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Name: Elana Gitterman

District: N/A
School: N/A
Subject: Jazz
Grade: 9
Date: March 20, 2019
Lesson Plan Number: 2 (Week 2, Day 1)

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards


2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION – Creating, Performing, and Participating in Music
Apply Vocal or Instrumental Skills
2.4 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various
genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation,
by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 4 on a scale of 1–6).
Compose, Arrange, and Improvise
2.8 Create melodic and rhythmic improvisations in a style or genre within a musical culture
(e.g., gamelan, jazz, and mariachi).
3.0 HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT – Understanding the Historical
Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of Music
Diversity of Music
3.7 Analyze the stylistic features of a given musical work that define its aesthetic traditions
and its historical or cultural context.

Objectives
1. To perform “Summertime” by George Gershwin/arr. Rich DeRosa
2. To understand the historical background of “Summertime”
Equipment and Supplies
1. Instruments
a. 5 saxes (AATTB)
b. 4 trumpets
c. 4 trombones
d. 1 drummer
e. 1 guitar
f. 1 bass
g. 1 piano
2. Sheet music for “Summertime” George Gershwin/arr. Rich DeRosa
3. Scale Pages with natural minor and blues scales
4. Program Notes from President’s Own Marine Band’s chamber concert, dated October
16th, 2016
5. Lyrics for “Summertime”
6. Recordings
a. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixdJLXDT_QM - George Gershwin -
Summertime
b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6O8eAKvdiQY - Dakota Collegiate Sr
Jazz - Summertime
Procedure
1. Warm ups
c. Scales
i.Establish tempo of 78 bpm (approximate tempo of “Summertime”) by
snapping tempo and tell students you will be giving them a full bar
count off and that they will play a concert D major scale (sheet music
will be allowed)
ii.Pass out scale sheets in concert D minor (the key of arrangement of
“Summertime”) to students as indicated below:
For Concert Pitch (Guitar, Piano )

Concert Pitch Bass (for bass, trombones)


For Trumpets and Tenor Saxes (Bb, their E Scale)

For Alto Saxes and Bari Sax (Eb, their B scale)

1. Ask students to silently finger through the scales on their own


for about a minute.
2. Establish tempo of 78 bpm by snapping tempo and tell students
you will be giving them a full bar count off and that they will
play the top scale (natural minor).
3. Go through natural minor scale.
4. Ask students how the bottom scale (blues scale) is different
from the top scale (less notes, first intreval is a 3rd instead of a
second, different pattern between notes)
5. Establish tempo of 78 bpm by snapping tempo and tell students
you will be giving them a full bar count off and that they will
play the blues scale.
6. Activity
a. Ask a member of the band to choose a major, minor, or
blues scale and have rest of ensemble vote to guess
which type of scale it is.
b. Repeat activity 5 - 6 times, choosing at least one student
from each section and ensuring that all three scales are
played at least once.
2. Sight Reading “Summertime”
d. Pass out “Summertime” George Gershwin/arr. Rich DeRosa for sight reading
e. Ask students to look through their music and mark anything that they need to
in order to play through as smoothly as possible.
f. Give students tempo for piece and conduct them through piece.
g. Ask students how they think they did reading the piece/about what difficulties
they noticed in the piece
3. Historical Background and listening to recordings
h. Ask students if they know anything about the piece/the composer of the piece
i. Pass out words to “Summertime”

j. Play recording of “original” version of “Summertime” and have students


follow along
k. Ask them about the lyrics of the piece/first recording (Are these lyrics
something you would expect based on the music in the piece? What do you
think of the imagery portrayed by the lyrics? How would you describe the way
the vocalist is singing the piece?).
l. Read students program notes from the President’s Own Marine Band’s
chamber concert
iii.“ ‘Summertime’ (1935) George Gershwin (1898–1937). George
Gershwin’s “Summertime” has its beginnings in a novel called Porgy
by American author DuBose Heyward, in which the title character is a
beggar in Catfish Row, a slum in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1926
Gershwin read the novel and was inspired to collaborate with Heyward
to create the opera Porgy and Bess. Nine years later, in 1935, two years
before Gershwin’s untimely death at age thirty-nine, the opera debuted
in New York City with an all African-American cast. Gershwin took a
poem in the novel, and gave it a melody based on the pentatonic scale,
giving it the quality of an African-American folk-song. He called it
“Summertime,” and made it the opening song of the opera, a lullaby
sung by a character named Clara. “Summertime” became one of the
most popular jazz standards and has been recorded by more than
33,000 musicians. This arrangement is based on the version recorded
by American folk singer and guitarist Doc Watson and his son Merle
in 1972.”
4. Put up recording of arrangement of “Summertime” played by Dakota Collegiate Sr.
Jazz and have students follow along
5. Run through “Summertime” as an ensemble again, this time unconducted unless
necessary
Assessment:
1. Students will be assessed intonation, rhythms, and correct notes while sight reading
“Summertime” and reassessed when they read through the second time to listen for
improvements.
2. Students will be assessed on their ability to differentiate between the major scale, the
minor scale, and the blues scale based on the activity in the beginning of class.
Evaluation:
Extension:
Name: KJ Lee
District: N/A
School: N/A
Subject: Jazz
Grade: 9
Date: March 20, 2019
Lesson Plan Number: 2

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards


2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION – Creating, Performing, and Participating in Music
Apply Vocal or Instrumental Skills
2.4 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various
genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and
articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 4 on a scale of 1–6).
Compose, Arrange, and Improvise
2.8 Create melodic and rhythmic improvisations in a style or genre within a musical
culture (e.g., gamelan, jazz, and mariachi).
3.0 HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT – Understanding the Historical
Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of Music
Diversity of Music
3.7 Analyze the stylistic features of a given musical work that define its aesthetic
traditions and its historical or cultural context.

Objectives
1. To perform “So What” by Miles Davis, arr. Michael Sweeney
2. To perform “Poco Loco” by Carl Strommen
3. To understand the stylistic features of “Poco Loco”

Equipment and Supplies


1. Chairs and stands
2. Amplifiers for the guitar, bass, and piano
3. Scores and parts for:
a. Warm-up exercises
b. “So What” by Miles Davis, arr. Michael Sweeney
c. “Poco Loco” by Carl Strommen
4. Recording sources:
a. “So What”: https://www.jwpepper.com/sheet-music/media-
player.jsp?&type=audio&productID=2470822
b. “Poco Loco”: https://www.jwpepper.com/sheet-music/media-
player.jsp?&type=audio&productID=2472203

Procedure
1. Play the recordings of “So What” and “Poco Loco” while students are setting up.
2. Greet the class and tell them to bring out their parts for the warm-up exercises, for “So
What,” and for “Poco Loco.”
a. In case of lost parts, lend them a copy and ask them to photocopy the parts for
homework
3. Warm-ups
a. Rhythm exercises
i. Without swing first, then with swing
b. Improvisation
i. Thirds and sevenths exercises
4. Play “So What”
a. Run through the piece
b. Ask the students questions
i. “How did we sound as an ensemble?”
ii. “How is the balance?”
c. Ask for a volunteer to listen to the ensemble in front of the classroom, and ask the
volunteer the same questions
d. Play through once more
e. If necessary, stop and give the students short reminders of the questions earlier
5. Play “Poco Loco”
a. Run through the piece
b. Ask the students questions
i. “How did we sound as an ensemble?”
ii. “How is the balance?”
c. Ask for a volunteer to listen to the ensemble in front of the classroom, and ask the
volunteer the same questions
d. Play through once more
e. If necessary, stop and give the students short reminders of the questions earlier
6. More about “Poco Loco”:
a. Ask the students to put their instruments down and take a seat, for those who
stand to play
b. Briefly explain the basic background of “Poco Loco”
i. by Carl Strommen
ii. A great introduction to the up-tempo Latin jazz style
iii. Publisher’s notes: “The piece starts out simply with the rhythm section
with the Latin percussion parts. The rest of the band join in with their own
unison licks.”
iv. The written solos for alto saxophone and trumpet help build confidence.
7. Play through “Poco Loco” once more
8. As the students are quietly packing up their instruments, assign homework assignments
a. Weekly exercises on SmartMusic
i. Exercises #33, #34, and #35
ii. Due before the first class of the following week.
Name: Sandra Na
District: LAUSD
School: UCLA
Grade: 9
Date: March 20, 2019
Lesson Plan Number: 2

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards


1.0 ARTISTIC PERCEPTION - Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory
Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to Music
Read and Notate Music
1.3 Sight-read music accurately and expressively

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING- Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works
of Music
Students critically assess and derive meaning from works of music and the performance of
musicians according to the elements of music, aesthetic qualities, and human responses.
4.1 Develop specific criteria for making informed critical evaluations of the quality and
effectiveness of performances, compositions, arrangements, and improvisations and apply those
criteria in personal participation in music.

Objectives
1. Playing improv without knowing the definition of what improvisation is
2. Understand the definition of improvisation
3. Reinforce “So What”
4. Understand relationship between “So What” and “Poco Loco”
Equipments and Supplies
1. Instruments
2. Improvisation warm up sheet
3. Youtube links:
a. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mu_AynRFxFw
b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87ZPnOsvI8g
4. “So What” x how many students are present in class
5. “Poco Loco” x how many students are present in class
Procedures
1. Warm-ups
a. Improvisation
i. Work on the warm up sheet. Give 5~7 students chances to improv on the
spot as others accompany the student
2. Talk about soloing and improvisation
a. Play examples of what soloing and improvisation looks like but also touch upon
that not soloing does not mean you are less or less important
b. Ask the students if they noticed if they have been noticing similarities between
our warm ups and improvisation.
c. Play a short excerpt from warm up
3. Review “So What” for scale (same one as “Poco Loco”)
a. Play through “So What” and the scale
4. Intro “Poco Loco”
a. Play through “Poco Loco” for the first time as sight reading
b. Ask students why they think we played “So What” before sight reading
c. Ask the key of this piece
Assessment Plan
1. Being able to play through warm up series
2. The students understand and could identify improvisation was inputted our daily warm
ups
3. By playing through the whole piece of “So What” and see if the students remember notes
and rhythm we went over previously
4. By asking to identify the difference and similarities between “So What” and “Poco Loco”
during intro to “Poco Loco” portion.
Name: Ashley Bowman
District: N/A
School: N/A
Subject: Composing with Music Technology
Grade: 9
Date: 20 March 2019
Lesson Plan Number: 2

This lesson plan is Week 6 out of an 18 week plan for a freshman level jazz band class.

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards


2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION: Creating, Performing, and Participating in Music- Students
apply vocal and instrumental skills in performing a varied repertoire of music.
Apply Vocal or Instrumental Skills
-2.4 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various
genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation, by
oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 4 on a scale of 1–6).
-2.5 Perform on an instrument in small ensembles, with one performer for each part.
Compose, Arrange, and Improvise
-2.10 Improvise original melodies over given chord progressions.
4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING: Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About
Works in the Visual Arts- Students critically assess and derive meaning from works of music
and the performance of musicians in a cultural context according to the elements of music,
aesthetic qualities, and human responses.
Analyze and Critically Assess
-4.2 Evaluate a performance, composition, arrangement, or improvisation by comparing
each with an exemplary model.

Objectives
1. To strengthen understanding behind the musicality necessary for each of the three pieces
2. To explore working in small groups with one or more student(s) helping, directing, and
leading the other students to success.

Equipment and Supplies


1. Instruments
a. 5 saxes (AATTB)
b. 4 trumpets
c. 4 trombones
d. 1 drummer
e. 1 aux percussion
f. 1 guitar
g. 1 bass
h. 1 piano
i. Note: this will vary depending on number of students in the class.
2. Sheet music for:
a. Bb Blues, unknown composer
b. So What, by Miles Davis
c. Summertime, by George Gershwin
3. Youtube
a. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNCdTsnzESw Bb Blues
b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylXk1LBvIqU So What
c. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xMoeW5gePI Summertime

Procedure
1. Greet the students and inform them of the plan for the day. Have the students come in and
sit down without getting their instruments out.
2. Before playing the recording of Bb blues, ask the students what they should be listening
for in the recording. After asking, explain any answers students did not name, such as
articulation, the way the musicians swing rhythms, dynamic contrast, instrument blend,
and improvisation.
a. Play the recording of Bb blues for the students. After, ask the students a series of
questions: How did the musicians interpret each of these categories? Should we
interpret the piece in the same ways they did or differently? Why?
3. Tell the students to get their instruments out and go into sectionals.
a. The sectionals will be divided into wind instruments with similar parts (ex: if alto
saxophones and trumpets have the same parts for a certain piece, they will be in
sectionals together. But, if on another piece they have different parts, they will not
be in sectionals together), rhythm section, and bass instruments.
b. Section leaders will run the sectionals. Section leaders will be chosen at the
beginning of the semester and each section will have one section leader. If there is
a sectional with multiple sections (ex: alto saxophones and trumpets), the section
leaders will run the sectional together.
c. After sectionals begin, the teacher will go around from section to section to help
and observe the section leaders run sectionals.
4. For day 2, use this same procedure but with the piece So What, by Miles Davis.
5. For day 3, use this same procedure but with the piece Summertime, by George Gershwin.

Assessment Plan
1. As seen in the procedures, the students will be asked questions and listen to recordings
each day for the three pieces. Later in the lesson when the students are in sectionals, the
teacher will be going around to each section to listen in. Hearing what the section leaders
and students are saying in sectionals after listening to recordings will give the teacher a
good idea of the students’ understanding of musicality in the piece. If the teacher feels
that they need more assessment, they can have the students write an “exit note,” a
paragraph at the end of the class period, about their understanding of the different aspects
of musicality within the piece.
2. As the teacher goes around and observes sectionals, they can assess how the section
leaders are teaching and if the other students are learning from them. If needed, the
teacher can talk to all the section leaders outside of class to discuss leadership skills with
them and see if the students have any questions about the best way to run sectionals.
Also, if the teacher notices anything during sectionals that is being incorrectly done, the
teacher can approach the student to fix the issue. On the other hand, if the teacher notices
students doing a great job, they can pull them aside to praise them as well.

Evaluation

Extension
Name:​ Tara Fay
District:​ N/A
School:​ N/A
Subject:​ Jazz Ensemble
Grade:​ 9 (Beginner/Proficient)
Date:​ 20 March 2019
Lesson Plan Number:​ 2

Week 7 Day 3 Lesson Plan

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards:


1.0 ARTISTIC PERCEPTION - Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory
Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to Music
● 1.3 Sight-read music accurately and expressively (level of difficulty: 3 on a scale of
1–6).
2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION - Creating, Performing, and Participating in Music
● 2.4 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing
various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and
articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 4 on a scale of 1–6).
● 2.5 Perform on an instrument in small ensembles, with one performer for each part.
4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING - Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgements About
Works of Music
● 4.1 Develop specific criteria for making informed critical evaluations of the quality
and effectiveness of performances, compositions, arrangements, and improvisations and
apply those criteria in personal participation in music.

Objectives:
1. Students will be able to maintaining a balanced group sound.
2. Students will be able to play their individual parts alone in small ensembles.

Supplies and Equipment:


1. Instruments (students will provide their own)
a. 5 saxophones (AATTB)
b. 4-5 Trombones (1 bass trombone, tuba if applicable)
c. 4 tumpets
d. 1 bass (tuba can be interchangeable)
e. 1 drum set
f. 1 guitar
g. 1 piano
2. SmartMusic
3. Smart Board

Procedure:
1. Warm-ups (SmartMusic will be used for tuning)
a. Long tones
b. Scales (chromatic, CM - GM, cm - gm)
c. Arpeggios (CM - EM, two octaves, 80 BPM)
2. Preparation for assessment
a. Review previously determined ensemble sound
i. Tone
ii. Balance between sections
b. Have everyone read through the assigned section of the piece together, give
overarching comments on things to pay attention to in the assessment
3. Small Ensemble Assessment for “Poco Loco”
a. Reveal group assignments on the board
i. Some students will have to perform more than once because of uneven
numbers; they will only be graded on their first performance
ii. Teacher will
4. Sectionals on “Autumn”
a. Section leaders will take their groups to different corners of the band room or to
connecting storage/rehearsal spaces if available
b. Groups will run through the entire piece but focus on the introduction, on which
they will be assessed in the future.
c. Teacher will circulate between groups and provide guidance while ensuring
groups are on task
d. For the last five minutes of class, the entire ensemble will regroup in the band
room and put together the sections they’ve practiced.
i. This will serve as an opportunity to reinforce our good ensemble sound
with a new song, allowing for mental representation of this sound without
it being tied to a particular song.
ii. Section leaders will announce how they’re groups did, what they did well
in their sectionals and what could be improved.

Assessment Plan:
● Objective 1: Balanced sound
○ Prior to the assessment for objective 2, all students will play the section for the
small ensemble test together. They will be asked which instruments are the most
prominent/soft and to identify
● Objective 2: Small ensemble playing
○ Small groups will be randomly assigned to perform Poco Loco in front of the
class. One person will be assigned per part and will be given
compliments/constructive criticism by other members of their section. Grades will
be given out of 10 by the teacher, with 5 points for note/rhythmic accuracy and 5
for dynamics/articulations.

Evaluation:
● n/a

Extension:
● n/a
Jazz Improvisation  
Unit Plan for Grade 9, Jazz Ensemble 
Prepared by Mr. Juan Gonzalez 

OVERVIEW & PURPOSE 

Improvisation is critical to the study of jazz and is required in all instances in order to 
appreciate the art form in its entirety. Improvisation is also needed in order to perform 
accurately in the jazz idiom since solos will be required of all students in varied keys. 
Students will be able to improvise over 6 keys in ii V I chord progressions and identify all 
3rds and 7ths both major and minor in all 12 keys. 

EDUCATION STANDARDS 

1. 1.0 Artistic Perception: Students read, notate, listen to, analyze, and describe 
music and other aural information, using the terminology of music. 
2. 2.0 Creative Expression: Students apply vocal and instrumental musical skills in 
performing a varied repertoire of music. They compose and arrange music and 
improvise melodies, variations, and accompaniments. 

OBJECTIVES 

1. Students will know all major and minor 3rds on their instruments in all 12 keys. 
2. Students will be able to recognize chord symbols and identify the Root, 3rd and 
7th chord tones. 
3. Students will be able to play an improvised solo over Major ii V I progressions in 6 
keys. Autumn Leaves, Song for my Father. 
4. Students will demonstrate proficient understanding of jazz theory (ii V I, voice 
leading/guidetones) and style. 

MATERIALS NEEDED 

1. Access to backing track: iReal Pro, YouTube, etc 

1   
2. Jazz improv handouts: supplied once by instructor  

VERIFICATION 

Steps to check for student understanding 

1. Students will play the assigned exercise in class to show comprehension. 


2. Instructor will ask questions 
3. Students will play with backing track 

ACTIVITY 

Describe activity that will reinforce the lesson 

1. Week One: Students will learn all major and minor 3rds on their respective 
instruments. 
2. Week Two: Students will learn all major and minor 7ths on their respective 
instruments.   
3. Week Three: Students will be able to perform all major and minor 3rds and 7ths 
to their corresponding chord symbol. Major 7, Minor 7 and diminished.   
4. Students will Solo over the first 4 bars of Autumn Leaves using jazz rhythms and 
the learned guidetones 
5. Students will solo over the 2nd 4 bars of Autumn Leaves which is learning the 
entire tune. 

2   
Name: Cameron Wirtz
District: LAUSD
School: XXX Middle School
Grade: 6-8 Intermediate
Date: 2-3-2019
Lesson Plan Number: 1

National Standards for Music Education:


PERFORMING
- Analyze- Analyze the structure and context of varied musical works and their
implications for performance
-MU:Pr4.2.E.5a Demonstrate, using music reading skills where appropriate, how
the setting and formal characteristics of musical works contribute to
understanding the context of the music in prepared or improvised performances.

RESPONDING
-Interpret- Support an interpretation of a musical work that reflects the
creators’/performers’ expressive intent.
-MU:Re8.1.E.8a Identify and support interpretations of the expressive intent and
meaning of musical works, citing as evidence the treatment of the elements of
music, contexts, and (when appropriate) the setting of the text.

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards


2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION: Creating, Performing, and Participating in Music
-Apply Vocal or Instrumental Skills
-2.1 Sing or play repertoire of vocal literature representing various genres, styles,
and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, vowel shape, and
articulation—written and memorized, by oneself and in ensembles (level of
difficulty: 2 on a scale of 1–6).

-2.2 Sing or play music written in two and three parts.

Objectives:
1. Choose a soloist’s for Autumn Leaves ensemble
2. Become familiar with improvisation in Autumn Leaves
Equipment and Supplies:
1. Personal instruments
2. Pencil
3. Smart Music subscription
a. Blues Shuffle by Houghton & Warrington
4. Autumn Leaves – Miles Davis
5. Projector
6. Computer with internet
7. NuTune Subscription
Procedure:
1. Warm up
a. Sight reading
i. Blues Shuffle by Houghton & Warrington
ii. Pair students into groups of two
1. Each group performs in front of the class while the teacher
records their rendition
a. Smart music records the accuracy score
i. It is up to the teacher’s discretion to check weather
smart music made a correct and accurate grade
b. Scales using NuTune
i. 2 Octave Natural Minor Scale on C and F at 120 beats per minute
1. Using swung rhythms (8th note 16th note)
a. use same groups of two and perform the scales with the
program
i. Teacher must grade the accuracy of the scales
ii. 2 Octave Harmonic Minor Scale on C and F 120 beats per minute
1. Using swung rhythms (8th note 16th note)
a. Use same groups of two and perform the scales with the
program
i. Teacher must grade the accuracy of the scales
2. Autumn Leaves - Miles Davis
a. Complete run through
i. Assess previous progress of group
ii. Listen for intonation, rhythm, and blended group sound
b. Remind students of solo opportunities
i. Give individual students opportunities to play solo lines while rehearsing
the piece
1. Remind group of dynamic difference when a soloist is playing
a. Do not overpower the soloist
2. Blend with the soloist sound
Assessment:
1. Students will be assessed on the accuracy of rhythm, intonation, and blended sound of
autumn leaves using a rubric
2. Students will be assessed on their ability to perform an improvised solo in autumn
leaves using a rubric
Evaluation:
Extension:
Name: Samantha Buchanan
District: LAUSD
School: XXX High School
Grade: 9
Date: 3/18/2019
Lesson Plan Number: 2

California Visual and Performing Arts Content Standards:

2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION: Creating, Performing, and Participating in Music


Apply Vocal or Instrumental Skills
-2.4 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various
genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and
articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 5 on a scale of 1–6).

Compose, arrange, and improvise:


-2.8 Create melodic and rhythmic improvisations in a style or genre within a musical
culture (e.g., gamelan, jazz, and mariachi).
-2.9 Improvise harmonizing parts, using an appropriate style.
-2.10 Improvise original melodies over given chord progressions.

Objectives:

1. To complete performance-practice regarding set up, ensemble seating, getting on and off
the stage, attire, and concert etiquette.
2. For the ensemble to perform the set in its entirety in preparation for the concert.

Equipment and Supplies:

1. Jazz ensemble instruments


2. Sheet music
3. Pencil
4. Computer w/ internet for Smart Music

Procedure:

1. This is the final rehearsal prior to the concert! Most of this rehearsal will be spent fixing
small issues within the pieces, running through the concert as a whole, and discussing
proper concert etiquette.
a. It should be noted, this rehearsal will be spent NOT in the band room, but in the
concert space that the concert will be held in.
2. I will first ensure that the ensemble is sitting in the appropriate formation and area on the
concert stage before starting the rehearsal.
a. They will still need pencils to make notes as needed for any potential changes.
3. I will begin the rehearsal with a quick warm-up with a Bb major scale, followed by a
rhythmic exercise from “Essential Elements for Jazz Ensemble” from Smart Music.
a. We will utilize the “Swing Rhythm Workout” numbers 1-3.
4. Following the warm-up sequence, I will have the ensemble put their repertoire in concert
order.
i. So What
ii. Autumn Leaves
iii. Summertime
iv. Poco Loco
v. Bb Blues
vi. Chameleon
5. Then I will run each piece one at a time and spot check any notational, rhythmic,
dynamic, or tempo issues on an as-needed basis.
a. This will also include giving the soloists any feedback they may need.
6. Following each piece being spot-checked, I will begin a dialogue regarding concert
etiquette. This will include:
a. Attendance promptness:
i. Any tardiness to call time will result in a partially lowered grade for the
day, failure to show for the concert will result in a failing grade without
proper excuse.
b. Dress:
i. Concert black will be worn. Skirts or dresses must be at or below the knee,
and clothing must be properly pressed and without wrinkles. Black closed-
toed shoes must be worn. If men wear a shirt beneath a tux/suit jacket, it
must be black or white, with a black tie/bowtie. Any distracting headwear,
jewelry, or heavy perfume is prohibited. (Deodorant, however, is highly
recommended!)
c.

Assessment:

Evaluation:

Extension: