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Unit 1: ​Survival

Grade level: 4 ​
Themes: ​Enduring hardships and overcoming adversity

Stage 1 – Desired Results


Summary and Overview
Survival is the literary theme that drives this first unit of study which centers around
realistic fiction from a reading and writing perspective. We’ll set a foundation of using
readers workshop and applying the writers workshop model for process writing of
realistic fiction.

Literary Connections
The book that are setting the overarching theme are ‘​My Side of the Mountain​’ which
chronicles a young boy’s experience surviving in the woods in upstate New York.

Math Connections
The focus will be on Geometry, multiplication and division (Number sentences) followed
by perimeter and area. The applied learning activity around which this unit theme is
focused will be to construct a ‘Lean To’ survival shelter using limited materials while on a
long term stay on Zanzibar island using the design thinking process for our STEM
product.

Science Connections
A long term stay in Africa with access to game parks and island ecosystem provides a
perfect opportunity to study ecosystems and Zanzibar island the setting for geologic
learning of weathering, minerals and the rock cycle.

Social Studies Connections


Geography and mapping skills are the first social studies connections with the theme of
how culture ‘survives’ despite colonialism across Europe, east and north Africa.

Understanding (s)/goals Essential Question(s):


Student will learn about stories of survival Why do some things ‘survive’ and others
to write a similar story combining effective don’t?
elements of reading and writing to tell a How can we overcome hardship?
similar story.

Knowledge: Skills:
Student will recognize the elements of Student will apply reading and writing
realistic fiction. strategies to help design a structure for
survival and understand a text.

Stage 2 – Standards and Assessments


Learning Standards

Reading: Literature
Key Ideas and Details
1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
● RL.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
● RL.4.2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize
the text.
3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the
course of a text.
● RL.4.3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
● Craft and Structure
4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
● RL.4.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the
whole.
● RL.4.5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the
structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of
characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or speaking
about a text.
6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
● RL.4.6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated,
including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

Reading: Informational Text


Key Ideas and Details
1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
● RI.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
● RI.4.2. Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details;
summarize the text.
3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the
course of a text.
● RI.4.3. Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or
technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the
text.

Craft and Structure


4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
● RI.4.4. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or
phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.

Writing
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

● W.4.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
● W.4.3a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or
characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
● W.4.3b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the
responses of characters to situations.
● W.4.3c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of
events.
● W.4.3d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and
events precisely.
● W.4.3e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.

5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or


trying a new approach.
● W.4.5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing
as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact
and collaborate with others.
● W.4.6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the
Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others;
demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in
a single sitting.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
● L.4.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
● L.4.2a. Use correct capitalization.
● L.4.2b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a
text.
● L.4.2c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
● L.4.2d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge


7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused
questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
W.4.7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different
aspects of a topic.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and
research.
● W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection,
and research.
● W.4.9a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Describe in depth a
character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text
[e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions].”)
Next Generation Science Standards
4.Earth’s Systems: Processes that Shape the Earth

Performance Expectations
● 4-ESS1-1. Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers for
changes in a landscape over time to support an explanation for changes in a landscape
over time.
● 4-ESS2-1. Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of
weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.
● 4-ESS2-2. Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features.
● 4-ESS3-2. Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural
Earth processes on humans.

3-5.Engineering Design
Performance Expectations
● 3-5-ETS1-1. Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes
specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.
● 3-5-ETS1-2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on
how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
● 3-5-ETS1-3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure
points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

Mathematics
Geometry
4.G.A. Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines
and angles.
● 4.G.A. Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines
and angles.
● 4.G.A.1. Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and
perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.
● 4.G.A.2. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel
or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size.
Recognize right triangles as a category, and identify right triangles.
● 4.G.A.3. Recognize a line of symmetry for a two-dimensional figure as a line across the
figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify
line-symmetric figures and draw lines of symmetry.

Measurement and Data


4.MD.A. Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a
larger unit to a smaller unit.
● 4.MD.A.1. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including
km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement,
express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement
equivalents in a two-column table.
● 4.MD.A.2. Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals
of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving
simple fractions or decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given
in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using
diagrams such as number line diagrams that feature a measurement scale.
● 4.MD.A.3. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and
mathematical problems.
4.MD.B. Represent and interpret data.
● 4.MD.B.4. Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit
(1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using
information presented in line plots.
4.MD.C. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of angle and measure angles.
● 4.MD.C.5. Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays
share a common endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement:
● 4.MD.C.5a. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common
endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points
where the two rays intersect the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is
called a “one-degree angle,” and can be used to measure angles.
● 4.MD.C.5b. An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle
measure of n degrees.
● 4.MD.C.6. Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor. Sketch angles of
specified measure.
● 4.MD.C.7. Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into
non-overlapping parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures
of the parts. Solve addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a
diagram in real world and mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a
symbol for the unknown angle measure.

Applied Learning Activities and Other Evidence:


Differentiation: Formative assessment as demonstrated by
Reading​: Literary analysis of a text as oral conferencing, student journaling, and
book trailer or digital story. assessment with digital tools.
Math and STEM​: ‘Lean To’ planning design
and construction. Video Logs.
Writing​: Realistic Fiction process writing.
Science and Social Studies​: Mapping of
geologic features in ‘Google Maps’.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan


Learning Activities:
To be determined on site restraints and opportunities.