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MATTHEW A.

SCHRAGE
Bachelor of Architecture, Virginia Tech

UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO
PERSONAL PROJECT

This self-directed project involved “borrowing” a design from a classmate and recreating it in
a unique form. I rebranded this intersecting lines design using alternating colored lines that
“blend” into a single color when observed from a distance. Rather unsatisfying first and second
iterations (top), done in pencil, gave way to the final project (bottom) done with fine point pens.
THE TOWER PROJECT

For the Tower Project, I constructed a 32-inch tall structure from a single material and incor-
porated the ideas of openness, layers, geometry, and structural stability, By “cutting, scoring,
and folding” a single sheet of Bristol, I created a concentric diamond design on two sides of the
tower and an open diamond design on the other two.
COLOR DRAWING

For the Color Drawing project, I created a 16x16 color pattern by rotating and alternating a sin-
gle 2x2 square. Using a simple trianguar design for my 2x2 square, I rotated and alternated the
green, blue, and purple segments to create an intricate diamond pattern with markers.
FONT PROJECT

The prompt for the Font Project was to spell your name using a well-established typeface of our
choosing. I drew my name in the font “Gotham Bold” on Bristol paper (top) using black sharpie. In
my draft work (bottom), I experimented with letter thicknesses and spacing.
LINE DRAWING

The goal of the Line Drawing was to use three different line thicknesses to portray the ideas of flow and geometry.
I incorporated flow using a line thickness “gradient” in each of the four quadrants; the transitions created between
different thicknesses also created an apparent diamond figure.
“SNAPSHOT” LINE DRAWING

Using my original Line Drawing, I took four distinct 6x6 “snapshots” and rotated, flipped, and
scaled them to create a new drawing. I organized the snapshots so that similar conditions be-
tween the sections were “matched,” creating a coherence between adjacent squares.
WOOD PROJECT

As an introduction to the woodshop, we were asked to “remove as much wood as possible”


from a 36” x 1-1/2” piece of poplar and form a pattern that spans all four sides. Using a band-
saw, I cut this staggered design with one-inch spacing between slits, creating an interesting
pattern from simple repetition.