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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)

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Chinese Literature in Translation (CHIN 355-01)

Class sessions: TR, 12:45-2:30 pm, KA 111

Instructor: Prof. Wei Yang Menkus

Office: KA 372

Office phone number: 2918

Email: wyang16@usfca.edu

Office Hours: Wednesday 3pm-4pm and by appointment

Teaching Assistants:

Sylvia Lee (clee66@usfca.edu)

Office Hour: By appointment only

Course Description: This course surveys a broad swath of traditional and modern Chinese literature, including representative works of poetry,
history, the prose essay, and fiction. We will trace the evolution of the forms, styles, and themes of these various types of writing, in the context of
historical and philosophical influences as well as through the biographies of exemplary writers.  In addition to many shorter or excerpted works of both
traditional and modern literature, we will also read several modern novels in their entirety.

Texts (available at USF Bookstore):

Burton Watson, Pda ? khqi ^e] >kkg kb? dej aoa Lkapnu6 Bnki A] nhu Pei ao pk pda Pdenpaaj pd ? aj pqnu* Columbia University Press, 1984 

All other course readings are available on Canvas, under “Modules”.

Course Requirements:

Attendance. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class session. More than 4 unexcused absences will reduce your final course
grade by one half step i.e., A to A-). Student with 8 or more unexcused absences will not pass the class. An excused absence must be
approved by the instructor l neknpk the class session in question. If you miss class due to a medical emergency, please provide me with a signed
note from your health care provider.  In the event of other emergencies, you may be expected to provide appropriate documentation. If you are
more than 10 minutes late to class, or are absent during the class for more than 10 minutes, you will be marked late. 2 lates = 1 unexcused
absence. Regardless of whether you are present, you are responsible for all information, announcements, and assignments delivered in class.
Class Participation. (20%) Students are expected to have completed all assigned readings BEFORE class and to participate in class discussions
actively and regularly. You participation will be documented and graded each class. The record is available on Canvas and will be updated
regularly. 
Response Papers. (20%) In order to encourage deeper reflection on the readings and in-class lectures and discussions, three literary response
papers are assigned over the semester. These response papers should be posted on Canvas (under “Discussion”) by 12pm Noon on Thursdays
Febuary 21, March 28, and April 25. Each response paper deals with materials of the previous weeks, including readings, lectures, and class
discussions, and should be 300 words in length. Prompts will be provided for each assignment a week before the due day. Your response
should NOT consist merely of a general introduction of the author or the text.

Response papers will be graded on a scale of 0 to 5 as follows:

“0” – not submitted;

“2.5” – submitted but does not follow directions (for example, because it is too short, it is submitted late, it does not deal with the contents from the
week, etc.);

“4” – submitted on-time, follows directions, and shows adequate reflection on the content from the week;

“5” – submitted on-time, follows directions, and shows significant reflecction on the contents from the week. (20%)

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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)

Pop-quizzes. (15%) Late pop-quiz will only receive half credit and must be made up within a week.
Mid-term Exam (in-class) on Thursday, April 4, 2019. (10%)
Final Project and Presentation. (20%) The final project is a re-interpretation of literary classic studied in this class. Students will form groups of 3
or 4 people and work on the script together, either writing a new story inspired by the old, telling the story from a new point of view, or recasting it
in a new genre or under new conditions. Each group will turn the script into a 15- to 20-minute visual presentation (live performance, short film,
etc.) and perform it in class at the end of the semester, followed by an oral presentation and Q&A.                                                Student
groups must develop the project topic in consultation with the professor. A detailed guideline will be distributed in class.
Final Paper.(15%) 5-7 pages, to be submitted on Wednesday, December 5, 2018. The paper is based on your interpretation and analysis of two
literary works studied in the class. A one-page abstract is due in class on Thursday, May 9, 2019. 

Paper style guide, grading rubric, and abstract samples are available on Canvas.

Extra credits. Students attending extra credit events will receive extra credit upon submitting evidence of attendance (such as a selfie photo at
the event) and a one-page written response within two weeks after the event takes place. (up to 2%)
Film Screening: Kj D] l l ej aoo Nk] ` 幸福路上 (dir. Hsin Yin Sung, 2017). Tuesday, January 29, 5:30pm-7:30pm., Fromm Hall, Xavier
Room
Talk: “Happiness in China: Family, Fate, and the Good Death”. Thursday, February 28, 5:30pm-6:45pm., Fromm Hall, Xavier Room
Art Exhibit at SF MOMA: “Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World” (exhibit closes on February 24, 2019)
More extra credit opportunities may be announced during the semester.

Classroom Code of Conduct:

Do not do work for other classes in this class; do not text message, step out to talk on the phone or read irrelevant material during lectures,
discussions or film screenings. Student will lose participation grade of that class and may be asked to leave the classroom if he or she engaged
in these behaviors.
Laptops, tablets, cell phone, and other digital devices are generally banned in this class except when used in course-related activities specifically
requested by the instructor. Students with special need are encouraged to discuss the issue with the instructor at the beginning of the semester.

The Learning, Writing and Speaking Centers 

The Learning, Writing, and Speaking Centers at USF provide individualized support to assist you in better understanding course material and to aid
you on your path to success. Services are free and include one-on-one tutoring, group tutoring, and one-on-one Academic Skills Coaching
appointments to discuss effective study strategies. The Learning Center supports over 80 courses each semester. The Writing Center helps
students develop their writing skills in rhetoric, organization, style, and structure, through one-on-one interactive conferences. The Speaking Center
helps students prepare for public speaking—including speeches, oral presentations, team presentations, and visual aid demonstrations. International
students may also contact us to learn more about communicating with professors and general academic study skills. The Learning, Writing, and
Speaking Centers are located on the Lower Level of Gleeson Library (G03). Please contact them at (415) 422-6713 for further assistance or
visit: myusf.usfca.edu/lwsc (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-
3A__t.e2ma.net_click_9b8atb_5gltyp_df9sfm&d=DwMFaQ&c=qgVugHHq3rzouXkEXdxBNQ&r=eqYa_oo8qwNCNNhWJ8wL7f8fL7kDaFSpd8Jw4eQQuM
tsO5lu_SHtzCmc0RiKPEnTBui0&s=P6s7vSzwHT84cJbq9jDg3ZQkyj9lqleXZQV0mwibwt0&e=)

  

Teaching Assistants

This semester, we are fortunate to have Sylvia (Chaiyeon) Lee to be our Teaching Assistant. Sylvia (Chaiyeon) has a BA in Chinese Language and
Literature and a MA in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) at USF. She is a current student in the MA Educational Technology
department and will become a doctoral student of Learning & Instruction in Fall 2019. Her research revolves around educational psychology,
educational technology and second language acquisition. She is fluent in several languages including Korean and Chinese. Over the past twenty
years she has lived and worked in four different countries and traveled around 80 cities in over 35 countries on five continents. Having lived in
different parts of the world and interacted with culturally diverse people has shaped her as an effective educator with a strong global communication
skill. 

Sylvia (Chaiyeon) will manage all class logistics and preparation, including maintaining attendance and participation records, entering assignment
scores, as well as setting appointments between students and the professor. She also holds office hour by appointment, so please confirm with her
about meeting time and location before coming to the appointment. Sylvia (Chaiyeon) cannot give you a fresh lecture on the literary works we
discussed in class, and she cannot serve as a copy-editor or a co-author of your paper/project. Lastly, though it goes without saying, please accord
her the respect that she deserves and that you would give to any instructor of a course.

Class Schedule:

*All readings marked with an asterisk are available on Canvas (under “Modules”). All assigned readings must be completed BEFORE class.  
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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)
 

Week 1: The Beginning

January 22        Introduction

January 24        The Book of Odes: A Confucian Classic

Readings:          Watson,1-43     

Why did the Book of Odes survive Chinese literary history? (Canvas Discussion due)

Week 2: Philosophical Influences: Confucianism

January 29        Confucius and The Analects

Readings:          1) Selections from Pda =j ] ha_po, Canvas *

 “Confucius and The Analects” p41-44; all entries on “The noble person (fqj ve)”, “Humaneness (naj )”, “Wealth and poverty, economy, material
possessions”, “”Virtue or moral force (` a)

2) “Why are hundreds of Harvard students studying ancient Chinese philosophy?”, Canvas * (optional)

3) Who exactly is Confucius?, Canvas * (optional)

The Book of Odes in the Present Day (Canvas Discussion)


Extra Credit Event: Film Screening Kj D] l l ej aoo Nk] ` 幸福路上 (dir. Hsin Yin Sung, 2017). Tuesday, January 29, 5:30pm-7:30pm., Fromm Hall,
Xavier Room

January 31        Core Values in Confucian Thoughts

Readings:          1) Selections from Pda =j ] ha_po, Canvas *

All entries on “Filial devotion (t e] k)”, “Rites and sacrifices”, “Laws and punishments”, “Government”

2) All remaining entries in the selections from Pda =j ] ha_po (optional)

Week 3: Philosophical Influences: Taoism

February 5        Guest Lecture: Prof. Chris Wen-zhao Li “Translating Confucius: Skopos, Realia, and the Cultural Turn”

                        Time & Location: 3:15pm-4:25pm, KA 111

February 7        Zhuangzi and the School of Tao

Readings:          Selections from Vdq] j cve

Chapters 1-3, Canvas*

Week 4: Philosophy and Myth

February 12      Zhuangzi (II)

Readings:          Selections from Vdq] j cve:

Chapters 4-7, Canvas*

February 14      Songs of the South (Ch’u-tz’u)

Readings:          Introduction to Qu Yuan and selections from J ej a Okj co, “Encountering Sorrow”

 Watson, 45-53, 54-66

Week 5: Heroes and Assassins

February 19      Records of the Grand Historian


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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)
Readings:          Sima Qian and the Na_kǹ o kbpda Cn] j ` Deopkne] j

“The Biographies of the Assasin”, Canvas *

February 21    In-class screening: Hero (Zhang Yimou, 2002)

            * 1st Response paper due by noon.

Week 6: The Hero and The Recluse

February 26    Discussion: Zhang Yimou’s Hero and Sima Qian’s assassins

Readings:          “Sima Qian’s World of Assassins and Wandering Knights”, Canvas *

February 28    Tao Yuanming: What is a Chinese Recluse?

Readings:          Watson, 123-41; 142-43, “Preface to the Poem on the Peach Blossom Spring”

Week 7: The Poet Buddha and The Banished Immortal

March 5    Wang Wei: The Poet Buddha

Readings:          Watson, 197-204

Extra Credit Event: Talk “Happiness in China: Family, Fate, and the Good Death”. Thursday, February 28, 5:30pm-6:45pm., Fromm Hall, Xavier
Room

March 7    Li Bai: The Banished Immortal

Readings:          Watson, 205-217

** HAPPY FALL BREAK J

Week 8: Poetry and Stories

March 19    Du Fu: The Confucian Mandarin

Readings:          Watson, 218-234

March 21    Tang Chuanqi

Readings:          Yuan Zhen, “The Story of Yingying”, Canvas *

Week 9: Poetry and Song Lyrics (ci)

March 26   Su Shi and the Turning Away from the Feminine

Readings:          Selected odepoems of Su Shi, Watson, 295-312

Selected _epoems of Su Shi, Watson, 365-368

March 28   Li Qingzhao: The Burden of a Female Talent

Readings:          Selected _epoems of Li Qingzhao, Canvas *

More _epoems of Li Qingzhao, Watson, 369-71

      * 2 nd Response paper due by noon.

Week 10: Yuan Drama

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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)
April 2  Yuan Dynasty Drama: Ghost, Law, and Justice

Readings:          Guan Hanqing, Pda Ej fqope_a pk @kq A( Canvas*

April 4     Mid-term exam (in-class)

* Introducing the Final Group Project

Week 11: The May Fourth Generation

April 9     History, Violence, and Modern China

Readings:          Lu Xun, “Preface” to Kqp_nu, “Diary of a Madman”, “New Year’s Sacrifice”; Canvas*

April 11     Between Modernity and Tradition

Readings:          Lu Xun, “In Memoriam”, “What Happens After Nora Walks Out?”; Canvas*

Week 12: Modern Visions

April 16     The New Women

Readings:          Ding Ling, “Miss Sophia’s Diary”; Canvas*

April 18    Eileen Chang and Anti-romantic Love Stories

Readings:          Chang, “Sealed Off”; “Writing of One’s Own”Canvas*

Week 13: Contenporary Visions

April 23     In-class workshop: How to Write a Convincing Paper? + What is Plagiarism?

      * 3 rd Response paper due by noon.

April 25     Library Information Session: How to Look Up Secondary Sources For Your Final Paper?

* One-page abstract due

Week 14

April 30     Yu Hua: China in Ten Words

Readings:          “Copycat”, 181-202; “Bamboozle”, 203-225

May 2       Student Presentation I

Week 15

May 7   Student Presentations  II

May 9   Student Presentations III

* Final Paper Due

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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)
 

Learning Outcomes for Literature:

Relevant Course
Core C1 Learning Assessment
Learning Outcome
Outcomes Mechanism
and Details

1. Students will gain an


introductory knowledge
of Chinese literature from
11 th century BC to the
present day, its diversity
of perspectives and
experiences, as well as
the continuity of major
traditions over time.

2. Students will
demonstrate an
understanding of
significant themes and
concerns characteristic
of Chinese culture, as
they have impacted
literary forms.

1. Demonstrate a basic   Class discussion, in-


understanding of the class presentation,
literary, historical, social, 3. Students will response papers, and
or cultural influences that demonstrate an final paper
inform literary works, understanding of the
socioeconomic and  
including diversity of
perspectives, gendered contexts from
 
experiences, and which Chinese literature
traditions emerged, as well as the
 
multiple regional and
ethnic identities that have
contributed to its
formation and
development in both the
traditional and modern
periods. 

Students will gain


familiarity with the outline
of Chinese literary
development of the
traditional and modern
periods, and an
appreciation for the
diverse literary and social
voices in relation to their
literary, historical, social,
and cultural contexts.

2. Articulate in writing 4. Students will develop Class discussion, in-


and discussion their an ability to write and class presentation,
responses to literary texts discuss literary works response paper, midterm

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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)
(75% of which must be critically, and to convey examination and final
written texts) with a view their own interpretations paper.
to equipping them with persuasively, skills that
the knowledge, values, will serve them well no
and sensitivity to matter where their future
succeed as persons and professional activities
professionals take them.

Topics include man and


nature, gender roles,
masculinity, madness
and social revolution,
modernity and the
tenacity of tradition, the
use of image and
symbolism, humor and
social criticism, and so
on.

5. Students will cultivate


their capacity to judge
the aesthetic, thematic,
and ethical value of
literary texts and
articulate the criteria for
3. Demonstrate a basic their judgments.
critical ability to identify,
interpret, and evaluate  
the ideas and formal
features of an integrated Through analysis of Response paper,
body of literary texts in literary forms and midterm examination and
the context of a socially content, students are final paper.
responsible learning encouraged to engage
community of high quality with the plurality of ideas
scholarship and expressed, and how
academic rigor formal elements of
language and genre
shape meaning, while
developing an awareness
of how they themselves
are situated historically
and culturally. 

4. Show a sensitivity to 6. Students will develop Class discussion,


the plurality of meanings the ability to approach response paper, midterm
within a literary text, Chinese literature from a examination, final group
including the moral variety of angles, and the project and final paper
implications of human ability to appreciate the
choices complexity and ambiguity
of meanings within
  literary texts, including
their ethical dimensions.

Students are encouraged


to interpret literary texts
from various
perspectives (artistic,
moral, socio-political,
philosophical, historical)
with an awareness of and
curiosity toward other
viewpoints.

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2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)

LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR CULTURAL DIVERSITY:


 

Demonstrate familiarity with the factors that create diversity in human societies, including, for example, gender, race, class, and ethnicity

Understand the relationship between diversity, inequality, and justice

Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of global interdependence, for example, the role of migration and immigration, economic, political,
and cultural globalization, on contemporary society.

Demonstrate familiarity with the historical contributions of traditionally marginalized groups to contemporary ideas, values, and culture

How CD Learning Outcomes Will Be Met:

Students will explore the economic and social conditions that are reflected in traditional and modern Chinese literary works, especially issues
such as the exploitation of women as concubines, slaves, and prostitutes, the class disparities that were endemic to traditional society in spite of
its relatively egalitarian ethic, and the ethnic cleavages that divided majority Han from minority populations

Students will understand the contributions of writers belonging to China’s ethnic minorities (including Manchu, Mongolian, and Tibetan, among
others) in both traditional and modern periods

Through reading assignments and lectures, students will be introduced to the deeply divisive and corrosive conditions of social inequality that
prevailed in much of China during the early modern period

Students will be exposed to the plurality of Chinese culture and society beneath its seemingly monolithic surface, particularly its regional, gender,
and class differences, as reflected in literary works

Student with Disabilities:


Students with disabilities (including learning disabilities) who are interested in receiving services while at USF should contact Student Disability
Services (SDS) as soon as possible to initiate the intake and eligibility process. Students eligible for reasonable academic accommodations receive
an accommodation letter from SDS verifying the recommended classroom accommodations and the need for such accommodations. The letter is
presented to the instructor by the student. For more information, please visit http://www.usfca.edu/sds/ (http://www.usfca.edu/sds/)

Academic Honor Code:

For every assignment, an qj ` anop] j ` ej c of and ] ` danaj _a to USF standards of academic honesty is required. Study the Academic Honesty Policy at:
https://myusf.usfca.edu/academic-integrity/honor-code. Ignorance of the exact content of this Policy is unacceptable. Among the i ] j u elements of
academic honesty, note, for example, that all submitted work must be a new project for you and must be your ks j s kng.  Small parts of your work
can borrow from other works so long as they are properly cited (in footnotes, endnotes, or in-text citations with an accompanying bibliography). Here,
a good rule of thumb is: when in doubt, cite (including yourself)! Academic dishonesty will be handled easily: ] j B cn] ` a ] j ` j kpebe_] pekj s ehh^a ceraj
pk pda @a] j тo kbbe_a* And, again, ignorance is no excuse.

The Learning, Writing, and Speaking Centers:

https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/syllabus 8/10
2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)
The Learning, Writing, and Speaking Centers at USF provide individualized support to assist you in better understanding course material and to aid
you on your path to success. Services are free and include one-on-one tutoring, group tutoring, and one-on-one Academic Skills Coaching
appointments to discuss effective study strategies. The Learning Center supports over 80 courses each semester. The Writing Center helps students
develop their writing skills in rhetoric, organization, style, and structure, through one-on-one interactive conferences. The Speaking Center helps
students prepare for public speaking - including speeches, oral presentations, team presentations, and visual aid demonstrations. International
students may also contact us to learn more about communicating with professors and general academic study skills. The Learning, Writing, and
Speaking Centers are located on the Lower Level of Gleeson Library (G03). Please contact them at (415) 422-6713 for further assistance or
visit: https://myusf.usfca.edu/lwsc (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-
3A__t.e2ma.net_click_11qsob_5gltyp_hyai0l&d=DwMFaQ&c=qgVugHHq3rzouXkEXdxBNQ&r=eqYa_oo8qwNCNNhWJ8wL7f8fL7kDaFSpd8Jw4eQQuM0
 to make an appointment.

COURSE SUMMARY:
 
Date Details

Thu Feb 21, 2019  First Response Paper (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817614) due by 12pm

Thu Mar 28, 2019  Second Response Paper (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817615) due by 12pm

Thu Apr 4, 2019  Midterm Exam (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817635) due by 11:59pm

Thu Apr 25, 2019  Third Response Paper (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817616) due by 12pm

https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/syllabus 9/10
2019/5/8 Syllabus for Chinese Literature in Translation - 01 (Spring 2019)

Date Details

 1/24 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6819320)  

 1/29 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823899)  

 1/29 The Book of Odes (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6819322)  

 1/31 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823910)  

 1/31 Confucius and The Analects (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817623)  

 2/12 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823913)  

 2/14 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823914)  

 2/19 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823915)  

 2/26 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823917)  

 2/26 Sima Quan (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817667)  

 2/28 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823918)  

 2/7 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6823912)  

 3/19 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6836827)  

 3/21 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6836828)  

 3/21 The story of Yingying (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817619)  

 3/26 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6836829)  

 3/28 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6836830)  

 3/5 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6835114)  

 3/7 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6835115)  

 4/ 9 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840147)  

 4/11 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840148)  

 4/11/Lu Xun " In Memoriam" (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840369)  

 4/16 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840149)  

 4/16 DingLing "Miss Sophia's Diary" (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840897)  

 4/18 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840150)  

 4/18 Eileen Chang "Sealed Off" (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6841186)  

 4/2 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6838174)  

 4/2 Guan Hanqing, " The Injustice of Dou E" (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6838986)  

 4/23 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840151)  

 4/25 (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840152)  

 4/9 Lu Xun short stories (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6840141)  

 Extra Credit (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817631)  

 Final paper (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817632)  

 Final Project (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817633)  

 One­page abstract (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817659)  

 Roll Call Attendance (https://usfca.instructure.com/courses/1583016/assignments/6817661)  

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