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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work – 3 Credits


Spring 2019 – Monday and Wednesday 10:00am – 11:20am in HMB W328

Professor: Kota Takayama


E-mail: kota.takayama@gallaudet.edu
Videophone: (202) 618-6859
Office Hours: Mondays 12:30pm – 3:30pm
Thursdays 12:30pm – 2:30pm
Other times by appointment
Office Location: HMB S334A

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is an introductory three-credit course that provides foundation knowledge and skills
associated with social work practice. Students’ learn about social work in the context of fields of
practice, settings for practice, and career options. They are also provided opportunities to identify
personal biases, conflicts between private beliefs and the profession’s values/ethics, as well as
strategies for the elimination of personal- professional conflict. Given the significance of a long-
standing commitment to social justice and culturally competent practice, using readings,
examinations, and dialogue knowledge relative to social welfare concerns from the colonial period
through present day is acquired. Building on the understanding of the profession’s social welfare
historical roots consideration is given to current social change concerns, political action endeavors,
and the empowerment of diverse populations and populations at risk.

Problem solving and critical thinking for the amelioration of individual, family, group, community,
and organization concerns is emphasized throughout the course. Students are guided through the
process of acquiring a beginning ability to appraise, assess, and analyze using case materials
provided in the required text. For this introductory course, those who are considering a major in
social work are expected to demonstrate professional behavior (for example, consistently attend
class, submit assignments at the agreed time, engage in class dialog, and demonstrate respect for
peers and the professor, and leaving class if texting is necessary).

Those electing social work as a major will need a letter of reference from the professor
articulating adherence to standards of professional behavior.

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

COMPETENCIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS

Competency 1—Ethical and Professional Behavior:

• PB 1: make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics,
relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of
research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;
• PB 2: use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain
professionalism in practice situations
• PB 4: Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication;
oral, written, and electronic communication;

Competency 2—Engage diversity and difference in practice

• PB 6: apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and


difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels
• PB 7: present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of
their own experiences;
• PB 8: apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases
and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies

Competency 4—Research

• PB 11: Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including


research-based knowledge and practice

Competency 6—Engagement

• PB 17: apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-
environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients
and constituencies

Competency 7—Assessment

• PB 22: elect appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research


knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Assessment
Attainment of the competencies and practice behavior are measured with quiz, group and
individual presentations, reflection paper, client assessment, and ethics case studies. Assignments
and corresponding competency/practice behavior are described on the syllabus. Rubrics used for
determining outcomes (the grade) are posted on Blackboard.

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Required Texts:
Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). Empowerment Series: An introduction to the
profession of social work (6th Ed.) United States: Cengage Learning.

ATTENDANCE POLICY
Any absence may impact your grade negatively. Two unexcused absences will be accepted. Your
letter grade will be dropped one degree of a letter grade (for example, from a B+ to a B, or from
a C to a C-).

Excused absences must be accompanied by official documentation (doctor’s note, jury duty, etc.)
or be arranged with the instructor in advance.

Excessive unexcused absences can lead to a failing grade or a suggestion to withdraw from the
course, regardless of performance on assignments.

If the student has excessive excused absences, he or she may be asked to make other
arrangements (withdraw, leave of absence, incomplete grade) depending on the situation
because they are not benefitting nor contributing to the learned class environment and not able
to demonstrate professional presence which is required of social workers.

SUBMISSION OF ASSIGNMENTS
Assignments are not accepted after the due date. It is up to the instructor if he or she is willing to
accept a late assignment. Any assignment that is turned in late is subject to a 10% reduction in
grade for each day late (including Saturdays and Sundays). There is no guarantee that a late
assignment will be accepted, especially without valid documentation of a University accepted
excuse. In-class assignments, quizzes and activities may not be made up unless the student
provides authorized documentation (i.e. from a physician or other professional).

Assignments must be submitted through Blackboard. The instructor will not accept hard-copy
assignment or electronic copy of the assignment through e-mail. Each student is responsible
uploading his/her assignment on Blackboard before its due date. Each student is also responsible
uploading his/her PowerPoint presentation before its due date. Bring to class on USB to avoid
technical problems.

EVALUATION OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE


Online Quiz 20%
Campfire/homework 10%

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

Self-Reflection paper 10%


Ethics Paper 15%
NASW Paper 10%
Individual Short Papers 15%
Group Presentation 15%

Grading Definition
A 93 and above Excellent
A - 90-92
B+ 87-89
B 83-86 Good
B- 80-82
C+ 77-79
C 73-76 Satisfactory
C- 70-72
D+ 67-69
D 60-66 Poor
F Below 60 Failing

For more information regarding the grading system at Gallaudet University, visit:
https://www.gallaudet.edu/academic-catalog/registration-and-policies/undergraduate-
policies/grading-system.html

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities


The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits the exclusion of people from jobs, services,
activities, or benefits based on disabilities. In addition, Section 504 states that no otherwise
qualified handicapped individual shall, solely by reason of his or her handicap, be excluded from
participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program
or activity receiving federal financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education. Further, it
specifically ensures that no qualified handicapped person shall, on the basis of handicap, be
subjected to discrimination in employment under any program or activity that receives federal
financial assistance. Consistent with its nondiscrimination policy, Gallaudet has made many
accommodations and implemented technological advancements to facilitate a fully accessible,
barrier-free environment. Gallaudet will, upon disclosure, attempt to make other reasonable
accommodations if needed.

Students are responsible for ensuring that the OSWD staff brings the appropriate academic
accommodation documentation to the professor. Ideally, this should be done by the end of the
second week of classes, but no later than the end of the fifth week of classes. Accommodation
may only be provided from the time the professor receives documentation until the end of the
course. If the student is registered with OSWD but the accommodations documentation is not sent
by this office to the professor in a timely manner, the student should send an e-mail message and
written note to the professor, program director and chair of the department asking for asking for

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assistance and naming the OSWD staff member who is working with them and this person’s email
address.

For more information visit the Academic Accommodations Policy at the Gallaudet University
website: http://www.gallaudet.edu/academic-catalog/registration-and-policies/graduate-
policies/academic-accommodations-policy.html

Americans with Disabilities Compliance and Concerns:


For more information regarding ADA grievances visit: http://www.gallaudet.edu/eop/federal-
eeo-laws/section-504ada-student-grievance-procedure.html

Class Communication Policy


We will abide by the University Communication Policy in that each of us has the right and
responsibility to understand and be understood. As a bilingual university, we will incorporate and
respect ASL and English and recognize that we each have different visual communication needs.
We will respect everybody’s signing style.

Writing Style
Social Work as a profession adheres to the American Psychological Association (APA) writing
style. All papers must conform to this writing style. Below are the optional references to use APA
style:

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed. Washington, DC:
American Psychological Association, 2010.

Purdue Owl, https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/05/

Classroom Etiquette
Personal Technology: If you need a laptop, tablet, or any other device for taking notes or otherwise
participating in class, that is fine. However, do not use personal device for any purpose unrelated
to our class. All devices should be silenced. Cell phones should be put away. If there is a serious
need to leave your cell phone on, such as family emergency, please let me know. If you leave the
classroom to answer your phone, I’ll understand why.

Punctuality: I expect you to show up on time and/or few minutes early. If the door is closed, you
are late and your attendance will be marked as absent.

Classroom Discussion: Listen respectfully, without interrupting; respect one another’s views;
criticize ideas, not individuals; commit to learning, not debating; avoid blame and speculation;
avoid inflammatory language.

Academic Integrity & Honesty Policy


The Gallaudet University Undergraduate Catalogue has an academic honesty policy which all
students should be aware of. This policy can be found at Academic Honesty Policy’s website:

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

http://www.gallaudet.edu/academic-catalog/registration-and-policies/graduate-
policies/academic-integrity.html

Be aware that if a student is discovered doing unethical practices such as cheating on exams,
providing false information or other unethical actions as indicated in the University Integrity &
Honesty policy, your professors have the right to give a failing grade for the particular assignment
or course, and/or recommend dismissal.

In particular, Social Work majors are expected to uphold and demonstrate knowledge of and
commitment to the social work values, standards and ethics of the profession as well as adhere to
the Code of Ethics set in motion by the National Association of Social Work. Social work majors are
expected to exhibit academic honesty and understand that plagiarism (using other’s ideas and
words without acknowledging the source of information) and cheating are prohibited. Be sure and
review the section on Academic Honesty in your BA Social Work Student Handbook.

Syllabus Change Policy and Disclaimers:


Changes which substantially alter the assessment and grading of students will not be made
without first informing the students. It is imperative that each student attends class and pays
attention to any course correspondence on blackboard in power points which are posted in BB
after classes and email to make sure they are apprised of any changes in this syllabus. It is the
responsibility of all students to make arrangements to meet with the professor through video or
email if there are any foreseeable issues with completing the course work. This syllabus is a course
guide and is subject to change for a variety of reasons during the semester.

The course, schedule, and assignment deadline dates are subject to reasonable change by the
instructors at any time. These changes may be announced in class or Blackboard. It is your
responsibility to be aware of any announcements.

Credit Hour Policy:


A three-credit hour traditional in-class course, students spend 150 minutes in class per week for
15 weeks, resulting in 37.5 contact hours for the semester. Students are expected to engage in
reading and other assignments outsides of class for at least 5 hours per week, which adds up to
75 hours. These two sums should result in total student engagement time of 112.5 hours for the
course. Please plan accordingly.

A Word about Potentially Sensitive Course Content:


Social work education prepares students for professional practice with populations at risk and
those who may present with a variety of difficult life experiences. Many of us have had some
difficult life experiences as well. At times, content from social work classes and internship
experiences may be emotionally difficult for individual students, particularly when they may have
similar personal life experiences.

The NASW Code of Ethics indicates that social workers should not let their own unresolved issues
interfere with their professional judgment and responsibilities. Thus, social work students are

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encouraged to seek professional help to address personal challenges, especially when they find
social work education content distressing.

The Gallaudet University Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) center can provide direct
services and referrals to community providers. For more information, visit this website:
http://www.gallaudet.edu/counseling_and_psychological_services.html.

Students are encouraged to speak with their respective course instructors should they be
concerned about personal reactions to certain content areas. Likewise, students in internships are
encouraged to confer with the Director of Field Education regarding concerns about personal
reactions in certain kinds of internship settings or situations, both prior to placement, and should
concerns arise after the internship has begun.

Confidentiality and Mandatory Reporting


As an instructor, one of my responsibilities is to help create a safe learning environment on our
campus. I also have a mandatory reporting responsibility related to my role as a University staff
and instructor. It is my goal you feel able to share information related to your life experiences in
classroom discussions, in your written work, and in our one-on-one meetings. I will seek to keep
information you share private to the greatest extent possible.

However, I am required to share information regarding sexual misconduct or information about a


crime that may have occurred on Gallaudet University’s campus with the University.

Students may speak to someone confidentially by contacting


1. Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
2. Student Health Services (SHS)
3. Office of Campus Ministries (OCM)Campus Ministries
4. Office of the Ombudsman
These four offices are NOT required to report any sexual misconduct and all information is kept
confidential.

As a Reminder:
You must get a C (73%) or above as a final grade in all practice courses (SWK 335, 337, 436, 482,
494, 484, and 486) in order to be in good standing in the social work major. If you receive a grade
of less than a C in any practice course, you will not be able to stay in the social work major and
must reapply for consideration if you would like to return to the major. However, you may get
any passing grade (not an F) in any other non-practice social work major and pre-major courses
and remain a social work major as long as your GPA does not drop below a 2.0.

Important Dates
1. January 24 – Last day to ADD/DROP courses
2. March 4-8 – Midterm week
3. March 11 – Midterm grade posted
4. March 18-22 – Spring Break

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5. March 26 – Last day to WD from the course


6. May 6 – Last day of class

Source: https://www.gallaudet.edu/registrar/academic-calendars/undergraduate-academic-
calendar/spring-2019

~Campfire Rule~
As you review a textbook/required reading, develop one question that come to your mind. Upon
entering the classroom, write one question on the board. Sitting in a campfire setting, we will
discuss the reading/viewing with your questions. If you do not bring your own question, you will
possibly be receiving no attendance points for that day.

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Class Schedule

Required Reading Chapter Exercises Paper Quiz Presentation

Class 1: Introduction to the Field of Social Work


Wednesday, The course syllabus is reviewed and expectations, goals, and outcome measures are discussed. The
January 23rd first class is also used to discuss methods for researching topics related to social work practice.

History of the Profession


The historical social welfare concerns of individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations
are examined from the colonial period through the 21st century. The relevance of pioneering women
Class 2: and influence of Elizabethan Poor Laws on early social work practice are considered for the purpose of
Monday, understanding human experiences and the profession’s advocacy for social change.
January 28th Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Ed.). United States: Cengage Learning. Chapter 2: The History of the Social Welfare
Campfire rule System
Carlton-LaNey, I. (1997). Elizabeth Ross Haynes: An African-American reformer of womanist
consciousness, 1908-1940. Social Work, 42(6), 573-582.
(Article must be obtained from Aladin EBSCO)

Transitions
Events marking social works emergence as a profession are discussed. Its roots in volunteerism, the
shift to being identified as an occupation, and development as professions are discussed from a
Class 3: perspective that consider mutual aid, the establishment of charity organization, and development of
Wednesday, specialized practice groups. The session also examines the professions attributes and the relevance for
January 30th determining professional status.
Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work
Online class (6th Ed.). United States: Cengage Learning. Chapter 2: The History of the Social Welfare System
and please DUE Monday February 4TH AT 11:59PM
read the Chapter Exercise #1:
textbook • Read major social welfare programs in the textbook - pages 53-56 and explain how those
chapter and services apply to the senior citizens.
do the • Conduct social history interview with a senior citizen – ask questions from the textbook
assignments on page 66 (Exercises section)

Social history interview; explain what social services are to the senior Pg 53-56 and: ask the
questions from the required text on page 67-68

Social Work: A Helping Profession


The mission, practice approaches and career patterns of the profession are examined. Specifically,
Class 4: social work’s mission in the context of serving people through counseling, advocacy, and service
Monday, delivery are discussed. Additionally, employment options that align with the mission are reviewed.
February 4th Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Ed.). United States: Cengage Learning. Chapter 1: What is Social Work? (Pages 2-18)
Campfire rule DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH AT 11:59PM
Chapter Exercises #2:

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• Answer question #5 in Exercises section, discussing the social work values.

From required text page 34 Exercise #5: Social Work Values

Social Work: Accreditation, Credentialing, and Career Opportunities


Class 5: Readings and discussion focus on the distinctions between accreditation, certification, licensing, and
Wednesday, professional standards. To strengthen the understanding of professional social work education and its
February 6th competencies, skills/ knowledge, the educational policy and accreditation standards applicable to the
course are discussed. The BA program director will discuss the CSWE accreditation process and the
Online class core competencies acquired in the required introductory course. And the application process for the
and please major.
read the G. Alejandro, (1990). An examination of the social work profession’s efforts to achieve legal
textbook regulation. Journal of Counseling and Development. May/June, 68, p.49-68.
chapter and (Article must be obtained from Aladin EBSCO)
do the Zugazaga, C.; Mendez, M.; Surette, R.; Otto, C. (2008). Social worker perceptions of the portrayal
assignments. of the profession in the news and entertainment media. Journal of Social Work Education,
42(3), 621-636.
(Article must be obtained from Aladin EBSCO)

The Meaning of Poverty


Economic disparities are discussed from a perspective that considers the causes of poverty from the
Class 6: societal view, i.e., the condition is the fault of the individual, the social and personal cost of poverty,
Monday, and the social welfare programs that have failed to improve the conditions of the poor.
February 11th Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
Campfire rule (Chapter 3: Poverty and Economic Disparity)
DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11th AT 11:59PM
Paper #1: Self-Reflection Paper

Values and Ethic


Values and ethics for the profession are discussed and distinguished from those that are personal.
Using case material students are provided opportunities to identify value dilemmas and articulate the
differences between professional and personal valued and ethics.
Class 7: Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Wednesday, Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
February 13th (Chapter 1: What is Social Work? Pages 18-21)
Waltz, T. & Ritchie, H. (2000). Gandhian principles in social work practice: Ethics revisited. Social
Campfire rule Work, 45(3), p213-221.
(Article must be obtained from Aladin ProQuest)
Freud, S. & Krug, S. (2002). Beyond the Code of Ethics Part I: Complexities of ethical decision
making in social work practice. Families in Society, 83(5/6), 474-482.
(Article must be obtained from Aladin ProQuest)

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

Class 8: Social Justice


Monday, The concept of social justice is introduced and discussed in the context of fairness, equality and the
February 18th distribution of resources. Explanations for injustice are discussed from both psychological and
sociological perspectives and the societal efforts to overcome inequity/injustice are identified.
Online class Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
and please Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
read the (Chapter 4: Human Rights and Social and Economic Justice – Pages 96-120)
textbook DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18th AT 11:59PM
chapter and Paper #2: Ethical Decision-Making Paper
do the
assignments.

Diversity
The concerns of diverse populations, e.g. immigrants, LGBT populations, and people of color are
discussed. Among the issues examined are violence against persons from diverse groups, their
disproportionate social problems, and their experiences of discrimination. Discourse is also focused on
Class 9: social work practice from an empowerment perspective and the importance of developing self-
Wednesday, awareness for effective practice.
February 20th Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (5th
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
Campfire rule (Chapter 5: Dimension of Diversity)
DUE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20th at 11:59PM
Chapter Exercises #3:
From the required text complete page 150-161: Exercise (limit the paper to two pages and be
prepared to share your findings with the class)

Class 10:
Monday, Online Quiz #1: Covering all required readings from class 1 – 9.
February 25th

Generalist Social Work Practice


Students are introduced to the generalist practice perspective that is consistent with the Council on
Social Work Education’s Educational Policy B2.2
• “Generalist practice is grounded in the liberal arts and the person and environment construct.
To promote human and social well-being, generalist practitioners use a range of prevention
and intervention methods in their practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations,
Class 11:
and communities. The generalist practitioner identifies with the social work profession and
Wednesday,
applies ethical principles and critical thinking in practice. Generalist practitioners incorporate
February 27th
diversity in their practice and advocate for human rights and social and economic justice. They
recognize, support, and build on the strengths and resiliency of all human beings. They engage
Campfire rule
in research-informed practice and are proactive in responding to the impact of context on
professional practice.”
From this generalist framework methods of intervention with individual (micro practice) as well as
practice strategies with families, groups, organizations, and communities (macro practice) are
discussed. Imbedded in the definition are the concepts of person in environment fit (ecological
systems) and the principles associated with human strengths. Using assigned readings and practice

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examples students acquire a beginning understanding of ecological concepts and the strengths
perspective.
Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (5th
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 6: Generalist Social Work)
Early, T. & GlenMaye, L. (2000). Valuing families: Social work practice with families from a
strengths perspective. Social Work. Vol 45(2), 118-129
(Article must be obtained from Aladin EBSCO)

Class 12: Generalist Practice-continued


Monday, Several of the department’s licensed clinical social workers with current practice experience will
March 4th discuss the application of the generalist model with their client population.

Class 13 and Fields of Practice: Children and Youth and Family


Class 14: Mutual factors affecting the lives of children and youth are studied. Human needs such as the
Wednesday, adequacy of family income, safety and the levels of poverty are examined. Each is discussed from a
March 6th perspective that considers issues of social justice and advocacy.
and Monday, Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
March 11th Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 7: Child Welfare: Working with Children and Their Families )
Online class Early, T. & GlenMaye, L. (2000). Valuing families: Social work practice with families from a
and please strengths perspective. Social Work. Vol 45(2), 118-129
read the (Article must be obtained from Aladin EBSCO)
textbook
chapter and
do the
assignments.

Class 15:
Group presentation and submission of individual papers on practice with children and families
Wednesday,
(syllabus, p. 17)
March 13th

SPRING BREAK: MARCH 18 – 22

Fields of Practice: Practice with Older Adults


Class 16: The unique needs, interest, and concerns of older adults are identified. Among the issues discussed
Monday, are the importance of social contacts, financial stability, and wellness. By reading case studies
March 25th beginning knowledge relative to interventions with older adults is acquired.
Campfire rule Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 8: Gerontology: Working with People who are Older)

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DUE MONDAY, MARFCH 25th AT 11:59PM


Paper #3: NASW Paper

Class 17:
Group Presentation and submission of individual papers on practice with older people (refer to
Wednesday,
guideline on the syllabus).
March 27th

Class 18:
Monday, Online Quiz #2: Covering all required readings from class 11 – 17
April 1st

Fields of Practice: Practice in Health Care Services


Variables affecting the well-being of persons with disabilities and approaches for addressing them are
Class 19:
examined. The class session also examines the impact of discrimination on individuals with disabilities
Wednesday,
and social work interventions from an ecosystems approach.
April 3rd
Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Campfire rule
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 9: Health Care Services – Pages)

Class 20:
Group Presentation and submission of individual papers on practice in health care (syllabus, p.
Monday,
17)
April 8th

Fields of Practice: Mental Health Services


Discussion examines the biological and social factors associated with mental health disorders and the
Class 21:
role of social workers for service delivery. Mental health care systems are also studies in the context
Wednesday,
of the practice settings and the values/ethical dilemmas posed to social workers in each.
April 10th
Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Campfire rule
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 10: Mental Health Services)

Class 22:
Group Presentation and submission of individual papers on social work practice in mental health
Monday,
settings (syllabus, p. 17).
April 15th

Fields of Practice: School Social Work


The history of school social work is discussed. Attention is given to the roles and skills needed as well
Class 23: as the responsibilities of school social workers. The discussion and required readings also focus on
Wednesday, the role of school social workers with diverse student populations (homeless, students with
April 17th disabilities & bilingual)
Campfire rule Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 11: School Social Work)

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Class 24: Group Presentation and submission of individual papers on school social work. Members of this
Monday, group should choose one of the following schools related issues bulling; pregnancy; dropout;
April 22nd violence prevention; special needs (syllabus, p. 17).

Class 25:
Wednesday, Online Quiz #3: Covering all required readings from class 19 – 24.
April 24th

Class 26: Fields of Practice: Substance Abuse


Monday, Issues related to addiction, treatment, and prevention are discussed. Additionally, the role of social
April 29th workers practicing with diverse populations experiencing addiction and recovery are examined.
Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2016). An introduction to the profession of social work (5th
Campfire rule Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
(Chapter 12: Substance Abuse )

Class 27:
Group Presentation and submission of individual papers on social work practice associated with
Wednesday,
substance abuse, recovery, and prevention.
May 1st

Class 26: Fields of Practice: Criminal Justice


Monday, Presentations continue if needed and submission of individual papers on social work practice
April 29th associated with substance abuse, recovery, and prevention (refer to guidelines).
Online class Social work practice in criminal justice examines relevant theories associated with criminal behavior,
and please with emphasis on advocacy initiatives. Advocacy within the criminal justice system is focused on
read the issues related to juvenile justice, poverty and incarceration, imprisonment of undocumented
textbook immigrants, and the adequacy of care for inmates with disabilities and mental health problems
chapter and Segal, E.; Gerdes, K.; & Steiner, S. (2019). An introduction to the profession of social work (6th
do the Ed.).United States: Cengage Learning.
assignments. (Chapter 13: Violence, Vicitims, and Criminal Justice)

Class 28:
Monday, May 6th Wrap Up and Class Evaluation
(Last Class)

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ASSIGNMENTS WITH CORRESPONDING COMPETENCIES AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS

Paper #1: Self-Reflection Paper

Type a one-page paper that accurately responds to each of the issues. The grading rubric for this
assignment will serve as a guide for completing the paper. Grammatical errors on your paper will
not be accepted visit TIPs if needed 3 days before the paper is due.

Discuss in several paragraphs your reasons for considering social work as major.
1. Consider the following:
a. To work with others and to advocate, support, and guide people;
b. For religious reasons;
c. Because you can’t tolerate social injustice
d. Friends depend on you for help or friends think you would make a good social
worker;
e. Betterment of society, humankind, future;
f. A social worker helped you or you had a bad social worker and you want to better
serve others.
g. If none of the examples are reasons, identify another that best explains why social
work is being considered.

Competency 1 Ethical and Professional Behavior


PB 2 use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain
professionalism in practice situations

2. Values and Strengths


a. What would be your professional goal as a social worker?
1. Are your goals different or similar to the profession’s mission?
• Explain the mission, discuss your differences or similarity.
2. How can you strengthen your personal goals to fit with the mission of
the social work profession?
3. Discuss three (3) of your values. Identify and discuss three (3) social
work values.
• How are your values the same or different from the social work
values?
4. List and elaborate four (4) of your strengths.
• How can you potentially use your strengths as a social worker?

Competency 2 Engage diversity and difference in practice


PB 8 – apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases
and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

3. Vulnerable, At-Risk, and Disempowered Populations


a. Discuss your experiences of feeling vulnerable, at-risk, disempowered, or
oppressed.
1. Identify three (3) populations that you consider oppressed.
2. For each selected group discuss the reasons for their oppression.
3. Discuss your beliefs, both positive and negative about the identified
oppressed groups.
4. How can you work toward changing your stereotypical or prejudicial
beliefs about one of the oppressed populations?

Competency 2 Engage diversity and difference in practice


PB 6 apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in
shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels

PB 7: present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their
own experiences;

Self-Reflection Paper

4 3 2 1 Points
Awarded
Competency 1 Ethical and Goal: A reason is There is a No reason is
Professional Behavior: A minimum given for response, it given for
of one reason considering unrelated to considering
PB 2 use reflection and self- is given for the major, it the reason for the major
regulation to manage personal considering lacks detail considering
values and maintain the major the major
professionalism in practice
situations

Competency 2 Engage diversity Strengths: Personal Personal goals Information


and difference in practice Personal goals are are given, but is missing
goals are clearly stated, there is not related to
PB 8 – apply self-awareness and clearly stated but unrelated discussion of the
self-regulation to manage the and related to the the personal
influence of personal biases and to the profession’s profession’s goals or the
values in working with diverse profession’s mission mission profession’s
clients and constituencies mission mission

Competency 2 Engage diversity Three person Less than Information is There is not
and difference in practice values and three given, it does information
three social personal not reflect an related to
PB 8 – apply self-awareness and work values values or less accurate personal or
self-regulation to manage the are given than three description of social work
influence of personal biases and social work personal or values
values in working with diverse work values

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

clients and constituencies values are


given

4 3 2 1 Points
Awarded
Competency 2 Engage Four personal Less than four There are less Either the
diversity and difference in strengths and personal than four discussion of
practice methods of using strengths are identified personal
them as a social given, the personal strengths is
PB 8 – apply self-awareness worker are given methods for strengths and/ missing
and self-regulation to manage using or there is no and/or the
the influence of personal personal discussion of discussion of
biases and values in working strengths as a their use as a their use as
with diverse clients and social worker social worker a social
constituencies are discussed worker is
missing

Competency 2 Engage Vulnerable at-risk The The There is no


diversity and difference in populations: information information discussion of
practice There is a provided provided is experiences
description of does not limited and or feelings
PB 6 apply and communicate personal express does not related to
understanding of the experiences of personal demonstrate vulnerability
importance of diversity and feelings experiences an or at-risk
difference in shaping life associated with or feelings understanding
experiences in practice at the vulnerability or associated of the
micro, mezzo, and macro being at-risk with concepts
levels vulnerability vulnerability or
or being-at at-risk
PB 7: present themselves as risk
learners and engage clients
and constituencies as experts
of their own experiences;

4 3 2 1 Points
Awarded
PB 6 apply and communicate Three Less than The There is no
understanding of the populations three populations identification
importance of diversity and considered to be populations considered of oppressed
difference in shaping life oppressed are considered to to be populations
experiences in practice at the correctly be oppressed oppressed
micro, mezzo, and macro levels identified are correctly are
identified incorrect

PB 6 apply and communicate For each For each of the The reasons There is
understanding of the population populations given are limited or no
importance of diversity and correctly (less than 3) incorrect information
difference in shaping life identified as reasons for (one or related to
experiences in practice at the oppressed oppression are more the reasons
micro, mezzo, and macro levels reasons for each given identified for the
groups (3) oppression

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

oppression are groups are of 3 groups


given incorrect) is given
PB3 demonstrate professional The paper The paper The paper The paper is
demeanor in behavior; consistently does not has more filled with
appearance; and oral, written, demonstrates consistently than 10 errors in
and electronic communication mastery of demonstrate errors in spelling,
writing correct spelling, punctuation,
mechanics writing. There punctuation, grammar,
are 4-10 errors grammar, organization
in spelling, organization of ideas, or
punctuation, of ideas, or sentence
grammar, sentence structure
organization of structure
ideas, or
sentence
structure

Your total points=

Self-Reflection paper Possible Points


32-31 A
30-29 A-
28-27 B+
26-25 B
24-23 B-
22-20 C+
19-17 C
16-14 C-
13-11 D+
10-8 D
7 or lower F

Paper #2: Ethical Decision-Making Paper

Type a 2-page paper that responds to this case:

A 14-year-old accompanied by her mother presents with complaints of nausea and


vomiting for two weeks. After her mother leaves the room, she admits to being sexually
active and tells you that she has had unprotected intercourse recently with her
boyfriend and missed a period.

Her parents do not know she is sexually active, and she does not want her mother to
know that a pregnancy test is being done or the result of that test. Pregnancy test
comes back positive.
http://www.seattlechildrens.org/research/initiatives/bioethics/education/case-based-teaching-
guides/confidentiality/case-discussion/

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SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

1. What ethical issue/dilemma is involved in this situation (see hand out: Social Work Ethics:
5 Common Dilemmas and How to Handle Them Responsibly:
https://www.mswguide.org/blog/social-work-ethics/)
2. Which Social work ethical responsibilities are involved in this situation? (List minimum of
2 and -use the NASW code numbers from textbook appendix A).
3. What social work ethical values are involved in this situation? (list 2 )
4. What are your personal values and thoughts about this situation?
5. Is there a legal requirements to break confidentiality? How would you find out?
6. Engagement: How do you and the client differ? How will this impact your work together?
7. Are there other realities about this situation that you as an older person might be are of
that she is not? Any things that could impact her decision that you need to make her
aware of?
8. What are the 5 steps for handing ethical dilemmas? List them and apply to this situation
(apply class hand out).

Competency 1 Ethical and Professional Behavior:

PB 1 - make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics,
relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of
research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context;

PB 4. Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication;


oral, written, and electronic communication;

Competency 6 Engagement

PB 17 - apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-


environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients
and constituencies

Competency 7: Assessment

PB 22 - select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research


knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 4 Research

PB 11. Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including


research-based knowledge and practice

19
SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

Paper #3: NASW Paper


Please visit
1. NASW website (https://www.socialworkers.org)
2. CSWE website (http://www.cswe.org)
Complete a short paper, double spaced typed paper that answers the following:
1. What are the differences between NASW and CSWE?
2. Which organization should you as a student join and why?
3. Should Gallaudet’s social work students become a member of either NASW or CSWE, if
yes why and if no, why not?
4. What were your impressions of the organizations? Of their websites? How well do they
reflect social work values and goals?

Competency 4 Research

PB 11. Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including


research-based knowledge and practice

Group Presentation (Part A):

A. Groups will be assigned a field of practice and pick an agency/nonprofit organization of


their own choice.
B. Groups will give a 30-minute power point presentation
C. Work together to create a presentation slides that reflects the information –Part B-
H,I,JK, and one work possibility in the field (below)
D. Identify agency, and/or nonprofit organization serving Deaf, DeafBlind, or Hard of
Hearing
E. Educate the class of your selected agency and/or nonprofit organization
F. Follow the rubric guidelines for the presentation.

Competency 1 Ethical and Professional Behavior:

PB 4. Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication;


oral, written, and electronic communication;

Individual Short Paper (Part B):


G. Individuals- each student in the group will type their own short paper of the selected
practice, agency, and/or nonprofit organization serving Deaf, DeafBlind, and Hard of
Hearing population:
H. Gives an overview of the field of practice and agency or nonprofit organization;
I. Identifies clients served in the practice area.
J. The paper must discuss a minimum of 3 client populations served;

20
SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

K. Describes the needs or kinds of problems client’s experience. This section of the paper
should be no more than 3-4 paragraphs

Individuals-the second section of the typed paper must include


L. A description of two (2) BA social work job opportunities in the selected field and the
qualifications for positions.
M. There are multiple social work job search engines, some of the most frequently used are
a. Indeed.com; Simplyhired.com;
b. USAjobs.gov;
c. careerbuilders.com;
d. social service.com; social work jobbank.com;
e. The NASW job link www.socialworkers.org/joblinks.

Individual-each typed paper must also include


N. Information related to licensing requirements for their state of residence, specifically
what type of license is preferred/required to practice at the BA level
a. IE: NC issues a certified social work case manager license to persons who pass the
state exam and have an undergraduate social work degree from a CSWE
accredited program
b. MD issues a Licensed Social Work Associate.
O. What are the qualifications for taking the state examination? Fees?
P. Are there a specific number of credit hours in social work or must the requirements for a
degree be completed?
Q. Among the sources for information on state licensing for social work are state boards of
social work examiners, association of social work boards, and the state NASW office.
Please cite where you got your information from.

Competency 2 Engage diversity and difference in practice

PB 7: present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of


their own experiences;

Competency 4 Research

PB 11. Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including


research-based knowledge and practice

21
SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

Grading Rubrics

Group Presentations
4 3 2 1
Required PP included all of All required There are at Several key
Elements the required elements are least two elements are
elements included, but the elements missing from the
(pictures, information is missing for the presentation
graphs, not clearly presentation
newspaper expressed and it
articles, is difficult to
drawings) and all understand what
information that is being
clarifies the communicated
presentation about the topic
Accuracy of The PP presents It includes The PP includes The content is
Content factual several pieces of pictures, but no not clearly
information information that information that presented
are inaccurate explain pictures
Attractiveness The PP is The PP is The PP is The PP is
exceptionally attractive with acceptable, but distractingly
attractive with layout and messy or mess or very
layout and neatness cluttered poorly designed
neatness
ASL Academic ASL is Academic ASL is Incorrect correct Searching for
communication used , Visually used , Visually sign choices correct signs,
clear correct clear Incorrect speech not poor eye
sign choices. correct sign memorized contact, speech
Good eye choices not memorized
contact

Total possible: 16

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)

22
SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

Learning Opportunity Assessment Tools Program SLO GU’s UG SLO


Course SLO

Identify as a Annotated Bibliography Assignment Identify as a 1, 2, 3, 4


professional social Literature Review Rubrics professional social
worker and conduct Class Discussion (see above) worker and
oneself accordingly Guest Speaker conduct oneself
accordingly
Apply social work Annotated Bibliography Assignment Apply social work 1, 2, 3, 4
ethical principles to Assignment Rubrics ethical principles to
guide professional Literature Review (see above) guide professional
practice practice

Apply critical thinking Annotated Bibliography Assignment Apply critical thinking 1, 2, 4


to inform and Assignment Rubrics to inform and
communicate Literature Review (see above) communicate
professional judgment professional judgment

Engage, assess, Annotated Bibliography Assignment Engage, assess, 1, 2, 4


intervene, and evaluate Assignment Rubrics intervene, and evaluate
with individuals, Literature Review (see above) with individuals,
families, groups, families, groups,
organizations, and organizations, and
communities communities
Engage diversity and Annotated Bibliography Assignment Engage diversity and 1, 2, 4
difference in practice Assignment Rubrics difference in practice
Literature Review (see above)

23
SWK 203: Introduction to Social Work

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