You are on page 1of 17

5/12/2011 

Atmospheric Disperssion 
Dispersion is the process by which contaminants move through 
the air and a plume spreads over a large area, thus reducing the 
concentration of the pollutants it contains. 

Atmospheric Disperssion 
The plume spreads both horizontally and vertically. 
If it is a gaseous plume, the motion of the molecules follows 
the laws of gaseous diffusion. 


5/12/2011 

Gaussian Dispersion Model 

Wind Rose 


5/12/2011 

Dispersion Model Assumptions 

 The predominant force is the wind. 
 The greatest concentration of the pollutant 
molecules is along the plume centerline. 
 The process is a steady state process. 

Dispersion Model Construction 
 Plume travels horizontally in x‐direction 
 Plume disperses horizontally (y) and vertically (z) 
 Concentration inside the plume follows Gaussian 
Distribution 
 Concentration (C(x,y,z)) is proportional to: 
 Source strength (Q) 
 Inverse of wind speed (1/U) 
 Normalized Gaussian distribution function in the y and z directions 
that is dependent on weather conditions 


5/12/2011 

Plume Dispersion Coordinate System 

Gaussian Dispersion Model 

At ground level, we have z=0, thus 


5/12/2011 

Gaussian Dispersion Model 

The greatest value of the ground level concentration in any 
direction, and this is the concentration along the plume 
centerline; that is, for y = 0. We have 

Finally, for a source of emission at ground level, H = 0, and the ground level 
concentration of pollutant downwind along the plume centerline is given 
by 

Maximum ground level conc. 

For a release above ground level the maximum downwind 
ground level concentration Occurs along the plume 
centerline when the following condition is satisfied: 

H
z 
2


5/12/2011 

Key to Stability Categories 

Horizontal 
Dispersion 
Coefficients 


5/12/2011 

Vertical 
Dispersion 
Coefficients 

Effective Stack Height 
 Carson and Moses Equation 
Superadiabatic 
Stability 

Nuetral Stability 

Subadiabatic 
Stability 

Vs = stack gas exit speed (in m/s ) , 
d = stack diameter (in m), and 
Qh = heat emission rate from the stack (in kJ/s). 


5/12/2011 

Effective Stack Height 
 Holland Formula 

vsd    T  Ta  
1 . 5   2 . 68  10 ( P )  s  d 
2
H  
u    Ts   

Where 
  vs = stack velocity, m/s 
  d = stack diameter, m 
  u = wind speed, m/s 
  P = pressure, kPa 
  Ts = stack temperature, K 
  Ta = air temperature, K 

Example 
 It has been estimated that the emission of SO2 from a cola-
fired power plant is 1,656.2 g/s. At 3 km downwind on an
overcast summer afternoon, what is the centerline
concentration of SO2 if the wind speed is 4.50 m/s? (Note:
“centerline” implies y =0)
 Stack parameter:
 Height = 120.0 m
 Diameter = 1.20 m
 Exit velocity = 10.0 m/s
 Temperature 315 oC
 Atmospheric conditions:
 Pressure = 95.0 kPa
 Temperature = 25.0oC


5/12/2011 

Air Pollution 
Control 

Source Correction 

 Changing or eliminating a process that produces a 
polluting air effluent 
 Elimination of lead from gasoline 
 removal of sulfur from coal and oil before the fuel is burned 
 Controls: raw material substitution, and equipment 
modification to meet emission standards 
 Abatement : devices and methods for decreasing the 
quantity of pollutant reaching the atmosphere, once it 
has been generated by the source. 


5/12/2011 

COLLECTION OF POLLUTANTS

Collection of pollutants for treatment is the 
most serious problem in air pollution control. 

COOLING 
 The exhaust gases to be treated are sometimes too hot 
for the control equipment, and must first be cooled. 

10 
5/12/2011 

Air Pollution Control Technologies 
 Control of Particulate Emission 
‐ Settling 
‐ Cyclone separation 
‐ Wet scrubbing 
‐ Baghouse filtration 
‐ Electrostatic precipitation 
 Control of Vapor‐phase Emissions 
 Wet scrubbing 
 Activated carbon adsorption 
 Incineration 

Cyclone 
 Control particulates 
 Used as precleaners 
 >90% efficiency for > 5m 
 In expensive and maintenance free 

11 
5/12/2011 

Cyclones 

Fabric Filters 

 known as baghouses 
 Control particulates 
 efficient and cost 
effective 
 99% efficient for 
very fine particulates 
(<1m). 
 

12 
5/12/2011 

Baghouses 

Wet Collectors 
 The spray tower or scrubber 
 Remove larger particles 
effectively 
 can remove both gases and 
particulate matter. 
 A venturi scrubber is a 
frequently used high‐energy 
wet collector. 
 100% efficient in removing 
particles >5 pm 

13 
5/12/2011 

Wet collectors 

Electrostatic Precipitators 

14 
5/12/2011 

Electrostatic Precipitators 

CONTROL OF GASEOUS POLLUTANTS 
 
 Wet scrubbers: can remove pollutants by dissolving them 
in the scrubber solution. Ex. SO2 and NO2 in power 
plant . 
 Packed scrubbers, spray towers packed with glass 
platelets or glass frit,  more efficient. Ex. removal of 
fluoride from aluminum smelter exhaust gases. 

15 
5/12/2011 

Activated Carbon Adsorber 

 Removal of organic 
compounds with an adsorbent 
like activated charcoal. 

Incinerator 
 
 Incineration, or flaring, is used when 
an organic pollutant can be oxidized 
to CO2 and water, or in oxidizing 
H2S to SO2.  
 Catalytic combustion is a variant of 
incineration in which the reaction is 
facilitated energetically and carried 
out at a lower temperature by 
surface catalysis, 

16 
5/12/2011 

Effectiveness of Technologies 

17