Code of Practice for Food Handler Activities

Section 1

Introduction and Definitions

1.1

Introduction
This code of practice relates to food handler suitability and activities, and has been developed by occupational physicians who are members of the Food Industry Medical Association, a subgroup of the Society of Occupational Medicine. The main objective has been to produce a set of minimum standards, based on a sensible assessment of risk, for practical application in food businesses. The Code of Practice sets out the risk reduction measures to protect the integrity of food, with specific reference to food handler activities. In this context, it is important to distinguish issues relating to the risk of compromising food safety, from other operational requirements, eg acceptable business dress as might be applied to clothing or jewellery at work. It deals with the various circumstances when appropriate steps should be applied, the detail of how such steps should be taken and the responsibilities of those involved. Its application is intended to cover all food handler employees, whether they are directly employed, temporary or agency personnel. The relevant legal framework is the Food Safety Act 1990 and the Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations 1995, which place an obligation on all food businesses to conduct their business in such a way so as to prevent food contamination. Section 14 of the Food Safety Act 1990, states that it is an offence to sell food, which is found to be not of the nature, substance or quality. A foreign body in a product can fall into the category of selling food not of the substance demanded by the purchaser. Section 8 of the act, creates the offence of selling food, which is so contaminated, whether by extraneous matter, or otherwise that it would be unreasonable to expect it to be eaten. In addition, the Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations 1995 also requires an individual working in a food handling area to report any illness or other medical condition to their employer. It is also the legal duty of food businesses to exclude infected food handlers or those suspected of infection, from any food handling area in any capacity, where their medical condition could lead to the contamination either directly or indirectly of food with pathogenic micro-organisms. This is the responsibility of management. In addition, all food handlers must be trained or receive instruction in food hygiene.

Guidance on food handler fitness is also provided by the Department of Health in their publication “Food handlers: fitness to work”. This document emphasises the need for education and training, in conjunction with proper supervision and good personal hygiene, as the basis for good food hygiene.

1.2

Definitions
In this document the terms below have the following meanings:

1.2.1 Food Handler For the purposes of this Code of Practice, a Food handler is defined as a person who is engaged in the manufacture, storage or transport of food products involving direct contact with the product, and those whose work may result in touching surfaces that may come into contact with unwrapped food (eg engineering, hygiene cleaning staff, contractors and other visitors). It also includes those engaged in the preparation or serving of food in canteens or retail food outlets. The definition does not include those who only handle pre-wrapped, canned or bottled food or those involved in primary agricultural or harvesting processes.

1.2.2 Competent Food Safety Adviser The Competent Food Safety Adviser is either: i) A Registered General Nurse with a post-registration qualification or experience in occupational health nursing. A Registered Medical Practitioner with a postgraduate qualification or experience in occupational medicine. A manager who possesses a certificated qualification to Advanced Level in Food Hygiene.

ii)

iii)

1.2.3 Occupational Health Adviser The Occupational Health Adviser is either: i) A Registered General Nurse with a post-registration qualification or experience in occupational health nursing. A Registered Medical Practitioner with a postgraduate qualification or experience in occupational medicine.

ii)

earrings.4 Personal Protective Equipment Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) covers any item which is worn either to protect the health and safety of the individual or to maintain an acceptable level of food hygiene. bracelets.1. but may also be constituted of fibrous materials. watches.4 To meet the requirements of legislation and associated guidance. Section 2 2. 1.1 It is the responsibility of management to implement this Code of Practice commensurate with the level of risk associated with the product by: • • Identifying persons who are food handlers (ie employees. which are worn for decorative purposes.5 Jewellery The term jewellery refers to various items. artificial nails and artificial eyelashes. . 2. 2. For the purposes of this Code rings worn as items of jewellery are only considered continuous if there is no possible way of breaking the continuity of the ring.2 To set out the measures to be followed in the event of an employee suffering from an infectious condition which could contaminate food products. 2.2.2 Responsibilities 2.2. chains. studs.1 To protect the safety of the product where this may be compromised by an employee’s fitness to work as a food handler. Ensuring that all food handlers are subject to the appropriate level of health screening.1. contractors and visitors).1 Objectives Food Handler Hygiene 2.3 To promote the general health and hygiene awareness of employees. It will include rings.1. The items usually consist in part or in whole of metal.1.1. 2.2.

Support management in the application of control measures in the event of infectious conditions becoming known.3 It is the responsibility of the Competent Food Safety Adviser to: • • • • • Advise management on the organisation of health screening of employees.3.2. 2. • • • 2.2. 2.3. Advise management on preventive measures in respect of food borne disease.2 It is the responsibility of all food handlers to: • • • • Practise good personal hygiene.• Informing all employees of their responsibilities in respect of safe handling of food and the need to report infectious or potentially infectious conditions. Advise management concerning employee fitness for work.1 Protection of Product Integrity . Maintain good hygiene standards in the workplace.1. Supervising employees in the safe handling of food.1 Screening of Employees who are Food Handlers . Report infectious management or potentially infectious conditions to Take part in food hygiene training (including refresher training) and to demonstrate an understanding of food safety principles.Health Supervision 2.3 Preventative Measures 2. These responsibilities are made more explicit in the sections below. Providing employees with training and continuing education for safe handling of food. Taking appropriate action following the receipt of advice on an employee’s fitness to work.

an infected wound. nose. See Appendices 3 and 4 for details of the procedure and the questionnaire. by identifying individuals who are: i) suffering from or are suspected of suffering from. throat or eyes.The objective of screening is to exclude individuals with medical conditions which either pose a microbiological risk to the product or otherwise present an unacceptable risk of product contamination. Review of fitness of visitors and/or contractors prior to entering food handling areas (see appendices 5 and 6 for details). contractors or visitors who enter food handling areas must: i) For entry to high risk food handling areas.Dealing with reports of illness from food handlers . hands and forearms) which result in increased shedding of skin scales.1. or may be carriers of infectious disease conditions likely to be transmitted to food. ii) iii) Screening consists of: i) Health assessment by questionnaire before commencing employment. See Appendices 1 and 2 for details of the procedure and the questionnaire. diarrhoea or condition of the ears. Review of fitness to work after overseas travel. a skin infection. ii) iii) iv) 2. ii) 2. See Appendices 3 and 4 for details of the procedure and the questionnaire.3.3. or suffering from conditions which may give rise to carriage of pathogenic organisms which may then be transmitted to food eg. skin sores. be made aware of basic health and hygiene standards by a printed notice.2 Screening of Contractors or Visitors who Enter Food Handling Areas Depending upon the level of risk. complete a Visitor’s Health Screening Form (see Appendices 5 and 6 for details of the procedure and the questionnaire).2 Protection of Product Integrity . suffering from skin conditions affecting exposed parts (ie face. Review of fitness to work following illness and/or absence from work. For other food handling areas.

diarrhoea or bowel disorder any infected wound. eyes.Information and Training One of the key elements in preventing the risk of food borne disease as a threat to product integrity is the provision of continuing education of employees in the safe handling of food and the need to report infectious or potentially infectious conditions to management. iii) . It is the responsibility of management to ensure that all food handlers must be trained or receive instruction in: i) ii) The basic principles of food safety. infection of the skin. ears. 2. In cases where employees are either sent home or re-deployed away from food handler duties. a record should be kept of: employee name normal area in which employee works and duties date and time of onset and nature of illness date and time when taken off food handler duties/sent home vomiting.3.3 Protection of Product Integrity . if they are suffering from or been in contact with any of the following conditions. nose or Where a report of illness is initiated by medical certification from a general practitioner or by notification of microbiologically proven conditions from an Environmental Health Department. The importance of good personal hygiene. throat jaundice contact with such illnesses above at home or whilst overseas It is the responsibility of local line management to ensure that all reports of illness should be referred to the departmental management or higher for a decision as to whether the employee may work or be sent home. Their legal responsibilities to inform their employer when they know or suspect they are suffering from or are a carrier of any illness or condition likely to result directly or indirectly in the contamination of food. the Competent Food Safety Adviser should be consulted by local management regarding appropriate action.Employees must report to management before starting work. how to maintain good hygiene standards both in the workplace and in the home. Employees who complain of sickness and diarrhoea should normally be sent home.

2. fulfils the definition of “sensitive personal data”. Simple guidance is given in the Appendix 7 . contact the Competent Food Safety Adviser.Food handler Fitness criteria. and must therefore be processed in accordance with the data protection principles.5 Confidentiality of Records Information recorded on the Pre-Employment Health Screening Questionnaire. upon their return to food handling duties. 2. providing they are otherwise well enough to do so. but for further specific advice on individual cases.The instruction and/or training in food hygiene matters should be designed so that it is commensurate with their work activity. eg high risk food handler training should have a higher content of basic microbiological knowledge. particularly regarding thorough hand washing after using the toilet. there is no reason why they cannot return to work in a temporary non-food handler role until the end of the exclusion period. apply: . signs should be erected in appropriate areas (eg toilets. In order to reinforce good basic hygiene practice. as defined in Section 2(e) of the Data Protection Act 1998. In addition such signs should remind employees of the importance of reporting illness and to whom.4 Clearance for Return to Work as a Food Handler The criteria for clearance for return to food handler work depend on the type of condition involved. A record of all training should be made with both the trainer and trainee signing the record with the trainee acknowledging not only receipt but also understanding. It is the responsibility of the company to ensure confidentiality of the information contained within the forms and that the data will only be processed when at least one of the following conditions. The training material should have accompanying questions in order to test trainees’ knowledge and understanding. Both induction and on-job training should have clearly defined content to be covered by the trainer. changing rooms and hand wash stations) as reminders to food handlers. It is important that the need to maintain scrupulous standards of hygiene. should be reemphasised to individuals who have recently suffered from diarrhoeal illness. as listed in Schedule 3 of the Act. Although such individuals cannot return to work in a food handler capacity until an appropriate period of time has elapsed. Food Handler Declaration of Health form and Contractor and Visitor Screening Form for Food Handler Areas. The most common reason for excluding employees from food handler work is diarrhoeal illness.

2 To prevent foreign body or microbiological contamination of food products by poor hygiene practices. Supervising food handlers with respect to hand washing practices.2. 3.1. adequate and used in the correct manner. but where consent cannot be given or obtained The information has been divulged as a result of steps deliberately taken by the data subject The processing is necessary for the purpose of. Informing all food handlers of their responsibilities with respect to the need for adequate hand washing. 3.1 To ensure hand washing facilities are available. contractors and visitors). 3.1. by: • • • Identifying persons who are food handlers (ie employees.1 It is the responsibility of management to implement this Code of Practice. . any legal proceedings The processing is necessary for any medical purposes (when undertaken by a health professional) • • • Section 3 3.1. or in connection with.3 To prevent employees from developing dermatitis as a result of hand washing practices.4 To meet the requirements of relevant legislation.• • The data subject has given his/her explicit consent The processing is necessary “in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject or another person”.1. 3.2 Responsibilities 3.1 Objectives Hand Washing 3.

Spout may be in the form of a rose. Ideally. Hand basins to be used exclusively for hand washing. Soap to be available from hand operated dispensers. Water must be delivered from a single spout.3. Sufficient hand wash stations should be provided. but must not produce aerosols. 3. elbow or electronically operated. these should be “hands-free”. 3. these should be roller towels or disposable paper towels. eg knee. 3. • 3. ie in toilet areas and at each entrance to the production area.3 Acceptable Practice 3. Facilities for washing equipment must be separate.2 It is the responsibility of all food handlers to comply with the provisions of this Code in connection with hand washing.4 Soap • • • Soap to be food grade of liquid or non-perfumed anti bacterial type.3. Ideally.3.• Providing suitable facilities for hand washing. These facilities must be used by people entering these areas and likely to handle product.3. 3.3. Open bins or foot operated lidded bins should be provided at all .5 Hand drying • • Adequate drying facilities to be provided.1 Facilities Adequate hand washing facilities must be provided at the entrance to production areas where product or edible material is being processed.2 Hand Basins • • • Hand basins to be of a hygienic design.3 Water supply for hand washing • Sink units must have a good supply of both hot and cold running water. A minimum of one dispenser to be provided for every two basins. 3.2.

• Hand drying must be achieved without contacting any surface such as a lever for dispensing/moving towels.6 Site of facilities • Hand washing facilities must be provided at the pedestrian entrance to all production areas.hand wash facilities. After eating. handling debris. After visiting the toilet. If they become soiled or visibly contaminated.3. handwashing facilities should be provided close to where soiling of hands is significant eg wet areas.3. 3. After smoking. • • • 3. Hand washing or sanitising facilities should be provided at the exit of tea rooms within production areas. refuse or potentially contaminated food waste. . After cleaning.3. personnel where possible should be channelled past the hand wash stations by the use of guard rails or other appropriate measures. To ensure good hand washing disciplines. 3.7 Signs Standardised notices reminding employees of the handwashing requirements must be posted in each toilet facility (toilet cubicles and urinal areas). in break/canteen areas and on every entrance door to production areas. After blowing the nose or touching the mouth. In addition. Washing facilities may alternatively be provided in a room or enclosed space through which pedestrians pass when entering manufacturing departments.8 Hand Washing: Hands should be washed:• • • • • • • Immediately before commencing work. or entering production areas.

4. 4. Ensuring that appropriate PPE is readily available. Supervising food handlers with respect to PPE.1 Acceptable Practice Personal Protective Equipment .1.3.1.3.2 It is the responsibility of all food handlers to comply with the provisions of this Code in connection with the wearing of PPE. Section 4 4. 4. Informing all food handlers of their responsibilities with respect to the need for PPE.3 To prevent employees from developing work-related ill health as a result of exposure to food ingredients.2 To prevent foreign body or microbiological contamination of food products by poor hygiene practices.1.2.9 Auditing There should be regular confirmation of the provision and correct usage of the facilities.1 Objectives Personal Protective Equipment 4.3. 4.4 To meet the requirements of relevant legislation.1 To provide clear guidance on acceptable standards of personal protectice equipment for both employees and visitors.2 Responsibilities 4.1 It is the responsibility of management to implement this Code of Practice.3 4. 4. 4. by: • • • • Identifying persons who are food handlers (ie employees.2. contractors and visitors).1.

The changing frequency of protective clothing will vary in accordance with the nature of the work being undertaken and the working environment. Long sleeve workwear will normally be worn.2 • • • • • Protective clothing will not have external pockets. Where for safety reasons hard (bump) hats are worn. This applies to all employees.3. visitors and contractors.3. packing and storage areas must wear clean appropriate protective clothing. . Garments for staff working in designated high risk areas will be distinctive and stored separately. 4. these must be worn on top of disposable hair coverings. they must be replaced by new ones. or Velcro will be used for fastenings. Protective clothing and designated footwear must not be worn by employees outside the site perimeter (depending on local circumstances). Where for aesthetic reasons trilby or similar hats are worn. these must be worn on top of disposable hair coverings.3 Headwear • • • • Suitable disposable head covering will be worn such that hair and ears are completely enclosed. Items of personal clothing must not be worn over protective clothing and undergarments should not protrude below sleeves. Employees must not be allowed to take protective clothing from the premises.• All personnel entering production. Overalls • • • • 4. If disposable head coverings are removed during the working day. Protective clothing will be provided by the employer to all employees and will be appropriate to the job. Metal popper studs. but short sleeves will be permitted for certain tasks.

3.• Where hearing protection is required.7 Gloves • • • • Glove wearing is unnecessary for most food handling tasks and should be discouraged. 4. clean and visually detectable.4 Beard Snoods • All facial hair (beards and moustaches) must be suitably covered. Dedicated receptacles for soiled laundry must be provided.3. Home Minor repairs or alterations to protective clothing must be professionally undertaken. Gloves for product handling must be changed frequently. 4.3.5 Ear Protection • • Where earplugs are worn they must be of the type which are joined together by an integral cord and metal detectable.6 Footwear • Footwear must be kept clean and in good condition at all times. Where disposable gloves are required for certain processes. Repair materials used must in no way .3. 4. laundering by staff is not acceptable. Ear plugs must be removed from packaging before being taken into production/manufacturing areas. ear muffs should be worn on top of disposable head coverings. Disposable gloves must be of food grade quality. whereas ear plugs should be worn underneath the head covering.8 Storage of Protective Clothing • • Outside clothing and footwear must not be stored in direct contact with clean protective clothing.3. 4. 4.9 Laundering of Protective Clothing • • All protective clothing must be laundered regularly. they must be sound.3. 4.

5.1.1.3 To prevent personal injury which may arise directly from the wearing of jewellery in the workplace. 5. contractors and visitors). Supervising food handlers with respect to the wearing of jewellery or in connection with body piercing.2.2 To prevent microbiological contamination of food products in connection with either the wearing of jewellery or from piercing of body parts.compromise product safety or hygiene. Section 5 5.10 Donning and Removal of Protective Clothing • Donning of protective clothing must be in the following order with removal in reverse: i) ii) iii) • Footwear Hat Overall Removal of protective clothing for toilet breaks and meal breaks may be required depending on local circumstances and practice.1. by: • • • Identifying persons who are food handlers (ie employees.4 To meet the requirements of relevant legislation. 5.1. Informing all food handlers of their responsibilities with respect to the wearing of jewellery or in connection with body piercing. .3.1 To prevent foreign body contamination of food products by items of jewellery. 5. 4.1 Objectives Jewellery and Body Piercing 5.2 Responsibilities 5.1 It is the responsibility of management to implement this Code of Practice commensurate with the level of risk outlined below.

to management 5. ie hands.3.2 It is the responsibility of all food handlers to: • • Comply with the provisions of this Code in connection with the wearing of jewellery and issues arising from body piercing. The area of skin beneath or around the item remains persistently moist. Such an infected area will only present a significant risk to food when it occurs on an exposed area of the hands. 5.1 Foreign Body Contamination by Jewellery In order for an item of jewellery to present a significant risk of falling into food products. 5. 5.5. ie hands.3. forearms or head.3.4 Health and Safety Risks . It must have the potential. in part or in total. Report infectious or potentially infectious conditions relating to the wearing of jewellery or in connection with body piercing.2 Microbiological Contamination by Jewellery In order for an item of jewellery to present a significant risk of contaminating food products with microorganisms. The item must also fulfill either of the following criteria: • • It has surface indentations (eg filigree engraving) in which food material and other dirt can collect. to become detached from the body.3. Infection can be recognised by redness of the surrounding skin and/or moist discharge from the area. the item must fulfil both of the following criteria: • • It is worn on an exposed area on the upper part of the body.3 Microbiological Contamination from Pierced Body Parts Areas with piercings present a significant risk of contaminating food products with microorganisms if they become infected. it must be worn on an exposed area on the upper part of the body.3 Principles Relating to Risk 5. forearms or head.2. forearms or head.

For example. If there is a desire for the items to be kept on the person.4. must be removed. since they do not present a significant risk. forearms and head are: Plain tight fitting finger rings (without stones or ornate • • engraving) - Continuous single piece sleeper earrings (depending on local circumstances and practice) Continuous plain wrist bangles worn for religious reasons (eg Karas) • All other items of jewellery not included in the list above and wristwatches. because of the possibility of entrapment or entanglement in machinery. increase the risk of finger injury because of the possibility of trapping in closing doors. face. especially loose. There is no good evidence of their efficacy and they present a significant risk of falling into the product. Bracelets worn for on the wrist for putative medical reasons will not be permitted.An increased risk of personal injury may arise from loose bangles worn around the wrist. otherwise it must be removed. there may be a requirement for the bangle to be covered by either an elastic cuff or some other restraining measure for health and safety reasons. or foreams should be permitted. 5. ornate or bulky ones. depending upon relevant risk assessments performed under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations. Rings. machinery. In the case of religious wrist bangles. a loose necklace which is exposed when leaning forward will present both a food safety risk from foreign body contamination and a health and safety risk from possible entanglement in machinery. Any item worn around the neck must be remain permanently covered by clothing. As an • • .4 Acceptable Practice 5. they should be placed in a tied cloth bag. beneath outer clothing. which can either be kept in a pocket or strung around the neck.1 Wearing of Jewellery • Items of jewellery worn on non-exposed areas other than the hands. etc. The only items of jewellery which are permitted to be worn on the hands. or from necklaces/chains dangling outside outer garments.

If the individual is otherwise fit to work. whether as a result of wearing jewellery. • • 5. they may be worn around the ankle. 5. face. without presenting a food safety risk. depending on local circumstances and practice (but may be unacceptable as a matter of business dress). he or she must be taken off food handling duties until the infection has completely resolved.3 Infected Areas of Skin • If a food handler develops infection on any exposed skin part. Where jewellery has been removed from these areas.4. or forearms does not present a significant risk in the context of this policy.2 Body Piercing • The piercing of non-exposed areas other than the hands. body piercing or for any other reason. there must be no evidence of infection (redness or discharge) in the surrounding area. Items of jewellery worn in pierced areas on exposed parts the head are not permitted.4. providing they are covered by a sock or other hose.alternative to being worn on the wrist. they may be fit to work in a non-food handling capacity. Piercing of the tongue may be permitted for food handlers. • .

Do you have any allergies to food? 5. Company Position applied for Name Date of birth Address Site Please tick the boxes in answer to the following questions 1. In the last year. Health and Safety and Food Safety legislation. arms or face? 3. In accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. Do you suffer from fits.Appendix 1 Pre-Employment Questionnaire Health Screening The purpose of this questionnaire is to assist the company in complying with the requirements of Employment. paratyphoid or enteric fever? 2. Are you suffering from any medical condition for which you receive treatment or have regular specialist follow up? 7. Have you suffered from a runny ear in the last year? 4. Have you had to leave or change a job for health reasons? 9. Have you ever suffered from typhoid. have you been off sick for more than two weeks? 10. blackouts or dizzy spells? 8. the information given will remain confidential within the company. Have you suffered from asthma at any time in the last five years? 6. Do you suffer from any disability that may require adjustments to your working circumstances? Yes No I declare that the information I have given is true to the best of my knowledge (to be signed by the employee) Signature Date . Do you suffer from any skin problems affecting your hands.

He or she should be considered fit to work in other areas where food handler fitness standards are not required. To ensure that prospective employees are not placed in jobs which may affect their health. 2. If answers to all questions are negative. The form should then be retained in the individual’s personal file. If the answer to question 4 is positive: i) The person should not be considered fit in any areas where contact with food materials may arise until he or she has been assessed and cleared by the Occupational Health Adviser. If the answers to Questions 1. skill and experience) have been considered. 2 or 3 are positive i) The person should not be considered fit in a food handler position until he or she has been assessed and cleared by the Competent Food Safety Adviser. 2. ii) . To ensure that employees with specific medical conditions do not compromise food safety. He or she should be considered fit to work in other areas where food contact does not occur. the person should be considered fit to start work. Action on Questionnaire Responses 1.Appendix 2 Purpose Pre-Employment Health Screening Guidance This guidance note accompanies the Pre-Employment Health Screening Questionnaire. The aim of the screening procedure is: 1. ii) 3. The completed questionnaire should be returned to the person responsible for recruitment who will then take action as described below. Procedure The questionnaire should be completed by the prospective employee after other selection criteria (eg qualifications.

apply: • • • • • The data subject has given his/her explicit consent The processing is necessary “in order to protect the vital interests of the data subject or another person”. If the answer to questions 6. 7. ii) 5. Confidentiality of Records Information recorded on the Pre-Employment Health Screening Questionnaire fulfils the definition of “sensitive personal data”. until he or she has been assessed and cleared by the Occupational Health Adviser. If the answer to Question 5 is positive: i) The person should not be considered fit to work in areas where powdered ingredients are used or in areas where ambient temperature are below 4oC. 8. and must therefore be processed in accordance with the data protection principles. but where consent cannot be given or obtained The information has been divulged as a result of steps deliberately taken by the data subject The processing is necessary for the purpose of. It is the responsibility of the company to ensure confidentiality of the information contained within the forms and that the data will only be processed when at least one of the following conditions. He or she should be considered fit to work in other areas where there is no exposure to dust or cold temperatures. or in connection with. any legal proceedings The processing is necessary for any medical purposes (when undertaken by a health professional) .4. 9 or 10 are positive. as defined in Section 2(e) of the Data Protection Act 1998. as listed in Schedule 3 of the Act. the person should not be considered fit to start work until cleared by the Occupational Health Adviser.

Declaration of Health Please tick appropriate box: 4.Appendix 3 Food Handler Declaration of Health To be completed by all food handlers on return to work following: Name: Absence due to ill health Overseas travel (ie outside the U. 3. I have been free from sickness or bowel disorders for 48 hours Signature of employee: Date: Yes No Signature of supervisor: Date: The purpose of this questionnaire is to assist the company in complying with the requirements of Food Safety legislation.K. and Ireland) Date of birth: Please tick appropriate box 1. I am currently free from all the above symptoms 5. Have you suffered from vomiting. ears. forearms and face 6. during the last 21 days? Yes No 2. the information given will remain confidential within the company. throat or eyes? Have you been in contact with anyone suffering from Enteric fever. diarrhoea or a bowel disorder during the last seven days? Are you currently suffering from an infection of the skin. I am currently free of any skin rash affecting my hands. . In accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. Typhoid or Paratyphoid. nose.

K. Information recorded on the form fulfils the definition of “sensitive personal data”. 5. Otherwise clearance to enter food handler areas must be obtained from the Competent Food Safety Adviser. Any person with a positive answer in the Declaration of Health box (Questions 4. 9. and Ireland). dysentery or cholera during the last 21 days (Question 3) must not be allowed to enter food handling areas until cleared by the Competent Food Safety Adviser. ears. 4. before they are allowed to enter food handling areas.5 or 6) must not be allowed to enter food handling areas until cleared by the Competent Food Safety Adviser. 2. as defined in Section 2(e) of the Data Protection Act 1998. Paratyphoid. 8. Typhoid. The declaration form should be retained for at least 3 months. providing they have answered yes to being free of sickness and bowel disorders for 48 hours (Question 6). and must therefore be processed in accordance with the data protection principles. The form should be completed by all food handlers who are returning to work after absence due to ill health or overseas travel (ie outside the U. throat or eyes (Question 2) must not be allowed to enter food handling areas until cleared by the Competent Food Safety Adviser. 7. Any person who answers positively to contact with anyone suffering from Enteric Fever. Any person who has suffered from sickness or diarrhoea (Question 1) during the last seven days can be allowed to enter food handling areas. nose. The completed form should be scrutinised and signed by the responsible supervisor.Appendix 4 Guidance Notes on Food Handler Declaration of Health 1. Any person who answers positively to suffering from an infection of the skin. 3. .

In accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. We require all visitors and contractors who enter food production and / or technical areas to complete this questionnaire prior to entering these areas. Your Name: Your Company: Date of Visit: Please Tick the Appropriate Box: Have you ever suffered with: 1. 7. 3. Typhoid Fever (Enteric Fever) Paratyphoid Fever Food allergy (eg nuts) Yes No Are you currently suffering from: 4. 10. I have read and understand the above. 9. 2. unless given permission to do so. A runny ear Acne. Signed: . the information given will remain confidential within the company. 6. 8. 5. forearms or face Diarrhoea Nausea or vomiting Sticky or sore eyes We respectfully ask you not to handle any of the food products or surfaces where food is being prepared or transferred.Appendix 5 Contractor and Visitor Screening Form for Food Handler Areas The purpose of this questionnaire is to assist the company in complying with the requirements of Food Safety legislation. boils or carbuncles Septic cuts or sores Scaling skin condition on the hands.

In the case of diarrhoea.3 2.Appendix 6 Guidance Notes for Screening Contractors or Visitors Entering Food Handler Areas 1. 2.3 2. they should have been symptom free for 48 hours. Contractors or visitors answering yes to question 3 (food allergy) should be prevented from entering food preparation/handling areas unless advice to the contrary has been obtained from the Competent Food Safety Adviser. he or she must complete and sign a new Contractor and Visitor Screening Form on subsequent return to work. If a contractor has been excluded from food handling areas because of diarrhoea or nausea/vomiting.1 Visitors Any visitor answering YES to questions 8 or 9 (ie currently suffering from either diarrhoea or nausea/vomiting) should not be allowed to enter any food preparation/handling area. 2. and must therefore be processed in accordance with the data protection principles.4 3. as defined in Section 2(e) of the Data Protection Act 1998. Contractors answering YES to any questions 4 to 10 should be prevented from entering food preparation/handling areas until the condition has cleared. . Confidentiality Information recorded on the form fulfils the definition of “sensitive personal data”. as proof of clearance.2 2. 1. Any visitor answering YES to any of the other questions should not be allowed to enter any food preparation/handling area UNLESS the site person accompanying the visitor can be certain that no surfaces or produce will be touched.2 1. and answering YES to questions 1 or 2 should not be allowed entry unless they can provide proof of carrier free state.1 Contractors Contractors who are expected to work in food preparation/handling areas. 1. Visitors answering yes to question 3 (food allergy) should be prevented from entering food preparation/handling areas unless advice to the contrary has been obtained from the Competent Food Safety Adviser.

Enteric Fever ie.Hepatitis A - - * Shigella dysenteriae requires clearance by three negative stools. Typhoid. foreams and face. Unfit if persistent watery stools (excluding individuals with colostomy or ileostomy). Free of purulent skin conditions affecting hands. coli O157 (Verotoxin producing strains) . unfit until 7 days after onset of jaundice - . no history of discharge in last year.Salmonella. Cholera Unfit until two negative stools obtained at 48 hour intervals. foreams and face. Free of diarrhoea and vomiting for 48 hours. Paratyphoid (A. 6 consecutive negative stool tests required at 2 week intervals. if perforation of drum. Free of eczema or psoriasis on hands.B & C) Unfit if persistent watery stools (excluding individuals with colostomy or ileostomy). Unfit if history of enteric fever unless stool testing has excluded the presence of persistent carrier status. . . Amoebic Dysentery.Other infective causes of diarrhoea and vomiting . Free of purulent skin conditions affecting hands. Gastrointestinal . Shigella*.Appendix 7 Site or Condition Ear Food Handler Fitness Criteria Pre-employment Standard Free of discharge and. Standard if in Employment Free of discharge. 6 consecutive negative stool tests required at 2 week intervals. starting 2 weeks after completion of antibiotic treatment. forearms and face. Free of diarrhoea and vomiting for 48 hours.Non-infective diarrhoea .E. Throat Eyes Skin Unfit if purulent tonsillitis Unfit if infective conjunctivitis Free of eczema or psoriasis on hands. forearms and face. Following acute illness. * See separate note on Shigella dysenteriae below. Household contacts of acute cases or people who have had contact with an acute outbreak should be excluded from food handling duties until three consecutive negative stool tests have been collected at weekly intervals starting 3 weeks after last contact with the case or outbreak. Unfit if suffering from enteric fever until persistent carrier status has been excluded.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful