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DISSERTATION

SYNOPSIS

DEEPSHIKHA PUROHIT
B. ARCH 4TH YEAR
A PLACE TO MEET

The industrialization of modern societies in todays’ world has had an


enormous effect on reducing the traditional ways of communication among
people. The cities of the world are in serious demand of more specific
spaces that fulfils the Socio– cultural relationships of the people. As a
result, creating more spaces for the people who frequently try to overcome
the dearth of human communication and interaction is necessary

NEED AND SCOPE:

Importance of communication can not only be measured by lack of


communication and its effects, but also effects of deficiency of human
communication can be found.
The more the social increase, the more specified that the unsociable human
being lacking communication with others is susceptible to social damages
such as suicide. suicide is not only results from disease or handicap but
also from gap between person and society or deficiency of human relations
Places like plazas, squares, clubs, lounges, designed markets, churchhouses,
templecourtyards are needed to increase the public interaction so as to
maintain the cultural values and sanity of human existence.

SCOPE

Interference of technology in lives of people have raised issues of lack of


human interaction leading to various physiological problems.
Urban planners are now looking forward to make the towns more creative
and friendly for the people.
There is an increased demand of public spaces in all types of communities.
And hence public architecture has a large scope off blooming.
AIM:

This dissertation will aim at studying that how successful are the designed
public spaces.
How they help reduce the dead spaces in a city.it will focus on drawing the
analysis through a thorough study of such public spaces and their
effectiveness in maintaining the cultural values of a place.
It will study the effect of public architecture on economy of a place as well
as the reduction of depression in people due to such spaces.
LOOKING CLOSER TO HOME: HOW IS HISTORY
CHASED AND FOLLOWED BACK IN MODERN
ARCHITECTURE?

Some of the most exciting buildings – private and public, big and
small – combine different genres, eras and materials.
Old construction techniques at times prove to be more effective than the
new ones. These buildings at times are more welcomed then the new ones
as they can provide more comfort in the climatic conditions and traditional
beliefs of a place.

NEED AND SCOPE

A building is long lived till it has life in itself which means that if a
building is regularly occupied it will last for a longer era than an abandoned
building.

The question is: How to keeping using a building?


The basic answer yet the most important aspect is: public flow.

Now, when will they keep visiting a place?


When the place offers the comfort they need in their mind where they can
feel homely.

Yes, exactly, that’s the point why history keeps coming back in modern
architecture.
Even in this world of technological advances humans making great
progress in every field everyone at some point of time feel the nostalgia and
that’s when they want to visit places where their heart is connected to.
But don’t you think that making of building of historical era is a costly and
time consuming effort? Yes, it is!
The solution to this came in the form of a balanced blending of new
architectural dimensions with the old relatable ethics of the place and hence
there is an increase in demand where people want to see such buildings.

AIM
This dissertation will aim at studying the effectiveness of a building
designed with blending of new and old techniques and styles of
architecture, public reception of such places, their climatic effectiveness,
economic benefits, conservation values and their scope with contemporary
frame of reference.
REDIFINING MODERNITY: LOCAL ENVIRONMENT
WITH MODERN DEVELOPMENT

“Is it possible to study the old aesthetic and to recreate it once again for
the cities of India?
“What measures can be taken to maintain the local environment and yet
walk hand in hand with modern development?”

In the course of twentieth century architecture, like most aspects of culture


we have seen an increasing homogeneity between regions.
Present world has come to accept this concept of ‘blandification’, it is
often difficult to tell by architecture alone where a piece of international
style architecture might be sited on the earth. This highlights the problem of
local stylistic sources of innovation being lost, as universal styles of
architecture, art, food, etc., of internationalist culture take over. This creates
a tension and sometimes an outright conflict between those who welcome a
human universal architecture of modernity and those who deplore it, seeing
it as a threat to indigenous cultures, traditions, and to regional architectural
character in particular.
We love to visit unique cities such as St Petersburg, Paris, Rome, Venice,
Bangkok, or wander through towns and villages in Greece, Spain, Italy,
Mexico, and Japan.
In india people love to visit their local markets or heritage places to get the
essence of the city. Even local residents prefer living in old towns or
shopping from their available local markets.
Part of the appeal of all these places is their architecture. They have an
uniqueness about them, they are distinct, recognizable, generated by their
site, location, climate, and locally sourced materials and construction
techniques.
Most of the population inhabiting these built environments as well as the
people visiting them strive to safeguard their established architecture,
culture, and system of settings. They are often integrated systems in which
people act, behave and live.
It is important for people to value their historic continuity, cultural
diversity and preserve their identity in combination with their geography.

NEED AND SCOPE


It is a real challenge for the young architects in the developing countries on
how to express a cultural identity of their local qualities in their cities.
There are lessons that are to be learned from traditions of a place.
The need for reviving the local environment of a place came due to:

rising monotonicity, due to which cities started losing their identity as an


individual unit. People have started forgetting their cultural and heritage
value which makes them different from others.
Buildings are becoming more dependent on artificial environment created
inside them which is increasing load on environment and is more or less
same as other new buildings.

Loss of identity: It is essential to maintain the identity of a place rather than


destroying it for the sake of modernity.
If a building is designed with keeping in mind the traditional values of a
place it seems more receptive. People relate themselves more to their
culture and hence buildings or spaces with their cultural identities increases
the footfall.

Attracts visitors: essence of a place lies in their local markets,public spaces


and residences .spaces deisgned with intact cultural values with modern
facilities invite more visitors as well as local people, also working towards
profit to the economy of the city.
Like for instance, in India
the bazaar is the most dominant culture of shopping and closely defines the
term 'shopping' itself. However, in contemporary times, the shopping mall
culture has also gained in popularity. Therefore, if a market place has to be
designed in today’s scenario, it could be an amalgamation of both these
shopping cultures.
Residences in India also are more climate responsive and based on local
beliefs and hence provide more comfort to residents keeping health factors
in mind. therefore, there is a need to design places which are more
connected to roots so as to engage more public interest.
With this in mind, architects and urban planners are increasingly looking to
the past for the queries to be answered.
As said before the essence of a city lies in their residences and markets. We
can easily get an overview of a place just by visiting their local markets or
other public spaces.
Design is now free from its traditional factors such as local environment
and culture indicating the end of borders, customs and earthly differences.
Yet, it does not promise for a positive response for the dilemma.

AIM

Tis dissertation will aim at studying how successful is the recreation of


local environment with all the comforts and facilities of the modern
developments.
It will focus on maintain the identity of the place and engaging more public
interaction for a more and better architecture and economy.
In the course of twentieth century architecture, like most aspects of culture
we have seen an increasing homogeneity between regions. In our present
world that has come to accept this concept of ‘blandification’, it is often
difficult to tell by architecture alone where a piece of international style
architecture might be sited on the earth. This highlights the problem of
local stylistic sources of innovation being lost, as universal styles of
architecture, art, food, etc., of internationalist culture take over. This creates
a tension and sometimes an outright conflict between those who welcome a
human universal architecture of modernity and those who deplore it, seeing
it as a threat to indigenous cultures, traditions, and to regional architectural
character in particular. We love to visit unique cities such as St Petersburg,
Paris, Rome, Venice, Bangkok, or wander through towns and villages in
Greece, Spain, Italy, Mexico, and Japan. Part of the appeal of all these
places is their architecture. They have an uniqueness about them, they are
distinct, recognizable, generated by their site, location, climate, and locally
sourced materials and construction techniques. Most of the population
inhabiting these built environments as well as the people visiting them
strive to safeguard their established architecture, culture, and system of
settings. They are often integrated systems in which people act, behave and
live.1 It is important for people to value their historic continuity, cultural
diversity and preserve their identity in combination with their geography.