work, The Beautiful Funeral: The Aesthetics of a Liturgy (UMI, 2003). She has written for New Proclamation, Sundays and Seasons, the journal Liturgy, various publications of the ELCA and homiletical helps. Her involvement with the Renewing Worship project of the ELCA to prepare the new hymnbook, Evangelical Lutheran Worship, included work on the preaching consultation on Principles for Worship, development panels for the Holy Communion
The Catalog / 2006–2008

The Rev. Robin D. Mattison, PhD
associate Professor, new Testament and Greek (1989) BA, University of Delaware, 1969; MA/MDiv, University of Chicago, 1973; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 1995; Pastorates in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, 1974-80. Dr. Mattison is passionate about teaching the New Testament and feminist hermeneutics from the perspective of literary and anthropological criticism. Her research interests are in exploring symbol systems in Scripture. A recent focus has been on how themes and images are developed by an author to change a reader’s point of view. She is also deeply committed to assist, using the New Testament’s own examples, women students and students of color to be prepared to face the specific challenges of their ministry. She encourages all students to develop a well-informed perspective on New Testament origins and disciplined interpretive skills to address the challenges of a less-than-inclusive world. Besides teaching courses on the New Testament, Dr. Mattison teaches Greek, biblical interpretation, exegetical methods, and feminine biblical issues.

section Title

The Rev. Charles R. leonard, edD

Jon Pahl, PhD

faculty

and Life Passages liturgies, Renewing Worship Days presentations in several different synods, and congregational testing for the holy communion settings. As a member of the North American Academy of Liturgy, she convenes the Liturgical Language Seminar. Dr. Quivik is also a member of the Academy of Homiletics, Societas Liturgica, and the American Academy of Religion.

The Rev. Dr. stephen G. Ray
associate Professor of african american studies; Director, Urban Theological Institute (2005) B. S., Charter Oak State College, Newington, CT, 1989; MDiv, Yale Divinity School, 1993; PhD., Religious Studies-African American Studies Joint Degree Program, Yale University, 2000 Raised in New York City’s Queens Borough, Stephen Ray refers to himself as a man of comparatively simple faith. “My mother instilled in me that God will provide,” says Ray, who is an ordained minister of the United Church of Christ. “When I worked at the Crisis Intervention Center, I got to see how the social and economic systems work to bring calamity on people who had nothing to do with bringing it on to themselves.” Prior to joining the LTSP faculty, he taught broadly in contemporary theology, African American Studies and philosophy as the Associate Professor of Theology and Philosophy at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. Dr. Ray has also taught courses at Yale Divinity School and the Hartford Seminary. He has written several articles and lectured on African American religion and human rights. Dr. Ray is the author of several published works, including A Struggle from the Start: The Black Community of Hartford, 1639-1960 and Do No Harm: Social Sin and Christian Responsibility. In addition to his own monographs, he has been a contributor to the recently published book, Constructive Theology: A Contemporary Approach to Classical Themes, and to the forthcoming book, Human Rights: Christian Influences and Issues. In 2002 he was named the Kentuckiana Metroversity Distinguished Teacher of Adult Learners. During much of his time in Louisville he served as pastor of Plymouth Congregational United Church of Christ. “Teaching and scholarship always need to be accountable to the church, and serving as a pastor has been one way I’ve tried to be accountable,” he says. “Teaching needs to be seen through the prism of concrete ministry.”

The Rev. J. Paul Rajashekar, PhD
luther D. Reed Professor, systematic Theology (1991) BA, St. Philomena’s College, 1968; BD, United Theological College, 1971; STM, Concordia Seminary-Seminex, 1974; PhD, University of Iowa, 1981; Pastorate in Iowa, 1976–79. For Dr. Rajashekar, the current Dean of the Seminary, grappling with issues of religious pluralism in our society has been a lifelong pursuit. A former Executive Secretary for the Lutheran World Federation in Geneva, he joined the LTSP Faculty in 1991 and teaches courses on scriptural authority, doctrine, contemporary theology, ecumenism, world religions and inter-religious dialogue. The corpus of his published work includes New Religious Movements and the Church (co-edited with A. Brockway, WCC Publications, 1987), “Religious Pluralism and Lutheran Theology” (LWF Report, 23/24, 1988), and Islam in Asia: Perspectives for Christian-Muslim Encounter (co-edited with H.S. Wilson, LWR-WARC, 1992). Dr. Rajashekar’s research today involves the many challenges facing our practice of the Christian faith, particularly in our context of Christian ecumenism, cultural pluralism, post modernism, and our scientific and technological worldview. He seeks to articulate a relevant and responsible theology that is true to Lutheran convictions and is at the same time open to insights and values of other faiths in dialogue. His latest publications include Bridging Gospel and Asian Cultures (ELCA, 2006) and “Navigating Difficult Questions” in The Evangelizing Church: A Lutheran Contribution, Richard H. Bliese and Craig Van Gelder, eds. (Augsburg Fortress, 2005). Dr. Rajashekar will direct a Henry Luce Foundation grant to develop an Asian Theological Initiative at LTSP.

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associate Professor, systematic Theology and Hispanic Ministry; Director, latino Concentration (1998) BA, Universidad de Puerto Rico, 1981; MDiv, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 1987; MA, Temple University, 1997; STM, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, 1998; PhD, Temple University, 2006; Pastorates in Puerto Rico 1987-93. Due to his interest in developments in modern science, as well as his concern for the proper understanding of the relationship between religion and the sciences, Dr. Rivera’s teaches courses that explore the social and theological dimensions of important scientific concepts and ideas. Of late, his research has focused on the meanings and implications of evolutionary theory and on the possibilities for a theology of evolution. As part of his responsibilities with the Latino Concentration, Dr. Rivera also teaches courses in systematic theology from a Latino perspective. As a Lutheran, he has been involved, with other members of the Latino community, in a critical reassessment of Luther’s theology as a source for their own ecclesial reflection. As a theologian, as a Latino scholar, and as someone committed to the perspectives brought by liberation theology, Dr. Rivera normally moves within an interdisciplinary intellectual landscape.

The Rev. Richard n. stewart, MDiv
associate Professor, Communications, Parish administration (1988) BA, Wittenberg University, 1967; MDiv, Hamma School of Theology, 1971; Graduate study, Temple University. Pastorates in Ohio and the US Virgin Islands, 1971-89, and Pennsylvania, 1998-2002. Since joining the LTSP faculty, Professor Stewart has served as an interim minister, having previously been a parish pastor in Ohio and the US Virgin Islands. He was a campus pastor at Central State University in Ohio and has served on the advisory committee of The Lutheran magazine and the ELCA’s Office of Communication. Believing that the congregational leader is an essential communicator for parish life, his ministry has been shaped by his studies of media, communication, and technology. As Director of Distance Learning, Mr. Stewart was instrumental in enabling the Seminary to offer state-of-the-art distance learning capabilities. His recent work in leadership development explores the ways congregations can use technology in administration, outreach and mission, and he strives to assist students, both lay and clergy, to understand and utilize contemporary communication media as they prepare for leadership in the parish. Mr. Stewart teaches courses in the Integrative Theology area, including evangelism, stewardship, parish administration, and use of media. 9

The Rev. Robert b. Robinson, PhD
anna C. burkhalter Professor, old Testament and Hebrew (1989) BA, Ursinus College, 1969; MDiv, Yale Divinity School, 1974; PhD, Yale University, 1982. Dr. Robinson is deeply interested in the theory and practice of interpretation of the Bible, and particularly in the application of current literary techniques to interpretation. Behind that interest is a desire to see the Bible read with understanding and confidence by all Christians. Approaching the Bible as a consummately profound literary work allows the sort of disciplined observation and probing discussion that leads to deeper understanding of the Word of God for our lives. He has written a commentary on the Book of

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

The Rev. nelson Rivera, PhD

Genesis, a commentary that uses such familiar literary terms as character, plot, theme and allusion to knit together a holistic picture of the book. At the same time he is researching the history of interpretation of Genesis, studying the many brilliant early readers to learn what they saw as most important in each passage and how that message spoke to the life of their community of faith. Besides the books of Genesis and Job, Dr. Robinson’s area of expertise includes biblical Hebrew, as well as the Old Testament’s milieu, social models, and worldviews.

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The Rev. Timothy J. Wengert, PhD
Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor, Reformation History (1989) BA, University of Michigan, 1972; MA, 1973; MDiv, Luther Seminary, 1977; PhD, Duke University, 1984; Pastorates in Minnesota and Wisconsin, 1977-78, 1983-89. Dr. Wengert brings to LTSP a career-long interest in Lutheran history, particularly as it relates to Martin Luther, Philip Melanchthon and the Lutheran Confessions. An author of many books and scholarly articles, his published works include his dissertation on Melanchthon’s interpretation of John’s Gospel. Dr. Wengert is the co-editor of the English edition of The Book of Concord (Augsburg Fortress, 2000), used throughout the ELCA. His work includes two other books on Philip Melanchthon: Human Freedom, Christian Righteousness (Oxford University Press, 1998), which focuses on Melanchthon’s relation to Erasmus, and Law and Gospel (Baker Books, 1997), which concentrates on Luther’s relation to John Agricola and the third use of the law. In 2000 Dr. Wengert was awarded the Melanchthon Prize by the City of Bretten, Germany, for contributions to the field of Reformation scholarship, the first American to win this award. With Prof. Gordon Lathrop he published essays on ecclesiology, Christian Assembly (Fortress, 2004). His latest book is A Formula for Parish Practice: Using the Formula of Concord in Congregations (Eerdmans, 2006). Dr. Wengert serves on a number of committees and board, including the ELCA Task Force for Studies in Sexuality and the Lutheran World Federation–World Mennonite Conference conversations, and is associate editor of Lutheran Quarterly. He teaches courses on Lutheran confessions, as well as Reformation history and theology.

emeriti
The Rev. LeRoy H. Aden, PhD, Luther D. Reed Professor Emeritus, Practical Theology (1967, 1994) The Rev. Robert E. Bornemann, PhD, Anna C. Burkhalter Professor Emeritus, Old Testament and Hebrew (1953, 1993) The Rev. Robert G. Hughes, PhD, St. John Professor Emeritus, Homiletics (1972, 2002) The Rev. Dr. Gordon W. Lathrop, ThD, Charles A. Schieren Professor Emeritus, Liturgy (1984, 2004) The Rev. John H. P. Reumann, PhD, DD, Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor Emeritus, New Testament and Greek (1951, 1995) The Rev. Andrew J. White, PhD, Peter Paul and Elizabeth Hagan Professor Emeritus, Practical Theology (1967, 1997)

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st. John’s (summit, nJ) Visiting Professors
2001-2002: The Rev. Dr. William G. Rusch 2002-2003: The Rev. Dr. H. George Anderson 2004-2005: Dr. Carter Lindberg 2005-2006, 2006-2007: Dr. Larry Rasmussen

Regular Visiting lecturers and Professors
The Rev. Ralph C. Ciampa, Chaplain, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, UTI Clinical Practicum Ms. Colleen Clemens, Academic Writing The Rev. Dr. Guy Collins, Anglican Theology The Rev. Dr. Sudarshana Devadhar, United Methodist History, Polity, and Doctrine Mr. Michael P. Heinsdorf, German The Rev. Dr. John A. Jorgenson, Pastoral Care of the Aging Dr. Sally L. Kerr, Christian Education The Rev. Dr. William B. McClain, Homiletics and Worship Mr. Mark A. Mummert, Seminary Musician, Liturgy and Music The Rev. Dr. James A. Pollard, Sr., Hebrew and Old Testament The Rev. Dr. William Staton, Jr., Pastoral Care The Rev. Dr. Walter H. Wagner, DMin Collegial Seminar The Rev. Dr. David J. Wartluft, Spirituality The Rev. Andrew H. Willis, Church of God in Christ History, Polity, and Doctrine

Visiting lecturers and Professors
2006-2007: The Rev. Dr. David D. Daubert The Rev. Dr. Maria E. Erling Mr. Conrad Hackett

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

The Rev. Michael C. Linderman The Rev. Dr. John Samuel Raj Dr. Larry Robbins The Rev. Dr. Paul E. Rorem The Rev. Dr. William G. Rusch The Rev. Dr. Horace O. Russell 2007-2008: The Rev. Dr. Philip Baker The Rev. Dr. Karen L. Bloomquist The Rev. Dr. Sarah Henrich The Rev. Dr. James R. Nieman

The Rev. Thomas E. Maehl First Lutheran Church, Waltham, MA The Rev. Lee M. Miller II St. John (Mayfair) Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, PA The Rev. Gary E. Mills Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Brooklyn, NY The Rev. Terry Allen Moe Redeemer Lutheran Church, Portland, OR The Rev. Susan E. Nagle Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, Forestville, CT The Rev. Thomas Neel Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Kreidersville, PA The Rev. Heidi B. Neumark Trinity of Manhattan Lutheran Church, New York, NY The Rev. Fred S. Opalinski Incarnation Lutheran Church, Reading, PA The Rev. Kathleen O. Reed Christ Lutheran Church, Natick, MA The Rev. Robert R. Schoepflin Abiding Presence Lutheran Church, Fort Salonga, NY The Rev. Gordon E. Simmons, II Reformation Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, PA The Rev. Roger W. Spencer Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Glen Rock, NJ The Rev. Gregory A. Tennermann King of Kings Lutheran Church, New Windsor, NY The Rev. William A. Vanderslice St. Paul Lutheran Church, Red Hill, PA The Rev. Janice A. Vogt Grace Lutheran Church, Norristown, PA

Internship supervisors and sites
2005-2006 The Rev. Richard B. Baumann St. Paul Lutheran Church, Allentown, PA The Rev. Michael J. Bodnyk Faith Lutheran Church, Whitehall, PA The Rev. Joanne A. Bond Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, Babylon, NY The Rev. Kelly Chatman Redeemer Lutheran Church, Minneapolis, MN The Rev. Steven D. Dorsett First Lutheran Church, Chambersburg, PA The Rev. John P. Dougherty St. Stephen Lutheran Church, Feasterville, PA The Rev. James R. Egan St. Paul Lutheran Church, East Windsor Twp, NJ The Rev. Richard H. Elliott Holy Spirit Lutheran Church, Emmaus, PA The Rev. Susan F. Fox Robeson Lutheran Church, Mohnton, PA The Rev. Michael C. Gebhart St. Michael Lutheran Church, Cherry Hill, NJ The Rev. Ross S. Goodman St. Paul Lutheran Church, Arlington, MA The Rev. Douglas G. Grant Turtle River Ministry, Larimore, ND The Rev. Scott L. Harris St. John Lutheran Church, Stamford, CT The Rev. Wolfgang D. Herz-Lane Bridge of Peace Community Church, Camden, NJ The Rev. David H. Hinkelman Trinity Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, PA The Rev. John B. Hougen St. John’s Lutheran Church, Melrose Park, PA

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The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

The Rev. Dr. William Levering

The Rev. Rosa M. Key Trinity Lutheran Church, Philadelphia, PA

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administration & students

aDMInIsTRaToRs anD sTaff
President ......................................................................................................................Philip D. W. Krey [Chief executive; planning; church relations; development; alumni/ae relations; Chair of the Faculty] Executive Assistant to the President .....................................................Lois A. LaCroix Director of Communications ......................................................................... John Kahler Creative Producer/Publications..........................................................Merri L. Brown Writer-Producer/Public Relations.....................................................Molly Campbell Mailroom Coordinator ....................................................................... Jarrod Caldwell Director of Information Systems ....................................................................Kyle Barger User Support Technician ................................................................. Robert G. Hensil Dean ......................................................................................................................... J. Paul Rajashekar [Coordination of academic programs; faculty development and support; student academic support; oversight of Library and Urban Theological Institute; coordination of international student services] Director of Admissions ........................................................................ Louise Johnson Director of Student Services ......................................................................Marcia G. Bell Director of Seminary Services, Evening Program ..................................Eloise R. Scott Registrar .........................................................................................................René Diemer Financial Aid Officer ................................................................................Louis M. Bugno Administrative Assistant to the Dean ..................................................... Diana Downey Faculty Assistant .........................................................................................Carrie Schwab Administrative Assistant for Enrollment Services .........................Shannon Hagarty Administrative Assistant for Enrollment Services ...................................Lyn Jackson executive Director of the foundation .....................................................................Glenn D. Miller [Administrative coordination and oversight; planning; resource development and asset management] Associate Director for Alumni/Annual Fund .........................................Ellen Anderson Associate Director for Grants............................................................. Natalie K. Hand Manager of Administration ........................................................................ James Walker Manager of the Database............................................................ Kathleen A. Afflerbach Deployed Staff—New England ...............................................................Paul D. Sinnott Andrew E. V. Krey Deployed Staff—Metro New York ........................................................... Paul L. Brndjar James E. Sudbrock Richard A. Miller Deployed Staff—New Jersey .....................................................................Jan Schnitzlein Chief financial officer .................................................................................................. Curtis Haynes [Business Office; finance and budget; physical plant; security; campus housing; food services; guests and facilities use; insurance] Business Office Manager ..................................................................... Bayeh Thompson Business Office Administrator ..............................................................Lisa Hutchinson Junior Accountant ..................................................................................... Martin Schwab Hospitality and Events Coordinator..............................................................Rita Faison Facilities Coordinator ................................................................................... Lisa Dawson Grounds Supervisor ............................................................................. Keith Lingenfelter Brossman Welcome Center Receptionist ......................................Stephanie Ammons

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THe lIbRaRY
Director of the library ................................................................................................Karl D. Krueger Acquisitions Assistant......................................................................... Ronald Townsend Technical Services Librarian ................................................................... Lois R. Reibach Public Services Assistant ............................................................................ Sharon Baker Archives and Library Project Manager ................................................... Mary Redline

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

aDMInIsTRaTIon anD GoVeRnanCe

faCUlTY aDMInIsTRaTIVe aPPoInTMenTs
advanced Degree Programs (Graduate school) Associate Dean of Graduate Education ............................. Margaret A. Krych Assistant for Graduate Education .............................................Sara Calderón black Church Concentration Director........................................................................................Stephen G. Ray Chapel and Music Chaplains .......................................................................................Dirk G. Lange ............................................................................... Melinda A. Quivik Seminary Musician ...............................................................Mark A. Mummert Contextual education Director of Contextual Education ..................................Charles R. Leonard [Field Education, Ministry Action/Reflection; Clinical Pastoral Education, Internship] Administrative Assistant for Contextual Education ................. Lucille Hall Coordinator for Rotational Field Education ..............................Marcia Bell Coordinator for Site Placement Field Education.................... Louis Bugno Institute for ecumenical and Inter-religious Dialogue Director................................................................................... J. Paul Rajashekar Instituto de Teología y Pastoral Director.......................................................................................... Nelson Rivera Multicultural Mission Resource Center Director................................................................................................................... Metropolitan/Urban Ministry Concentration Advisor ..................................................................................................Katie Day Program Coordinator .................................................... Theresa Youngblut Urban Theological Institute Director ................................................................................... Stephen G. Ray

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anCIllaRY PRoGRaMs anD seRVICes
augsburg-fortress seminary bookstore Manager ....................................................................... Heidi Rodrick-Schnaath facilities Maintenance (Professional services) Director ...................................................................................... Kevin Lycette faith and life Institute Directors..........................................................................................Mark Staples .......................................................................................... George E. Keck lTsP HelpDesk (Phones and Computers) Director of Information Systems.....................................................Kyle Barger lutheran archives Center at Philadelphia Curator ..................................................................................... John E. Peterson Media Center Director. ............................................................................................. John Kahler Refectory (CURa) Director............................................................................................. John Kopyar Dining Room Service Manager ................................................ Diane Koenig safety and security Safety and Security Supervisor ............................................ Vincent Ferguson Staff Supervisor ............................................................... Jonathan Robinson Theological education with Youth Director................................................................................................................... Program Coordinator.............................................................. Carrie Schwab

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

administration & students

CHaIR of THe boaRD................................Addie J. Butler Vice-Chair........................................................Sara E. Lilja secretary .........................................................Cynthia L. Krommes assistant secretary .......................................John A. Kaufmann Treasurer.........................................................John O. Heck PResIDenT of THe seMInaRY .............Philip D. W. Krey eXeCUTIVe CoMMITTee The offcers of the Board and the president of the seminary, and Nelvin Vos, Jack Bradt, Lynn Askew, Carl. W. Phelps, David R. Strobel, and Rolf Hedsberg. boaRD of TRUsTees The Board of Trustees is composed of twenty-four members: fifteen elected by the synods of Region 7; six elected by the Vocation and Program (V&E) Unit of the ELCA; two Bishops of Region 7, elected by their peers; and the President of the Seminary. Trustees serve three-year terms through June 30 of the year shown. THe sYnoDs of ReGIon 7 Metropolitan New York New England New Jersey Northeastern Pennsylvania Class of 2007 The Rev. Dr. Rolf L. Hedberg Ms. Sonja Hegymegi The Rev. Cynthia L. Krommes Class of 2008 Dr. Robert F. Blanck Ms. Susan M. Fayle Ms. Lorraine Knapp Class of 2009 Mr. L. Jack Bradt The Rev. Carol A. Fryer Mr. John D. Heck eleCTeD bY V&e Ms. Lynn H. Askew - 2007 Dr. Addie J. Butler - 2007 Ms. Priscilla Kinney - 2009 The Rev. Nancy A. Milleville - 2008 RePResenTInG THe bIsHoPs Bishop E. Roy Riley, Jr. - 2009

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Slovak Zion Southeastern Pennsylvania Upstate New York

Mr. William C. O’Hara The Rev. Dr. John C. Richter

The Rev. Sara E. Lilja Ms. Betty A. Pettit

Dr. Earl A. Marsan Mr. Carl W. Phelps

Ms. Amanda Smoot - 2008 Dr. Nelvin L. Vos - 2009 The Rev. Dr. Andrew Willis - 2007

Bishop David R. Strobel - 2008

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

THe boaRD of TRUsTees

THe foUnDaTIon
Established in 1996, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia Foundation exists to advance the mission of the seminary by strengthening relationships between the seminary and its constituents with the goal of undergirding the mission of the seminary and strengthening its financial position. Its primary objectives are fund raising and asset management. sTaff of THe foUnDaTIon The Rev. Glenn D. Miller, Executive Director The Rev. Ellen Anderson, Associate Director for Alumni/Annual Fund Ms. Natalie K. Hand, Associate Director for Grants Mr. James Walker, Manager of Administration Mrs. Kathleen A. Afflerbach, Manager of the Database The Rev. Paul D. Sinnott, Deployed Staff - New England The Rev. Andrew E. V. Krey, Deployed Staff - New England The Rev. Dr. Paul L. Brndjar, Deployed Staff - Metro New York The Rev. James E. Sudbrock, Deployed Staff - Metro New York The Rev. Richard A. Miller, Deployed Staff - Metro New York Ms. Jan Schnitzlein, Deployed Staff - New Jersey boaRD of DIReCToRs Robert F. Blanck (Chair), Glenn D. Miller (Executive Director), John Heck (Secretary), Wesley Astheimer, Robert H. Buescher, Addie Butler, Kenneth Daly, James A. Greenleaf, Carla P. Haugen, Robert G. Hughes, Paul Jann, Philip D.W. Krey, Robert Lauman, Janet Huber Neff, Walter Reimet, Fred E. Risser, Howard I. Rundquist ResoURCe DeVeloPMenT: oPPoRTUnITIes foR GIVInG Students at LTSP pay only a fraction of the actual cost of their education. The rest comes from generous gifts from congregations, synods, friends, alumni/ae, businesses, trustees, Faculty and staff, and from endowment income from previous gifts. The seminary is grateful for the support of its donors and welcomes additional gifts for preparing leaders for service in our Church. The seminary continually works to upgrade its facilities and welcomes gifts to assist in renewing its historic campus. Many opportunities are available to be given in memory or honor of loved ones. Gifts may provide immediate and direct support of current programs, or they may provide special funds and endowments for perpetual support of the seminary’s mission. Among the forms of support to be considered by donors are The Annual Leadership Fund Gifts of stock, real estate and other appreciated assets Student aid funds Capital needs for campus renewal Planned Giving Opportunities, including Charitable Gift Annuities Deferred Charitable Gift Annuities Trusts Other Life Income Opportunities Bequests for information concerning gift arrangements, call: The Rev. Glenn Miller, lTsP foundation, 1-800-286-4616, extension 7304. Please remember the seminary in your will.

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administration & students

DeGRees ConfeRReD—2005
CeRTIfICaTes of sTUDY Nancy Burton Dilliplane Elizabeth Anne Haines Richard H. Kremer Carolyn Vetter Tryggestad aDVanCeD GRaDUaTe CeRTIfICaTe Robert Lee Helton, Jr. Charles Edward Kershaw THe DeGRee of MasTeR of aRTs In RelIGIon Scott Stephen Reeder THe DeGRee of MasTeR of DIVInITY Michael P. Anderson Frances Darnella Maxwell Baxter2 Manuel Mathew Biagas4 Karyn Denise Bodenschatz Delores Russell Brown Jacqueline Gale Capers4 Heeralal Cheedie Lula Glass Custis4 Romeo Karamchand Dabee Laura Kathleen Daly Diedoné Panzo Diela3 Michael Kenneth Evans, Sr.4 Joseph D. Faust Tonia Regina Graham4 Brent Kevin Halverson Curtis Anthony Haynes4 Cheryl A. Hensil Brenda Bracy Jack3 A. Dianne Johnson4 Alberta Jones4

faculty 2Master of Divinity Degree awarded with Certificate attesting to successful completion of Urban Concentration requirements 3Master of Divinity Degree awarded with Certificate attesting to successful completion of Latino concentration requirements 4Master of Divinity Degree completed through the Urban Theological Institute

THe DeGRee of MasTeR of saCReD THeoloGY Shadrack Ndiwa Andiema Roldano Auguste Kathleen Elizabeth Brennan Eric Sean Childers Sandra Kathrine Cizek-Wood Divendra Randolph Etwaroo Edwin A. Fernando Julia Lee Fraser Carver Washington Israel Jonathan Scott Riches THe DeGRee of DoCToR of MInIsTRY Brian W. Armen David Arthur Brown Emmanuel Mwanga Chemengich1 Susan Cole Catherine Cook Davis Catherine Jamieson-Ogg Abraham Cheng Shin Lu Wanda E. McNeill Mark Richard Summer 1Doctor of Ministry Degree awarded with distinction by vote of
the faculty

99

Irving Courtley Jones4 Brian E. Klawiter-Benton David O. Maddox II Eva Joyce Martin4 Jo Ellen Mauger Barbara Melosh1 Michael A. Metz Kenneth Mitchem4

DeGRees ConfeRReD—2006
CeRTIfICaTes of sTUDY Katrin Berger Johannetta Cornell Kathleen Marie Walter aDVanCeD GRaDUaTe CeRTIfICaTe George Andrew Engelhart III Wilbert Smith Miller Merrill Louise Woolnough THe DeGRee of MasTeR of aRTs In RelIGIon Karen Warker Bernhardt Natalie Carlson Bloomquist1
The Catalog / 2006–2008

Natalie D. Mitchem4 Reginald A. Monte, Jr.4 JoEllen Morrison3 Ernst A. Mossl Christina Nord Thomas M. O’Brien, Jr. Peter J. L. Perella1 H. Theodore Proudford III4 Carlton E. Rodgers4 Karen B. Safstrom1 Giovanny F. Sanchez3

section Title

ReGIsTeR of sTUDenTs

John Patrick Seyler3 Gregory B. Shreaves A’Shellarien Smith Jonathan William Suloff Preston E. Thompson, Jr. 1, 4 Gloria W. Walker4 Rose Marie Wilkins4 Steven Paul Aaron Woyen Richard Stephen Yost 1Master of Divinity Degree awarded with Honors by vote of the

Randall Mark Claney Timothy Adam Cook Mary E. Houston James L. Ley Deborah Payson Molly Elizabeth Wilson Joseph J. Zerby, Jr. 1Master of Arts in Religion Degree awarded with Honors by
vote of the faculty 

00

THe DeGRee of MasTeR of DIVInITY June Elva Bair Nathan Lehman Baker-Trinity1 Tracy L. Bass1, 3 Gervine Ragin Bell3 Kathleen L. Blaner1 Christine Anne Dawson Bridge2 Elizabeth Green Brunton3 Ann L. Colley Giselle Carvalho Côrte-Real do Amaral Coutinho1 Julie Anne Crosby San Miguel2 Moses Suah-Dennis Jeffery Gaskin, Sr. 3 Kathryn Ruth Gosswein Lura N. Groen1 Kathleen D. R. Harkness Patricia L. Harris1 Gregory G. Holston3 Gregory Raymond Huth Suzanne H. Walls Kershaw3 Donna Jean Kiessling Darryl Will Kozak James Robert Krombholz John Lewis, Sr. 3 John Michael Longworth1 Gloria Dean Meeks3 Jessica K. Merchant Paul Nicholas Desaulniers Miller1 Nancy Lynn Penrod Moore Gomes Pedro Audrey J. Reid Robert A. Scheurer Nathaniel Lee Shaw, Jr. 3 Kevin Thomas Shock Ryan Douglas Gabriel Stout1 James Lawrence Thibodeaux Kevin Arthur Wardlaw3 Eli E. Washington3 Lynn Elizabeth Aprill Webb Lee Ann Zandstra1 1Master of Divinity Degree awarded with Honors by vote of the
faculty 2Master of Divinity Degree awarded with Certificate attesting to successful completion of Latino concentration requirements 3Master of Divinity Degree completed through the Urban Theological Institute

THe DeGRee of MasTeR of saCReD THeoloGY Louis Michael Bugno Michael Andrew Dubsky Llewellyn Murphy Lantz Walter H. Lichtenberger Marjorie J. Neal Jennifer Phelps Ollikainen Joel William Pancoast Anna Christine Garbisch Sorenson Joan D. Sorenson Elna Lindstrom Stratton Kimberly Miller van Driel THe DeGRee of DoCToR of MInIsTRY Johan Arndt Anders Bergh Stephen J. Heetland Elizabeth Carter Langensiepen Joseph J. Scholtes, Jr. Brian J. Stamm Kipp W. Zimmermann

2005-06 sTUDenT ReGIsTeR
The Master of Divinity Program
Class of 2006 Bair, June E. Baker-Trinity, Nathan L. Bass, Tracy L. (UTI) Bell, Gervine (UTI) Blaner, Kathleen L. Bridge, Christine Dawson Brunton, Elizabeth A. (UTI) Colley, Ann L. Coutinho, Giselle C. Crosby San Miguel, Julie A. Dennis, Moses S. Gaskin, Jeffery (UTI) Gosswein, Kathryn R. Groen, Lura N. Harkness, Kathleen D. R. Harris, Patricia L. Holston, Gregory G. (UTI) Huth, Gregory R. Kershaw, Suzanne H. (UTI) Kiessling, Donna Jean (UTI) Kozak, Darryl W. Krombholz, James R. Lewis, John, Sr. (UTI) Longworth, John M. Meeks, Gloria D. (UTI) Merchant, Jessica K. Miller, Paul N. Moore, Nancy L. Pedro, Gomes Rassmann, Mark-Anthony, Sr. (UTI) Reid, Audrey J. Scheurer, Robert A. Shaw, Nathaniel L., Jr. (UTI) Shock, Kevin T. Stout, Ryan D. Thibodeaux, James L. Walter, Kathleen M. Wardlaw, Kevin A. (UTI) Washington, Eli E. (UTI) Webb, Lynn E. Zandstra, Lee A. Class of 2007 Bishop, Christopher M. Burems, Donald, Sr. Chappell, Veronica D. Cover, Virginia J.

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

administration & students

Dassin, Franklin S. Davis, Mary E. (UTI) Dean, Marjorie A. DiFranco, Eileen M. Diroff, Nicole D. Eikerenkoetter, Marian G. (UTI) Evenson, Andrew J. Fernando, Lois Frischmann, Margaret D. Grice, Korey V. Hartner, Annemarie Hauser, Nancy Tayler Hayes, Margaret L. Hodgetts, William T., Jr. Jones, Sandra I. Kay, Edward N. Kern, Travis E. Kingstorf, Jennifer Kobb, Margaret Lynn B. Kohl, Karin E. Kohn, Carolyn R. Lackey, Richard E. (UTI) Lang, Sarah E. Lewis, Stephen M. (UTI) Livingston, Edward L. G. Livingston, Emily Ann Mattson, Ari D. McKillip, Michael A. Mentzer, Rebecca E. Montford, Janet (UTI) Neal, James M. Neale, Patricia G. Nienstedt, William B. Novak, JoAnna M. Parker, Mark E. Pope, Stephanie K. Sosnin, Susan H. Stange, Todd M. Storr, Arnold C. (UTI) Wilson, Joshua R. Wolfe, Deborah A. Zehmer, James B. Class of 2008 Anderson, Marsha K. Hansen, Arnold Krey, Benjamin T. Kroeze, William R. Lammi, Kurt M. Marston, Jane M. McGarry, Joseph L. Middeke, Rebecca E. Miller, Danielle L. Niketh, Jonathan R. Obrecht, Paulette K. Plummer, Charles B. Read, M. Kathleen Ruggles, Andrew P. Schmidt, Miriam A. E. Strobel, Erika L. Theobald, Emilie E. Weiland, Cora L. Class of 2009 Beckwith, Nancy J. Bleam, Wende L. Crouch, Megan C. Eckbold, Earl K. Esposito, Laura E. Goodson, Andrew D. Harris, Marissa S. Hartford, Flora M. Mantovani, Joseph McCullough, Mary A. Ortiz, Leila M.Lat Peterson, Lorraine E. Rajagopal, Doris E. Rea, Stacey-Kyle S. Reynolds, Deborah A. Rowe, A. Rebecca Rush, Carla M. Schaeffer, Kristina E. Sedzro, Miriam E. Smith, James D. Spaulding, Suzanne M.

fourth-Year/Post-MDiv Internship Auguste, Roldano Childers, Eric S. Holben, Brian R. Mossl, Ernst A. Sanchez, Giovanny F. Scholtes, Michael J. MDiv students on leave of absence Saul, Thomas L. open Class Anderson, Flora J. (UTI) Barksdale, A. Lois (UTI) Cederstrom, Robert T. Cohen, Edward S. Coleman, Lisa R. (UTI) Collier, Mary Ellen (UTI) Davidson, Robert M. Gay, Jeanne E. Gleiter, Donald P. Glover, Traci B. Goodrich, Kenneth L., II Goodyear, James L., Jr. Goyins, Theodore R., Jr. (UTI) Grayson, Narie L. (UTI) Hahn, Trevor J. Hartel, Arthur P., Jr. House, Donna M. Hutchins, Susan E. Johnson, Reginald W., II Jones, Susan S. Kem, Paula A. King, Dale M. King, Steven P. Leatherbury, Philip B. (UTI) Lee, Bum Ho Lewis, Maria L. Henderson (UTI) Mannix, W. Robert Martin, Natalie F. McConnell, Matthew E. McDuffy, Joell D. (UTI) Nelson, Janis R. Paige, Rita M. (UTI) Pokorny, Gail G. Raines, Elizabeth (UTI) Rhoades, Stephanie K. Richie, Rebecca R. Ross, Gregory Royster, Dwayne D. (UTI) Savage, Frances E. Scheible-Yost, Rachel A. Schmidt, Christoph P. Smith, Jennifer A. Smith, Linwood M., Jr. (UTI) Stevenson, Anthony C. (UTI) Summy, Christine L. Warfield, Rodney E. 

0

The Master of arts in Religion Program
Class of 2006 Bernhardt, Karen W. Bloomquist, Natalie C. Claney, Randall M. Cook, Timothy A. Houston, Mary E. (UTI) Ley, James L. Payson, Deborah Wilson, Molly E. Zerby, Joseph J., Jr. Class of 2007 Boyd, Evan E. Calderwood, Megan J. Davis, Jessica L. Fenderson, Faith F. Hafer, Tom P. Howard, Shane L.

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

Tonnesen, Mark R. Valigorsky, Mark S. Warren, J. Lena Wright, Josephine M.

Keiter, Shirley L. Lefever, Valerie A. Rice, Marva R. Rowehl, Carol A. Schaeffer, Gary P., Jr MaR students on leave of absence Wheeler, L. Justin open Class Alderfer, Cheryl A. Armstrong, Adel Blum, Lauren A. Boston, Keisha T. (UTI) Caldwell, Benjamin D. Connelly, Theresa A. Dalton, Robert D. Goins, Lani M. Guyer, Joshua K. Kinsey, Thomas A. Kinzler, Marie E. Lybrand, Stephen E. McCaslin, H. Kenneth Pettaway, Noreen Smith, Lindsay M. Stephens, Mildred B. Wilcox, Allison S. 

0

special students

Alves, Sozinho Berger, Katrin Charity, Stanley R. Cornell, Johannetta Davenport, Patricia A. Fiore, Joyce C. Ifland, Petra G. Koch, Carol A. Lawrence, William A. Mason, Dwight Mwakabonga, Ipyana K. Santiago, Rashion V. Sanvee, George A. Washington, Joel S. Wollo, Daniel K.

affiliated students

Batchelor, D. Shelby Bauck, Peter L. (Yale Divinity School) Converse, Judith R. (Andover Newton) Dunlap, Julia B. (Yale Divinity School) Haines, Elizabeth A., (Moravian Theological Seminary) Higle, Robert A. (Ecumenical Theological Seminary) Jones, E. Oliver (Andover Newton) Kremer, Richard H. (Andover Newton) Kuba, Jacqueline R. (Moravian Theological Seminary) Mays-Holder, Janis L. (Princeton Theological Seminary) Nelson-Colaneri, Susan P. (Princeton Theological Seminary) Olsen, Donna M. (General Theological Seminary) Pioske, Daniel D. (Princeton Theological Seminary) Rinas, Joshua D. (Yale Divinity School) Schwalbe, Nicole M. (Duke University Divinity School) Stahler, Jared R. (Yale Divinity School) Stevenson, Charles N. (Yale Divinity School) Thatcher, Jay R., III (Moravian Theological Seminary) Tryggestad, Carolyn V. (Andover Newton) Vogel, George E. (Andover Newton) Wills, Jonathan C. (Yale Divinity School) Wogaman, Christopher E. (Yale Divinity School)

Dolich, Maritza Torres Dougherty, Stacie E. Dubsky, Michael A. Faust, Joseph D. Garrett, Marsha S. Glimp, Guy L. Guillory, J. Brennen Harrell, Robert L., III Harris, Carla D. Herz-Lane, Margaret E. Huffman, Mark A. G. Johnson, Daniel J. Keiser, Stephen A. Kletzing, Joel C. Lantz, Llewellyn M. Laubenstein, Matthew J. Luper, Terri E. C. Macwan, Smita O. Madigan, Karen E. McCarty, Robert D. McMullan, J. Christian Morrison, JoEllen Nakirerio, James R. Neal, Marjorie J. Neilson, Christopher A. Nischal, J. Naveen Nord, Christina O’Brien, Thomas M., Jr. Ollikainen, Jennifer Phelps Ortiz, Omar I. Pancoast, Joel W. Pearson, John G. Perella, Peter J. Rabell-González, Nelson H. Reist, Michael L. Rios-Sanchez, Lyzette Seales, Esther L. Smith, A’Shellarien D. Sorenson, Anna C. G. Sorenson, Joan D. Stratton, Elna L. Strietelmeier, Charles R. Summers, Kendall B. Thomas, Andréa L. Thurston, Linda J. Trump, Suzanne M. Van Driel, Kimberly M. Walker, Gloria W. Wood, Andrew J. Woolnough, Merrill L. Wright, Nancy G. Youngblut, Theresa M. Zippilli, Mario L. sTM students on leave of absence Brennan, Robert L.

The Doctor of Ministry Program
Anderson, Ellen M. Anderson, Kenneth A. Andrews, Dianne P. Babcock, Kevin A. Basal, Patrick R. Bass, Aaron C., Jr. Bass, Jade King Baumann, Richard B. Bergh, Johan A. A. Booth, Steven A. Braun, Katherine B. Burkett Dearhamer, Timothy A. Carlsson, Andrew E. Carroll, Julius Cholke, Robert W. Conner, Paul B. Cross, Ellen S. Daniel, Joseph Davey, Randall E. Dayett, Bradley H. Deneen, Anne L. Donio, Thomas S. Dorr, Sharon L. Duesenberry, Stephen S. Engelhart, G. Andrew, III Faison, Dee D. Fitzsimmons, Mark E.

The Master of sacred Theology Program
AlJoe-Thurman, Lynell A. Anderson, John M. Anderson, Mary H. Andonian, Kathryn A. Anglada, Angel-David Auxter, Mark S. Baker, Kathleen J. Baker-Trinity, Jennifer L. Blair, Janet E. Bn Sdriq, Yrmah Brown, David L. Bugno, Louis M. Crompton, Sherry A. Dabee, Romeo K. Deal, Donna T.

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

administration & students

Flammann, William H. Forsberg, Linda R. Frizzell, Thomas K., Jr. Frost, Michael A. George, Jacob Gillan, Garth J. Gohl, William J., Jr. Graeser, James E., Jr. Guider, Shirley S. Hartney, Peter M., Jr. Hedman, Douglas V. Heetland, Stephen J. Heffelfinger, Harry L., Jr. Held, Gregory B. Henning-Ferkin, Krista L. Hoogland, Kevin J. Irsch, Leona M. Isaacs, Mark D. Israel, Carver W. Johnson, Richard W. Johnson, Wylie W. Jones, David W. Knecht, Jon D. Knobler, Carla H. Krahn, Mary L. Krommes, Cynthia L. Langensiepen, Elizabeth C. LaRiviere-Mestre, Ivis J. Lee, Byoung Su Looker, Catherine, SSJ Lozano, Michael L. Lunow, Ulf B. Martin, Lois D. Maurer, Kerry P. McMasters, Bernadette M. Miller, Lee M., II Miller, Wilbert S. Min, Aye Myles, James W., III Neale, Alan J. R. Nelson, Frank L. Newswanger, Richard G. Nuesch, Osvaldo D. Nummela, Tiina H. Nurk, Heino O’Farrell, Cornelius O. Peterson, Kristine A. Pilger, Peter L. Powell, Catherine S. Rawl, Leon A. Riches, Jonathan S. Rourk, Marguerite M. Ruppar, Kenneth M. Salmon, Ann J. Schneider, Eugene Wm., III Schoenfeld, Frederick H. Scholtes, Joseph J., Jr. Shellhamer, Ronald E. Silverstein, Philip Simurro, Kenneth G., Jr. Smith, Philip K. Stamm, Brian J. Stevens Poirel, Sandra Stewart, Richard N. Strømmen, Cecilie Jørgensen Stumpf, Karl E. H. Sturdivant, Janet Jenkins Sweitzer, Jennifer L. Thom, Rodwell G. Varghese, Sabu Verkouw, Stephen P. Wall, Tom H. B. Weathers, Wayne M. Wilkins-Arnold, Meredith A. Williams, John F. Yondura, Sophie M. Young, Karen K. Zeiders, Joel L. Zimmermann, Kipp W. Zschech, P. Wayne DMin students on leave of absence Anderson, Kristen K.

Cooper, Derek T. Howard, Charles L. Thuan, San No

The first Professional level non-Matriculant Program
Alexander, William A. Ammons, Stephanie V. Baker, Edward B. Boone, Ernie L., II Cornell, Joseph C. Friend, Erik B. Gohl, Justin M. Goodrich, Regina D. Graf, Deborah M. Grauel, Jacqueline M. (LTSG) Henry, Nadine S. Hyden, Marlene S. Indivero, Virginia M. Jones, Cynthia R. (LTSG) Lawson, David S. Loucks, Diane M. Lutz, Jerry W. Mariani, Kathryn R. Nelson, Gregory P. (LTSG) Richardson, Tanya R. (Palmer) Roberts, Michael Schaeffer, Kathleen M. (LTSG) Sharpe, Sheila G. Shepherd, Deborah R. Smith, Debra G. 

0

The Graduate level non-Matriculant Program
Collinson-Streng, Paul S. Esposito, Cheryl-Ann Faust, Gerald W. Hiebert, Jared R. (Westminster) Imbert, Yannick F. (Westminster) Kane, Jeff L. (Luther Seminary) Lathrop, Justin C. Linde, Kurt R. (LTSS) Mills, Ryan D. Monte, Reginald A., Jr. Paradise, Scott J. Purcell, Christine F. Quiñones, Nelson Shankweiler, Carl D. Shaw, C. Pierson, Jr. (LTSS) Spencer, Keith A. (Columbia) Steeves, Gary C. Swensson, Eric Sy, Charles V. (Westminster) Tachin, Philip (Westminster) Wuertele, Peggy M. Xander, Paul J.

first Prof Grad level level None/Unknown ................................................ 7 ................6 Adelphi University ........................................... 1 ................0 Agnes Scott College ........................................ 0 ................1 Albright College ............................................... 0 ................1 American University ........................................ 3 ................0 Antioch University ........................................... 1 ................0 Appalachian State University ......................... 0 ................1 Augsburg College............................................. 1 ................2 Augustana College, Rock Island .................... 1 ................0 Augustana College, Sioux Falls...................... 0 ................3 Baldwin-Wallace College ................................ 0 ................1 Baptist Bible College....................................... 1 ................0 Barnard College ............................................... 0 ................2 Bates College.................................................... 1 ................0 Baylor University .............................................. 0 ................1 Beaver College ................................................. 2 ................0 Bernard M. Baruch College............................. 0 ................1 Boston University ............................................ 1 ................2 Bowling Green State University ..................... 1 ................1 Brock University ............................................... 0 ................1 Brooklyn College (CUNY)................................ 2 ................0 Brown University .............................................. 1 ................1 California Lutheran University ....................... 1 ................0 California State Polytechnic ........................... 1 ................0 California State University, Northridge ......... 0 ................1

Register of students by College/University

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

The Doctor of Theology Program 

04

Canisius College .................................................1..............0 Capital University................................................2..............1 Carthage College.................................................0..............3 Case Western Reserve University......................0..............1 Catholic University of America..........................0..............1 Cedar Crest College ............................................1..............0 Chestnut Hill College .........................................0..............2 Cheyney University of Pennsylvania .................3..............0 City College of New York ...................................0..............2 Claflin University.................................................0..............1 Clarke College .....................................................1..............0 Colgate Universtiy...............................................0..............1 College of Charleston .........................................1..............0 College of New Jersey .........................................0..............1 College of New Rochelle ....................................1..............0 College of St. Elizabeth ......................................1..............0 College of Wooster (OH)....................................1..............0 Community College of Philadelphia ................0..............1 Concordia College, Bronxville ...........................1..............1 Concordia College-Moorhead ...........................2..............2 Concordia Senior College ..................................0..............4 Concordia Teachers College ..............................0..............1 Concordia University, Irvine, CA .......................1..............0 Concordia University Wisconsin .......................0..............1 Concordia University, St. Paul ...........................1..............0 Dartmouth College .............................................0..............1 Davis College .......................................................1..............0 Dayster University, Kenya ..................................1..............0 Delaware State College ......................................1..............0 DePaul University ...............................................1..............0 DeSales University ..............................................1..............0 Dickinson College ...............................................2..............0 Douglass College (Rutgers) ...............................1..............0 Drexel University .................................................6..............1 Duke University ...................................................1..............0 East Stroudsburg University..............................1..............1 Eastern Nazarene College .................................0..............1 Eastern University...............................................5..............0 Elizabethtown College .......................................1..............0 Empire State College, NY ..................................0..............1 Fairfield University ..............................................1..............0 Fairleigh Dickinson University...........................0..............1 Fitchburg State College......................................0..............1 Florida A & M University ....................................1..............0 Fort Valley State College ....................................0..............1 Framingham State College ................................1..............0 Franklin & Marshall College ..............................1..............0 Furman University...............................................1..............0 Geneva College .................................................10..............4 George Mason University...................................0..............1 Gettysburg College .............................................2..............4 Ghana Christian College ....................................1..............0 Greensboro College ............................................0..............1 Gustavus Adolphus College ..............................5..............1 Gwynedd-Mercy College ....................................1..............0 Hamline University .............................................0..............1 Hartwick College .................................................0..............1 Hiram College .....................................................0..............1 Houghton College...............................................0..............1 Howard University ..............................................1..............0 Hunter College of New York ..............................0..............1 Hyvinkään Uusi Yhteiskoulu, Finland ..............0..............1 Illinois State University ......................................0..............1 Immaculata College............................................2..............0 Indiana University of Pennsylvania ..................5..............2 Johns Hopkins University...................................1..............0 Juniata College ....................................................1..............0 Kean College of New Jersey ...............................0..............0 Keene State College ...........................................1..............0 Korean Baptist Christian University .................1..............0 Kutztown University............................................3..............0 Lake Superior State University..........................1..............0 LaSalle University ...............................................4..............0 Lawrence University ...........................................1..............0 Lehigh University ................................................1..............0 Lenoir-Rhyne College .........................................1..............2 LeTourneau University .......................................0..............1 Lincoln University ...............................................2..............1 Luther College.....................................................1..............1 Louisiana State University.................................0..............1 Loyola College, Baltimore .................................1..............0 Madonna University ...........................................1..............0 Mangalore University .........................................0..............1 Mansfield University of Pennsylvania ..............1..............1 Marion College ....................................................1..............0

Marshall University .............................................1..............0 Marymount College ............................................0..............1 Maryville College ................................................1..............0 Marywood University ..........................................1..............0 Medaille College .................................................0..............1 Meredith College ................................................1..............0 Michigan State University..................................2..............0 Michigan Technological University ...................1..............0 Middlebury College ............................................0..............1 Millersville University of Pennsylvania ............2..............2 Mississippi University for Women ....................1..............0 Muhlenberg College ...........................................7..............3 Mutu-Ya-Kevela College.....................................1..............0 New York University............................................1..............1 Newberry College................................................1..............1 Nichols College ...................................................1..............0 Norfolk State University .....................................1..............0 North Carolina Central University ....................0..............1 North Park College .............................................0..............1 Northeastern University .....................................1..............0 Northwestern State University ..........................0..............1 Northwestern University ....................................1..............0 New York Institute of Technology .....................1..............0 Oberlin College ...................................................1..............0 Ohio State University .........................................0..............1 Ohio Wesleyan University ..................................1..............0 Oxford University ................................................0..............1 Pacific Lutheran University................................1..............0 Palm Beach Atlantic University.........................1..............0 Peirce College......................................................2..............0 Pennsylvania State University ...........................5..............6 Philadelphia Biblical University ........................2..............1 Polytechnic University, Brooklyn.......................1..............0 Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico ..............0..............1 Pomona College..................................................0..............1 Providence College .............................................0..............1 Queens College, CUNY ......................................1..............1 Radford University ..............................................1..............0 Richard Stockton College ..................................1..............1 Rider University...................................................0..............1 Roanoke College .................................................0..............1 Rosemont College ..............................................0..............1 Rowan College of New Jersey ............................1..............1 Rutgers University...............................................1..............4 Saint Leo University ...........................................0..............1 Shawnee State University ..................................1..............0 Shenandoah University ......................................0..............1 Shepherd College ...............................................1..............0 Shippensburg University....................................1..............1 Siena College.......................................................0..............1 Simpson College .................................................3..............0 Slippery Rock University ....................................1..............0 South Carolina State University........................1..............0 Southern Illinois University ...............................1..............0 Southern New Hampshire University...............1..............0 Spring Garden College .......................................1..............0 St. Andrews College, Kenya ...............................0..............1 St. Anselm College .............................................0..............1 St. Charles Seminary ..........................................0..............1 St. John’s College ................................................1..............0 St. John’s University, Queens.............................2..............0 St. John’s University, Collegeville......................0..............1 St. Joseph’s University ........................................2..............1 St. Lawrence University......................................2..............0 State University of Haiti .....................................0..............1 SungKyul Christian University ..........................0..............1 SUNY at Albany...................................................0..............2 SUNY at Binghamton .........................................3..............0 SUNY at Buffalo ..................................................1..............0 SUNY at Fredonia ...............................................1..............0 SUNY at Potsdam ...............................................1..............0 SUNY at Stony Brook .........................................1..............0 SUNY at Syracuse ...............................................1..............0 Susquehanna University ....................................7..............3 Swarthmore College ...........................................1..............0 Tartu University ...................................................0..............1 Temple University ...............................................7..............3 Tennessee Temple University ............................0..............1 Texas A&M University.........................................0..............1 Texas Lutheran College ......................................0..............1 The Citadel...........................................................0..............1 The Defiance College..........................................1..............0 The King’s College ..............................................0..............1 Theological Faculty Kiel .....................................1..............0 Thiel College........................................................2..............1

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

administration & students

Thomas Edison State College ...........................1..............0 Thomas Jefferson University ..............................1..............0 Trevecca Nazarene University ............................0..............1 Trinity College .....................................................1..............0 Trinity Lutheran College ....................................1..............0 Tumaini University ..............................................1..............0 Union Institute ....................................................1..............0 United Wesleyan College ...................................0..............2 University of Anchorage .....................................0..............1 University of Arizona ..........................................1..............0 University of Bonn ..............................................0..............1 University of Bridgeport .....................................1..............0 University of California-Davis............................0..............1 University of Cincinnati......................................0..............1 University of Colorado at Boulder ....................1..............2 University of Delaware .......................................3..............0 University of Florida ...........................................0..............2 University of Göttingen ......................................0..............0 University of Guyana ..........................................0..............1 University of Kansas ...........................................0..............1 University of Kerala ............................................0..............2 University of Madras...........................................1..............0 University of Maine.............................................0..............1 University of Maryland .......................................3..............1 University of Maryland Baltimore .....................1..............1 University of Massachusetts..............................0..............1 University of Minnesota .....................................1..............0 University of Minnesota-Duluth .......................1..............0 University of North Carolina .............................1..............3 University of Northern Colorado ......................0..............0 University of Pennsylvania.................................2..............4 University of Phoenix .........................................1..............1 University of Pittsburgh .....................................3..............0 University of Puerto Rico ...................................1..............2 University of Richmond......................................0..............1 University of Rochester ......................................1..............0 University of South Carolina .............................0..............4 University of Texas at Austin .............................1..............1 University of Texas at Tyler ................................0..............1 University of the West Indies ............................0..............2 University of Virginia ..........................................1..............1 University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire ..................2..............0 Ursinus College ...................................................1..............0 US Naval Academy .............................................0..............2 Valparaiso University ..........................................8..............4 Vassar College .....................................................0..............1 Villanova University ............................................1..............0 Virginia Polytechnic Institute ............................2..............0 Virginia State University.....................................0..............1 Wagner College ...................................................4..............1 Wake Forest University .......................................1..............1 Wartburg College ................................................1..............0 Wayland Baptist University................................1..............0 West Chester State University ...........................8..............2 West Indies College ............................................0..............1 West Virginia University .....................................0..............1 Western Illinois University.................................0..............1 Westfield State College ......................................0..............1 Westmont College ..............................................1..............0 Wheaton College.................................................2..............1 Widener College ..................................................1..............1 William Penn University.....................................1..............0 Wittenberg University.........................................1..............2 Xavier University .................................................1..............0 Yale University.....................................................3..............1 Yangon University, Myanmar.............................0..............1 Yeshiva University ...............................................0..............1 York College of Pennsylvania ............................1..............0 Zomi Theological College ..................................0..............1

Christian University, North Haiti .......................................1 Church Divinity School of the Pacific ................................1 Colgate Rochester Divinity School ....................................2 Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne ....................1 Concordia Seminary ............................................................4 Conservative Baptist Theological Seminary .....................1 Drew University ....................................................................1 Duke University Divinity School.........................................3 Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary ..............................6 Emory University..................................................................1 Episcopal Divinity School ...................................................1 Erskine Theological Seminary ............................................1 Fordham University .............................................................1 General Theological Seminary. ..........................................2 Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary ............................2 Hamma Divinity School ......................................................1 Harvard Divinity School ......................................................2 Jewish Theological Seminary of America ..........................1 Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago .........................7 Lutheran Theological Seminary-Gettysburg...................17 LTSP .....................................................................................68 Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary ........................8 Luther Northwestern ...........................................................1 Luther Seminary...................................................................3 Moravian Theological Seminary.........................................1 Myanmar Institute of Theology ..........................................2 Nazarene Theological Seminary. ........................................2 Neumann College ................................................................1 New Brunswick Theological Seminary ..............................1 Norwegian Lutheran School of Theology .........................1 Oxford University .................................................................1 Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary.............................1 Philadelphia Theological Seminary ...................................1 Phillips Theological Seminary ............................................1 Princeton Theological Seminary. .....................................11 Providence Theological Seminary......................................1 Serampore College, India ...................................................3 Southern Baptist Theological Seminary ...........................1 St. Charles Borromeo Seminary.........................................1 St. Mary-of-the-Woods College ..........................................1 St. Paul’s United Theological College ...............................1 St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Seminary......................................1 Starr King School of Ministry .............................................1 Temple Baptist Seminary ....................................................1 Trinity Lutheran Seminary ..................................................5 Union Theological Seminary. .............................................4 United Theological College of the West Indies................1 University of Helsinki ..........................................................1 Wake Forest University ........................................................1 Wartburg Theological Seminary .........................................1 Washington Theological Union..........................................1 Western Seminary ................................................................1 Westminster Theological Seminary ...................................2 Yale Divinity School.............................................................5 

05

Graduate school students by seminary/Divinity school

None/Unknown ....................................................................3 Alliance Theological Seminary ...........................................1 Andover Newton Theological Seminary............................1 Andrews University ..............................................................1 Bethel Bible College, India .................................................1 Biblical Theological Seminary ............................................2 Boston University.................................................................1 Brite Divinity School, TCU ..................................................1 Chestnut Hill College ..........................................................1 Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary ..........................1 Christ Seminary-Seminex ...................................................2 Christ the King Seminary ....................................................1

first Professional Program Region synod 1 Eastern Washington-Idaho Synod ..................1 Oregon Synod ....................................................1 2 Sierra Pacific Synod ..........................................1 Pacifica Synod ...................................................1 Grand Canyon Synod ........................................1 3 Eastern North Dakota Synod ...........................1 Southwestern Minnesota Synod .....................3 Minneapolis Area Synod ..................................2 Southeastern Minnesota Synod......................3 4 Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast Synod .................1 5 Metropolitan Chicago Synod ...........................1 Southeastern Iowa Synod ................................1 Northwest Synod of Wisconsin .......................1 Greater Milwaukee Synod ................................1 South-Central Synod of Wisconsin .................1 6 Southeast Michigan Synod ..............................1 North/West Lower Michigan Synod ................1 Indiana-Kentucky Synod ..................................2 Southern Ohio Synod .......................................3 7 New Jersey Synod ............................................19 New England Synod .......................................20 Metropolitan New York Synod ......................14 Upstate New York Synod..................................1 Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod................23 Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod ...............41 8 Northwestern Pennsylvania Synod .................1

elCa students by Region and synod

The Catalog / 2006–2008

section Title

9

Southwestern Pennsylvania Synod .................2 Allegheny Synod................................................1 Lower Susquehanna Synod .............................9 Delaware-Maryland Synod ...............................5 Metropolitan Washington DC Synod..............3 Virginia Synod....................................................2 North Carolina Synod .....................................11 Southeastern Synod .........................................1 Florida-Bahamas Synod ...................................2 Caribbean Synod ...............................................1 

0

Graduate school Program Region synod 1 Alaska Synod .....................................................1 2 Sierra Pacific Synod ..........................................1 Pacifica Synod ...................................................1 Rocky Mountain Synod ....................................1 3 South Dakota Synod .........................................1 Northeastern Minnesota Synod ......................1 Southwestern Minnesota Synod .....................1 4 Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast Synod .................1 5 Metropolitan Chicago Synod ...........................2 East-Central Synod of Wisconsin....................1 6 Indiana-Kentucky Synod ..................................1 Northeastern Ohio Synod ................................1 Southern Ohio Synod .......................................1 7 New Jersey Synod ............................................16 New England Synod .........................................5 Metropolitan New York Synod ......................17 Upstate New York Synod..................................5 Northeastern Pennsylvania Synod................16 Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod ...............18 Slovak Zion Synod ............................................1 8 Northwestern Pennsylvania Synod .................4 Southwestern Pennsylvania Synod .................1 Allegheny Synod................................................1 Lower Susquehanna Synod .............................4 Upper Susquehanna Synod .............................4 Delaware-Maryland Synod ...............................9 Metropolitan Washington DC Synod..............4 9 Virginia Synod....................................................3 North Carolina Synod .......................................4 South Carolina Synod.......................................2 Southeastern Synod .........................................2 Florida-Bahamas Synod ...................................8 Caribbean Synod ...............................................1

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

DMin degree .................................................................41, 43-45 Accreditation ..............................................................................9 Administration ...................................................................95-96 Admission procedures......................................................13-14 ThD ...............................................................................43 Admission requirements Certificate programs..................................................34 DMin ............................................................................13 General Studies (Graduate School) .......................44 MAR..............................................................................13 MDiv .............................................................................13 STM ..............................................................................13 ThD ...............................................................................13 Affiliation (ELCA candidates)......................................... 15, 39 Alumni/ae Association..................................................... 22, 56 Apartments, campus ........................................................ 15, 20 Application for admission (see Admission procedures) Attendance (classes) ...............................................................50 Audit/auditor (academic study) ..................................... 34, 45 Board of Trustees .......................................................... 7, 53, 97 Bookstore ....................................................................... 8, 57. 96 Calendars, Academic ............................................................4, 5 Candidacy (ELCA ministry).................................19, 23, 25, 38 Certificate Programs...................................................41, 45, 57 Chestnut Hill College.................................................44, 55, 79 Choir ......................................................................................21 Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) ............................25, 27-28 Cluster (see Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries) Concentrations (MDiv) .....................................................28-30 Contextual education .......................................................27-28 Continuing education ................................................35, 45, 50 Course Scheduling ..................................................................45 Courses of instruction Formats .......................................................................48 First Professional .................................................61-82 Graduate School ..................................................82-83 Degree programs First Professional MAR ......................................................29-34 MDiv......................................................24-29 Graduate School STM .............................................................41 DMin ...........................................................43 ThD..............................................................42 Diaconal Ministry.................................................. 30, 32-33, 39 Drug/alcohol use......................................................................53 Eastern Cluster of Lutheran Seminaries ...8-9, 44, 55-56, 60 Ecclesiastical relationships ..14, 23, 25, 27-28, 30, 45, 50-57 Ecumenical ........................................................................ 55, 58 ELCA Candidacy .............................................14, 23, 25, 28, 38 Employment, student .............................................................54 Enrollment lists (see Register of Students) Episcopal Church ............................................................. 22, 56 Examination, credit by (test-out).......................15, 26, 31, 57 Extensions Course deadlines .................................24, 36-37, 47, 51, 54 Program limits......................... 25, 28, 30, 35, 41-42, 43, 47 Faculty ................................................................................85-94 Faith and Life Institute ...................................................... 8, 59 Fees, Tuition and................................................................15-17 Field Education ............................................................26-27, 31 Financial aid .......................................................................16-20 Food Service .............................................................................20 Foreign students (see International Students) Formation Groups ......................................................26, 31, 79 Foundation, The LTSP.............................................................98 General Studies (Graduate School) .............................. 41, 45 Gifts to the Seminary ..............................................................98 Global Concerns ............................................................... 26, 31 Grading practices ...............................................................47-48 Graduate School ................................................................41-48 Harassment Policy...................................................................53 Health Insurance 2 .............................................................. 1, 55 Helps Center.............................................................................57 History of Seminary............................................................... 7-9 Honors, Academic ...................................................................36 Housing (student) ............................................................ 15, 20 Independent Study ........................................................... 24, 61 Insurance Medical/health/accident .................................... 21, 55 Personal property ......................................................54 Inter-institutional relationships ......................................55-56 Intern supervisors ................................................... 28, 108-109 International Students.........................................14, 34, 43, 58 Internship ...................................................13, 15, 21, 25-30, 77 Latino Concentration (MDiv) ................................................29 Lay Theological Education (see Faith and Life Institute)
The Catalog / 2006–2008 

0

section Title

InDeX

Disciplinary action/dismissal.......................................... 35, 53

Index

Learning Communities...........................................................59 Leave of absence .......................................................................2 Lectureships .............................................................................56 Library ......................................................................................56 Loans ................................................................... 17-18, 52, 55 “Lutheran Year” .....................................................15, 38, 39, 46 MAR degree .....................................................13, 23, 24, 29-33 MDiv degree........................................................................25-28 Media Center ............................................................................57 Methodist Church........................................................56, 66-67 Metropolitan/Urban Ministry Concentration ....7, 29, 57, 74 Ministry Action/Reflection ..................................31, 33, 51, 75 Mission Statement ....................................................................8 08 Non-degree study programs Advanced Graduate Certificate ..................41, 44, 45 Audit/auditors ..................................................... 34, 45 Certificates of Study ..................................................39 General Studies, Graduate School .................. 41, 45 Lutheran Year ..........................................15, 38, 39, 46 Non-matriculant study .............................................34 Special Students ........................................................34 Oral Examination (STM).........................................................41 Overload (registration) ...........................................................36 Pastor-in-Residence Program................................................59 Payment of fees/charges...................................................14-16 Plagiarism ...........................................................................53-54 Privacy, Student right to .........................................................54 Probation, academic ...............................................................35 Project (DMin) ................................................................... 44, 47 Publications ..............................................................................22 Records, access to ...................................................................54 Refectory (see Food Service) Refunds......................................................................................16 Register of students ........................................................99-106 Regulations, academic ...............................................45, 49-54 Residence requirement ...........................15, 24-26, 31, 37, 39 Rights/privileges of students ...........................................53-54 Rules, academic (see Regulations, academic) Specializations (MAR)...................................................... 30, 32 St. John’s Lutheran Church (Summit, NJ)..................... 56, 92 Stafford Loans .............................................................17, 18, 55 STM degree ..................................................................41, 45, 47 Scholarships .................................................................17-19, 58 Security ......................................................................................54 Social Ministry...................................................8, 21, 34, 58, 75
The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Special Students ......................................................................34 Spirituality (DMin) ............................................................ 44, 55 Staff ................................................................................95-96 Student Body......................................................... 16, 20, 21-22 “Test-out” (see Examination, credit by) ThD Degree ..........................................13, 14, 15, 41, 42, 82-83 Theological Education with Youth .......................................60 Thesis (STM) ...............................................................15, 41, 47 TOEFL ..........................................................................13-14, 42 Transcripts..............................................................13, 16, 45, 52 Transfer Students.....................................................................14 Trustees, Board of ....................................................................97 Tuition and Fees.................................................................15-17 Upsala/LTSP Partnership ........................................................56 Urban Ministry (see Motropolitan/Urban) Urban Theological Institute (UTI) .................. 7, 22, 28-29, 57 Wagner College (Upsala/LTSP)..............................................56 Withdrawal From courses ...................................4, 5, 16, 35, 50, 51 From seminary ..............................................16, 46, 52 Web page.............................................................................. 2, 22 Yale Divinity School.................................................................55

The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
7301 Germantown Avenue + Philadelphia, PA 19119 215-248-4616 + 800-286-4616 + www.Ltsp.edu

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