The World Famous Unjustified Trial of Aung San Suu Kyi in the 21st Century Year 2009, Rangoon

, Burma
Release to Public 3 November 2010

Contents
I. II. III. IV. V. Introduction Army Generals National League for Democracy (NLD) International Communities Chronicle

I.

Introduction

For today world’s leaders and future generations to come, Burmese people truthfully reveal the unjustified trial of the Prime Minister-Elect Aung San Suu Kyi; it has been lacking rule of law in Burma under Army Generals since 1962. To understand the situation of judicial proceedings as well as suffering and desire of the whole people and international community, all ethnicities living together create this record by collecting information regarding her trial. The political activists, in addition, compile on the Executive Branch and Cabinet of State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) and its followers: riot police, Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA/Kyant Phoot) / Swan Arr Shin / Police, setting to inspect and interrogate the NLD members who attend the trial peacefully following their leader. And then, the Ministry of Home Affairs of Executive Branch instructs both judges and prosecutors of Judicial Branch about the verdict they want. The Home Minister of the SPDC outside his jurisdiction has made decisions on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi first house arrest (1989-1995) and second house arrest (20002002). Since 2003 third arrest, the military junta has continuously extended the house arrest at the end of each period her term due to expire in May every year. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi received an unusual visit from an American man, John William Yettaw, who swam across Inya Lake and intruded her tightly guarded residence. According to the intelligent sources, the Burmese Embassy in USA hired and assigned John Yettaw to assassinate Aung San Suu Kyi by the order of Generals and Ministers. Aung San Suu Kyi, her two live-in party members Khin Khin Win and her daughter Win Ma Ma and an American man, John Yettaw appeared the first time at a special court in Insein Prison compound to hear the charges against them on May 14, 2009 with under section 22 of the State Protection Law. She could face three to five years in prison if found guilty. The regime’s courts were composed of Rangoon Northern District Court, Divisional Court and High Court where the generals order their judges and prosecutors about the verdict they have decided. The political activists describe that the regime start to use the judiciary as a tool of oppression. Judges from the court has broken the law themselves. Such as, the judicial proceedings are very unfair - the court has allowed 14 prosecution witnesses but only allow two Page 1 of 226

from the defense witnesses. Aung San Suu Kyi was charged with and convicted of three years imprisonment and hard labor under the State protection law 1975 section 22 of “Law to safeguard the State from the dangers of destructive element” by Rangoon Northern District Court on August 11, 2009. In fact, Senior General Than Shwe, the head of the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) military regime, interfered with Rangoon Northern District Court’s decision. Referring to the Head of the State, his statement was read out in court on Tuesday that he would reduce Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s sentence. That is the worst period for the non-independence of judiciary system and for outrageous rulings. Always above the law, the regime’s Home Minister Maj-Gen Maung Oo entered and addressed the courtroom with a prepared statement from Senior General Than Shwe. Maung Oo said that since Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was the daughter of national hero Aung San, the junta chief had decided to exercise leniency upon her. The assembled reporters and diplomats were told that Than Shwe had decided to intervene and cut the sentence in half and to have it suspended to house arrest. Whatever it may be, this paper will vividly identify with readers that there is no independent Judicial Branch of government in Burma. To come to the point, Burmese people, in fact, have no right of fair and independent court system. Maung Maung Latt B.A. Law; LL.B. (Advocate) Member of Parliament 1990, National League for Democracy, Bilin (1), Mon State 16 August 2009, Edited

II.

Army Generals

The Nazi Burmese Generals
The darkest hellhole of military dictatorship has terminated democracy and human rights since 2 March 1962 by Gen. Ne Win (Burma Socialist Program Party, BSPP / Ma Sa La, 4 July 1962) with his henchmen Gen. Saw Maung 18 September 1988/ Gen. Than Shwe 23 April 1992 (State Law and Order Restoration Council, SLORC / Na Wa Ta / Nyeinpi, 18 September 1988) and Gen. Than Shwe (State Peace and Development Council, SPDC / Na Ah Pha, 15 November 1997). Power is centered on the ruling junta that maintains strict authoritarian rule over the people of Burma.

State Peace and Development Council (SPDC / Na Ah Pha)
No. 1, Sr-Gen Than Shwe, Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council, Butcher of Buddhist Monks 2007. He has ordered the judges to sentence the Lady at least 3 years in jail. May 2009 No. 2, Vice Sr-Gen Maung Aye, Deputy Commander-in-Chief of Defence Services, Vice Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council, Butcher of Dooplaya. No. 3, Gen Thura Shwe Mann, Butcher of Mae Tha Waw 1989, Cunning Diplomatic General. No. 4, Gen Thein Sein, Prime Minister, National Convention Chairman. No. 5, Gen Thiha Thura Tin Aung Myint Oo, Secretary-1 of the State Peace and Development Council. Rising Star in SPDC, Lt-Gen Myint Swe, Chief of the Bureau of Special Operations 5 and Military Affairs Security, member of the State Peace and Development Council, Christie Island Massacre 1998.

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Left to Right: Shwe Mann, Than Shwe, Maung Aye. AFP / MMK, 5 June 2009

Lt-Col Zaw Min Aung, Police Special Branch Officer. Dr. Tin Aung Aye, Supreme Court Judge. Brig-Gen Kyaw Hsan, Minister of Information, Chief of World Information Working Committee and Information Working Group, Head of Counter-media Campaign, Secretary of National Convention Convening Committee, Comical Ali. U Myint Kyaing, District Law Officer, Junta Lawyer. U Aye Maung, Attorney General, Vice-Chairman of the National Convention Working Committee, Secretary of Multiparty Democracy General Election Committee. Maj-Gen Khin Aung Myint, Minister of Culture, former Director of Public Relations and Psychological Warfare, Board Member of Union of Myanmar Economic Holdings Ltd. U Thaung Nyunt, Judge, Rangoon Northern District Court. Maj-Gen / U Htay Oo, Minister of Agriculture and Irrigation, Secretary-General of the Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA / Kyant Phoot, para-militia). Maj-Gen Maung Oo, Minister of Home Affairs, Home Land Terrorist. U Nyi Nyi Soe, Judge, Rangoon Western District Court. Maj Tint Swe (a) Yeyint Tint Swe, Director of the Press Scrutiny and Registration Division, Ministry of Information, consultant of Eleven Media Group. Lt-Col / U Thaung, Minister of Science and Technology, Minister of Labour. Col / U Aung Thaung, Minister of Industry (1), Secretariat member of Union Solidarity and Development Association. Col Win Naing Tun, Police Deputy Head of Special Intelligence Department (Special Branch). U Aung Toe, Chief Justice, Vice-Chairman of National Convention Convening Committee. Maj-Gen/U Nyan Win, Minister of Foreign Affairs. Brig-Gen Zaw Win, Director General of prisons of murderous terror, Ministry of Home Affairs. Maj-Gen Khin Yi, Police Chief, Burma Police Force. May 2009 Only Senior General Than Shwe, Burma’s military strongman, will decide “if and when” Aung San Suu Kyi is freed; only he “knows exactly when she will be granted freedom,” wrote The Irrawaddy, a dissident Burmese newspaper, citing two Burmese government officials. A close aid of the Nobel Prize winner says that Burma’s main opposition leader plans to tour the country once she is released to rally support for democracy. Aung San Suu Kyi spent 15 of the past 21 years in prison or under house arrest. Her latest sentence, due to an American man who broke into her home in August 2009, will end on 13 November, a few days after the country’s general elections on 7 November. The incident was a pretext to exclude her from taking part in the elections, and give the military regime a large majority in the new parliament. For opponents, analysts and western governments, the election process is in fact just a farce. speroforum.com, 2 October 2010

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Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA / Kyant Phoot)
The USDA has hired laborers and unemployed people, paying incentives of 2,000 - 5,000 kyat (approximately US $2-$4) to intimidate and attack protestors. Recent legal analysis by the Burma Lawyers’ Council found that under the existing Criminal Procedure Code, USDA is an “unlawful association,” and called on the SPDC to declare it as such, stop its use of violence, and cease its criminal acts. Failure to do so, according to the BLC, is proof that the regime is using the USDA to violently crackdown on Burmese citizens exercising their right to freedom of expression. Burma Office (Australia), 30 August 2007 Founded in 1993, the USDA is a junta-backed organization, which acts as a local authority in many areas. Analysts say that the military government is remodeling the organization to stand as a pro-junta political party in the event of future elections. Irrawaddy, 23 November 2007 A powerful mass movement that supports Burma’s ruling junta has disbanded and transferred its assets to a new political party, its spokesman has told the BBC’s Burmese service. The move is designed to ensure the junta dominates the election later this year, critics say. The movement, USDA, has been blamed for assaults on opposition activists, including Aung San Suu Kyi. The new party, USDP, was set up by senior members of the junta. BBC, 15 July 2010

Swan Arr Shin
A Ministry of Home Affairs source said the Swan Arr Shin took orders from the junta’s feared Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA). Basically, they are junta-backed thugs. They come from anywhere, and are the unemployed underclass. Everywhere you go, there are groups and truckloads of grubby-looking men looking bored and looking for a fight. Reuters, 28 August 2007

Police
Police units might also be transformed into paramilitary outfits. “The junta is enhancing police forces for the suppression of any kind of protest that might erupt, while the military will be maintained to sustain the fight against ethnic rebels,” Mya Maung said. He said the junta has thus far expanded at least 16 to 18 battalions of police across the country, with over 400 policemen in each battalion. Mizzima, 24 November 2008

SPDC / USDA / Swan Arr Shin / Police
Some of the methods, used by State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) to crackdown on peaceful demonstrators in the city of Rangoon have been revealed. A man, who participated in the crackdown programme told the New Era Journal (NEJ) how the police forces and Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA) militia members are systematically used to control and arrest pro democracy protesters. “On the day of the events, the leader, who has been appointed by USDA would come around to where we live to collect us in a pickup truck. We are told to sit up straight without any expression on our faces. We just ride around, wherever we are driven. We get paid K 2000 (about US$ 2) for that.” “We were told that if there are some protesters or there is someone they want to arrest, or to beat or harass, then the fees will be up from K10,000 to 20,000. We are allowed to use force in any way we want.” “The rules in the pick-up truck are simple. No speaking, no questions. We are not to ask about each other. We have been assured that we will not be held responsible for any of our actions and that we will never be arrested by police. When the time is up for the day, we will be taken back to our roads, with K 2000 guaranteed.” The Page 4 of 226

man also went on to say that the pickup truck would go around to many different areas but never pick up more than 2 people from any one quarter. Different people are being carried around each time so there is little chance of them recognizing each other. Sometimes, the collection time is at night, when they have to practice the drills. Recently, U Wisara Road and Myenigon Road were sealed off for the drill at mid-night. The truck drivers have less choice. One truck driver told the NEJ that they are being organized by traffic police and USDA members. The USDA official would sit in the passenger seat and give the driver instructions. The driver is not supposed to ask any question. “The first stop is always to report at a police station. Then we have to either cover up the number plates or remove them. After that we just have to drive from one quarter to another to collect different people. Once the truck is full, the boss in the front seat would tell me where to go and when to stop. I just have to follow instructions, without complaint.” The drivers’ fees is K 30,000 a day. If a driver refuses to do his round, then his driving license will be confiscated. The SPDC military government have been using the same tried and tested crackdown method well before the September Revolution, right the way through present time and every time they succeeded in defeating the peaceful demonstrators. People who sit at the back of the pickup trucks and ride around the city are know as Swan Arr Shin (The Swine Militia). They are hand-picked and selected by the local USDA members, who then train and pay to do the casual jobs. A ‘swine’ is usually jobless, and a gambler or a criminal. Nay Chiu, New Era Journal, jegsburma.blogspot.com, 11 June 2009

Military Judiciary System
Sr-Gen Than Shwe, Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council, has ordered the judges to sentence the Lady at least 3 years in jail. May 2009 There are two judges in the case, U Thaung Nyunt from Rangoon Northern District Court and U Nyi Nyi Soe from Rangoon Western District Court. Lt. Colonel Police Special Branch Officer Zaw Min Aung read out the statement of prosecution against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her colleagues and John William Yettaw. Her lawyers were able to raise counter-questions to Zaw Min Aung. Security preparations have been underway since yesterday evening. Insein Road is closed off to traffic, and barbed wire fencing has been erected. Riot police; members of the regime-affiliated militia, Swan Arr Shin; the regime’s social organisation Union Solidarity and Development Association; and the Fire Brigade were all present. This morning NLD Youth members distributed black ribbons and possibly armbands. NLD Youth member Htwe Thein and others were arrested and taken away by security officers. They have now been released and are back at their homes. NLD co-founder and Central Executive Committee member U Win Tin and hundreds of NLD members and supporters tried to enter Insein Prison compound to listen to the court hearing, but were prevented from doing so by security forces. Some youth and monks were seen wearing headbands and holding placards which said, “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is not guilty.” Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her colleagues are being held in a guesthouse facility located within Insein prison compound. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi passed on a message that she is fine, and prays that others are in good health. Trial will resume at 10 am tomorrow, Tuesday 19 May. AAPP Burma’s highest court rejected an appeal yesterday by Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers to reinstate two key witnesses in a trial that could send the pro-democracy leader to prison for five years. High Court judge Tin Aung Aye rejected the appeal because it was “intended to disturb and delay the trial,” court officials said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. The court’s ruling means only two people will testify in Suu Kyi’s defense at her trial, which resumes Friday, and that a verdict could be reached in a week or two. “This is very unfair. The court had allowed 14 prosecution witnesses but only allowed two from the defense,” said Nyan Win, one of Suu Kyi’s lawyers. “We tried our best to have the trial conducted according to the law but it has failed.” After the testimony by Khin Moe Moe - a lawyer and member of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy - on Friday at the District Court inside Insein prison, the court will have one more session for the lawyers’ final arguments before rendering judgment, he Page 5 of 226

explained. The trial has drawn outrage from world leaders and human rights groups who say Burma’s junta is using the incident as an excuse to keep the country’s opposition leader behind bars through elections scheduled for 2010. Suu Kyi has been in detention for more than 13 of the last 19 years. The court at first had allowed only one of four defense witnesses to take the stand. On appeal, the Rangoon Divisional Court ruled that Khin Moe Moe also could be heard. Suu Kyi’s lawyers pursued a second and final appeal to reinstate barred witnesses Win Tin and Tin Oo, both senior members of her party. Prosecutors argued that Win Tin, a prominent former journalist and ex-political prisoner, should not be allowed to testify because he is critical of the government and often gave interviews to foreign media, said Nyan Win. The defense team argued there was no law in the tightly ruled country that bars court testimony from government critics. kuwaittimes.net, 30 June 2009 Junta leader Sr. Gen. Than Shwe intervened even before the court decision was announced, telling the country’s home minister Maj-Gen Maung Oo to halve whatever sentence was handed down and then suspend it, leaving Suu Kyi sentenced to 18 more months of house arrest. Kyodo, 14 August 2009

State Media
Burma’s tightly controlled state media has reported on the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi for the first time, giving a rare mention of the imprisoned pro-democracy leader. State television and radio carried brief items after the first day of proceedings, while the government mouthpiece New Light of Burma newspaper had a report on Tuesday. It was the biggest story on the back page of the English-language paper, but failed to knock a story about a state transport and agricultural scheme off the front page. The newspaper said that Yettaw now faced a third charge, brought by the Rangoon City Council Sanitation Department, of swimming in Inya Lake without permission. He is also charged with breaching security and immigration laws. Neither paper mentioned the fact that the trial was being held behind closed doors in the notorious Insein prison, where Aung San Suu Kyi is being held, only saying that it was taking place at Rangoon’s northern district court. theage.com.au, 19 May 2009 Foreign Minister Nyan Win said last week Suu Kyi’s trial “will proceed fairly according to the law.” But diplomats who were given a brief glimpse of the trial inside Rangoon’s Insein prison said it appeared “scripted.” After 47 years of unbroken military rule, Burma’s courts have a long history of stretching laws to suit the generals, activist lawyers say. “I’m sure they will jail Daw Suu,” said Aung Thein, a prominent lawyer who was helping prepare her defense when his law license was revoked a week ago. Rights groups said revoking Aung Thein’s right to practice law was the latest “blatant attempt” by the regime to intimidate lawyers working on political cases. Some 11 lawyers are in jail for working on such cases, including defending top monks and former student leaders arrested in the September 2007 protests crushed by the military. Reuters, 24 May 2009 Despite of promised by authorities to provide round-the-clock electricity supply in Rangoon, an official from Ministry of Electrical Power in Naypyidaw said, it is almost impossible until next month. Rangoon Electricity Board Secretary, Lt. Col. Maung Maung Latt, in a recent briefing to journalists said, Rangoon would get all round-the-clock electricity in July. However, the officer from the concerned Ministry said it was unlikely. Mizzima, 12 June 2009 Burma dismissed European Union concerns about military operations against Karen rebels as political meddling Sunday, even after thousands of ethnic minorities fled the country to escape the fierce fighting. A counterinsurgency offensive in eastern Burma has forced more than 4,000 ethnic Karen to abandon their villages and cross into Thailand this month, according to the Thailand Burma Border Consortium, the key aid provider to border refugees. The EU last week expressed “serious concern” over the mounting offensive in the military-ruled nation and the exodus of refugees, and called for an immediate truce. AP, 14 June 2009 Page 6 of 226

The Burmese junta’s censorship board has banned all internal media from publishing news about the Kang Nam 1 - a North Korean ship scheduled to dock near Rangoon in the next few days. The Kang Nam 1 is believed to be carrying arms and potentially nuclear technology for the Burmese military government, who have a stated goal of becoming a nuclear power by 2025. scoop.co.nz, 25 June 2009 Reporters Without Borders and the Burma Media Association today condemned the military junta for intimidating the press trying to cover recent national and international events, as a journalist was jailed for two years after being arrested near the home of Aung San Suu Kyi. “Since the UN envoy Ibrahim Gambari arrived in Burma one might expect greater tolerance on the part of the authorities, but on the contrary, the trial of Suu Kyi is being held in a climate of repression and censorship,” the press freedom organisations said.”We call on the UN envoy to show firmness in his talks with the authorities, including on the release of all political prisoners and an end to prior censorship. Without this, there can be no approval of any reconciliation process or elections,” they said. The two organisations strongly condemned the two-year sentence imposed on freelance journalist Zaw Tun on 18 June. A former journalist with the magazine The News Watch, he was arrested near the Suu Kyi’s home by a police officer who claimed he had shown ‘hostility’ towards him. He was found guilty at a court in Bahan, near Rangoon, of obstructing the work of an official. A Rangoon journalist said that Zaw Tun was taken immediately to jail after the verdict. Military intelligence agents on 23 June went to several media offices to demand lists of journalists who had taken part in journalism training sessions at the US Embassy in Rangoon. The renowned journalist U Win Tin, who was cited as a defence witness in the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, has been under constant surveillance by the special police. The prosecutor refused to accept the former political prisoner as a witness because he criticises the government, particularly in foreign media. The junta has imposed strict censorship on both national and international news items. The censorship bureau, the Press Scrutiny and Registration Division, banned the publication of news on the arrival of a North Korean cargo ship, Kang Nam 1, in a port near Rangoon, which is suspected of transporting weapons. A journalist in Rangoon told the magazine Irrawaddy that “most newspapers have tried to report on the arrival of the cargo vessel but the government censor rejected all the articles”. The censorship bureau also banned some articles on demonstrations that followed the disputed elections in Iran. The press was refused the right at the start of June to publish information about the investigation into the collapse of the Danoke pagoda in Dala, near Rangoon, in which several people died. “We cannot publish articles or photos about this incident, because it was the wife of junta leader General Than Shwe who installed the sunshade on the pagoda on 7 May 2009”, one journalists explained. She is known to be very superstitious. The censorship bureau on 1st June threatened the privately owned weekly True News for carrying an article in its 19 May issue by the famous journalist Ludu Sein Win who said that “many governments cannot tolerate criticism from journalists”. The censors alleged that the paper changed the front page after it had been passed by the censors. Reporters Without Borders revealed at the end of 2008 that the censorship bureau sent all media offices a document detailing ten rules imposed on editors, who would be punished if changes were made after the article had been checked. The state-run media reported the charges against Suu Kyi, without giving anything the full statements by the defence. The daily New Light of Burma reported the main developments in the trial insisting there was complicity between the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and the American William Yetaw, who swam to her lakeside home on 3 May. In its 27 May edition, the daily published the full questioning of Suu Kyi by the judge, but the cross examination by defence lawyers were only briefly summarised in the official press. The state press also relays the junta’s threats against the opposition, as happened on 5 June, when the New Light of Burma carried threats by the authorities against the youth branch of the National League for Democracy for putting out a statement. 24-7PressRelease.com, 30 June 2009 Burma’s state-run media reported on Wednesday that Sr-Gen Than Shwe, the head of the Burmese junta, has congratulated the recently re-elected president of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. The Burmese military regime has censored news of the Iranian demonstrations since protesters took to the streets to dispute the election results during the past three weeks. Irrawaddy, 1 July 2009 Page 7 of 226

The demand to release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and political prisoners is “nonsense and unreasonable,” said Burma’s state-run newspaper the New Light of Burma in its issues published today and yesterday. The regime’s stance published in the newspaper is in opposition to the views of the ‘National League for Democracy’ (NLD), the UN Secretary General, the Association of South East Asia Nations (ASEAN) and the US. The government has said many times that there are no political prisoners in Burma, the writer ‘Lu Thit’ said in his article. Mizzima, 24 July 2009 On Wednesday the newspaper warned against predictions of a guilty verdict in the trial and said that anticipating the ruling would amount to contempt of court. Military-ruled Burma’s state media on Thursday warned citizens against inciting protests as democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi began stockpiling supplies ahead of a possible five-year jail term. A prison court is expected to deliver a verdict on Friday in the Nobel peace laureate’s trial for breaching the terms of her house arrest by allegedly sheltering an American intruder who swam to her house. The New Light of Burma newspaper published a comment piece Thursday cautioning against anti-government factions and saying that “we have to ward off subversive elements and disruptions.” AFP, 30 July 2009 Burma’s junta-controlled state media on Sunday accused ‘power-craving’ opportunists of using Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial to incite riots as it condemned the uprising 21 years ago that made her a heroine. The Nobel Laureate is in a Rangoon prison awaiting the delayed verdict in her trial on charges that she breached her house arrest when an American man swam uninvited to her lakeside home in May. ‘The people noticed that today, some political opportunists and power-craving elements are trying to incite riots under the pretext of Daw Suu Kyi’s case,’ a commentary in The New Light of Burma newspaper said. straitstimes.com, 9 August 2009 The house arrest rather than imprisonment of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi is a “win-win” solution and a “giant step toward change” in Burma, state-owned media said Friday. Suu Kyi’s sentence of three years’ imprisonment with hard labor was reduced to 18 months of house arrest following an order by the junta’s leader. AP, 14 August 2009 The European Union has added four state-run media outlets to its list of Burmese sanctions targets in response to the court ruling against pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Four media enterprises – the Myanmar News and Periodicals Enterprise, which publishes three state-run newspapers; the Tatmadaw Telecasting Unit, which runs Myawaddy Television; Myanmar Radio and Television; and the Myanmar Motion Picture Enterprise—were added to the revised sanctions list published on Friday. The EU stated that it put the media organizations on the list because they have been involved in promoting the regime’s policies and propaganda. Wai Moe, Irrawaddy, 14 August 2009 The junta has put the Burmese media on a leash and banned mention of the names of pro-democracy activists, politicians and their movements. Nem Davies, Mizzima, 21 August 2009 Burma’s state media on Thursday defended the ruling junta’s decision to bar opposition icon Aung San Suu Kyi from court during final arguments in her appeal against her detention. The Nobel laureate was convicted on August 11 of breaching security laws after an American swam to her house. She was sentenced to three years’ hard labour but junta chief Than Shwe cut the term to 18 months’ house arrest. Her lawyers say the military regime has denied her permission to attend court on Friday to hear closing submissions in her appeal, but government mouthpiece newspapers said the decision was in line with the law. The article did not mention Suu Kyi’s name nor her party but it was published one day after Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy said the decision to bar her from the appeal court was “not justice”. AFP, 17 September 2009

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Open Letter to Senior General Than Shwe
Commander-in-Chief, Defence Services, Burma By Bilal M. Raschid

July 13, 2009 Dear General Than Shwe, After the resignation of General Ne Win as head of his government as well as of the Burma Socialist Program Party (BSPP), and the take-over of the military dictatorship by the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) in early 1989, not only has the country been ruled with a ruthlessness unknown in Burmese history, but Burma has been made into a racist State. Among the first demonstrations of this fact was the wholesale removal of my father, Mr. M. A. Raschid’s photographs and name from all the history books and other publications that have been made available to the Burmese people. As a close personal friend and colleague of General Aung San in the fight for Burma’s independence, with an unblemished record of service and devotion to the country, he had even earned the respect of General Ne Win. Over the past several years this racism has been manifested by the excessive persecution of all the religious minorities; and the destruction of mosques and churches, and the desecration of their religious books and cemeteries. You and your people have recently seen the wonderful display in the country of my adoption, of the election of a person of mixed ethnic descent to the most honored position of President of the United States of America. This is the clearest demonstration of the strength of a free society, which provides the climate where historical prejudices and injustices can be overcome; and where respect for the rule of law, and human freedoms are valued; and where equal rights and freedom of opportunity provides the environment in which anyone can achieve his ultimate dream, provided he works hard and with integrity to achieve it. This, sadly, is not the situation in Burma today, even though just over four decades back, Burma was such a place; and it was a country from which no one wanted to emigrate even to the United States, or anywhere else! Now another calumny is being perpetrated by your people by the patently absurd charges brought against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the daughter of the father of the nation, because someone almost literally broke into her home, while the security detail placed around her home by your government was asleep. But instead of the guards around her home being punished for their incompetence, she is being charged and tried, for reasons which are known to you, namely, to keep her locked up so that she does not pose a threat to the sham elections you are planning for 2010. Please take note that the world knows what the truth is; and eventually you will be accountable for any harm that may come to her. The peoples’ uprising of 1988, led at great personal cost by thousands of students, and participated in with great conviction by the masses of ordinary citizens, instead of demonstrating to the military leadership the genuine desire of the Burmese people for the individual freedoms inherent in a democratic society, was seen as a threat to their existence. The brutality with which the uprising was put down is known to the world and to your junta. The word “democracy” has become a dirty word in your vocabulary; and it is considered by you as being antithetical to the Burmese people, when in fact it is very much a part of the Buddhist teachings; and imbued in its practices. I have wondered for some time now, whether, even though you are the most powerful man in Burma today, you are aware of what really goes on inside the country, as you have no contact with the people, and the sycophants around you dare not tell you the truth. I have also wondered whether you realize that instead of creating a Socialist paradise, you have really built a great big prison, from which all who can are escaping. The greatest shame is that you have converted the loyal armed forces of Burma, created and given pride of place by General Aung San, into a band of thugs, butchers and prison guards. An army that was once loved and cherished is now despised and hated. Burma is perhaps the only country in the world where there is not one iota of affection for the members of the armed forces! Page 9 of 226

But the most important thing that you must think and ponder over is that, soon your life on this earth will end. Like others before you, and each according to his own belief, you will pass on to another existence. As a Buddhist, have you ever wondered whether you have accumulated enough merit not to return as a dog? All the individuals, all the families, all the children and students, all the old people who have been in so many, many ways harmed by your actions and policies, will be your moral responsibility. Are you also confident that history will be kind to you? You know what happened to General Ne Win after his death. He was buried in the dead of night, and with no military honors. Is that how you wish to go? Of course you will certainly leave a name behind, but of what kind? Would you like to be remembered like Hitler, or perhaps Idi Amin, or Stalin, or even Tojo? Would it not be nice if future generations of Burmese could think of you as a Gandhi, or Nehru, or even a Moses who delivered his people from bondage? Would it not be good to be remembered as a man who led his army to free his people, as in the 1940s, rather than to enslave them, as in the 1960s? And what of the sufferings of our ethnic brethren and other minorities? Is this also not their native land? Should they not be permitted to live with honor and respect, cherishing their own culture and religious heritage? People have come to the United States of America from all over the world. They come to live in freedom, with absolute equality under the laws, and with respect for each other’s varied traditions and beliefs. The United States has shown that the human individual can achieve his full potential only in a free environment, which provides equal opportunity for all its citizens. The proof of this can be seen in the success and achievement of the young Burmese immigrant community in the U.S. There is absolutely no reason why Burma cannot be a similarly successful country, where its people can develop fully to their God given potential, if given this opportunity. A fact already shown in the first two decades after independence. The recent happenings in Burma, where even the honored and respected Buddhist monks were brutalized by your armed forces, should make you think seriously of the present situation, and what lies ahead if you do nothing. The people are unhappy and in deep distress. They are dissatisfied and frustrated with the prevailing conditions, and lack of personal freedoms; and the state of constant fear in which they live. This is a generation who were born after the military coup of 1962, who do not know what democratic freedoms are, and what democracy really means. Yet there is a yearning in their hearts for a society free from fear, with freedom to choose their own destinies; and to again bring back honor to their country. No amount of suppression, no matter how ruthless, can stop this yearning. In the long run they will win! So, there is still time, dear General. Please give this serious thought. Will you have the courage and strength of character to change this despicable state? Or are you going to prove that in the end you were really a coward and a bully, who was too weak to lead his nation to prosperity; and in the end, became the Chief Jailor of a nation of beggars? Sincerely, Bilal M. Raschid Son of U Raschid of Burma

Open Letter to Senior General Than Shwe
By Salai Tun Than 16 August 2009 Dear Brother Sr. Gen. Than Shwe, I am Salai Tun Than. It has been a long time since I wrote to you last. I am writing to you this letter to implore two petitions. The first one is about my wife Daw Khin Nwet and my daughter Sandar Tun Than. They are harassed by some authorities almost constantly and denied of passport issuance for no reason. May I implore you to inform your subordinates to stop harassment and kindly issue passports to them so that we may have a family reunion. If you can show some leniency to Mr John Yettaw, I am sure you could also Page 10 of 226

demostrate the same to your fellow citizens who do no harm to any body. I thank you very much whatever the outcome. My second request is to release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and all political prisoners and let them participate in 2010 election. Let that election be held through an interim government with the international observers. I never have opportunity to meet either you or Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. Manay people believe that you are some kind of a villain. But my sincere belief is that you only perform the tasks required by God. To me God loves Burma. Honestly we are not worthy of democracy. In order to make Burmese people learn democracy en mass practically God has to let us become diaspora in democratic countries through your undertaking. Now, about six percent of Burmese people are learning democracy practically every day in those countries. Our next government most likely will be a truly democratic one. Through your action we come to know what is leadership. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is the product of our past political crises. We have now a true leader who is forgiving to all her opponents and dares to suffer all sorts of hardship disregarding her self comfort. Please believe me that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is all forgiving and she will harm nobody. Here, I like to give you a gentleman assurance that your life will not be threatened unless my life is destroyed first. To summarize my requests: (1) Please issue passports to my wife and daughter and give order for no further harassment. (2) Please release all political prisoners including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and let them participate 2010 election to be held by an interim government with international observers. Let us have a truly democratic government with complete justice, human and monority rights. Let us show the world that we are capable of managing our own affairs with malaise to none but charity to all. Your brother, Salai Tun Than (Presently USA)

III.

National League for Democracy (NLD)

The most recent election was held on the 27th May 1990. In this watershed election, the National League for Democracy (NLD) won 392 of the 485 constituencies contested (seven were deemed too unstable), thus the right to form government. The SLORC refused to cede power. The SLORC claimed retrospectively that the elections were not multi-party general elections, which they were merely to elect a group to work out a constitution. That the SLORC-supported party, the National Unity Party (NUP), won only 10 of the 485 constituencies shocked the Tatmadaw and this shock result remains the reason for them not ceding power. In fact the result was a shock only to the Tatmadaw who were and still are so out of touch with popular sentiment. The SLORC claimed retrospectively that the elections were not multi-party general elections, that they were merely to elect a group to work out a constitution. The Tatmadaw have not accepted the will of the people as so clearly and so decisively expressed in the 1990 election. They have chosen to violate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) that they claim to scrupulously abide by. They have continued to repeat that lie in various other forums wherever the opportunity arises. Burma Lawyers’ Council, Legal Issues On Burma Journal No. 7, December 2000 The trial has drawn outrage from the international community and Suu Kyi’s local supporters, who worry that the military junta has found an excuse to keep her detained through next year’s elections. Her party won the last elections in 1990 but was not allowed to take power by the military, which has run the country since 1962. AP, 28 May 2009

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Aung San Suu Kyi, Prime Minister-Elect, General Secretary of National League for Democracy, political prisoner 1989-95, 2000-02, 2003 + one-year extension November 2004 + six-month extension November 2005 + one-year extension May 2006+ one-year extension May 2007 + one-year extension May 2008 + 3 months in Insein prison during the trial + 3-year imprisonment with hard labor and then conditionally reduced to 18-month house arrest August 2009, survivor of Depayin Massacre 30 May 2003, Thorolf Rafto Prize (1990), European Parliament’s Sakharov Prize (1990), Nobel Peace Prize (1991), US Congressional Gold Medal (2008).

Aung San Suu Kyi (1989) followed and harassed by soldiers (1989) Daw Aung San Suu Kyi Photo Gallery, http://www.pbase.com/dassk/dassk&page=all

Aung San Suu Kyi (1996) with khamauk (hat)

Aung San Suu Kyi (2002) NLD organizing tour

Aung San Suu Kyi entering the court, MMK, 21 May 2009 We, as the National League for Democracy and as part of the forces for democracy, are always ready to work together with the authorities to achieve national reconciliation and we would like to think that the strength of our good will and the very strong desire of the people for democracy will bring positive results. BBC, 14 August 1998

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The newspapers are generally full of abuse of the National League for Democracy. From reading the newspapers you get the idea the generals look on the NLD as the most dangerous thing in the whole wide world. I think this military regime is frightened of losing power. 5 October 1999 For obvious security reasons we do not publish the list of NLD members. But I can assure you that support for us has not dropped since the years 1988-89 when the population voted massively for the NLD. 24 May 2000 “The NLD must stand up firmly to achieve the results of the elections of 1990,” she says. 27 May 2003 She put a signboard on which the word read “A way yah haw tu” in Pali meaning “All be saved from danger”. September 2007 There are some other messages she has been sending out on the banner she made. This time her Armed Forces Day’s message to the people of Burma read as “I have never deceived the public or the nation!” She had put this message on portrait painting of her own father, a National Hero of Independence, General Aung San and she herself painted the portrait. Khin Ohmar, BP Update, 30 March 2008 Neighbors of the democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi said a new message appeared last month on a large outdoor signboard in her compound, saying, “All martyrs must finish their mission.” The message appeared on July 19, Burma’s Martyr Day. The signboard, about 10 X 4-feet, is located on Suu Kyi’s property and can be read from the street in front of her home, where she has been under house arrest for 13 of the past 19 years. Irrawaddy, 19 August 2008 “I have never deceived the public and the nation!” She had put this message on the top of another note “For the country and the people, act firmly.” on a large outdoor signboard in her compound with the picture of General Aung San. Moe Ma Ka, 26 March 2009 The political party of detained Burma pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi says her health has improved after she suffered dehydration and low blood pressure last week. National League for Democracy spokesman Nyan Win said Tuesday that one of the Nobel laureate’s medics, Dr. Pyone Moe Ei, was allowed to visit Suu Kyi Monday afternoon at her lakeside home and reported that her condition has improved. Burma Net News, 12 May 2009 Lawyer Aung Thein said Saturday that he was dismissed from the country’s Bar Council on Friday, a day after he applied to represent Suu Kyi. He has defended political activists in the past and was earlier jailed for four months for contempt of court. Suu Kyi has already spent 13 of the last 19 years in detention without trial for her nonviolent promotion of democracy. She had been scheduled to be freed May 27 after six consecutive years of house arrest but now faces up to five years in prison if convicted, according to one of her lawyers, Hla Myo Myint. He and another lawyer represented her at the arraignment, but Suu Kyi had asked for three other defense lawyers, including Aung Thein. AP, 16 May 2009 Ms Suu Kyi is being held in the grounds of the prison, which is notorious for its squalid conditions and the abuse suffered by inmates. She was reported as saying her accommodation was “comfortable.” Mr Yettaw and Ms Suu Kyi’s two housekeepers and companions, a mother and daughter who have lived with her since 2003, are being tried together with her. Nyan Win said the trial could last for three months. A diplomat commented: “The regime hates the world’s attention on this so they will try to kick it into the long grass and hope the interest fades.” The Independent, 18 May 2009 Daw Aung San Suu Kyi passed on a message that she is fine, and prays that others are in good health. Trial will resume at 10 am tomorrow, Tuesday 19 May. AAPP Page 13 of 226

Burma’s pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi today said she was “ready to face anything” as her lawyer said the military junta appeared rushing her trial to keep her incarcerated on charges that she violated conditions of her detention by sheltering a US citizen. Press Trust of India, 19 May 2009 “Thank you very much for coming and for your support,” Suu Kyi, dressed in a pink blouse and marooncolored tied skirt, known as a longhi, told the diplomats after the hearing. “I hope to meet you in better days,” she said, smiling, before female police officers escorted her out of the court. Later at a meeting with diplomats from Russia, Thailand and Singapore at her prison guesthouse, Suu Kyi said she and two female assistants also on trial were being treated well. Singapore’s Foreign Ministry said she told the diplomats that national reconciliation was still possible “if all parties so wished.” “She also expressed the view that it was not too late for something good to come out of this unfortunate incident.” It was not clear if the trial would be open on Thursday. Mark Canning, Britain’s ambassador to Burma, said he saw little evidence that Suu Kyi was receiving a fair trial. “All the paraphernalia of the court room is there,” he told BBC television. “The judges, the prosecution, the defense. That’s all there, but I think this is a story where the conclusion is already scripted.” One Asian diplomat said: “They seem to want to improve the image of the trial by allowing us to be there.” Reuters, 20 May 2009 Burma democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi proclaimed her innocence in front of a prison tribunal, her lawyer said on Friday. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said ‘I have no guilt as I didn’t commit any crime,’” Nyan Win said at the end of the fifth day of her trial on charges of breaching the conditions of her house arrest. Nyan Win said Aung San Suu Kyi spoke to the court, held behind closed doors, as the prosecution wrapped its case before the trial resumes on Monday with her legal defence. AFP, 22 May 2009 There was a telling moment as she entered when the police guards rose to their feet before lowering themselves sheepishly down. She welcomed our presence. She hoped to meet us in better times and said how good it was to see people from the outside world. It was deeply impressive and one was left wondering how she managed to display no trace of indignation at this latest twist. Mark Canning, British ambassador in Burma, guardian.co.uk, 26 May 2009 Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi told a court Tuesday that although she gave “temporary shelter” to an uninvited American earlier this month, she had not violated her house arrest and was merely trying to shield the man and her security guards from punishment. Testifying for the first time in the case, Suu Kyi appeared frail and pale but managed an occasional smile. A judge questioned her for less than half an hour about John W. Yettaw, who swam uninvited to her lakeside house. Reporters and diplomats, including a reporter for The Associated Press, were allowed into the courtroom for Tuesday’s session, the second time during the trial that such rare access has been granted. “Thank you for your concern and support. It is always good to see people from the outside world,” she told reporters and diplomats before being escorted out of the court by four policewomen. AP, 26 May 2009 Aung San Suu Kyi said last week that the charges against her were “one-sided.” The 63-year-old accused Burmese authorities of failing to provide proper security despite the fact that she informed them of a previous intrusion by Yettaw in November 2008. AFP, 31 May 2009 Lawyers for jailed opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi filed an appeal Thursday to Burma’s High Court to reinstate two key defense witnesses in a case that could put her in prison for five years. Suu Kyi gave her legal team instructions to pursue a second appeal during a 90-minute meeting Wednesday at Insein Prison, where she is being held while on trial on charges of violating the terms of her house arrest, lawyer Nyan Win said. The charges stem from the surprise visit of an American man who swam across a lake to her house. The District Court trying Suu Kyi allowed only one of four defense witnesses to take the stand. On appeal, the Rangoon Divisional Court on Tuesday ruled that a second witness could be heard. Two senior Page 14 of 226

members of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party remain barred from giving testimony. Suu Kyi “told us to see it through to the end as the ruling is legally wrong,” Nyan Win said. AP, 11 June 2009 Burmese pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi believes her trial by the ruling junta is “politically motivated”, her lawyer said Thursday, as he lodged an appeal over a ban on two witnesses. The opposition leader met with her legal team in prison on Wednesday to discuss her defence against charges that she broke the rules of her house arrest when an American man swam to her lakeside property in May. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said yesterday when we met that the trial is politically motivated,” Nyan Win, one of her three lawyers and the spokesman for her National League for Democracy (NLD), told AFP. 11 June 2009 We’e just heard that from inside Burma’s notorious Insein prison Aung San Suu Kyi has asked her lawyer to thank the tens of thousands of people that wished her happy birthday last Friday. Her lawyer Nyan Win just released this message: “Shesaid she thanks those at home and abroad who wished her a happy birthday, because she cannot reply to everyone.” Burma’s brutal regime wants the world to forget Aung San Suu Kyi. Johnny Chatterton, Campaigns Officer, Burma Campaign UK, 23 June 2009 The trial of Burma’s detained pro-democracy leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi was adjourned at the last minute until July 10, one of her lawyers has said Friday. The adjournment came even as United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon arrived in Burma’s former capital of Rangoon Friday morning at the start his two-day official visit to the country. The trial of Suu Kyi, who is accused of violating the terms of her house arrest by allowing a U.S. national to swim to her lakeside residence in Rangoon, had been due to resume Friday morning. But as lawyers gathered at Rangoon’s Insein jail, officials announced that the trial, already adjourned for more than a month, had been put off once again. Speaking to reporters Nyan Win, a member of Suu Kyi’s legal team, said the Supreme Court did not send the case files to the lower court, so the case has been adjourned until July 10. He said Suu Kyi had “expressed her surprise that this happened.” RTT News, 3 July 2009 Detained Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi is in complete agreement with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s three main points to resolve Burma’s political imbroglio during his two-day visit to Burma on Friday. Speaking to Mizzima on Thursday, Nyan Win, lawyer of Aung San Suu Kyi said the detained Burmese democracy leader supports Ban’s major agendas to address the political deadlock in military ruled Burma. “She said the three issues are worthy of discussion,” Nyan Win said. Aung San Suu Kyi’s comment came because the UN Secretary General, during his stay in Burma, plans to resolve the issues of political prisoners, bring up the issue of resumption of dialogue between the government and the opposition, persuade the junta to initiate national reconciliation, and set the stage for credible elections slated for 2010. Mizzima, 3 July 2009 The trial in Burma of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been postponed. Suu Kyi, 64, was “abolutely dissatisfied” with the decision of an army-ruled court in Rangoon, Burma’s capital, to allow prosecutors more time to prepare their final arguments in the case, said Nyan Win, one of her lawyers. Lawyers for the Nobel peace laureate early on Friday gave their closing arguments in the trial that could lead to Suu Kyi being jailed for five years if she is found guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest. Win told the Reuters news agency that prosecutors had been told to deliver their final arguments on Monday. aljazeera.net, 24 July 2009 The 64-year-old opposition icon has asked for English and French novels and Burmese-language books including dictionaries and religious works to help her pass the time if she is jailed, her lawyer Nyan Win said. “I think Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is preparing for the worst,” Nyan Win, who is also a spokesman for her National League for Democracy (NLD), told AFP. Daw is a term of respect in Burmese. “She has said that if she has to stay in prison for a long time, she has only one thing to do and that is reading.” AFP, 30 July 2009 Page 15 of 226

The Burma court scheduled to deliver a verdict in the high-profile trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi said Friday it was not yet ready to make a decision and adjourned until Aug. 11, diplomats said. Suu Kyi rose to her feet after the judge’s announcement, turned to foreign diplomats in the courtroom and said jokingly, “I apologize for giving you more work,” a Western diplomat said on condition of anonymity, citing protocol. AP, 31 July 2009 “She told me that when she met with Senator Jim Webb she reiterated the need for the Burmese regime to first interact ‘inside the country’. She said only when that happens ‘will Burma benefit from relations with the international community’,” Mr Nyan Win told The Irrawaddy. He said the Nobel Peace Prize laureate who is regarded as a strong supporter of economic sanctions, also told Senator Webb: ‘She was not the one who imposed sanctions against the Burmese regime. She is not in a position to lift those sanctions.” Kyaw Zwa Moe, Irrawaddy, 21 August 2009 Three US Congress staffers met with representatives from the opposition National League for Democracy (NLD) in Rangoon for talks about political prisoners including Aung San Suu Kyi, and the US policy review on Burma, an NLD spokesman said. “We met with the Congress staffers at NLD headquarters at 4 p.m. on Friday. The main reason for their trip is to discuss humanitarian issues,” NLD spokesman Nyan Win said. “We talked about Burmese politics—the first issue they raised concerned the political prisoners.” The US Congress staffers also asked about Suu Kyi’s detention, he said. During the meeting, the staffers told the NLD policymakers are still discussing a US policy shift in Washington. “But they said they did not think a decision on the Burma policy review will come soon,” Nyan Win said. After US Senator Jim Webb’s recent trip and article in the New York Times, Nyan Win said he told the Congress staffers that Suu Kyi said she did not think his trip and his writing reflected the policy of the Obama administration. “I think the staffers came to Burma to survey the facts for the policy review or for Congress,” he said. Irrawaddy, 28 August 2009 Always following the four principles of the NLD’s Shwegondaing Declaration in April 2009; before the 2010 election we demand the military regime to recognize the 1990 election results, release all political prisoners, open dialogue with Aung San Suu Kyi, and review the 2008 constitution. Win Tin, Moe Ma Ka, January 2010 Aung San Oo, her elder brother living in San Diego, California, USA, filed a lawsuit against her for half ownership of the house where she now lives in 2000-02. Again in 2009-2010 he stopped her sister repairing her same residence damaged during Cyclone Nargis 2007. His wife, Lei Lei Nwe Thein, has political ambitions for him through his connections with the military junta. Because, ethically and politically, he has been doing wrong on his younger sister and the Cause of Burma; Buddhist monks, All Burma Monks Alliance (ABMA), conduct a refusal to accept alms or to attend religious ceremonies held by his family since February 2010. Tin Oo, the vice-chairman of the National League for Democracy (NLD) and Burma’s former army chief, told The Irrawaddy that the army should stay out of politics and that past military coups in Burma have only harmed the country. 27 March 2010 Six Points in Aung San Suu Kyi’s Analysis in Rejecting Party Registration: 1. She doesn’t accept the 2008 Constitution and upholds the Shwegondaing Declaration. 2. She doesn’t accept the junta’s unjust and one-sided Political Party Registration Law, which is undemocratic. 3. She said the NLD is neither her property nor anyone else. 4. She doesn’t favor or accept any attempt to create factions within the party. Page 16 of 226

5. She would like to say to the people that she is committed to democracy and will continue her struggle. 6. She won’t recognize that the NLD is abolished, even if it is dissolved by the military regime. English Translation by The Irrawaddy, 30 March 2010 Burmese people have the right not to vote in the upcoming election, detained Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi told her lawyer on Friday. “Daw Suu said that just as the people have the right to vote, they also have the right not to vote,” Suu Kyi’s lawyer Nyan Win told The Irrawaddy shortly after meeting with her on Friday afternoon. Irrawaddy, 12 June 2010 Win Htein, 68, told reporters that he would participate in social activities arranged by the National League for Democracy party, especially to help political prisoners and their families. The party was recently forced by law to dissolve after failing to register for an election supposed to be held this year. “I have no faith in the elections, and I was happy that the NLD had decided not to re-register,” said Win Htein. Critics have dismissed the election as a sham designed to cement nearly 50 years of military rule in Burma. Win Htein said he wanted to help political prisoners and their families “materially, morally and spiritually.” He said he had seen many deaths in prison due to lack of medical care and poor nutrition. However, he thanked the prison doctor who was moved to Katha prison a few years ago, saying that since that doctor has arrived no prisoners had died in Katha prison. Win Htein said he was in the same prison with other, younger political prisoners who remain defiant and committed to democratic struggle. “Having a party signboard or not doesn’t matter because a political party can stand as long as it enjoys public support. The NLD enjoys public support immensely,” said Win Htein. Win Htein said he had invested 20 years of his life in prison for his beliefs. “I will continue to work for democracy and for the country. Democracy will one day prosper in the country. If I don’t see democracy in my lifetime, I will be happy if the next generation can enjoy democracy,” he said. AP, 16 July 2010 Burma’s election body has confirmed the abolition of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s party along with nine others ahead of November elections, state media reported Tuesday. Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy is one of five parties forcibly dissolved after failing to apply to continue their activities, state media announced, quoting the Union Election Commission. It was the first time state media has announced the NLD’s dissolution, although it has been previously confirmed by officials after the party decided to boycott the upcoming election, saying the rules were unfair. The other parties abolished for failing to reregister are the Union Pa-O National Organization, the Shan Nationalities League for Democracy Party, the Shan State Kokang Democratic Party, and the Wa National Development Party. State media said five more political parties -- out of 42 which were initially allowed to register to run in the November 7 poll -- were abolished because they failed to meet requirements on registering candidates. The election has been widely condemned by activists and the West as a charade aimed at putting a civilian face on military rule. AFP, 14 September 2010 Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will not be able to cast her vote in the upcoming elections as her name does not appear in the list of voters for residence of Bahan Township. However, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is in the list of voters in the previous referendum held to approve the 2008 Constitution. NLD News Bulletin, 20 September 2010 The Burmese regime’s announcement that detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will be permitted to vote in the Nov. 7 election is merely a cynical ploy to confuse the Burmese public, according to one of her closest political colleagues. “I don’t welcome this at all,” said Win Htein, an aide to Suu Kyi, in response to reports on Friday that the National League for Democracy (NLD) leader and her two live-in maids were officially registered on the voters list in Rangoon’s Bahan Township. “The regime is playing a trick. Daw Suu has already said that she is boycotting the election. So this is deliberately meant to confuse people,” he said. It is also raises questions about Suu Kyi’s status as a political prisoner. According to Page 17 of 226

election laws enacted in May, detainees are barred from voting or belonging to political parties. The same laws also forced her party to disband for refusing to register for this year’s election. According to media reports, officials said that Suu Kyi will not be allowed to go out on polling day, but might be given permission to vote in advance. Aye Thar Aung, the secretary of the Committee Representing the People’s Parliament, an umbrella group of political and ethnic groups that won in Burma's last election in 1990, said that the announcement was probably a political trap. “Daw Suu would decline to vote even if the regime offered her a chance to do so,” he said. “Then the regime could accuse her of not fulfilling her duties as a citizen. But no matter what they say, the public knows what they’re up to.” Political dissidents in Rangoon said the news was an example of how arbitrarily the regime applies its own laws. “Breaking its own laws is what the regime has been doing all along,” said one dissident. Irrawaddy, 25 September 2010 Only Senior General Than Shwe, Burma’s military strongman, will decide “if and when” Aung San Suu Kyi is freed; only he “knows exactly when she will be granted freedom,” wrote The Irrawaddy, a dissident Burmese newspaper, citing two Burmese government officials. A close aid of the Nobel Prize winner says that Burma’s main opposition leader plans to tour the country once she is released to rally support for democracy. Aung San Suu Kyi spent 15 of the past 21 years in prison or under house arrest. Her latest sentence, due to an American man who broke into her home in August 2009, will end on 13 November, a few days after the country’s general elections on 7 November. The incident was a pretext to exclude her from taking part in the elections, and give the military regime a large majority in the new parliament. For opponents, analysts and western governments, the election process is in fact just a farce. speroforum.com, 2 October 2010

Defense Lawyers of Aung San Suu Kyi
Burma’s pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, was charged Thursday with violating the terms of her house arrest after an American man swam across a lake to sneak into her Rangoon home, her lawyer said. Suu Kyi, whose latest detention period was set to end May 27, could face a prison term of up to five years if convicted, said lawyer Hla Myo Myint. Her trial is scheduled to start Monday at a special court at Rangoon’s notorious Insein Prison, where she was arraigned Thursday. AP, 14 May 2009 Lawyer Kyi Win has blamed Mr Yettaw for her detention, calling him a “fool”. BBC, 14 May 2009 “The charge is going to be violating the conditions of her house arrest and what her lawyer is going to argue is that of course that’s ridiculous because, yes under the terms of her arrest she cannot invite people to visit her but she of course did not invite this person to visit her,” Jared Genser told the BBC. “If somebody shows up at her doorstep in violation of Burmese law she cannot be held responsible for it.” 14 May 2009 “Everyone is very angry with this wretched American,” Suu Kyi’s attorney, Kyi Win, told reporters. “He is the cause of all these problems.” columbiamissourian.com, 16 May 2009 A prominent activist lawyer says Burma’s military government disbarred him after he applied to defend opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi in her upcoming trial. Aung Thein said Saturday the order revoking his license was issued Friday, a day after a prison court charged Aung San Suu Kyi with breaking the conditions of her house arrest, which is due to expire on May 27. VOA, 16 May 2009 The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) has learned that lawyer U Aung Thein has had his licence to practise law revoked by the authorities, on grounds that he was not abiding by professional ethics. U Aung Thein is one of the lawyers in Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy legal advisory team. Together with her lawyers U Kyi Win and U Nyan Win, members of the NLD legal advisory team are currently preparing the defence case for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her two Page 18 of 226

live-in party members, Daw Khin Khin Win and her daughter Daw Win Ma Ma. The revoking of his licence to practise law is a blatant attempt by the regime to damage the defence for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her two live-in party members. U Aung Thein’s close associate U Khin Maung Shein - not directly involved in Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s case - has also had his lawyer’s licence revoked. This is yet another example of the regime’s harassment of lawyers who choose to defend pro-democracy activists. There are currently 11 lawyers in prison. AAPP, 16 May 2009 Lawyer Aung Thein said Saturday that he was dismissed from the country’s Bar Council on Friday, a day after he applied to represent Suu Kyi. He has defended political activists in the past and was earlier jailed for four months for contempt of court. Suu Kyi has already spent 13 of the last 19 years in detention without trial for her nonviolent promotion of democracy. She had been scheduled to be freed May 27 after six consecutive years of house arrest but now faces up to five years in prison if convicted, according to one of her lawyers, Hla Myo Myint. He and another lawyer represented her at the arraignment, but Suu Kyi had asked for three other defense lawyers, including Aung Thein. AP, 16 May 2009 The first day of the trial against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her colleagues Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma and US citizen John William Yettaw began today at 10.30 am and finished this afternoon at around 2 pm local time. Four lawyers (U Kyi Win, U Hla Myo Myint, U Nyan Win and Daw Khin Htay Kywe) represented Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. Daw Khin Htay Kywe, U Hla Myo Myint and U Nyan Win also represented National League for Democracy party members Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma. Lawyer U Khin Maung Oo represented John William Yettaw. There are two judges in the case, U Thaung Nyunt from Rangoon Northern District Court and U Nyi Nyi Soe from Rangoon Western District Court. Lt. Colonel Police Special Branch Officer Zaw Min Aung read out the statement of prosecution against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her colleagues and John William Yettaw. Her lawyers were able to raise counterquestions to Zaw Min Aung. Security preparations have been underway since yesterday evening. Insein Road is closed off to traffic, and barbed wire fencing has been erected. Riot police; members of the regimeaffiliated militia, Swan Arr Shin; the regime’s social organisation Union Solidarity and Development Association; and the Fire Brigade were all present. This morning NLD Youth members distributed black ribbons and possibly armbands. NLD Youth member Htwe Thein and others were arrested and taken away by security officers. They have now been released and are back at their homes. NLD co-founder and Central Executive Committee member U Win Tin and hundreds of NLD members and supporters tried to enter Insein Prison compound to listen to the court hearing, but were prevented from doing so by security forces. Some youth and monks were seen wearing headbands and holding placards which said, “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is not guilty.” Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her colleagues are being held in a guesthouse facility located within Insein prison compound. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi passed on a message that she is fine, and prays that others are in good health. Trial will resume at 10 am tomorrow, Tuesday 19 May. AAPP The defense has argued that there is no legal basis for the charge that Suu Kyi had violated the terms of her house arrest when an uninvited American swam secretly to her home. Suu Kyi’s defense team acknowledges that 53-year-old John W. Yettaw swam to and entered her lakeside home, where he stayed for two days. They argue, however, that it was the duty of government guards outside her closely watched house to prevent any intruders. AP, 28 May 2009 Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi called the verdict returning her to house arrest “totally unfair,” but remains cheerful and alert, her lawyer said Wednesday. Four of her lawyers were allowed to visit the Nobel Peace Prize laureate at her lakeside home for an hour to discuss an appeal of her conviction Tuesday on charges of violating the terms of her previous house arrest. A burma court found Suu Kyi, 64, guilty of sheltering an uninvited American visitor. Her sentence of three years in prison with hard labor was reduced to 18 months of house arrest by order of the head of the country’s ruling military junta, Senior Gen. Than Shwe. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said the conviction was totally unfair and the court’s assessment of the case was not just,” lawyer Nyan Win said. Her defense had contended that it was the responsibility of the police Page 19 of 226

guarding her house to keep out intruders. Suu Kyi’s defense team will appeal as soon as it receives a certified copy of the judgment from the district court, Nyan Win said. AP, 12 August 2009 Lawyers for Aung San Suu Kyi are seeking U.N. action to win her release after a Burma court extended her house arrest for 18 months. A petition filed Tuesday with the U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva, Switzerland, argues she is being arbitrarily detained in violation of international human rights law. AP, 12 August 2009 Lawyers representing Burma pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and US national John Yettaw have said they both plan to lodge appeals against their convictions for breaking the country’s internal security laws. Speaking to reporters lawyer Nyan Win said the appeals would be filed because they were “not satisfied” with the judgement, which stemmed from an incident in which Yettaw swam uninvited to Aung San Suu Kyi’s lakeside home in May. “We assume that the judgement is totally wrong according to the law,” he told the AFP news agency, adding that he had received approval from Aung San Suu Kyi to go ahead with the appeal. Win Tin, a former political prisoner and member of Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD), said the verdict was unacceptable and a “violation of justice”. Speaking to Al Jazeera, he said the NLD officials were hopeful that they would secure a more favourable verdict in a higher court. Nyan Win said the appeal process could begin immediately once they received a copy of the judgement. Khin Maung Oo, the lawyer representing Yettaw, said they would also appeal “step-by-step” to the Burmese court system. If necessary, he said, he would write to senior officials in Burma’s military government to ask for Yettaw to be deported. He said his client was “very calm” and “hopes for the best”. AFP, 12 August 2009 The international lawyer for Aung San Suu Kyi says Australia’s Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, could play a key role in pushing for her release. The Australian Government has urged the United Nations to impose an arms embargo on Burma in response. In an interview with the Australia Broadcasting Corporation, Ms Suu Kyi’s lawyer Jared Genser says the Prime Minister should also pressure China to intervene. “Because China is really key, sharing a border with Burma as it does, with substantial investments in the country particularly in oil and gas, if China can be made to see the wisdom in doing more internationally, that along with India, Thailand, Singapore and other countries in ASEAN that could be very very helpful to moving towards a process of national reconciliation in Burma.” radioaustralianews.net.au, 15 August 2009 The conditions of Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s detention have gotten “worse” since her conviction this month for violating terms of her previous house arrest, her lawyer said Tuesday. Burma’s military government has not responded to Suu Kyi’s request for a visit by her personal physician, said Nyan Win, her lawyer and spokesman for her National League for Democracy party. Nyan Win also said he and his colleagues have not yet been given permission to meet the Nobel Peace Prize laureate since her Aug. 11 conviction to consult on filing an appeal. “The present regulations imposed on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi are worse than the previous rules,” he said. AP, 25 August 2009 Burma’s highest court has agreed to hear a final appeal to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest, her lawyer said Thursday, pressing forward with the case despite her scheduled release in less than a month. “We believe that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will be released on Nov. 13, but we are pursuing this legal battle to prove her innocence,” lawyer Nyan Win told reporters. He said the High Court posted an announcement Wednesday night that it would hear the special appeal on behalf of Suu Kyi, who has spent most of the past 15 years under house arrest. Nyan Win said lawyers will have to present their argument before the Special Appellate Bench, a multi-judge panel in the remote administrative capital of Naypyidaw, on a date that has not yet been set. This will be Suu Kyi’s last legal option to appeal her 2009 conviction for violating the terms of her house arrest for briefly sheltering an American who swam uninvited to her home. Suu Kyi’s lawyers have argued that her house arrest was unlawful since it was based on provisions of the 1974 constitution which was abolished after a ruling military junta seized power in 1988, said Nyan Win. Page 20 of 226

The Nobel Peace Prize laureate has already lost two appeals against the conviction and her 18-month house arrest expires on Nov. 13, a week after the country’s first election in two decades. Irrawaddy, 21 October 2010 Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi looks set for release before nationwide elections to be held in a matter of days, according to one of her lawyers outside Burma’s top court in Naypyidaw, where the special appeal against her house arrest began today. “I believe that Aung San Suu Kyi will be free before the election,” Nyan Win, one of three lawyers representing her, told Mizzima. Khin Htay Kywe and Kyi Win joined Nyan Win as assistant counsel before the Special Appellate Bench of the Supreme Court in the junta’s capital, which had accepted the special appeal after two lower courts rejected the basis of arguments made by Suu Kyi’s legal team. Chief Justice Aung Toe led Deputy Chief Justice Tun Tun Oo and Justice Kyaw Win on the three-member panel in the three-hour hearing amid calls yesterday and today by respectively US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for release of all political prisoners in Burma, Suu Kyi’s current sentence was due to expire on November 13, six days after Burma’s first elections in 20 years. Party members and supporters were expecting her to be released from detention at her home on Rangoon University Avenue road. Nevertheless, the court had failed to fix a date for the next hearing, as was the junta courts usual practice, her lawyer said. “The appeal is to test the state of Burma’s law and order. We seek not only the freedom of Aung San Suu Kyi but also to restore the rule of law,” Nyan Win highlighted repeatedly. The leader of the National League for Democracy party has spent most of her life in detention of various forms since her party won the last national elections in a landslide in 1990. Party members Han Thar Myint, May Win Myint, Win Myint, Thein Oo, Aye Aye Mar, Khin Saw Mu, Dr. Myo Aung, Lawyer Khin Maung Shein, Saw Nai Nai, and youth-wing members Myo Nyunt, Myint Myint Aye, Thuza Lwin, and Min Maw Oo were permitted to attend the trial. Authorities imposed no unusual security arrangements during the trial or near the court, a 1990 elected member of parliament Saw Nai Nai told Mizzima. Suu Kyi’s earlier failed appeals were submitted at district and division level courts. Mizzima, 29 October 2010

IV.

International Communities

A Diplomat / Diplomats
A diplomat commented: “The regime hates the world’s attention on this so they will try to kick it into the long grass and hope the interest fades.” The Independent, 18 May 2009 A western diplomat in Rangoon said that Burma was “surprised and rather embarrassed” by the scope of the international reaction to the trial. The diplomat said it was likely that Burma’s giant neighbour and ally China, which has been silent on the issue, privately urged the generals to find a way to calm the international uproar. AFP, 19 May 2009 “Thank you very much for coming and for your support,” Suu Kyi, dressed in a pink blouse and marooncolored tied skirt, known as a longhi, told the diplomats after the hearing. “I hope to meet you in better days,” she said, smiling, before female police officers escorted her out of the court. Later at a meeting with diplomats from Russia, Thailand and Singapore at her prison guesthouse, Suu Kyi said she and two female assistants also on trial were being treated well. Singapore’s Foreign Ministry said she told the diplomats that national reconciliation was still possible “if all parties so wished.” “She also expressed the view that it was not too late for something good to come out of this unfortunate incident.” It was not clear if the trial would be open on Thursday. Mark Canning, Britain’s ambassador to Burma, said he saw little evidence that Suu Kyi was receiving a fair trial. “All the paraphernalia of the court room is there,” he told BBC television. “The judges, the prosecution, the defense. That’s all there, but I think this is a story where the conclusion is Page 21 of 226

already scripted.” One Asian diplomat said: “They seem to want to improve the image of the trial by allowing us to be there.” Reuters, 20 May 2009 The government insists Suu Kyi will get a fair trial, but analysts say the courts have a long history of stretching laws to suit the generals. Diplomats who were given a brief glimpse of the trial last week said it appeared “scripted.” Reuters, 26 May 2009 Another senior European diplomat, who declined to be named, said that Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi did not mention Suu Kyi by name in closed-door remarks, “but he de-facto did.” “It was a new tone from China on the question of Burma. That, I think, can be said. There’s no question about it,” he said. Yang declined to comment specifically on Tuesday. Asked about the statements, Yang told Reuters: “It’s a consensus.” Reuters, 26 May 2009 Burmese officials on Friday postponed an appeal hearing and adjourned the main trial of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in what Western diplomats in Rangoon say a string of delayed court dates is a sign that the ruling generals are seeking to stall the proceedings after being shocked by the vehement worldwide criticism of the trial. AFP, 12 June 2009 The vast majority of Thailand’s energy supplies come from its neighbour. Many observers cite Burma’s vast natural gas reserves, and the subsequent trade with China, India and Thailand amongst others, as the key preventative of economic collapse in Burma in the face of sanctions. DVB, 16 June 2009 Military-ruled Burma is ready to host a visit by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon next month, foreign diplomats said Wednesday. A Western diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity because of protocol, said the junta has agreed to receive Ban in early July. An Asian diplomat, who also asked not to be identified by name, confirmed that the government was ready to host Ban early in the month for a very brief visit. The secretary-general’s special envoy to Burma, Ibrahim Gambari, is expected to visit ahead of his boss, the Western diplomat said. AP, 18 June 2009 As Burma’s state-run media continues to call on Washington to lift sanctions following the highly publicized visit of pro-engagement US Senator Jim Webb, a Western diplomat close to US officials says it is now up to the Burmese regime to make the next move. “I don’t think the US will be the first to blink. Junta leader Sr-Gen Than Shwe should be the one to blink now,” said the Bangkok-based diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity. “If they are serious about the new relationship with the US, they should commute Suu Kyi’s sentence completely and free her immediately,” said the Western diplomat. After Webb’s visit, dissidents both inside and outside of Burma began to speculate about whether the US was going to shift its policy. However, given the ongoing political stalemate, Washington is not likely to make any major changes in its Burma policy, the diplomat said. It seems unlikely, then, that Washington will relax its sanctions on the Burmese junta as long as it continues to persecute its political opponents. “How can the US lift its sanctions without action in Burma?” asked the Western diplomat, adding that Than Shwe has “done nothing to loosen his grip.” Irrawaddy, 22 August 2009

Amnesty International
Amnesty International called on the UN Security Council and Burma’s Asian neighbours to urgently intervene to secure Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s release from prison. “The government of Burma must free Daw Aung San Suu Kyi at once, without condition, and not return her to house arrest,” said Benjamin Zawacki, Amnesty International’s Burma expert. “In the absence of a unified international voice, the Burmese government will continue to act in utter disregard for human rights. Now more than ever, the Page 22 of 226

Security Council and ASEAN member states must send an unequivocal signal to the generals that they can no longer act with impunity,” Zawacki concluded. AI, 14 May 2009 Amnesty International Malaysia campaign co-orinator K. Shan also feels for the people of Burma. “Refugees from the country have been coming here for a long time. At last count, there are about 20,000 of them. But there has been no improvement in conditions for them here. We hope the Malaysian government will look at the problem and find a solution. In fact, Asean as a whole has failed to come forward to protect the rights of these displaced people.” Still, Shan sees hope in their unwavering dedication of their cause. “Many of them are young people who have escaped from a climate of oppression, and developed politically here. They are very committed to liberating their country. They see Aung San Suu Kyi as the legitimate leader of the people. In the contest between democracy and authoritarianism, she represents their will and struggle.” thestar.com.my, 14 June 2009 U.N. envoys have long pushed the Burmese government to release all political prisoners and allow democratic reforms. But in the past two years, the number of dissidents locked up has nearly doubled to more than 2,000. Benjamin Zawacki, a Burma researcher for Amnesty International in Bangkok, says the arrests are part of the military’s plan to stamp out opposition ahead of next year’s controversial elections. “This is clearly what’s driving them to keep Daw Aung San Suu Kyi behind bars or at least out of the way,” said Zawacki. “They’ve effectively locked up the opposition and thrown away the key. And, I say thrown away the key because they’ve sentenced them to extraordinarily long prison terms and sent them to the furthest borders of the country.” Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy won Burma’s last elections in 1990 but the military never allowed them to take power. voanews.com, 2 July 2009 Irene Khan, Amnesty International’s secretary general, said Suu Kyi had faced a maximum sentence of five years. “The Burmese authorities will hope that a sentence that is shorter than the maximum will be seen by the international community as an act of leniency,” added Khan. “But it is not, and must not be seen as such.” She said Suu Kyi should never have been arrested in the first place. AP, 11 August 2009

Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN)
Burma’s Southeast Asian neighbors expressed “grave concern” on Tuesday over the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi but China said it would not interfere in the regime’s affairs. On the second day of the closed trial, five prosecution witnesses testified against Suu Kyi, who is accused of violating her house arrest after an American intruder swam to her lakeside home two weeks ago. The charges, denied by the Nobel Peace laureate, have drawn international condemnation and calls for Asian governments to get tough with Burma’s ruling generals. Setting aside its usual line of non-interference, the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) said the “honor and credibility” of its troublesome member was at stake. It urged “humane treatment” for Suu Kyi and reminded the regime that it had ignored the 10-member group’s previous calls for her release from detention. Nevertheless, ASEAN chair Thailand said the group would not change its policy of engagement with the regime. “Events over the last week have raised concern and we expressed our concern very clearly, but our policy is to engage and continue to engage constructively,” Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva said in Bangkok. Reuters, 19 May 2009 A group of Southeast Asian politicians is urging the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to suspend Burma’s membership if it refuses to release democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Aung San Suu Kyi testified Tuesday against charges that could put her in prison for five years. Aung San Suu Kyi said she was innocent when she was called Tuesday to testify in court. The trial has been widely condemned as an excuse to keep the Nobel Peace Prize winner locked up and pressure is growing for her release. The ASEAN InterParliamentary Myanmar Caucus on Tuesday called for tougher actions against Burma, including suspending its membership in the regional bloc. Charles Chong, a Singaporean lawmaker and member of the caucus, Page 23 of 226

told journalists in Bangkok that dealing with Burma has bogged down ASEAN, making it harder for them to accomplish anything. “More and more parliamentarians within ASEAN are beginning to lose their patience with Burma. And, we are calling upon our governments to do more than just expressions of dismay, regret, grave concern and so on, and seriously look at suspending Burma’s membership of ASEAN,” he said. VOA, 26 May 2009 Thailand, as the chairman of Asean on Wednesday, expressed its “disappointment” over Burma’s ruling on its opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The ten-member grouping which Burma is a member of called for immediate release of all political prisoners including 64-year-old Aung San Suu Kyi. The call came a day after Burma’s court sentenced Aung San Suu Kyi another 18 months for breaching condition of her house arrest after an American John Yettaw swam across the Inya Lake to stay two nights at her resident in Rangoon in May. A statement from Thai foreign ministry said the Asean is reiterating the calls made by the 42nd Foreign Ministers’ Meeting and the 16th Asean Regional Forum held in July 2009 in Phuket, for the immediate release of all political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi, to enable them to participate in the 2010 General Elections. The Asean said only the release of political prisoners would contribute to national reconciliation among the people of Burma, meaningful dialogue and facilitate the democratization of Burma. “Only free, fair and inclusive general elections will then pave the way for Burma’s full integration into the international community,” the statement said. Nation, 12 August 2009 Thailand, as chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, sought a consensus Friday from the other nine ASEAN members as to whether the group should seek a pardon for Burma’s democratic icon Aung San Suu Kyi. Thai Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya told reporters by telephone from Kuala Lumpur that he had sent out a letter to all the other nine ASEAN members to seek the consensus. The Philippines denounced the court ruling as “incomprehensible and deplorable” and renewed its call for Suu Kyi’s “immediate and unconditional release.” Malaysia expressed “deep disappointment” and said it would consult with other ASEAN members on the development. While Singapore also expressed disappointment and hope that Suu Kyi will be allowed to participate in the political process as soon as possible, it commended Burma’s generals for reducing her sentence and keeping her out of jail. Indonesia’s Foreign Ministry said it is “strongly disappointed” with the court verdict. Vietnam did not comment directly on the ruling but urged Rangoon to “adopt measures to promote national reconciliation and dialogue between concerned parties in Burma.” Kyodo, 14 August 2009

Australia
Australia has called for the immediate release of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi after Burmese authorities sent her to prison over an unauthorised visit by an American. Foreign Minister Stephen Smith expressed grave concern over the latest chapter in Ms Suu Kyi’s incarceration. “It is Australia’s longstanding position - shared by governments of both political persuasions - that she should be released immediately and unconditionally and I repeat that today,” he told parliament. Opposition foreign affairs spokeswoman Julie Bishop told parliament the military junta had ignored the will of the majority of Burmese people. Ms Bishop travelled to Burma in 1995 and met Ms Suu Kyi. Ms Suu Kyi said at the time that she was “a prisoner in her own country”. The Sydney Morning Herald, 14 May 2009 The junta is usually impervious to international pressure, although U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon may believe he has some sway with the generals, having convinced them to allow aid agencies to operate in Burma after the devastating Cyclone Nargis last year. Analysts say Ban may have been given some indication by the generals, or by U.N. envoy Ibrahim Gambari after his trip last week, that his visit can bring some kind of positive result. “There must be something worthwhile he can achieve but it won’t be enough to satisfy the international community,” said Trevor Wilson, a former Australian ambassador to Burma. “He Page 24 of 226

has to be seen to be tough and uncompromising when he meets the generals and they will appear attentive. However, they’re a hardline bunch and I’m not optimistic they’ll change.” thestar.com, 3 July 2009 Australia plans to broadcast a Burmese language radio service into the south-east Asian nation to promote democracy and human rights, it was revealed today. The military junta that rules Burma heavily censors the nation’s media and limits the population’s communications with the outside world. Foreign radio remains popular among locals, including US government-funded Radio Free Asia and Democratic Voice of Burma, a Norwegian-supported operation. Australian Foreign Minister Stephen Smith said today that the Burma service would become the eighth language broadcast by state-owned Radio Australia, which focuses on Asia and the Pacific. Mr Smith said the service would “open up a new channel of international contact for the people of Burma”. It would also show Australian solidarity with pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, he said. “This is a further demonstration that Australia now and for a considerable period of time ... has stood shoulder to shoulder with her and stood shoulder to shoulder for the restoration of democracy and respect for human rights in Burma,” Mr Smith said. irishnews.com, 12 August 2009 The Government has called in the Burmese ambassador to protest the ongoing detention of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi following her conviction and sentence yesterday. Foreign Minister Stephen Smith says Canberra will also support calls for a United Nations global arms embargo against Burma. Ms Suu Kyi was sentenced to three years jail but the ruling junta signed an order commuting the term to 18 months house arrest. She was charged following an incident in which an American man swam to her lakeside residence in May. Mr Smith said Australia condemned the conviction and called for Ms Suu Kyi's release. “On my instruction today the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade called in the Burmese ambassador, at lunchtime, and relayed these strong messages on behalf of the Australian Government and the Australian people,” he told Parliament. “Our ambassador in Burma is doing likewise.” theaustralian.news.com.au, 12 August 2009 Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd declared himself to be “deeply dismayed” by Suu Kyi’s conviction and sentencing under Burma’s “Law Protecting the State Against the Dangers of Subversive Elements.” “The Austarlian Government is convinced that Aung San Suu Kyi was tried on spurious charges and not granted a fair hearing,” Mr Rudd said. Foreign Minister Stephen Smith said yesterday he had instructed the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to call in Burmese Ambassador Hla Myint to express Australia’s “dismay” at Suu Kyi’s conviction and sentencing. Mr Smith said Suu Kyi’s sentence would remove any protect of her participating in Burma’s elections, scheduled for next year. He said Australia’s Ambassador to Burma, Michelle Chan, would also convey the Australian Government’s views directly to the Burmese regime. Mr Smith said the Governmnet would update Australis’s financial sanctions against the Burmese regime, while Mr Rudd announced that Radio Australia would resume transmissions to Burma. Coalition foreigh affairs spokewoman Julie Bishop also condemned the sentencing. The Canberra Times, 12 August 2009 / U Kin Oung

Burma Lawyers’ Council (BLC)
1. Recently, the president of East Timor and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Jose Ramos-Horta claimed that, if the SPDC does not immediately release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, he will urge the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to investigate and prosecute Sen. Gen. Than Shwe and other responsible leaders of the SPDC for the crimes they have committed over the years. The Burma Lawyers’ Council welcomes and fully supports Mr. Ramos-Horta’s statement. 2. The ICC may have jurisdiction to investigate and/or prosecute heinous crimes which have been committed and are being committed if a given state’s judicial system is unable or unwilling to investigate and take legal action to ensure justice. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is being detained under the State Protection Law of 1975. The government is permitted to detain her for five years under that law. Contrary to law, they Page 25 of 226

have already held her in detention for almost six years. Despite that she is being unlawfully detained Burma’s judiciary did not provide any protection. According to Article 9 of that Law, restrictions may be laid down by the Central Board only, not the judiciary. However, judiciary has admitted the complaint of the government to extend her detention by accusing her of violating the conditions of her original detention under the State Protection Law of 1975. This is a blatant disregard of the Burma’s judiciary for the rule of law. It is evident that Burma’s judicial system is unable or unwilling to ensure justice. 3. Illegal detention of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners causes commission of international crime provided for in the Rome Statute of the ICC, article 7 Crimes Against Humanity, subarticle 1(e) which states that a crime against humanity is imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law. According to Article 14, “a State Party may refer to the Prosecutor a situation in which one or more crimes within the jurisdiction of the Court appear to have been committed.” Under article 15(1), should a “situation” be referred by a State Party, the Prosecutor may initiate investigations on the basis of information related to crimes within the jurisdiction of the Court. 4. Some Generals in the Army may desire a genuine national reconciliation and hold the belief that the military should not interfere in politics. However, Sen. Gen. Than Shwe and other military officials have been committing heinous crimes repeatedly, to strengthen their political power, with impunity given that judiciary did not take any action, denying the principles of the rule of law. If there is no rule of law, a genuine national reconciliation will never become a reality in Burma. The Burma Lawyers’ Council requests the international community to work together to restore the rule of law in Burma, by seeking the power of the International Criminal Court. Burma Lawyers’ Council, 16 May 2009

Campaign for Burma
Meanwhile, Burma Campaign Australia spokeswoman Zetty Blake said the regime “never had any intention of releasing Aung San Suu Kyi because they know that she will unite the country and lead the people in their struggle for democracy.” The Canberra Times, 12 August 2009 / U Kin Oung Burma Campaign for Malaysia leader Tun Tun agrees. “She is a brave woman. She could have lived a safe life in England. But she sacrificed that to fight for our freedom. We all admire her very much. Even when she got money from foreign governments, she didn’t use it for herself. She set up the Aung San Foundation to support the education of the next generation. “Aung San Suu Kyi believes, and makes us believe that one day, people power will win. Sad to say, there is no good news from our country. People are suffering but the military dictatorship seems unaffected. The current Asean engagement policy is very good for the government, but bad for the people.” Thestar.com.my, 14 June 2009 We should be impatient for change in this beautiful country. But we should not lose sight of what real change means. I believe Aung San Suu Kyi has always been clear about that. She said in an interview that her only fear is to let people down who depend on her, that she would rather go down herself than let that happen. It says something about her if she ends up doing that, but it will also say something about the international community. John Jackson, former director of the Burma Campaign UK, Irrawaddy, 6 June 2009 “Burma’s generals think they can act with impunity. We’ll have to wait until after the trial verdict to see if this time will be any different,” said Mark Farmaner of Burma Campaign UK, one of the organizers. AP, 15 June 2009 We’e just heard that from inside Burma’s notorious Insein prison Aung San Suu Kyi has asked her lawyer to thank the tens of thousands of people that wished her happy birthday last Friday. Her lawyer Nyan Win just Page 26 of 226

released this message: “Shesaid she thanks those at home and abroad who wished her a happy birthday, because she cannot reply to everyone.” Burma’s brutal regime wants the world to forget Aung San Suu Kyi. Johnny Chatterton, Campaigns Officer, Burma Campaign UK, 23 June 2009 “This is the cunning plan of the regime – to put Aung San Suu Kyi in continuous detention beyond the six years allowed by the law they used to justify the detention,” Aung Din, executive director of the Washington-based US Campaign for Burma, said in a statement. AFP, 14 May 2009 Meanwhile the US Campaign for Burma announced that Ban’s Burma policy is “fundamentally flawed” and demanded immediate action by the Security Council in a press release on Monday. “Ban not only failed to obtain the release of the world’s only imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi, or even a single political prisoner (out of the country’s 2,100) in Burma, but he also failed to even secure a meeting with her,” the statement said. “For over a decade, the UN Secretary-General has sent envoys to Burma seeking changes in the country, a policy used by China and Russia as an excuse to avoid action on Burma at the UN Security Council. Finally, the world can see how this process is fundamentally flawed—without strong action by the UN Security Council, even the UN Secretary-General himself has failed,” said Aung Din, executive director of US Campaign for Burma. During his Burma trip last week, Ban met Senior General Than Shwe. “The United Nations must not allow its credibility to be destroyed by a two-bit dictator like Than Shwe,” Aung Din said. “It is time for Ban Ki-moon to ask the UN Security Council to pass a global arms embargo against Burma’s military regime, while at the same time initiating an inquiry into crimes against humanity and war crimes committed by Than Shwe’s regime,” he said. Irrawaddy, 7 July 2009 Some of the junta’s critics have expressed disappointment with the latest developments. “I don’t think Sen. Webb can be proud for the release of Mr. John Yettaw, while our leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who is the real victim of this conspiracy and injustices, and two women colleagues, are still under detention,” said Aung Din of the U.S. Campaign for Burma, a Washington-based group. Daw is a term of respect used for older women. “This will surely make a negative impression among the people of Burma. They will think that Americans are easy to satisfy with the dictators when they get their citizens back,” he said. examiner.com, 16 August 2009

Canada
Canada on Thursday called on Burma to release all political prisoners, specifically naming pro-democracy activist and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. “Our government is alarmed by the charges laid against Aung San Suu Kyi, and we call for her immediate release, along with all political prisoners in Burma,” Canada’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Peter Kent said in the House of Commons. AFP, 14 May 2009 In Ottawa, Prime Minister Stephen Harper issued a statement strongly condemning the sentencing. “This decision is clearly not in accordance with the rule of law: the charges laid against her were baseless and her trial did not come close to meeting international standards of due process,” Harper said. “Her continued detention is unwarranted, unjustified, and vindictive.” AP, 11 August 2009

China
The EU also wants Asian governments to exert their influence on the regime and planned to raise the issue at an Asia-Europe meeting in Hanoi next week. But Beijing said on Tuesday it would not interfere in the affairs of its neighbor. “Events in Burma should be decided by the people of Burma,” China’s Foreign Page 27 of 226

Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu told a regular news briefing. “As a neighbor of Burma, we hope all parties can realize reconciliation, stability and development through dialogue.” India, which has not commented on the trial, and China are competing for influence in Burma with an eye on the country’s timber, gas and mineral wealth. Reuters, 19 May 2009 Another senior European diplomat, who declined to be named, said that Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi did not mention Suu Kyi by name in closed-door remarks, “but he de-facto did.” “It was a new tone from China on the question of Burma. That, I think, can be said. There’s no question about it,” he said. Yang declined to comment specifically on Tuesday. Asked about the statements, Yang told Reuters: “It’s a consensus.” Ian Holliday, a Burma expert at the University of Hong Kong, suggested China may have acted tactically but it would be unlikely to change its Burmese policy unless it sensed a clear threat to stability or its access to Burma’s resources. “Even though it possesses a veto over those forums in some ways, it’s hard for China to maintain all of its other relationships intact if it’s really, really hard-nosed about Burma,” Holliday said. Reuters, 26 May 2009 The Burmese junta’s number 2, Vice Sr-Gen Maung Aye, is to travel to China soon on a visit analysts say will include talks focusing on the regime’s uneasy relationship with ethnic ceasefire groups based along Sino-Burmese border. The visit was announced on Friday in the state-run newspaper The New Light of Burma, which said Maung Aye and his wife would travel to China “soon.” Irrawaddy, 12 June 2009 Burma’s second top leader Vice Senior-General Maung Aye left Naypyidaw Monday for Beijing to begin a six-day official visit to China at the invitation of Chinese Vice-President Xi Jinping. Aimed at promoting neighborly, friendly and cooperative ties with China, Maung Aye, who is Vice-Chairman of the Burma State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), is paying his third visit to China in six years. Maung Aye, is also Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Defense Services and Commander-in-Chief of the Army, traveled to China in August 2003 and in April 2006. There were also exchange of visits between other leaders of the two countries over the last two years. In January 2007, Vice-Chairman of the Chinese National People’s Congress Standing Committee Li Tieying visited Burma, while SPDC Member General Thura Shwe Mann and Prime Minister General Thein Sein visited China in the same year. In 2008, Thein Sein attended the Beijing Olympic Games, while Shwe Mann toured China again. In March this year, Li Changchun, member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee, visited Burma, during which four documents were signed. In April the same year, Thein Sein attended the “Boao Forum for Asia” in Boao, southern China’s Hainan province. On that occasion, Thein Sein also met his Chinese counterpart Wen Jiabao and the two leaders discussed fruitful results of bilateral economic cooperation, oil and gas, energy, electric power, rail transportation, agriculture and human resource sectors. Over his five-day China trip, Thein Sein also met a number of Chinese industrialists and entrepreneurs investing in Burma and had discussions with them on bilateral economic cooperation. According to Chinese official statistics, China-Burma trade amounted to 2.626 billion U.S. dollars in 2008, up 26.4 percent. Of the total, China’s export to Burma took 1.978 billion dollars. Up to the end of 2008, China’s contracted investment in Burma reached 1.331 billion dollars, of which that in mining, electric power and oil and gas respectively took 866 million dollars, 281 million dollars and 124 million dollars. China has risen from the 6th position to the 4th in Burma’s foreign investment line-up. chinaview.cn, 15 June 2009 Burma democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi awoke at her lakeside home Wednesday to begin serving the first full day of her latest house arrest, following her globally condemned conviction that lawyers said they would promptly appeal. Only China – Burma’s top trading partner and key ally - asked the world to respect the decision. “The international community should fully respect Burma’s judicial sovereignty,” Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu said in a statement Wednesday. He said China hopes Burma can “gradually realize stability, democracy and development.” AP, 12 August 2009

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Fresh fighting erupted Saturday in northeastern Burma after days of clashes between government troops and ethnic rebels drove tens of thousands of people into China, and a bomb tossed across the border killed one person and injured others. Up to 30,000 people have fled into China from Burma’s Kokang region, according to reports received by the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. Most of the people injured in the clashes and in the hospital are ethnic Chinese from Burma, said an official from Zhenkang County People’s Hospital, who refused to give her name. At least 25 people have been admitted, she said. Chinese soldiers are now guarding the border area, which has been sealed off, said a staffer at the Zhenkang County Public Security Bureau, who only gave his surname, Hui. The camps where some refugees are being housed are under strict control, he said. “Ordinary people cannot go near this area. Even police must be in uniform and police vehicles to come close.” The fighting near the border has threatened communist China’s goal of stability ahead of the sensitive Oct. 1 celebration of its 60th anniversary. It also could strain China’s close relationship with Burma’s military junta. Already, China has told Burma to stop the fighting. miamiherald.com / bignewsnetwork.com, 29 August 2009

Christian Science Monitor
In at least two of Asia’s battlegrounds for democracy, it is sometimes women who often have their ear to the ground more than men; that have been pivotal political players. In the Philippines, the passing of Corazon Aquino this month reminded the world of how much “people power” was key to ousting a dictator, Ferdinand Marcos, in 1986. Her rallying of common folk in pacifist protests sent a ricocheting message to the world that inspired uprisings from South Korea to the Soviet bloc. A second reminder of an Asian woman rallying the masses came Tuesday with a harsh verdict against Burma’s democracy champion, Aung San Suu Kyi. The Nobel Peace Prize winner now faces a further 18 months in detention for harboring an uninvited American in her house. Her mere presence as a voice of the people for freedom keeps the ruling generals on the defensive. Ever since her role in a popular uprising in 1988 – driven in part by the model set by Aquino – she and her millions of followers have been thwarted in seeking democracy. The verdict against Ms. Suu Kyi has set off a renewed debate in the West about how to influence Burma. The court decision may speed up the Obama administration’s review of past US policy, which includes stiff economic sanctions on the country. Such sanctions have allowed China a large opening to dominate Burma and its economy, providing wealth to the regime in Rangoon even as common Burmese suffer. Some in Congress want President Obama to now “engage” the generals as a way to counter China’s sway over its Southeast Asian neighbor. Others prefer to harden the isolation of the country. Much of this debate ignores the fact that it is the Burmese people who need to muster the will to overthrow their corrupt rulers – as the Filipinos did in 1986. Other countries can assist that process up to a point. And it’s not clear when that tipping point might come. If anything, the West must be patient while also supportive of “the people.” Suu Kyi’s appeal lies in part from her backing by Buddhist monks. They are an everyday presence in Burmese life. And in ancient days, it was often the leading Buddhist clergy, based on their close reading of the people’s will, who decided whether a king should stay or fall. A ruler’s legitimacy rested on the views of Buddhist believers, who revere monks for their compassion and pacifism, symbolized by their daily walks door to door with begging bowls asking for alms – mainly from the women in a home. Just as China suppresses the views of the Dalai Lama in Buddhist Tibet, the regime in Burma has suppressed the monkhood, along with Suu Kyi. Yet it is the spiritual desires of the Burmese that can empower monks to act and to demand that Suu Kyi be released and that democracy be allowed. If the West wants to save Burma, it must look for ways to “engage” the monks. Out of the monks’ humility and compassion – feminine qualities, even in the political arena – the people will rally someday to help free their real leader from the shackles of a long-overdue detention. CSM, 11 August 2009

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Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW)
Mervyn Thomas, CSW’s Chief Executive, said: “The treatment of Aung San Suu Kyi by the Burmese military dictatorship is inhumane. The charges made today are outrageous. She cannot be held responsible for the actions of the uninvited American intruder, especially as reports indicate that although she pleaded with him to leave, he insisted on staying. It is essential that the UN and ASEAN, and key members of the international community such as China and India, act immediately to secure her release and safety, and the release of all her associates. She has committed no crime whatsoever, her detention violates international law, and the regime must not be given any excuse to continue to hold her captive.” CSW, 14 May 2009 It is time to treat Than Shwe as the war criminal that he is, and hold a commission of inquiry into crimes against humanity, writes Benedict Rogers.Within the past month, two new shocking chapters of misery have opened up in Burma’s decades-long tragedy. The first is the trial, on ludicrously fabricated charges, of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who marks her 64th birthday this coming Friday. Now in the notorious Insein Prison, after over 13 years of house arrest, her trial is a blatant attempt by the regime to keep her locked up. Her continued detention is illegal under both international and Burmese law, according to the UN – which is why the regime has gone to such absurd lengths to find fresh charges. The second is the attacks within the past week on Ler Per Hur , a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Karen State, Burma. Situated on the banks of the Moie river, opposite Thailand, Ler Per Hur has been home to more than 1,200 Karen IDPs who had fled the Burma Army’s attacks on their villages deeper inside Burma. Although it has twice been attacked before, it has for the past seven years provided a place of sanctuary and relative peace for those escaping the junta’s policies of forced labour, rape, torture, destruction of villages, crops and livestock, extrajudicial killings and conscription of villagers as human minesweepers. telegraph.co.uk, 17 June 2009 Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW) is marking the 64th birthday of Burma’s democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi today by calling on the United Nations Security Council to take immediate action to secure her freedom, the release of all political prisoners and an end to the Burma Army’s offensive against civilians in eastern Burma. CSW’s East Asia Team Leader, Benedict Rogers, who has made almost 30 visits to Burma and its borders, said: “On Aung San Suu Kyi’s birthday, it is time for the international community to turn its tributes into action. Her unjust detention violates international law, and the continued imprisonment of over 2,100 activists is a scandal. The gross violations of human rights in Burma, particularly against the Karen people at this time, including the use of rape, forced displacement, destruction of villages, torture, forced labour and extra-judicial killing must be addressed. It is time for the UN Security Council to impose an arms embargo on the regime, establish a commission of inquiry to investigate crimes against humanity, and mandate the Secretary-General to make the release of all political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi, his personal priority”. CSW, 19 June 2009 Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW) is marking the 65th birthday of Burma’s democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi by renewing its call for the establishment of a United Nations Commission of Inquiry, to investigate crimes against humanity and war crimes in Burma. CSW is also calling for a universal arms embargo on the regime. CSW, 17 June 2010

European Union
China, India and other Asian countries should press Burma’s military leaders to drop charges against pro– democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and release her from house arrest, European Union foreign ministers said Monday. British Foreign Secretary David Miliband said there was an agreement at a meeting of the ministers here that the EU pursue fresh contacts with Burma’s Asian neighbours at talks in Vietnam next week. “It is right the EU put on the table all the potential ways of exercising influence including Page 30 of 226

engagement and including sanctions, both of which will be undertaken with real vigor,” Miliband told reporters. The ministers discussed increasing sanctions against Burma’s junta, to help restore democracy in the Southeast Asian country, but failed to agree on new measures. Instead they will focus on putting pressure on countries like China, India and Thailand who could exert influence over Burma to change its ways. French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner in Paris called the trial a “scandalous provocation.” Miliband and other ministers said the EU was concerned about the trial and efforts by the military junta to shove through “sham” constitutional reforms. “The house arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi is bad enough, but for her to be put on a show trial just adds to her pain,’ he said in Brussels. EU foreign policy chief Javier Solana led the call for more sanctions, though others questioned whether existing EU punitive measures were working, including a travel ban on Burma’s political officials, an arms embargo and a freeze of assets in Europe. Sweden’s Carl Bildt said EU nations would pressure their counterparts from the 10–country Association of Southeast Asian Nations, which includes Burma, when they meet next week in Hanoi, Vietnam. Past efforts to cajole the Asian group to denounce Burma have failed. caycompass.com, 18 May 2009 The EU also wants Asian governments to exert their influence on the regime and planned to raise the issue at an Asia-Europe meeting in Hanoi next week. But Beijing said on Tuesday it would not interfere in the affairs of its neighbor. “Events in Burma should be decided by the people of Burma,” China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu told a regular news briefing. “As a neighbor of Burma, we hope all parties can realize reconciliation, stability and development through dialogue.” India, which has not commented on the trial, and China are competing for influence in Burma with an eye on the country’s timber, gas and mineral wealth. Reuters, 19 May 2009 The European Union has repeated calls for Burma’s military government to free Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s opposition leader who is standing trial on charges of violating the terms of her house arrest. The call came on Monday at the start of two days of talks in Vietnam between foreign ministers from Asia and Europe. The Asia-Europe Meeting (Asem) in Hanoi had been called to discuss ways of tackling the global economic slowdown and boosting economic cooperation. But it is expected to be overshadowed both by the Aung San Suu Kyi trial and Monday’s surprise nuclear weapon test by North Korea. Representatives from 45 nations are taking part in the two-day meeting with brings together representatives of the European Union (EU), the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), as well as China, Japan, South Korea, India and Pakistan. Aljazeera, 25 May 2009 European Union nations are divided over whether to increase sanctions against the Burma regime and will await the outcome of the current trial of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, sources said Friday. “As far as I am aware E.U. member states are very divided on that issue,” an E.U. official said. The E.U. sanctions in place since 1996 - include a travel ban and the freezing of assets of Burma’s leaders and their relatives, as well as a ban on arms exports to the country. The sanctions also limit diplomatic relations between the Southeast Asian nation and the European bloc. Last month, E.U. foreign ministers asked experts to consider possible ways to beef up the current raft of sanctions. According to another E.U. diplomat, the Czech E.U. presidency has prepared a list of possible options, ranging from boosting sanctions to increasing “ political pressure.” “Britain and most member states are in favor of increasing sanctions, but others like Germany and Austria doubt their effectiveness,” the source said. “We have to find the most effective method of persuading the regime to free all opposition figures and become more democratic” and that could be through “fine-tuning the sanctions we already have in force,’ a European source said. If the E.U. ministers are going to wait for the result of the Aung San Suu Kyi trial then that wait just got longer. Friday, Burmese officials postponed an appeal hearing and adjourned the main trial in what diplomats said were attempts by the junta to stall the legal process. AFP, 12 June 2009 European governments condemned Tuesday’s sentencing of Burma’s most prominent pro-democracy leader to another 18 months of house arrest and prepared for new economic and other sanctions against the Page 31 of 226

country’s military regime. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown spoke of a “sham trial.” Sweden, the current European Union presidency holder, promised tighter sanctions against Burma’s leaders. Amnesty International’s secretary general called the verdict “shameful.” Brown said the verdict showed Burma’s military leaders are “determined to act with total disregard” for international law and said the verdict was designed to prevent Suu Kyi from participating in elections planned for next year. The EU said the verdict continued 20 years of violations of international law by Burma’s leaders. It promised “additional targeted measures against those responsible for the verdict” and to “further reinforce its restrictive measures” against Burma’s economy. Sanctions now bans arms sales and travel to EU countries by hundreds of Burmese government officials and their families and a freeze of assets held by Burmese leaders and companies abroad. Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt said the EU was working on additional sanctions that “include measures such as trade restrictions against certain state-owned companies and prohibition of entry into the EU for the four key individuals responsible for the decision.” Current sanctions affect some 120 companies - a number that will grow if the EU intensifies steps against Burma’s banking, tourism and precious stones sectors - and a dozen top justice officials, including four supreme court judges. Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini called the verdict “unfair” and urged a “common, firm and unequivocal” answer from the EU. AP, 11 August 2009 The European Union on Thursday extended its sanctions against the Burmese regime following the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, slapping a visa ban and asset freeze on members of the judiciary. The 27 EU nations also widened their existing assets freeze to cover all businesses owned and controlled by members of the regime and their associates. The moves were taken “in reaction to the verdict against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and given the gravity of the violation of her fundamental rights,” the European Council said in a written statement approved by all 27 EU capitals. Under the new restrictive measures “members of the judiciary responsible for the verdict are added to the existing list of persons and entities subject to a travel ban and to an assets freeze,” the statement said. The move comes after Tuesday’s conviction of opposition leader and Nobel Peace Laureate Suu Kyi and an American man who swam to the lakeside home where she was already under house arrest. indiatimes.com, 13 August 2009

Finland
Some diplomats sensed that China had adopted a fresh tone on Burma and had been constructive on North Korea. “We can certainly say that they have not been pushing on the brake. I’m not saying that they’re pushing on the accelerator either, but they are not holding things up,” Finland’s Foreign Minister Alexander Stubb said. Reuters, 26 May 2009 MEPs discussed Burma and its long-suffering people in Parliament on 11 February. With the first elections in 20 years due this year and the country wracked by internal conflict, many MEPs want more pressure on the ruling military to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Held under house arrest almost continuously since 1989, the Nobel Peace Prize winner has become the iconic symbol of Burma’s struggle against military rule. Speaking in Thursday’s debate, Finnish MEP Eija-Riitta Korhola of the centre right European People’s Party said: “Burma is one of the most fragile countries in the world as far as human rights are concerned. The situation doesn’t seem to get any better.” European Parliament, 17 February 2010

France
French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner denounced the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi on Monday, as activists rallied in Paris in support of Burma’s pro-democracy leader. “All of this is exasperating,” said Kouchner, calling the trial a “scandalous provocation” and a “pretext” by the ruling military junta to neutralize a major political opponent before upcoming elections. AP, 18 May 2009 Page 32 of 226

French first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy meanwhile appealed for Aung San Suu Kyi’s release in an open letter to Burma. indiatimes.com, 19 May 2009 The mayor of Paris has called for the release in Burma of Nobel Laureate and pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi who is on trial on charges she violated the terms of her house arrest. Mayor Bertrand Delanoe joined other municipal officials at the Place de la Republique in eastern Paris on Tuesday where a large portrait of Suu Kyi was hung. Suu Kyi is an honorary citizen of Paris. eTaiwan News, 19 May 2009 The leaders of France and Germany expressed grave concern Thursday for Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been put on trial by Burma’s junta, and appealed to China and India to intervene on her behalf. During a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Nicolas Sarkozy said he had sought to speak by phone to the pro-democracy leader but the military government denied his request. “We are asking our Chinese and Indian friends for help and to take into account the concern that we have for the Nobel Peace Prize winner ahead of a conviction that appears, unfortunately, unavoidable,” said Sarkozy. AFP, 11 June 2009 French President Nicolas Sarkozy said Suu Kyi’s trial served one purpose: to prevent her “from leading her fight in favour of a free and democratic Burma.” And French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner called for a “robust mechanism for tracing rubies and wood” sold from Burma. AP, 11 August 2009

Germany
Germany called Thursday on Burma to halt the prosecution of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The Foreign Ministry in Berlin said it was ‘very deeply concerned about her situation and health.’ A spokesman, Jens Ploetner, said the Burmese government should drop the charges and end her state of house arrest. monstersandcritics.com, 14 May 2009 The leaders of France and Germany expressed grave concern Thursday for Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been put on trial by Burma’s junta, and appealed to China and India to intervene on her behalf. During a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Nicolas Sarkozy said he had sought to speak by phone to the pro-democracy leader but the military government denied his request. “We are asking our Chinese and Indian friends for help and to take into account the concern that we have for the Nobel Peace Prize winner ahead of a conviction that appears, unfortunately, unavoidable,” said Sarkozy. AFP, 11 June 2009 On 17 June, officials from the Embassy of Germany, which is the current rotational Chair of European Union embassies in Burma, along with representatives from Great Britain, France, Italy, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Czech Republic and Austria, met with leaders of NLD at the Embassy of Germany in Rangoon, and inquired about the current political and future activities of NLD, and in return, U Win Tin, member of the Central Committee of NLD, detailed the future activities of NLD in order for the EU to be able to continue its support to NLD. VOA, 17 June 2010

Heritage Foundation
Walter Lohman, director of the Asian Studies Centre, The Heritage Foundation, said: “I think that the Burmese government saw an opportunity to make an impression both on their neighbours and on their populace with Senator Webb’s visit and, in exchange, they gave him somebody they probably would have released in the not-too-distant future anyway.” Channel News Asia, 21 August 2009 Page 33 of 226

Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch called on China and India, Burma’s closest allies, to pressure the ruling generals to free Suu Kyi. The New York-based group said the charges against her are part of an intensified campaign against pro-democracy activists that has brought increased arrests as the regime seeks to crush the opposition before elections. The junta plans a ballot in 2010 after passing a constitution last year that it said was backed by 92 percent of voters. The NLD and other groups have denounced the charter, which bars Suu Kyi from holding office. “China, India, Singapore, Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries should be calling for a genuine and participatory political process in Burma, which means serious public pressure for the release of political opponents,” said Elaine Pearson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch. Bloomberg.com, 15 May 2009 UN Secretary general Ban Ki-moon faced a barrage of criticism last night for apparently praising the Burmese junta without winning any concessions over human rights or a move towards democracy. Mr Ban was under pressure to produce results from his two-day mission to Burma, which was criticised as providing an endorsement of the Burmese leadership just as it is staging a trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The high-stakes visit to Burma comes at a critical time for Mr Ban, whose low-key approach to his job has been criticised as ineffectual. He came under further fire on arrival in Naypyidaw, the regime’s headquarters, when he told junta leader Gen Than Shwe: “I appreciate your commitment to moving your country forward.” “That is absolute nonsense,” said Brad Adams, a Burma specialist at Human Rights Watch. “It’s just what we implored him not to say, to make these diplomatic gaffes. Than Shwe has steadily moved his country backwards.” British officials were also furious at the remarks. They had urged Mr Ban not to visit Burma, and risk handing the junta a propaganda prize, without ensuring he would gain concessions in the form of the release of political prisoners and steps towards genuine democracy. Gen Than Shwe said little at his meeting with Mr Ban and did not grant his request to meet Suu Kyi in prison. Mr Ban expressed hope that a meeting could still be permitted. “I am leaving tomorrow, so logically speaking I am waiting for a reply before my departure,” he said. The secretary general added that he had called for the release of all political prisoners before the elections, but got no response. However, Mr Adams said: “A meeting with Than Shwe is not a success. Even a meeting with Suu Kyi shouldn’t be counted as a success, if all it means is she goes from being in jail back to being under house arrest. irishtimes.com, 4 July 2009 “If Ban is saying it’s disappointing it must be really bad – it basically means he’s got absolutely nowhere. He should have realized it was going to be a disappointing trip,” David Mathieson from Human Rights Watch told AFP. “He didn’t even get one of the empty gestures the State Peace and Development Council, the name for the ruling junta, probably should have given him so he could cast it as a minor victory.” “Now he has to go back to New York and brief the Security Council and basically say ‘We have got nowhere. We have to seriously rethink our engagement strategy,’” HRW’s Mathieson said. “This really shows that he’s got to put more pressure on China and Russia in the Security Council, I think that’s one thing to come out of it.” chinapost.com.tw, 6 July 2009 Ahead of a planning meeting before the June summit of the G8 group of industrialised countries New York based Human Rights Watch (HRW) has urged ministers to include Burma on the agenda. The G8 is a grouping of 8 of the leading economies, formed by France in 1975. It also includes the US, Japan, Italy, Canada, the UK, Germany and Russia. This year’s gathering will take place in the Canadian city of Toronto in June. “One of the reasons that we sent this letter to the G8 is to say; for an international policy towards Burma to have more effect it’s actually got to have more unanimity.” “That’s why we talked about the commission of enquiry and targeted financial sanctions and the elections,” said David Mathieson, HRW’s Burma analyst. The letter points to four main issues. The commission of inquiry refers to Tomas Ojea Quintana, the UN special rapporteur on human rights in Burma, who recommended on 8 March, after his Page 34 of 226

last visit to Burma, that the UN should initiate a commission of inquiry into the junta’s alleged crimes against humanity. HRW petition the G8 to support such an inquiry, HRW believe that the grouping; “can play a crucial role in helping to bring an end to these abuses by supporting an impartial inquiry into violations of international human rights and humanitarian law ” said the letter. Targeted sanctions were an area that HRW felt was an “important way to bring about improvements in human rights” but Mathieson was concerned that; “I am sure the Russians will try to block it because the Russians are pretty interested in diverting attention from all the murky things that they are doing in Burma”. The letter urged however that; “those punitive measures to be truly effective and effect change, they must be strengthened, fully implemented, and better coordinated among influential international actors”. With Mathieson further labelling US inability to curtail US oil companies operational in Burma as “hypocrisy”. The elections naturally were included in the letter and it labelled them likely only to “establish a parliamentary facade for continued military rule” but added that “It may be premature to judge the elections themselves, but it is essential that the electoral process conducted in such conditions of repression not be endorsed in any way by the international community.” The final point was humanitarian assistance with the letter calling for “increased international assistance” concluding that “strengthening Burmese communities through humanitarian aid while imposing targeted sanctions on the country’s senior leadership is the best approach to support positive change in this long-suffering country”. Mathieson meanwhile asserted that Burma’s dire humanitarian situation could become a “regional security issue”. Joseph Allchin, DVB, 26 March 2010

India
An Indian human rights advocacy group on Wednesday condemned Burma’s military rulers for conducting a trial against Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Lenin Raghuvanshi, director of the People’s Vigilance Committee on Human Rights, a grassroots human rights advocacy group based in India’s Uttar Pradesh, said the charge against Aung San Suu Kyi over the visit of an uninvited guest is discriminating and inhumane. He also condemned India, Burma’s giant neighbor, for remaining silent over the Insein Prison trial against the recipient of India’s prestigious Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding. Raghuvanshi said that instead of seeking to build a good relationship with the military junta at all costs, the Indian government should pressure the regime to release Aung San Suu Kyi. “India should support Aung San Suu Kyi,” said Raghuvanshi, a human rights champion who himself received the 2007 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights from South Korea. Mizzima, 25 May 2009 An Indian Member of Parliament and activists on Tuesday echoed the international outcry for the release of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, facing a trial in Rangoon’s Insein prison. Sharad Yadav of the Janata Dal (United) party and a Member of Parliament of India from Bihar State in the Rajya Sabha (Upper House), said he supports the international community’s demand for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi. “We are here to mobilise world opinion. The whole world is asking the junta to release Aung San Suu Kyi and to pave the way for democracy,” Yadav said in a seminar organized by South Asian Forum for Peoples’ Initiative at the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi on Tuesday. Mizzima, 26 May 2009 Contending that India had compromised on the issue of supporting a democratic movement in neighbouring Burma, former Defence Minister and veteran socialist leader George Fernandes today called for a rethink on the country’s foreign policy. In a letter written to Minister for External Affairs S M Krishna, Mr Fernandes said Ms Aung San Suu Kyi, who was waging a battle for restoration of democracy in her country, had great hopes from India as a country that valued democractic rights. Her perception of India was evident from her acceptance speech given at the time she was honoured with the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding 14 years ago, Mr Fernandes said, adding he was enclosing a copy of her speech to remind the policy makers of what she had said. “Our compromises have been too many and silence too long on the issue of supporting a democratic movement in our immediate neighbourhood,” he said. The New Kerala, 10 June 2009 Page 35 of 226

A group of 118 MPs on Wednesday appealed to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to ask the Burmese government to release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and impress upon the military regime to respect democratic principles. Cutting across party lines, the MPs in a memorandum to Singh said India should intervene in the current situation to urge upon the Burmese generals through all “possible diplomatic and other demarches to release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.” The MPs, including CPI(M) leader Brinda Karat, SP’s Amar Singh, BJP’s Prakash Javadekar, JD(U)’s Sharad Yadav, NCP’s Supriya Sule, Congress’ B S Gnanadesikan and RSP’s Abani Roy have signed the appeal. Indian Parliamentarians’ Forum for Democracy in Burma (IIPFDB) co-convenor Sharad Joshi said India should change its policy towards Burma and try to establish contacts with the people and not with the military regime. Abani Roy said as a largest democracy and good neighbour, India has the moral obligation to rescue Suu Kyi and Burma from “devastation.” The MPs also said Burmese believe that there will be no inclusive political process and free and fair polls in 2010 if Suu Kyi and more than 2100 political prisoners are not released. Dr Tint Swe, Burmese MP, said India should work with the UN to revive democracy in Burma. The Hindu, 10 June 2009 Contrary to New Delhi’s policy on Burma the civil society and advocacy groups of Northeast India continue supporting the pro-democratic movement in the military ruled country. If the Central government is willing to engage the Burmese junta for various strategic and trade relationship, the student-youthjournalist and also political party workers of the region maintain their demands to snap all ties with the brand of dictators of Naypyidaw. They are also in unanimous in various public meetings taking places in the region that the pro-democracy Burmese icon Daw Aung San Suu Kyi must be released and allowed her to continue the political activities. The latest interaction between a group of Burmese exiles and local citizens of Guwahati revolved around those issues. The meeting at Guwahati Press Club on July 4, where an exile Burmese Parliamentarian participated, concluded with a number of resolutions in support for the democratic movement in the Southeast Asian country. Organised jointly by Burma Centre Delhi and Journalists’ Forum Assam, meeting on ‘India’s Policy on Burma: A Northeastern Perspective’ also witnessed the discussion on the probable ways, by which the people from Northeast can extend support for the movement led by Suu Kyi. americanchronicle.com, 19 July 2009 Following the conviction of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the Indian Government on Tuesday said that it has emphasized to the Burmese Government to expedite their political reform. This was said by an official spokesperson of the Ministry of External Affairs in response to a question on sentencing of Suu Kyi. “We have seen reports of the sentencing of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in Burma for a period of 18 months. India has emphasised to the Government of Burma the need to expedite their political reform and national reconciliation process and have noted the various steps taken so far by the Government of Burma in this direction,” the spokesperson said. “We have maintained that this process should be broad based, including the various ethnic groups. In this context, the issue of release of political prisoners will no doubt receive due attention,” he added. Earlier, a forum of Indian lawmakers had urged Burma’s military junta to release Suu Kyi, saying that her release was essential for the restoration of democracy in Burma. India has always maintained that it wants Burma to expedite national reconciliation. ANI, 11 August 2009 India has questioned the value of holding a UN Commission of Inquiry (CoI) into war crimes in Burma, an Indian diplomat recently told a General Assembly committee. The probe, now supported by more than a dozen nations, may be “counter productive” and “end up adversely affecting the very people it is supposed to help,” Acquino Vimal said, according to the Press Trust of India. Vimal pointed out that UN chief Ban Ki-Moon’s recent report on Burma made no mention of the CoI, which was first proposed in March by UN special rapporteur on human rights in Burma, Tomás Ojea Quintana. “We believe that the focus of efforts of the international community should be on ensuring constructive engagement with Burma,” Vimal said. In comments which bore a striking resemblance to Chinese policy on Burma, Vimal also stressed the importance of “peace and stability” on India’s borders. Burma’s controversial 7 November elections would Page 36 of 226

be a “step forward” in the country’s “national reconciliation process and democratic transition,” he added. The diplomat’s comments come days after Nobel-prize winning Indian economist Amartya Sen made a statement bemoaning his country’s policies towards the Burmese regime. In July, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh welcomed junta leader Senior General Than Shwe on a state visit to India. “It breaks my heart to see the prime minister of my democratic country – and one of the most humane and sympathetic political leaders in the world – engage in welcoming the butchers from Burma and to be photographed in a state of cordial proximity,” AFP quoted Sen as saying. India had forgotten its ideals and was emulating China because of fears over its communist rival’s growing influence in the region, he said. While India used to offer unqualified support to Burma’s democracy movement, over the past two decades it has changed tack. The country is now investing heavily in Burma, particularly in the energy and extraction industries, and maintains a strategic partnership with the country in a bid to counter growing Chinese influence in the region. DVB, 28 October 2010

Indonesia
A number of Indonesian legislators grouped in the Asean Inter-Parliamentary Myanmar Caucus (AIPMC) have urged President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono to take proactive steps to help Burma democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi in Rangoon, Indonesia’s Antara news agency reported Friday. Two members of the group, Sidarto Danusubroto and Marzuki Darusman, said here Friday the AIPMC had written to the President asking him to obtain complete information on Suu Kyi’s recent detention in Burma. Bernama, 15 May 2009 Indonesia has asked India and China to push for reform in the military-ruled Burma, whose trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has sparked international outrage. Foreign Ministry spokesman Teuku Faizasyah said Friday the request was raised in a recent UN forum, which convened envoys from India, China, Burma and Japan, as well as representatives of the multilateral body. “Those countries play a key role to a settlement in Burma’s issue... and we would very much like to see them urge Burma to embrace the value of human rights,” he said. Both China and India have maintained their backing of Burma’s notorious junta due to their close economic ties in a time when western countries and international organizations consider imposition of more economic sanctions on Rangoon. Lilian Budianto, The Jakarta Post, 12 June 2009 Asean member states, especially Indonesia, must assume a leadership role in putting pressure on the Burma regime with strict and targeted sanctions. Asean members are in a prime position to cut the junta’s financial lifeline. Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam are among the junta’s top trading partners. Thailand alone purchases more than 44% of Burma’s exports each year. Sanctions by Asean member states would deprive Burma’s generals of a large portion of the more than $11 billion they earn from foreign trade annually. Eva Kusuma Sundari, member of the Indonesian parliament, Wall Street Journal Asia, 17 June 2009 A meeting of exiled Burmese opposition groups in Indonesia has been curtailed due to complaints from the junta in Rangoon, organisers said on Wednesday. Bo Hla Tint, foreign affairs minister for the exiled National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma, told AFP in an email that the Burmese embassy had lodged a complaint about the meeting with the Indonesian foreign ministry. ‘Regional politics or Asean internal politics are as usual taking place... We are very disappointed,’ he said. The activists had hoped to make a ‘historic’ announcement about their joint proposal for democracy in Burma, but their press conference had been cancelled, they said. Indonesia is a founding member of the 10-state Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), which is criticised for failing to speak out stongly enough against human rights abuses in member-state Burma. Critics have accused the military junta in Burma of convicting Suu Kyi in order to keep her off the scene for elections next year. The Indonesian government was ‘very Page 37 of 226

disappointed’ over the conviction, according to a foreign ministry spokesman Tuesday. AFP, 12 August 2009

International Labour Organisation (ILO)
International labour experts on Saturday called on the Burmese government to amend a provision in the country’s new constitution that could be interpreted as justifying forced labour. A special session at the International Labour Organisation on the forced labour situation in Burma concluded that the steps taken by the ruling junta towards eradicating forced labour were “totally inadequate.” In a report presented at the meeting, the experts pointed to a provision in the new constitution referring to “duties assigned thereupon by the State in accord with the law in the interests of the people.” The experts expressed deep concern about a provision in the text of the Constitution that “may be interpreted in such a way as to allow a generalised exaction of forced labour from the population.” They called on the government to amend the new constitution, which is meant to take effect in 2010, to bring it into conformity with labour rules. Burma’s representative however said the government “cannot accept criticism on our constitution process,” which he said had been adopted by over 90 percent of voters. ILO experts said that exploitation remained rampant in the Asian country, adding “there is no genuine and sustained political will to end forced labour.” They also raised “serious concern on the continued human rights violations in Burma and the detention of Aung San Suu Kyi” and other political prisoners. AFP, 6 June 2009 A report by the ILO’s liaison officer in Burma, Steve Marshall, said only 152 complaints of forced labor had been received under the mechanism agreed in 2007. “The government continues to play the diplomatic game of doing just enough to create an appearance of cooperation. No one in this room is fooled by that,” said Edward Potter, who speaks for the employers’ group on the committee. Several workers’ representatives called for disinvestment from Burma, which is rich in oil, gas, timber and gems, and was once a major rice producer. Reuters, 6 June 2009

Internationa Trade Union Confederation (ITUC)
The Internationa Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) categorically denounces this Tuesday’s verdict against Aung San Suu Kyi and demands her immediate and unconditional release. After what the ITUC regards as a mock trial, the leader of the Burmese opposition was initially sentenced to three years in prison with forced labour for breaching the terms of her house arrest, though the sentence was subsequently commuted by the head of the junta Than Shwe to 18 months’ house arrest. For the ITUC it is quite clear that this mock trial was mainly aimed at ensuring that the key figure in the Burmese opposition could play no part in the forthcoming national “elections”, due to be held in 2010. Unless some form of pardon is announced between now and 2010, today’s sentence is indeed likely to prevent Aung San Suu Kyi from standing in those elections. ituc-csi.org, 11 August 2009

Ireland
Irish Foreign Minister Micheal Martin claims Burma’s ruling military junta had defied the international community by again jailing pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The 64-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate was sentenced to 18-months after a court martial found her guilty of violating her house arrest by allowing an uninvited American into her home. Mr Martin said: “I will continue to speak out within the EU and the UN and in my contacts with the countries of the region for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and for the goals of justice, democracy, reconciliation and prosperity for the people of Burma.” UKPA, 13 August 2009 Page 38 of 226

Italy
Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini called the verdict “unfair” and urged a “common, firm and unequivocal” answer from the EU. AP, 11 August 2009

Japan
Japan voiced “serious concern” Friday about Burma moving Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s prodemocracy leader, to prison from house arrest Thursday. “We are closely watching the development with serious concern,” Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone said at a news conference. “We have conveyed this message to the Burmese government.” Nakasone said the Foreign Ministry told Burmese Ambassador to Japan Hla Myint earlier Friday that Japan wants the junta to advance democracy with the participation of “all related people,” including Suu Kyi, the 63-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Nakasone said Japan expects Burma to hold a general election in 2010 as a way acceptable to the international community. Suu Kyi has been charged in connection with an incident last week in which a U.S. citizen is accused of swimming across a lake and sneaking into her house to visit her. Japan Today, 15 May 2009 Japan Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone has expressed concern over the indictment of detained prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and called for Burma’s military junta to give her humanitarian treatment. Nakasone conveyed his concern to Burma’s foreign minister, Nyan Win, during telephone talks Monday, officials said. The Japan Times, 18 May 2009 “If Suu Kyi is found guilty and jailed, there will be much popular anger, but it won’t make a real difference because the government is well-equipped and experienced in dealing with the people’s protests,” said Donald Seekins, a Burma expert at Japan’s Meio University. Seekins said the regime has already posted soldiers throughout Rangoon, the largest city, “and can suppress demonstrations with little difficulty.” AP, 1 June 2009 About 100 Burmese activists rallied in Japan on Wednesday, calling on visiting UN chief Ban Ki-moon to press the junta to free political prisoners including democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Protesters said Ban, who is slated to visit Burma on Friday and Saturday, must press the military regime for a concrete outcome when he meets the generals ruling the isolated country formerly known as Burma. “Ban Ki-moon used to say he would not visit until the military regime makes visible progress” toward democracy, said Myat Thu, 44, a Japan-based activist. “I want him to achieve the release of political prisoners, like Aung San Suu Kyi,” he said, referring to the Nobel Peace laureate who has been under house arrest for 13 of the past 19 years. The protesters rallying outside the foreign ministry held pictures of the democracy leader and chanted for democracy in Burma. Japan has historically maintained relatively friendly ties with Burma and was previously its leading donor. Tokyo drastically reduced development aid to Burma over human rights concerns, particularly after the junta cracked down on pro-democracy demonstrations led by Buddhist monks in 2007. However, the Japanese government refused to join its Western allies in imposing sanctions. AFP, 1 July 2009 Japanese Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone, in talks Tuesday with a minister from Burma, urged the country’s ruling junta to release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi as soon as possible. Tokyo “strongly expects the swift release of Aung San Suu Kyi... and that she will be able to participate in Burma’s democratic process,” Nakasone told Agriculture Minister Htay Oo, according to a statement. Htay responded that the military regime “will consider her early release if she leads a sincere life,” according to Japan’s foreign ministry statement. Asia One News, 25 August 2009 Page 39 of 226

Japanese Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada met Wednesday with his Burmese counterpart Nyan Win to ask the ruling junta to ensure the participation of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi in a general election slated for later this year. Kyodo, 21 July 2010

Korea
As North Korea’s recent nuclear test raises tensions in Asia, rogue state Burma’s nuclear program is ringing alarm bells in the Western world, say Greenpeace and a local expert. Burma’s notorious junta, which has been subject to Western economic sanctions because of its poor human rights record, has attracted criticism over its plan to develop nuclear reactors. In 2002 it was reported that the Russian government had agreed to help the military junta build a nuclear research facility that would be used to develop reactors for medical and electricity resources. The US has shunned Burma’s nuclear plans, saying Rangoon has neither the legal framework nor the provisions that would safeguard its nuclear program from posing a security threat. “Nuclear power and nuclear arms are different sides of the same coin. Every nuclear-power-wielding state can turn into a nuclear-armed nation,” said Tessa de Ryck, an anti- nuclear campaigner from Greenpeace Southeast Asia. The Jakarta Post, 2 June 2009 Bertil Lintner reveals how North Korea has been secretly helping Burma to build an extensive tunnel network as emergency shelter and for other unknown purposes. Lintner has obtained the first-ever images of this secret tunnel building effort along with photos of foreign advisers, almost certainly from North Korea. Payments are made in gold or barter, any store of value North Korea can use. The photos, taken between 2003 and 2006, show that while the rest of the world is speculating about the outcome of long-awaited elections in Burma, the ruling military junta has been busy digging in for the long haul - literally. North Korean technicians have helped them construct underground facilities where they can survive any threats from their own people as well as the outside world. It is not known if the tunnels are linked to Burma’s reported efforts to develop nuclear technology - in which the North Koreans allegedly are active as well. The photographs show that an extensive network of underground installations was built near Burma’s new, fortified capital Naypyidaw. In November 2005, the military moved its administration from the old capital Rangoon to an entirely new site that was carved out of the wilderness 460 kms north of Rangoon. Meaning the “Abode of Kings,” Naypyidaw is meant to symbolize the power of the military and its desire to build a new state based on the tradition of Burma’s pre-colonial warrior kings. But underground facilities were apparently deemed necessary to secure the military’s grip on power. Additional tunnels and underground meeting halls have been built near Taunggyi, the capital of Burma’s northeastern Shan State and the home of several of the country’s decades-long insurgencies. Some of the pictures, taken in June 2006, show a group of technicians in civilian dress walking out of a government guesthouse in the Naypyidaw area. Asian diplomats have identified those technicians, with features distinct from the Burmese workers around them, as North Koreans. This is quite a turnaround as Burma severed relations with Pyongyang in 1983 after North Korean agents planted a bomb at Rangoon’s Martyrs Mausoleum killing 18 visiting South Korean officials, including the then-deputy prime minister and three other government ministers. Secret talks between Burmese and North Korean diplomats began in Bangkok in the early 1990s.The two sides had discovered that despite the hostile act in the previous decade they had a lot in common. Both had come under unprecedented international condemnation, especially by the US, because of their blatant disregard for the most basic human rights and Pyongyang for its nuclear weapons program. Burma also needed more military hardware to suppress an increasingly rebellious urban population as well as ethnic rebels in the frontier areas. North Korea needed food, rubber and other essentials - and was willing to accept barter deals, which suited the cash-strapped Burmese generals. “They have both drawn their wagons in a circle ready to defend themselves,” a Bangkok-based Western diplomat said. “Burma’s generals admire the North Koreans for standing up to the United States and wish they could do the same.” After an exchange of secret visits, North Korean armaments began to arrive in Burma. The curious relationship between Burma and North Page 40 of 226

Korea was first disclosed in the Hong Kong-based weekly Far Eastern Economic Review on July 10, 2003. A group of 15 to-20 North Korean technicians were then seen at a government guesthouse near the old capital Rangoon. The report was met with skepticism, especially because of the 1983 Rangoon bombings. But, when North Korean-made field artillery pieces were seen in Burma in the early 2000s, it became clear that North Korea had found a new ally ― several years before diplomatic relations between the two countries were restored in April 2007. “While based on a 1950s Russian design, these weapons [the field guns] were battle-tested and reliable,” Australian Burma scholar Andrew Selth stated in a 2004 working paper for the Australian National University. “They significantly increased Burma’s long-range artillery capabilities, which were then very weak.” Since then, Burma has also taken delivery of North Korean truckmounted, multiple rocket launchers and possibly also surface-to-air missiles for its Chinese-supplied naval vessels. Then came the tunneling experts. Most of Pyongyang’s own defense industries, including its chemical and biological-weapons programs, and many other military as well as government installations are underground. This includes known factories at Ganggye and Sakchu, where thousands of technicians and workers labor in a maze of tunnels dug under mountains. The export of such know-how to Burma was first documented in June 2006, when intelligence agencies intercepted a message from Naypyidaw confirming the arrival of a group of North Korean tunneling experts at the site. Today, three years later, the dates on the photos published today confirm the accuracy of this report. By now, the tunnels and underground installations should be completed, as would those near Taunggyi. This well-hidden complex ensures there is no danger of irate civilians storming government buildings, as they did during the massive pro-democracy uprising in August-September 1988. Sources say that the internationally isolated military junta may also consider these deep bunkers as their last repair in case of air strikes of the kind that the Taliban in Afghanistan or Saddam Hussein regime in Iraq endured. Bertil Lintner, Asia Sentinel, 14 May 2009 A North Korean ship that the United States is shadowing is likely headed for Burma, South Korean television reported on Sunday. YTN channel quoted a South Korean intelligence source as saying the final destination of the Kang Nam looks to be Burma, after leaving a North Korean port on Wednesday. North Korea has raised tensions in the region in the past months by test-firing missiles, restarting a plant to produce arms-grade plutonium and holding a May 25 nuclear test, which put it closer to having a working nuclear bomb. Fox News quoted a senior U.S. military source as saying the ship appeared to be heading toward Singapore and that the navy destroyer USS John McCain was positioning itself in case it gets orders to intercept, according to a story on its website. Singapore, a U.S. ally, said it would act “appropriately” if the vessel heads to its port with a cargo of weapons. Singapore has the world’s busiest shipping port and is also the world’s top ship refueling hub. The Kang Nam is the first North Korean ship to be monitored under the new sanctions, adopted this month in response to Pyongyang’s May nuclear test. The resolution authorized U.N. member states to inspect North Korean sea, air and land cargo. Japan’s Mainichi newspaper, citing unidentified sources close to North Korean leadership, said on Saturday the Swisseducated Kim Jong-un has been working as acting chairman of North Korea’s National Defense Commission, supporting his father, who is commission chairman. “If something happens to Kim Jong-il, Jong-un looks set to move up to the post as chairman,” the paper quoted one of the sources as saying. Reuters, 21 June 2009 The increasingly close ties between Burma and North Korea since the two sides quietly resumed diplomatic relations in 2007 could also cast a shadow over Mr Ban’s trip. A 37-page document in Burmese obtained by Radio Free Asia detailed a visit by 17 Burmese officials, including General Thura Shwe Mann, the chief of staff of the army and Burma’s third-ranked leader, to Beijing and Pyongyang last November. The stated aim of the visit was “to modernize the Burmese military and increase its capabilities through visiting and studying the militaries” of China and North Korea, and a memorandum of understanding was signed with North Korea counterparts on November 27. The report also says the Burmese delegation was shown North Korean surface-to-air missiles and rockets, along with naval and air defense systems and tunnel construction, including how Pyongyang stores aircraft and ships underground to protect them from aerial attack. The delegation also visited a Scud missile factory. Pyongyang has been a major supplier of Page 41 of 226

Scud missiles to Iran, Egypt, and Syria since the 1980s. Photographs in the report show a Burmese delegation in civilian clothing in North Korea, suggesting a bid to maintain a low profile. Experts suggested that the leaking of the document was timed to coincide with Mr Ban’s visit by figures inside the junta who are unhappy with the cooperation with North Korea. Reports in South Korea suggest that North Korea may already be illegally exporting weapons to Burma via overland routes in China in order to avoid naval interception. Last week, the Kang Nam 1, a North Korea ship that has been used for weapons trading in the past, turned back before reaching Burma while being tracked by a US Navy destroyer. The Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Pyongyang has exported weapons to Iran, Syria, Laos and Burma worth USD800 million since 2008. telegraph.co.uk, 3 July 2009 South Korean President Lee Myung-bak urged Burma to take steps to promote democracy during a meeting with its prime minister Tuesday, Lee’s office said. Lee held talks with Gen. Thein Sein on the sidelines of a two-day summit between South Korea and leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. “President Lee expressed the hope that the Burmese government would address the concerns of the international community by making sure that national unity and democracy take root in a substantial manner through dialogue and compromise,” Lee’s office said in a press release. AP, 3 June 2009

Malta
Foreign Minister Tonio Borg expressed “sadness and deep dismay” at the sentence meted out to Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “Her sentencing is a political act of intolerance intended to prevent her from her legitimate political activities in view of the regime’s elections planned for next year. The regime in Burma cannot project itself as an international outlaw and must free its political opponents and stop political persecutions,” Dr Borg said. After the new sentence, Ms Suu Kyi will now serve a further one and a half years under house arrest. She has already spent 13 of the past 19 years under house arrest. Independent.com.mt, 13 August 2009

New Zealand
New Zealand on Friday joined the international condemnation of the imprisonment of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi as Foreign Minister Murray McCully said the only thing the Burma opposition leader was guilty of was standing up for the rights of her country’s people in the face of appalling repression. “This action is yet another setback for Burma and throws more doubt over the credibility of the planned 2010 elections,” McCully said, referring to voting planned by the ruling military junta in the country once known as Burma. “The Burmese government must release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately, and take meaningful steps towards the restoration of democracy.” monstersandcritics.com, 15 May 2009 New Zealand will raise its concerns about the fairness of Burma’s first election in two decades when Prime Minister John Key attends the East Asian Summit in Vietnam tomorrow. Burma is set to hold its first elections in 20 years next week, but Mr Key said elections where the main opposition leader -- Aung San Suu Kyi -- was under house arrest failed the test for democracy. While the holding of elections was a tiny step in the right direction it was not enough to satisfy New Zealand, he said. “New Zealand’s spelt out its position quite clearly and we’ll continue to reiterate that over the next day or so.” He said he would raise the issue with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon and possibly with Burma’s Prime Minister Thein Sein. “We’re more than likely to be sitting next to him.... for alphabetical reasons we may have a bit of time to chat with them about it.” The human rights record of host country Vietnam could also come up. “New Zealand doesn’t support Vietnam’s human rights record, nor do we sanction and condone everything that we see that takes place in China,” Mr Key said. “What we do is use diplomatic ties to raise those issues and Page 42 of 226

seek progress and change.” The only other option was to take an isolated approach which would not achieve anything, he said. Voxy News, 29 October 2010

Norway
Norway on Thursday expressed “concern” over the treatment of Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi who was charged with allowing an unauthorized US national to visit her Rangoon home. “The Norwegian government is concerned over the reports that Aung San Suu Kyi has been imprisoned and demands her immediate release,” Foreign Minister Jonas gahr Store said in a statement. “The imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi is a step in the wrong direction,” Store said, adding that Norwegian diplomats had been instructed to raise the matter with countries in the region including China and India. The Norwegian foreign minsiter also urged that Suu Kyi be given adequate medical treatment, citing reports over her poor health. Former Norweigan Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik who heads the Oslo Centre for Peace and Human Rights said he was not surprised over Suu Kyi’s arrest, noting that her current sentence was soon due to expire. “The Burmese junta will try to use this incident as an excuse to detain her in the years to come. The international community must stand together and demand her immediate release,” Bondevik said. Earth Times, 14 May 2009 Erik Solhiem, Norway’s minister for environment and international development, visited Burma last month where he met with government officials, civil society groups and National League for Democracy (NLD) members. He tells DVB that engagement with the ruling junta must be stepped up, as well as increasing dialogue with all political actors in the country. The main objective was to observe the effect of the assistance Norway has given to people after cyclone Nargis in May 2008: whether money was properly distributed to people and if shelter was constructed and schools rehabilitated. Then of course we wanted dialogue with all parts of Burmese society – the government, civil society, as well as opposition representatives, such as the National League for Democracy (NLD). There was this, but also we wanted to forward our ideas about the future of Burma. We met with three different ministers – agriculture, foreign affairs and social affairs – and some deputy ministers. But not Than Shwe. We had a good dialogue – clearly we differ on substantial issues. I asked them to release Aung San Suu Kyi and political prisoners, and on such issues we do not agree. We did agree on important issues, on climate change – they are very much concerned with climate change, and the drought in the dry zone of Burma – and Norway and Burma can cooperate globally in the fight against climate change. I could only visit a few places: what we saw on the one hand was that a lot of good work has been done in the recovery, but also you saw widespread poverty – that is obviously one of the challenges for Burma; that the country is much poorer than neighbours like Thailand and China. When you visit the countryside in these two countries you see widespread affluence coming up, while still in Burma there are very poor people who can’t send children to school because they can’t afford to pay for the uniform or schoolbooks. And they needed the income from the children. I can’t give the exact figure, but we have been one of the biggest foreign donors to Burma after the cyclone – I think 10 percent has been provided by Norway. We are satisfied with the results in the sense that progress has been made. But the international amount for Nargis is still very small compared with the amount Haiti received after the earthquake. We are ready to invite Burmese students to Norway. However there is of course a language problem which makes it easier for them to go to the US than to Norway. Learning the Norwegian language takes a lot of time. I’m generally satisfied but of course clearly Burma has huge challenges ahead from my perspective: the two main challenges is to move towards democracy – they need to build democratic institutions, to have free and fair elections that are open to all inhabitants, and that political prisoners are released. The big challenge is to move towards rapid development – so many people are suffering and their lives should be uplifted. What the government has achieved is that there is peace largely in all parts of the country and ceasefire agreements have been reached with most of the insurgent groups and on the basis of peace, Burma should now move towards democracy and towards affluence. Our view is that we want to work in accordance with the wishes of the EU and US and other Page 43 of 226

Western powers to find the right way to influence developments in Burma in a positive way. We believe in political dialogue; we have dialogue with a lot of governments that we disagree politically with. We should have dialogue also with Burma. That dialogue has to include both the government, civil society, but as well Aung San Suu Kyi and the NLD – it cannot be one-sided dialogue, it should include all major political actors in the land. There is absolutely no doubt that the NLD was the true winner of the 1990 elections and should have been able to form a government after those elections. It is now 20 years post, so it is up to the NLD to decide the future of the movement but we will continue to have dialogue with the NLD leaders, whether they form an NGO or just as individuals – what path they want to take is their business and we will continue to meet with them when we visit Burma, and to meet with the government. I had a long two-hour discussion with U Tin Oo and U Win Tin and other leaders, and we asked to be granted access to Aung San Suu Kyi. I definitely think that political dialogue and engagement is the better way; engagement can also be combined with sanctions, not just either/or. Norway is part of sanctions which are applied by the EU, but at the same time we are engaging with all actors – the government, civil society, those actors taking part in elections – but clearly Aung San Suu Kyi is a great a symbol of democracy in Burma, as is the NLD. That’s very clearly right – when you meet some government officials they are very sceptical toward Norway because DVB is broadcast from here. You also of course find people who are opposed to the Peace prize to Aung San Suu Kyi, but these are all part of Norwegian political tradition – we support press freedom, so that’s why we accept DVB. That’s not to say we agree to everything broadcast on that channel – we do not agree with things broadcast from many channels in Norway. So that is part of our historical tradition to accept that. The Norwegian Nobel committee is completely independent – it’s their decision to award the peace prize to Aung San Suu Kyi and I think that was also accepted by the world at that time. DVB, 5 July 2010

Pakistan
Pakistan on Tuesday lamented the trial of Burma pro-democracy leader and Nobel peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and called for her swift release, AFP reports. Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi described the trial as ‘unfortunate’and urged the Burmese government to consider reviewing its decision. ‘Her early release would serve the fundamental interests of Burma with which Pakistan enjoyed close cooperative relations,’ said Qureshi. 19 May 2009

Philippines
Affairs Secretary Alberto Romulo urged the government of Burma yesterday to “immediately and unconditionally” release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi as he expressed the Philippine government’s “outrage” over the filing of new charges against her just days before the expiration of her sixyear detention. “The Philippine government is deeply troubled and outraged over the filing of trumped-up charges against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her transfer to Insein prison, particularly when concerns have been raised regarding her health,” Secretary Romulo said. “We urge the government of Burma to resolve the matter speedily, and to release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately and unconditionally.” The secretary said the Burmese government should not be sidetracked by the filing of the trumped-up charges. “As we had conveyed earlier, it is high time for the Burmese government to carry out its own ‘Roadmap for Democracy,’ its avowed program of releasing political detainees, including unfettering the National League for Democracy, and allowing its unconditional participation in free elections,” Romulo said. “Fulfilling these commitments is long overdue.” Manila Bulletin, 18 May 2009 U.S. President Barack Obama and Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo agreed Thursday to join forces in tackling the issues surrounding Burma and North Korea. Arroyo became the first leader of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to meet Obama. “We stand behind the United States on the position Page 44 of 226

that it has taken with regard to Burma and with regard to North Korea’s nuclear adventurism,” Arroyo told reporters with Obama at the White House. Obama thanked Arroyo for her support on U.S. policies in Asia. “We are very grateful for the strong voice that the Philippines has provided in dealing with issues in Asia, ranging from the human rights violations that have for too long existed in Burma to the problems that we’re seeing with respect to nuclear proliferation in North Korea,” he said. AP, 30 July 2009 The Philippines’ foreign secretary shrugged off Burma’s rejection of international monitors for the junta-led country’s first elections in 20 years, saying Thursday the polls were a farce anyway. The polls, to be held sometime this year, have been sharply criticized as a means for the military to maintain its grip on power under a civilian guise. The criticism from Foreign Secretary Alberto Romulo was unusually blunt, coming from a fellow member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, a grouping which typically avoids commenting on the internal affairs of its counterparts. Sending observers may “legitimize a farce” since opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy party will not be involved in the election, Romulo told reporters. “In the first place that election is fraudulent and a farce so why bother (sending monitors)?” said Romulo, adding it was his personal opinion. “It’s a game, like children playing games.” The NLD won the last election in 1990 but was never allowed to take power by the military. Irrawaddy, 14 May 2010 Philippine President Benigno Aquino III is set to describe Burma’s controversial 7 November elections as a “farce” at the annual summit of Southeast Asian leaders in Hanoi this week. Aquino’s statement, seen by the Manila Standard Today, would be the strongest yet from any of Burma’s neighbours on polls widely decried by critics as a charade. The president will cite the exclusion of Aung San Suu Kyi as a sign that the elections lack credibility, the Standard claims. Under Burma’s 2008 constitution, one quarter of parliamentary seats are reserved for the military, and any serving or former political prisoners, including Suu Kyi, are barred from seeking office, leading many in the democracy movement to urge an election boycott. Two junta-backed parties, the Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) and the National Unity Party (NUP), are expected to be the only parties fielding candidates for the vast majority of seats. Opposition candidates have complained of harassment, and foreign election watchdogs and journalists have been barred from observing the polls. The elections are not officially scheduled for discussion at the threeday Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit, which starts on Thursday. However, Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa has said there may be a session to discuss recent progress in the region at which the topic may arise. DVB, 27 October 2010

Reporters Without Borders
Reporters Without Borders reiterates its call for the release of Zarganar, a dissident blogger and comedian who was jailed a year ago today on a charge of disturbing public order. He was given a 45-year jail sentence by special court inside Insein prison last November and then received an additional 14-year sentence a few days later. The combined jail terms were reduced to 35 years on 16 February. “The sentence alone shows that Zarganar has been subjected to a travesty of justice,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Do you give such a long jail term just for ‘disturbing public order’? The military government had him arrested and then denied him due process because he had become a reliable source of information in a country throttled by censorship and repression.” The press freedom organisation added: “The conditions in which Zarganar is being held are very bad and his health is deteriorating steadily. These are additional reasons why he must be released.” Suffering from jaundice and hypertension, Zarganar is not getting access to adequate medical care in Myitkyina prison, to which he was transferred in December. CNW Telbec, 5 June 2009 Burma has barred foreign observers and journalists from the country’s controversial elections. The restriction is the latest in a series of moves that critics say guarantees Burma’s first elections in 20 years will favor the military government. At a briefing in Burma’s remote capital, Naypyidaw, the Election Page 45 of 226

Commission told journalists and diplomats already in the country their presence would be adequate for the elections. Burma’s neighbors in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations offered to observe the elections, but the government turned them down. There are about 25 foreign news organizations registered in Burma, most are staffed by Burmese citizens. The commission says diplomats and foreign organizations in Burma will be taken on a tour during the elections. Therefore, he said, no invitations will be given to election observers or foreign media. Vincent Brossel is with the media freedom organization Reporters Without Borders in Paris. He says this latest restriction shows the government has no intention of holding free and fair elections. “One of the conditions for a democratic election is again refused by the government,” said Brossel. “They have all control on the Burmese media and now that the foreign journalists are denied to access to Burma during the elections that gives no chances to get transparency and accountability.” VOA, 18 October 2010

Russia
The Russian Foreign Ministry objects to political and economic pressure on Burma and hopes for an unbiased trial of opposition leader Suu Kyi, the ministry’s information and press department said on Sunday. Russia is watching “the efforts of the Burmese government to achieve peace and national concord,” the department said. “We believe that Burma will ensure the fulfillment of the reform program, primarily the holding of parliamentary elections in due time in 2010.” Moscow “opposes attempts to internationalize the internal situation in Burma, because it does not endanger peace and security in the region and the world at large. In our opinion, the political and economic pressure on that country is counterproductive, as it enhances isolationist feelings of the Burmese military and exacerbates the socioeconomic position of citizens,” the department said. “We see no reasons why the UN Security Council should discuss Burma. At the same time, we call on Burma for greater openness and cooperation with the international community, as well as for closer relations with the mission of Special Representative of the UN Secretary General Ibrahim Gambari. We are confident that this negotiating mechanism is useful in building up mutual understanding and confidence between Burma and the world,” the department said. Russia hopes that the trial of “Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will be unbiased, strictly comply with national laws and humanitarian standards, and take into account the international opinion,” the department said. Itar-Tass, 21 June 2009 Russia’s state-controlled Novosti news agency has declared that Moscow’s cooperation with Burma on commercial nuclear development does not contravene international treaties on preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. The agency this week quoted a Russian foreign ministry spokesman, Andrei Nesterenko, on the issue at the same time the US expressed concerns about a possible liaison between the Burmese and North Korean regimes. Rosatom, Russia’s state-owned nuclear energy corporation, signed an agreement in 2007 to help construct a nuclear research center in Burma, and Moscow will stand by this agreement, Nesterenko said. The deal, which is supposed to cost tens of millions of dollars, envisages developing a reactor with an energy capacity of 10 megawatts. Weekly Business Roundup, 24 July 2009

Singapore
Singapore’s ambassador to Burma, Robert Chua was among three ambassadors invited to meet Aung San Suu Kyi on Wednesday in Rangoon after the adjournment of her trial. A spokesman for the Singapore Foreign Ministry said Ambassador Robert Chua had reported that the meeting took place at a guest house within Insein Prison. Aung San Suu Kyi informed the representatives that she and her two housekeepers are well and being well treated by the Burmese authorities. And she believes there could be many opportunities for national reconciliation if all parties so wished. She added that she did not wish to use the intrusion into her home as a way to get at the Burmese authorities. Aung San Suu Kyi also expressed the view that it was not too late for something good to come out of the unfortunate incident. The spokesman said Ambassador Page 46 of 226

Chua expressed the hope that there would be peaceful national reconciliation and that representatives of the diplomatic corps would be able to meet both Aung San Suu Kyi and Burmese leaders regularly. Channel News Asia, 20 May 2009 A group of Southeast Asian politicians is urging the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to suspend Burma’s membership if it refuses to release democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Aung San Suu Kyi testified Tuesday against charges that could put her in prison for five years. Aung San Suu Kyi said she was innocent when she was called Tuesday to testify in court. The trial has been widely condemned as an excuse to keep the Nobel Peace Prize winner locked up and pressure is growing for her release. The ASEAN InterParliamentary Myanmar Caucus on Tuesday called for tougher actions against Burma, including suspending its membership in the regional bloc. Charles Chong, a Singaporean lawmaker and member of the caucus, told journalists in Bangkok that dealing with Burma has bogged down ASEAN, making it harder for them to accomplish anything. “More and more parliamentarians within ASEAN are beginning to lose their patience with Burma. And, we are calling upon our governments to do more than just expressions of dismay, regret, grave concern and so on, and seriously look at suspending Burma’s membership of ASEAN,” he said. VOA, 26 May 2009 Former Singapore prime minister Goh Chok Tong has urged Burma’s ruling generals during a visit to the country to ensure that elections due next year are free and fair, a report said Wednesday. Goh, still a senior minister in Singapore, told junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe and Prime Minister Thein Sein not to ignore the global interest in the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the Strait Times reported. But he also said the case against the Nobel peace laureate - who faces up to five years in prison for violating the terms of her house arrest after a U.S. man swam to her lakeside home - was a domestic matter, the report said. The city-state’s former prime minister met the two senior generals Tuesday, with each meeting lasting more than an hour, the newspaper said. AFP, 10 June 2009 Singapore investors will likely wait until after Burma’s elections next year before pouring any more money into the country, former Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong said Friday, according to television station Channel News Asia. Goh made the comments at the end of a four-day trip to meet with Burma’s military leaders, the television station said on its Web site. The military has run the country since 1962, and the current ruling junta has scheduled elections for next year. “I don’t believe any Singapore investors would come in a big way before the picture is clear, before this move to democracy is seen to produce results,” said Goh, who is a senior adviser to Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, according to the station. Singapore is one of the biggest foreign investors in Burma, with annual bilateral trade of more than $1 billion. AP, 12 June 2009 Singapore’s Senior Minister, Goh Chok Tong, has urged Burma to continue with its process of national reconciliation and democracy. Wrapping up his four-day visit to the country, Mr Goh noted that without political reform, Burma will not be able to achieve fast economic growth like other ASEAN economies. And in its efforts towards national reconciliation, Mr Goh said Burma cannot ignore the international interest surrounding pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial. Ms Suu Kyi is currently on trial for breaching the rules governing her house arrest. Mr Goh said he had constructive discussions with Burma’s top leaders, including Senior General Than Shwe. And it provided him with insights into just how complex Burma’s political situation is. He said: “I could see that Senior General Than Shwe is in a very difficult position. He has inherited this military regime – Burma has been under military government since 1962, so it’s not his creation. Burma has come to a cul de sac, how does it make a u-turn? I think that’s not easy.” Mr Goh added that Burma’s stability is dependent on bringing together the three parties – the military government, the ethnic groups and the opposition. Channel News Asia, 13 June 2009 Singapore views Burma’s military junta and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi as equal parts of both that country’s problems and the solution leading to its democratisation, its leaders said at the weekend. They also Page 47 of 226

pointed out that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), of which Burma is a member, has no ability to play a crucial role in making changes in the military-ruled country. Burma’s political situation has been in stalemate for nearly two decades, since the junta refused to hand over power to Aung San Suu Kyi when her National League for Democracy won a 1990 election. Instead, they put her in jail. She is now on trial again after being visited by an American, John Yettaw, who swam across Inya Lake in May to reach her home, where she is still confined. “In the view of the West, Aung San Suu Kyi is seen as the solution. But in my view, she is only a part of the solution, she cannot be the whole solution. At the same time, she is also part of the problem,” said Singapore's former Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong. He said Suu Kyi should not think that her National League for Democracy party remained the “legitimate government” that was “thrown aside” by the armed forces 19 years ago. “In Third-World countries, once there is a coup, you are out. You can’t be going back. If she wants to come back to take charge of a government, then she must find a way to win the next elections, which should be held next year,” Goh told visiting journalists from Asean countries and the Middle East. Goh said a national reconciliation plan that would bring Burma on to a democratic path could not leave out the military. It has been given a quarter of the seats in parliament, control of key ministries and the right to suspend the Constitution at will. “You can’t just take away the army and let the people run the country,” he said. “They have to worry about their own lives, the lives of their families, their own careers. Therefore they have to be a part of the solution, even though they are now a part of the problem.” Nation, 10 August 2010

Sri Lanka
Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa left for burma on a two day official visit this morning. The President will hold bilateral discussions with the Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council, Senior General Than Swe and other high ranking officials of the Burmese government including Prime Minister Gen.Thein Sein. Burma and Sri Lanka last week celebrated 60 years of diplomatic relations and Burma as a gesture made a token financial grant towards the welfare of displaced persons in the North. asiantribune.com, 14 June 2009 Catholic priests, nuns and Buddhist monks have joined a rally against the deterioration of democracy in Burma and have urged the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and all other political prisoners. “Free Aung San Suu Kyi!” “Freedom for Burmese People!” “Let parliamentary rule be established in Burma!” the 30 or so demonstrators shouted in front of the Burmese embassy in Colombo on May 26, ucanews.com reports. The protest takes place every year to mark the general election victory of the National League for Democracy (NLD), led by Suu Kyi, in May 27, 1990. However, the military junta refused to recognize the results, and continued to place Suu Kyi under house arrest. “Our traditional relations with the Burmese in terms of culture and religion since time immemorial make us concerned about their sufferings and their long struggle for democracy,” said S. Gunaratne, an activist. “The suppressions in Burma are not justifiable,” Gunaratne said. “Suu Kyi has been in prison for more than 20 years,” said Father Terrence Fernando of Colombo archdiocese, another protester. “She should be freed very soon. The Burmese military government should release her and take steps to uphold democratic rights in Burma.” Holy Family Sister Sunitha Fernando, said, “I join with other activists to urge the Burmese government to uphold democratic rights and release all political prisoners and detainees.” The NLD is boycotting polls slated for later this year. The party has denounced new election laws as undemocratic and declined to register as required, which meant it is automatically dissolved. CathNews Asia, 28 May 2010

South Africa
International Relations and Co-operation Minister Maite Nkoana- Mashabane’s department wants to send a delegation to Burma. The South African government plans to send a delegation to Burma to facilitate Page 48 of 226

negotiations among political parties after opposition leaders were arrested by the military junta. The move is seen as an attempt by SA to restore its diplomatic credibility after being condemned internationally in 2007 for blocking a United Nations (UN) Security Council resolution calling for sanctions against Burma for human rights abuses. SA was president of the security council at the time. International Relations and Cooperation Minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane’s deputy, Ebrahim Ismail Ebrahim, said yesterday the government would like to see Burma return to civilian rule, with a multiparty and functioning democracy. “SA stands ready to assist in its transition,” he said. SA voted against the proposed Security Council resolution, saying it was “not a vote against the people of Burma or a vote in favour of the military rulers of Burma”. SA said at the time that the proposed resolution would have undermined efforts by the UN secretary-general to find a solution to Burma’s problems, arguing further that the issue could have been better handled by UN bodies such as the Human Rights Council. This provoked international outrage from human rights groups, with the UK and the US accusing SA of forgetting the international support and sympathy it received during the struggle against apartheid. Business Day, 26 May 2009 Archbishop Desmond Tutu condemned the decision on Tuesday to return democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi to house arrest in Burma, saying her trial was illegal and must not be accepted. In a statement issued in London, the Nobel laureate said the decision by the ruling military junta to commute Aung San Suu Kyi’s sentence of hard labour to 18 months under house arrest was “a manipulation of an illegal process”. “This decision is wrong. We must not allow the government of Burma to convince the world that they are making concessions in relation to Aung San Suu Kyi by returning her to house arrest instead of prison,” Tutu said. “This is not a concession — it is a manipulation of an illegal process. It must not be accepted by any government, Asean, the EU or the UN.” iafrica.com, 12 August 2009

Sweden
Carl Bildt, Foreign Minister of Sweden, called it a major step forward and said it went beyond anything previously endorsed by China or Vietnam. “It’s a substantial increase on the political pressure on the regime in Burma,” he said. Reuters, 26 May 2009 Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt said the EU was working on additional sanctions that “include measures such as trade restrictions against certain state-owned companies and prohibition of entry into the EU for the four key individuals responsible for the decision.” Current sanctions affect some 120 companies - a number that will grow if the EU intensifies steps against Burma’s banking, tourism and precious stones sectors - and a dozen top justice officials, including four supreme court judges. AP, 11 August 2009

Taiwan
Taiwan has recently acted to strengthen its economic and trade cooperation with Burma as part of its efforts to seek closer ties with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), an expanding regional economic bloc. A memorandum of understanding (MOU) on mutual cooperation between the quasi-official Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) and the Union of Myanmar Federation of Chambers of Commerce and Industry (UMFCCI) was signed in Rangoon last week, according to a TAITRA statement. e Taiwan News, 14 June 2009

Thailand
Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva said on Tuesday that his government wants to see neighbouring Burma follow a national reconciliation plan and Thailand does not want to intervene in the internal affairs of Page 49 of 226

that country. Mr. Abhisit told journalists that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) which he chairs has issued a statement calling for the immediate release of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi who appeared at her trial in Insein prison in Rangoon on Monday. Thai News Agency, 19 May 2009 Thailand has denied interfering in Burma’s affairs with its demand as the chair of Asean for the junta to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Mrs Suu Kyi has entered a plea of not guilty to charges of violating her house arrest rules. Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya said the statement issued by Thailand on May 18 reflected the concern of Asean members on the situation in Burma. He said the statement was approved by top foreign ministry officials of the grouping. “It did not interfere in Burma’s internal affairs,” Mr Kasit said in Hanoi, where he was attending the Asia-Europe Meeting (Asem). “Like the situation in Thailand, many countries expressed concern over the street protests as well as the conflict in the South because it affected stability in the region and progress in Asean. Thailand did not want to see any obstacles on the move towards the reconciliation process in Burma.” He said the release of Mrs Suu Kyi and all political prisoners in Burma was an important step for reconciliation and general elections next year. Bangkok Post, 26 May 2009 Thailand’s foreign minister urged the creation of an “open society” in neighbouring Burma, saying that an end to repressive government in the military-run nation would help “stabilize” the south-east Asian region. Kasit Priyoma said during an official visit to Bangladesh that “change in Burma is very much needed. It is not only a necessity for the security of Burma, but also for all the neighbouring countries.” The minister is on a two-day official visit to Dhaka, where he met Monday with his Bangladeshi counterpart Dipu Moni. The Thai diplomat said that many southeast and south Asian nations had had military dictatorships, and had now emerged into democratic rule. Burma is widely seen as an international pariah for its harsh government, as well as its treatment of human-rights activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi. Earth Times, 1 June 2009 Twenty-two female members of Thai parliament on Wednesday petitioned Burma’s junta to drop current charges against democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and free her immediately. “As a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and as a longstanding democracy advocate, Mrs Aung San suu Kyi has been an inspiration not only for women MPs in Thailand but also for all adherents and participants of democratic ideals worldwide,” the 22 Thai women said in a statement. Altogether there are 62 women MPs out of 474 total seats in Thailand’s Lower House. It was the first such statement by a group of women MPs in Thai parliament on a diplomatic matter. Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, in his position as current chair of the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN), last month issued a statement expressing “deep concern” about Suu Kyi’s latest trial and possible imprisonment. The statement was rejected by Burma’s junta as interference in the country’s internal affairs. Burma joined ASEAN in 1997. Earth Times, 3 June 2009 The Thai Army yesterday sent more heavy weapons, including mortars, into border areas near the fighting, on the orders of Third Region Army commander Lt-General Thanongsak Apirakyothin. The mortars were installed in Tak’s Tha Song Yang district to fire warning shots against any stray shells from the Burmese side of the border. The commander said Thailand would take progressive measures in reaction to any violation of sovereignty. Thanongsak yesterday visited a military unit in Tha Song Yang district and saw 458 war refugees there. He was briefed by local officials that 1,714 refugees had arrived and more were expected. The general instructed officers to work with administrative officials to take good care of the refugees, most of whom are children and elderly people, though it is expected that if the battle becomes intense young adults will follow. The Nation, 7 June 2009 Thailand’s condemnation of the Suu Kyi trial and the arrival of thousands of Burmese refugees has put relations between the two countries under “unprecedented strain”, according to a Burmese state-run newspaper. Burma has come under mounting international criticism over the trial of opposition leader Aung Page 50 of 226

San Suu Kyi, whose next hearing has been adjourned until 26 June. Thailand, who holds the chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) bloc, has recently expressed “grave concern” both at the lack of democratic progress in the country and the potential for the trial to tarnish the bloc’s image. DVB, 12 June 2009 If the junta fails to release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the Association of Southeast Asian Nation’s (Asean) credibility will be “affected inevitably,” Thai Prime Minster Abhisit Vejajjiva told The Far Eastern Economic Review recently. During the Far Eastern Economic View’s interview published on Tuesday, 16 June, Abhisit, who is now chairman of Asean, said Burma’s political process will have to be inclusive to gain the acceptability and respectability of the international community. However, the Thai PM said the Burma issue is the responsibility of the international community and not just Asean. Irrawaddy, 16 June 2009 Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva indicated that ASEAN was not willing to discharge Burma from the group and would not be able to force its government to release the opposition leader, Ms Aung San Suu Kyi. After US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged the ASEAN members to pressure the Burmese government for a release of Ms Suu Kyi, Prime Minister Abhisit insisted that Ms Clinton was only expressing the US’s standpoint on democracy. Thai Press Reports, 24 July 2009 Thailand’s prime minister says Burma has rejected any help to carry out its upcoming election. Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva said Tuesday he offered Thailand’s assistance Monday during an official visit to Burma. He met his counterpart Prime Minister Thein Sein and reclusive junta chief Senior Gen. Than Shwe. Burma’s election on Nov. 7 will be its first in 20 years, after the junta refused to recognize the results of the 1990 vote. Critics say the new vote is being held under unfair and undemocratic conditions to cement the junta’s power. Abhisit told reporters in Bangkok he conveyed the international community’s concerns. Burma’s leaders replied they were “aware of the concerns, but did not want any outside help.” AP, 12 October 2010

Tibet
His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Tibetan Spiritual Leader I extent my support and solidarity with the recent peaceful movement for democracy in Burma. I fully support their call for freedom and democracy and take this opportunity to appeal to freedom-loving people all over the world to support such non-violent movements. Moreover, I wish to convey my sincere appreciation and admiration to the large number of fellow Buddhists monks for advocating democracy and freedom in Burma. I pray for the success of this peaceful movement and the early release of fellow Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. Burma Net, 23 September 2007 The European Union began preparing new sanctions against the country’s military regime, and a group of 14 Nobel laureates, including the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, called on the U.N. Security Council to take strong action against the country. AP, 12 August 2009

Timor
East Timor President Jose Ramos-Horta on Friday urged Australia to learn from the past and push harder for reform in military-ruled Burma. The Nobel Peace laureate said Australia had turned a “blind eye to blatant human rights abuses” during Indonesia’s 24-year occupation of East Timor and should not repeat the mistake. “Australia can, working together with Indonesia for instance… help bring an end to that ugly Page 51 of 226

situation in Burma,” he told reporters. Australia has imposed financial sanctions and visa restrictions on members of the regime in Burma, and banned all defence exports to the country. It also called last month for the release of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the democracy icon who has spent most of the past 19 years in detention. But Ramos-Horta said “occasional statements” were not enough and urged Australia to apply consistent pressure for reform in the country. “It’s been going on for over two decades with the imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi and there is no light at the end of the tunnel,” he said. “Here is where Australia can be more proactive and not only be happy with occasional statements.” Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League of Democracy won a landslide election victory in 1990 that the junta, in power since 1962, refused to recognise. AFP, 24 July 2009 President Ramos-Horta started with the development of East Timor in his time period in contrast to the development in Burma. He said that his country has about 12% in economic growth and at least 9% in poverty reduction, whereas Burmese people are confronting with political crisis and social poverty. So, he does not support the economic sanctions on Burma since it hurts the poor people, although he can understand some targeted sanctions. He would rather prefer to a meaningful dialogue towards peace and democracy in Burma. The conflict between the Burmese military and democratic movement including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi resulted in the loss of valuable time to develop the country, like South Africa when Nelson Mandela was in prison for 27 years. In conclusion he expressed sympathy for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the people of Burma. When asked about his position on UN commission of inquiry on Burma, he did not clearly express his opinion. European Parliament in Brussels, 5 October 2010

United Kingdom
A delegation of senior foreign diplomats, including Britain’s ambassador to Burma, was barred from the notorious Insein Prison this morning after attempting to observe the trial of the country’s democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Britain’s Mark Canning, along with the ambassadors of France, Germany and Italy, and an Australian diplomat, were turned away without explanation at the military cordon which has been thrown around the prison. The charges against Ms Suu Kyi, relating to a secret visit by an American man who emerged uninvited from the lake next to her home, have been denounced as a travesty by western governments and international human rights organisations. The Times, 18 May 2009 Burma risks global isolation because its continued oppression of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, British Foreign Secretary David Miliband warned today. He slammed the “show trial” which started today and urged the authorities to begin a “constitutional process” to include Ms Suu Kyi’s party and other minority groups. Only three weeks ago Mr Miliband and his EU counterparts extended two-year-old sanctions against Burma for another year and demanded the opposition leader’s release. Today the same ministers opted to wait and see the result of her new trial for allegedly breaching the terms of her house arrest. “We are very concerned by the situation in Burma,” said Mr Miliband. “The house arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi is bad enough but for her to be put on show trial just adds to the pain. Our position is that everything should be done to ensure that the Burmese government understands fully the need to create an inclusive constitutional process rather than a sham process, which needs to includes all of the minorities as well as the opposition.” He said it was vital that the Burmese regime understood the risks it was taking: “The EU has shown itself ready to help the people of Burma, but certainly the regime should be under no illusion about the isolation it brings upon itself through its actions.” Irish Examiner, 18 May 2009 British prime Minister Gordon Brown has sent a message of personal support and solidarity to the arrested Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, saying that she is “not alone” in her fight to bring back democracy in Burma. “We should not rest until you are able to play your rightful role in a free and secure Burma. I want you to know: you are not alone,” The Independent quoted Brown’s letter, as stating. ANI, 19 May 2009 Page 52 of 226

Britain challenged Sunday Burma’s military rulers to release imprisoned opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and implement democratic reforms in the isolated state. “Now is the time for transition to democracy starting with the release of Aung San Suu Kyi,” Britain’s Minister for International Defence and Security Ann Taylor told a summit on Asian security in Singapore. Suu Kyi, a Nobel peace laureate, has spent 14 of the past 20 years under house arrest. The democracy advocate is currently standing trial on charges of breaking the terms of her house arrest. “Aung San Suu Kyi is not alone,” Taylor said. Burma’s military junta has been continually criticized for human right abuses. DPA, 31 May 2009 “The continued imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi by the Burmese regime is a reminder that we cannot take for granted the institution of democracy,” Ann Taylor, Britain’s Minister for International Defense and Security, told a security forum in Singapore Sunday. AFP, 1 June 2009 The military government has accused officials of the US and British embassies in Rangoon of allegedly dropping into the office of the Opposition party – the National League for Democracy – 25 times in May alone. The junta’s mouthpiece, the New Light of Burma, on Friday reported that officials of the US and British embassies in Rangoon had visited the NLD office 25 times and passed on instructions and unknown materials to NLD members. “During their visit, they met Central Executive Committee (CEC) members of the party NLD and gave them large and small envelopes and parcels,” the newspaper said. But Win Tin, a former political prisoner and a CEC member of the NLD made light of the accusation saying the visits by US and British embassy officials were in keeping with ‘normal relations’ that diplomats maintain across the world. Mizzima, 5 June 2009 First, we need to support the countries of the region as they step up efforts to secure democracy and reconciliation. I have been struck by how Burma’s neighbours have led the world in calling for Ms Suu Kyi’s release. We need to translate this outrage into political pressure for change. Second, we need the UN Security Council to reinforce its calls for Ms Suu Kyi’s release and to support the Secretary-General’s efforts to bring about political progress through an early visit to Burma. Third, we should impose a new set of tough sanctions that target the regime’s economic interests. We will be pushing for stronger EU action in this regard. Such a step would hit the business interests of the generals and their cronies. I also believe we should identify and target those judges complicit in the recent political show trials. The growing sense of outrage and the unity of the international community behind this message should mark a turning point. The regime is at a crossroads. Long-promised elections in 2010 will remain a charade while political prisoners are being tortured, ethnic minorities are persecuted, the media muzzled, freedom of speech and assembly are non-existent and Ms Suu Kyi is silenced. The regime can choose to ignore the clamour for change. But this will only condemn the country to deeper isolation, poverty, conflict and despair. Or it can choose the path of reform, as the region has urged. Burma is rich in natural and human resources, at the heart of a dynamic continent. Democratic reform would unleash the country’s enormous potential. Britain and the international community would be ready to extend the hand of friendship. If the Burmese generals rethink their ways, we will be ready to recognise and embrace any genuine reforms they make. Some may question why Burma warrants so much attention. There are other countries where human rights are ignored or people live in poverty. But the Burmese junta stands virtually alone in the scale of its misrule and the sheer indifference to the suffering of its 50 million people. How we respond to this injustice will send a message about our resolution to tackle similar injustices across the globe. To those that stand for human rights, freedom and democracy, our message remains clear - you are not alone. Gordon Brown, British Prime Minister, Sydney Morning Herald, 19 June 2009 UN Secretary general Ban Ki-moon faced a barrage of criticism last night for apparently praising the Burmese junta without winning any concessions over human rights or a move towards democracy. Mr Ban was under pressure to produce results from his two-day mission to Burma, which was criticised as providing an endorsement of the Burmese leadership just as it is staging a trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Page 53 of 226

The high-stakes visit to Burma comes at a critical time for Mr Ban, whose low-key approach to his job has been criticised as ineffectual. He came under further fire on arrival in Naypyidaw, the regime’s headquarters, when he told junta leader Gen Than Shwe: “I appreciate your commitment to moving your country forward.” “That is absolute nonsense,” said Brad Adams, a Burma specialist at Human Rights Watch. “It’s just what we implored him not to say, to make these diplomatic gaffes. Than Shwe has steadily moved his country backwards.” British officials were also furious at the remarks. They had urged Mr Ban not to visit Burma, and risk handing the junta a propaganda prize, without ensuring he would gain concessions in the form of the release of political prisoners and steps towards genuine democracy. Gen Than Shwe said little at his meeting with Mr Ban and did not grant his request to meet Suu Kyi in prison. Mr Ban expressed hope that a meeting could still be permitted. “I am leaving tomorrow, so logically speaking I am waiting for a reply before my departure,” he said. The secretary general added that he had called for the release of all political prisoners before the elections, but got no response. irishtimes.com, 4 July 2009 British Prime Minister Gordon Brown spoke of a “sham trial.” Brown said the verdict showed Burma’s military leaders are “determined to act with total disregard” for international law and said the verdict was designed to prevent Suu Kyi from participating in elections planned for next year. AP, 11 August 2009 British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has dismissed the sentencing of Burma’s opposition figurehead Aung San Suu Kyi as “purely political”. The prime minister said he was saddened and angry by the “sham trial” which Daw Suu Kyi had been forced to undergo. She was being tried for letting an American man, who had swam across to her home unexpectedly, into her house. “This is a purely political sentence designed to prevent her from taking part in the regime’s planned elections next year,” Mr Brown said. Shadow foreign secretary William Hague agreed, describing the Burmese junta’s move as being “entirely politically motivated”. Mr Brown was in full flow as he ruled out legitimacy for next year’s planned elections without Daw Suu Kyi’s participation. She convincingly won the last open elections held in Burma in 1990. “The façade of her prosecution is made more monstrous because its real objective is to sever her bond with the people for whom she is a beacon of hope and resistance,” he said. “I have always made clear that the United Kingdom would respond positively to any signs of progress on democratic reform in Burma. But with the generals explicitly rejecting that course today, the international community must take action.” politics.co.uk, 12 August 2009 Tourism Concern has welcomed the closure of a legal loophole targeted at operators offering tours of Burma. Director Tricia Barnett said the Burma (Financial Restrictions) Regulations 2009 makes it an offence for UK firms, including tour operators, to provide financial benefits for prominent members of the country’s military regime and their associates. It is one of a series of measures deployed by the European community in a bid to force Burma's military junta to introduce democratic reform in the country. Travel Weekly, 21 August 2009 Britain’s new prime minister, David Cameron, has said that he will do more than the previous Labour government to help Burma’s beleaguered opposition. The message was passed on to the National League for Democracy (NLD) party yesterday by British ambassador Andrew Heyn, on the same day that 1,600 letters were delivered to Downing Street by campaigners calling on Cameron “to take the lead in pushing for strong and effective international action on Burma”. DVB, 5 August 2010

London stands in solidarity with democracy advocates in Burma and calls for the release of all political prisoners, the British foreign secretary said. British Foreign Secretary William Hague said he was standing in solidarity with the estimated 2,100 political prisoners held by the military junta in Burma. Hague said he was highlighting 44-year-old Ko Mya Aye, who was sentenced to 65 years in prison in 2004. The foreign secretary added that reports say the activist was tortured while in custody and suffers from poor health. “The continued detention of Ko Mya Aye and of more than 2,100 other political prisoners in Burma is Page 54 of 226

deplorable,” said Hague in a statement. “I urge the military regime to release all political prisoners immediately and unconditionally and respect the human rights of Burma’s people.” UPI, 21 October 2010

United Nations
UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said he was “gravely concerned” while the UN special envoy on human rights in Burma, Tomas Ojea Quintana, called for Aung San Suu Kyi to be freed, and said her detention broke the country’s laws. sbs.com.au, 15 May 2009 “The only body that the junta really fears is the Security Council,” said the former UN Rapporteur for Human Rights in Burma, Paulo Sergio Pinheiro. “I have personal evidence of this. So the Security Council must address this immediately as a matter of absolute urgency.” Irrawaddy, 4 June 2009 The United Nations refugee agency today said that it is looking into the situation of a group of several thousand Karen people who recently fled across the Moei River from Burma to Thailand. Estimates of the number of people who escaped to northern Thailand since last Wednesday range from 2,000 to 6,400, and “one of the first things we would like to do is ascertain the number of people who are in the five sites near Mae Sot,” William Spindler, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told reporters in Geneva. Mr. Spindler said that according to preliminary talks with some new arrivals, “it seems some were fleeing actual fighting between the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army, which is allied with Government forces, and the rebel Karen National Union (KNU). Others say they were fleeing forced recruitment or forced labour by Government forces.” A number of the recently-arrived refugees were already uprooted in Burma and living in the Ler Per Her camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs) run by the KNU in Karen-held territory, he noted. Many of the refugees brought supplies with them, and aid agencies are also providing them with necessities, such as food, mosquito nets, pots, pans and blankets, while UNHCR has distributed plastic sheeting. In February, the agency said that there were some 111,000 registered refugees living in nine camps along the Thai-Burma border, who are restricted from leaving the camps and as a result unable to earn a living or receive higher education. UN News Centre, 9 June 2009 The UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki Moon, will visit Burma on Friday in a diplomatically risky effort to win concessions from the country’s military dictatorship. Mr Ban hopes to persuade the Burmese junta to release political prisoners, including the country’s democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, in advance of an election next year, denounced by opposition groups as fraudulent and meaningless. “The Secretary-General considers that three of the most important issues for the future of Burma cannot be left unaddressed at this juncture of the country’s political process,” Mr Ban’s spokesperson, Michele Montas, said yesterday in New York. “These are the release of all political prisoners, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi; the resumption of dialogue between the Government and Opposition and the need to create conditions conducive to credible elections. timesonline.co.uk, 30 June 2009 “It is clear the process remains deeply flawed,” Mr. Ojea Quintana, an Argentine lawyer, said at a news conference here, noting that freedom of expression and assembly had been further restricted and that more than 2,100 “prisoners of conscience” still languished in prison. Torture is systematic and 144 such prisoners have died in custody since 1988, he said. “The conditions do not show that these elections will be inclusive, free and fair,” Mr. Ojea Quintana added. “The potential for these elections to bring meaningful change and improvement to the human rights situation in Burma remains doubtful.” Those opposition parties that have agreed to participate complain of harassment and intimidation, Mr. Quintana noted, while some representing ethnic groups have not been approved. Candidates must pay a $500 election fee, a prohibitive sum in a country where the average annual income is $459, he said. nytimes.com, 21 October 2010

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United Nations human rights chief Navi Pillay said on Friday that Burma had failed so far to meet international standards for “genuine elections”, 10 days ahead of the poll. “On 7 November the electoral process will culminate in voting and counting at polling stations around most of the country,” the High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a statement. “However, conditions for genuine elections that meet international standards have so far not been reached,” she added. Pillay reiterated calls by the UN for the release more than 2 000 political prisoners, and for the military junta to respected freedom of assembly and expression. AFP, 29 October 2010 UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, on a visit to China, has held talks with foreign minister Yang Jiechi on the situation in Burma ahead of the country’s much-criticised election next week. Ban met Yang in Shanghai on Saturday on his first day in China before attending the closing of the World Expo Sunday. “In addition to nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, they discussed the situation in the Korean Peninsula, Burma and Sudan,” a UN spokesperson said in a statement emailed to AFP, without giving further details. The UN leader has already called for more pressure to be put on Burma to free opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and others ahead of the nation’s first election in two decades on November 7. Western nations and activists have criticised the vote as undemocratic, with Suu Kyi locked up, and pro-democracy parties allege that restrictions imposed by the iron-fisted military regime will virtually ensure it wins the poll. China is one of Burma’s closest allies, and has long helped it to keep afloat through trade ties, arms sales, and by shielding it from UN sanctions over rights abuses as a veto-wielding member of the Security Council. AFP, 31 October 2010

United States of America
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is urging Burma to immediately release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Clinton told reporters at the State Department on Thursday that she was deeply troubled by Burma’s “baseless charge” against the Nobel Peace laureate. She says the government is looking for a “pretext” to place further unjust restrictions on Suu Kyi. AP, 14 May 2009 Two top US senators urged Burma to free pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and urged “reformminded” members of its ruling junta to step forward to help forge new ties with the United States. “Now is the time for reform-minded leaders within the military junta to step forward and be heard,” said Democratic Senator John Kerry and Republican Senator Richard Lugar, the top Senate Foreign Relations Committee members. AFP, 15 May 2009 President Barack Obama has formally extended US sanctions against Burma amid latest tensions over detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi who was put on trial on charges of allowing a US national to visit her home without permission from the authorities. “I have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency with respect to Burma, and maintain the sanctions against Rangoon to respond to this threat,” Obama told the Congress. The Friday’s move comes despite an official review of the US policy on Burma currently underway, Geo TV reported Saturday. Aung San Suu Kyi was put on trial Thursday for allowing a US national to visit her home, where she has been under detention for the past six years. After an initial hearing, the trial was scheduled to be continued May 18. The Nobel laureate was taken from her family compound Thursday and kept at Insein Prison after the hearing. IANS, 16 May 2009 U.S. State Department spokesman Ian Kelly said the charges against Suu Kyi were “unjustified” and called for her unconditional release and that of more than 2,100 other political prisoners. AP, 19 May 2009 “ASEAN was bogged down by Burma last week in its meeting with Europe,” said Bridget Welsh, a Southeast Asia specialist at Johns Hopkins University in the U.S. She was referring to last week’s gathering in Hanoi of Asian and European foreign ministers. “The failure of ASEAN to take a strong stand Page 56 of 226

on Burma has seriously undermined the credibility of the organization. ASEAN as an organization cannot evolve without Burma taking steps to show it genuinely respects the norms of the international community,” she said. “ASEAN members are fed up with Burma, and although they are not saying so publicly, many would like Burma to leave,” said Welsh. AFP, 1 June 2009 Police in Burma detained two women and four children after they held a protest asking the US embassy to help obtain the release of a prisoner, an official said. The group unfurled a banner asking for assistance as the husband of one of the women had earlier been arrested by authorities in the military-ruled nation, the official said on condition of anonymity. “Two women and four children have been detained for questioning as they staged a small protest in front of the American Embassy,” the official said. The banner said “Please help as my husband was arrested unjustly,’ according to the official. news.com.au, 4 June 2009 The military government has accused officials of the US and British embassies in Rangoon of allegedly dropping into the office of the Opposition party – the National League for Democracy – 25 times in May alone. The junta’s mouthpiece, the New Light of Burma, on Friday reported that officials of the US and British embassies in Rangoon had visited the NLD office 25 times and passed on instructions and unknown materials to NLD members. “During their visit, they met Central Executive Committee (CEC) members of the party NLD and gave them large and small envelopes and parcels,” the newspaper said. But Win Tin, a former political prisoner and a CEC member of the NLD made light of the accusation saying the visits by US and British embassy officials were in keeping with ‘normal relations’ that diplomats maintain across the world. Mizzima, 5 June 2009 President Barack Obama’s choice as top U.S. diplomat for East Asia said Wednesday the United States is interested in easing its long-standing policy of isolation against military-run Burma. Kurt Campbell, however, told U.S. lawmakers at his Senate confirmation hearing that Burma’s heavy-handed treatment of detained democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi hinders any U.S. effort to change course and engage the ruling junta in Burma. “As a general practice, we’re prepared to reach out, not just in Burma but in other situations as well,” Campbell said. But, he said, the junta’s trial this week of Suu Kyi on charges that could put her in prison for five years is “deeply, deeply concerning, and it makes it very difficult to move forward.” AP, 10 May 2009 Former US first lady Laura Bush called for new international pressure on Burma in order to force its military leaders to stop human rights abuses. “With UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon planning to visit Burma this summer, it is crucial that he press the regime to take immediate steps to end human rights abuses, particularly in ethnic minority areas,” the spouse of former president George W. Bush wrote in an op-ed piece in The Washington Post. “There have been 38 UN resolutions condemning these abuses, yet the horrors continue unabated,” she pointed out. “Under the junta’s brutal rule, too many lives have been wasted, lives whose talents could have helped all of Burma prosper.” Bush hails Aung San Suu Kyi’s “continued example of civil courage,” saying that it reminded Americans of the desire of people around the world to live in freedom. “We should all share her hope and add our voices to those who risk so much to protest tyranny and injustice in Burma and beyond,” Bush said. AFP, 28 June 2009 The US Senate has approved a one-year renewal of sanctions banning the import of Burmese goods to the US, and will now look to Congress for an extension to the boycott. The decision belonged to the Senate Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over United States’ international trade. The current resolution on Burma, contained in the 2003 Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act, authorizes Congress to renew the import ban each year through to 2012. DVB, 24 July 2009 A ban on imports from Burma has been renewed for one year by the US House of Representatives. The ban affects a range of products but especially Burmese gemstones via third countries, said the Voice of America radio station. The house action seeks to renew the import bans contained in the Burmese Freedom Page 57 of 226

and Democracy Act, which was due to expire on July 26. The sponsor of the renewed import ban, New York Democrat Joseph Crowley, said it was justified because the “junta has also rejected recent diplomatic outreach” on the Suu Kyi issue. Weekly Business Roundup, 24 July 2009 U.S. President Barack Obama and Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo agreed Thursday to join forces in tackling the issues surrounding Burma and North Korea. Arroyo became the first leader of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to meet Obama. “We stand behind the United States on the position that it has taken with regard to Burma and with regard to North Korea’s nuclear adventurism,” Arroyo told reporters with Obama at the White House. Obama thanked Arroyo for her support on U.S. policies in Asia. “We are very grateful for the strong voice that the Philippines has provided in dealing with issues in Asia, ranging from the human rights violations that have for too long existed in Burma to the problems that we’re seeing with respect to nuclear proliferation in North Korea,” he said. AP, 30 July 2009 Democratic US Senator Jim Webb will travel to Burma over the next two weeks, becoming the first US lawmaker to visit the country in more than 10 years, his office announced on Thursday. Webb – a Vietnam war veteran who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on East Asia and Pacific affairs – leaves Sunday and will also visit Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia over a two-week span. The Virginia lawmaker, whose precise itinerary was not disclosed, aims “to explore opportunities to advance US interests in Burma and the region,” his office said in a statement. AFP, 6 August 2009 The United States called on Friday for the unconditional release of Burma democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and urged the country’s military rulers to begin a process of national reconciliation. “As the world honours the long struggle of the Burmese people for a better future, we renew our call on the Burmese authorities to begin a process of national reconciliation and a genuine transition to democracy,” State Department deputy spokesman Rebert Wood said in a written statement made public on Friday. Henry Soe Win, D4B, 9 August 2009 Speaking in Goma, Congo, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Suu Kyi “should not have been tried. She should not have been convicted. We continue to call for her release.” AP, 11 August 2009 US President Barack Obama, and his secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, on Tuesday called for the immediate and unconditional release of Aung San Suu Kyi, the popular leader of Burma, who has been sentenced to an additional 18 months of house arrest. Both Obama, who is currently battling on the domestic front on the issue of health care, and Clinton, who was in Congo, were quick to issue statements following the verdict from Rangoon. Calling it an unjust decision, Obama said: “The conviction and sentencing of Aung San Suu Kyi today on charges related to an uninvited intrusion into her home violate universal principles of human rights, run counter to Burma’s commitments under the Asean charter, and demonstrate continued disregard for UN Security Council statements.” The US president called on the Burmese regime to heed the views of its own people and the international community and to work toward genuine national reconciliation. Terming it as a politically motivated verdict, the House of Representatives speaker, Nancy Pelosi, said this is a “step backward” for the future of Burma. “The international community must send a clear message that elections in Burma, planned for 2010, will not be open or credible without the participation of imprisoned and detained pro-democracy leaders,” she said. Irrawaddy, 12 August 2009 Philip Crowley, US State Department spokesman, said: “We remain very concerned about the continued detainment of Aung Sun Suu Kyi and more than 2,100 prisoners that are in detention. We continue to look for signs that the Burmese government is prepared to embark on a meaningful dialogue with Aung Sun Suu Kyi, along with the rest of the democratic opposition. “And obviously, Burma needs to have a dialogue with a full range of ethnic minority leaders in Burma, and move towards a peaceful transition to genuine democracy and national reconciliation.” As for a more comprehensive indication of US policy going Page 58 of 226

forward, it remains a waiting game. A US State Department official said the review continues and gave no date for when the results might be announced. Channel News Asia, 21 August 2009 A US official met Burma’s Aung San Suu Kyi today after expressing concerns about the legitimacy of the military-run country’s forthcoming elections. Kurt Campbell, assistant secretary of state for East Asia, held nearly two hours of talks with Aung San Suu Kyi at a government guesthouse. Details of their conversation are not yet known. Campbell arrived yesterday and met senior junta officials in the remote administrative capital of Naypyidaw before flying to Rangoon, the biggest city. Among the officials he met were foreign minister Nyan Win, information minister Kyaw Hsan and science and technology minister U Thaung – Burma’s former envoy in Washington – who is the point person for the US-Burma engagement. “We are troubled by much of what we have seen. We have very real concerns about the election and the environment that has been created,” Campbell told a news conference yesterday during a stopover in the Thai capital, Bangkok. Campbell, however, said he would continue a dialogue with all sides in Burma as part of a new Washington policy of engagement rather than isolation of the ruling generals. Last year President Barack Obama reversed the Bush administration’s isolation of Burma in favour of dialogue with the junta. Campbell cited the recently issued election laws, lack of talks between the military and pro-democracy advocates, political prisoners, status of ethnic minorities and nonproliferation as issues he would bring up during discussions. The US has also raised concerns that Burma may be trying to acquire nuclear technology, possibly with the help of North Korea. Washington has said it will maintain political and economic sanctions on the junta until talks with the generals result in genuine political progress. guardian.co.uk, 10 May 2010

Commemorating the 20th anniversary of the 1990 election in Burma in which the National League for Democracy (NLD) won an overwhelming number of seats but the military regime refused to transfer power, six US senators condemned the regime for its past and present oppression. Senators Mitch McConnell, Joe Lieberman, Dianne Feinstein, Judd Gregg, John McCain and Sam Brownback condemned the military regime both for its refusal to transfer power to the NLD in 1990 and its plan to hold a new election this year without the participation of the NLD and other pro-democracy forces. “On the twentieth anniversary of this election, we reaffirm our conviction that the people of Burma deserve the freedom to choose their future for themselves,” the senators said in a joint statement. “We condemn the continuing dictatorship imposed by the junta and call on its ruling generals to release all prisoners of conscience immediately and unconditionally, and to begin a genuine political dialogue with opposition and ethnic groups and leaders, including with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,” they said. The senators also condemned the junta’s election laws, which required the NLD to expel its imprisoned members in order to register for the new election, saying that the election laws confirm that the vote the junta has promised later this year represents yet another mockery of the democratic process in Burma. “Rather than accept the junta’s outrageous election laws, the NLD is now forced into dissolution. While we recognize that this was a painful decision for the NLD’s leaders, we applaud and honor their courage in upholding the principles that have guided their efforts since the party’s founding,” the senators said. Irrawaddy, 28 May 2010 US senator Jim Webb has postponed his visit to Burma, scheduled for today, because of reports that Burma is developing a nuclear programme in conjunction with North Korea. Webb had been due to fly to Naypyidaw this evening to meet with the Burmese prime minister, before heading to Rangoon to meet with opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. A statement penned by Webb and released by his office today cites news reports that Burma is in the process of building nuclear weaponry. “From the initial accounts, a defecting officer from the Burmese military claims direct knowledge of such plans, and reportedly has furnished documents to corroborate his claims,” said the statement. DVB, 3 June 2010 US Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, said on Thursday that the Obama administration will continue to push for the establishment of an international commission of inquiry into alleged crimes against humanity in Page 59 of 226

Burma. “I would like to underscore the American commitment to seek accountability for the human rights violations that have occurred in Burma by working to establish an international Commission of Inquiry through close consultations with our friends, allies, and other partners at the United Nations,” Clinton said in a speech in Honolulu, Hawai, at the start of a tour of the Asia-Pacific region. “Burma will soon hold a deeply flawed election, and one thing we have learned over the last few years is that democracy is more than elections,” Clinton said. “We will make clear to Burma’s new leaders, old and new alike, that they must break from the policies of the past.” Irrawaddy, 29 October 2010

V.

Chronicle

Burma’s junta has rejected a legal appeal for the release of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, whose latest house arrest is due to expire on May 27, her party said on Tuesday. Lawyers for Suu Kyi, the Nobel Peace laureate who has spent more than 13 of the past 19 years under some form of detention, were told of the regime’s decision last week, Nyan Win of the National League for Democracy (NLD) said. Suu Kyi’s latest detention began on May 30, 2003 under Section 10 (B) of the Law Safeguarding the State from the Dangers of Subversive Elements. The law allows for a detention of five consecutive years before the accused must be freed or put on trial. When the regime extended Suu Kyi’s house arrest last year in an apparent violation of the law, her lawyers filed an appeal. “Since the appeal was the last resort allowed under that law, we will have to explore other avenues to work for her release,” Nyan Win said. A commentary in a state-owned newspaper several months ago said the law allowed for detentions of up to six years. The U.N. Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has ruled that the 63-year-old Suu Kyi’s confinement in her Rangoon home is illegal under Burmese law. But analysts say it is unlikely the military, which has ruled the former Burma for more than four decades and refused to recognize the NLD’s 1990 landslide election victory, will release her anytime soon. antara.co.id, 6 May 2009 Neighbors of Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi say about 20 police officers have entered her compound, following reports that an American man was detained after entering her home. The Myanma Ahlin newspaper reported Thursday that an American man was arrested the previous day for allegedly swimming across a lake and entering Suu Kyi’s lakeside home. The newspaper gave no details of the man’s identity or motives. AP, 6 May 2009 Police tightened security around Burma’s detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Thursday after an American man was arrested for allegedly swimming across a lake and sneaking into her lakeside home. The Myanma Ahlin newspaper reported that authorities fished the man out of Rangoon’s Inya Lake early Wednesday while he was returning from the visit to Suu Kyi’s home. The report identified the man as John William Yettaw but gave no details of his motives. It would be the first time anyone has sneaked into Suu Kyi’s compound or swam across the lake in an attempt to get there. Despite police checkpoints and barbedwire barricades outside the home, police rarely enter Suu Kyi’s compound where she has been kept under house arrest for more than 13 of the past 19 years. The newspaper report said the American man had confessed to swimming across the lake Sunday evening, sneaking into Suu Kyi’s residence and then swimming back late Tuesday before being spotted by police and arrested early Wednesday. “He secretly entered the house and stayed there,” the newspaper reported, saying that he swam with an empty 5-liter plastic water jug, presumably to use as a float. “Further investigation is under way to find out his motive for secretly entering the restricted area.” Police confiscated the man’s belongings which included an American passport, a black backpack, a pair of pliers, a camera and two U.S. 100 dollar bills, the newspaper reported. A spokesman from the U.S. Embassy in Rangoon said consular officers were “seeking access” to the man as is routine in any case of an American citizen arrested overseas. “Right now we don’t know anything more than what is generally known, that this man was arrested for swimming across the lake and wound up being at Aung San Suu Kyi’s house,” said spokesman Richard Mei, who said he could not immediately confirm Page 60 of 226

the man’s identity or spelling of his name. Suu Kyi’s home is tightly guarded and she is not allowed visitors, aside from her doctor. Swimming in Inya Lake in the vicinity of Suu Kyi’s compound is not allowed. wjla.com, 7 May 2009

John William Yettaw, BBC, 21 May 2009 The Burmese military government is not allowing doctors to check out detained opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who reportedly is suffering from an eating disorder and is surviving on intravenous fluid injections. On Thursday, security personnel arrested Suu Kyi’s primary physician after an American sneaked into her closely guarded home and stayed there for over two days. Another doctor was permitted on Friday to see the 63-year-old Nobel Laureat, but a request for a follow-up visit on Saturday was rejected. newkerala.com, 9 May 2009 The party of detained Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has urged the military regime to allow her to receive medical attention, saying it was concerned about her health. Party spokesman Nyan Win says the 63-year-old Nobel Laureate was placed on an intravenous drip by her doctor’s assistant on Friday because she cannot eat, has low blood pressure. Nyan Win says Burmese authorities have refused to grant the assistant permission to visit her again at her home while her physician is being detained by police on unspecified charges. australianetworknews.com, 10 May 2009 The US government demanded Monday that Burma’s military junta grant “immediate” access for opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi to see her detained doctor, expressing fears for her condition. “The United States government is concerned about reports that Aung San Suu Kyi needs medical care and that Burmese authorities have detained her primary personal physician, Dr Tin Myo Win,” State Department spokesman Ian Kelly said. “We urge the Burmese regime to allow Aung San Suu Kyi to receive immediate medical care from Dr Tin Myo Win,” he said in a statement. “We further call on the regime to permit Aung San Suu Kyi to meet with her personal attorney immediately,” Kelly added, while also restating US demands for the regime to free Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest. Tin Myo Win has been detained since last week on unspecified charges and the physician’s assistant, Dr Pyone Moe Ei, was refused access over the weekend. But on Monday the assistant entered Aung San Suu Kyi’s house at around lunchtime and was still there about three hours later, witnesses said. AFP, 11 May 2009 Last week’s incident — initially thought to be the first case of someone creeping unnoticed into Suu Kyi’s closely guarded compound — has raised fears that the Nobel Peace laureate might have been ensnared in activities that could put her in further legal trouble. Authorities on Tuesday tightened security in the back of Suu Kyi’s lakeside home. Workers rolled barbed wire along the water’s edge, where a newly erected fence of tall wooden poles was built, according to witnesses who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals. A news report in a Burmese-language Web site published two photos said to have been found in the digital camera of the visitor, identified by the U.S. Embassy as John William Yettaw. One photo shows a heavyset, middle-aged man posing for a self-portrait in front of a mirror. The report says Yettaw is from Falcon, Missouri, USA. The Web site’s report also said on arrival last week at Suu Kyi’s house, Yettaw first met her two female assistants — a mother and daughter who are her sole allowed companions — and told Page 61 of 226

them he was tired and hungry after the swim and has diabetes. The two women, supporters of Suu Kyi’s party, were said to have given him food. One of many strict rules the junta imposes on citizens is that they must notify local officials about any overnight visitor who is not a family member. The law also states that foreigners are not allowed to spend the night at a local’s home. Some members of Suu Kyi’s party, the National League for Democracy, have been jailed for about two weeks for violating that law. “I’m not really concerned she could be penalized for this break-in because she didn’t invite him in,” said Nyan Win, adding that it was worrisome how easily the man accessed her home. “My main concern is her security.” AP, 12 May 2009 The political party of detained Burma pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi says her health has improved after she suffered dehydration and low blood pressure last week. National League for Democracy spokesman Nyan Win said Tuesday that one of the Nobel laureate’s medics, Dr. Pyone Moe Ei, was allowed to visit Suu Kyi Monday afternoon at her lakeside home and reported that her condition has improved. Burma Net News, 12 May 2009 If you look at these and earlier incidents in light of basic humanity, law and human rights you can see a pattern of willful negligence by the regime. Of course, in Burma the local population is used to neglect. The fact is that Suu Kyi has been detained illegally for 13 years, with no just cause and only the minimum of proper medical treatment, which could lead to an early death or a premature loss of physical strength. The junta’s rubber-band law could find a way to keep her under house arrest. Or perhaps Suu Kyi does develop a serious illness, effectively limiting her leadership ability. Or, if the regime does release her—somehow seeing a political gain in that act—it could always fabricate a new reason for her arrest, as it did in 2003. Kyaw Zwa Moe, Irrawaddy, 12 May 2009 The ASEAN Inter-Parliamentary Myanmar Caucus (AIPMC) is gravely concerned about the lack of proper medical monitoring, attention and care given to the health condition of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi by the country’s military regime. The organisation repeats its call for constant and adequate medical attention to be given to her especially following recent reports indicating that she had suffered from low blood pressure and dehydration and has had difficulty eating. Parliamentarians from the ASEAN region strongly call on ASEAN Heads of State and its foreign missions to immediately intervene and make necessary efforts in ensuring the regime complies with basic human rights principles, as subscribed to in the ASEAN Charter, and adequately tend to Daw Aung Suu Kyi’s situation. Burma Net News, 12 May 2009 Burma’s military government has expelled two American journalists who were teaching feature writing and photography to students in the country’s second largest city of Mandalay. Jerry Redfern and Karen Coates on Monday said they were arrested on the evening of May 6 at their hotel room in Mandalay and were taken to Rangoon on a train and deported to Bangkok the following day. In a statement, the two journalists admitted teaching Burmese students non-fiction feature writing and photography, under an arrangement facilitated by the American Center in Rangoon and approved by the Burma’s Press Scrutiny Board. Mizzima, 12 May 2009 The 2009 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights Committee has therefore chosen Min Ko Naing to be this year’s prizewinner. Min Ko Naing and his colleagues have devoted themselves to Burma’s democratization, and it is their devotion that we hope to remember and share as we commemorate the May 18 Gwangju Uprising. The committee sincerely desires that Min Ko Naing and other political prisoners be released as soon as possible, and hopes that democracy will truly take root in this country. AHRC, 12 May 2009 In a bid to give a leg up to bilateral ties between military-ruled Burma and North Korea, a sports and physical health delegation from North Korea is currently visiting Burma. Burma’s state-owned newspaper, the New Light of Burma, on Wednesday carried a front page story of the Burmese Prime Minister General Thein Sein meeting the North Korean delegation led by Mr. Pak Hak Son, chairman of the physical Page 62 of 226

education and sports commission, at the Government Office in Naypyidaw. In October 2007, Burma’s Prime Minister Nyan Win paid the first visit to Pyong Yang. The visit was followed by exchanges including the visit of Burma’s Sports Minister, Brig. Gen. Thura Aye Myint along with senior military officers, in early 2008. Both Burma and North Korea have attracted international criticism, with the former US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice terming them as “Outposts of tyranny”. Mizzima, 13 May 2009 The state-run newspapers The New Light of Burma and The Mirror have published no new information since the news of the man’s arrest last week. However, state-friendly Web sites are spewing out damaging allegations that could hurt the pro-democracy leader’s image among her non-supporters, and—most dangerous of all—provide an unsubstantiated foundation to deny her release from house arrest, which is set to expire this month. The People Media Voice, an online journal, quoting a pro-junta Web site, reported that the detained democracy leader could be sentenced to three-years in prison under Article 22 if she is convicted of failing to inform authorities that the US man entered her home and spent the night. Irrawaddy, 13 May 2009 The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) can today confirm that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her two live-in party members Daw Khin Khin Win and her daughter Win Ma Ma and an American man, John William Yettaw were all charged under section 22 of the State Protection Act. The charges relate to violating the rules and regulations surrounding her house arrest. All four appeared at a special court in Insein Prison compound to hear the charges against them. Today, the judge read out the charges to them in court. The judge did not ask any questions. The judge ordered the defendants to return to court again on May 18, 2009. The court is located in Insein prison compound. The court was presided over by the Rangoon Western District Justice Thaung Nyunt, and Nyi Nyi Soe, in the presence of district legal advisor Myint Kyaing. The defendants are allowed to have lawyers. They are U Kyi Win and U Hla Myo Myint. The American John William Yettaw also faces an additional charge under immigration law, although the details are not yet known. He appeared at a separate court hearing on this charge. According to the latest information, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Pa Pa were not sent back to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s home. All of them are being held in Insein prison now. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Daw Khin Khin Win and her daughter Win Ma Ma were taken to Insein prison from Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s home early this morning by armed escort. John William Yettaw was taken from Aung Tha Pyay police interrogation center to Insein prison to appear at the court hearing this morning. AAPP, 14 May 2009

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Official Trial Record dated 14 May 2009 on Aung San Suu Kyi at Insein Prison, MMK, 22 May 2009

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NLD Statement dated 14 May 2009 Burmese authorities allowed a U.S. diplomat to visit an American arrested last week for swimming across a lake to sneak into the home of detained democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, according to a state television report Wednesday. Burmese state television showed a still photo of John William Yettaw meeting with consular chief Colin Furst. A U.S. diplomat confirmed the meeting, saying it lasted 30 minutes and that Yettaw appeared to be in good spirits and said he had been treated well. The diplomat, who insisted on anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the press, said that Yettaw had not yet been formally charged with any crime. Burma’s state-run newspapers reported last week that Yettaw, 53, of Falcon, Missouri, swam about 1 1/4 miles (2 kilometers) on the night of May 3 to the lakeside home of the 63-yearold Suu Kyi and left the same way on the night of May 5, before being arrested the next morning. The report said his motive was under investigation. AP, 14 May 2009 The EU on Wednesday voiced concern over the health of Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, urging the junta to allow “immediate and proper health care” for the ailing pro-democracy figure. “The European Union expresses its strong concern following reports on the health of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,” the Czech EU presidency said in a statement on behalf of the 27 EU member states, also renewing the call for her unconditional release from house arrest. “The EU calls on the authorities of Burma to guarantee for Ms Suu Kyi immediate and proper medical care, as well as access for her personal attorney,” the statement Page 65 of 226

added. The European Union also voiced concern over the recent arrest of her personal physician Tin Myo Win. “On the sad occasion of the anniversary of Ms Suu Kyi’s detention, the EU urges the authorities to halt systematic torture and denial of health care to prisoners and to release all political prisoners,” the statement said. AFP, 14 May 2009 Burma’s military junta has charged democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi with breaching the terms of her house arrest over an incident in which a US man swam across a lake and entered her home. The 63-year-old opposition leader faces trial on May 18 in what critics said was an excuse for the country’s generals to extend the latest period of her detention, which was due to expire in less than two week. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate and her two maids appeared in court at the notorious Insein Prison near Rangoon, hours after police whisked her away from the residence where she has been detained most of the past two decades. “The authorities have charged Aung San Suu Kyi and her two maids” under the Law Safeguarding the State from the Dangers of Subversive Elements, lawyer Hla Myo Myint said. Suu Kyi and the others face a prison term of between three and five years, the lawyer said, which would leave her behind bars next year when the junta has said it will make good on a long-standing vow to hold fresh elections. “This is the cunning plan of the regime – to put Aung San Suu Kyi in continuous detention beyond the six years allowed by the law they used to justify the detention,” Aung Din, executive director of the Washington-based US Campaign for Burma, said in a statement. AFP, 14 May 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed “grave concern” on Thursday over reports that Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi was charged with violating her house arrest and could face new jail time. “The Secretary-General is gravely concerned about the news that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has been moved to the Insein Prison to face criminal charges,” U.N. spokeswoman Marie Okabe told reporters. She said Ban believes Suu Kyi “is an essential partner for dialogue in Burma’s national reconciliation and calls on the government not to take any further action that could undermine this important process.” Ban is convinced that Suu Kyi and all others in the country formerly known as Burma “who have a contribution to make to the future of their country” should be free to do so, Okabe said. Reuters, 14 May 2009 The United Nations special expert for human rights in Burma called Thursday for the “unconditional release’ of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Tomas Ojea Quintana, the special rapporteur, said the detention of Suu Kyi was unlawful, both according to international law and Burma’s own domestic legislation. The UN expert said the opposition leader could not be blamed for the intrusion into her home. “Since her house is well guarded by security forces, the responsibility for preventing such intrusions, and alerting the authorities, lies with the security forces and not with Aung San Suu Kyi and her aides,” Ojea Quintana said. He also said that “all 2,156 prisoners of conscience currently detained by the authorities should be released before the 2010 elections.” Earth Times, 14 May 2009 Norway on Thursday expressed “concern” over the treatment of Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi who was charged with allowing an unauthorized US national to visit her Rangoon home. “The Norwegian government is concerned over the reports that Aung San Suu Kyi has been imprisoned and demands her immediate release,” Foreign Minister Jonas gahr Store said in a statement. “The imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi is a step in the wrong direction,” Store said, adding that Norwegian diplomats had been instructed to raise the matter with countries in the region including China and India. The Norwegian foreign minsiter also urged that Suu Kyi be given adequate medical treatment, citing reports over her poor health. Former Norweigan Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik who heads the Oslo Centre for Peace and Human Rights said he was not surprised over Suu Kyi’s arrest, noting that her current sentence was soon due to expire. “The Burmese junta will try to use this incident as an excuse to detain her in the years to come. The international community must stand together and demand her immediate release,” Bondevik said. Earth Times, 14 May 2009

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There is “no justification” for the new charges brought against Burma’s pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi by the country’s junta on Thursday, the European Union’s special envoy Piero Fassino said. “There is no justification” for the decision to charge her with breaching the terms of her house arrest and put her on trial next Monday, he told Italy’s Channel 5 television. Fassino said the international community should use “every possible means to press for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi as well as the 2,000 other political prisoners who are held in Burmese jails.” The Italian envoy said that Europe should work with the United States and Asian countries to “make the Burmese junta understand that its oppressive and dictatorial policy is unacceptable for the international community.” Eubusiness.com, 14 May 2009 British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said the Burmese military government was clearly looking for any pretext to extend Ms Suu Kyi’s detention. “I am deeply disturbed that Aung San Suu Kyi may be charged with breaching the terms of her detention,” Mr Brown said in a statement. Lawyer Kyi Win has blamed Mr Yettaw for her detention, calling him a “fool”. BBC, 14 May 2009 Canada on Thursday called on Burma to release all political prisoners, specifically naming pro-democracy activist and Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. “Our government is alarmed by the charges laid against Aung San Suu Kyi, and we call for her immediate release, along with all political prisoners in Burma,” Canada’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Peter Kent said in the House of Commons. AFP, 14 May 2009 Australia has called for the immediate release of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi after Burmese authorities sent her to prison over an unauthorised visit by an American. Foreign Minister Stephen Smith expressed grave concern over the latest chapter in Ms Suu Kyi’s incarceration. “It is Australia’s longstanding position - shared by governments of both political persuasions - that she should be released immediately and unconditionally and I repeat that today,” he told parliament. Opposition foreign affairs spokeswoman Julie Bishop told parliament the military junta had ignored the will of the majority of Burmese people. Ms Bishop travelled to Burma in 1995 and met Ms Suu Kyi. Ms Suu Kyi said at the time that she was “a prisoner in her own country”. The Sydney Morning Herald, 14 May 2009 Germany called Thursday on Burma to halt the prosecution of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The Foreign Ministry in Berlin said it was ‘very deeply concerned about her situation and health.’ A spokesman, Jens Ploetner, said the Burmese government should drop the charges and end her state of house arrest. monstersandcritics.com, 14 May 2009 The US State Department expressed concern Thursday after Burma’s military junta detained and charged pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi with breaching the terms of her house arrest. “We have seen this report, which is certainly troubling if true,” State Department spokesman Ian Kelly said about Suu Kyi’s expected trial on Monday to face the charges, which carry a maximum jail term of five years. US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton “has seen it as well, and has asked the Department to work to get more information,” added Kelly. AFP, 14 May 2009 Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is urging Burma to immediately release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Clinton told reporters at the State Department on Thursday that she was deeply troubled by Burma’s “baseless charge” against the Nobel Peace laureate. She says the government is looking for a “pretext” to place further unjust restrictions on Suu Kyi. AP, 14 May 2009 National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma, which describes itself as the country’s government-in-exile, said the junta was using the incident to extend Suu Kyi’s detention. “It is nothing more than a political ploy to hoodwink the international community so that it can keep Suu Kyi under lock and key while the military maneuvers its way to election victory on 2010,” the group’s Prime Minister Sein Win was quoted as saying in a statement. AP, 14 May 2009 Page 67 of 226

The 10-member Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN), one of the few groups that allows Burma as a member, was “concerned” by the latest events there, Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva told Reuters. “We would like to see positive steps being taken according to the roadmap. It’s very important the political process is inclusive,” he said. 14 May 2009 Western governments are condemning the new charges brought against Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown says the military, which has kept her under house arrest for years wanted any excuse to extend her detention. The European Union and the United States have also expressed concern. However, there has been no immediate response from ASEAN, the regional bloc which includes Burma. Amnesty International is urging the United Nations, China, Japan and ASEAN nations to push for the “immediate release” of Burma’s pro-democracy leader. The rights group says the UN Security Council must intervene after Aung San Suu Kyi was moved to prison and charged. Radioaustralianews.net.au, 15 May 2009 Amnesty International called on the UN Security Council and Burma’s Asian neighbours to urgently intervene to secure Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s release from prison. “The government of Burma must free Daw Aung San Suu Kyi at once, without condition, and not return her to house arrest,” said Benjamin Zawacki, Amnesty International’s Burma expert. “In the absence of a unified international voice, the Burmese government will continue to act in utter disregard for human rights. Now more than ever, the Security Council and ASEAN member states must send an unequivocal signal to the generals that they can no longer act with impunity,” Zawacki concluded. AI, 14 May 2009 Mervyn Thomas, CSW’s Chief Executive, said: “The treatment of Aung San Suu Kyi by the Burmese military dictatorship is inhumane. The charges made today are outrageous. She cannot be held responsible for the actions of the uninvited American intruder, especially as reports indicate that although she pleaded with him to leave, he insisted on staying. It is essential that the UN and ASEAN, and key members of the international community such as China and India, act immediately to secure her release and safety, and the release of all her associates. She has committed no crime whatsoever, her detention violates international law, and the regime must not be given any excuse to continue to hold her captive.” CSW, 14 May 2009 The members of the Sakharov Network protest against the imprisonment of fellow Sakharov Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of Burma’s pro-democracy opposition, who has been under house arrest since May 2003 and who was jailed today. She and the two women who live with her were taken to Insein prison in a north Rangoon suburb today because, according to military officials, they violated the terms of her house arrest by allowing an American citizen to gain access to her home. Her trial is to begin on Monday. Reporters Without Borders, 14 May 2009 The Nobel Peace Prize awards committee issued a rare public statement Friday to condemn the imprisonment of 1991 peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and to demand her immediate release. The secretive Nobel committee traditionally does not comment on past laureates. However, its non-voting secretary Geir Lundestad said they are deeply concerned about Suu Kyi and had made earlier appeals on her behalf. “We sent this because it is a matter of the life and health of a laureate,” Lundestad told The Associated Press. The five-member committee said in the statement that it “protests strongly against the way in which the government of Burma has treated Aung San Suu Kyi. Her recent detention in prison is totally unacceptable. She has done nothing wrong.” AP, 15 May 2009 Human Rights Watch called on China and India, Burma’s closest allies, to pressure the ruling generals to free Suu Kyi. The New York-based group said the charges against her are part of an intensified campaign against pro-democracy activists that has brought increased arrests as the regime seeks to crush the opposition before elections. The junta plans a ballot in 2010 after passing a constitution last year that it said Page 68 of 226

was backed by 92 percent of voters. The NLD and other groups have denounced the charter, which bars Suu Kyi from holding office. “China, India, Singapore, Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries should be calling for a genuine and participatory political process in Burma, which means serious public pressure for the release of political opponents,” said Elaine Pearson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch. Bloomberg.com, 15 May 2009 New Zealand on Friday joined the international condemnation of the imprisonment of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi as Foreign Minister Murray McCully said the only thing the Burma opposition leader was guilty of was standing up for the rights of her country’s people in the face of appalling repression. “This action is yet another setback for Burma and throws more doubt over the credibility of the planned 2010 elections,” McCully said, referring to voting planned by the ruling military junta in the country once known as Burma. “The Burmese government must release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately, and take meaningful steps towards the restoration of democracy.” monstersandcritics.com, 15 May 2009 UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said he was “gravely concerned” while the UN special envoy on human rights in Burma, Tomas Ojea Quintana, called for Aung San Suu Kyi to be freed, and said her detention broke the country’s laws. sbs.com.au, 15 May 2009 The European Union joined international criticism of Burma’s military rulers on Friday for pressing new charges against detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “I deeply regret that Nobel Peace Prize winner Mrs Aung San Suu Kyi has been arrested by the authorities of Burma and charged with violating the terms of her detention,” European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso said in a statement. “In fact, instead of being arrested she should have been released from house arrest, which was a clear violation of international law as determined by the United Nations.” Reuters, 15 May 2009 Former Czech President Vaclav Havel is calling on U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to intervene to ensure the release of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Havel says he is shocked and “gravely concerned” about Suu Kyi because of her poor health and the harsh conditions she endures in prison. AP, 15 May 2009 Two top US senators urged Burma to free pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and urged “reformminded” members of its ruling junta to step forward to help forge new ties with the United States. “Now is the time for reform-minded leaders within the military junta to step forward and be heard,” said Democratic Senator John Kerry and Republican Senator Richard Lugar, the top Senate Foreign Relations Committee members. AFP, 15 May 2009 Japan voiced “serious concern” Friday about Burma moving Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s prodemocracy leader, to prison from house arrest Thursday. “We are closely watching the development with serious concern,” Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone said at a news conference. “We have conveyed this message to the Burmese government.” Nakasone said the Foreign Ministry told Burmese Ambassador to Japan Hla Myint earlier Friday that Japan wants the junta to advance democracy with the participation of “all related people,” including Suu Kyi, the 63-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Nakasone said Japan expects Burma to hold a general election in 2010 as a way acceptable to the international community. Suu Kyi has been charged in connection with an incident last week in which a U.S. citizen is accused of swimming across a lake and sneaking into her house to visit her. Japan Today, 15 May 2009 Thin Thin Aung, Presidium Board Member of Women’s League of Burma, said: “We clearly make this call that the international community should not be silent and also act very urgently and firmly, and send the strong signal to the regime that they can no longer act with impunity, such kind of violations of basic human rights and democratic rights for her and all other political prisoners.” Burma’s political opposition in exile said the arrest was timed to undermine their attempts at answering the current government’s call for reform. Page 69 of 226

Nyo Ohn Myint, National Coalition of the Union of Burma, said: “This is unfairly and politically motivated and a setup for her not to participate in the political process now and in the future. We think this arrest is a response by the regime to the NLD offer just a few weeks ago. NLD offered that we would like to negotiate the 7 Step Road. We try to comprise.” Channel News Asia, 15 May 2009 Reporters Without Borders condemns a new wave of obstacles that Burma’s military government has imposed on Internet usage as well as its expulsion of two American journalism teachers on 6 May. It is getting steadily harder for Burmese to send emails or access websites while all means of communication were cut yesterday around opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s home. “The increased restrictions on Internet usage following Aung San Suu Kyi’s reimprisonment suggest that the military government is once again trying to isolate Burma, as it does whenever there is political tension,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We firmly condemn this behavior and appeal to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to put more pressure on the government to allow the free flow of information.” It is now extremely difficult to access websites. A Rangoon-based journalist told Reporters Without Borders: “For the past five days, it has been taking hours to open foreign websites, especially email sites, but no one knows why.” It took an average of one hour to send a single email message, he said. “This is almost certainly a deliberate policy, so that no reports or photos can easily be sent out of the country.” In practice, emailing is now very restricted. When an Internet user tries to connect to Gmail, the most popular email service in Burma, the browser often disconnects, treating Gmail as an “illegal” website. 15 May 2009 A number of Indonesian legislators grouped in the Asean Inter-Parliamentary Myanmar Caucus (AIPMC) have urged President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono to take proactive steps to help Burma democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi in Rangoon, Indonesia’s Antara news agency reported Friday. Two members of the group, Sidarto Danusubroto and Marzuki Darusman, said here Friday the AIPMC had written to the President asking him to obtain complete information on Suu Kyi’s recent detention in Burma. Bernama, 15 May 2009 Famed movie actors George Clooney, Brad Pitt and Matt Damon and others from the Not On Our Watch advocacy group on Friday called for the immediate release from prison of Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Also joining the effort were rockstar Bono, singer Madonna, director Steven Spielberg, Nobel Laureates professor Elie Wiesel and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, former US secretary of state Madeleine Albright and US Senator John McCain. The New York-based group said the imprisonment of Suu Kyi this week in Rangoon by the military junta is unlawful. The group joined the growing chorus of government leaders and human rights groups that have demanded her release. monstersandcritics.com, 15 May 2009 1. Recently, the president of East Timor and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Jose Ramos-Horta claimed that, if the SPDC does not immediately release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, he will urge the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to investigate and prosecute Sen. Gen. Than Shwe and other responsible leaders of the SPDC for the crimes they have committed over the years. The Burma Lawyers’ Council welcomes and fully supports Mr. Ramos-Horta’s statement. 2. The ICC may have jurisdiction to investigate and/or prosecute heinous crimes which have been committed and are being committed if a given state’s judicial system is unable or unwilling to investigate and take legal action to ensure justice. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is being detained under the State Protection Law of 1975. The government is permitted to detain her for five years under that law. Contrary to law, they have already held her in detention for almost six years. Despite that she is being unlawfully detained Burma’s judiciary did not provide any protection. According to Article 9 of that Law, restrictions may be laid down by the Central Board only, not the judiciary. However, judiciary has admitted the complaint of the government to extend her detention by accusing her of violating the conditions of her original detention under the State Protection Law of 1975. This is a blatant disregard of the Burma’s judiciary for the rule of law. It is evident that Burma’s judicial system is unable or unwilling to ensure justice. Page 70 of 226

3. Illegal detention of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners causes commission of international crime provided for in the Rome Statute of the ICC, article 7 Crimes Against Humanity, subarticle 1(e) which states that a crime against humanity is imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law. According to Article 14, “a State Party may refer to the Prosecutor a situation in which one or more crimes within the jurisdiction of the Court appear to have been committed.” Under article 15(1), should a “situation” be referred by a State Party, the Prosecutor may initiate investigations on the basis of information related to crimes within the jurisdiction of the Court. 4. Some Generals in the Army may desire a genuine national reconciliation and hold the belief that the military should not interfere in politics. However, Sen. Gen. Than Shwe and other military officials have been committing heinous crimes repeatedly, to strengthen their political power, with impunity given that judiciary did not take any action, denying the principles of the rule of law. If there is no rule of law, a genuine national reconciliation will never become a reality in Burma. The Burma Lawyers’ Council requests the international community to work together to restore the rule of law in Burma, by seeking the power of the International Criminal Court. Burma Lawyers’ Council, 16 May 2009 President Barack Obama has formally extended US sanctions against Burma amid latest tensions over detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi who was put on trial on charges of allowing a US national to visit her home without permission from the authorities. “I have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency with respect to Burma, and maintain the sanctions against Rangoon to respond to this threat,” Obama told the Congress. The Friday’s move comes despite an official review of the US policy on Burma currently underway, Geo TV reported Saturday. Aung San Suu Kyi was put on trial Thursday for allowing a US national to visit her home, where she has been under detention for the past six years. After an initial hearing, the trial was scheduled to be continued May 18. The Nobel laureate was taken from her family compound Thursday and kept at Insein Prison after the hearing. IANS, 16 May 2009 US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said she was deeply troubled by Burma’s decision to charge Suu Kyi for a “baseless crime,” and British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said he was “deeply disturbed” by the development, echoing calls by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon for her immediate release. arabtimesonline.com, 16 May 2009 “Everyone is very angry with this wretched American,” Suu Kyi’s attorney, Kyi Win, told reporters. “He is the cause of all these problems.” columbiamissourian.com, 16 May 2009 Burma’s military rulers disbarred a prominent lawyer who applied to defend pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi in her upcoming trial, the attorney said on Saturday. Lawyer Aung Thein said Saturday that he was dismissed from the country’s Bar Council on Friday, a day after he applied to represent Suu Kyi. He has defended political activists in the past and was earlier jailed for four months for contempt of court. AP, 16 May 2009 Burma’s junta has released the doctor of Aung San Suu Kyi, his family said, almost two weeks after he was detained in relation to an incident in which a US man swam to the democracy icon’s house. Tin Myo Win was arrested on May 7 as he tried to give medical care to Aung San Suu Kyi following the bizarre visit by the American, which has since led to the Opposition leader being charged with breaching her house arrest. “He was released from detention last night, Saturday, at about 7.00 pm. According to him his health situation is good,” one of Tin Myo Win’s family members told AFP, asking not to be identified. His release comes days after the US government demanded that Burma’s military rulers should grant Tin Myo Win “immediate” access to see the 63-year-old Aung San Suu Kyi, amid fears for her health. AFP, 17 May 2009 In unusually sharp criticism from a Southeast Asian nation, Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Alberto Romulo said Sunday that his government was “deeply troubled and outraged” over the “trumped-up Page 71 of 226

charges”against Suu Kyi. “We urge the government of Burma to resolve the matter speedily and to release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately and unconditionally,” he said. indopia.in, 18 May 2009

18 May 2008, Monday, First Day Court Trial
Riot police behind barbed wire barricades ringed a notorious prison where pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi went on trial Monday for allegedly harboring an American man who swam to her lakeside home. Security forces blocked all roads leading to the prison as several hundred riot police, many armed with guns, batons and shields, guarded the perimeter of Insein, where the regime has for years incarcerated political prisoners. The tight security came as activist groups, which spearheaded an uprising against Burma’s military rulers in 2007, called for peaceful protest rallies in front of Rangoon’s Insein prison until Suu Kyi is freed. More than 100 members of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy were able to pass through the first ring of barricades around the prison but not the inner one. One young protester was seen being taken away by police. The group was led by Win Tin, a leading member of the league who was freed last September after 19 years of imprisonment for exposing human rights violations in Burma’s prisons. Authorities said the trial began about 10:30 a.m. (0300 GMT) but no other information was immediately available. In Monday’s court session, Kyi Win said Suu Kyi’s defense team will ask for an open trial and may also request bail. The prosecution is expected to call 22 witnesses during the trial. Kyi Win said Suu Kyi was ready to tell her side of the story. “She has always been ready to tell the truth,” he said. The ambassadors of Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy as well as an Australian diplomat were barred from entering the prison, but the U.S. consul was allowed into the prison compound since a U.S. citizen, John William Yettaw, also was on trial. U.S. Embassy spokesman Drake Wiesert said it was unclear if the consul would be allowed to attend the court proceedings, or whether Yettaw was represented by a lawyer. On the eve of Suu Kyi’s trial, her defense lawyer said she was innocent of the charges, which could put her into prison for up to five years. indopia.in, 18 May 2009 The first day of the trial against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her colleagues Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma and US citizen John William Yettaw began today at 10.30 am and finished this afternoon at around 2 pm local time. Four lawyers (U Kyi Win, U Hla Myo Myint, U Nyan Win and Daw Khin Htay Kywe) represented Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. Daw Khin Htay Kywe, U Hla Myo Myint and U Nyan Win also represented National League for Democracy party members Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma. Lawyer U Khin Maung Oo represented John William Yettaw. There are two judges in the case, U Thaung Nyunt from Rangoon Northern District Court and U Nyi Nyi Soe from Rangoon Western District Court. Lt. Colonel Police Special Branch Officer Zaw Min Aung read out the statement of prosecution against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her colleagues and John William Yettaw. Her lawyers were able to raise counterquestions to Zaw Min Aung. Security preparations have been underway since yesterday evening. Insein Road is closed off to traffic, and barbed wire fencing has been erected. Riot police; members of the regimeaffiliated militia, Swan Arr Shin; the regime’s social organisation Union Solidarity and Development Association; and the Fire Brigade were all present. This morning NLD Youth members distributed black ribbons and possibly armbands. NLD Youth member Htwe Thein and others were arrested and taken away by security officers. They have now been released and are back at their homes. NLD co-founder and Central Executive Committee member U Win Tin and hundreds of NLD members and supporters tried to enter Insein Prison compound to listen to the court hearing, but were prevented from doing so by security forces. Some youth and monks were seen wearing headbands and holding placards which said, “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is not guilty.” Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her colleagues are being held in a guesthouse facility located within Insein prison compound. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi passed on a message that she is fine, and prays that others are in good health. Trial will resume at 10 am tomorrow, Tuesday 19 May. AAPP

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The first day of the trial heard testimony from police Lt. Col. Zaw Min Aung, the first of 22 scheduled prosecution witnesses, said Nyan Win. The officer, who signed the official criminal complaint on the case, laid out the prosecution’s basic case. The Daily Mail, 18 May 2009 The court on Monday heard two witnesses, one in Aung San Suu Kyi’s case and one in Yettaw’s, it said. theage.com.au, 18 May 2009 On May 18 Aung San Suu Kyi was put on trial, charged with breaching the terms of her house arrest after an American man, John Yettaw, swam to her house and refused to leave. The dictatorship is using the visit as an opportunity to extend her detention, which was expected to expire this month. Her trial is ongoing and she could face a further five years in detention. www.64forsuu.org Win Tin, a member of her party, the National League for Democracy (NLD), who spent 19 years in isolation in the jail as a political prisoner, was one of the protesters. In a telephone interview with The Independent he said the trial was simply a ploy to extend her detention, which is about to expire. “They are using this to extend her house arrest and to avoid her being present during the elections,” said the 79-yearold former journalist. “That way, she cannot meet the people, she cannot say anything against the election. She will be absent.” Elections under a new, widely criticised constitution are scheduled for next year. 18 May 2009 ‘We call all political forces for Free Aung San Suu Kyi to mobilise all over Burma, by holding praying sessions in homes, places of worship ... and holding silent, peaceful rallies in front of Insein prison,’ said a statement from three activist groups. The groups included an organisation of Buddhist monks, who were at the forefront of the 2007 protests, which were brutally crushed by the regime. The Daily Mail, 18 May 2009 Prime Minister Dr Sein Win said, “It is nothing more than a political ploy to hoodwink the international community so that they can keep Daw Aung San Suu Kyi under lock and key while the military maneuvers its way to election victory in 2010. This should not be allowed to happen.” It is time to stop the generals. The international community should closely monitor the situation and take effective action if the generals decide to continue persecuting Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. Lest we forget, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is Burma’s democracy icon and only hope for long-lasting peace in the country. NCGUB, 18 May 2009 The US citizen, John W. Yettaw, who swam across Inya Lake and entered Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s (Daw Suu) residence, is clearly a mentally unbalanced person. He should have been sent to a mental hospital for treatment and the security for Daw Suu should have been enhanced. Instead, the SPDC military dictatorship is accusing Daw Suu of protecting a criminal and preparing to subject her to a criminal trial, in the notorious Insein Jail. Obviously, the SPDC is using the incident as an opportunity to cause even more harm to Daw Suu, similar to the attack on her and her entourage, at Depayin. It is clear that under influence of the perverted ideology of total control, the SPDC dictators have no sense yet for national reconciliation, peace and justice. We, the KNU, strongly condemn this vengeful and confrontational act by the SPDC dictatorship against the people’s leader, Daw Suu, and call upon it to release her and all the political prisoners immediately. It is our perception that the dictatorship has been emboldened to the extent of committing crimes tantamount to crimes against humanity, time and again, by the policy of appeasement and pseudonational reconciliation process promoted by some wooly-headed Burma experts, INGOs and opportunist groups. In conclusion, we call upon justice and peace loving leaders of the world to concertedly push the SPDC military dictatorship onto the right tract of meaningful dialogue, with leaders of democratic and ethnic forces, for genuine national reconciliation, lasting peace and progress. Karen National Union Burma risks global isolation because its continued oppression of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, British Foreign Secretary David Miliband warned today. He slammed the “show trial” which started today and urged the authorities to begin a “constitutional process” to include Ms Suu Kyi’s party and other Page 73 of 226

minority groups. Only three weeks ago Mr Miliband and his EU counterparts extended two-year-old sanctions against Burma for another year and demanded the opposition leader’s release. Today the same ministers opted to wait and see the result of her new trial for allegedly breaching the terms of her house arrest. “We are very concerned by the situation in Burma,” said Mr Miliband. “The house arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi is bad enough but for her to be put on show trial just adds to the pain. Our position is that everything should be done to ensure that the Burmese government understands fully the need to create an inclusive constitutional process rather than a sham process, which needs to includes all of the minorities as well as the opposition.” He said it was vital that the Burmese regime understood the risks it was taking: “The EU has shown itself ready to help the people of Burma, but certainly the regime should be under no illusion about the isolation it brings upon itself through its actions.” Irish Examiner, 18 May 2009 China, India and other Asian countries should press Burma’s military leaders to drop charges against pro– democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and release her from house arrest, European Union foreign ministers said Monday. British Foreign Secretary David Miliband said there was an agreement at a meeting of the ministers here that the EU pursue fresh contacts with Burma’s Asian neighbours at talks in Vietnam next week. “It is right the EU put on the table all the potential ways of exercising influence including engagement and including sanctions, both of which will be undertaken with real vigor,” Miliband told reporters. The ministers discussed increasing sanctions against Burma’s junta, to help restore democracy in the Southeast Asian country, but failed to agree on new measures. Instead they will focus on putting pressure on countries like China, India and Thailand who could exert influence over Burma to change its ways. French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner in Paris called the trial a “scandalous provocation.” Miliband and other ministers said the EU was concerned about the trial and efforts by the military junta to shove through “sham” constitutional reforms. “The house arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi is bad enough, but for her to be put on a show trial just adds to her pain,’ he said in Brussels. EU foreign policy chief Javier Solana led the call for more sanctions, though others questioned whether existing EU punitive measures were working, including a travel ban on Burma’s political officials, an arms embargo and a freeze of assets in Europe. Sweden’s Carl Bildt said EU nations would pressure their counterparts from the 10–country Association of Southeast Asian Nations, which includes Burma, when they meet next week in Hanoi, Vietnam. Past efforts to cajole the Asian group to denounce Burma have failed. caycompass.com, 18 May 2009 Japan Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone has expressed concern over the indictment of detained prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and called for Burma’s military junta to give her humanitarian treatment. Nakasone conveyed his concern to Burma’s foreign minister, Nyan Win, during telephone talks Monday, officials said. The Japan Times, 18 May 2009 Affairs Secretary Alberto Romulo urged the government of Burma yesterday to “immediately and unconditionally” release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi as he expressed the Philippine government’s “outrage” over the filing of new charges against her just days before the expiration of her sixyear detention. “The Philippine government is deeply troubled and outraged over the filing of trumped-up charges against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her transfer to Insein prison, particularly when concerns have been raised regarding her health,” Secretary Romulo said. “We urge the government of Burma to resolve the matter speedily, and to release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately and unconditionally.” The secretary said the Burmese government should not be sidetracked by the filing of the trumped-up charges. “As we had conveyed earlier, it is high time for the Burmese government to carry out its own ‘Roadmap for Democracy,’ its avowed program of releasing political detainees, including unfettering the National League for Democracy, and allowing its unconditional participation in free elections,” Romulo said. “Fulfilling these commitments is long overdue.” Manila Bulletin, 18 May 2009 A statement issued late Monday by Thailand, which holds the rotating chairmanship of the regional bloc, expressed “grave concern about recent developments relating to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, given her fragile Page 74 of 226

health.” But Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva ruled out imposing sanctions as most western countries have done, saying he hoped Burma “will consider Asean as friends.” Manilatimes.net, 20 May 2009

19 May 2008, Tuesday
Burmese police were expected to give evidence on Tuesday against pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on the second day of a trial that has sparked international outrage. “The trial will continue with the official complaints by the police. We don’t know if Suu Kyi will speak today. All four will be in court,” a Burmese official told AFP on condition of anonymity. The first witness, a police colonel who filed the original complaint against her, gave evidence on Monday. A total of 22 witnesses are expected to testify -21 of them police officers. AFP, 19 May 2009 Burma’s tightly controlled state media has reported on the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi for the first time, giving a rare mention of the imprisoned pro-democracy leader. State television and radio carried brief items after the first day of proceedings, while the government mouthpiece New Light of Burma newspaper had a report on Tuesday. It was the biggest story on the back page of the English-language paper, but failed to knock a story about a state transport and agricultural scheme off the front page. The newspaper said that Yettaw now faced a third charge, brought by the Rangoon City Council Sanitation Department, of swimming in Inya Lake without permission. He is also charged with breaching security and immigration laws. Neither paper mentioned the fact that the trial was being held behind closed doors in the notorious Insein prison, where Aung San Suu Kyi is being held, only saying that it was taking place at Rangoon’s northern district court. theage.com.au, 19 May 2009 Win Tin, a leader of the National League for Democracy, spoke to The Irrawaddy regarding the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi. The matter of her security is totally in their hands. If the authorities don’t open up the compound, no person can enter it. At this time, the authorities have rejected her appeal and even charged her with another case. I believe that it is a conspiracy. I believe they did it because they don’t want to release her. They want to ban her from being involved in politics in the future. Ideally, they want to put her into prison. But politically, they can’t do that. The international community is voicing its concern and even demanding she be released. We also don’t accept the charges and demand she be released. Daw Suu is mentally strong and firm in her stand. Regarding the case of John W. Yettaw, she clearly told her lawyer that she didn’t breach any laws. Based on these facts, Daw Suu’s position is strong and firm. Although I haven’t seen her for years, based on our past experiences and her political stance and sacrifice during these 20 years, I can say that she will never feel depressed and give up or change her political stance. The truth is that it’s because of Daw Suu’s personal fame and the world’s recognition of her position. She has become the main enemy of the military regime. But putting aside personal fame and looking at things from the point of view of current politics, the situation has largely changed. In the past, we asked for a parliament to draw up a constitution in accordance with the 1990 election results, which we have consistently supported. Now, we recently called for parliament to review the constitution and for a dialogue with the military. We changed our position to be flexible in order to bring about a dialogue. Daw Suu is a key player if we are to solve the current political situation through a dialogue. Therefore, the present charges against Daw Suu mean that the generals are trying to eliminate her from the stage. I feel that they are trying to destroy the possibility of political dialogue and national reconciliation by political means.At first, we heard that Dr Tin Myo Win had also been brought to court and that there would be five persons in this case. But he was not on the list. Perhaps, he was under interrogation. Irrawaddy, 19 May 2009 Prosecutors in Burma picked up the pace of calling witnesses to the stand Tuesday, offering hope to Aung San Suu Kyi’s supporters that the opposition leader’s trial -- which nine Nobel laureates have called “a mockery” -- may end soon. Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party and diplomatic sources had worried the government might drag out the legal proceedings for several months, until the media lost Page 75 of 226

interest. The military junta would then quietly extend Suu Kyi’s detention well beyond next year’s planned elections, they feared. But at the end of proceedings Tuesday, party spokesman Nyan Win said the court had questioned five witnesses. A day earlier, the court had heard from only two of the 22 witnesses it has called. Nyan Win thinks the court might be speeding up the hearings so it can issue a verdict within seven days -before Suu Kyi’s latest round of home detention expires. “The trial is a mockery,” the nine Nobel Peace prize winners said in a letter to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Monday, urging him to intervene. “There is no judicial system in Burma,” the letter said. “It is clear that this is an excuse by the military junta to add trumped-up charges at a time when Daw Aung San Suu Kyis unlawful detention was scheduled to end May 27, 2009.” Signatories to the letter included Costa Rican President Oscar Arias and Archbishop Desmond Tutu. The case is being tried behind closed doors inside a prison compound near Rangoon. Police put up roadblocks outside, and turned away a group of Western diplomats who wanted to attend Monday. On Tuesday, however, a U.S. Embassy official was allowed to watch the proceedings. The governmentcontrolled media also made its first mention of the trial -- after carrying no reports about it before it began, or on its first day. Suu Kyi, 63, and two of her maids have been detained under Section 22 of the country’s legal code -- a law against subversion. If convicted, Suu Kyi could face three to five years in prison. The charges stem from May 3, when an American, John William Yettaw, allegedly swam almost two miles across the lake behind Suu Kyi’s crumbling, colonial-era home and stayed for two days. “Frankly, she does not believe she did any offense,” said Jared Genser, a Washington, D.C.-based lawyer who is one of the attorneys defending her. CNN, 19 May 2009 Burma’s pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi today said she was “ready to face anything” as her lawyer said the military junta appeared rushing her trial to keep her incarcerated on charges that she violated conditions of her detention by sheltering a US citizen. Press Trust of India, 19 May 2009 British footballing legend David Beckham has added his name to a list of celebrities calling for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi, as international pressure mounts on the Burmese junta on the second day of her trial. American-based charity foundation, Not On Our Watch, issued a statement supported by over 40 celebrities last week demanding the release of Suu Kyi. The charity was set up by a group of celebrities, including George Clooney and Brad Pitt. DVB, 19 May 2009 The UN Security Council is currently negotiating a possible statement reacting to the ongoing trial of Aung San Suu Kyi. If there is agreement on language and the type of statement (i.e. press or presidential) the Council may meet 20 May. Most members are in agreement with having a statement, although China has expressed reservations about interfering in what it considers Burma’s internal affairs. Japan and Russia also appear to be taking cautious positions. securitycouncilreport.org, 19 May 2009 French first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy meanwhile appealed for Aung San Suu Kyi’s release in an open letter to Burma. indiatimes.com, 19 May 2009 The mayor of Paris has called for the release in Burma of Nobel Laureate and pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi who is on trial on charges she violated the terms of her house arrest. Mayor Bertrand Delanoe joined other municipal officials at the Place de la Republique in eastern Paris on Tuesday where a large portrait of Suu Kyi was hung. Suu Kyi is an honorary citizen of Paris. eTaiwan News, 19 May 2009 British prime Minister Gordon Brown has sent a message of personal support and solidarity to the arrested Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, saying that she is “not alone” in her fight to bring back democracy in Burma. “We should not rest until you are able to play your rightful role in a free and secure Burma. I want you to know: you are not alone,” The Independent quoted Brown’s letter, as stating. ANI, 19 May 2009

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China hopes Burma can realize reconciliation, stability and development through dialogues of all parties, Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said here Tuesday. Ma made the remarks when answering a question concerning Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi at a regular press briefing. Xinhua, 19 May 2009 Pakistan on Tuesday lamented the trial of Burma pro-democracy leader and Nobel peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and called for her swift release, AFP reports. Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi described the trial as ‘unfortunate’and urged the Burmese government to consider reviewing its decision. ‘Her early release would serve the fundamental interests of Burma with which Pakistan enjoyed close cooperative relations,’ said Qureshi. 19 May 2009 Even as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations pressed for the release of detained Burmese prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi whose ill health is worrying the bloc, the military junta came under fire at the Philippine Senate on Tuesday for its continuing “harassment” of Suu Kyi, who was transferred from house arrest to prison while facing trial this week for new charges. Sen. Miriam Santiago, who chairs the Senate foreign relations committee, filed on Tuesday a resolution condemning the military regime’s actions, citing violations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Business Mirror, 19 May 2009 Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva said on Tuesday that his government wants to see neighbouring Burma follow a national reconciliation plan and Thailand does not want to intervene in the internal affairs of that country. Mr. Abhisit told journalists that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) which he chairs has issued a statement calling for the immediate release of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi who appeared at her trial in Insein prison in Rangoon on Monday. Thai News Agency, 19 May 2009

20 May 2008, Wednesday
Burma’s military regime will allow a few reporters from foreign and local news organizations to cover the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, an official said Wednesday. The announcement came after the first two days of hearings at Insein Prison near Rangoon were held behind closed doors, and it is the first time the junta has allowed media into the trial of a leading activist. “Ten journalists will go this afternoon to get the news from the trial,” a Burmese official said on the morning of the third day, without explaining the apparent change of policy. Five will be from foreign news outlets and five from local journals and magazines, the official said, without specifying which organizations would be allowed to report on the trial. The trial has so far heard from five police witnesses, with the only reports so far emerging through Aung San Suu Kyi’s legal team and Burma’s tightly controlled state media. The Wall Street Journal, 20 May 2009 The closed-door trial at the notorious Insein prison heard evidence from five witnesses, including four police who detained the American as he swam back across the lake after spending two nights at her house, a party spokesman said. “The witnesses described the situation when they arrested him. They said they watched him as he swam and at first they thought he was a thief,” Nyan Win, the spokesman for her National League for Democracy, told reporters. “But they said that they knew as soon as he came to the bank of the lake that he was a foreigner. Then they took him to special branch,” said Nyan Win, who was allowed to be in the court as part of Aung San Suu Kyi’s legal team. He said that the trial could finish by next week if the court continues to hear the case at the current rate. Around 100 party members gathered outside the prison also on Tuesday, including Win Tin, formerly Burma’s longest-serving political prisoner, while riot police manned a tight security cordon, witnesses said. manilatimes.net, 20 May 2009

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Around 20 ceiling fans stirred the humid air inside the concrete courtroom, part of a complex where many of Burma’s more than 2,000 political prisoners are held. In front of them sat two judges, while a stenographer clattered away in the corner. The trial heard from only one witness during the afternoon session of the trial - deputy police Major Tin Zaw Htun, who described the situation when he went to Aung San Suu Kyi’s house on May 7, the day after Yettaw’s arrest. Police had found Yettaw swimming back across Inya lake from the crumbling mansion, using a pair of homemade flippers and a large plastic bottle for buoyancy. Major Tin Zaw Htun exhibited some of the items that Yettaw allegedly left at the scene, demonstrating for the judges how a head-mounted torch worked and showing the judges some Muslim women’s clothing the American had apparently brought for Aung San Suu Kyi. Yettaw frequently consulted with his lawyer during the trial on Wednesday and at one point the former US military veteran bizarrely made a request to wear a pair of sunglasses in court. The motive for his nighttime swim remains unclear, but Aung San Suu Kyi’s party spokesman said that he may have had a very specific mission in mind - to protect her life after having a premonition she would be killed. ‘According to the police report, John Yettaw said that in my vision Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will be assassinated,’ said Mr Nyan Win, spokesman for the National League for Democracy. AFP, 20 May 2009 Yettaw on Wednesday also offered the first public clue to the motive for his actions, suggesting in a courtroom exchange that he had a premonition someone would try to kill the pro-democracy leader, according to Nyan Win, who attended the proceedings. His wife, Betty Yettaw, has said her husband wanted to talk to Suu Kyi as part of his research on forgiveness and resilience. AP, 22 May 2009 Defense counsels of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi said the trial on Wednesday was a ‘halfopen’ court but welcomed the authority’s permission to allow foreign diplomats and a few journalists to witness the trial. Kyi Win, Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyer, said all together 30 embassy officials and 10 journalists were present in the court session on Wednesday, where two witnesses were cross examined. Mizzima, 20 May 2009 Two photographers working for Japanese media were detained Wednesday by authorities for 20 minutes after they took shots of diplomats’ cars entering the prison, witnesses said. They were released after showing proof they were foreign correspondents. The trial adjourned Wednesday after two more police officers testified for the prosecution, including one who interviewed Suu Kyi after her arrest. He said Suu Kyi told him that she provided Yettaw with rehydration salts and several meals. The family of 53-year-old Yettaw, of Falcon, Missouri, describes him as a well-intentioned admirer of Suu Kyi who merely wanted to interview her, unaware of the possible consequences. Suu Kyi’s supporters have expressed anger at him for getting her into trouble. AP, 20 May 2009

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NLD Statement dated 21 May 2009 Nine Nobel Peace Prize winners are calling for fellow laureate and Burma pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi to be freed, calling her trial for violating her house arrest a ‘mockery,’ Costa Rica’s government said on Tuesday. “The trial of Aung San Suu Kyi is a mockery. There’s no legal system in Burma,’ the peace prize winners wrote in letters to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and Surin Pitsuwan, the Secretary General of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), according to a government statement. Costa Rican President Oscar Arias joined Desmond Tutu, Jody Williams, Rigoberta Menchu, Page 79 of 226

Adolfo Perez Esquivel, Wangari Mathaai, Shirin Ebadi, Betty Williams, and Mairead Corrigan Maguire in the demand. The pro-democracy leader’s protection was necessary for prosperity and stability in Burma and the whole of Southeast Asia, they said. The Straits Times, 20 May 2009 “Thank you very much for coming and for your support,” Suu Kyi, dressed in a pink blouse and marooncolored tied skirt, known as a longhi, told the diplomats after the hearing. “I hope to meet you in better days,” she said, smiling, before female police officers escorted her out of the court. Later at a meeting with diplomats from Russia, Thailand and Singapore at her prison guesthouse, Suu Kyi said she and two female assistants also on trial were being treated well. Singapore’s Foreign Ministry said she told the diplomats that national reconciliation was still possible “if all parties so wished.” “She also expressed the view that it was not too late for something good to come out of this unfortunate incident.” It was not clear if the trial would be open on Thursday. Mark Canning, Britain’s ambassador to Burma, said he saw little evidence that Suu Kyi was receiving a fair trial. “All the paraphernalia of the court room is there,” he told BBC television. “The judges, the prosecution, the defense. That’s all there, but I think this is a story where the conclusion is already scripted.” One Asian diplomat said: “They seem to want to improve the image of the trial by allowing us to be there.” Reuters, 20 May 2009 Generally speaking, the more depraved a military dictator is, the stupider his actions. This rough rule of thumb certainly seems to hold true for Than Shwe whose decision to place Burma’s much-persecuted prodemocracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, on trial on trumped-up charges has backfired spectacularly. If Burma’s senior general hoped to sideline Suu Kyi ahead of next year’s state-managed elections, the trial now under way in Insein prison is having the opposite effect. After a period in which her leadership of the National League for Democracy was increasingly questioned, Than Shwe has managed in the space of a week to re-unite the opposition and galvanise the international community in furious support of her. What British foreign secretary David Miliband calls the “show trial” in Rangoon has also drawn the spotlight back to the egregious human rights violations perpetrated by the regime in the wake of the failed 2007 uprising, known as the saffron revolution. Of grave concern is the plight of Burma’s more than 2,000 political prisoners who are held in a gulag of about 100 jails and labour camps spread across the country. A report entitled Burma’s Silent Killing Fields, published last week by the Thailand-based Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), a group comprising exiled activists and former prisoners, paints a horrific, case-by-case picture of systematic abuse including torture, deaths in custody, denial of medical assistance and a deliberate policy of transferring prisoners to remote regions to prevent family access and support. The Guardian, 20 May 2009 The European Union is asking China and other Asian nations to press Burma to drop charges against prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and free her from house arrest. EU officials said the issue will be raised Wednesday at the trade, economic and political talks in Prague with Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao, and in Hanoi next week with the 10-member Association of Southeast Asian Nations, which includes Burma. Both events were scheduled before Suu Kyi went on trial Monday for allegedly harboring an American man who swam to her lakeside home where she has been under house arrest. China has close diplomatic and economic ties with Burma’s junta, but has always refused to criticize it. chinapost.com.tw, 20 May 2009 Israel is deeply concerned about the new charges raised against Aung San Suu Kyi and her transfer to Insein prison especially when concerns have been raised regarding her poor health. Israel calls on the government of Buema to release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately and hopes for the restoration of the democratic and national reconciliation process in Burma. Ashin Mettacara, Communicated by the Foreign Ministry Spokesman’s Office, MFA, 20 May 2009 The Council of Churches of Malaysia joins churches around the world in strongly condemning the arrest and trumped-up trial of the Nobel Prize Laureate, Aung San Suu Kyi by the military government of Burma. Page 80 of 226

Freedom has been denied her and the people of Burma as she has become the victim of political repression. The trial in court is meant to meet out a judgement that will extend her house arrest for many more years and bar her from meaningful participation in the forth coming elections. Aung San Suu Kyi is a symbol of courage and hope for the people of Burma and for the rest of the world. She is an ambassador of passive resistance for democratic change. Therefore, we urge Asean countries, and most especially our government and the rest of the international community to exert pressure on the military government to release Aung San Suu Kyi unconditionally and to restore democracy in the country. We stand in solidarity and prayer with the people of Burma who are striving with great faith and hope to be able to live as a democratic and peaceful nation. Sin Chew Jit Poh, 20 May 2009 Diplomats at the hearing said Suu Kyi, dressed in a pink jacket and maroon sarong, appeared alert and in good spirits. She told her lawyer Nyan Win to request permission to talk to them and jokingly said she might be charged under a security law if she addressed them without the court’s consent. She spoke with the diplomats briefly, telling them she hoped to “meet you all in better days.” “Yes, we saw Aung San Suu Kyi, and she appeared very strong,” Joselito Chad Jacinto, the charge d’affaires of the Philippine Embassy in Burma, said after the court hearing. Suu Kyi has reportedly been ill recently. “She sat listening intently and alertly to what was going on,” he said. “She exuded a type of aura which can be described as moving, quite awe-inspiring.” But diplomats and her supporters said the limited access didn’t change their opinion of the trial, which many say is staged. AP, 20 May 2009 Singapore’s ambassador to Burma, Robert Chua was among three ambassadors invited to meet Aung San Suu Kyi on Wednesday in Rangoon after the adjournment of her trial. A spokesman for the Singapore Foreign Ministry said Ambassador Robert Chua had reported that the meeting took place at a guest house within Insein Prison. Aung San Suu Kyi informed the representatives that she and her two housekeepers are well and being well treated by the Burmese authorities. And she believes there could be many opportunities for national reconciliation if all parties so wished. She added that she did not wish to use the intrusion into her home as a way to get at the Burmese authorities. Aung San Suu Kyi also expressed the view that it was not too late for something good to come out of the unfortunate incident. The spokesman said Ambassador Chua expressed the hope that there would be peaceful national reconciliation and that representatives of the diplomatic corps would be able to meet both Aung San Suu Kyi and Burmese leaders regularly. Channel News Asia, 20 May 2009 In response to media queries that the Singapore Ambassador to Burma Mr Robert Chua was among three Ambassadors invited to meet Daw Aung San Suu Kyi on May 20, 2009 in Rangoon, an MFA Spokesman said: The Myanmar Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Mofa) had today invited members of the diplomatic community to observe the ongoing trial of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi at Insein Prison in Rangoon. The Burmese Mofa also invited the Dean of the Diplomatic Corps, currently the Singapore Ambassador, as well as a representative of Thailand as the Asean Chair and a representative from Russia, as the current President of the United Nations Security Council, to meet Daw Aung San Suu Kyi after the adjournment of her trial this afternoon. Our Ambassador in Rangoon, Mr Robert Chua, has reported that the meeting took place at a guest house within Insein Prison. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi informed the diplomatic representatives that she and her two housekeepers are well and being well treated by the Burmese authorities. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi also informed the three diplomatic representatives that there could be many opportunities for national reconciliation if all parties so wished, and that she did not wish to use the intrusion into her home as a way to get at the Burmese authorities. She also expressed the view that it was not too late for something good to come out of this unfortunate incident. As Dean and on behalf of the diplomatic corps, Ambassador Chua expressed the hope that there would be peaceful national reconciliation and that representatives of the diplomatic corps would be able to meet both Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and Burmese leaders regularly. Today Online, 21 May 2009

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U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Wednesday criticized Burma’s military-led government for continuing to detain Suu Kyi, calling it “outrageous.” Suu Kyi, who is being held at Insein Prison along with scores of other political prisoners, had been scheduled to be freed May 27 after six consecutive years under house arrest. The charges against her are widely seen as a pretext to keep her in detention during polls scheduled for next year. AP, 22 May 2009

21 May 2008, Thursday
The middle-aged American man whose nighttime swim to visit democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi may cost her a chance at freedom came into fuzzy focus Thursday, as a court in Burma showed a home movie he allegedly shot at her lakeside residence. However, few outsiders were able to view the unique video because the court again closed the proceedings, barring reporters and diplomats after allowing them to attend a single session on Wednesday. On Thursday, the prosecution spent almost two hours showing a video said to have been shot by Yettaw at Suu Kyi’s house during his latest visit, according to one of her lawyers, Nyan Win. The video had a voice-over, apparently by Yettaw, which was translated into the Burmese language in the courtroom. “The video taken by Mr. Yettaw showed the portrait of Gen. Aung San (Burma’s independence hero and Suu Kyi’s father), a bookshelf and Mr. Yettaw himself standing in front of the portrait of Gen. Aung San. “He was saying he is now in Rangoon, at Aung San Suu Kyi’s house and that he asked permission to film Aung San Suu Kyi but she refused. “She looked nervous and I am sorry for that, he was saying that, in his video,” Nyan Win told reporters. AP, 21 May 2009 Burma’s military junta closed the trial of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi to reporters and diplomats again Thursday, sparking complaints that the regime was trying to hide the widely criticized proceedings from the world. It was unclear whether the junta would again reopen the hearings as it did Wednesday, when diplomats said the Nobel peace laureate appeared spirited and healthy. AP, 22 May 2009 The special court in Insein prison has fixed the next hearing of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s case on May 22, the fifth continuous day since the trial began on Monday. Nyan Win, one of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s defense lawyer, said, Thursday’s court hearing was longer than usual as the court showed the video clip produced by the witness, which was found in the possession of John William Yettaw. In the video, Yettaw was heard explaining that he had arrived in Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s house, but she had refused to allow him to take her picture and that he wants to go back to Thailand, Nyan Win told Mizzima. All together, four witnesses were produced on Thursday. Mizzima, 21 May 2009 Fears are being expressed within Burma’s opposition National League for Democracy (NLD) over the safety of its veteran executive committee member Win Tin. According to Rangoon sources, threats have been made against Win Tin by members of the pro-regime Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA) and the paramilitary group Swan Arr Shin. Aung Thein, a prominent Rangoon lawyer, told The Irrawaddy on Thursday: “I am concerned about the security of Win Tin and all pro-democracy activists. Win Tin is a very important person for the NLD.” Aung Thein said he thought that despite the threats, Win Tin would reject any idea of employing bodyguards. The 80-year-old former editor was released earlier this year after serving 19 years in Rangoon’s notorious Insein Prison. This week he joined youth members of the NLD who gathered outside the jail during the opening days of Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial. The USDA, a mass-based governmental organization, and Swan Arr Shin have been involved in several past attacks on democracy activists, particularly during the demonstrations of August and September 2007. The Burmese Lawyers Council said in a statement in March that the USDA’s affiliations with members of the military government and its own comments on transforming into a political party violated the Unlawful Associations Act as set out by the government. Furthermore, the USDA’s documented role in abuses against Burmese citizens, including the 2003 Depayin massacre in which hundreds of opposition party supporters were killed, also contravened Burmese law. Irrawaddy, 21 May 2009 Page 82 of 226

Expressing concern for democracy icon Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, currently facing trial in Rangoon’s Insein prison, Burma’s ethnic nationalities have said that they look at her as a turning point for national reconciliation in the country. Duwa Mahkaw Hkunsa, General Secretary of the Ethnic Nationalities Council-Union of Burma (ENC), in exile said, the Nobel Peace Laureate had won their hearts and trust and hoped that she could unite the various ethnics of Burma into a federal union. “We believe, she can lead the process of national reconciliation and also build a federal union, which we, the ethnics have been demanding,” said Hkunsa. Earlier, ethnic leaders have had opportunities to discuss with Aung San Suu Kyi, during her short periods of freedom from house arrests, and have spoken of issues, including the building of a federal union, he said. “She has also promised the ethnic leaders of wanting to build such an union,” Hkunsa added. The ENC was first established in 2001, as Ethnic Nationalities Solidarity and Cooperation Committee (ENSCC), with an objective of bringing together different ethnics and also to advocate for a tripartite dialogue, as the solution for Burma’s political crisis. Later, it was transformed into the Council in 2004 and was renamed as the Ethnic Nationalities Council. The ENC was later re-structured and was made into a state-based organization, representing the existing states of Burma – Arakan, Chin, Karen, Karenni (Kayah), Mon and Shan. Hkunsa said, the ENC is concerned over the current trial that Aung San Suu Kyi is facing and has called the charges against her, mere pretexts to continue detaining her. “We already know that the junta will do something to her before her detention period ends, because they do not want to see her out before the 2010 elections,” Hkunsa said, adding that Aung San Suu Kyi continues to pose a threat to the junta, as she is well loved and is popular among the people. “People love her, including soldiers and back her, so the authority are afraid and simply wants to continue detaining her,” he said. Meanwhile, the Karen National Union (KNU), one of the longest running armed resistance groups in Burma, also expressed their concern over the trial against Aung San Suu Kyi. Naw Zipporah Sein, General Secretary of the KNU, told Mizzima, she is concerned about Aung San Suu Kyi and believes that she is the only person, who can lead a tripartite dialogue, in the process of national reconciliation. “She means a lot of hope for all of us and as a leader, she has proved her ability to work with all ethnics,” Naw Zipporah Sein said. Meanwhile, without Aung San Suu Kyi, it is almost hopeless to talk about a tripartite dialogue, which is being demanded by all ethnic groups, the KNU leader said. Condemning the current trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, Naw Zipporah Sein, called on the United Nations Security Council to intervene and stop the junta from detaining her further. “We oppose this trial. It is simply unjust, the international community must pressurize the junta to release her,” Naw Zipporah Sein said. Mizzima, 21 May 2009 Five of the world’s leading international jurists have commissioned a report from the International Human Rights Clinic at the Harvard Law School, calling for the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) to act on what they describe as more than 15 years of condemnation from other UN bodies on human rights abuses in Burma. The Harvard report, “Crimes in Burma”, comes in the wake of renewed international attention on the country, with the continued persecution of Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi who is now on trial on charges of harbouring a United States man who swam to her home. On that charge, she faces up to five years in detention. The report, released today, concludes with a call for the UNSC to establish a Commission of Inquiry into alleged crimes against humanity and war crimes in Burma. The Harvard report is based on an analysis of scores of UN documents, including UN General Assembly and Commission on Human Rights resolutions as well as reports from special rapporteurs. The report said that the documents indicate that human rights abuses in Burma are “widespread, systematic and part of state policy” -- the legal terms that justify further investigation and strongly suggest that the military regime may be committing crimes against humanity and war crimes prosecutable under international law. Major abuses cited by the UN include forced displacement of over 3,000 villages in eastern Burma, mass exodus of at least 250,000 Rohingyas in 1992, and widespread and systematic sexual violence, torture and summary execution of innocent civilians. “The UNSC, however, has not moved the process forward as it should and has in similar situations such as those in the former Yugoslavia and Darfur,” the jurists write in the report’s preface. “In the cases of Yugoslavia and Darfur, once aware of the severity of the problem, the UNSC established a Commission of Inquiry to investigate the gravity of the violations further. “With Burma, there has been no Page 83 of 226

such action from the UNSC despite being similarly aware of the widespread and systematic nature of the violations.” The five jurists are Judge Richard Goldstone (South Africa), Judge Patricia Wald (United States), Judge Pedro Nikken (Venezuela), Judge Ganzorig Gombosuren (Mongolia) and Sir Geoffrey Nice (United Kingdom). Tyler Giannini, the Clinical Director of the Human Rights Program at the Harvard Law School and one of the report’s authors, said its findings clearly demonstrate that a Commission of Inquiry on Burma should proceed. “The UNSC has taken action regarding Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sudan when it identified information strongly suggesting the existence of crimes against humanity and war crimes,” said Giannini. He said that UN documents “clearly and authoritatively” suggest that the human rights abuses occurring in Burma are not isolated incidents. He warned that failure by the UNSC to take action and investigate these crimes could mean that violations of international criminal law would go unchecked. Bernama, 21 May 2009 Appearing in a court in prison in Rangoon this week Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s opposition leader, appeared “composed, upright and crackling with energy”, according to Mark Canning, Britain’s ambassador. He was one of a handful of diplomats and journalists afforded a glimpse of proceedings. After spending most of the past two decades in more or less restrictive forms of detention, and recently in poor health, her composure is remarkable; all the more so given the almost laughable nature of the charges against her. She is accused of having broken the terms of her house arrest by offering hospitality to John Yettaw, an American who swam uninvited to her house across the adjacent lake, helped by plastic containers as floats and homemade wooden flippers. The backdrop to this farce is an election expected early next year. It always seemed impossible that the junta would free Miss Suu Kyi before then. Mr Yettaw’s hapless intrusion simply provides them with the flimsiest of pretexts not to. She still retains the popularity which gave her a sweeping victory in the country’s election in 1990, a result the generals ignored. In preparation for the new poll, dissent has been quashed even more ruthlessly than usual. The number of political prisoners has doubled since 2007 to around 2,100. The Economist, 21 May 2009 U.K. Foreign Secretary David Miliband called on Burma to stop the “charade” of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial, as the junta again barred media and diplomats from the court. “Yesterday we saw Aung San Suu Kyi’s strength and dignity in the face of a deplorable trial,” he said, commenting on her appearance in court Wednesday, when access was allowed. “Today’s move to secrecy is a step back. This charade must be brought to an end. She and the 2,000 other political prisoners around the country should be released,” he said. Burmese authorities had unexpectedly allowed diplomats and journalists to attend the trial for the first time Wednesday, but abruptly announced Thursday the hearings would be back behind closed doors again. AP, 21 May 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon plans to visit Burma as soon as possible and will urge the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners. Ban said Suu Kyi was in good health and that U.N. officials in the country were closely monitoring her condition at the notorious Insein prison in Rangoon. “This is an unacceptable situation,” he told CNN television in an interview aired on Thursday. Ban said he was discussing the timing of his visit with the country’s authorities. “I’m going to visit Burma as soon as possible,” he said. “I’m deeply concerned about what has been happening in Burma in terms of democratization and I’m going to urge again the release of political prisoners including Aung San Suu Kyi,” he said. U.N. diplomats say they expect Ban probably will not go to Burma before July. The military junta that has ruled the Asian country since 1962 has put Suu Kyi on trial again, accusing her of breaking the terms of her house arrest because an American man swam to the lakeside home of the Nobel Peace laureate. If found guilty, she could be jailed for up to five years. Critics say the trial is scripted and aimed at silencing the charismatic leader of the National League for Democracy until after a multi-party election in the country formerly known as Burma in 2010. Suu Kyi has been detained for more than 13 of the past 19 years, most of them at her home in Rangoon, guarded by police, her mail intercepted and visitors restricted. Ban visited Burma in May 2008 after the country was devastated by a cyclone, winning agreement from senior general Than Shwe to admit foreign aid workers. He has promised to return to discuss political issues but aides said Page 84 of 226

he was reluctant to visit without assurance of a concrete result. Separately, Western diplomats in New York said on condition of anonymity that the U.N. Security Council, which has so far been silent on the issue of Suu Kyi’s latest trial, is negotiating a statement condemning her incarceration. They said the U.S.-drafted statement would have the council deploring her new trial and demanding her release. But China, the nearest Burma has to a major ally, has objected to the wording and would like to soften it, the diplomats said. Reuters, 21 May 2009

22 May 2008, Friday
Burma democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi proclaimed her innocence in front of a prison tribunal, her lawyer said on Friday. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said ‘I have no guilt as I didn’t commit any crime,’” Nyan Win said at the end of the fifth day of her trial on charges of breaching the conditions of her house arrest. Nyan Win said Aung San Suu Kyi spoke to the court, held behind closed doors, as the prosecution wrapped its case before the trial resumes on Monday with her legal defence. AFP, 22 May 2009 Suu Kyi’s lawyer said presiding judge Thaung Nyunt declared the court accepted the charge after testimony had finished for the day, and asked Suu Kyi if she was guilty. “I am not guilty. I said I am not guilty because I have not broken any law,” she replied, according to her lawyer Nyan Win, who spoke to reporters afterward. The same charge was also accepted against two women companions who stay with Suu Kyi, and the American, John W. Yettaw. All pleaded not guilty. AP, 22 May 2009 The trial this week has mostly focused on the motives and methods of Yettaw, a part-time contractor from Falcon, Missouri. The trial was briefly opened to reporters and diplomats Wednesday but otherwise has been closed. AP, 22 May 2009 The generals who run Burma don’t encourage their subordinates to pay attention to the political affairs of the country. So when soldiers start huddling around radios listening to news of the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, the generals start to panic. According to military sources who spoke to The Irrawaddy recently, commanders around the country have been alerted this week by Naypyidaw to keep a close watch on armed personnel and their families. The military head office reportedly issued a communiqué to all battalion commanders earlier this week ordering them to “strictly control” the activities of all personnel and their family members and warn them not to take part in any anti-government demonstrations that might occur in the near future. Family members are currently not allowed to go outside the military compounds where they live, said the sources. Only armed soldiers on duty are allowed outside the barracks. “It seems that Than Shwe is worried that his troops and their families may be Daw Suu sympathizers,” said a military source in Rangoon. Normally, Burmese senior generals do not allow army, navy and air force personnel to listen to or watch broadcasts involving the NLD leader, but now the barracks are buzzing with rumors and updates from the Insein courtroom, said the source. “We are interested to see if the government will sentence Daw Suu,” said a family member from Naypyidaw military regional command. “We certainly don’t think Daw Suu could be guilty of this crime.” Meanwhile, Maj Aung Linn Htut, a former intelligence officer who currently lives in the United States, said in an open letter that many Burmese army staff want the world to know that there is a profound difference between the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) and the Tatmadaw, the regular soldiers of the Burmese army. Aung Linn Htut said that the SPDC was run by senior military generals who controlled the country’s government and economy. Their families were granted all the business concessions, he said. On the other hand, low-ranked officers, soldiers and general staff members did not receive benefits and faced the same economic hardships as the general public. In his open letter, Aung Linn Htut said that there were angry mutterings among the army regulars around the country because they were excluded from their superiors’ access to foreign currency and earnings from natural gas revenues. According to the former intelligence officer, the Burmese military government earned several million of dollars selling natural gas to Thailand and had financed its new executive capital in Naypyidaw from the Page 85 of 226

proceeds. He accused the SPDC of rifling the nation’s wealth and said payments for natural gas were not transferred to the Ministry of Revenue, but were deposited in a bank account in an unknown foreign country run by the Union of Myanmar Economic Holding Limited (UMEHL). UMEHL, also known in Burmese as U Pai, was founded in 1990 and deals with the investments and savings of military personnel, military units, retired military personnel, army veteran organizations and the Ministry of Defense. According to the International Institute for Strategic Studies, the junta’s military expenditures account for more than 40 percent of the national budget while Burma’s health and education spending is 0.4 percent and 0.5 percent respectively, as reported in the UK-based Burma Digest online publication. The Burmese military government buys most of its weapons from Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, China and India, according to researchers. Irrawaddy, 22 May 2009 In what her supporters are taking as an ominous sign, authorities have now removed the last of the barriers that were used to maintain roadblocks on either end on the street where her house is located, suggesting she may not be returning home any time soon. The day she was taken away to prison, the barbed wire barricades on University Avenue were pulled aside, and then hauled away the next day, and the poles that were used to block the road were taken away after dark on Thursday. Responding to anger abroad over the trial, Burma’s Foreign Minister U Nyan Win was quoted Friday in the New Light of Burma as telling his Japanese counterpart that the incident was manufactured by internal and external anti-government forces — a term that usually refers to pro-democracy groups. At a time when the United States, Japan and the European Union were reviewing their policies toward Burma, Nyan Win said “it was likely that this incident was trumped up to intensify international pressure on Burma by internal and external anti-government elements who do not wish to see the positive changes in those countries’ policies toward Burma,” the paper said. The paper reported that Japanese Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone called on May 18 to express his concern about Suu Kyi’s trial. Critics have accused the junta of using Yettaw’s visit as a pretext to keeping Suu Kyi in detention through polls scheduled for next year — the culmination of the junta’s “roadmap to democracy,” which has been criticized as a fig leaf for continued military rule. Suu Kyi, who is being held and tried at Rangoon’s Insein Prison, had been scheduled to be freed May 27 after six consecutive years under house arrest. AP, 22 May 2009 Following the trial against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the UNSC issued a statement on May 22 expressing its concern over developments in Burma. The UNSC, in its press statement, called on the junta to create necessary conditions for a genuine dialogue with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and all concerned parties and ethnic groups in order to achieve an inclusive national reconciliation with the support of the United Nations. Mizzima, 22 May 2009 British Ambassador Mark Canning regarded the closing of court access with some resignation. Under the junta, Burma is a closed society and routinely places restrictions on the movement of foreigners. “The arrangement yesterday was always pitched as for one day only, although it was suggested that if things went OK there might be further opportunities,” he said. “So there was no particular expectation that we would be allowed access today.” Debbie Stothard, coordinator of the regional rights network Alternative ASEAN Network on Burma, said Wednesday’s move “was definitely a stunt by the regime to stave off pressure so they can proceed with their kangaroo court to jail Suu Kyi.” “They wanted to say they are not ill-treating her, so go away. You don’t need to see the rest,” she said. “It also means the regime doesn’t have a strong case against Suu Kyi and has no grounds to proceed.” But diplomats said they had not changed their opinion of the trial simply because they had been allowed to attend. Most assume the special court in Rangoon’s Insein Prison will find Suu Kyi guilty. AP, 22 May 2009 European foreign ministers will press Burma at an Asia-Europe meeting next week to end the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, but analysts expect only lukewarm backing from their Asian counterparts. The Suu Kyi trial, which entered its fifth day on Friday, has sparked outrage in the West, and the European Union is considering tougher sanctions against the military government. In Asia, no Page 86 of 226

government has gone beyond chastising the regime for putting the Nobel Peace laureate on trial for breaking the terms of her house arrest after an American man swam uninvited to her lakeside home. Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt said on Monday Burma would be discussed at the Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) Foreign Ministers’ meeting in Hanoi on Monday and Tuesday. British Foreign Secretary David Miliband said Suu Kyi faced a “show trial,” adding: “We need to make sure that the Burmese regime understands fully the risks that it’s taking.” The EU ministers said it was incumbent upon Burma’s neighbors to try to sway the regime through political pressure. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which includes Burma, has said trial threatened the regime’s “honor and credibility” and repeated a call for her release. ASEAN, however, has historically opted for non-interference over confrontation and does not follow its words with actions in cases like this. Burma’s main backer, China, has already said Burma should be left alone to handle its internal affairs. Sean Turnell, an expert on Burma’s economy at Australia’s Macquarie University, said China was the “big elephant in the room” and hinted that Beijing may ultimately be arm-twisted into playing a constructive role. “It protects the regime in so many ways,” he said. “There are aspects of the Burmese regime that are quite impervious to pressure, but a group that may not be impervious to pressure is China.” Reuters, 22 May 2009 The European Union (EU) and China summit held in Prague on Wednesday failed to agree on any of the key points dividing them, including the issue of military-ruled Burma and the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi. According to a joint press statement of the 11th China-EU Summit, Burma was among the many issues ranging from the world financial crisis, climate change and international affairs that EU officials and Chinese representatives discussed for nearly two hours. The German news agency DPA reported that the two sides failed to bridge their differences on many issues including Burma, North Korea, Taiwan, climate change and trade liberalization. China’s Prime Minister Wen Jiabao called on the EU to expand “practical cooperation.” “The most important thing is to stick to the principles of mutual respect and not interfere in each others internal affairs,” the Chinese premier told a news conference after the summit. He also urged the 27-member bloc “to ensure that our bilateral relationship will not be adversely affected by individual incidents.” EU ministers have been unanimous in their condemnation of the trial of Burma’s pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who was accused of violating the terms of her house arrest just two weeks before she was to be released. Several EU ministers have suggested appealing to regional powers, such as China and India, for help. China has close diplomatic and economic ties with Burma’s junta, but has always refused to criticize it. Irrawaddy, 22 May 2009 Former President Kim Dae-jung met with a group of exiled Burmese parliamentary leaders and officials of the Korean chapter of the National League for Democracy (NLD), headed by pro-democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi, at his home in Seoul Friday. Kim made a contribution of $10,000 to the Burmese activists, asking them to use it to support Suu Kyi’s political cause. The fund was raised during a 2007 Seoul event held under the theme “Free Burma, Free Suu Kyi,” aimed at raising domestic awareness of the democracy movement in Burma and urging the release of the Burmese opposition leader. According to a spokesperson, Kim expressed concerns regarding recent reports of Suu Kyi’s alleged violation of a house arrest imposed by the Burmese military regime ahead of her release slated for May 27. The Korean Times, 22 May 2009 Ambassador of the Union of Burma was called to the Foreign Office on Friday and a demarche made with him regarding the arrest and trial of Ms. Aung San Suu Kyi. It was conveyed to the Ambassador that Pakistan was deeply concerned about this unfortunate development and would urge the government of Burma to consider reviewing their decision and releasing Ms. Aung San Suu Kyi immediately. According to the Foreign Office Spokesman, it was underlined that her early release would serve the fundamental interest of Burma with which Pakistan enjoyed close cooperative relations. AFP, 22 May 2009 South Africa’s foreign minister expressed grave concern Friday over the trial of Burmese Nobel peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, calling for her immediate release. “It is with regret that the South African government learnt of the new charges against Aung San Suu Kyi less than two weeks before her house Page 87 of 226

arrest was due to end,” read a statement from the foreign ministry. “The South African government also took note of the recent reports on Ms Suu Kyi’s poor health and fears that the arrest may worsen her condition.” AFP, 22 May 2009 Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva expressed his concern over the fate of Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who went on trial in Burma on Wednesday, during an interview with The Yomiuri Shimbun at Government House in Bangkok the same day. Abhisit also spoke about the political situation in Thailand, which currently chairs the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. Asked about the indictment of Suu Kyi in Burma, an ASEAN member state, Abhisit said: “We’ve been assured by the Burmese government during the ASEAN meetings in recent months in Hua Hin and Pattaya in Thailand that they were continuing to implement the road map toward democracy and transition on what has happened. Clearly we’re concerned about the credibility of that.” He said ASEAN “asked for humanitarian treatment, and that there would be justice, which is an essential component of a good political process.” On Tuesday, Thailand issued a statement as the ASEAN chair, asking for the immediate release of Suu Kyi among other requests. During the interview, Abhisit stressed that ASEAN has examined progress in Burma’s democratic process during past summit meetings and on other occasions. “We want to see this is solved as quickly as possible and reiterate our stance that the democratic process needs to be inclusive. And we hope to see the progress,” Abhisit said, suggesting he believed that democracy supporters, including Suu Kyi, should be able to take part in Burma’s next general election scheduled in 2010. The Yomiuri Shimbun, 22 May 2009 The Security Council today expressed its concern over the political impact in Burma of the detention of opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. In a press statement, the 15-member body reiterated “the importance of the release of all political prisoners,” repeating the need for Burma’s Government to “create the necessary conditions for a genuine dialogue with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and all concerned parties and ethnic groups in order to achieve an inclusive national reconciliation with the support of the United Nations.” Security forces arrested Aung San Suu Kyi, who leads the National League for Democracy (NLD), and two aides on 14 May and took them to Insein Prison, where they were charged by a special court. They are said to have been charged with violating the terms of her house arrest, after an uninvited United States citizen gained access to their home, and her trial is currently under way. Last week, High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay said that “her continued detention, and now this latest trial, breach international standards of due process and fair trial.” It had been hoped that she would be released when her current detention order, which has already continued for one year longer than the maximum of five years permitted under Burma’s laws, expires at the end of this month. “The Burmese authorities might claim Aung San Suu Kyi has breached the conditions of her detention, but they have broken both their own laws and their international human rights obligations,” Ms. Pillay said. “She should not be detained in the first place.” UN News Centre, 22 May 2009 The following Security Council press statement on Burma was read out today by Council President Vitaly Churkin ( Russian Federation): The members of the Security Council express their concern about the political impact of recent developments relating to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. The members of the Security Council reaffirm, in this context, their statements of 11 October 2007 and 2 May 2008 and, in this regard, reiterate the importance of the release of all political prisoners. The members of the Security Council reiterate the need for the Government of Burma to create the necessary conditions for a genuine dialogue with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and all concerned parties and ethnic groups in order to achieve an inclusive national reconciliation with the support of the United Nations. The members of the Security Council affirm their commitment to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Burma and, in that context, reiterate that the future of Burma lies in the hands of all of its people. Security Council, 22 May 2009

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23 May 2008, Saturday
Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has pleaded not guilty to violating the terms of her house arrest, blaming the military junta’s lax security for allowing an American intruder to swim uninvited to her lakeside home. Lawyers for the Nobel peace laureate said yesterday that prosecutors in the closed court, held in Rangoon’s notorious Insein Central Prison, had formally charged her and two female housemates – as well as the intruder – after five days of hearings that have sparked international outrage. The Scotsman, 23 May 2009 Several items left by an uninvited American visitor, including a book on the Mormon faith and a letter, could be used to convict and imprison Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on charges of violating her house arrest, a state-run newspaper said Saturday. Meanwhile, the U.N. Security Council called for the release of all political prisoners in military-ruled Burma including Suu Kyi and expressed concern over the political impact her trial, which started Monday. Prosecutors accused Suu Kyi on Friday of accepting the items left by John W. Yettaw, the Myanmar Ahlin newspaper said. Yettaw swam across a lake to her Rangoon home under the cover of darkness earlier this month and entered her compound uninvited. Yettaw left at least six books including the “Book of Mormon,” the newspaper said. He also left a letter written by his daughter which Suu Kyi later ripped up, it said. They were among 23 items that Suu Kyi handed over to police including two black robes, a flashlight and three sets of goggles. Police Col. Win Naing Tun told the court that Suu Kyi breached the conditions of her house arrest by receiving books and documents from the outside, the newspaper said. The order also bars her from communicating with the outside world by phone or mail and from meeting diplomats and politicians. Suu Kyi, who has been in detention without trial for more than 13 of the past 19 years, pleaded not guilty Friday after the special court trying her agreed to accept the charges and proceed with her trial. Nyan Win, one of Suu Kyi’s lawyers, insisted Saturday the restriction order only bars her from sending out books and letters, not receiving them. Yettaw and the two female companions who stay with Suu Kyi also pleaded not guilty to the same charge. Burma’s courts operate under the influence of the ruling military and almost always deal harshly with political dissidents. The trial, which is to resume after the weekend, has sparked new international criticism of the military junta and calls for Suu Kyi’s immediate release. Critics have accused the junta of using Yettaw’s visit as a pretext for keeping Suu Kyi in detention through elections scheduled next year, the culmination of the junta’s “roadmap to democracy” which has been criticized as a fig leaf for continued military rule. Suu Kyi is being held at notorious Insein Prison along with other political prisoners. She had been scheduled to be freed May 27 after six consecutive years under house arrest, although it was expected that the government would try to find a reason to hold her, as has happened in the past. “We will certainly win the case if it is conducted according to law,” Nyan Win said Friday. “But we cannot say if there are other things to be considered. They have not been able to prove that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is guilty of breaking the law.” “Daw” is a term of respect used for older women. He said a verdict could be reached in 10 to 14 days. AP, 23 May 2009 The intention of Depayin massacre was to assassinate Daw Aung San Kyi, but she fortunately released with the help of people and pro-democracy members. Now the military government and General Than Shwe are trumping up new charges to silence her again. Last year, the Nargis cyclone hit many parts of Burma, with more than 138,000 people killed and more than 2 million people helpless, homeless and hopeless. Nargis killed less, but Burmese military government killed more with the failures to rescue, food supplies and medical supplies. All the cruelties of life in Burma are masterminded by Senior General Than Shwe. Ashin Mettacara Blog, 23 May 2009 Generally speaking, the more depraved a military dictator is, the stupider his actions. This rule of thumb seems to hold true for Than Shwe, whose decision to try Burma’s much-persecuted pro-democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, on trumped-up charges has backfired spectacularly. If Burma’s Senior General had hoped to sideline Suu Kyi before next year’s state-managed elections, the trial in Insein prison is having the Page 89 of 226

opposite effect. After a time in which her leadership of the National League for Democracy was increasingly questioned, Than Shwe has in one week reunited the opposition and galvanised international support for Suu Kyi. The trial in Rangoon has also drawn the spotlight back to human rights violations perpetrated by the regime after the failed 2007 uprising, known as the Saffron Revolution. The Sydney Morning Herald, 23 May 2009 Actress and singer Jane Birkin pledged on Saturday her support for Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, facing trial for allowing an uninvited guest into her home. Birkin , who met Suu Kyi in Burma in 1999, said she had written a song about the Nobel laureate, who faces up to five years in jail if found guilty of breaking the terms of her house arrest. “I haven’t stopped singing it and won’t until things change in Burma,” she told an audience at the Hay Festival. Suu Kyi on Friday pleaded not guilty after a prison court formally charged her. Birkin, has supported a campaign of disinvestment in Burma and has taken her plea to French President Nicolas Sarkozy. The 62-year old actress, who achieved fame in 1969 for her duet “Je t’aime, moi non plus” with her late partner Serge Gainsbourg, performed songs from a new album as part of the Hay Festival programme. Reuters, 23 May 2009 A Christian council has condemned the closed-door trial of Nobel Prize-winning peace activist Aung San Suu Kyi who was accused of breaching the terms of her house arrest by permitting a foreigner stay overnight without “state approval”. The Global Council of Indian Christians (GCIC) said it condemned the arrest and demands the immediate release of the peace activist. The council also appealed to the Indian government to step in efforts to free Suu Kyi. “As the world’s largest democratic country, India should stand in support of democracy in Burma. Additionally India is in a position to use its economic leverage and geographical location to push hard for the freedom of Ms Suu Kyi,” it noted. GCIC hopes the prodemocracy leader can at least celebrate her birthday on 19 June. “The onus is on the international community and Indian government to help her to celebrate her next birth day as a free citizen of Burma.” The Christian Post, 23 May 2009 Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva has expressed hope that the planned visit to Burma by UN SecretaryGeneral Ban Ki-moon will ease the political tensions there. The UN has tried to stick to its original plan to intervene to resolve the political conflict between the Burmese military junta and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her supporters. It is not clear when Mr Ban’s visit will take place. The UN and Rangoon have recently worked together towards bringing about national reconciliation and Asean had recognised and accepted that approach, Mr Abhisit said. He said the Thai envoy to Burma Bansarn Bunnag had met Mrs Suu Kyi. Mrs Suu Kyi told the ambassador that she did not want anything special except to explain herself and to get a fair trial, Mr Abhisit said. Suu Kyi tells the court: “I have no guilt as I didn’t commit any crime.” Bangkok Post, 23 May 2009 Cardiff North MP Julie Morgan has called on residents to launch a letter- writing campaign to free Burmese democracy campaigner and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi. Suu Kyi, who has spent 13 of the past 19 years under arrest, is facing charges after an American swam across a lake to her home when she was under house arrest. Mrs Morgan said: “I ask everybody who cares about democracy to do what they can. “Write to your MP, write to government ministers, support Amnesty’s International’s campaign, support the Burma Campaign – do everything you can to show that people care deeply.” The Wales Online, 23 May 2009

24 May 2008, Sunday
The Assistance Association of Political Prisoners (AAPP) and Forum for Democracy in Burma (FDB) have launched the Free Burma’s Political Prisoners Now! Campaign, in support of the ongoing advocacy work. There are over 2,100 political prisoners languishing in prisons all over Burma. Free Burma’s Political Page 90 of 226

Prisoners Now aims to collect 888,888 signatures before 24 May 2009, the legal date that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi should be released from house arrest. This is a united global campaign working with over a hundred groups from around the globe. The petition calls on UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to make it his personal priority to secure the release of all political prisoners in Burma, as the essential first step towards democracy in the country. Daw Aung Suu Kyi says, “We are all prisoners in our own country.” Political prisoners are not criminals. They have courageously spoken out on behalf of those who have been silenced. The release of all political prisoners is the essential first step towards freedom and democracy in Burma. There can be no democratic transition without them. They must be allowed to freely participate in any future democratic political process. Sign the petition on http://www.fbppn.net/, Tin Kyi, Burma Related News Lawyers for Burma pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi said on Sunday they were preparing to open the defence case at her trial this week, as the junta looked set to face further pressure from the West. The tribunal’s second week promises to be crucial, with European nations likely to push Asian countries for help at a meeting in Vietnam and Aung San Suu Kyi’s official period of house arrest due to expire. “We expect to begin our defence case this coming week,” Nyan Win, a spokesman for her National League for Democracy (NLD) party and also a member of her legal team, told AFP. “Now we are preparing a witness list and are preparing what we need for tomorrow (Monday),” he said, adding that the prosecution was expected to call final witnesses early next week. Nyan Win estimated it would take another two weeks for a verdict at the trial, which has provoked a storm of international outrage over the military regime’s treatment of Aung San Suu Kyi. AFP, 24 May 2009 Foreign Minister Nyan Win said last week Suu Kyi’s trial “will proceed fairly according to the law.” But diplomats who were given a brief glimpse of the trial inside Rangoon’s Insein prison said it appeared “scripted.” After 47 years of unbroken military rule, Burma’s courts have a long history of stretching laws to suit the generals, activist lawyers say. “I’m sure they will jail Daw Suu,” said Aung Thein, a prominent lawyer who was helping prepare her defense when his law license was revoked a week ago. Rights groups said revoking Aung Thein’s right to practice law was the latest “blatant attempt” by the regime to intimidate lawyers working on political cases. Some 11 lawyers are in jail for working on such cases, including defending top monks and former student leaders arrested in the September 2007 protests crushed by the military. Reuters, 24 May 2009 The Burmese government Sunday lodged a strong protest over a statement of the alternate chairman of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) over a lawsuit against detained political party leader Aung San Suu Kyi, saying that the statement is an interference in the country’s internal affairs. The ASEAN alternate chairman is now represented by Thailand. chinaview.cn, 24 May 2009 Asian powers hold the key to persuading Burma’s ruling junta to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, France’s human rights minister said Sunday ahead of key meetings in Asia this week. France and Europe have done everything that they can and it is now up to Asian governments to turn up the pressure on Yangon, said Rama Yade who is to meet with ministers from Burma’s neighbours in Vietnam and Cambodia. “It is obvious that the key is in Asia,” Yade told TV5 Monde in an interview. “I fundamentally believe that our Asian partners can incite the junta to evolve.” Yade will represent France at the ASEM (Asia-Europe) ministerial meeting on Thursday in the Vietnamese capital Hanoi and the European Union meeting with the Association of South East Asian Nations Saturday in the Cambodian capital Phnom Pen. The junior minister said she has asked to meet with Burma’s foreign minister to discuss the plight of Aung San Suu Kyi, who went on trial this month for violating the terms of her house arrest. “I will meet various Asian authorities who are the only ones capable of influencing the junta because we have done everything we can,” said Yade. EU nations have condemned the 63-year-old opposition leader’s arrest and are considering tighter sanctions against the regime, but Burma’s partners in ASEAN have not gone beyond expressing concern over the situation. AFP, 24 May 2009 Page 91 of 226

A widely expected guilty verdict in the trial of Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi is likely to halt tentative Western moves to improve relations with the country’s junta and make it harder to raise funds for humanitarian relief efforts, analysts said Sunday. The trial comes weeks after the European Union announced it was stepping up humanitarian aid to the impoverished country, also known as Burma, and the United States said it was reviewing its policy — including speculation that it might soften sanctions the regime says have crippled its economy. But now the European Union is talking of introducing tougher sanctions in response to the trial and the administration of President Barack Obama has announced it will continue its economic penalties. Obama extended a state of emergency against the country after Suu Kyi’s arrest. Sanctions would have expired had the emergency order not been extended. Sean Turnell, a Burma expert at Australia’s Macquarie University, said the timing of the trial shows the junta “never misses an opportunity to miss an opportunity.” “I think there was, prior to these latest events, a strong likelihood that the U.S. and Europe positions on Burma may have softened, and that some sanctions may even have been on the table” for review, Turnell said in an e-mail interview. “The regime have now shot themselves in the foot so to speak — and anything like this would seem to be decidedly off the table now.” AP, 24 May 2009

25 May 2008, Monday
The trial of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi resumed Monday as Burma lashed out against Thailand , one of its few supporters in an international community likely to halt recent moves to improve relations with the country’s military rulers. Suu Kyi, due to testify this week, is widely expected to be found guilty for allegedly harboring an American who swam across a lake to her residence. She faces up to five years in prison. A list of four or five defense witnesses will be submitted to the court and statements from remaining prosecution witnesses are to be heard at Monday’s session inside Rangoon’s security-ringed Insein prison, said Nyan Win, a spokesman for Suu Kyi’s political party. Already bombarded by criticism from Western nations, the junta turned on neighboring Thailand, a partner in the 10-nation Association of Southeast Nation, or ASEAN, accusing its neighbor of violating the bloc’s principle by interfering in Burma’s internal affairs. Thailand, the grouping’s current chairman, last week expressed “grave concern” over the trial, saying “the honor and the credibility of the Burmese government are at stake.” AP, 25 May 2009 However, Win Tin said, the trial against Aung San Suu Kyi has ingited public anger and it would not be wise for the government to underestimate the level of peoples’ anger. While he said he cannot definitely tell what might happen, but if the junta sentenced Aung San Suu Kyi, it would really bring out the anger in the people. “This time, I am sure, it will not be just another story of the junta’s injustice, because the level of anger among the people is high. And the junta cannot expect the people to simply disperse, after they sentence Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. It will not be as simple as just drawing the curtain,” he added. Mizzima, 25 May 2009 The European Union has repeated calls for Burma’s military government to free Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s opposition leader who is standing trial on charges of violating the terms of her house arrest. The call came on Monday at the start of two days of talks in Vietnam between foreign ministers from Asia and Europe. The Asia-Europe Meeting (Asem) in Hanoi had been called to discuss ways of tackling the global economic slowdown and boosting economic cooperation. But it is expected to be overshadowed both by the Aung San Suu Kyi trial and Monday’s surprise nuclear weapon test by North Korea. Representatives from 45 nations are taking part in the two-day meeting with brings together representatives of the European Union (EU), the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), as well as China, Japan, South Korea, India and Pakistan. Aljazeera, 25 May 2009 But now the European Union is talking of introducing tougher sanctions in response to the trial and the administration of President Barack Obama has announced it will continue its economic penalties. Obama Page 92 of 226

extended a state of emergency against the country after Suu Kyi’s arrest. Sanctions would have expired had the emergency order not been extended. EU External Relations Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner, in Bangkok on her way to the ASEAN-EU foreign ministers meeting in Hanoi, Monday called on China and India to push for democratic change in Burma and welcomed ASEAN’s unprecedented criticism of Burma. “This was a remarkable statement. At the moment when we all hoped to see Aung San Suu Kyi released she is imprisoned again. That was of course a big negative surprise to the international community,” she told reporters. AP, 25 May 2009 The South African government has called on the Burmese military regime to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, saying it wants to see Burma adopt civilian rule under a democratic multiparty system. The South African stand was delivered by Deputy Minister of International Relations and Cooperation Ebrahim Ebrahim at a meeting on Monday with Burma’s ambassador designate to Pretoria, Tin Oo Lwin. Ebrahim said South Africa was ready to assist Burma in a transition to democracy, and he proposed the dispatch to Burma of a delegation tasked with facilitating “a negotiation process among the various political parties.” Irrawaddy, 26 May 2009 U.K. junior foreign minister Bill Rammell Monday urged Asian and European officials meeting here to issue a “very strong statement” condemning the trial of Burma democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi. The two-day ASEM (Asia-Europe) Foreign Ministers’ Meeting was expected to focus on the global financial crisis, but diplomats had said the trial of the Nobel Peace Prize winner could spark informal discussions about Burma. “In the face of Aung San Suu Kyi’s arrest and trial, I think we need the strongest possible international response,” Rammell told reporters on the sidelines of the meeting in Vietnam. “And we need nothing less from the ASEM conference in the next couple of days.” AFP, 25 May 2009

26 May 2008, Tuesday
Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi told a court Tuesday that although she gave “temporary shelter” to an uninvited American earlier this month, she had not violated her house arrest and was merely trying to shield the man and her security guards from punishment. Testifying for the first time in the case, Suu Kyi appeared frail and pale but managed an occasional smile. A judge questioned her for less than half an hour about John W. Yettaw, who swam uninvited to her lakeside house. Reporters and diplomats, including a reporter for The Associated Press, were allowed into the courtroom for Tuesday’s session, the second time during the trial that such rare access has been granted. “Thank you for your concern and support. It is always good to see people from the outside world,” she told reporters and diplomats before being escorted out of the court by four policewomen. AP, 26 May 2009 Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has told a secret trial she did not violate her house arrest after a US man swam to her home. “I didn’t,” the Nobel Peace Prize winner replied when asked in Rangoon’s notorious Insein jail whether she had breached a restriction order. She faces up to five years in jail, if convicted of the charges lodged by Burma’s military junta - she is widely expected to be found guilty. It is claimed Mrs Suu Kyi harboured the army veteran for two days. “I didn’t know about it (Yettaw’s visit) immediately. I was informed about it at 5 am. My assistant told me that a man had arrived,” the 63-year-old said in court. Mrs Suu Kyi has told her lawyers she asked Yettaw to leave immediately, but he said he was too exhausted, so she let him stay on humanitarian grounds. She has spent 13 of the past 19 years in detention, most of them at her crumbling house on Rangoon’s Inya Lake. The leader of the National League for Democracy (NLD) blamed lax security for Yettaw being able to swim across the lake. Legal representative Nyan Win said Mrs Suu Kyi’s defence team is unhappy it has not been given sufficient time to consult with their client about her planned testimony. The charges against Mrs Suu Kyi are widely seen as a pretext to keep her detained during elections planned for next year. If she is found guilty the verdict is likely to further sour relationships between the West and the military regime. Sky.com, 26 May 2009 Page 93 of 226

There was a telling moment as she entered when the police guards rose to their feet before lowering themselves sheepishly down. She welcomed our presence. She hoped to meet us in better times and said how good it was to see people from the outside world. It was deeply impressive and one was left wondering how she managed to display no trace of indignation at this latest twist. Mark Canning, British ambassador in Burma, guardian.co.uk, 26 May 2009 A petition with 600,000 signatures in support of the release of all political prisoners in Burma has been sent to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, accordingly to the Campaign Committee of the Free Burma’s Political Prisoners (CCFBPP). The signatures were gathered from more than 150 countries and by more than 200 groups in support of Burma over a 10-week period. The CCFBPP held a press conference in Bangkok on Tuesday to announce the petition, on this the seventh day of the trial of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi by the Burmese military government. International condemnation of the trial has been widespread, including unprecedented criticism from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean). The petition campaign has been led by the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) (AAPP) and the Forum for Democracy in Burma, representing former political prisoners and pro-democracy activists. Since October 2008, more than 350 Burmese political activists have been sentenced to harsh sentences of up to 104 years. Burma now has 2,100 political prisoners, according to the AAPP. Bo Kyi, a co-founder and jointsecretary of the AAPP, said, “We intend to urge the secretary-general to take more measures in the Security Council. It’s time for the international community and for the Burmese people to demand more from the UN.” A broad-based consortium of Burmese exiles and solidarity groups around the world worked to secure the petition signatures, including Avaaz, an online community of activists. Avaaz executive director Ricken Patel said, “Aung San Suu Kyi is Burma’s Nelson Mandela. The UN secretary-general must insist that her release be the condition for any further international engagement with the Burmese junta.” Since the campaign launched on March 13, commemorating Burma’s Human Rights Day, one person has signed the petition every 10 seconds. Irrawaddy, 26 May 2009 A global campaign for the release of Burma’s political prisoners has secured over 650,000 petition signatures in just ten weeks, according to campaign organisers. Signatures have come from 220 countries and territories. “This is the largest global coordinated action for Burma the world has ever witnessed,” said Dr Naing Aung, Secretary-General of the Forum for Democracy in Burma. Burma Net, 26 May 2009 A group of Southeast Asian politicians is urging the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to suspend Burma’s membership if it refuses to release democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Aung San Suu Kyi testified Tuesday against charges that could put her in prison for five years. Aung San Suu Kyi said she was innocent when she was called Tuesday to testify in court. The trial has been widely condemned as an excuse to keep the Nobel Peace Prize winner locked up and pressure is growing for her release. The ASEAN InterParliamentary Myanmar Caucus on Tuesday called for tougher actions against Burma, including suspending its membership in the regional bloc. Charles Chong, a Singaporean lawmaker and member of the caucus, told journalists in Bangkok that dealing with Burma has bogged down ASEAN, making it harder for them to accomplish anything. “More and more parliamentarians within ASEAN are beginning to lose their patience with Burma. And, we are calling upon our governments to do more than just expressions of dismay, regret, grave concern and so on, and seriously look at suspending Burma’s membership of ASEAN,” he said. VOA, 26 May 2009 Foreign ministers from Asia and Europe have condemned North Korea’s test of a nuclear weapon, besides expressing concern over the continuing detention of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. A statement adopted Tuesday by the Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) in Hanoi termed Monday’s nuclear test “a clear violation of U.N. resolutions.” The ministers from more than 40 countries called on Pyongyang to “immediately return” to the Six-Party Talks, aimed at ending its nuclear program. They issued a strong warning to the reclusive Communist nation against conducting further nuclear tests and to comply with U.N. Page 94 of 226

resolutions. In another statement issued, the ministers called on the Burmese military regime to release people it imprisoned, citing “recent developments” in the case of Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. Czech Foreign Minister Jan Kohout, whose country holds the rotating European Union presidency, congratulated the ministers for moving ‘swiftly and resolutely’ to deal with the North Korean and Burmese situations at the concluding session of the two-day trans-continental conference. RTT News, 26 May 2009 China said the trial is an internal affair. “It involves the internal judicial procedures of Burma, whose judicial sovereignty and independence should be respected,” Ma Zhaoxu, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, told reporters on May 26. bloomberg.com, 5 June 2009 An Indian Member of Parliament and activists on Tuesday echoed the international outcry for the release of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, facing a trial in Rangoon’s Insein prison. Sharad Yadav of the Janata Dal (United) party and a Member of Parliament of India from Bihar State in the Rajya Sabha(Upper House), said he supports the international community’s demand for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi. “We are here to mobilise world opinion. The whole world is asking the junta to release Aung San Suu Kyi and to pave the way for democracy,” Yadav said in a seminar organized by South Asian Forum for Peoples’ Initiative at the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi on Tuesday. Mizzima, 26 May 2009 Carl Bildt, Foreign Minister of Sweden, called it a major step forward and said it went beyond anything previously endorsed by China or Vietnam. “It’s a substantial increase on the political pressure on the regime in Burma,” he said. Reuters, 26 May 2009 Thailand has denied interfering in Burma’s affairs with its demand as the chair of Asean for the junta to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Mrs Suu Kyi has entered a plea of not guilty to charges of violating her house arrest rules. Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya said the statement issued by Thailand on May 18 reflected the concern of Asean members on the situation in Burma. He said the statement was approved by top foreign ministry officials of the grouping. “It did not interfere in Burma’s internal affairs,” Mr Kasit said in Hanoi, where he was attending the Asia-Europe Meeting (Asem). “Like the situation in Thailand, many countries expressed concern over the street protests as well as the conflict in the South because it affected stability in the region and progress in Asean.” Bangkok Post, 26 May 2009 The decision by Burma’s government to put Aung San Suu Kyi, the opposition leader and Nobel Peace laureate, on trial has chilled relations with some of the ruling military junta’s traditional allies and made it less like likely that international sanctions against the nation will be eased, according to U.S., European and Asian officials. The issue has dominated the two-day Asia-Europe Meeting, which is being held in Hanoi this week. Benita-Maria Ferrero-Waldner, the European Union’s External Affairs Commissioner, said she would press for the release of Suu Kyi and the 2,100 other political prisoners held in the country when she meets with Burmese Foreign Minister Nyan Win. Washington Post, 26 May 2009

The UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention said Suu Kyi should have been freed in May 2008 and called for her immediate release in a legal opinion last year. Her lawyers have said her detention violates both Burmese and international law. The charges against Suu Kyi prompted the U.S., the European Union and Burma’s neighbors in Southeast Asia to call for her immediate release. Foreign ministers from Asia and Europe, who met for a two- day summit in Hanoi, issued a statement today about Burma, calling for “the early release of those under detention, and the lifting of restrictions placed on political parties.” bloomberg.com, 26 May 2009

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27 May 2009, Wednesday
Yettaw, of Falcon, Missouri, told the court Wednesday he had been sent by God to warn Suu Kyi of his premonition that she would be assassinated by terrorists, Nyan Win said. Suu Kyi acknowledges that she allowed him to stay for two days because he said he was too tired and ill to leave immediately. Yettaw also secretly went to her house late last year but did not meet Suu Kyi. He testified that security personnel observed him during both of his visits but did not try to stop him, Nyan Win said. AP, 27 May 2009 At Wednesday’s hearing, Yettaw testified that he met with armed security personnel upon leaving her house after his first visit, in November of last year, with the security detachment aiming their guns at him and asking, “What are you doing here?” Apart from that, he reportedly faced no trouble and harassment by security deployed at Suu Kyi’s compound and managed to leave the area, according to his testimony. Then, in his second visit, he again testified he encountered five security personnel while trying to sneak into her house by swimming across Inya Lake. On this occasion security personnel threw some stones at him but did not do anything to block his entry. Mizzima, 27 May 2009 The party of Burmese democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi released doves and balloons at a ceremony on Wednesday marking the 19th anniversary of an election victory that was voided by the ruling junta. Around 300 people gathered at the headquarters of the National League for Democracy (NLD) in Rangoon, as the trial of their leader on charges of breaching her house arrest continued at a notorious prison in the city. Dozens of plainclothes security officials videotaped and photographed people entering the event, including some western diplomats, while security was boosted across the city, witnesses said. The NLD won Burma’s last democratic elections on May 27, 1990 by a landslide, but the military regime never allowed Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi to form a government. Wearing “Free Aung San Suu Kyi” T-shirts, senior party members released a total of 64 doves and balloons into the air -- symbolising her upcoming 64th birthday on June 19. “We are releasing them to call for the release of Aung San Suu kyi and Tin Oo,” an announcer said over a megaphone. Tin Oo is the detained deputy leader of the party. Aung San Suu Kyi and Tin Oo have both been detained since May 30, 2003 following a deadly attack on her convoy during a party visit to northern Burma by an allegedly government-backed mob. Authorities unexpectedly announced that Aung San Suu Kyi’s house arrest had been lifted on Tuesday, a day before it was due to expire, but she remains in detention at Insein prison awaiting trial. The 63-year-old faces up to five more years in jail on charges stemming from an incident in which an American man, John Yettaw, swam to her house earlier this month. Diplomats from the United States, Britain, France, Italy and other western countries attended the ceremony. hindustantimes.com, 27 May 2009 The ministerial meeting began on Wednesday evening, with 110 ASEAN delegates and 161 European delegates in attendance. Most arrived directly from the Asian-EU summit in Hanoi, where North Korea’s nuclear tests and Burma’s human rights abuses had dominated talks. At the end of the meeting, diplomats released a joint statement calling for the release of Suu Kyi and other political prisoners. Asia Times Online, 27 May 2009 “I call on the Burmese government to release National League for Democracy Secretary General and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi from detention immediately and unconditionally. I strongly condemn her house arrest and detention, which have also been condemned around the world. The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention has issued opinions affirming that the detention of Aung San Suu Kyi dating back to 2003 is arbitrary, unjustified, and in contravention of Burma’s own law, and the United Nations Security Council reaffirmed on May 22 their concern about the situation and called for the release of all political prisoners,” U.S. President Obama said. He went on to emphasise on the statement released to the site that “Aung San Suu Kyi’s continued detention, isolation, and show trial based on spurious charges cast serious doubt on the Burmese regime’s willingness to be a responsible member of the international community. This is an important opportunity for the government in Burma to demonstrate that it respects its Page 96 of 226

own laws and its own people, is ready to work with the National League for Democracy and other ethnic and opposition groups, and is prepared to move toward reconciliation. “By her actions, Aung San Suu Kyi has represented profound patriotism, sacrifice, and the vision of a democratic and prosperous Burma. It is time for the Burmese government to drop all charges against Aung San Suu Kyi and unconditionally release her and her fellow political prisoners. Such an action would be an affirmative and significant step on Burma’s part to begin to restore its standing in the eyes of the United States and the world community and to move toward a better future for its people,” Obama said. www.64forsuu.org British Prime Minister, Gordon Brown’s “64”: “I add my voice to the growing chorus of those demanding your release. For too long the world has failed to act in the face of this intolerable injustice. That is now changing. The clamour for your release is growing across Europe, Asia, and the entire world. We must do all we can to make this Birthday the last you spend without your freedom.” www.64forsuu.org

28 May 2009, Thursday
Yettaw was taken to Suu Kyi’s residence Thursday, accompanied by dozens of police, to re-enact before court officials how he entered and left her compound, said state-run newspapers Friday, which also published photos of the re-enactment. AP, 28 May 2009 Kyi Win, the defense witness who is a legal expert and a member of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party, highlighted what appears to be the defense’s main argument, that the charge against Suu Kyi is unlawful. The charge against Suu Kyi cites a 1975 state security law, not the more narrowly defined confinement order for her house arrest. The 1975 law sets out broader penalties and refers to the 1974 constitution, which was annulled when the military took power in 1988. The country adopted a new charter last year. Prosecutors seemed very unhappy at his testimony, Kyi Win told reporters outside the courtroom after the trial’s ninth day. Accounts of testimony have generally come only from the state press and defense lawyer Nyan Win, because reporters have been barred from all but two of the sessions. AP, 28 May 2009 Speaking to The Irrawaddy on Thursday, defense lawyer Nyan Win said that Burmese pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi privately told him that the charges against her are invalid as she was charged under the 1975 State Security law, which was annulled by the 2008 constitution. “We are facing a crisis of constitution, not a constitutional crisis,” she reportedly told him on Thursday. The lawyer said that Suu Kyi was referring to a 1975 law enacted under the 1974 constitution, which became invalidated when the military seized power in 1988. In addition, under the junta’s “seven-step road map,” the country approved a new constitution in May 2008 by national referendum, which would also invalidate the 1975 act. 28 May 2009 Lawyers for Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi expressed optimism about her case after the only witness allowed to testify for the defense addressed the court in her trial on charges of violating house arrest. Closing arguments in a case that could send the Nobel Peace laureate to prison for five years are set to be heard Monday. The defense has argued that there is no legal basis for the charge that Suu Kyi had violated the terms of her house arrest when an uninvited American swam secretly to her home. Suu Kyi’s supporters fear that she may be found guilty because the courts are under the influence of the ruling junta and usually mete out harsh punishment for political dissidents. But one of Suu Kyi’s lawyers, Nyan Win, said Thursday night he was “very confident of victory if the trial is carried out according to law.” The court was in recess Friday. AP, 28 May 2009 Suu Kyi’s case and North Korea’s recent nuclear test were major topics at a meeting of foreign ministers from the European Union and the 10-nation Association of Southeast Nations in the Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. But Jan Kohout, deputy prime minister of the Czech Republic and the meeting’s co-chairman, Page 97 of 226

said that “we are still deeply concerned over Ms. Aung San Suu Kyi’s detention and urge that she should be released immediately.” Burmese Deputy Foreign Minister Maung Myint said it was inappropriate for the meeting to take up Suu Kyi’s cases, because it breached the region’s traditional policy of noninterference in each other’s affairs. AP, 28 May 2009 The trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, which entered its ninth day on Thursday, is purely a legal matter and of no concern to the outside world, Deputy Foreign Minister Maung Myint said on Thursday. “It is not political, it is not a human-rights issue. So we don’t accept pressure and interference from abroad.” European delegates summarily rejected Maung Myint’s statement, sparking a back-and-forth discussion that lasted hours and sidelined hopes for substantial progress in other areas. Myint declined to elaborate on his comments when approached by Asia Times Online, saying, “I already expressed myself at the meeting this morning.” Czech Foreign Minister Jan Kohout told delegates that Burma had taken “a big step backwards” and Suu Kyi’s trial could not be treated as merely an internal issue. Finnish Foreign Minister Alexander Stubb added that “it is an old-fashioned way of thinking” to talk about “not meddling in internal affairs.” The EU was created to do exactly that within Europe, Stubb said, and ASEAN should consider doing likewise. Later, during their lunch of shrimp cocktail, grilled lamb and caramel flan, a French diplomat reportedly delivered a 15-minute lecture on human rights directed at Burma. Asia Times Online, 28 May 2009

29 May 2009, Friday
Final arguments in the case had been expected on Monday, but the prison court informed Suu Kyi’s lawyers on Friday that the trial would resume on June 5. It gave no reason for the change. Reuters, 29 May 2009 A spokesman for the National League for Democracy, Nyan Win, told VOA Burmese Service Friday that Aung San Suu Kyi is suffering from severe leg cramps, which keep her awake at night. 29 May 2009 Speaking to The Irrawaddy on Friday, Nyan Win said Suu Kyi’s defense team had not been informed that court authorities intended to take the American intruder to the lakeside compound. “The government has just done whatever they wanted,” he said. “In fact, if they want to do something regarding the trial, they must inform us.” 29 May 2009 Burmese justice, or more precisely the lack of it, is on full display in Rangoon with the trial of democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi on spurious charges of violating the terms of her house arrest. Secretary General of Burma’s National League for Democracy, or NLD, and a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, she faces up to 5 more years in detention if convicted of allowing an uninvited intruder to spend the night in her home when he became too weak and ill to leave when so ordered. The U.S. is not alone in its concern for the imprisoned Nobel laureate. Asian and European Union leaders meeting in Vietnam jointly called for her release and that of all other Burmese political prisoners. Some of Burma’s neighbors have called for the Rangoon government to be suspended from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations if she continues to be detained. Burma’s leaders have an important opportunity to show their commitment to genuine rule of law. They should release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately. Editorial, VOA, 29 May 2009 Despite a note of guarded optimism struck by one of Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers and notwithstanding mounting international pressure, there is no real indication that her trial in Rangoon will end in her acquittal and release. “We don’t accept pressure and interference from abroad,” said Burma’s Deputy Foreign Minister Maung Myint. “The case against Aung San Suu Kyi is an internal legal issue,” he told a meeting of the European Union and Southeast Asian ministers in Cambodia. Since the pro-democracy leader was first arraigned on a charge of violating the terms of her house arrest, international pressure has been increasing to unexpected levels, even from the organization where the regime traditionally finds protection, the Page 98 of 226

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean). Strong statements came from world leaders such as US President Barack Obama, who said, “It is time for the Burmese government to drop all charges against Aung San Suu Kyi and unconditionally release her and her fellow political prisoners. Obama’s administration—which had been reviewing its hard-line policy towards Burma—also extended its economic sanctions against the junta right after her arrest on May 14. Britain’s Prime Minister Gordon Brown delivered a particularly strong and impassioned statement, talking of action to ensure the release of Suu Kyi. World leaders like Obama and Brown can work with the international bodies, the UN, EU and Asean, and even with Burma’s closest allies, China, India and Russia, which are quietly guarding their business interests with the junta by turning a blind eye to the trial and other injustices. All need only one thing— political will. Editorial, Irrawaddy, 29 May 2009 What foreign secretary David Miliband calls the “show trial” in Rangoon has also drawn the spotlight back to the egregious human rights violations perpetrated by the regime in the wake of the failed 2007 uprising, known as the saffron revolution. Of grave concern is the plight of Burma’s more than 2,000 political prisoners who are held in a gulag of about 100 jails and labour camps spread across the country. A report entitled ‘Burma’s Silent Killing Fields’, published last week by the Thailand-based Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), a group comprising exiled activists and former prisoners, paints a horrific, case-by-case picture of systematic abuse including torture, deaths in custody, denial of medical assistance and a deliberate policy of transferring prisoners to remote regions to prevent family access and support. The Guardian, 29 May 2009

30 May 2009, Saturday
Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi marked the sixth anniversary of her latest period of detention on Saturday, as she awaits her trial verdict amid renewed fears for her health. Members of the Nobel peace laureate’s political party donated food to monks in early morning ceremonies as they recalled her arrest in 2003 following a pro-junta mob attack on her motorcade that left about 70 people dead. She has been held under house arrest since the incident near Depayin in northern Burma, but was moved to Rangoon’s Insein Prison two weeks ago following fresh charges against her. AFP, 30 May 2009 Burma’s detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi harbors no ill feelings toward an American whose uninvited intrusion into her house may put her behind bars for five years, her lawyer said Saturday. The country’s military regime has accused her of violating the terms of her house arrest for sheltering American John W. Yettaw after he swam to her lakeside residence in early May. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said she bore no grudge against Mr. Yettaw or his family,” her defense lawyer Nyan Win told reporters after meeting her for 2 1/2 hours to prepare for the defense’s final arguments. AP, 30 May 2009 The EU has threatened to tighten sanctions against Burma if the pro-democracy icon is convicted. Czech Foreign Minister Jan Kohout, who co-chaired the meeting as the Czech Republic now holds the rotating EU presidency, also refrained from identifying any repercussions. “We have to wait,” he said. Asia Times Online, 30 May 2009 On Saturday US Defence Secretary Robert Gates told a high-level security forum in Singapore that Burma’s rulers must release her and begin dialogue with the opposition. “We need to see real change in Burma -- the release of political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi, and the institution of meaningful dialogue between the junta and the opposition,” Gates said. AFP, 30 May 2009 Around 250 people held a rally outside Burma’s embassy in central Tokyo on Saturday, the sixth anniversary of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s latest period of detention, to call for her release. The demonstrators, including Burmese citizens and Japanese supporters, gathered at the embassy’s gates, Page 99 of 226

where they recalled her arrest in 2003 after a pro-junta mob attack on her motorcade that left about 70 people dead. The demonstrators then placed flowers at the gates and held a one-minute silent prayer for the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s immediate release. They also carried her portraits and banners, which were read: “Free Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners now. The Japanese government must pressure the military regime immediately.” Japanese Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone has told Burma his country has “profound concerns” about Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial at Rangoon’s Insein Prison, where she is currently detained. dose.ca, 30 May 2009 It is not very often that Asean countries, together, take a strong stand against one of their own members. At the special meeting in Phnom Penh early this week every member apart from Burma expressed solidarity with the Thai chairman’s statement. The chair had issued a statement expressing grave concern about the deteriorating health of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and the problems she is facing. Asean foreign ministers know deep within their hearts that Burma cannot get away scot-free this time by citing the principle of non-interference. Burma has been using this mantra since it joined Asean 12 years ago. The ongoing trial of Suu Kyi is making the country and its junta leaders a laughing stock. It is also adversely affecting Asean’s reputation. If Asean remains firm and unified, other countries, especially China and India, will proffer their support in the near future. These two Asian giants can get away with their own approach at the moment because Asean does not have a common position. However, with the current solidarity, China and India would be expected to show moral courage. Failure to do so would only jeopardise their ties with the grouping in the future. China, which joined the UN Security Council in expressing concern over Burma’s action last week, should do more. Unfortunately, India is still an oddball as far as Burma is concerned. New Delhi remains tight-lipped on Rangoon’s action against Suu Kyi, which is a shameful thing for the world’s largest democracy to do. The Nation, 30 May 2009 Burmese authorities have banned the general public from entering the area of the collapsed Danok pagoda, local residents report. People of Danok model village in Rangoon’s Dalla Township, where the pagoda is located, have also been warned not to talk about the accident. Local residents have been threatened with imprisonment if found talking to independent journalists. The 2,300 year-old pagoda, located in Danok model village in Rangoon’s Dalla township, collapsed last Saturday, killing at least 20 people and injuring about 150. The wife of junta leader Than Shwe, members of their family and relatives of senior military officials had attended a ceremony at the pagoda on May 7, at which a sacred golden umbrella was hoisted to the top of the structure. The association of Than Shwe’s wife, Kyaing Kyaing, and members of their family with the pagoda gave rise to a flood of speculation about the mystical significance of the accident. The pagoda was being repaired at the time, however. The work was being carried out by the Shwe Than Lwin Company, owned by Burmese tycoon Kyaw Win. No news about the collapsed pagoda has appeared in the official media, and one Rangoon journalist said a report written for her journal had been suppressed by the censorship board. Fortune tellers were quick to find significance in the collapse of the pagoda, and elderly residents talked about the mystic powers the ancient structure was said to possess. Some said the pagoda shook when it disapproved of any visiting pilgrim. One local monk said the accident was a bad omen. Irrawaddy, 3 June 2009

31 May 2009, Sunday
The pro-democracy icon’s legal team said they hoped to meet with her this week at the jail where she is being held, before the prosecution and defence present closing arguments to the court on Friday. “We will prepare this week for the final arguments in the case. We are still working on whether we will meet Daw Suu again,” Nyan Win, one of her lawyers and also the spokesman for her opposition party, told AFP. No hearings are expected in her trial at the notorious Insein Prison until Friday, but Yettaw is due back in court on Monday on separate charges including immigration violations, a Burmese official said. On Sunday Burma’s deputy defence minister, Major General Aye Myint, rejected foreign criticism of the trial and said Page 100 of 226

Aung San Suu Kyi was facing normal legal procedures. “It is no doubt that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has committed a cover-up of the truth by her failure to report an illegal immigrant to the authorities concerned,” he told a security forum in Singapore. Opposition party spokesman Nyan Win said he could not comment on the general’s remarks as the trial was ongoing, adding: “He (Aye Myint) is talking about court matters. The court has not given any decision yet.” A guilty verdict is widely expected as Burma’s courts have a track record of handing down tough sentences to dissidents, often in secret hearings. Aung San Suu Kyi said last week that the charges against her were “one-sided.” The 63-year-old accused Burmese authorities of failing to provide proper security despite the fact that she informed them of a previous intrusion by Yettaw in November 2008. AFP, 31 May 2009 Britain challenged Sunday Burma’s military rulers to release imprisoned opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and implement democratic reforms in the isolated state. “Now is the time for transition to democracy starting with the release of Aung San Suu Kyi,” Britain’s Minister for International Defence and Security Ann Taylor told a summit on Asian security in Singapore. Suu Kyi, a Nobel peace laureate, has spent 14 of the past 20 years under house arrest. The democracy advocate is currently standing trial on charges of breaking the terms of her house arrest. “Aung San Suu Kyi is not alone,” Taylor said. Burma’s military junta has been continually criticized for human right abuses. DPA, 31 May 2009

1 June 2009, Monday
Burma’s detained democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi believes she is innocent and will continue to defend herself against the charge she faces in the Insein Prison court, according to her lawyers. One of her lawyers, Kyi Win, told The Irrawaddy that, according to the evidence, “we have a very good case because she has not breached any conditions and restrictions imposed upon her.” At home she at least had a radio and is believed to have kept herself well up to date with news on Burma and the rest of the world. Visiting UN officials were often surprised to learn how well informed she was. In Insein Prison, however, she has no access to a radio and very limited access to news from outside. She did meet some diplomats who were allowed to attend two sessions of her trial last week, but journalists who were also present were not allowed to talk to her. Through her lawyers, though, Suu Kyi has learned about the international outcry against her trial and the overwhelming support she commands. Kyi Win said, “I conveyed sentiment and support from world leaders including British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, US President Obama and many other leaders. She expressed her sincere thanks to them.” Another of her lawyers, Nyan Win, who is also spokesman of her National League for Democracy, questioned the country’s judicial system and its independence. It is believed that the details of the court proceedings have been submitted to the top leaders in Naypyidaw. Diplomats have said they believe that the verdict has already been written, ready to be read out on the final day of the trial. There is no doubt that junta leader Sr-Gen Than Shwe holds the key to the final decision. Political observers in Rangoon believe that the decision to postpone the trial until Friday also came from Than Shwe. The judges exercise no power in the Insein Prison court. Although they know the verdict has already been decided, Suu Kyi’s lawyers say they cannot afford to lose hope. “We will always have hope,” Kyi Win said. Aung Zaw, Irrawaddy, 1 June 2009 Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, the current ASEAN chair, was trying to convene a meeting of its leaders later Monday on the sidelines of the ASEAN- Korea Summit, diplomatic sources said. Abhisit said in Bangkok Sunday that Suu Kyi’s trial, which has drawn strong international condemnation, would be discussed. AFP, 1 June 2009 “ASEAN was bogged down by Burma last week in its meeting with Europe,” said Bridget Welsh, a Southeast Asia specialist at Johns Hopkins University in the U.S. She was referring to last week’s gathering in Hanoi of Asian and European foreign ministers. “The failure of ASEAN to take a strong stand on Burma has seriously undermined the credibility of the organization. ASEAN as an organization cannot Page 101 of 226

evolve without Burma taking steps to show it genuinely respects the norms of the international community,” she said. “ASEAN members are fed up with Burma, and although they are not saying so publicly, many would like Burma to leave,” said Welsh. AFP, 1 June 2009 Analysts and diplomats said the problem has become especially acute since ASEAN members including Burma signed a charter, or mini-constitution, which came into force last year. Under the charter, they commit themselves “to strengthen democracy, enhance good governance and the rule of law, and to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms.” Burma, however, is “behaving as if it has not signed the charter at all,” said a Southeast Asian diplomat. AFP, 1 June 2009 “The continued imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi by the Burmese regime is a reminder that we cannot take for granted the institution of democracy,” Ann Taylor, Britain’s Minister for International Defense and Security, told a security forum in Singapore Sunday. AFP, 1 June 2009 The spray-painted demands appear overnight: “Free Aung San Suu Kyi” read the scrawls on walls across this city - only to be whitewashed by security forces as soon as they are discovered. “I’m so upset about what has happened in my country,” said Zin, a 28-year-old housewife who, like most Burmese, won’t give her full name for fear of retaliation. “People are angry and people are sad, but we can’t do anything for her. We have no power.” AP, 1 June 2009 “If Suu Kyi is found guilty and jailed, there will be much popular anger, but it won’t make a real difference because the government is well-equipped and experienced in dealing with the people’s protests,” said Donald Seekins, a Burma expert at Japan’s Meio University. Seekins said the regime has already posted soldiers throughout Rangoon, the largest city, “and can suppress demonstrations with little difficulty.” AP, 1 June 2009 Thailand’s foreign minister urged the creation of an “open society” in neighbouring Burma, saying that an end to repressive government in the military-run nation would help “stabilize” the south-east Asian region. Kasit Priyoma said during an official visit to Bangladesh that “change in Burma is very much needed. It is not only a necessity for the security of Burma, but also for all the neighbouring countries.” The minister is on a two-day official visit to Dhaka, where he met Monday with his Bangladeshi counterpart Dipu Moni. The Thai diplomat said that many southeast and south Asian nations had had military dictatorships, and had now emerged into democratic rule. Burma is widely seen as an international pariah for its harsh government, as well as its treatment of human-rights activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi. Earth Times, 1 June 2009

2 June 2009, Tuesday
Lawyers for Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi said Tuesday they had asked a court to overturn an earlier ban that prevented three defense witnesses from testifying at her trial. Judges at the closed court in Rangoon’s Insein prison last month refused to allow three people including two members of her party to testify at the trial, in which final arguments are due Friday. “We have filed a revision order to the court today. We want to call the other three witnesses,” Kyi Win, her main laywer, told AFP. “The prosecution had 14 witnesses and we had only one so far. If you look at the numbers it is one-sided, and that is why we have made this application,” he said. Nyan Win, the spokesman for Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, said after going to court to file the application that it would be heard on Wednesday. The three barred witnesses were Win Tin, a journalist who was Burma’s longest serving prisoner until his release in September; Tin Oo, the detained deputy chief of her party, and lawyer Khin Moe Moe. The only person to testify last week for the defense was a legal expert. AFP, 2 June 2009

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But Yettaw’s lawyer Khin Maung Oo said earlier Tuesday that the former U.S. military veteran, who also faces up to five years in jail, didn’t take orders or money from outside organisations to carry out his bizarre intrusion into Aung San Suu Kyi’s residence. He said that Yettaw, a devout Mormon, was a “sincere and pious” person who believed God had told him to warn her and the government after he had a vision that she would be assassinated. AFP, 2 June 2009 Burmese democracy leader and Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi stood trial last month on new, false charges --despite having spent 13 of the past 19 years under house arrest. She has committed no crime: Indeed, it is the regime that is criminal. Benedict Rogers, Christian Solidarity Worldwide, asahi.com, 2 June 2009 As North Korea’s recent nuclear test raises tensions in Asia, rogue state Burma’s nuclear program is ringing alarm bells in the Western world, say Greenpeace and a local expert. Burma’s notorious junta, which has been subject to Western economic sanctions because of its poor human rights record, has attracted criticism over its plan to develop nuclear reactors. In 2002 it was reported that the Russian government had agreed to help the military junta build a nuclear research facility that would be used to develop reactors for medical and electricity resources. The US has shunned Burma’s nuclear plans, saying Rangoon has neither the legal framework nor the provisions that would safeguard its nuclear program from posing a security threat. “Nuclear power and nuclear arms are different sides of the same coin. Every nuclear-power-wielding state can turn into a nuclear-armed nation,” said Tessa de Ryck, an anti- nuclear campaigner from Greenpeace Southeast Asia. The Jakarta Post, 2 June 2009 South Korean President Lee Myung-bak urged Burma to take steps to promote democracy during a meeting with its prime minister Tuesday, Lee’s office said. Lee held talks with Gen. Thein Sein on the sidelines of a two-day summit between South Korea and leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. “President Lee expressed the hope that the Burmese government would address the concerns of the international community by making sure that national unity and democracy take root in a substantial manner through dialogue and compromise,” Lee’s office said in a press release. AP, 3 June 2009

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NLD Youths Statement dated 2 June 2009 Page 104 of 226

3 June 2009, Wednesday
Burma’s judiciary accepted an appeal from Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers Wednesday over the number of witnesses she could call, delaying closing arguments at her internationally condemned trial. Nyan Win, a spokesman for her party, said a higher court would now hear from the government and the defence on the matter on Friday, when closing arguments at the prison trial were originally due to be heard. “I think it is a positive sign, if we look at the law,” Nyan Win, who is also a member of Aung San Suu Kyi’s legal team, told AFP. “The Rangoon divisional court accepted our appeal so both sides have to give statements to the court on Friday at 3:00 pm. That means the final arguments in the trial are postponed,” he added. AFP, 3 June 2009 Twenty-two female members of Thai parliament on Wednesday petitioned Burma’s junta to drop current charges against democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and free her immediately. “As a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and as a longstanding democracy advocate, Mrs Aung San suu Kyi has been an inspiration not only for women MPs in Thailand but also for all adherents and participants of democratic ideals worldwide,” the 22 Thai women said in a statement. Altogether there are 62 women MPs out of 474 total seats in Thailand’s Lower House. It was the first such statement by a group of women MPs in Thai parliament on a diplomatic matter. Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, in his position as current chair of the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN), last month issued a statement expressing “deep concern” about Suu Kyi’s latest trial and possible imprisonment. The statement was rejected by Burma’s junta as interference in the country’s internal affairs. Burma joined ASEAN in 1997. Earth Times, 3 June 2009

4 June 2009, Thursday
“If the military government unfairly finds Daw Aung San Suu Kyi guilty, all means and possibilities for people and political parties to participate in the 2010 election will be undermined,” Win Tin, a veteran journalist and prominent opposition leader of the NLD, told The Irrawaddy. Burmese politicians and activists are continuing the campaign to urge the International community and world leaders to maintain pressure on the military regime. Win Tin, a prominent politician and executive member of National League for Democracy (NLD) told The Irrawaddy on Thursday international pressure has given the democracy movement “a bit of breathing space.” 4 June 2009 Han Thar Myint, a spokesperson for the NLD, told The Irrawaddy on Thursday, “The international criticism is very important for Burmese pro-democracy activists and the Burmese people, because it makes them feel good. Now, Asean has also criticized the Burmese military government. I think it is important because Burma is a member of Asean.” He said the image of the Burmese military junta has been tarnished, and, “I think they are trying to release international pressure, so they postponed Aung San Suu Kyi’s verdict.” Activists have called for the international community and world leaders to take more effective actions against the junta. Win Tin said, “UN chief Ban Ki-moon should go to Burma as soon as possible. But, if he leaves Burma empty-handed, it will be a set back. We must keep up the pressure.” Many activists said the military regime’s real fear is the UN Security Council. “The only body that the junta really fears is the Security Council,” said the former UN Rapporteur for Human Rights in Burma, Paulo Sergio Pinheiro. “I have personal evidence of this. So the Security Council must address this immediately as a matter of absolute urgency.” Some observers have called for the International Criminal Court to become involved. The monk-activist, Ashin Issariya, said, “Now, International organizations and governments need to take effective measures against the military junta. We should build a case for human-rights abuses by military junta and call for the Security Council to take action to bring it before the International Criminal Court.” Page 105 of 226

Ashin Issariya said the UN is aware of the scale and severity of rights abuses in Burma, and it is incumbent on the Security Council to authorize a commission of inquiry into crimes against humanity and war crimes in the country. Pro-democracy leader Suu Kyi’s trial has drawn worldwide condemnation and is seen as an effort of the junta to detain the political leader through elections scheduled for 2010. Irrawaddy, 4 June 2009 Two prominent Buddhist monks were injured in an elevator crash while inspecting the country’s tallest Buddha statue in the second temple-related accident within a week, monastery officials said Friday. “Sayadaw Ashin Sanda Dika and Sayadaw Yawainwe Innma were injured on Thursday at about 6 pm when the temple lift suddenly dropped,” an official from the Bawditataung monastery said. The Bawditataung monastery in Monywa, 136 kilometres north-west of Mandalay, is famous for its 130 metrehigh Buddha statue that was completed in 2007. The monks were inspecting the statue in a maintenance lift, witnesses said. The cause of the failure of lift was still unknown and was under investigation, sources said. “The two abbots are now in a hospital in Mandalay with leg injuries,” said a monastery source, who asked to remain anonymous. Ashin Sanda Dika and Yawainwe Innma are well-known monks in Burma who have published many books on society and religion. The accident was the second temple-related mishap within a week. monstersandcritics.com, 5 June 2009 At least 30 supporters of Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi held a noisy demonstration outside the country’s mission here Thursday to demand her release. During the brief protest, the Burmese nationals shouted slogans such as “We want democracy,” and “Free Aung San Suu Kyi” and carried placards with the words: “We oppose the 2010 elections.” “The protest is to press the military junta to free Aung San Suu Kyi and other leaders,’ Thein Aung, 38, told AFP. Kuala Lumpur, 5 June 2009 Police in Burma detained two women and four children after they held a protest asking the US embassy to help obtain the release of a prisoner, an official said. The group unfurled a banner asking for assistance as the husband of one of the women had earlier been arrested by authorities in the military-ruled nation, the official said on condition of anonymity. “Two women and four children have been detained for questioning as they staged a small protest in front of the American Embassy,” the official said. The banner said “Please help as my husband was arrested unjustly,’ according to the official. news.com.au, 4 June 2009

5 June 2009, Friday
On Friday Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers presented appeal documents to a Rangoon divisional court, asking the court to overturn a ban on three of four witnesses whom she called to give evidence at her trial. A judge said a decision on the appeal would be given on Tuesday, June 9, three days before her prison trial reconvenes after a week-long adjournment. AFP, 6 June 2009 The trial of Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi for allegedly violating conditions of her house arrest was delayed for a week over efforts to reinstate three defense witnesses, one of her lawyers said on Friday. Suu Kyi’s trial was adjourned until June 12 while a higher court hears a request by her attorneys to reinstate the defense witnesses who were earlier barred from testifying at her trial, lawyer Nyan Win said. The decision on those witnesses was expected later today. The lower District Court earlier disqualified all but one defense witness -- legal expert Kyi Win. Those rejected were all members of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party. They include prominent journalist and former political prisoner Win Tin, the party’s vice chairman Tin Oo, currently under house arrest, and lawyer Khin Moe Moe. indiatimes.com, 5 June 2009 Security around Rangoon was especially tight Friday, witnesses said, with truckloads of riot police and groups of pro-junta supporters stationed outside the Divisional Court, the headquarters of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, and City Hall in downtown Rangoon. Riot police also patrolled the city. If Page 106 of 226

the Divisional Court rejects the witnesses next week, Suu Kyi’s lead attorney, Kyi Win, said the defense team would appeal the ruling to the High Court, which could further delay the trial. The High Court is Burma’s top court. AP, 5 June 2009 Every time we become distracted, the generals in Burma manage to jolt us back to attention. The world’s most despotic regime is alive and well, inflicting suffering on its people after five decades in power, while the world does little more than issue an occasional statement of outrage. We’ve grown awkwardly accustomed to that. Now, security forces in the former capital Rangoon have sprung into action. The junta’s most recent move comes perfectly timed to ensure continuing hopelessness. The latest outrage in Burma, the country renamed Myanmar by its ruling generals, came May 14, when startled witnesses saw a security convoy speeding from the home of pro-democracy activist Aung San Suu Kyi, headed for the horrific Insein prison. After years of house detention, the ailing Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, was moved to prison to face a show trial. The generals had found a convenient excuse to extend her detention. Frida Ghitis, ajc.com, 5 June 2009 Reporters Without Borders reiterates its call for the release of Zarganar, a dissident blogger and comedian who was jailed a year ago today on a charge of disturbing public order. He was given a 45-year jail sentence by special court inside Insein prison last November and then received an additional 14-year sentence a few days later. The combined jail terms were reduced to 35 years on 16 February. “The sentence alone shows that Zarganar has been subjected to a travesty of justice,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Do you give such a long jail term just for ‘disturbing public order’? The military government had him arrested and then denied him due process because he had become a reliable source of information in a country throttled by censorship and repression.” The press freedom organisation added: “The conditions in which Zarganar is being held are very bad and his health is deteriorating steadily. These are additional reasons why he must be released.” Suffering from jaundice and hypertension, Zarganar is not getting access to adequate medical care in Myitkyina prison, to which he was transferred in December. CNW Telbec, 5 June 2009 The military government has accused officials of the US and British embassies in Rangoon of allegedly dropping into the office of the Opposition party – the National League for Democracy – 25 times in May alone. The junta’s mouthpiece, the New Light of Burma, on Friday reported that officials of the US and British embassies in Rangoon had visited the NLD office 25 times and passed on instructions and unknown materials to NLD members. “During their visit, they met Central Executive Committee (CEC) members of the party NLD and gave them large and small envelopes and parcels,” the newspaper said. But Win Tin, a former political prisoner and a CEC member of the NLD made light of the accusation saying the visits by US and British embassy officials were in keeping with ‘normal relations’ that diplomats maintain across the world. Mizzima, 5 June 2009 Burma will not be under a military dictatorship forever. It is important that a democratic nation like India does not compromise its cardinal democratic values just to dance in the tune of the Burmese military generals. The new Congress-led coalition government, under the leadership of Sonia Gandhi and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, needs to look beyond the Northeast militancy problem and its relations with Communist China. While the United States is reviewing its policy toward Burma, India should offer every possible support to formulate a coordinated international strategy. A democratic Burma would better serve the interests of a diverse and democratic India. Nehginpao Kipgen, kukiforum.com, 5 June 2009 One of the most obvious truths in international politics is that Burma’s military regime has absolutely no interest in caring for the millions of people that reside within its borders. Next year, the crowning achievement of the junta’s chokehold on Burma will be complete. The proposed elections set for 2010 amount to a circus act. General Than Shwe acts as the ringmaster. There are 50 million civilians on a tightrope and the military regime sways both ends of a rapidly fraying rope. The concerned international community are forced to watch from the stands, helpless to watch any impending disaster unfold. The safety Page 107 of 226

net that may well prevent yet another massacre, in the form of intervention from China and India in publicly condemning the junta’s actions has not been cast. At any moment, a sudden gust of madness could result in catastrophic circumstances and once again, just like in 1988 and 2007, we could be faced with the stench of innocent blood and lifeless bodies. General Than Shwe and his regime enjoy toying with the emotions of more than 50 million civilians of Burma. The junta has arrogantly tossed a bone to the international community by “unexpectedly” cancelling Daw Suu Kyi’s house arrest. However, she is still on trial in Insein Prison facing a lengthy jail sentence, and we need to be prepared for the possibility of a guilty verdict, and let our feelings be known about the disgusting manner in which Daw Suu Kyi has been treated over the years. The regime’s stupidity, paranoia and irrationality know no boundaries. With Daw Suu Kyi out of the picture, the junta have removed their greatest obstacle and most vocal critic. Opposition groups in Burma and governments world wide have clearly stated that no election will be considered worth participating in unless two conditions are met. Firstly, the immediate and unconditional release of more than 2,100 political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi, and secondly, a review the constitution by all political stakeholders is undertaken. David Calleja, theepochtimes.com, 5 June 2009

6 June 2009, Saturday
Unelected and unwanted by their own people, the ruling generals of Burma are now becoming more and more irrational and paranoid. Instead of forging a sincere dialogue with the National League for Democracy (NLD), they have chosen to marginalize the opposition and its leader, Suu Kyi, by fabricating charges against her. Burma is suffering and Suu Kyi is just one of the many living symbols of the noble cause to free Burma once and for all. If somebody must be prosecuted, it is the junta generals! Egoy N. Bans, spokesperson, Free Burma Coalition-Philippines (FBC-Phils), Letters to the Editor, Philippine Daily Inquirer, 6 June 2009 Thousands of political dissidents remain in detention in Burma. The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) estimates about 10,000 former political prisoners still live inside the country and continue to face the threat of imprisonment. Asia Times Online, 6 June 2009 Burmese authorities have summoned members of Aung San Suu Kyi’s pro-democracy party to rebuke them for provoking “unrest” over a statement critical of her trial, state media reported Saturday. Four senior members of the National League for Democracy (NLD) met officials for 30 minutes late Friday after comments by the party’s youth wing were leaked to the website of a prominent blogger, the New Light of Burma said. The four NLD members ordered to meet with officials Friday were Than Tun, Nyunt Wai, Hla Pe and Soe Myint. They signed a document to acknowledge a formal warning by the authorities. The NLD’s youth members had circulated an internal document criticising the trial for being largely held behind closed doors and highlighted international condemnation of the proceedings. But the comments ended up on the “Niknayman” website, which is blocked in Burma as it is run by a well-known activist, and the New Light said this constituted a breach of the country’s publishing laws. The paper said the statement had falsely accused authorities of not allowing public reporting of the trial. Local journalists and two Chinese reporters have been allowed in court along with diplomats to cover two of the ten days of hearings so far. AFP, 6 June 2009 According to a report in The New Light of Burma, youth members of the National League for Democracy (NLD) were told that posting a party statement about Suu Kyi’s trial on the Internet constituted a violation of Electronic Act 33 (A). The law, which forbids unauthorized use of electronic media, was used against many pro-democracy dissidents in trials held at Insein Prison late last year, resulting in lengthy prison sentences for critics of the ruling regime’s crackdown on monks in 2007 and its response to Cyclone Nargis last May. The report also suggested that the youth members may have broken other draconian censorship laws by posting the statement on the blog http://www.niknayman-niknayman.co.cc/ on June 3. “Without Page 108 of 226

seeking permission for publication, the announcement has reached the public. Therefore the announcement is against the printing and publishing registration law,” the newspaper reported. However, the NLD youth members denied that they intended to post the statement on the blog, which is run by a Burmese exile. They said that it was merely being circulated among members of the party. In the statement, the NLD youth members said they were saddened by the junta’s failure to respond to international calls for the unconditional release of Suu Kyi, and expressed doubts about the legality of her trial. They pointed out that the trial is being carried out under provisions of the 1974 constitution, which was abolished when the current regime seized power in 1988. “The act of saying that the 1974 constitution has been dissolved without showing any firm proof is a lawless act,” the report in The New Light of Burma claimed. The report also said that NLD central executive committee members would be held responsible for the actions of the party’s youth members because they had authorized the online publication of the statement. The authorities warned the CEC members yesterday that the statement “harmed peace and stability and prevalence of law and order in the country and disturbed the trial proceedings of a court.” According to The New Light of Burma, the NLD leaders were instructed to sign a statement showing that they had been warned about the situation. However, NLD spokesperson Han Thar Myint said that the NLD leaders refused to sign anything. Irrawaddy, 6 June 2009 State media in Burma says authorities have released two women and four children detained after protesting outside the U.S. Embassy. The group was arrested Thursday as they protested the detention of a man who is the boss of one woman and the husband of the other. He was reportedly detained for taking photographs of a shop. Such an action is liable to raise police suspicions in the military state. The Padauk Mye radio station reported Saturday that the women and children aged between 5 and 17 years have been freed. eTaiwan News, 6 June 2009 US President Barack Obama has described the court proceedings as a “show trial” while Burma’s usually reticent Asian neighbours have expressed strong concerns. Japan’s deputy minister for foreign affairs, Kenichiro Sasae, urged Burma’s junta to listen to the concerns during his trip on Thursday and Friday to the capital Naypyidaw, the Japanese ministry said. AFP, 6 June 2009 International labour experts on Saturday called on the Burmese government to amend a provision in the country’s new constitution that could be interpreted as justifying forced labour. A special session at the International Labour Organisation on the forced labour situation in Burma concluded that the steps taken by the ruling junta towards eradicating forced labour were “totally inadequate.” In a report presented at the meeting, the experts pointed to a provision in the new constitution referring to “duties assigned thereupon by the State in accord with the law in the interests of the people.” The experts expressed deep concern about a provision in the text of the Constitution that “may be interpreted in such a way as to allow a generalised exaction of forced labour from the population.” They called on the government to amend the new constitution, which is meant to take effect in 2010, to bring it into conformity with labour rules. Burma’s representative however said the government “cannot accept criticism on our constitution process,” which he said had been adopted by over 90 percent of voters. ILO experts said that exploitation remained rampant in the Asian country, adding “there is no genuine and sustained political will to end forced labour.” They also raised “serious concern on the continued human rights violations in Burma and the detention of Aung San Suu Kyi” and other political prisoners. AFP, 6 June 2009 A report by the ILO’s liaison officer in Burma, Steve Marshall, said only 152 complaints of forced labor had been received under the mechanism agreed in 2007. “The government continues to play the diplomatic game of doing just enough to create an appearance of cooperation. No one in this room is fooled by that,” said Edward Potter, who speaks for the employers’ group on the committee. Several workers’ representatives called for disinvestment from Burma, which is rich in oil, gas, timber and gems, and was once a major rice producer. Reuters, 6 June 2009 Page 109 of 226

The last time I met Aung San Suu Kyi was in 2003, shortly before the regime ordered an attack on her motorcade that led to the massacre of a number of her supporters and to her detention. She had warned that the viciousness of government intimidation was increasing against tens of thousands who would gather at rallies around the country to hear her speak. Years of isolation had failed to diminish her allure for the Burmese people. Despite the increasing danger, her fortitude and focus was inspirational. I know she will draw on the rare qualities she possesses to deal with the verdict of the show trial she faces now. If anything, she will be energized and invigorated by it. The events of the last few weeks have once again thrown the spotlight on her statesmanlike perseverance against the juvenile banality of Burma’s dictator Than Shwe. The regime has set flowing the myriad streams that coalesce to make her so powerful despite her captivity. Aung San Suu Kyi’s power flows from many different sources. It comes from all those who invest hope in her inside Burma and beyond: from dirt-poor farmers in the plains to cyclone survivors in the delta; from refugees outside her borders to those displaced within them; from the businesses that are choked by the regime to the public servants prevented form serving their people. It comes from those inspired by her selflessness and integrity in a world where cynicism dominates our view of leadership. It comes from the narrative of a monolithic military machine pitted against a solitary, courageous woman. Than Shwe cannot stop the flow of these streams—his actions only help them to flow stronger and faster. This is why he fears her. Those who believe political struggles have failed if they do not deliver results quickly, comprehensively and categorically need to return to their history books. The African National Congress was formed in 1912 and achieved its goal of a democratic South Africa eight decades later. The victory of democrats in Eastern Europe took half a century. I don’t want Burma to wait that long. We should be impatient for change in this beautiful country. But we should not lose sight of what real change means. I believe Aung San Suu Kyi has always been clear about that. She said in an interview that her only fear is to let people down who depend on her, that she would rather go down herself than let that happen. It says something about her if she ends up doing that, but it will also say something about the international community. John Jackson, former director of the Burma Campaign UK, Irrawaddy, 6 June 2009

7 June 2009, Sunday
Four officials of the Buthidaung prison in Arakan state in western Burma have been removed from their posts following the arrest of a man possessing a documentary film on the conditions inside the prison. Sources in the Ministry of Home Affairs told Mizzima that Buthidaung prison in-charge Tin Tun, prison doctor Htay Win, jailer Win Maung and anther prison officer Thein Kyaw were dismissed on June 7 by the authorities. “The video tape shows, the living condition in the prison and how prisoners are being forced to work. The tape was seized from a man who was travelling from Budithaung to Maungdaw town,” a source in the Military Affairs Security (MAS) told Mizzima. The arrested man was identified as Thein Oo and is a resident of Buthidaung town, sources said. 16 June 2009 The Thai Army yesterday sent more heavy weapons, including mortars, into border areas near the fighting, on the orders of Third Region Army commander Lt-General Thanongsak Apirakyothin. The mortars were installed in Tak’s Tha Song Yang district to fire warning shots against any stray shells from the Burmese side of the border. The commander said Thailand would take progressive measures in reaction to any violation of sovereignty. Thanongsak yesterday visited a military unit in Tha Song Yang district and saw 458 war refugees there. He was briefed by local officials that 1,714 refugees had arrived and more were expected. The general instructed officers to work with administrative officials to take good care of the refugees, most of whom are children and elderly people, though it is expected that if the battle becomes intense young adults will follow. The Nation, 7 June 2009

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8 June 2009, Monday
A court in Burma is set to rule Tuesday on whether to allow the testimony of three witnesses who were earlier not allowed at the trial of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. According to Nyan Win, one of Suu Kyi’s lawyers, the court approved 23 prosecution witnesses, of whom 14 testified. He has described the rejection of three defense witnesses as “unfair and unjust.” AP, 8 June 2009 The National League for Democracy (NLD) is faced with a new threat with the ruling junta having warned and restricted it from issuing statements, an executive member of the party said on Monday. Win Tin, a veteran journalist and Central Executive Committee (CEC) member of the NLD, said the junta’s warning to party leaders and youths came in the wake of a statement issued last week by the Youth Working Group. It is a new threat to the party and also signals an increasing crackdown on party activities. The NLD Youth Working Group on June 2 issued a statement condemning the ongoing trial of party leader Aung San Suu Kyi saying that the junta is applying an ineffective law of the 1974 constitution to sue her and to continue to detain her. The youth group also said that the trial was not free and fair as the defendant was only allowed one witness while the prosecution presented 14. In a vindictive response to the statement, the junta authorities on Friday summoned the NLD CEC members along with leaders of the Youth Working Group and warned them. They made them sign a pledge not to repeat such accusations. “It is a threat to us as our members, including youths, have been warned about issuing statements, which we as a legal political party used to issue and have the right to,” Win Tin said. “It is also a restriction of freedom of expression,” Win Tin added. On June 4, the authorities called members of the NLD youth wing Hla Thein, Myo Nyunt, Hla Oo and Aye Tun and on June 5 called CEC members Than Htun, Nyunt Wai, Hla Pe and Soe Myint and warned them against issuing statements. “When we were summoned, they read out a paper the content of which was similar to the context in the newspaper. They said, we had broken the law,” a youth member told Mizzima. “After they finished reading, they told us to sign the paper as a confession that we had committed a crime,” he added. Mizzima, 8 June 2009 The Burmese junta has clamped down on the rising numbers of unlicensed radio owners in a move that media experts see as restriction on the freedom of media and access to pro-democracy broadcasts. The ruling junta yesterday issued a warning in the New Light of Burma newspaper that those listening to radio without holding a license could be prosecuted under the Wireless Act. The warning carried no information on why people would be prosecuted nor why numbers of listeners are increasing, but a Burmese journalist on the China-Burma border said the increase was linked to the political crisis. The chairman of the exiled Burma Media Association (BMA) said the move is an attempt to restrict the freedom of media and a means to arrest listeners of exiled media. “The military governments…legal actions on radio listeners who do not pay license fees… is an effort to hamper the people of Burma who have been depending more and more on foreign radios lately,” said Maung Maung Myint. “Let’s say, if they want to take action on listeners of foreign radios, they want to create a scenario in which they could arrest them not for listening to the radio but for not licensing their radios.” DVB, 8 June 2009 Former Singapore prime minister Goh Chok Tong visited Burma, officials said, amid international pressure on the military regime to halt its trial of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi. Goh was set to meet Burma’s junta chief Senior General Than Shwe, Prime Minister Thein Sein and other senior officials on the “goodwill” trip, a Burmese official and a Singaporean statement said. The visit comes just days after the Singaporean government said that expelling Burma from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was not the way to bring about reform in the army-ruled country. AFP, 8 June 2009

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9 June 2009, Tuesday
A court in army-ruled Burma has upheld a ban on two defense witnesses in the widely condemned trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, one of her lawyers said on Tuesday. Although the court overturned a ban on one witness, Khin Moe Moe, the Nobel laureate’s lawyer Nyan Win said he was disappointed by the ruling and would appeal the decision. “We didn’t get the result we expected and we will go to a higher court to appeal,” Nyan Win told reporters. But Nyan Win said final arguments in the trial, which had been delayed several times, would likely be put back again. “The final verdict on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is now expected after two weeks,” he said. Security was tight during Tuesday’s hearing, with at least 20 trucks carrying riot police assembled in front of the City Hall, the site of previous anti-junta protests in the former capital. Reuters, 9 June 2009 To date, only one witness has testified in Suu Kyi’s defense. Her lawyers had requested that the Rangoon Divisional Court reinstate three witnesses who were disqualified from testifying by judges in the lower district court presiding over her trial. Burma’s courts are widely viewed as subordinate to the ruling military and expectations are high that Suu Kyi will be found guilty. The mostly closed-door trial, which started May 18, is taking place inside Insein Prison, home to many of the junta's political prisoners. AP, 9 June 2009 India is an immediate neighbour of Burma, a country which has been plagued by political crisis for over four decades. Not only the two countries have shared border, but India and Burma are homes to millions of people from the same ethnic community, separated during the creation of India and Burma in 1947 and 1948. Examples are the Kukis, the Nagas and the Shans, who live side by side along the Indo-Burma region. In the late eighties and the early part of nineties, the Indian government was noticeably sympathetic and supportive to the Burma’s democracy movement; the Burmese activists were openly welcomed and sheltered in the Indian soil. India was more vocal on human rights and democracy. The policy shift began during the Congress government of prime minister P V Narasimha Rao in 1991, and augmented by the Bharatiya Janata Party under prime minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee (1998-2004). The salient factor for India's policy shift was its national interest and security. Opening doors to Southeast Asia was a gateway to expanding its much needed international market. To tackle the rising insurgency problems in its Northeast part of the country and countering China’s influence in the region were the primary security concerns. As long as its rival China is economically and strategically engaged in Burma, India is likely to stick with the defunct non-aligned movement doctrine of non-interference in the internal affairs of others, which serves its national interest. There is no foreseeable sign, at least in the near future, that New Delhi will retreat from a sweetheart relationship with Naypyidaw. While the international community, from West to East, is outraged at the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi over charges of violating her house arrest for allowing William John Yettaw, an American visitor, to stay in her lakeside home in Yangoon, India has not lived up to the expectation of the international community. Its economic interest and fear of antagonising the Burmese military has prevented India from advocating human rights and democracy. Nehginpao Kipgen, kanglaonline.com, 9 June 9, 2009 Burma’s ethnic Karen rebels urged the international community Tuesday to pressure the ruling junta into talks, after around 3,000 villagers fled to Thailand to escape a military offensive. Government soldiers have been battling Karen National Union, or KNU, guerillas in eastern regions of Burma for decades, but the latest exodus into neighboring Thailand is one of the biggest for years. Free Burma Rangers, an aid group operating inside Burma, said more than 3, 500 people had crossed the border into Thailand to escape the violence. Most had fled from Ler Per Her camp, where Karen rebel forces are based, it said. The Washington-based U.S. Campaign for Burma said the situation was “very tense” and put the number of Karen people arriving at the border at nearly 4,000 - most of them women and children. The group accused the government of diverting attention from the trial of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi in Rangoon, saying it was “not usual” for such an attack during monsoon season, when it is harder for troops to operate. Page 112 of 226

“We believe that current military offensives are intended to distract the public attention from Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial and subsequent sentencing,” said Aung Din, executive director of the Washington-based group. AFP, 9 June 2009 Singapore’s Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong has said the trial of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi should not be allowed to affect Burma’s national reconciliation process or disrupt its elections due in 2010. Mr Goh made the comments in meetings with Burma’s top leadership. He was in Naypyidaw on Tuesday, where he was given a rare tour of the administrative capital. Senior Minister Goh was given a full brief on Burma’s new administrative capital, located some 320 kilometres north of Rangoon. In meetings with Senior General Than Shwe and Burma’s Prime Minister Thien Sein, the leaders exchanged frank views on developments in Burma. On Ms Suu Kyi who is currently on trial for breaching the terms of her house arrest, Mr Goh noted that the trial is a domestic affair. But he also stressed that there is an international dimension to the matter, which Burma should not ignore. Channel News Asia, 9 June 2009 The United Nations refugee agency today said that it is looking into the situation of a group of several thousand Karen people who recently fled across the Moei River from Burma to Thailand. Estimates of the number of people who escaped to northern Thailand since last Wednesday range from 2,000 to 6,400, and “one of the first things we would like to do is ascertain the number of people who are in the five sites near Mae Sot,” William Spindler, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told reporters in Geneva. Mr. Spindler said that according to preliminary talks with some new arrivals, “it seems some were fleeing actual fighting between the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army, which is allied with Government forces, and the rebel Karen National Union (KNU). Others say they were fleeing forced recruitment or forced labour by Government forces.” A number of the recently-arrived refugees were already uprooted in Burma and living in the Ler Per Her camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs) run by the KNU in Karen-held territory, he noted. Many of the refugees brought supplies with them, and aid agencies are also providing them with necessities, such as food, mosquito nets, pots, pans and blankets, while UNHCR has distributed plastic sheeting. In February, the agency said that there were some 111,000 registered refugees living in nine camps along the Thai-Burma border, who are restricted from leaving the camps and as a result unable to earn a living or receive higher education. UN News Centre, 9 June 2009

10 June 2009, Wednesday
Burmese pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi has met with her defence lawyers in jail, an official said, as her legal team vowed to push ahead with an appeal to allow more witnesses at her trial. An appeal court in the military-ruled nation on Tuesday allowed her to call a second witness at her closed prison trial -- a legal expert has already given evidence -- but upheld a ban on testimony by two key members of her party. Her lawyers went to visit her at the Insein Prison in Rangoon on Wednesday, a Burmese official said on condition of anonymity, without giving further details about the meeting. Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers had initially accused the ruling junta of trying to push through to a widely expected guilty verdict, but diplomats said the regime now wanted to buy time to defuse the storm of protest over the trial. AFP, 10 June 2009 Imprisoned Burmese pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi instructed her legal team Wednesday to push ahead with a high court appeal to allow two more defence witnesses at her trial, her lawyer said. The Nobel laureate decided to press on with the appeal after a lower Rangoon court a day earlier overturned a ban on one witness but refused to allow the others to testify at the trial, being held at the notorious Insein prison. Aung San Suu Kyi was allowed to meet her lawyers for one-and-a-half hours at the jail on the outskirts of Rangoon on Wednesday afternoon, said Nyan Win, one of her three lawyers and the spokesman for her National League for Democracy. The two barred defence witnesses are Win Tin, a dissident journalist who was Burma’s longest serving prisoner until his release in September, and Tin Oo, the detained deputy leader of the NLD. AFP, 10 June 2009 Page 113 of 226

A coalition of Burmese ethnic groups Wednesday called on the United Nations Security Council to investigate attacks on ethnic Karen villages in eastern Burma that have forced more than 3,000 refugees into Thailand. Since June 6, some 3,295 Karen refugees have fled from Ler Per Her camp in eastern Burma to Thailand, escaping attacks on the camp by the Burmese military and their allies the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA), according to border sources. “The Security Council must urgently establish a commission of inquiry to investigate and report on crimes against humanity and war crimes in Burma in addition to imposing a global arms embargo against Burma’s violent military regime,” said Naing Aung, secretary-general of the Forum for Democracy in Burma (FDB). The forum, based on the Thai-Burma border, comprises representatives from six ethnic minority groups, including the Karen, whose traditional homeland was the Karen State, who are opposed to Burma’s military regime. “We demand that these barbaric actions stop immediately,” Naing Aung said. Earth Times, 10 June 2009 Win Tin said he hopes Goh noted the wrongdoings of the junta in Burma and suggested ways to alleviate the suffering in the country. Commenting on the potential for an all-inclusive process in Burmese politics, Win Tin said he believes that the term “all-inclusive” should mean not only in respect of elections, but also an all-inclusive process in all political issues in Burma. He also said that elections are important in the democratization process, but that the regime must review the constitution alongside opposition parties. Larry Jagan, a British journalist in Bangkok who specializes in Burmese issues, told The Irrawaddy on Wednesday that although Goh visited Burma as the Singaporean Senior Minister, he could informally act as an envoy on behalf of Asean to tell Than Shwe face-to-face what Asean members think about the criminal trial of Suu Kyi and the Burmese political situation. “Goh Chok Tong is a senior politician within Asean. He is someone that Than Shwe has high regard for. So, he has the kind of stature that is needed as someone who can go to talk with Than Shwe frankly,” Jagan said. “What he told Than Shwe is more his personal view than Asean’s view,” he added. “But his concerns about the trial and the political crisis in Burma are shared by most Asean leaders.” Analysts have said Goh’s trip is quite significant as a diplomatic approach, because he was able to meet with Than Shwe who earlier this year rebuffed Ibrahim Gambari, the UN special envoy to Burma. Debbie Stothard of Alternative Asean Network on Burma said Asean leaders are now showing their concerns over the ongoing political process in the country. “But just one trip is nothing as far as diplomatic efforts for change in Burma are concerned,” she said, adding, “Asean should push continuously. Burma issues are now a problem for Asean.” Irrawaddy, 10 June 2009 Contending that India had compromised on the issue of supporting a democratic movement in neighbouring Burma, former Defence Minister and veteran socialist leader George Fernandes today called for a rethink on the country’s foreign policy. In a letter written to Minister for External Affairs S M Krishna, Mr Fernandes said Ms Aung San Suu Kyi, who was waging a battle for restoration of democracy in her country, had great hopes from India as a country that valued democractic rights. Her perception of India was evident from her acceptance speech given at the time she was honoured with the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding 14 years ago, Mr Fernandes said, adding he was enclosing a copy of her speech to remind the policy makers of what she had said. “Our compromises have been too many and silence too long on the issue of supporting a democratic movement in our immediate neighbourhood,” he said. The New Kerala, 10 June 2009 A group of 118 MPs on Wednesday appealed to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to ask the Burmese government to release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and impress upon the military regime to respect democratic principles. Cutting across party lines, the MPs in a memorandum to Singh said India should intervene in the current situation to urge upon the Burmese generals through all “possible diplomatic and other demarches to release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.” The MPs, including CPI(M) leader Brinda Karat, SP’s Amar Singh, BJP’s Prakash Javadekar, JD(U)’s Sharad Yadav, NCP’s Supriya Sule, Congress’ B S Gnanadesikan and RSP’s Abani Roy have signed the appeal. Indian Parliamentarians’ Forum for Democracy in Burma (IIPFDB) co-convenor Sharad Joshi said India should change its policy towards Page 114 of 226

Burma and try to establish contacts with the people and not with the military regime. Abani Roy said as a largest democracy and good neighbour, India has the moral obligation to rescue Suu Kyi and Burma from “devastation.” The MPs also said Burmese believe that there will be no inclusive political process and free and fair polls in 2010 if Suu Kyi and more than 2100 political prisoners are not released. Dr Tint Swe, Burmese MP, said India should work with the UN to revive democracy in Burma. The Hindu, 10 June 2009 Former Singapore prime minister Goh Chok Tong has urged Burma’s ruling generals during a visit to the country to ensure that elections due next year are free and fair, a report said Wednesday. Goh, still a senior minister in Singapore, told junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe and Prime Minister Thein Sein not to ignore the global interest in the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the Strait Times reported. But he also said the case against the Nobel peace laureate - who faces up to five years in prison for violating the terms of her house arrest after a U.S. man swam to her lakeside home - was a domestic matter, the report said. The city-state’s former prime minister met the two senior generals Tuesday, with each meeting lasting more than an hour, the newspaper said. AFP, 10 June 2009 President Barack Obama’s choice as top U.S. diplomat for East Asia said Wednesday the United States is interested in easing its long-standing policy of isolation against military-run Burma. Kurt Campbell, however, told U.S. lawmakers at his Senate confirmation hearing that Burma’s heavy-handed treatment of detained democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi hinders any U.S. effort to change course and engage the ruling junta in Burma. “As a general practice, we’re prepared to reach out, not just in Burma but in other situations as well,” Campbell said. But, he said, the junta’s trial this week of Suu Kyi on charges that could put her in prison for five years is “deeply, deeply concerning, and it makes it very difficult to move forward.” AP, 10 May 2009

11 June 2009, Thursday
Burmese pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi believes her trial by the ruling junta is “politically motivated”, her lawyer said Thursday, as he lodged an appeal over a ban on two witnesses. The opposition leader met with her legal team in prison on Wednesday to discuss her defence against charges that she broke the rules of her house arrest when an American man swam to her lakeside property in May. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said yesterday when we met that the trial is politically motivated,” Nyan Win, one of her three lawyers and the spokesman for her National League for Democracy (NLD), told AFP. 11 June 2009 Lawyers for jailed opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi filed an appeal Thursday to Burma’s High Court to reinstate two key defense witnesses in a case that could put her in prison for five years. Suu Kyi gave her legal team instructions to pursue a second appeal during a 90-minute meeting Wednesday at Insein Prison, where she is being held while on trial on charges of violating the terms of her house arrest, lawyer Nyan Win said. The charges stem from the surprise visit of an American man who swam across a lake to her house. The District Court trying Suu Kyi allowed only one of four defense witnesses to take the stand. On appeal, the Rangoon Divisional Court on Tuesday ruled that a second witness could be heard. Two senior members of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party remain barred from giving testimony. Suu Kyi “told us to see it through to the end as the ruling is legally wrong,” Nyan Win said. AP, 11 June 2009 Burmese pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi is dissatisfied that her lakeside home is still guarded by authorities despite her house arrest officially ending in May, a lawyer has said. The Nobel laureate, currently held in Rangoon’s notorious Insein prison, said friends had been denied access to her residence despite the fact that police told her in May that the house arrest had been cancelled. AFP, 11 June 2009 The leaders of France and Germany expressed grave concern Thursday for Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been put on trial by Burma’s junta, and appealed to China and India to intervene on her behalf. During a Page 115 of 226

joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Nicolas Sarkozy said he had sought to speak by phone to the pro-democracy leader but the military government denied his request. “We are asking our Chinese and Indian friends for help and to take into account the concern that we have for the Nobel Peace Prize winner ahead of a conviction that appears, unfortunately, unavoidable,” said Sarkozy. AFP, 11 June 2009

12 June 2009, Friday
Burmese officials on Friday postponed an appeal hearing and adjourned the main trial of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in what diplomats said were attempts by the junta to stall the legal process. Aung San Suu Kyi’s high court appeal, seeking to overturn a ban on two defence witnesses at her trial, was due to be held on June 17 but a later date will now be set, said one of her three-member legal team, Nyan Win. She appeared in court for a 20-minute hearing on Friday, but the closed-door prison trial was then adjourned to reconvene on June 26 when it will hear from legal expert Khin Moe Moe, whose testimony was initially refused. “They will now accept the testimony of Khin Moe Moe. She will testify as an expert on legal and political matters and explain that Aung San Suu Kyi was not the person who disturbed the peace and stability of the people,” Nyan Win said. The court told Aung San Suu Kyi’s defence team that a two-week court recess was necessary because Khin Moe Moe, whose witness ban was overturned by an appeal court on Tuesday, lives far from Rangoon in eastern Shan state. Another legal expert, Kyi Win, has already testified for Aung San Suu Kyi. Bars remain on Win Tin, a journalist who was Burma’s longest serving political prisoner until his release in September, and detained deputy NLD leader Tin Oo, but Nyan Win said he hoped for a positive verdict by the high court. “We expect our appeal to be accepted by the high court because our request is clearly in accordance with the law,” he said. Nyan Win, who also acts as the NLD’s spokesman, said he had also been given permission to visit the now deserted lakeside property of Aung San Suu Kyi on Saturday, where she was kept in near isolation. The Nobel Peace Prize winner, aged 63 and recently in poor health, faces up to five years in jail if convicted. Some 20 members of her NLD party on Friday sat outside Rangoon’s notorious Insein prison, where Aung San Suu Kyi is being held. Western diplomats in Rangoon say a string of delayed court dates is a sign that the ruling generals are seeking to stall the proceedings after being shocked by the vehement worldwide criticism of the trial. AFP, 12 June 2009 A conviction for the charismatic National League for Democracy (NLD) party leader is widely expected in a country where the courts often bend the law to suit the military. The Supreme Court on Thursday accepted an appeal over a lower court’s decision to bar two of her defense witnesses, senior NLD member Win Tin and the party’s detained vice-chairman, Tin Oo. The appeal will be heard on June 17. If the court overturns the bans and allows the pair to testify, final arguments and a verdict on Suu Kyi’s case would be reached “much later,” Nyan Win added. He said Khin Moe Moe’s testimony will highlight flaws in the prosecution’s case and “explain that these charges are all politically motivated.” Suu Kyi is charged under Section 22 of an internal security law to protect the state from “subversive elements” but her lawyers say all charges should be dropped because the legislation is outdated. She has blamed lax security for allowing Yettaw to swim to her home. She has spent more than 13 years in detention since her first period of house arrest in July 1989. Her latest stint was lifted on May 26 and she is now being held in a guesthouse at Rangoon’s infamous Insein prison while the trial continues. Reuters, 12 June 2009 Five political prisoners in Rangoon’s Insein prison have been held in punishment cells – military dog cells – and banned from receiving family visits since 11 May 2009, the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) has learned They are Naing Naing, National League for Democracy Member of Parliament, Soe Han, NLD member and lawyer, Aung Naing, NLD member, Lwin Ko Latt, student and member of the All Burma Federation of Student Unions, and U Sandimar, senior abbot monk. Aung Myo Thein, AAPP, 12 June 2009 Page 116 of 226

The Burmese junta’s number 2, Vice Sr-Gen Maung Aye, is to travel to China soon on a visit analysts say will include talks focusing on the regime’s uneasy relationship with ethnic ceasefire groups based along Sino-Burmese border. The visit was announced on Friday in the state-run newspaper The New Light of Burma, which said Maung Aye and his wife would travel to China “soon.” Irrawaddy, 12 June 2009 Despite of promised by authorities to provide round-the-clock electricity supply in Rangoon, an official from Ministry of Electrical Power in Naypyidaw said, it is almost impossible until next month. Rangoon Electricity Board Secretary, Lt. Col. Maung Maung Latt, in a recent briefing to journalists said, Rangoon would get all round-the-clock electricity in July. However, the officer from the concerned Ministry said it was unlikely. Mizzima, 12 June 2009 A Burmese junta-backed militia group involved in the offensive against the Karen National Union near the Thai-Burma border has reportedly threatened to shell Thai villagers if they don’t supply them with food. Thousand of Karen have fled into Thailand over the past week following attacks by the government, backed by the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA), against the Karen National Union. Up to 6000 people are believed to have crossed into Thailand and are now holed up in makeshift camps along the border. Medical group the Free Burma Rangers (FBR) said yesterday that DKBA troops had threatened villagers in Thailand’s Noh Bo village with artillery bombardments unless they supply food to support them in their attack. Irrawaddy, 12 June 2009 “Freedom from fear.” These words, uttered by Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in 1990, resound more than ever as a call for help at a time when the Burmese junta has initiated proceedings against her that are as absurd as they are unjustified. We are not fooled: This is a poor pretext to prevent her from participating in the upcoming elections. Bernard Kouchner, The New York Times, 12 June 2009 Indonesia has asked India and China to push for reform in the military-ruled Burma, whose trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has sparked international outrage. Foreign Ministry spokesman Teuku Faizasyah said Friday the request was raised in a recent UN forum, which convened envoys from India, China, Burma and Japan, as well as representatives of the multilateral body. “Those countries play a key role to a settlement in Burma’s issue... and we would very much like to see them urge Burma to embrace the value of human rights,” he said. Both China and India have maintained their backing of Burma’s notorious junta due to their close economic ties in a time when western countries and international organizations consider imposition of more economic sanctions on Rangoon. Lilian Budianto, The Jakarta Post, 12 June 2009 Thailand’s condemnation of the Suu Kyi trial and the arrival of thousands of Burmese refugees has put relations between the two countries under “unprecedented strain”, according to a Burmese state-run newspaper. Burma has come under mounting international criticism over the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, whose next hearing has been adjourned until 26 June. Thailand, who holds the chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) bloc, has recently expressed “grave concern” both at the lack of democratic progress in the country and the potential for the trial to tarnish the bloc’s image. DVB, 12 June 2009 This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson William Spindler at the press briefing, on 12 June 2009, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva. UNHCR staff have visited five sites in northern Thailand where Karen villagers are taking shelter after fleeing eastern Burma since 3 June. We have now verified the presence of 2,000 recent arrivals. The Karen villagers are taking shelter mostly in temples, in a communal hall and in private Thai homes in four villages. A large group at a fifth place called Mae Usu who were reported to be sheltering in a cave are actually in a large field that was once the site of a refugee camp many years ago. By and large, the Karen villagers say they fled in fear of conscription by armed forces or of Page 117 of 226

forced labour as porters for armed forces. Those who mentioned military action mostly said they fled in anticipation of fighting as the Burmese army and their allies, the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army, approached rebel Karen National Union bases and villages. Our staff report that most of the new arrivals seem to be women and children. Some of the Karen women say many of their men stayed behind to protect crops and livestock. They also admit some men are scattered throughout Thai villages trying to find day labour and are not registered at the five sites. Many of the new arrivals said they would like to go back to Burma if the situation calms down. Many said they had crossed over to Thailand for safety for short periods in the past and then gone home. Thai authorities have responded quickly and sympathetically to the needs of the new arrivals and we are working well together with them and with non-governmental agencies to meet the needs of the Karen villagers. Relief web, 12 June 2009

13 June 2009, Saturday
Karen villagers trying to reach the relative safety of Thailand after weeks of heavy fighting in Karen State are trapped and hiding in the jungle, as Burmese junta troops and their allies try to prevent them from joining the four thousand civilians who have already crossed the border. Saw Hla Htun, the chairman of the Karen Youth Organization, told The Irrawaddy on Saturday that several hundred villagers from Pa-an District in southern Karen State were unable to reach the border because Burmese soldiers and troops from the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA) are blocking their way. Saw Yan Naing, Irrawaddy, 13 June 2009 Singapore’s Senior Minister, Goh Chok Tong, has urged Burma to continue with its process of national reconciliation and democracy. Wrapping up his four-day visit to the country, Mr Goh noted that without political reform, Burma will not be able to achieve fast economic growth like other ASEAN economies. And in its efforts towards national reconciliation, Mr Goh said Burma cannot ignore the international interest surrounding pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial. Ms Suu Kyi is currently on trial for breaching the rules governing her house arrest. Mr Goh said he had constructive discussions with Burma’s top leaders, including Senior General Than Shwe. And it provided him with insights into just how complex Burma’s political situation is. He said: “I could see that Senior General Than Shwe is in a very difficult position. He has inherited this military regime – Burma has been under military government since 1962, so it’s not his creation. Burma has come to a cul de sac, how does it make a u-turn? I think that’s not easy.” Mr Goh added that Burma’s stability is dependent on bringing together the three parties – the military government, the ethnic groups and the opposition. Channel News Asia, 13 June 2009

14 June 2009, Sunday
Come Friday, the world’s most famous prisoner of conscience will turn 64. But there is no cause to celebrate. Aung San Suu Kyi’s latest gift from the government of Burma was another farcical trial designed to extend her detention. On May 14, she was moved from her home on University Road in Rangoon, where she has been under house arrest for most of the last 19 years, to Insein prison. The court’s argument was that, by allowing American John William Yettaw to enter her lakeside residence, she had violated the terms of her house arrest. Suu Kyi’s plea was that she felt sorry for Yettaw after he swam across Lake Inya to visit her. This recent travesty is yet another tribulation the Nobel Peace Prize winner has had to endure in her long struggle to bring democracy and freedom to her native country. Despite a thumping win in the 1990 general elections, Suu Kyi has never been allowed to take office as her country’s rightful leader. During her extended detention, her British husband, Dr Michael Aris, died, and she has barely seen her two sons, Alexander and Kim. Aung San Suu Kyi’s family has played a crucial role in her country’s history. Martin Vengadesan, The Star Online, 14 June 2009 Page 118 of 226

Malaysia-based Nyan Lin Aung, an NLD activist in charge of migrant workers’ issues, says Aung San Suu Kyi is virtually irreplaceable. “She has a unique position. She is a national leader who leads by example. She stands for justice and is trusted by everyone in the country. She is accepted not just by the Burmese race, but by also the Shan, the Mon and the Karen. “We are worried about her health. The current regime is afraid of her popularity and always tries to undermine her. They have even tried to infiltrate the NLD. The situation at home is terrible now, but we won’t give up. Even though we had to leave because of the economy and rigid control by the military, we have faith that one day things will change. Aung San Suu Kyi can change our future.” thestar.com.my, 14 June 2009 Sri Lankan President Mahinda Rajapaksa left for burma on a two day official visit this morning. The President will hold bilateral discussions with the Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council, Senior General Than Swe and other high ranking officials of the Burmese government including Prime Minister Gen.Thein Sein. Burma and Sri Lanka last week celebrated 60 years of diplomatic relations and Burma as a gesture made a token financial grant towards the welfare of displaced persons in the North. asiantribune.com, 14 June 2009 Taiwan has recently acted to strengthen its economic and trade cooperation with Burma as part of its efforts to seek closer ties with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), an expanding regional economic bloc. A memorandum of understanding (MOU) on mutual cooperation between the quasi-official Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) and the Union of Myanmar Federation of Chambers of Commerce and Industry (UMFCCI) was signed in Rangoon last week, according to a TAITRA statement. e Taiwan News, 14 June 2009

15 June 2009, Monday
Burma’s junta has dropped its guard over opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s compound in Rangoon since her house detention officially ended May 27, but she has meanwhile been transferred to Insein Prison, opposition sources said Monday. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s house is already free from control by the authorities,” Nyan Win, one of Suu Kyi’s lawyers, said. Suu Kyi, currently a resident at Rangoon’s notorious Insein Prison, has assigned two men to take care of her family compound in her absence, said Nyan Win, who is also the spokesman for the National League for Democracy (NLD) opposition party which Suu Kyi leads. thaindian.com, 15 June 2009 Veteran journalist Win Tin said on Monday Burma’s military rulers are going the whole hog to garner diplomatic support from regional countries in the face of growing international condemnation over the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Win Tin, who is also a central executive committee member of the Aung San Suu Kyi led National League for Democracy said, the visit of Sri Lankan President Mr. Mahinda Rajapaksa and Singapore’s Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong are all part of the junta’s effort to cosy up to regional countries. “Clearly, the junta is in a tight spot as the international community has reacted more sharply than it had anticipated. And since it might be difficult for the regime to try and influence the West, they at least want the support of regional countries,” Win Tin added. He said the junta had not anticipated that there would be such a loud outcry from the international community by putting on trial opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “It seems to have miscalculated on the strong support for Aung San Suu Kyi by the international community,” Win Tin said. The junta wants to gauge China’s reaction over the mounting pressure and is likely to go ahead and sentence the Burmese Nobel Peace Laureate, if China gives the green signal, he said. According to Win Tin, the junta is determined to sentence Aung San Suu Kyi to a prison term and put her away before their proposed 2010 general elections. But it had not anticipated such an outburst from the international community. Sources said Thura Shwe Mann, the third leader in the Burmese military hierarchy, last week visited China without making any official announcement. On Monday, the Chinese News Agency Xinhua reported that Vice-Senior General Maung Aye, number two in the military Page 119 of 226

hierarchy, is visiting China. Observers believe these visits are aimed at explaining and trying to convince China about the junta’s stand regarding the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi and the regime’s plans ahead. Win Tin said, “Whatever the circumstances, the junta is likely go ahead with its plan if China approves.” Mizzima, 15 June 2009 A delegation of former political prisoners and human rights activists from Burma have formally delivered a petition to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, calling on him to make it his personal priority to secure the release of all Burma’s political prisoners. Almost 680,000 signatures were collected in just ten weeks in the largest global coordinated action for Burma yet. The delegation included Tate Naing, former political prisoner and Secretary of the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma); Khin Ohmar, Foreign Affairs Secretary of the Forum for Democracy in Burma; and Nyi Nyi Aung, whose mother and two cousins are serving jail terms of up to 65 years for their pro-democracy activities. Nyi Nyi Aung said, “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to deliver this petition to the UN. I truly believe every signature counts. To Mr. Ban Ki-moon, my message is simple: Your words show you take this issue seriously. But now I want to see what action you will take to secure the release of my family and all Burma’s political prisoners.” There are currently more than 2,100 political prisoners in Burma’s prisons and labour camps. Last month, National League for Democracy member Salai Hla Moe became the 140th political prisoner to die in detention since 1988. His family were only informed of his death on a routine prison visit, almost three weeks after his death. The 48 year-old activist leaves behind a wife and four children. Tate Naing said, “How many more political prisoners have to die before the UN will act? I urge Mr. Ban Ki-moon to accept nothing less than the immediate and unconditional release of all Burma’s political prisoners in his current negotiations with the regime. He must not allow any more delay. Political prisoners, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, are the hope for democracy and future leaders of our country. Their lives are at stake.” Aung Myo Thein, AAPP, 15 June 2009 Burma’s second top leader Vice Senior-General Maung Aye left Naypyidaw Monday for Beijing to begin a six-day official visit to China at the invitation of Chinese Vice-President Xi Jinping. Aimed at promoting neighborly, friendly and cooperative ties with China, Maung Aye, who is Vice-Chairman of the Burma State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), is paying his third visit to China in six years. Maung Aye, is also Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Defense Services and Commander-in-Chief of the Army, traveled to China in August 2003 and in April 2006. chinaview.cn, 15 June 2009 Today is the second day of President Mahinda Rajapakse’s official visit in Burma. The President participated in religious activities at the Uppaththatan Viharaya in the Burma’s administrative capital Nepito this morning. President Mahinda Rajapakse also visited a herbal park in the area. Meanwhile, the visiting Sri Lankan President met Prime Minister of Burma Thein Sein at his office yesterday. The President thanked Mr. Sein and his government for their warm welcome and hospitalities extended to the Sri Lankan delegation. Sri Lankan Broadcasting Corporation, 15 June 2009 Hollywood star Julia Roberts and detained Chinese activists are among celebrities and political prisoners tweeting and signing petitions for the release of Burma’s democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi as she approaches her 64th birthday – her 14th spent in detention – organizers said Sunday. Suu Kyi will spend her 64th birthday Friday in Rangoon’s notorious Insein prison, facing charges of violating terms of her house arrest by harboring an American who swam uninvited to her lakeside home. “We must not stand by as she is silenced again. Now is the time for the international community to speak with one voice,’ Roberts wrote as part of a campaign – ‘64 words for Aung San Suu Kyi” – organized by a coalition of human rights and activist groups. The campaign, launched May 27, asks Suu Kyi’s supporters to tweet, write text messages or send video and photos to its Web site, http://64forsuu.org. “Burma’s generals think they can act with impunity. We’ll have to wait until after the trial verdict to see if this time will be any different,” said Mark Farmaner of Burma Campaign UK, one of the organizers. Actress Demi Moore, actor Kevin Spacey, artist Yoko Ono and British Prime Minister Gordon Brown were among the contributors to the Web site. James Page 120 of 226

Cameron, director of “Titanic” and “The Terminator,” wrote, “While my heroes are fictional, Aung San Suu Kyi is a real-life hero and she needs help from you.” In a parallel campaign, the organizers have to date gathered the signatures of 107 former or current political prisoners from over 20 countries calling for the release of political prisoners in Burma and calling on the U.N. Security Council to impose a global arms embargo on the Southeast Asian nation. “The continued denial of your freedom unacceptably attacks the human rights of all 2,156 political prisoners in Burma. As those also incarcerated for our political beliefs, we share the world’s outrage,” the 64-word message said. The signatories include Kim Dae-jung, a former South Korean president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate; Shirin Ebadi, an Iranian human rights campaigner who also won the prize; former Czech President Vaclav Havel; and two female Chinese activists currently under house arrest, Yuan Weijing and Zeng Jinyan. “Aung San Suu Kyi’s continued detention shames Asia,” wrote Kim. Anwar Ibrahim, former deputy prime minister of Malaysia, urged the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to lift its policy of nonintervention in Burma, which is a member of the 10-nation bloc. Organizers of the campaign include Human Rights Watch, the U.S. Campaign for Burma, Burma Info Japan, Open Society Institute, France’s Info Birmanie and Amnesty International. AP, 15 June 2009 The Korean government is failing to hold Korean corporations accountable for abuses connected to natural gas development in military ruled Burma, according to a report released today by EarthRights International (ERI) and the Shwe Gas Movement (SGM). The report, entitled A Governance Gap: The Failure of the Korean Government to Hold Korean Corporations Accountable to the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises Regarding Violations in Burma, details how the Korean government summarily rejected a 43page complaint filed in October 2008 by ERI, SGM and nine co-complainants, including Korea’s two largest labor organizations regarding abuses connected to the Shwe Gas Project, a large-scale natural gas development project in Burma led by Korea’s Daewoo International. The complaint detailed violations of six OECD Guidelines, including a failure to respect international human rights law. The report released today explains substantive problems with Korea’s decision, which was issued in late 2008. It highlights how the Korean decision is inconsistent with decisions from NCPs in other countries, and documents inherent conflicts of interest within the Korean government: The ministry tasked with receiving OECD complaints is the same ministry tasked with promoting overseas energy development projects and the same ministry that provided Daewoo a sizable loan to proceed with the controversial Shwe Project. 15 June 2009

16 June 2009, Tuesday
China would like to join with Burma to promote comprehensive, stable and lasting relations, Vice President Xi Jinping said Tuesday. During talks with Burmese State Peace and Development Council Vice-Chairman Maung Aye, Xi said China valued good-neighborly relations with Burma. He said Burma was among the first group of countries that forged diplomatic ties with the People’s Republic of China, and Sino-Burma relations had maintained good momentum. Xi also said the two countries should implement on-going projects to boost their economies amid the global downturn. He stressed that the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence were the cornerstone of China’s diplomacy, and as a good neighbor, China hoped Burma would overcome difficulties to achieve stability and prosperity. Maung Aye expressed gratitude for China’s longterm assistance. He particularly mentioned that China sent medical teams after Burma was hit by a cyclone last year. He reaffirmed Burma would support China’s stance on the Taiwan and Tibet issues. Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao met with Maung Aye earlier Tuesday. Hailing the 60-year diplomatic relationship, Wen said the two nations enjoyed traditional friendship and broad common interests. Maung Aye said his government valued the relationship with China. Maung Aye came to China on an official visit scheduled for June15 to 20 at Xi’s invitation. chinaview.cn, 16 June 2009 If the junta fails to release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, the Association of Southeast Asian Nation’s (Asean) credibility will be “affected inevitably,” Thai Prime Minster Abhisit Vejajjiva told The Page 121 of 226

Far Eastern Economic Review recently. During the Far Eastern Economic View’s interview published on Tuesday, 16 June, Abhisit, who is now chairman of Asean, said Burma’s political process will have to be inclusive to gain the acceptability and respectability of the international community. However, the Thai PM said the Burma issue is the responsibility of the international community and not just Asean. Irrawaddy, 16 June 2009 U.N. investigators said on Tuesday the trial of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi flouted international standards and urged the country’s military rulers to ensure it was open and fair. In a strongly worded joint statement, the five human rights investigators noted a U.N. panel issued an advisory ruling a year ago that the Nobel laureate’s continued house arrest was arbitrary. The trial of Suu Kyi and of American John Yettaw, whose uninvited visit to her home last month was deemed a breach of her house arrest, is set to resume on June 26. “The five experts called upon the authorities of Burma to allow the justice system to function in an independent and impartial manner, so as to guarantee an open and fair trial for the defendants, and to grant unfettered media access,’ the joint statement said. Suu Kyi says the trial is politically motivated to keep her in detention during next year’s multi-party elections. “So far, the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi and her aides has been marred by flagrant violations of substantive and procedural rights,” said Leandro Despouy, the U.N. special rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers. “Transparency in the administration of justice is a pre-requisite of any state governed by the rule of law,’ added Despouy, an Argentine lawyer. All witnesses with relevant evidence must be allowed to testify, he said. Only one witness called by the defence had been permitted to give evidence so far, although a second has been granted permission, compared with 14 called for the prosecution. The trial had mostly been conducted behind closed doors and the media were prevented from speaking to the defence lawyers, according to the statement issued in Geneva. “National and international media should be granted full access to the trial,” said Frank La Rue, U.N. special rapporteur on freedom of opinion and expression. The U.N. working group on arbitrary detention declared arbitrary her house arrest after May 2008. Chairwoman Manuela Carmena Castrilo said on Tuesday this meant “Aung San Suu Kyi needs to be released immediately and unconditionally.” Reuters, 16 June 2009 Five UN human rights experts have called on Burma to guarantee a fair trial for imprisoned Nobel Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and her two aides. Leandro Despouy, a UN expert on the independence of judges and lawyers, says the trial so far “has been marred by flagrant violations of substantive and procedural rights.” Israel News, 16 June 2009 / Thein Win

17 June 2009, Wednesday
It cannot have pleased Burma’s ruling family: the collapse of a 2,300-year-old gold-domed pagoda into a pile of timbers just three weeks after the wife of the junta’s top general helped rededicate it. “People were laughing at her,” said a longtime astrologer, reached by telephone in Burma, speaking of Mrs. Kyaing Kyaing. “O.K., she thinks she is so great, but even the gods don’t like her – people believe like that,” the astrologer said on the condition of anonymity because of the danger of speaking to reporters. “Even the spiritual world will not allow her to do this thing or that thing,” the astrologer said. “People laugh like that.” The ceremony was part of a decades-old campaign by the senior general to legitimize his military rule on a foundation of Buddhist fealty – dedicating and redecorating temples, attending religious ceremonies and, with his influential wife, making donations to monks and monasteries. That campaign was undermined, and perhaps fatally discredited, in September 2007 when soldiers beat and shot monks protesting the military rule in the streets, invaded monasteries without removing their boots and imprisoned or disrobed hundreds of monks. “No matter how many pagodas they build, no matter how much charity they give to monks, it is still they who murdered the monks,” said Josef Silverstein, a Burma specialist and professor emeritus at Rutgers University, at the time of the protests. “The fact that the umbrella did not stay was a sign that more bad things are to come, according to astrologers,” said Ingrid Jordt, a professor of anthropology at the Page 122 of 226

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and a specialist in Burmese Buddhism. “It is also a sign that Than Shwe does not have the spiritual power any longer to be able to undertake or reap the benefit from good acts such as this,” Professor Jordt said in an e-mail message. “In a sense, the pagoda repudiated Than Shwe’s right to remain ruler.” The New York Times, 17 June 2009 It is time to treat Than Shwe as the war criminal that he is, and hold a commission of inquiry into crimes against humanity, writes Benedict Rogers.Within the past month, two new shocking chapters of misery have opened up in Burma’s decades-long tragedy. The first is the trial, on ludicrously fabricated charges, of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who marks her 64th birthday this coming Friday. Now in the notorious Insein Prison, after over 13 years of house arrest, her trial is a blatant attempt by the regime to keep her locked up. Her continued detention is illegal under both international and Burmese law, according to the UN – which is why the regime has gone to such absurd lengths to find fresh charges. The second is the attacks within the past week on Ler Per Hur , a camp for internally displaced people (IDPs) in Karen State, Burma. Situated on the banks of the Moie river, opposite Thailand, Ler Per Hur has been home to more than 1,200 Karen IDPs who had fled the Burma Army’s attacks on their villages deeper inside Burma. Although it has twice been attacked before, it has for the past seven years provided a place of sanctuary and relative peace for those escaping the junta’s policies of forced labour, rape, torture, destruction of villages, crops and livestock, extrajudicial killings and conscription of villagers as human minesweepers. telegraph.co.uk, 17 June 2009

18 June 2009, Thursday
Supporters of Burmese democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi made preparations around the world Thursday to mark her 64th birthday, with calls for her release from jail as she faces trial by the ruling junta. In Rangoon, NLD members were making preparations at party headquarters for a similar celebration to those in previous years, including giving breakfast to Buddhist monks. “We have to hold the birthday party without the host again. We would be very happy if she could be released, we are hoping and praying for this,” senior party member Lei Lei told AFP. “We will offer a dawn meal to five monks early in the morning to mark Daw Suu’s birthday. After that we will release balloons, doves and sparrows before the small party starts,” said May Win Myint, another senior party member. Campaigners across the world will mark the day with events ranging from live music and speeches in Malaysia, evening vigils in Ireland and Australia and debating forums in Thailand. The website “64 for Suu” was set up to gather birthday wishes – including many via Twitter and YouTube – and has so far received nearly 10,000. Famous names who have sent messages demanding her release include British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, footballer David Beckham and US actors George Clooney and Julia Roberts. On Monday, a global petition was delivered to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, signed by more than 670,000 people from 220 countries, calling for the release of all Burma’s political prisoners, especially Aung San Suu Kyi. AFP, 18 June 2009 Two members of the opposition National League for Democracy party arrested after praying for the release of political prisoners in Burma have each been sentenced to one-and-a-half years in prison. The two, Chit Pe and Aung Soe Wai, were arrested on 21 April after holding a prayer ceremony at a pagoda near to Rangoon division’s Twante township, and charged under Section 295a which addresses “desecration of religious buildings and property.” Aung Soe Wei’s wife Ma Lwin said the two were immediately taken to Rangoon’s Insein prison following the verdict and were barred from speaking to family members waiting outside the court. Lawyer Kyi Toe said that his requests to authorities to let him meet his clients to were denied. “I made a request to the police station chief Myint Kyaw and also to the court, but was denied both times,” said Kyi Toe. “I was not given the right to freely talk to and discuss with my client from the start until the end of the case.” Meanwhile, three National League for Democracy (NLD) youth members in Rangoon were arrested by authorities last Friday. NLD spokesperson Nyan Win said it was a further sign of the ruling State Peace and Development’s Council’s repression of opposition groups in Burma. “The NLD Page 123 of 226

has been under pressure from the SPDC for many years and it is not easing, even when they are promising a new election and the end of all arguments,” said Nyan Win. “But we are not in depression; we will continue doing our work and will never change our non-violence policy.” DVB, 18 June 2009 Burmese government forces captured three Karen rebel positions on Thursday in the latest fighting that has forced thousands of refugees to flee into neighbouring Thailand, commanders said. The army and their Karen allies were also threatening two bases of the Karen National Union (KNU), the largest rebel group in the eastern Burma. Thai army officials say some 3,000 Karen refugees have fled across the border into Thailand since the fighting began. The U.N. refugee agency has said it is working with the Thai government to assist the refugees. Rebel leaders say the latest offensive is part of the military regime’s campaign to eliminate all opposition ahead of promised multi-party elections in 2010. Reuters, 18 June 2009 Burma State Peace and Development Council Vice-Chairman Maung Aye ended a two-day visit Thursday to Xi’an, capital of China’s northwestern Shaanxi Province. Maung Aye was received by Shaanxi Governor Yuan Chunqing. Both sides agreed that China and Burma, as friendly neighbors, should strengthen cooperation in fields like technology, education and economy. During his stay in Xi’an, Maung Aye visited the terracotta warriors in the mausoleum of Qinshihuang, the first emperor of a united China, and the Famen Temple, which had kept a finger bone of the founder of Buddhism since 874 AD. Maung Aye came to China for an official visit scheduled for June 15-20 at the invitation of Vice President Xi Jinping. He is scheduled to head for Hangzhou in the eastern Zhejiang Province. Chinaview.cn, 18 June 2009 The Taiwan Free Burma Network – an alliance of more than 100 groups supporting the democracy movement in Burma – will hold a Free Burma Concert tomorrow as part of an internationally coordinated campaign calling on Burma’s military junta to release more than 2,000 political prisoners. “This is the first time we will be holding a public Free Burma Concert at an outdoor location,” Tsai Ya-ju, an executive member of the group, told the Taipei Times. “In the past three years since the first concert in Taiwan, we’ve always had the concert indoors.” Free Burma Concerts in Taiwan are held annually on June 19, the birthday of Burma democracy pioneer Aung San Suu Kyi. The Taipei Times, 18 June 2009 Burma protestor Mike Robertson shocked Lloyd’s staff after climbing the London headquarters building today. Robertson put up a five metre banner urging Lloyd’s underwriters to stop financial dealings with Burma. Robertson was later arrested by police. His protest was timed to coincide with the eve of the birthday of Burma’s elected Prime Minister, Aung San Suu Kyi. Suu Kyi’s 64th birthday falls on Friday 19 June. Robertson scaled the Eiffel Tower in November 2007 to draw attention to the campaign. Insurance Times, 18 June 2009 Soccer star David Beckham, pop singer Madonna and billionaire investor George Soros have joined an online appeal supporting Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who will spend her 64th birthday in detention tomorrow. “Now is the time for the international community to speak with one voice: Free Aung San Suu Kyi,” reads their message of support. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Virgin Group Ltd. Chairman Richard Branson and former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson posted video messages on the Web site 64forSuu.org. Bloomberg, 18 June 2009 Images of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will be displayed on the European Parliament’s buildings at Place du Luxembourg, Brussels, this Thursday and Friday in support of the EP’s campaign for her release before her trial resumes on 26 June. A giant image of Aung San Suu Kyi will be projected onto the building of the former Quartier Léopold station from 10pm to midnight on Thursday 18 and Friday 19 June. In addition, posters of the former Sakharov Prize winner, with the slogan “Free Aung San Suu Kyi now’ in English and Burmese, will be placed on the outside of the walkways linking the different EP buildings as of Friday morning. European Parliament President Hans-Gert Pöttering has called on the Burmese military authorities to release Aung San Suu Kyi immediately and unconditionally, saying “She Page 124 of 226

was arrested on 14 May accused of violating the conditions of her detention under house arrest, as an obvious pretext for keeping her detained as the country approaches new multi-party elections in 2010.” Mr Pöttering also appealed for a fair and transparent trial in accordance with international standards. He added “The European Parliament, which enshrines the values of democracy and freedom for which the European Union is a beacon throughout the world, reaffirms its complete support and solidarity with Aung San Suu Kyi. This courageous woman represents the best hopes of her people for a free and prosperous future.” European Parliament News Report, 18 June 2009 The Burmese military junta has invited United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to visit Burma next month, but UN sources say he is unlikely to accept if opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi is convicted and sentenced to imprisonment or a further term of house arrest. The sources say said Ban wants to make sure that any visit to Burma produces tangible results and is not used for propaganda purposes by the military junta. Irrawaddy, 18 June 2009

19 June 2009, Friday
Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW) is marking the 64th birthday of Burma’s democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi today by calling on the United Nations Security Council to take immediate action to secure her freedom, the release of all political prisoners and an end to the Burma Army’s offensive against civilians in eastern Burma. CSW’s East Asia Team Leader, Benedict Rogers, who has made almost 30 visits to Burma and its borders, said: “On Aung San Suu Kyi’s birthday, it is time for the international community to turn its tributes into action. Her unjust detention violates international law, and the continued imprisonment of over 2,100 activists is a scandal. The gross violations of human rights in Burma, particularly against the Karen people at this time, including the use of rape, forced displacement, destruction of villages, torture, forced labour and extra-judicial killing must be addressed. It is time for the UN Security Council to impose an arms embargo on the regime, establish a commission of inquiry to investigate crimes against humanity, and mandate the Secretary-General to make the release of all political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi, his personal priority”. CSW, 19 June 2009 The Trade Union Congress (TUC) is calling for the release of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on her 64th birthday today. The TUC is as part of a global movement demanding the release of all Burma’s political prisoners, and calling on the UN Security Council to step up pressure on the military regime by establishing a global arms embargo on Burma. TUC General Secretary Brendan Barber said: “The British union movement sees Aung San Suu Kyi’s continued incarceration and trial as an outrage. Aung San Suu Kyi is the symbol of hope for a free and prosperous Burma. What better gift to give her on her birthday than her freedom? And the freedom of the thousands of political prisoners - many of whom are trade unionists or labour activists - who are rotting away in Burma’s jails for doing nothing more than speaking up for their rights.” The TUC is calling for an end to the persecution of Burmese workers and the unions that represent them, and for the total abolition of forced labour which is rife. Burma needs a constitution that will pave the way for a truly democratic and prosperous nation, not a sham puppet state keeping its people in misery. The UN Security Council should join the birthday celebrations by putting in place a global arms embargo against this brutal regime.” tuc.org.uk, 19 June 2009 Paul McCartney, U2 and Yoko Ono have joined the ranks of international celebrities marking the birthday of Aung San Suu Kyi with personal messages of support and renewed calls for her immediate release. Message of support from celebrities and international figures have been published on the 64forsuu.com website. “Aung San Suu Kyi is an inspiration to her country and to the rest of the world,” said Paul McCartney, while Yoko Ono published a poem that included the lyrics “Your heart beats with my heart. My eyes see what you see. My belief is your belief.” Other celebrities that have supported the 64forsuu campaign include David Beckham, Julia Roberts and Steven Fry. The renowned Indian musician and Page 125 of 226

conductor Zubin Mehta added his voice to calls for Suu Kyi’s release. “As a proud neighbour of Burma, being an Indian. I am extremely hopeful that the authorities in Burma will not judge Aung San Suu Kyi and will release her as soon as possible on this birthday,” he said. “I know I speak for hundreds of thousands of Indians who say that she is a shining light in our part of the world, and we pray for her quick release.” Ban Ki-moon was yesterday invited to visit Burma by the country’s ruling generals, although he is yet to make a decision due to suspicion that the trip may be used by the junta for propaganda purposes. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown also offered his willingness to “extend the hand of friendship” was the military government to “rethink their ways”. DVB, 19 June 2009 Burma pro-democracy figure Aung San Suu Kyi turned 64 in prison Friday, while a judge considers when to hear her appeal to allow more witnesses at her subversion trial. “Today is Aung San Suu Kyi’s 64th birthday and it is a tragedy that she will spend it in prison as the Burmese regime pursues its absurd and contemptible sham trial of her,” British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said Friday. CNN, 19 June 2009 Sixteen Burmese refugees have joined Burma pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi in detention on her birthday today, but in far away Malaysia. Police picked up the 16 for being without any identification papers at the Taman Jaya Park here about 9 pm where they were attending a commemoration organised by Pakatan Rakyat parties. Two of the detainees were later released. Among those at the gathering was DAP’s Ronnie Liu, who is a Selangor exco member. Police had mounted an operation to stop people from gathering to celebrate the Nobel laureate’s birthday. There were a few other gatherings to celebrate her birthday in Malaysia and around the world, including one organised by the British High Commission in formerly trendy Bangsar. Human rights group Suaram said those arrested are detained in the Petaling Jaya district police station and denied access to lawyers. Some activists have begun a candle-light vigil outside the police station. “We strongly urge the police to release all the individuals arrested immediately and unconditionally. We also demand that the Malaysia government recognise the refugee’s status and providing protection to them, while guaranteed the people rights to assembly and stop the assault on freedom of expression,” said Suaram coordinator Temme Lee. The Malaysian Insider, 19 June 2009 The 17 women serving in the US Senate made a joint appeal Friday for the release of Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi as she spent her 64th birthday in prison. “The military junta has tried for years to stifle the will of the people and silence the voice of Suu Kyi through a brutal campaign of violence and oppression,” they said. “Yet Aung San Suu Kyi remains a beacon of hope for a future of democracy, the rule of law and human rights,” they said. The Women’s Caucus of the US Senate is headed by Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat representing California, and Kay Bailey Hutchison, a Republican from Texas. AFP, 19 June 2009

20 June 2009, Saturday
Burma’s second top leader Maung Aye concluded a week-long visit to China and returned home Saturday afternoon. Maung Aye, vice-chairman of the Burma State Peace and Development Council arrived in Nanning, capital city of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, from east China’s Zhejiang Province Friday night. Guo Shengkun, the Communist Party chief of Guangxi, met him Saturday noon. Guo said Guangxi and Burma have complementary economies, and the two should promote cooperation in agricultural, trade, mining and cultural areas. Maung Aye said Burma hopes to expand cooperation with China in resources exploration, and will actively participate in the China-ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) Expo in Nanning this October. Nanning was Maung Aye’s last leg of China tour. He also visited Beijing, Shaanxi and Zhejiang. chinaview.cn, 20 June 2009 The ASEAN Inter-Parliamentary Myanmar Caucus (AIPMC) calls on ASEAN leaders to urgently meet to deliver new and effective policies and mechanisms that are desperately needed vis-a-vis Burma’s military Page 126 of 226

junta that will enable a tangible and lasting solution to the country’s crisis. Members of Parliament from various ASEAN countries, at a forum co-organized and co-hosted by the AIPMC, ‘Friends of Burma’, the Regional Centre for Social Science and Sustainable Development, and the Centre for Ethnic Studies and Development of the Chiang Mai University delivered strong messages to ASEAN leaders calling for change in the dire situation in the military ruled nation. “There has been a considerable increase in military offensives and armed fighting in ethnic states especially in the Karen State over the past few weeks. Ethnic communities are fleeing their villages into Thailand while some remain as internally displaced persons in Burma,” said AIPMC President Kraisak Choonhavan. AIPMC Senior Adviser Loretta Ann P Rosales added that in the Shan State, acts amounting to systematic sexual violence are used by Burma’s military as weapons of war. “Testimonies and documentation by Shan people, fleeing their homes, indicate that women and children are subjected to rape and torture by soldiers,” said the former Philippines Congresswoman adding that since 2001 till now, there have been 297 rape cases in Shan State alone. “This is outrageous and unacceptable. AIPMC condemns such acts by the regime and armed groups. We insist that ASEAN uses its human rights charter to investigate and put a stop to such atrocities,” stressed Loretta at the sidelines of the event marking Aung San Suu Kyi’s 64th birthday. Parliamentarians M. Kulasegaran and Charles Chong, from Malaysia and Singapore respectively, reminded ASEAN that its ‘constructive engagement’ with the military regime has failed. “It’s all about dollars and cents at the end of the day for governments such as Malaysia whom invest with a military that uses the money to repress and harm its leaders like Aung San Suu Kyi and its citizens and not help them at all,” said Kulasegaran. Participants at the event, primarily from Chiang Mai University’s academia, delivered messages of support and solidarity to Aung San Suu Kyi who celebrates her birthday once again in detention. Asiantribune, 20 June 2009 A group of senators, activists and academics has called for Burma to be suspended from Asean in protest against the ruling junta’s oppression of pro-democracy movements. The group includes Senator Jon Ungphakorn and academics such as Nidhi Eowseewong from Chiang Mai and Charnvit Kasetsiri. Their open letter was issued yesterday to mark the 64th birthday of Burma’s democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi. They called on Asean secretary-general Surin Pitsuwan to suspend Burma as an Asean member country for one year until Mrs Suu Kyi is released from jail. They also urged other Asean member countries to expel Rangoon from the grouping if the Burmese regime fails to bring about democracy and political reform in the country within three years. The Bangkok Post, 20 June 2009 The European Council yesterday called “for the immediate unconditional release of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who has tirelessly defended universal values of freedom and democracy”. Unless she is released, the summit statement said, “the credibility of the 2010 elections will be further undermined”, and the leaders pledged to respond with additional targeted sanctions. The EU renewed visa bans and an asset freeze in May for a year. The Irish Times, 20 June 2009 A rights group has accused Burma’s military government of prosecuting opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi in order to keep her in custody through the planned 2010 general election, which the group said would be neither free nor fair. The Hong Kong-based Asian Human Rights Commission issued a statement Friday saying charges against Aung San Suu Kyi for violating the terms of her house arrest have no basis in law whatsoever. The group said the trial is being motivated by purely political considerations, and it urged concerned United Nations agencies and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to take action. The rights group also called for the International Committee of the Red Cross go be given access to detention facilities throughout Burma. VOA, 20 June 2009 U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon is expected to visit Japan at the end of June before possibly traveling to Burma in early July, U.N. diplomatic sources said Thursday. During Ban’s trip to Japan, which will be his third visit to the country since taking the lead at the world body, he is expected to meet with Prime Minister Taro Aso and other Japanese leaders in Tokyo and discuss a broad range of issues, including North Korea, climate change and U.N. reform. But the possible visit to Burma is “still under consideration,” Page 127 of 226

though it could take place in early July, one of the sources said. Meanwhile, The Associated Press reported out of Rangoon Thursday that a Western diplomat was quoted as confirming that the junta is ready to host Ban for a “very brief visit” early next month. The Japan Times, 20 June 2009

21 June 2009, Sunday
Burma has jailed two supporters of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi for one and a half years for insulting religion after they prayed at a pagoda for her release, her party has said. Chit Pe and Aung Saw Wai, members of the detained Nobel laureate’s National League for Democracy (NLD) party, were each sentenced last week, according to lawyer and NLD spokesman Nyan Win. The pair were arrested at their homes in April after they led a religious ceremony at a pagoda in Twante, about 40 kilometres (30 miles) west of Rangoon, at which they offered prayers for their leader’s freedom. AFP, 21 June 2009 A North Korean ship that the United States is shadowing is likely headed for Burma, South Korean television reported on Sunday. YTN channel quoted a South Korean intelligence source as saying the final destination of the Kang Nam looks to be Burma, after leaving a North Korean port on Wednesday. North Korea has raised tensions in the region in the past months by test-firing missiles, restarting a plant to produce arms-grade plutonium and holding a May 25 nuclear test, which put it closer to having a working nuclear bomb. Fox News quoted a senior U.S. military source as saying the ship appeared to be heading toward Singapore and that the navy destroyer USS John McCain was positioning itself in case it gets orders to intercept, according to a story on its website. Singapore, a U.S. ally, said it would act “appropriately” if the vessel heads to its port with a cargo of weapons. Singapore has the world’s busiest shipping port and is also the world’s top ship refueling hub. The Kang Nam is the first North Korean ship to be monitored under the new sanctions, adopted this month in response to Pyongyang’s May nuclear test. The resolution authorized U.N. member states to inspect North Korean sea, air and land cargo. Reuters, 21 June 2009 The Russian Foreign Ministry objects to political and economic pressure on Burma and hopes for an unbiased trial of opposition leader Suu Kyi, the ministry’s information and press department said on Sunday. Russia is watching “the efforts of the Burmese government to achieve peace and national concord,” the department said. “We believe that Burma will ensure the fulfillment of the reform program, primarily the holding of parliamentary elections in due time in 2010.” Moscow “opposes attempts to internationalize the internal situation in Burma, because it does not endanger peace and security in the region and the world at large. In our opinion, the political and economic pressure on that country is counterproductive, as it enhances isolationist feelings of the Burmese military and exacerbates the socioeconomic position of citizens,” the department said. “We see no reasons why the UN Security Council should discuss Burma. At the same time, we call on Burma for greater openness and cooperation with the international community, as well as for closer relations with the mission of Special Representative of the UN Secretary General Ibrahim Gambari. We are confident that this negotiating mechanism is useful in building up mutual understanding and confidence between Burma and the world,” the department said. Russia hopes that the trial of “Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will be unbiased, strictly comply with national laws and humanitarian standards, and take into account the international opinion,” the department said. Itar-Tass, 21 June 2009 A Prachinburi astronomer said yesterday that Thais would be able to observe a solar eclipse for about six minutes from approximately 7-9.30 am on July 22. Worawit Tanwutthibundit said the 240-kilometre-long shadow would give one of the longest-lasting solar eclipses in history and be visible in India, Pakistan, China, Burma, Thailand and Japan. The Upper North will see a 60-per-cent eclipse, the Lower North 50 per cent and the Upper South 30 per cent. The Nation, 21 June 2009 Sen. John McCain says the U.S. should board a North Korean ship it is tracking if hard evidence shows it is carrying missiles or other cargo in violation of U.N. resolutions. McCain says that such cargo would Page 128 of 226

contribute to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction to nations that pose a direct threat to the United States. South Korean media reported Sunday that the ship was sailing toward Burma via Singapore. AP, 21 June 2009 United Nations special envoy Ibrahim Gambari is scheduled to visit Burma on June 25, a government official said. Gambari’s June 25 visit will be his eighth to Burma and he will likely stay two days. His last visit was January 31. On that visit he met with Suu Kyi and executive members of the NLD, but he was denied a meeting with Senior General Than Shwe. The official, who requested anonymity, said Gambari will discuss national reconciliation, but his visit is also seen as preparing for a probable visit by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon in July. Ban will be in Tokyo from June 30-July 2 to meet government and business leaders. Ban told reporters at the UN headquarters in New York early this month that he was ready to visit Burma. “Promoting democratization, including the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners, has been one of my top priorities and it will continue to be my top priority,” Ban said then. “When the time is appropriate and conditions are ripe, as I said many times, I’m ready to visit Burma. I’m working on that now.” Ban visited Rangoon and the delta areas devastated by Cyclone Nargis in May 2008. Earth Times, 21 June 2009

22 June 2009, Monday
A Burmese woman, Daw Mya Kyi, aged 117, has been found as the country’s oldest woman, the local Myanmar Times reported Monday quoting the Department of Social Welfare. Daw Mya Kyi, born in Mae Taw Su village in Mandalay Division and now a widow, survives with two daughters with no contact with the elder one. She is a kind-hearted woman and is now living in a house donated to her by well wishers. She claims that her daily life is normal, saying that she can eat whatever she has appetite but not sour food for health reason. She, who devotes to religious undertaking and donation socially, is now found to be in good health, according to the report. The population of Burma, which hit 57.5 million as of May 2008, increased by about 2 percent annually. Of the country’s population, the female account for over 50 percent. chinaview.cn, 22 June 2009 For years, John Yettaw had experienced visions that warned him of events to come. Sometimes the Missouri resident ignored them and came to regret it. This time, though, he intended to act. In early 2009, the 53-year-old told friends and family that he had seen himself as a man sent by God to protect the life of a beloved foreign leader. He arranged for his kids to stay with a friend, borrowed money to buy a plane ticket and printed new business cards, as if launching a new life. He seemed calm at first, spending hours at the local Hardee's, where he used the free Wi-Fi to download music—Gladys Knight, Michael Bublé—and Mormon sermons from Salt Lake City. But as his flight date approached, he also showed signs of nervousness. He broke down on the shoulder of his best friend, and didn't sleep at all on his last night at home. Sometime after 3 a.m. on April 15, he woke his son Brian, 17, and his three younger children for a family prayer, and piled them into a minivan for the hourlong drive to the airport. Unlike the backpack tour Yettaw had taken through Asia late last year, this trip would propel him into the heart of Burma’s repressive regime and an ongoing crackdown on dissidents that has drawn condemnation from Barack Obama and United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, among others. On the 20th, he flew to Bangkok, where he spent a week waiting for his Burmese visa and sending whimsical e-mails home, including a final cheerful message: “Pray. Study peace. Live calmness. Kindness toward everyone. Love and pray.” The next word the family got regarding Yettaw came in a 5 a.m. phone call from the consulate at the U.S. Embassy in Rangoon. He had been arrested just past dawn on May 6, seized as he kicked through the soupy brown waters of Inya Lake, a man-made reservoir some four miles from his hotel. He had made an unauthorized and uninvited two-day visit to the weathered colonial-style home of Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel Prize– winning leader of Burma’s pro-democracy movement. Suu Kyi says that she asked Yettaw to leave, but relented when he complained of hunger and exhaustion. “The Lady,” as locals call her, trounced opponents Page 129 of 226

in the country’s last open election in 1990, but the junta refused to recognize the results, and has kept her under arrest for 13 of the past 19 years for trying to unseat the regime. She was due to be released on May 27, ahead of next year’s landmark national elections – the first in two decades. But now Suu Kyi, the Oxford-educated daughter of Burmese revolutionary Aung San, faces five more years for violating the terms of her imprisonment and breaking the country’s law forbidding unregistered guests from staying overnight. Yettaw, too, is on trial for charges including “illegal swimming” and breaching security laws; judging from the line of questioning in court, Burmese authorities suspect he intended to help Suu Kyi escape. At the start of the legal proceedings last month, they presented two black chadors, two long skirts, three pairs of sunglasses, six colored pencils, flares, flashlights and a pair of pliers as evidence of a getaway plot. Yettaw was also carrying empty jugs he used for buoyancy, and a camera wrapped in plastic with a picture of the improvised flippers he used for the mile-long swim. Since his arrest, he has been held in Insein Prison. If convicted, he faces as many as five years behind bars—perhaps more if he is found guilty of trying to spring Suu Kyi. Both he and his host (Suu Kyi’s lawyer says, “This is a political case, not a criminal one”) have pleaded not guilty. “He had no criminal intent,” Yettaw’s lawyer, Khin Maung Oo, told newsweek, adding that the only charge he should face is “lurking house-trespass,” a lesser crime on the books in Burma. “He has no relationship with anything political. His only mission was to save her.” Newsweek, 22 June 2009 / Nyunt Than, badasf.org

23 June 2009, Tuesday
We’e just heard that from inside Burma’s notorious Insein prison Aung San Suu Kyi has asked her lawyer to thank the tens of thousands of people that wished her happy birthday last Friday. Her lawyer Nyan Win just released this message: “Shesaid she thanks those at home and abroad who wished her a happy birthday, because she cannot reply to everyone.” Burma’s brutal regime wants the world to forget Aung San Suu Kyi. The tens of thousands of people like you that left birthday messages of support to her sent a strong message to Burma’s General’s. We showed that the world will never forget Burma’s democracy leader or any the 2,155 political prisoners currently detained in appalling conditions inside Burma. Johnny Chatterton, Campaigns Officer, Burma Campaign UK, 23 June 2009 District police in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia should free Burmese asylum seekers detained since June 19, 2009, at a peaceful celebration of the 64th birthday of the Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, Human Rights Watch said today. “The Malaysian authorities only made themselves look ridiculous by cracking down on a peaceful celebration of Aung San Suu Kyi’s birthday,” said Elaine Pearson, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “By detaining Burmese asylum seekers who were calling for democracy in their homeland, Malaysia was broadcasting support for Burma’s despotic generals.” The scheduled gathering in Malaysia was one of many held worldwide to condemn Suu Kyi’s arbitrary detention and her current trial in Rangoon. The Nobel laureate has spent 14 of the last 20 years in some form of detention. HRW, 23 June 2009 Several senior military Burmese officials have been dismissed over the weeks followed the recent publication of photographs of secret tunnels built by North Korean experts between 2003-2006 inside Burma, according informed sources. The sources, who asked not to be identified because the information they gave could endanger their lives, said that the Burmese intelligence officials have began massive investigations to identify the sources of leakages. They have combed the city of Rangoon and interviewed associates of former intelligence chief, Lt Gen Khin Nyunt to search for persons who might leak one of the most secretive programs. They have already arrested several suspects including journalists who might have accessed to these sensitive photos and documents. The Nation, 23 June 2009 Weighed down by state corruption, economic decline and vastly uneven development, Burma has ranked at the tail-end of this year’s Failed States Index, published by US-based Foreign Policy magazine. The Page 130 of 226

current economic recession has sparked conflict and instability across the world, and has pulled many struggling countries further toward the brink of collapse. In Burma, however, the majority of responsibility for near economic breakdown and endemic human rights abuses lies with the military government, says Foreign Policy’s Failed States Index, which ranked Burma 164 out of 177 countries. Like Zimbabwe, the report says, Burma is failing because its government is “strong enough to choke the life out of its society.” The Southeast Asian pariah state ranked below North Korea, Ethiopia and East Timor overall, and only above Somalia and Sudan in terms of even development. Burma is one of the world’s most isolated states, and is under tough United States and European Union sanctions, which have contributed in part towards the country’s economic decline, although state corruption is widely perceived as the key catalyst for this. Burmese political analyst Aung Thu Nyein said that the results were not surprising. “It reflects the reality of the current situation in Burma, where the economy is in a bad state and there major political problems,” he said. “The government is not providing public services. The main problem for me is the military rule - it’s not surprising that there is a failed state when the army is in power.” Corruption is also a major problem, he said, and it “affects every sector of society”. The index used 12 political, economic and social indicators, including external intervention and presence of public services, to measure whether a country qualifies as a ‘failed state’. Burma was ranked as one of 14 countries deemed to be in a “critical” state, with Somalia heading the list, followed by Zimbabwe and Sudan. DVB, 23 June 2009 Burma’s jungle capital of Naypyidaw has been chosen to host this year’s ASEAN meeting on transnational crime, with Chinese, EU and UN delegates lined up to attend, according to Burma’s Weekly Eleven journal. Senior officials of the Association of the Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) had originally earmarked late June for ninth annual meeting, although Weekly Eleven now say it will take place from 1 to 3 July. A report released by the US state department earlier this month said that human trafficking within Burma’s remains “significant”, despite Burma in April signing a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Thailand aimed at stemming the flow of trafficking between the two countries. This is in addition to Burma being party to the UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime and the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children. The US report also labelled Burma as “a destination country for child sex tourism” and stated that Burma has not “adequately addressed” trafficking for commercial sexual exploitation and labour exploitation within the country. Many Burmese women and children are trafficked to neighbouring countries such as Thailand, China and Malaysia, often for forced marriage arrangements. Within Burma, trafficking of girls for the purpose of prostitution “persisted as a major problem”, said the US report. Similarly, Burma is listed by the CIA as being the world’s second largest producer of opium, behind Afghanistan. Government-allied armed groups, particular the United Wa State Army, are seen to be key players in the industry. DVB, 23 June 2009 A North Korean ship suspected of carrying illicit weapons was plying the waters off Shanghai on Tuesday en route to Burma, a news report said, as regional military officials and a U.S. destroyer kept a close eye on the vessel’s movements. The Kang Nam, accused of transporting illicit goods in the past, is believed to be carrying banned small arms to Burma, a South Korean intelligence official said Monday, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the information. AP, 23 June 2009 The U.S. Navy vessel that had been monitoring a North Korean ship suspected of carrying illicit weapons has handed over duties to another Navy destroyer, officials told FOX News. The USS John C. McCain has pulled back into port and is no longer monitoring the North Korean Kang Nam, according to U.S. defense officials. The Kang Nam, which is currently in the Taiwan Straits and appears to be on course for Burma, is now being monitored by the the U.S.S. McCampbell, according to two senior U.S. defense officials. Fox News, 23 June 2009

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24 June 2009, Wednesday
Lawyers for democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi pressed military-ruled Burma’s top court to overturn a ban on two key witnesses at her internationally condemned trial, her party said. The Nobel Peace laureate faces up to five years in jail on charges of breaching the terms of her house arrest after a bizarre incident in which an American man swam uninvited to her lakeside home in May. A court at Rangoon’s Insein prison last month barred two senior members of her National League for Democracy (NLD) from giving evidence, but the Supreme Court agreed to hear an appeal against the decision. “We gave our arguments to the Supreme Court for about one hour today. We do not have a date for the decision and must wait for it to be posted on the court’s list,” NLD spokesman and defence lawyer Nyan Win said. The two barred witnesses are Win Tin, a journalist who was Burma’s longest-serving political prisoner until his release in September, and detained deputy NLD leader Tin Oo. “Regarding today’s arguments, the prosecution complained about U Win Tin as he gave interviews to foreign media. We said that that is not related to the law,” Nyan Win said. U is a term of respect in the Burmese language. Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers earlier this month successfully appealed against a ban on a third witness, while a fourth has already testified. The prosecution has so far had 14 witnesses, adding to opposition and international claims that the proceedings are a show trial designed to keep the democracy icon locked up ahead of elections scheduled by the regime in 2010. AFP, 24 June 2009 Burmese court authorities Wednesday postponed the next hearing in the controversial trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who had been scheduled to appear in court Friday. The special court set up in Insein Prison delayed the hearing indefinitely as it awaits a decision by the Burmese Supreme Court on whether it will allow more defence witnesses, Nyan Win, a member of Suu Kyi’s defence team, said. Insein Prison was scheduled originally scheduled to hear the testimony of Khin Moe Moe, a witness for the defence, on Friday. On Wednesday the Supreme Court heard defence arguments for allowing two more witnesses to appear in Suu Kyi’s favour, including Tin Oo, the deputy leader of the opposition National League for Democracy, and senior party member Win Tin. Judges said it would be impossible to accept Tin Oo as a witness because he is currently under house arrest. They added that Win Tin, a former journalist, gave several interviews to the Democratic Voice of Burma, the BBC and Radio Free Asia, in which he had demonstrated a difference of opinion with authorities, Nyan Win said. “We said there is no law against witnesses having different opinions than authorities,” Nyan Win said. The Supreme Court postponed deciding on whether to allow the two to be witnesses in the trial, which has been delayed several times since it began last month. The charges have drawn widespread international criticism. Earth Times, 24 June 2009 There is heightened security in Rangoon with at least 30 army trucks with uniformed riot police personnel, patrolling the city on Wednesday. The army trucks are each carrying at least 20 policemen and are patrolling various townships of Rangoon, eyewitnesses said. “We can see about 30 to 40 army trucks carrying uniformed policemen patrolling the city. It looks like they are on high alert. They also have machine guns mounted on the trucks. They came to our township at about 3 p.m. (local time),” an eyewitness from Insein Township told Mizzima. “Earlier, when they patrolled like they are doing now, the police would carry shields but today they had a policeman standing on the truck with a machine gun mounted on the hood,” he added. Mizzima, 24 June 2009 Burma’s jailed democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi is to be awarded an honorary degree by the University of Ulster. The Nobel Peace Laureate will be awarded the honorary Doctor of Laws (LLD) in absentia at the university’s forthcoming graduation ceremony in Derry. The pro-democracy activist has led peaceful and non-violent resistance against the Burmese dictatorship for more than 20 years and won the right to be prime minister in the 1990 election despite being put under house arrest. She continues her fight for democracy and freedom for the people of Burma despite her imprisonment by the Burmese authorities. The degree will be accepted on her behalf by Mra Razam Linn who will deliver a speech written by Aung San Suu Kyi at the graduation ceremony which takes place at Derry’s Millennium Forum on Tuesday, July 7. Derry Journal, 24 June 2009 Page 132 of 226

An American destroyer was tailing a North Korean ship suspected of transporting weapons toward Burma, as anticipation mounted Wednesday that the North could soon conduct short- or medium-range missiles tests. The Kang Nam left the North Korean port of Nampo a week ago, and the destroyer USS John S. McCain was following as it sailed off the Chinese coast. The sailing sets up the first test of a new U.N. Security Council resolution that authorizes member states to inspect North Korean vessels suspected of carrying banned weapons or materials. AP, 24 June 2009 U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown reiterated Wednesday that his government would tighten sanctions against Burma over what he called the “sham trial” of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “At the last meeting of the European Council we sent a very powerful message that unless action is taken in Burma to free Aung San Suu Kyi, then we are prepared to take further sanctions against the regime,” Brown said in the weekly question and answer session in parliament. Brown also called on U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon to visit Burma. The prime minister said the actions of the Burmese regime were “completely unacceptable.” Dow Jones, 24 June 2009

25 June 2009, Thursday
Fighting between government forces and ethnic rebel groups in Burms’a Karen State has in recent weeks pushed thousands of refugees into neighboring Thailand. The upsurge in hostilities stems from the military regime’s drive to transform the ethnic ceasefire armies into government-controlled border guards and in the process assert central control in the contested territories ahead of general elections scheduled for 2010. Attacks led by the government-aligned Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA) and supported by Burmese army soldiers commenced on June 2 against the Karen National Liberation Army’s (KNLA) battalions and general headquarters, situated along the Thai-Burma border. The offensive has shifted international media attention away from the trial of pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and shortcircuited a recent Thai diplomatic overture to mediate a ceasefire between the government and insurgent group. The struggle between the insurgent Karen and Burma’s ruling military junta has ground on for 60 years, making it the world’s longest-running insurgency. Fighting along the Thai-Burma border has been a source of friction between the two Southeast Asian countries, especially since Burma’s military has asserted greater control over long-contested border regions. Some analysts contend that’s raised the temperature of a long-time regional security hot spot, made hotter in recent years by frequent cross-border incursions and shoot-outs often involving drug traffickers. The recent scaled-up attacks will no doubt have been noticed in Washington. Asia Times Online, 25 June 2009 Malaysian authorities might deport up to 14 Burmese nationals who were arrested at a demonstration to mark jailed pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s birthday, human rights activists said Wednesday. AP, 25 June 2009

26 June 2009, Friday
On the subject of UN envoy Gambari’s visit to Burma, which began this morning, Win Tin said that dialogue must be sought. “When Mr. Gambari comes, he must meet with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi - that must be his priority,” he said. “If he can’t do that his trip has no meaning and has no value.” DVB, 26 June 2009

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27 June 2009, Saturday
Several monks on Saturday refrained from going out to collect swan offering in Myingyan town in Mandalay division, following a visit and offerings made by junta’s Minister of Industries (1) Aung Thaung. Monks in Burma, who usually go out at dawn for food offerings from devotees, on Saturday refused to go when they came to know that the visiting Industries Minister Aung Thaung would also make offerings to the monks. A local monk told Mizzima that ‘Ponya Thaharya’, the group that regularly organises food offerings for monks in Myingyan town, usually makes swan offerings to about 700 monks in town, but on Saturday only about 300 monks turned up. “We did not want to go. Only new comers, who do not understand and younger novices, went. But when we made the offering it was attended only by about 250 to 300 monks. Most of the monks who understand did not go,” the monk told Mizzima. The organisation mobilises donors or devotees who wish to offer food to monks’ everyday. Aung Thaung, who is a native of Wei Laung village in Myingyan Township, on Friday also called a mass meeting and summoned villagers in the township to listen to his speech in Myingyan’s High School No. (1). But locals said despite being called only a few attended the meeting. “Aung Thaung arrived on Friday and called for a meeting. Local authorities went from village to village and made announcements about the meeting. They threatened that those who do not attend will be fined Kyat 1,000 (USD 1). But despite the threat only a few turned up. Not more than 15 people each from one village turned up,” a local resident said. During the meeting, Aung Thaung explained about the ongoing trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and the American man John William Yettaw. He also introduced Kyaw San and Win Myint, who have been nominated as candidates from Myingyan Township for the 2010 general elections. He also warned the people not to get involved in any possible future anti-government protests. Residents of Myingyan town have been carrying out a photo campaign for opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Mizzima, 29 June 2009

28 June 2009, Sunday
The authoritarian governments of China, Cuba and Burma have been selectively censoring or limiting the news out of Iran in recent days. In China, political commentators tinted their blogs and Twitter feeds green to show support for Iranians disputing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s re-election. The deaths of at least 20 people in violent clashes in Tehran have drawn comparisons online to “June 4,” the date of the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989. “The Iranian people face the same problems as us: news censorship and no freedom to have their own voices,” blogger Zhou Shuguang, 28, said in a telephone interview. The Chinese Communist Party has portrayed the protests in Iran as orchestrated by the United States and other Western powers, not a grass-roots movement. In Cuba, President Raul Castro’s government has imposed a complete blackout of news on Iran’s elections. But developments are trickling through, anyway. Havanabased blogger Yoani Sanchez, 33, said the Iranian protests -- in particular, the reportedly widespread use of Twitter, Facebook and cell phones -- served as “a lesson for Cuban bloggers.” In Burma, the junta’s New Light of Burma has drowned out news from Tehran with articles on bombings in Iraq and Afghanistan. But some of the nearly 200 journals published privately in Rangoon and Mandalay have seized on the topic. “What we, the private media, are trying to do was to put in as much stories of what’s going on in Tehran in our papers,” the editor of a Rangoon-based weekly publication said in an e-mail. The Washington Post, 28 June 2009 UN troubleshooter Ibrahim Gambari is expected to brief UN chief Ban Ki-moon on his recent visit to Burma, before the secretary general heads to Asia and possibly to the military-ruled nation. Gambari flew out of Burma on Saturday following a two-day visit aimed at paving the way for Ban’s prospective trip early next month, which would come against the backdrop of the trial of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The Nigerian diplomat met twice with Foreign Minister Nyan Win in the junta’s remote administrative capital Naypyidaw before holding talks with Singapore’s ambassador and UN staff in Rangoon, Burmese officials said. He was expected to brief Ban back in New York on the outcome of his mission before the UN Page 134 of 226

chief departs for Japan on Monday, UN spokesman in Bangkok Hak-Fan Lau said. Ban will then decide whether to go ahead with plans to visit Burma early next month, according to UN sources in New York. State media in Burma confirmed the focus of Gambari’s meetings there was on the UN secretary general’s expected visit in early July. The New Light of Burma, the state newspaper, said Gambari “called on Minister for Foreign Affairs U Nyan Win on 26 and 27 June”. The pair “held discussions about the programme for the visit of His Excellency Mr Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary General, to Burma,” the newspaper reported Sunday. But the UN special envoy to Burma did not meet Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi himself before flying out of the country on a Saturday evening Thai Airways flight. The UN boss and Gambari have been trying to persuade Burma’s ruling generals to free all political detainees, including Aung San Suu Kyi, and steer their country on the path to democracy and national reconciliation. AFP, 28 June 2009 Former US first lady Laura Bush called for new international pressure on Burma in order to force its military leaders to stop human rights abuses. “With UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon planning to visit Burma this summer, it is crucial that he press the regime to take immediate steps to end human rights abuses, particularly in ethnic minority areas,” the spouse of former president George W. Bush wrote in an op-ed piece in The Washington Post. “There have been 38 UN resolutions condemning these abuses, yet the horrors continue unabated,” she pointed out. “Under the junta’s brutal rule, too many lives have been wasted, lives whose talents could have helped all of Burma prosper.” Bush hails Aung San Suu Kyi’s “continued example of civil courage,” saying that it reminded Americans of the desire of people around the world to live in freedom. “We should all share her hope and add our voices to those who risk so much to protest tyranny and injustice in Burma and beyond,” Bush said. AFP, 28 June 2009 The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations says the U.S. is keeping close tabs on a suspected North Korea arms ship. An American destroyer has been tracking the North Korean freighter sailing off China’s coast, possibly on its way to Burma. Ambassador Susan Rice says the U.S. is pursuing and following the ship’s progress closely. But she is not saying what the U.S. actually might do on the high seas - such as whether to contact and request inspection. It is the first ship to be monitored under a U.N. resolution that bans North Korea from selling a range of arms and weapons-related materiel. The resolution allows other countries to request boarding and inspection of such ships, but the ships don’t have to give permission. AP, 28 June 2009

29 June 2009, Monday
Burma’s highest court Monday rejected an appeal by lawyers of Aung San Suu Kyi to reinstate two key witnesses in a trial that has sparked global outrage. The High Court upheld a lower court ruling, meaning Suu Kyi will be granted only two defense witnesses in her ongoing trial. Her trial resumes July 3 when an additional defense witness will testify before the District court inside Insein prison where Suu Kyi has been facing trial since May 18. Suu Kyi’s lawyers pursued a second and final appeal to reinstate the remaining two barred witnesses, Win Tin and Tin Oo, both senior members of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy. Prosecutors argued that Win Tin, a prominent former journalist and ex-political prisoner, should not be allowed to testify because he is critical of the government and often gave interviews to foreign media, said Nyan Win. The defense team argued there was no law in the tightly ruled country that bars court testimony from government critics, Nyan Win said. Prosecutors argued that Tin Oo, the party’s deputy leader, shouldn’t be allowed to testify because he is currently under house arrest, Nyan Win said. Defense lawyers noted to the court that Suu Kyi herself was under house arrest but that didn’t stop authorities from putting her on trial, Nyan Win said. Suu Kyi was allowed to testify May 26 and her term under house arrest officially ended the next day. AP, 29 June 2009

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Securing Burmese visas for international aid workers is again proving problematic more than a year after Cyclone Nargis killed nearly 140,000 people and affected another 2.4 million. After Nargis struck, Burma’s military-led government initially hesitated to allow in large numbers of aid workers, but that all changed on 30 May 20008 with the establishment of the Tripartite Core Group (TCG). The TCG - comprising the government, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the UN - has been instrumental in facilitating nearly 2,000 visa applications over the past year, with a fast-track process for workers involved in cyclone relief efforts. But in March 2009 the government reverted to the pre-Nargis system, requiring international aid workers to apply directly to their respective line ministries, which in turn would submit their applications to the Foreign Affairs Policy Committee (FAPC), which handles all visa applications. More than 200 visa applications are now pending with the FAPC. “We understand the FAPC meet once a week, but it’s not enough to process the backlog,” Thierry Delbreuve, head of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in Rangoon, told IRIN on 29 June. “Patience is a must, but we are pursuing all avenues to rectify this,” he added. UN agencies like the World Health Organization (WHO) are now obliged to submit their visa applications to the Ministry of Health, while confusingly some UN agencies are continuing to file their applications with the TCG. The line ministries or TCG act as conduits for the visas; they make recommendations, complete the files, and make 23 copies of each visa request for the FAPC. “It’s slowing our operations down. Some agencies, some NGOs have already indicated things cannot go on in this way,” Delbreuve said. The government says there are no new restrictions, but others wonder whether it is trying to impose some kind of quota system on aid workers per NGO or UN agency. “It’s as though they don’t want a lot of foreign aid workers in the country,” one international aid worker who preferred anonymity told IRIN. “It’s as though they think the cyclone effort is over, when in reality the recovery and rebuilding effort is really just beginning.” The switch to the old system came at a time when more aid workers were needed in the country, not fewer, he said. Most visas are single entry, so if an international aid worker needs to attend a meeting in Bangkok or has to leave the country for personal reasons, he or she has no choice but to reapply to get back in. While heads of office can usually get a visa for up to a year, most aid workers receive six months or less. “There are no rules. You just don’t know,” one UN staff member, who initially had permission to stay for just two weeks, said. “There is constantly an extension application from one of us in the system,” she added. To address the problem, the UN has offered to support the authorities in whatever way it can. Sometimes the process has been speeded up, observers say: On the eve of the arrival of UN special envoy to Burma Ibrahim Gambari on 26 June, the FAPC in a single meeting approved 103 single entry (one month) visas for international aid workers. But others are not so lucky, and donor programmes are beginning to be affected. On 29 June, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) temporarily suspended its helicopter air service to the cyclone-affected Irrawaddy Delta after a pilot in Bangkok failed to get an entry visa after waiting more than three weeks. IRIN, 29 June 2009 Russian and Italian engineering companies are reported to be involved in the development of a huge iron ore mine in Burma’s eastern Shan state that campaigners say could displace more than 7,000 homes. The already volatile Shan state is home to Burma’s second largest iron ore deposit, on the site of Mount Pinpet. Excavation of the site began in 2004, and work includes the conversion of around 11,000 acres of surrounding land for construction of a cement factory and iron processing plant. The Pa-O Youth Organisation (PYO), in a report released today, said that more than 25 villages home to around 7000 mainly ethnic Pa-O people could be destroyed by the Pinpet Mining Project. “The government don’t talk to the villagers, they don’t negotiate with the villagers regarding plans for the mining project - they don’t really discuss in advance what they are going to do,” said Khun Ko Wein. The report points to Russian company Tyazhpromexport as being the major foreign investor in the Pinpet Iron Factory, with $US150 million so far channeled into the project. An Italian company, Danieli, which claims to be one of the world’s leading suppliers of equipment to the metals industry, is also highlighted in the report. Another concern of PYO’s is the link between the Pinpet mine and rumours that Burma is mining uranium, a key ingredient for nuclear weaponry. According to the report, Burma’s Ministry of Energy has officially announced the presence of Page 136 of 226

five uranium deposits in the country, although has not publicly stated that these will be mined. DVB, 29 June 2009 U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon will travel to Burma on Friday and Saturday after a three-day visit to Japan, the United Nations announced Monday. Ban visited the militarily ruled nation last year, too. The U.N. chief’s trip came after U.N. special envoy to the country Ibrahim Gambari met with Foreign Minister Nyan Win amid renewed calls from the international community for the release of Burma’s pro- democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Gambari did not meet with Suu Kyi or other opposition party leaders during his visit. It was Gambari’s eighth visit to Burma since he became special envoy for the country in May 2006. He last visited the country in January this year. Kyodo, 29 June 2009 Burma’s courts have barred two of Aung San Suu Kyi’s four witnesses, just as UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon announced he will travel to the country on July 3-4. In New York, Inner City Press asked Ban’s spokesperson Michele Montas if Ban has any comment on the barring of these two witnesses, Win Tin and Tin Oo of the National League for Democracy. Ms. Montas said of Ban, “He’s not talking about the trial right now.” In fact, Ms. Montas’ Office reached out to media organizations which indicated they would have staffers from Bangkok and elsewhere in the Far East accompany Ban and told them that Ban wants only particular reporters who cover him at the UN. It would appear that, faced with negative press coverage of the first half of his term, particularly of his pro-government victory tour in Sri Lanka, Team Ban has sought to control how the Burmese trip is covered by hand selecting who gets to cover it. Inner City Press, 29 June 2009

30 June 2009, Tuesday
Burma’s highest court rejected an appeal yesterday by Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyers to reinstate two key witnesses in a trial that could send the pro-democracy leader to prison for five years. High Court judge Tin Aung Aye rejected the appeal because it was “intended to disturb and delay the trial,” court officials said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. The court’s ruling means only two people will testify in Suu Kyi’s defense at her trial, which resumes Friday, and that a verdict could be reached in a week or two. kuwaittimes.net, 30 June 2009 Aung San Suu Kyi met her lawyers Nyan Win, Kyi Win, Khin Htay Kywe and Hla Myo Myint in a guest house in Burma’s notorious Insein Prison at 1 pm on Tuesday. “We discussed her case and how to deal with it during the trial to resume tomorrow,” Kyan Win said. During the meeting with her lawyers, Aung Sang Suu Kyi said that she disagreed with some statements made by Khin Ye in a press conference held in Nayphidaw, the new jungle capital of Burma in the last week of June, regarding the cleaning of flotsam plant growing on the edge of Innya lake alongside her house and the her alleged non-cooperation with authorities over an American man John William Yettaw’s intrusion into her home in early May. “The police chief said there is regular cleaning of flotsam on Innya Lake near her house. Suu Kyi said, the authorities had cleaned the plants once in six month after she complained to them several times,” Nyan Win said. Mizzima, 3 July 009 UN chief Ban Ki-Moon announced that he would visit Burma and said that he must meet the democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, for the trip to be effective. This news was welcomed by the leader’s political party. A spokeswoman for Ban announced late Monday that the UN secretary general would travel to the military-ruled nation later this week for talks with the junta on the release of all political prisoners, including Suu Kyi. Ban is due to arrive Friday, the same day as a Burmese court is due to resume the trial of the Nobel laureate on charges of violation of her house arrest after an American man swam to her lakeside home. “We welcome Mr Ban Ki-moon’s visit,” Nyan Win, the spokesman for Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) and a member of her legal team, told AFP. “His visit will focus on three main things: to Page 137 of 226

release all political prisoners, to start dialogue and also to ensure free and fair elections in 2010,” he said. “Regarding these three things, he needs to meet with Aung San Suu Kyi.” The 64-year-old opposition icon is currently being held at Insein prison in Yangon where the internationally condemned trial is being held. She faces up to five years in jail if convicted. The UN chief decided to go ahead with his trip after being briefed Sunday by his special envoy to Burma, Ibrahim Gambari, who paid a short preparatory visit to the country last week. Ban will address “the resumption of dialogue between the government and opposition as a necessary part of any national reconciliation process, and the need to create conditions conducive to credible elections,” his spokeswoman, Michele Montas, said. The ruling junta has promised to hold elections in 2010, but critics say they are ‘a sham designed to entrench the generals’ hold on power’ and that the trial is designed to keep Aung San Suu Kyi behind bars during the polls. Aung San Suu Kyi has spent 13 of the last 19 years in jail since the junta refused to recognise the NLD’s landslide victory in Burma’s last elections, in 1990. The Dawn, 30 June 2009 United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is scheduled to visit Burma on Friday and Saturday, and there’s little hope for the release of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi from the trip, said a prominent Burmese opposition leader. Commenting on the trip, Win Tin, a prominent leader of the main opposition National League for Democracy (NLD) said that the international community has achieved little in the way of real progress toward national reconciliation. “Therefore, I do not expect Daw Aung San Suu Kyi would be released during or after Ban Ki-moon’s trip,” he said. “But it’s because the junta has failed to response to the international calls.” Win Tin, who spent 19 years as a political prisoner, told The Irrawaddy on Tuesday that he welcomed Ban’s trip. “I agree with Mr Ban Ki-moon’s agenda: release of political prisoners and dialogue for national reconciliation. But I want to point out that Burma’s problem now is about its constitution rather than the election,” Win Tin said. “So we need to review this unjust constitution first and then talk about the election. That will be more reasonable for the country’s democracy process,” he said. Although Ban’s trip is confirmed, a UN spokesperson indicated there was no agreement that he would meet with Suu Kyi, even though he requested to meet with the pro-democracy leader. “Despite the NLD’s protestations and the growing international pressure, there was never any real likelihood of Aung San Suu Kyi being freed ahead of the planned election in 2010,” noted a London-based think-tank, The Economist Intelligence Unit, in its June report on Burma. “The last time she was released, in May 2002, the junta clearly miscalculated the extent to which she had remained a popular and influential figure,” said the report. Wai Moe, Irrawaddy, 30 June 2009 Reporters Without Borders and the Burma Media Association today condemned the military junta for intimidating the press trying to cover recent national and international events, as a journalist was jailed for two years after being arrested near the home of Aung San Suu Kyi. “Since the UN envoy Ibrahim Gambari arrived in Burma one might expect greater tolerance on the part of the authorities, but on the contrary, the trial of Suu Kyi is being held in a climate of repression and censorship,” the press freedom organisations said.”We call on the UN envoy to show firmness in his talks with the authorities, including on the release of all political prisoners and an end to prior censorship. Without this, there can be no approval of any reconciliation process or elections,” they said. The two organisations strongly condemned the two-year sentence imposed on freelance journalist Zaw Tun on 18 June. A former journalist with the magazine The News Watch, he was arrested near the Suu Kyi’s home by a police officer who claimed he had shown ‘hostility’ towards him. He was found guilty at a court in Bahan, near Rangoon, of obstructing the work of an official. A Rangoon journalist said that Zaw Tun was taken immediately to jail after the verdict. Military intelligence agents on 23 June went to several media offices to demand lists of journalists who had taken part in journalism training sessions at the US Embassy in Rangoon. The renowned journalist U Win Tin, who was cited as a defence witness in the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, has been under constant surveillance by the special police. The prosecutor refused to accept the former political prisoner as a witness because he criticises the government, particularly in foreign media. The junta has imposed strict censorship on both national and international news items. The censorship bureau, the Press Scrutiny and Registration Division, banned the publication of news on the arrival of a North Korean cargo ship, Kang Nam 1, in a port near Page 138 of 226

Rangoon, which is suspected of transporting weapons. A journalist in Rangoon told the magazine Irrawaddy that “most newspapers have tried to report on the arrival of the cargo vessel but the government censor rejected all the articles”. The censorship bureau also banned some articles on demonstrations that followed the disputed elections in Iran. The press was refused the right at the start of June to publish information about the investigation into the collapse of the Danoke pagoda in Dala, near Rangoon, in which several people died. “We cannot publish articles or photos about this incident, because it was the wife of junta leader General Than Shwe who installed the sunshade on the pagoda on 7 May 2009”, one journalists explained. She is known to be very superstitious. The censorship bureau on 1st June threatened the privately owned weekly True News for carrying an article in its 19 May issue by the famous journalist Ludu Sein Win who said that “many governments cannot tolerate criticism from journalists”. The censors alleged that the paper changed the front page after it had been passed by the censors. Reporters Without Borders revealed at the end of 2008 that the censorship bureau sent all media offices a document detailing ten rules imposed on editors, who would be punished if changes were made after the article had been checked. The state-run media reported the charges against Suu Kyi, without giving anything the full statements by the defence. The daily New Light of Burma reported the main developments in the trial insisting there was complicity between the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and the American William Yetaw, who swam to her lakeside home on 3 May. In its 27 May edition, the daily published the full questioning of Suu Kyi by the judge, but the cross examination by defence lawyers were only briefly summarised in the official press. The state press also relays the junta’s threats against the opposition, as happened on 5 June, when the New Light of Burma carried threats by the authorities against the youth branch of the National League for Democracy for putting out a statement. 24-7PressRelease.com, 30 June 2009 The 50,000th refugee from Burma to leave the camps along the country’s border with Thailand for resettlement abroad will arrive in the US on Tuesday, the United Nations Refugee Agency said. Some 112,000 refugees remain along the Thai-Burma border, in a problem that has now being going on for 20 years. The man who will be the 50,000th refugee to be flown to the West, will resettle in New Jersey with his wife and daughter, after living and teaching primary school in a camp since 1996. The resettlement of Burmese refugees is the largest project of its kind in the world, as the UN generally pushes for refugees to return to their home nation once problems have been settled. The UNHCR said it does not expect the 112,000 remaining refugees in camps there to be able to return home “any time soon.” The Burmese refugee resettlement programme has been running since 2004. earthtimes.org, 30 June 2009 In September 2007, thousands of Buddhist monks led the “saffron revolution,” a series of peaceful marches in response to military oppression and a dire economic situation in Burma. Since then, three monks who escaped Burma and settled in Utica, N.Y., have continued campaigning across the United States for democracy and human rights for their country with the All Burma Monks’ Alliance. During the revolution, U Gawsita was beaten by military soldiers, along with hundreds other protesters. “When our nonviolent protest began to threaten power of authority, the government accused us as terrorists, and started to crack down with guns and sticks,” he said. But the monks remain dedicated to the cause. U Agga Nya Na, who wants to study political science, said that he was confident that he could contribute to the campaign for Burma’s democracy even while living in the United States. “We can make many young students inspired for democracy and human rights for Burma,” he said. The founder of the alliance and one of the leaders of the 2007 revolution, U Pyinya Zawta, said he was tortured and incarcerated by the government in Burma for 10 years. He says he believes that the cause demands attention now. “It is a very critical time in history of Burma,” he said. “Aung San Suu Kyi is being tried now. If the world leaders can come together now to free Aung San Suu Kyi, this will be great opportunity to promote democracy in Burma.” He also stresses that the saffron revolution has not ended. “My country has not gained democracy yet,” he said. “I will continue to struggle for democracy as long as Burma is not free.” The New York Times, 30 June 2009 Japanese police have arrested three men on suspicion of attempting to illegally export into Burma heavy machinery that could be used in the development of missile systems. The reports surfaced yesterday on the Page 139 of 226

Japanese news website, Yomiuri Shimbun, who reported that the three men, two Japanese and one Korean, were charged under the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Law. The Yomiuri quoted police as saying that the three men, who were working for a Hong Kong-based North Korean trading firm, were caught with a magnetic measuring device “believed necessary for developing long-range ballistic missile systems on instructions from North Korea”. The export was attempted in January this year, at a cost of around seven million yen (US$73,000). Police reportedly believe that the same firm has transported similar machinery to Burma in the past. According to the Yomiuri report, the firm’s office in North Korean capital Pyongyang is believed by Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be involved in the development of weapons of mass destruction. DVB, 30 June 2009 The UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki Moon, will visit Burma on Friday in a diplomatically risky effort to win concessions from the country’s military dictatorship. Mr Ban hopes to persuade the Burmese junta to release political prisoners, including the country’s democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, in advance of an election next year, denounced by opposition groups as fraudulent and meaningless. “The Secretary-General considers that three of the most important issues for the future of Burma cannot be left unaddressed at this juncture of the country’s political process,” Mr Ban’s spokesperson, Michele Montas, said yesterday in New York. “These are the release of all political prisoners, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi; the resumption of dialogue between the Government and Opposition and the need to create conditions conducive to credible elections. timesonline.co.uk, 30 June 2009

1 July 2009, Wednesday
Burmese politicians have expressed fear that Ban Ki-moon’s visit to Burma will achieve little without concerted attempts to meet National League for Democracy members, including Aung San Suu Kyi. The UN Secretary General is due to arrive in Burma on Friday on a two-day visit, the exact itinerary of which is unknown. Senior members of the National League for Democracy (NLD), as well as a number of human rights groups, have said however that the trip will be meaningless unless a meeting with NLD members, and even Suu Kyi, is secured. “If Ban Ki-moon can spare two days to meet with the junta, he should also consider trying to find a way to meet with the other side,” said NLD Central executive Committee member U Win Tin. “If not, and he leaves Burma having only made friends with the junta, then this trip would be meaningless.” DVB, 1 July 2009 About 100 Burmese activists rallied in Japan on Wednesday, calling on visiting UN chief Ban Ki-moon to press the junta to free political prisoners including democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Protesters said Ban, who is slated to visit Burma on Friday and Saturday, must press the military regime for a concrete outcome when he meets the generals ruling the isolated country formerly known as Burma. “Ban Ki-moon used to say he would not visit until the military regime makes visible progress” toward democracy, said Myat Thu, 44, a Japan-based activist. “I want him to achieve the release of political prisoners, like Aung San Suu Kyi,” he said, referring to the Nobel Peace laureate who has been under house arrest for 13 of the past 19 years. The protesters rallying outside the foreign ministry held pictures of the democracy leader and chanted for democracy in Burma. Japan has historically maintained relatively friendly ties with Burma and was previously its leading donor. Tokyo drastically reduced development aid to Burma over human rights concerns, particularly after the junta cracked down on pro-democracy demonstrations led by Buddhist monks in 2007. However, the Japanese government refused to join its Western allies in imposing sanctions. AFP, 1 July 2009 Laura Bush, the former first lady who made Burma a personal project, wrote recently in the Washington Post that it was crucial Ban Ki-moon press the regime to take immediate steps to end human rights abuses, particularly in ethnic minority areas where rape was common. She said the youngest victim was 8, the oldest 80. The Huffington Post, 1 July 2009 Page 140 of 226

A North Korean ship monitored for more than a week by the U.S. Navy has changed course and is heading back the way it came, U.S. officials said, as Pyongyang warned Wednesday it will take military action if anyone attempts to search its vessels. The Kang Nam 1 – originally believed to be bound for Burma with suspicious cargo on board, possibly illicit weapons – turned around and headed back north on Sunday, two U.S. officials said on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence. Burma’s authorities had informed the North Korean ambassador that it would not allow the Kang Nam to dock if it was carrying weapons or other banned materials, a Radio Free Asia report said. Koh Yu-hwan, an expert at Seoul’s Dongguk University, said North Korea appears to have decided to bring home its vessel because of Burma’s reaction. “The North’s cargo ship appears to have changed its course as the country’s rogue image could be further strengthened if illegal weapons were on board,” he said. huffingtonpost.com, 1 July 2009 The UN’s refugee agency announced yesterday that it had resettled the 50,000th Burmese refugee from Thailand’s nine border refugee camps as part of the world’s largest refugee resettlement programme. Currently there are around 112,000 registered Burmese refugees in Thai border camps. Added to the many that are not registered, the figure nears 140,000. The ongoing conflict in Burma’s western Karen state, which borders Thailand, has forced another 4000 refugees into Thailand in the last month, although few of these have ended up in camps. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been operating the programme since 2004, with the number of resettlements rising dramatically in 2005 when the US opened its doors to refugees from the camps. UNHCR spokesperson William Spindler said yesterday that resettlement in a third country had become the only viable option for Burmese refugees in Thailand’s camps, given problems settling permanently in Thailand and the dangers of returning to Burma. “So for them, resettlement in a third country is the best option,” he said. “For this reason we are very grateful to countries like the United States, Canada, Australia, Finland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway and Sweden for offering refugees a chance to begin new lives.” DVB, 1 July 2009 UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is likely to meet Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi during his visit to the country later this week, an official said on Wednesday. “He is supposed to meet Aung San Suu Kyi when he arrives here but we cannot definitely tell his schedule,” said an official who requested anonymity. Ban is scheduled to visit Burma Friday and Saturday at the official invitation of the ruling junta. He is expected to meet the country’s most powerful man, Senior General Than Shwe, head of the State Peace and Development Council, as Burma’s junta styles itself, officials said. Besides Suu Kyi and Than Shwe, Ban also plans to meet with political parties and ethnic groups and travel to the Irrawaddy delta region that was devastated by Cyclone Nargis on May 2-3 last year, killing up to 150,000 people. hindustantimes.com, 1 July 2009

2 July 2009, Thursday
UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is to meet senior members of the party of Aung San Suu Kyi when he visits Burma this week but has no plans yet to see the opposition leader, a party spokesman said. Ban is set to arrive in the military-ruled nation on Friday for a two-day visit focused on pressing the junta to release all political prisoners including the jailed Nobel peace laureate. “The authorities informed us that five central executive committee members of the NLD (National League for Democracy) are to meet Mr Ban Ki-moon. We don’t know details yet,” NLD spokesman Nyan Win told AFP. He said the five did not include Aung San Suu Kyi, who is currently being held at the notorious Insein Prison in the commercial hub Rangoon where she is on trial for breaching the terms of her house arrest. Nyan Win and other members of her legal team were due to meet her at the jail on Thursday, a day before her trial resumes. A Burmese official speaking on condition of anonymity said that Ban would meet with members of 10 political parties including the NLD in the administrative capital Naypyidaw on Friday. Ban is also set to meet junta leader Page 141 of 226

Senior General Than Shwe in Naypyidaw on the same day and is due to fly back to Rangoon on Saturday, officials said. AFP, 2 July 2009 Somalia remains the world’s most dangerous country for minority groups, followed by Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan and Burma, a leading human rights group said. The five were in unchanged positions from last year’s Minority Rights Group International’s (MRG) list of countries where groups or peoples are most at risk of genocide, mass killing or other systematic violent repression. MRG director Mark Lattimer said: “Ethnic and religious minorities across West Asia are under greater threat than ever before as a result of escalating military operations against Islamic extremists.” Half the top 20 countries in the “Peoples under Threat 2009’ report are African and six are in Asia. AFP, 2 July 2009 After his talks with Japanese Foreign Minister Hirofumi Nakasone, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon told reporters in Tokyo on Tuesday that he was aware of concerns about his July 3-4 visit coinciding with the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, the main opposition leader, who has been under house arrest for several years. “It may be the case that the trial happens during my visit to Burma. I am very much conscious of that,” Ban told reporters. “I consider that three of the most important issues for Burma cannot be left unaddressed at this juncture,” he said. According to Ban, the first issue on his agenda will be the release of all political prisoners, including Suu Kyi. The other two points are the resumption of dialogue between the military rulers and the opposition and the creation of conditions favorable to a trustworthy election. upiasia.com, 2 July 2009 UN chief Ban Ki-moon prepared Thursday for a risky visit to Burma amid warnings that the trip will be a “huge failure” if he fails to secure the release of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Ban is set to arrive in the military-ruled nation on Friday for a two-day visit that the UN says will focus on pressing the junta to free all political prisoners, including the Nobel peace laureate, who is currently on trial. He is due to meet junta leader Senior General Than Shwe and members of opposition parties including Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD), but there are no plans yet for him to meet her, officials said. AFP, 2 July 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon begins a high-risk trip to Burma on Friday, where he will press the military junta to release all their political prisoners and prepare for credible elections next year. The stakes are high for Ban and the risk of failure great. Halfway through a five-year term at the helm of the United Nations, Ban has faced a wave of criticism recently from detractors who say his low-key approach to the job does not work. He is eager to prove them wrong, U.N. diplomats say. Ban is aware that the timing of his trip to the former Burma is far from ideal, as he made clear when he spoke to reporters in Tokyo on Tuesday. He said he understood the concerns about the timing of his visit, which begins on the day the widely criticised trial of Burma’s opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is set to resume. “I will try to use this visit as an opportunity to raise in the strongest possible terms and convey the concerns of international community ... to the highest authorities of the Burmese government,” Ban said. Reuters, 2 July 2009

3 July 2009, Friday
The trial of Burma’s detained pro-democracy leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi was adjourned at the last minute until July 10, one of her lawyers has said Friday. The adjournment came even as United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon arrived in Burma’s former capital of Rangoon Friday morning at the start his two-day official visit to the country. The trial of Suu Kyi, who is accused of violating the terms of her house arrest by allowing a U.S. national to swim to her lakeside residence in Rangoon, had been due to resume Friday morning. But as lawyers gathered at Rangoon’s Insein jail, officials announced that the trial, already adjourned for more than a month, had been put off once again. Speaking to reporters Nyan Win, a member of Suu Kyi’s legal team, said the Supreme Court did not send Page 142 of 226

the case files to the lower court, so the case has been adjourned until July 10. He said Suu Kyi had “expressed her surprise that this happened.” RTT News, 3 July 2009 Detained Nobel Peace Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi is in complete agreement with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s three main points to resolve Burma’s political imbroglio during his two-day visit to Burma on Friday. Speaking to Mizzima on Thursday, Nyan Win, lawyer of Aung San Suu Kyi said the detained Burmese democracy leader supports Ban’s major agendas to address the political deadlock in military ruled Burma. “She said the three issues are worthy of discussion,” Nyan Win said. Aung San Suu Kyi’s comment came because the UN Secretary General, during his stay in Burma, plans to resolve the issues of political prisoners, bring up the issue of resumption of dialogue between the government and the opposition, persuade the junta to initiate national reconciliation, and set the stage for credible elections slated for 2010. Mizzima, 3 July 2009 Burmese junta supremo Than Shwe smiled briefly but gave nothing away as he listened on Friday to U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon, at the start of what Ban has called a “tough mission” to promote democratic reform. “I thank you for your invitation. I’m happy to be here and to see you are in good health since I last saw you,” Ban told the 76-year-old general, wearing a khaki uniform adorned with medals. The rare meeting with the reclusive general took place in Than Shwe’s lavish Bayint Nuang Yeiktha office in Naypyidaw, the new capital hastily built in the hills of Shan Plateau in 2005. Ban, on what he has called a “tough mission” to press the junta to release all political prisoners and hold fair and credible elections, commended the general for his contributions to peace, prosperity and democracy in the former Burma. “I would like to help move your country forward and appreciate your commitment to moving your country forward,” Ban said, offering a smile and a firm handshake to the man who has led the military regime for 17 of its 47 years in power. Moments later, the media were ushered out of the room. Ban was expected to ask Than Shwe’s permission to meet opposition leader Aung san Suu Kyi, who is on trial for breaching the terms of her house arrest. Suu Kyi’s trial was adjourned earlier on Friday because of a clerical error by the court, according to her lawyer. On arrival in Rangoon, Ban said he would convey international concern about Suu Kyi’s trial and press the regime to ensure next year’s multi-party elections are credible and transparent. “The genuine will of the Burmese people should be reflected.” Reuters, 3 July 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon had a rare meeting with Burmese junta supremo Than Shwe on Friday but left with no clear answer to his request to see detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “He told me that she is on trial. I told him that I wanted to meet her in person,” Ban told reporters after a meeting with the junta leader lasting nearly two hours in the country’s remote new capital, Naypyidaw. “I am awaiting their consideration and reply,” Ban said. Ban had made no secret of his intention to ask for permission to meet Suu Kyi during his two-day trip, which critics say has been orchestrated by the junta to try to legitimise the Nobel laureate’s trial. Ban called for the release all political prisoners ahead of the election and meaningful dialogue between the junta and opposition parties. “This election should be credible, fair and inclusive, and a legitimate one,” Ban said. “I was assured that Burma’s authorities will make sure that this election will be held in a fair and free and transparent manner.” manoramaonline.com, 3 July 2009 The increasingly close ties between Burma and North Korea since the two sides quietly resumed diplomatic relations in 2007 could also cast a shadow over Mr Ban’s trip. A 37-page document in Burmese obtained by Radio Free Asia detailed a visit by 17 Burmese officials, including General Thura Shwe Mann, the chief of staff of the army and Burma’s third-ranked leader, to Beijing and Pyongyang last November. The stated aim of the visit was “to modernize the Burmese military and increase its capabilities through visiting and studying the militaries” of China and North Korea, and a memorandum of understanding was signed with North Korea counterparts on November 27. The report also says the Burmese delegation was shown North Korean surface-to-air missiles and rockets, along with naval and air defense systems and tunnel construction, including how Pyongyang stores aircraft and ships underground to protect them from aerial Page 143 of 226

attack. The delegation also visited a Scud missile factory. Pyongyang has been a major supplier of Scud missiles to Iran, Egypt, and Syria since the 1980s. Photographs in the report show a Burmese delegation in civilian clothing in North Korea, suggesting a bid to maintain a low profile. Experts suggested that the leaking of the document was timed to coincide with Mr Ban’s visit by figures inside the junta who are unhappy with the cooperation with North Korea. Reports in South Korea suggest that North Korea may already be illegally exporting weapons to Burma via overland routes in China in order to avoid naval interception. Last week, the Kang Nam 1, a North Korea ship that has been used for weapons trading in the past, turned back before reaching Burma while being tracked by a US Navy destroyer. The Chosun Ilbo newspaper said Pyongyang has exported weapons to Iran, Syria, Laos and Burma worth USD800 million since 2008. telegraph.co.uk, 3 July 2009 The junta is usually impervious to international pressure, although U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon may believe he has some sway with the generals, having convinced them to allow aid agencies to operate in Burma after the devastating Cyclone Nargis last year. Analysts say Ban may have been given some indication by the generals, or by U.N. envoy Ibrahim Gambari after his trip last week, that his visit can bring some kind of positive result. “There must be something worthwhile he can achieve but it won’t be enough to satisfy the international community,” said Trevor Wilson, a former Australian ambassador to Burma. “He has to be seen to be tough and uncompromising when he meets the generals and they will appear attentive. However, they’re a hardline bunch and I’m not optimistic they’ll change.” thestar.com, 3 July 2009 British Prime Minister Gordon Brown called on Burmese authorities on Friday to halt the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and to release her. Brown’s call, in a post on the Huffington Post website, timed his comments to coincide with a visit to Burma by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. “I call on the regime to mark Ban Ki-moon’s arrival by immediately halting her trial, which makes a mockery of justice, and ending her detention which undermines their credibility in the eyes of the world,” Brown said. Reuters, 4 July 2009 The British Embassy in Jakarta has displayed a giant image of jailed Burma democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi to call for her release and that of other political prisoners in the military-ruled country. The image was projected onto a banner installed at the perimeter of the Hotel Indonesia traffic circle in Central Jakarta from Thursday until Saturday, the embassy said in a statement released Thursday. The projection will start at sunset. The initiative is being launched as Suu Kyi’s trial resumes in Burma on Friday; United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is also scheduled to visit the country on Friday. “The UK government believes it is essential that progress is made during the secretary-general’s visit in laying the groundwork for free and fair elections in Burma in 2010,” the statement said. “The visit will offer an opportunity for the Burmese regime to respond to the many calls for the release of all political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi; and to allow the start of a genuinely inclusive political dialogue involving the opposition and minority groups.” British embassy deputy head of mission Matthew Rous said Burma’s neighbors had a duty to call loudly for Suu Kyi’s release. “I am greatly encouraged by the fact that Indonesia’s voice is being heard so loudly and clearly. I hope the British Embassy’s initiative will help us all to keep Aung Sang Suu Kyi’s image in front of our eyes during this hugely important visit,” he said. thejakartapost.com, 3 July 2009

4 July 2009, Saturday
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown raised the prospect Saturday of further sanctions against Burma following UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s fruitless visit to the military regime. “We await the secretary-general’s report,” Brown said in a statement from his office. “I hope that there is still the possibility of a change of approach from Burma. But if not, my sad conclusion is that the Burmese regime has put increased isolation, including the possibility of further sanctions, on the international agenda.” Page 144 of 226

Brown’s comments came after Burma’s refusal to let Ban meet pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi during a two-day visit. Ban described the move “a setback for the international community.” AFP, 4 July 2009 As U2 kicks off its world tour, the Irish rockers are turning a spotlight on Burma’s jailed opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. On its Web site and on stage, U2 is asking fans to wear a Suu Kyi mask in support of the 64-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner. “Wear it to work or college. Wear it on the bus or the train. Wear it in the pub or at shops. And don’t forget. Bring it to a U2 show,” the band says on its official Web site. A mask of Suu Kyi’s smiling face can be downloaded and printed from http://www.u2.com and appears inside the program for the band’s “360 degree” tour, which opened earlier this week in Barcelona. Lead singer Bono paid tribute to Suu Kyi at a packed Barcelona stadium Tuesday night when he introduced U2’s 2000 single, “Walk On,” which was written for her. “This next song is dedicated to Aung San Suu Kyi and the people of Burma,” Bono told the crowd, according to a statement received Friday from the Burma Campaign UK. The London-based human rights group helped coordinate a recent campaign that groups celebrities, musicians and dignitaries calling for Suu Kyi’s release. “Let’s send her a message of love and support. Let us stand with her ... Put on your masks,” Bono said, according to the statement, which said thousands in the audience were wearing or holding the masks. AP, 4 July 2009 North Korea sought payment through a bank in Malaysia for its suspected shipment of weapons to Burma that is being carried on a freighter tracked by the U.S. Navy, a source said Saturday, as quoted by Yonhap.The visit by a U.S. envoy to Malaysia this weekend will focus on ways to cut off the payment transaction for the cargo from the bank in Malaysia to North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, the source said. “Kim will have a hard time collecting his money,” the high-level source said, speaking strictly on condition of anonymity. The source declined to identify the bank due to diplomatic concerns. Philip Goldberg, the U.S. coordinator for the implementation of a U.N. Security Council resolution that punishes North Korea for its May 25 nuclear test, is scheduled to arrive in Malaysia on Sunday.The visit comes after the White House said late last month that U.S. President Barack Obama discussed North Korea and financial regulations with Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib Razakon by phone.It also comes as North Korea’s Kang Nam freighter is apparently returning home after being tracked by a U.S. Navy destroyer that suspects it is carrying cargo banned under the resolution.Resolution 1874, which reinforced sanctions that were imposed after North Korea conducted its first nuclear test in 2006, bans Pyongyang from exporting any type of weapons -- light or heavy. According to another source in Seoul, the Kang Nam is believed to be carrying small Soviet-era arms such as AK-47 rifles and RPG-7 anti-tank launchers. AK-47s and RPG-7s are two of the most widely traded Soviet-era weapon types that North Korea is capable of producing on its own. “Kim appears to have received earnest money for the shipment, but it is a small sum compared to the payment held up in Malaysia,” the source said. Resolution 1874 bans states from making financial transactions with North Korea that could help the communist state build its nuclear and ballistic missile programs.The U.S. slapped financial sanctions on a Macau bank in 2005 to freeze USD 25 million worth of North Korean assets, effectively cutting off Pyongyang’s access to the international financial system.Banco Delta Asia was also accused of helping North Korea launder money it had acquired by circulating sophisticated counterfeit US$100 bills called “supernotes.” Goldberg visited China ahead of his visit Malaysia. Despite the resolution banning development of weapons of mass destruction, North Korea test-fired a series of missiles Thursday and Saturday into the East Sea, where it had imposed a June 25-July 10 maritime ban for a military exercise.North Korea test-fired a barrage of short-range missiles in the days following its latest underground nuclear explosion.The U.S. believes there are “multiple” North Korean ships used to export weapons. Focus English News, 4 July 2009 United Kingdom’s Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Ivan Lewis has praised and thanked the Philippines for its “strong” stance in calling for political reforms in Burma and for pushing for a credible human rights body in the region. Lewis met on Thursday with officials from the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) headed by Undersecretary for Policy Enrique Manalo, which the United Kingdom Page 145 of 226

Embassy in Manila noted was as the first high-level bilateral talks between the UK and the Philippines. He also expressed the British government’s openness to help the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in its human rights initiatives in the region. “The UK Government looks forward to the day when this body makes a substantive contribution towards tackling human rights abuses in the region and we stand ready to help you make that happen,” the British senior official told the Philippine delegation. The Philippines has been persistently calling on Burma authorities to follow the roadmap to democracy, which includes the release of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners. “The UK is immensely grateful to the Filipino government for the leading role that it has played in the ASEAN on Burma. The tough statements from the Philippine Government on Aung San Suu Kyi and the position it has taken on the death penalty are an example to other states in the region, Lewis said in his closing statement. Manila Bulletin, 4 July 2009

Ban Ki-moon, MMK, 4 July 2009 Excellencies, Distinguished guests and colleagues Ladies and Gentlemen, This is my second visit to Myanmar in just over a year. Both visits have been at critical times for the country’s future. My first visit was in the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis. This devastating natural disaster, which took so many lives and created so much hardship, touched hearts across the globe. In Myanmar’s moment of need, the world responded generously. I want to personally thank everyone here today for your remarkable contributions to the relief and recovery effort. You have saved lives, rejuvenated communities and made it possible for many thousands of people to reclaim their livelihoods. You have helped Myanmar to overcome adversity. It is important that this work continues. Ladies and Gentlemen, I felt the tragedy of Cyclone Nargis deeply -- as a fellow Asian and as Secretary-General. I am Asia’s second Secretary-General. The first was Myanmar’s U Thant. I revere his memory. I also recall his wise words. U Thant said: “The worth of the individual human being is the most unique and precious of all our assets and must be the beginning and end of all our efforts. Governments, systems, ideologies and institutions come and go, but humanity remains.” This is why I have returned. As Secretary-General, I attach the highest importance to helping the people of this country to achieve their legitimate aspirations. The United Nations works for people – their rights, their well-being, their dignity. It is not an option. It is our responsibility. I have come to show the unequivocal shared commitment of the United Nations to the people of Myanmar. I am here today to say: Myanmar – you are not alone. We want to work with you for a united, peaceful, prosperous, democratic and modern Myanmar. We want to help you rise from poverty. We want to work with you so your country can take its place as a respected and responsible member of the international community. We want to help you achieve national reconciliation, durable peace and sustainable development. But, let me emphasize: neither peace nor development can thrive without democracy and respect for human rights. Myanmar is no exception. Ladies and Gentlemen, Page 146 of 226

The challenges are many. But they are not insurmountable. We know from experience that securing Myanmar’s peaceful, democratic and prosperous future is a complex process. None of Myanmar’s challenges can be solved on their own. Peace, development and human rights are closely inter-related. Failure to address them with equal attention will risk undermining the prospects for democracy, durable peace and prosperity. However, we also know that where there is a genuine will for dialogue and reconciliation, all obstacles can be overcome. The question today is this: how much longer can Myanmar afford to wait for national reconciliation, democratic transition and full respect for human rights? The cost of delay will be counted in wasted lives, lost opportunities and prolonged isolation from the international community. Let me be clear: all the people of Myanmar must work in the national interest. I said this yesterday when I met with representatives of Myanmar’s registered political parties and with those armed groups that have chosen to observe a cease-fire. I encouraged them respectively to honour their commitments to the democratic process and peace. Nonetheless, the primary responsibility lies with the Government to move the country towards its stated goals of national reconciliation and democracy. Failure to do so will prevent the people of Myanmar from realizing their full potential. Failure to do so will deny the people of Myanmar their right to live in dignity and to pursue better standards of life in larger freedom. These principles lie at the core of the United Nations Charter, whose opening words are “We the peoples”. The founding Constitution of independent Myanmar echoes these noble words. We must work together to ensure that Myanmar’s future embodies these principles too. With this in mind, I bring three messages. First, respect for human dignity is the precondition for peace and development everywhere. Myanmar was one of the first United Nations Member States to adopt the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It subscribed early on to the consensus that respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms is indispensable to political, economic and social progress. Unfortunately, that commitment has not been matched in deed. Myanmar’s human rights record remains a matter of grave concern. The Government has articulated its goals as stability, national reconciliation and democracy. The upcoming election –the first in twenty years – must be inclusive, participatory and transparent if it is to be credible. Myanmar’s way forward must be rooted in respect for human rights. This is why I say that all political prisoners, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, should be released without delay. When I met General Than Shwe yesterday and today, I asked to visit Ms. Suu Kyi. I am deeply disappointed that he refused. I believe the government of Myanmar has lost a unique opportunity to show its commitment to a new era of political openness. Allowing a visit to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi would have been an important symbol of the government’s willingness to embark on the kind of meaningful engagement that will be essential if the elections in 2010 are to be seen as credible. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi must be allowed to participate in the political process without further delay. Indeed, all the citizens of Myanmar must be given the opportunity to contribute fully to the future of this country. National reconciliation cannot be complete without the free and active participation of all who seek to contribute. The country must embark on a process of genuine dialogue that includes all concerned parties, all ethnic groups and all minorities. People must be free to debate and to engage in political dialogue, and they must have free access to the information that will help them participate meaningfully in the democratic process. Ladies and gentlemen, Any transition is difficult. Myanmar has already undergone transitions from sovereign kingdom, to occupied colony, and now independent State. This history carries a twin legacy of armed conflict and political deadlock, including recent painful events: the repression of demonstrators in 1988, the cancellation of the 1990 election results, and the clampdown on peaceful dissent that continues to this day. At the same time, there have been some positive efforts that should be recognized. Although still fragile, the cease-fire agreements between the Government and armed groups have reduced the level of conflict. The United Nations has wide-ranging experience in making such gains irreversible. Sovereignty, territorial integrity and national unity are legitimate concerns for any government. We contend that opening and broadening the political space is the best way to ensure that each group and each individual becomes part of the greater collective project. The military, all political parties, ethnic minority groups, civil society, and indeed every son and daughter of Myanmar has a role to play in this country’s transition. Only mutual compromise, respect and understanding can lay the foundations for durable peace, national reconciliation and democracy. Page 147 of 226

My second message is on addressing the humanitarian needs of Myanmar’s people. I am glad I have been able to return to see the progress made in the Irrawaddy Delta. The loss of some 130,000 people was tragic, but the rebuilding I saw today was impressive. The tragedy showed the resilience of the people of Myanmar. It also demonstrated that people throughout the world care deeply about Myanmar and its people. Above all, the response to Cyclone Nargis proved the value of engagement over isolation. The unprecedented cooperation between Myanmar, the United Nations and ASEAN through the Tripartite Core Group, with the support of the donor community, has demonstrated that humanitarian imperatives and the principles of sovereignty do not conflict. Humanitarian assistance -- in Myanmar as elsewhere -- should never be held hostage to political considerations. We can and must work together to ensure access to humanitarian and development assistance to all those in Myanmar who need it. This brings me to my third message. It is time for Myanmar to unleash its economic potential. Myanmar sits in the middle of Asia’s economic miracle. Harnessing Myanmar to the rapid advances taking place around it is the surest way to raise living standards. I welcome the Government’s policy of opening up to outside trade and investment, and its efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, control HIV, combat human trafficking and curtail opium production. But the reality is that millions continue to live in poverty. Standards of living in Myanmar remain among the lowest in Asia. The people of Myanmar need jobs, they need food security and they need access to health care. We must work to ensure that the people of Myanmar can benefit from and contribute to the regional and global economy. We must recognize that the region and the world have much to gain from a stable, prosperous and democratic Myanmar. We must work together for that goal. The Government of Myanmar must seize the moment. It must take advantage of the opportunities that the international community is prepared to offer to the people of Myanmar. Ladies and Gentlemen, I came here as a friend. My duty is to uphold the ideals and principles of the United Nations Charter. My role is to encourage all of you – the Government, political parties, ethnic groups, civil society – to move forward together as one people and one nation. Nothing is insurmountable or impossible when the people’s interest is placed above divisions. The region and the world are changing fast. Myanmar only stands to gain from engagement -- and from embarking on its own change. The Government of Myanmar has repeatedly stated that cooperation with the United Nations is the cornerstone of the country’s foreign policy. We ask it to match deeds with words. The more Myanmar works in partnership with the United Nations to respond to its people’s needs and aspirations, the more it affirms its sovereignty. Similarly it is incumbent on the international community as whole to work together to help Myanmar meet our shared goals: a united, peaceful, prosperous and democratic future, with full respect for the human rights of all the country’s people. Kyae zoo tin bar tae. Ban Ki-moon’s Speech, Rangoon, Irrawaddy, 4 July 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon says he is “deeply disappointed” after the Burmese junta rejected his second and final request to meet jailed opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Ban met Saturday with Senior Gen. Than Shwe for a second inconclusive round of talks. Ban told reporters he is sorry to report it is “not possible” for him to see the jailed Nobel Peace Prize winner. AP, 4 July 2009 UN chief Ban Ki-moon gave a rare public speech on Saturday outlining his vision for a democratic Burma, just hours after the ruling junta refused to let him meet opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Ban told an audience of diplomats, UN agencies and non-governmental organisations that the military regime must free the pro-democracy icon and introduce other reforms for the good of the country’s people. “I am here today to say: Burma, you are not alone. We want to work with you for a united, peaceful, prosperous, democratic and modern Burma,” Ban said at the Drug Elimination Museum in the commercial hub Rangoon. “We want to help you rise from poverty ... work with you so that your country can take its place as a respected and responsible member of the international community,” the secretary general said. “But let me emphasise: neither peace nor development can thrive without democracy and respect for human rights. Burma is no exception.” AFP, 4 July 2009

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United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon concluded his two-day official visit to Burma and left the country Saturday evening. During his stay in the country’s new capital Naypyidaw, Ban had two meetings with Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council Senior-General Than Shwe on Friday and Saturday, according to a report of the state-run Burma Radio and Television (MRTV) Saturday. Dealing with the cooperation issue with the United Nations, Than Shwe said, as a UN member, Burma would like to cooperate with the world body and expressed thanks for its aid to his country in its relief and rehabilitation tasks in the post Cyclone Nargis period, the report said. Touching on the issue of Burma’s forthcoming general election in 2010, Than Shwe told Ban that his country would continue to follow its seven-step roadmap and promulgate in time the Election Law which is being drawn to fairly enable organization of political parties for entering the election and being inclusive, it said. Upon Ban’s request to meet Aung San Suu Kyi, Than Shwe maintained that as Aung San Suu Kyi, along with U.S. citizen John William Yettaw, is under trial, his request was therefore turned down, the report said. At the meetings, Ban said the U.N. agreed to Burma’s seven-step roadmap, saying that the organization wants to see the country’s 2010 election be democratic and inclusive, according to the MRTV report. Ban expressed wishes to extend more aid for Burma’s post-storm reconstruction. Before the conclusion of his Burma trip, Ban gave a nearly-an-hour public address in Rangoon’s Anti-Drug Museum Saturday evening. Diplomats, UN agencies, nongovernmental organizations and media reporters attended the event. During his Burma visit, Ban also met with the leadership of 10 legal political parties and ethnic peace groups. Ban also inspected the reconstruction site in cyclone-hit Irrawaddy division’s Dedaye. chinaview.cn, 4 July 2009 UN Secretary general Ban Ki-moon faced a barrage of criticism last night for apparently praising the Burmese junta without winning any concessions over human rights or a move towards democracy. Mr Ban was under pressure to produce results from his two-day mission to Burma, which was criticised as providing an endorsement of the Burmese leadership just as it is staging a trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The high-stakes visit to Burma comes at a critical time for Mr Ban, whose low-key approach to his job has been criticised as ineffectual. He came under further fire on arrival in Naypyidaw, the regime’s headquarters, when he told junta leader Gen Than Shwe: “I appreciate your commitment to moving your country forward.” “That is absolute nonsense,” said Brad Adams, a Burma specialist at Human Rights Watch. “It’s just what we implored him not to say, to make these diplomatic gaffes. Than Shwe has steadily moved his country backwards.” British officials were also furious at the remarks. They had urged Mr Ban not to visit Burma, and risk handing the junta a propaganda prize, without ensuring he would gain concessions in the form of the release of political prisoners and steps towards genuine democracy. Gen Than Shwe said little at his meeting with Mr Ban and did not grant his request to meet Suu Kyi in prison. Mr Ban expressed hope that a meeting could still be permitted. “I am leaving tomorrow, so logically speaking I am waiting for a reply before my departure,” he said. The secretary general added that he had called for the release of all political prisoners before the elections, but got no response. However, Mr Adams said: “A meeting with Than Shwe is not a success. Even a meeting with Suu Kyi shouldn’t be counted as a success, if all it means is she goes from being in jail back to being under house arrest. irishtimes.com, 4 July 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon knew he was taking a risk by traveling to Burma this week to plead with the country’s ruling generals for a meeting with imprisoned opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Several Western diplomats warned Ban the generals would use his presence to claim legitimacy for their autocratic rule, even as they proceed with what many regard as a show trial of Suu Kyi for allegedly violating terms of her house arrest. But regional powers China and India argued that engagement was more likely to soften the regime’s hard line against political opposition. Ban did not get the meeting with Suu Kyi on Friday, though he emerged from two hours of talks with Senior Gen. Than Shwe saying he had urged the regime to “accelerate the process of democratization.” The U.N. has been cooperating with key players and regional organizations. It is not only the United Nations that can raise a moral voice. But when it comes to universally accepted principles, the United Nations has been very vocal. When there are civilian casualties, crimes which should be condemned in the name of humanity, sexual violence against women, I have been more vocal than any world leaders. And I was swift in going to Burma. I was the first, and as of now the Page 149 of 226

only one, who has gone into Burma and talked to Senior Gen. Than Shwe. I have spoken on the basis of my moral duty. I will clearly tell them that they must fully understand the expectations of the international community. The whole international community wants to see Burma promote the protection of human rights; release political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi; treat Aung San Suu Kyi as a partner for national reconciliation. She can play an important role. Burma is an example of where it’s very difficult to defer to the regional players, because the regional players are not bringing much pressure to bear. That is why I have been working very hard to try to open up this dialogue channel. I was the one to pry open this door last year, and the United Nations was able to save at least half a million people after Cyclone Nargis. There is a clearly Asian culture and a clearly Western culture. Both should be mutually respected and mutually complemented. Most people regard my style as low-key, soft-spoken. But this so-called quiet diplomacy is just one part of my diplomatic style. Sometimes when you deal with a certain leader who has been quite closed, it is much more effective when you engage one-on-one. For them, they regard their face, or authority, as No. 1. They don’t want to be lectured in front of many of their senior advisors. My experience tells me if I raise sensitive issues in public, then their reaction will be very official, very emotional and hard-line. It doesn’t help the purpose of our meeting. But if we meet in private, we can really open up our hearts and I can really advise these leaders, very sincerely, in a direct way, a very vocal way sometimes. Sometimes it is very heated. In many cases, like in a meeting with President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir of Sudan, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, or even with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, I’ve been engaged in quite direct, straightforward talks, without much diplomatic courtesy. Freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, freedom of information -- those are basic principles of a democracy. Los Angeles Times, 4 July 2009 Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva said that he will meet with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon after Ban concluded his visit to Burma late Saturday. The two sides will talk about ties between ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations), the United Nations, Burma and Thai-Cambodia border dispute, Abhisit was quoted by the Nation news website as saying. Thailand currently chairs the ASEAN, which includes Brunei, Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. Ban will end his two-day official visit to Burma late Saturday and will make a stop over at Thailand’s Suvarnabhumi Airport at around 10:00 p.m. local time. chinaview.cn, 4 July 2009

5 July 2009, Sunday
Today, like most days, Aung San Suu Kyi will sit and wait. She will spend the day with the two women she has been detained with since 2003. That she is being held in a “guesthouse” in the grounds of Rangoon’s Insein jail, as opposed to her lakeside house where she has spent the past six years, makes little difference; she has no television, radio or phone. But today is special, and for the most dismal of reasons. It is the 5000th day of her incarceration. Ms Suu Kyi is being held at the prison, having been charged with violating the terms of her house arrest after a mysterious American swam to her home and spent the night there. In truth, the only crime committed by the graceful opposition leader was to win an election two decades ago. Even now, the junta is terrified that this slight 64-year-old widow has the power to do something they have never been able to do: lead and unite the people of Burma without the threat of force. That is why she is kept a prisoner, out of sight but never out of mind. Andrew Buncombe, nzherald.co.nz, 5 July 2009 Aging former political prisoner Win Tin says he wasn’t surprised that U.N. Secretary-General Ban Kimoon’s visit to Burma to plead for the release of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi ended in failure. Ban said Saturday he was “deeply disappointed” that Senior Gen. Than Shwe refused to allow him to see Suu Kyi, adding that she should be released “without delay.” He said Burma’s human rights record was a matter of serious concern. But Win Tin, 80, a former journalist and founding member of Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, said he didn’t expect a breakthrough. “I am not being cynical, but I expected nothing much from the visit. Even though he came at the invitation of the regime, it can be seen as the Page 150 of 226

regime’s response to worldwide pressure due to Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial,” he said by telephone Saturday from Burma. “If there is no real political progress, we will see Burma under a military dictatorship for many years.” Meanwhile, Win Tin says he is practically homeless. His property was seized by the government when he went to jail on July 4, 1989, and his friends have been denied the government approval needed to house him. Born into a poor family in north Rangoon, Win Tin dreamed of joining Burma’s struggle for independence from the British. When he was a teenager, he met Aung San, the nation’s independence hero and father of Aung San Suu Kyi. Win Tin asked if he could join the resistance and was rebuffed. “Aung San plainly said ‘Stick with your studies. There are many people to fight. The time will come for you,’ “ Win Tin said. When an uprising broke out in 1988, he became a founding member of NLD and a close aide to Suu Kyi. He was arrested a year later and jailed, and his sentence was extended when he managed to smuggle out a report to a United Nations official about torture and other human-rights violations rampant in Burma’s jails. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, Win Tin had repeatedly refused to sign a letter promising to give up his political activities as a condition of his release. Local media have reported that Win Tin could be jailed for refusing to return his prison-issue dungarees. He says he will continue to wear the prison blues until Burma is free. “I remember Daw Suu Kyi’s response to this kind of warning about her security. She said, ‘If a quack shoots me with a pistol, then the whole world will know where this bullet comes from,’ ” he said. latimes.com, 5 July 2009 The opposition party of Aung San Suu Kyi said today the United Nations’ secretary-general’s recent trip to military-ruled Burma was a failure but it was not his fault. Nyan Win, spokesman for Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy party, said UN chief Ban Ki-moon’s “failure to achieve his objectives was not due to a lack of effort but a lack of willingness and genuine goodwill on the part of the government”. irishexaminer.com, 5 July 2009 Burma’s pro-democracy opposition has said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s visit to the country has shown the military regime has no genuine interest in promoting national reconciliation and democratisation. '”Mr Ban Ki-moon is leaving Burma empty-handed, without even meeting Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, much less achieving his goal of securing the release all political prisoners and getting the regime to engage in a dialogue with the opposition,” said Aye Thar Aung, a senior member of the Committee Representing the People’s Parliament in Burma. “We do not believe in hopeful diplomacy, and we are not hopeful of political change in our country,” he added. Mr Thar Aung said the UN chief’s visit was an opportunity for the military regime to “showcase” its road map to a kind democracy that would ensure the military’s continued grip on the levers of power. newkerala.com, 5 July 2009 Before it began, United Nations officials had described UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon’s visit to Burma as a diplomatically risky mission that could end in failure. After it ended, following two days in Burma and two rare and lengthy meetings with the reclusive leader of the country’s military government, Ban had come away with nothing concrete to show for his venture. His requests to meet imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi were rejected. His pleas for the government to release its 2,000-plus political prisoners were ignored. “I believe the government of Burma failed to take a unique opportunity to show its commitment to a new era of openness,” Ban told reporters at Bangkok’s international airport Saturday night. time.com, 5 July 2009

6 July 2009, Monday
South Korea said Monday that a North Korean freighter suspected of carrying banned cargo was expected to return to home port, as United States officials claimed that international sanctions had forced the ship to turn back. The 2,000-ton ship, the Kang Nam 1, left North Korea in mid-June and was believed to be heading for Burma only days after the United Nations Security Council adopted a resolution that banned the North from nuclear and ballistic missile tests and called for a global embargo on its trade in weapons. The Page 151 of 226

American Navy tracked the ship amid suspicions that the North was using the voyage to test Washington’s will to enforce the sanctions. Late last month, the ship turned around and began sailing homeward. On Sunday, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. said the ship turned back because the United Nations sanctions prevented it from entering any port. The ship was sailing in international waters between China and the Korean Peninsula on Monday and was likely to enter North Korean waters within the day, said Won Taejae, a spokesman of the South Korean Defense Ministry. North Korea has not explained why the ship appeared to have canceled its voyage. American authorities monitored the ship on the high seas but did not stop and search it — a move the North said it would interpret as an act of war — while working with regional governments to inspect the ship under the United Nations mandate if it entered their ports. The New York Times, 6 July 2009 “If Ban is saying it’s disappointing it must be really bad – it basically means he’s got absolutely nowhere. He should have realized it was going to be a disappointing trip,” David Mathieson from Human Rights Watch told AFP. “He didn’t even get one of the empty gestures the State Peace and Development Council, the name for the ruling junta, probably should have given him so he could cast it as a minor victory.” “Now he has to go back to New York and brief the Security Council and basically say ‘We have got nowhere. We have to seriously rethink our engagement strategy,’” HRW’s Mathieson said. “This really shows that he’s got to put more pressure on China and Russia in the Security Council, I think that’s one thing to come out of it.” Aung Myo Thein of leading activist group the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners of Burma, based in Thailand, said Than Shwe’s hardline stance could itself backfire by causing international outrage. “In a way it’s a good situation. People can now know the intentions of the regime and discuss with each other about the situation,” he said. “They should now take whatever the regime says with a grain of salt.” chinapost.com.tw, 6 July 2009 United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on Monday for Burma’s generals to prepare for credible multi-party national elections next year. Ban was speaking to a news conference in Geneva after a two-day trip to Burma, where he was denied a visit to detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “It is up to the leadership to set in place the elements necessary for elections to be credible and legitimate,” he said. Reuters, 6 July 2009 UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon ended a mission to Burma saying he was “deeply disappointed” that the isolated nation’s top military ruler denied him a visit to jailed opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In two days of rare talks with Senior General Than Shwe, the UN chief urged the reclusive 76-year-old leader to release Suu Kyi and other political prisoners ahead of elections scheduled for next year. But their meetings on Friday and Saturday in Naypyidaw, the junta’s remote administrative capital, left Ban saying that his diplomatic gambit had produced no immediate results and amounted to “a setback to the international community’s efforts to provide a helping hand to Burma.” “I am deeply disappointed that they have missed a very important opportunity,” Ban said. chinadaily.com.ch, 6 June 2009 The Burmese junta’s refusal to allow U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to visit detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will likely prompt a new push for Security Council action, but all depends on China. The 15-nation council has been unable to take serious action in the case of the former Burma because China, the nearest Burma has to a major ally, has been opposed. Like the United States, Britain, France and Russia, China is a permanent veto-wielding member of the council and can block any action. The last time the council said anything about Burma was in May 2008, when it issued a non-binding statement urging the junta to ensure an upcoming referendum on the country’s new constitution would be “an inclusive and credible process.” At the time, critics said the referendum that approved the constitution was a farce. Many U.N. officials and diplomats worry next year’s multi-party election will be the same. China has shown flexibility on North Korea. It has supported two sanctions resolutions against Pyongyang for its nuclear weapons program. But Beijing has been unwilling to allow the council to impose sanctions on Burma, whose nearly 2,000 km (1,250 mile) coastline provides neighbour China with easy land and sea access to Page 152 of 226

South Asia markets. One Security Council diplomat said it may be time to try again to press China to use its influence on the secretive military rulers of Burma to reform. “I think China knows the council will have to look again at Burma,” the Western diplomat told Reuters on condition of anonymity after Ban’s visit. Other Western diplomats have expressed similar views. Reuters, 6 July 2009

7 July 2009, Tuesday
Meanwhile the US Campaign for Burma announced that Ban’s Burma policy is “fundamentally flawed” and demanded immediate action by the Security Council in a press release on Monday. “Ban not only failed to obtain the release of the world’s only imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi, or even a single political prisoner (out of the country’s 2,100) in Burma, but he also failed to even secure a meeting with her,” the statement said. “For over a decade, the UN Secretary-General has sent envoys to Burma seeking changes in the country, a policy used by China and Russia as an excuse to avoid action on Burma at the UN Security Council. Finally, the world can see how this process is fundamentally flawed—without strong action by the UN Security Council, even the UN Secretary-General himself has failed,” said Aung Din, executive director of US Campaign for Burma. During his Burma trip last week, Ban met Senior General Than Shwe. “The United Nations must not allow its credibility to be destroyed by a two-bit dictator like Than Shwe,” Aung Din said. “It is time for Ban Ki-moon to ask the UN Security Council to pass a global arms embargo against Burma’s military regime, while at the same time initiating an inquiry into crimes against humanity and war crimes committed by Than Shwe’s regime,” he said. Irrawaddy, 7 July 2009 Than Shwe is following Ne Win footsteps, he ordered his troops to kill the Monks who are the highest order and the most respected in Buddhist religion. Than Shwe is a murderer of innocent people, he is suppressing and hangs on the power with the military that is supposed to give protection to the people. He is using people’ money building his new palace and spending huge sum to attain nuclear weaponry. The people of Burma are living in very hardships with not enough electricity and the highest cost of living to survive with very expensive heath care/medical services. The wicked Than Shwe and his cronies will be toppled before their planned 2010 crooked election. Than Shwe will die in villain like Ne Win. Henry Soe Win, D4B, 7 July 2009 Burma’s ruling junta wanted Ban Ki-moon to go into a grandiose drug museum through the back door to prevent the U.N. secretary-general from making a rock-star entrance. Ban eventually did walk through the front door – a small victory after he had lost far bigger battles, notably a hoped-for meeting with jailed democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. After a two-day visit in which the generals tried to stage-manage the world’s top diplomat at every step, Ban left the country with few prospects of even slightly loosening the iron grip on power held by military regime and its junta chief, Senior Gen. Than Shwe. If people saw Ban acting independently in Burma “that would cause Than Shwe to lose face,” said Donald Seekins, a Burma expert at Japan’s Meio University. “So they want to manipulate him.” By snubbing Ban, the country’s military rulers lost an opportunity to improve its standing among many of the world’s nations that view the struggling country with rich reserves of gas and minerals as a pariah. Inside Burma, Suu Kyi’s opposition party said Than Shwe showed he is unwilling to permit real change ahead of the 2010 elections, which would be the first in two decades. Ban had asked to make his closing speech to diplomats and humanitarian groups Saturday at a hotel, but the junta refused and forced him to instead speak at the government’s Drug Elimination Museum. Ban’s staff didn’t want his presence there – where a wax figure depicts a military intelligence chief chopping opium poppies, which Burma views as a scourge introduced by colonialists – to appear like another prop furthering the government’s agenda. “They fought us over every last detail,” said a U.N. official who took part in organizing the trip, speaking anonymously and out of protocol because of the sensitivity of the matter. Ban – whose mild-mannered facade belies a toughness and occasional temper – would have preferred a tete-a-tete with Than Shwe to having note-taking aides around, an example of his Page 153 of 226

belief in his ability to sway recalcitrant world leaders if only he can get them alone in a room. But Than Shwe’s idea of a tete-a-tete was to pit himself and the other four generals who together make up the ruling State Peace and Development Council against Ban and some high-ranking U.N. deputies in the rarely visited capital of Naypyidaw, according to U.N. officials. The 76-year-old Than Shwe suggested that Ban might not be invited back until after the elections. Ban said Than Shwe promised to hand over power to civilians after the elections. But the generals refused to follow U.N. recommendations intended to prevent sham elections, including publishing an election law and freeing Suu Kyi and 2,200 other political prisoners to ensure general participation. “Only then will the elections be seen as credible and legitimate,” Ban told reporters Monday in Geneva, Switzerland. The government refused to honor the results of the 1990 elections after Suu Kyi’s party won in a landslide. The junta tolerates no dissent and crushed pro-democracy protests led by Buddhist monks in September 2007. At the end of the trip, Ban tried to defuse the notion he was returning empty-handed. He said the visit was an opportunity to plant seeds that could blossom later and that he was dutifully relaying the international community’s message the elections must be seen as credible. In the meantime, Ban said he will keep talks alive with Than Shwe through the so-called Group of Friends on Burma. That approach hasn’t nudged Burma on key issues. Nor have eight previous visits by Ibrahim Gambari, Ban’s top envoy to Burma, produced many results. “Than Shwe is using the United Nations as a way of buying time or distracting people from the main issues, so it isn’t very constructive,” Seekins said. “I don’t think Than Shwe is willing to make political concessions, especially concerning Aung San Suu Kyi. I think he would really like to put her away in jail and not have to worry about her.” In the absence of Suu Kyi, it was left to Ban to deliver unusually stinging remarks about the government, its pummeling of human rights and the urgent need to set a new course. When he took the stage at the museum, it was a rarity in the military’s half-century of dominance – an outside political figure allowed to say what he wants. And after much haggling, Ban’s black Mercedes was allowed to pull up to the front door of the museum. There, his motorcade disgorged a small entourage of aides and a half-dozen international journalists. Local press awaited him inside. That also ensured an audience for him in Burma and beyond – another small victory. AP, 7 July 2009

12 July 2009, Sunday
They prowl their jungle battleground in sneakers and have to steal their weapons, but Burma’s ethnic Karen rebels say they will never quit their struggle against the junta. The ragtag Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA) has been fighting Burma’s military government for 60 years -- marking the country’s eastern border as the stage for one of the world’s longest running conflicts. But a renewed crackdown by government forces in early June caused 4,000 of the mainly Christian Karen to flee to neighbouring Thailand, the largest group of refugees to cross in more than a decade, aid groups say. The offensive comes as Burma’s generals try to stamp out the last of the more than two dozen ethnic uprisings that have riven the country since shortly after independence in time for elections due next year. Despite the overwhelming firepower against them, the KNLA say they will not quit. “We never give up,” said David Tharckabaw, a former soldier with the KNLA and now a leader of the political wing, the Karen National Union (KNU), based in a secret location on the Thai-Burma border. “Yes, this is an asymmetric conflict, but overall we can still carry on.” The Karen’s struggle began alongside Burma’s other ethnic minority groups seeking greater autonomy the year after British colonial rule ended in 1948. Burma’s rulers now hope to use the defectors -known as the Democratic Kayin Buddhist Army (DKBA) -- as part of a national border defence force ahead of the 2010 elections, said Zipporah Sein, head of the KNU. “The junta try to push the DKBA to attack the KNLA base camp... they use their tactics in a tricky way to persuade them (not to rejoin the rebels),” said Sein, who also spoke to AFP from a secret border location. This sort of “divide and rule” strategy leaves no doubt that the fight must continue, says Tharckabaw, although he adds that the KNU are willing to talk with the authorities. “We are always ready to negotiate and we have been there five times already, but they say you have to lay down arms first. But who would? Where’s the trust?” Tharckabaw said. AFP, 12 July 2009 Page 154 of 226

17 July 2009, Friday
Astrologers and soothsayers in Burma are reportedly being consulted by an increasing number of people who haven’t heard for months from family members of the Burmese army’s Electrical and Mechanical Engineering section working on the regime’s tunnel construction projects. Some are practicing yadaya, or magic rites, in the hope that family members involved in the projects return home soon and unscathed. Concern about the fate of officers and soldiers assigned to the tunnel projects has grown following publication of reports about the secret work. Family members are reportedly worried that after the completion of the secret tunnel-construction project, the regime may not want the officers and soldiers involved to communicate with the public. The astrologer said that his clients included some family members who had visited Naypyidaw to try and meet soldiers and officers from the engineering department. “They have seen some tunnels near Naypyidaw and they also heard the sound of testing missiles that misfired,” he said. “They come and see me to get an advice of how to get out of the tunnel project.” According to a MoU signed between Burma and North Korea in November 2008, Burma plans to build with North Korean technical assistance a military headquarters facility with a maze of underground tunnels around Naypyidaw, the country’s remote capital. The government is also believed to be building underground silos to house anti-aircraft missiles, radar equipment and other military installations. Irrawaddy, 17 July 2009 A British diplomat Friday said the European Union would likely toughen sanctions on Burma’s military regime if pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi was found guilty at her ongoing trial. Asif Ahmad, Southeast Asia head for the British foreign office, told AFP that diplomats expected Aung San Suu Kyi to be found guilty over the incident in May when an American man swam to her lakeside house uninvited. He said if that was the case, once any appeal had been exhausted, the EU would slap further measures on the junta to signal its disapproval. “Financial sanctions have been certainly at the forefront of what we would be doing,” Ahmad said. “If the final sentence is anything other than her being free, looser chains are not acceptable, she has to be free,” he said. AFP, 17 July 2009

18 July 2009, Saturday
Disturbing recent developments concerning evidence of the Burmese military regime’s close cooperation with the North Korean regime, including acquisition of long-range ballistic missile technology, must serve as an urgent wake-up call to members of the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF). These add to regional impacts of the regime’s oppressive rule, including the increase of transnational crime and mass movements of millions of Burmese fleeing war, repression, and impoverishment over the past two decades. Last month’s intensified offensive in Eastern Burma has already witnessed mortar fire falling in Thai territory and more than 6,000 refugees fleeing to Thailand in a fortnight. Main ethnic ceasefire groups around Burma are bracing themselves for the resumption of armed clashes after they refused to comply with the junta’s ultimatum to surrender their armies. An intensified crackdown on the pro-democracy movement that has seen lengthy jail terms imposed on potential candidates in the 2010 election and the bogus trial of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, has severely reduced ethnic leaders’ confidence in the regime’s political roadmap. Further, the SPDC’s constitution guarantees military subjugation over ethnic groups (the military decides who will be Minister for Border Affairs). It is time for the ARF, which brings together ASEAN member states and regional dialogue partners, to move beyond unconditional diplomacy and reduce the Burmese military regime’s capability to threaten the comprehensive security of the region. Action must include restrictions and greater regulation of transactions and entities implicated in weapons deals with the regime and its proxies. It is particularly crucial that those implicated, such as Malaysia, Singapore, Japan, and China, take effective steps to stem the flow of funds and technology needed for such deals. These sanctions are less likely to hurt ordinary Burmese who do not use the formal banking system because of prohibitive Page 155 of 226

commissions and rules on retail customers. ARF members must no longer allow the SPDC to use diplomatic dithering to strengthen its capacity to threaten its neighbors. altsean.org, 18 July 2009

19 July 2009, Sunday

NLD Youths, Martyrs’ Day, MMK, 19 July 2009

21 July 2009, Tuesday
Congressman Joseph Crowley (D-Queens, the Bronx) applauded today’s passage by the U.S. House of Representatives of the Crowley-authored Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act (H.J.Res.56). He released the following statement in strong support of continuing sanctions against the Burmese military junta until they release their grip on power, enact democratic and human rights reforms and free the legitimate the leaders of the Burmese people such as Aung San Suu Kyi: This legislation was first enacted in 2003 under the leadership of the former chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and my good friend, Tom Lantos. Tom spent his life fighting for freedom and democracy for those who could not fully defend themselves. He is greatly missed here in Congress, but his legacy remains and I have been proud to help carry on his efforts to secure democracy in Burma. Former-Chairman Lantos would be pleased that we are considering The Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act. This legislation will reauthorize the current sanctions on imports from Burma’s military regime for an additional three years as well as maintain the ban on the importation of jade and other gems from Burma. I introduced The Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act because we must show the military regime currently ruling with an iron fist in Burma that there are consequences for their actions. Burma’s military regime has carried out a brutal campaign against its own people. It has destroyed 3,000 villages, forced 1 million people to flee as refugees, used rape as a weapon of war, and pressed millions of civilians into forced labor – modern-day slave labor. The junta has also rejected recent diplomatic outreach, which would have been well-received in the global community. Specifically, the junta refused United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s request to release political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of the nonviolent movement for democracy and human rights in Burma. Not only did the junta refuse Aung San Suu Kyi’s release, they even refused Ban Ki-moon’s request to meet with her. The Burmese regime must be stopped. If passed, The Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act will supplement President Obama’s actions on May 15th – when he Page 156 of 226

renewed investment prohibitions against the Burmese military regime that began under President Clinton. The United States is not alone in using sanctions as part of a diplomatic strategy to help promote change in Burma. The European Union renewed its Common Position on sanctions and Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and others have unilaterally imposed their own restrictions. Aung San Suu Kyi and the other legitimate leaders of Burma have also called on the world to impose sanctions on their country, just as Desmond Tutu and the leaders of the struggle to end apartheid in South Africa called for sanctions on South Africa in the 1980s. We must maintain our sanctions against the junta in Burma and I call on all of my colleagues to vote for the renewal of The Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act. 21 July 2009

22 July 2009, Wednesday
The unabated recruitment of child soldiers into the Burmese Army has been exposed in a report released by the Thai-Burmese border based ‘Yoma 3’ Burmese News Agency today. The agency said, it took about one and-a-half years to compile the 72-page ‘Child Soldiers: Burma’s Sons of Sorrow’, which was released on Wednesday at a press conference held along the Thai-Burmese border. The report includes interviews with two child soldier deserters, a sergeant and four parents of child soldiers forcibly recruited by the army. “The junta always claims to the international community and UN that it never recruits child soldiers into the army. They also always claim that organizations in exile are disseminating concocted stories to western countries. We wish to let people know clearly what the true facts are,” Nyein Lu, editor of the Yoma 3 told Mizzima. The report also presented news and photographs of the No. 1 Recruit Centre at Danyingone Township in Rangoon Division, No. 2 in Mandalay, No. 3 in Yemethin and No. 9 Basic Military Training School in Zaychaung village of Thaton Township in Mon state. Mizzima, 22 July 2009 “Finally the UN Secretary General travelled to Burma and met with the junta. Although he did not meet Aung San Suu Kyi, the visit was important. It showed to the people of Burma that the world cares about what happens in the country. But it also showed how little the junta cares about the world community. Now the United Nations have to follow up. We must not forget Burma,” says Kjell Magne Bondevik, president of the Oslo Center for Peace and Human Rights. oslocenter.no, 22 July 2009 Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton made an explicit appeal to Burma on Wednesday to release jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, offering the prospect of direct U.S. investment in the repressive Southeast Asian nation. The release of Suu Kyi is “critical” to easing the strained relations between Burma and the United States, Clinton said. “If she were released, that would open up opportunities at least for my country to expand our relationship with Burma, including investments in Burma,” she told reporters while attending a regional security forum. President Obama renewed a year-long investment ban on Burma on May 15, citing its “large-scale repression of the democratic opposition,” and U.S. officials suggested he would reverse it if Burma took strides to ease political repression. The new administration has made an intensive effort to reach out to repressive governments with a long history of human rights abuses in an attempt to shift what officials consider stalemated policies. A brutal military junta that has orchestrated gang rape of ethnic minorities, crushed democracy efforts, and kept most of the nation’s revenue from natural gas, gems and other natural resources rules Burma. State Department officials are also firmly convinced that the Burmese government is undergoing a wrenching internal debate over what to do about Suu Kyi, whose party, the National League for Democracy, won a landslide electoral victory in 1990 that the military leadership refused to accept. Since then, she has been under house arrest for most of the time, as have hundreds of her supporters. Clinton’s statement appeared intended to sharpen the choice for the Burmese government, but Suu Kyi’s attorneys reported Wednesday that they have been denied a request to meet with her one more time before Friday’s final court hearing. The secretary, in an interview with National Public Radio on Wednesday, attributed the many delays in the trial to internal angst among the junta. But other U.S. officials think the trial was postponed to avoid a confrontation at the security Page 157 of 226

conference held by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). washingtonpost.com, 23 July 2009

23 July 2009, Thursday
The US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made a meaningful offer to the Burmese military regime on July 22, 2009. Mrs. Clinton said, “If Aung San Suu Kyi were released, that would open up opportunities for my country to expand our relationship with Burma, including investments in Burma”. Now the Burmese military regime has a chance to grab the opportunity that they are shouting for decades, lifting sanction from the west. The regime accused Aung San Suu Kyi and her party National League for Democracy (NLD) for encouraging the West to impose sanction for their human rights violation to its own citizens that NLD denied for it. Now the ball is in the regime’s court. They have to decide whether they want sanction to continue or to end by releasing Aung San Suu Kyi. One Burmese high ranking army official said, “We are using second hand Chinese jet fighters, we rather use American made jets”, another officer said, “Our uniforms are really bad, even we order to make our own uniforms, it is not good as ordinary US marine uniform. We refer to use US made arms and ammunition not Chinese made or Russian made.” Many Burmese army officials do not like to be a close associate with North Koreans, Chinese and Russians. They want their kids to learn western education and have a good life. Many army officers want to quit from their job because they no longer feel right to work for the government. Some paid from 500,000 to one million kyat to resign from their positions. Most of them are not permitted to leave even though they want to become ordinary citizens. Army captains have a duty to recruit new soldiers every year. Each captain has to recruit at least two to three new soldiers ordered by the headquarters. If they could not find it, they have to pay for it to someone who can recruit for them. Burma is going towards North Korean style isolation and if the generals realized that they are on the wrong path, it is time to change the course for the betterment of the people. Htun Aung Gyaw, csburma.net, 23 July 2009 The recent aborted voyage of a North Korean ship, photographs of massive tunnels and a secret meeting have raised concern that one of the world’s poorest nations may be aspiring to join the nuclear club – with help from its friends in Pyongyang. No one expects military-run Burma, to obtain an atomic bomb anytime soon, but experts are closely watching the Southeast Asian nation. “There’s suspicion that something is going on, and increasingly that cooperation with North Korea may have a nuclear undercurrent. We are very much looking into it,” says David Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security, a Washington, D.C. think tank. The issue is expected to be discussed, at least on the sidelines, at this week’s ASEAN Regional Forum, a major security conference hosted by Thailand. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, along with representatives from North Korea and Burma, will attend. In the Thai capital Bangok on Tuesday, Clinton did not refer explicitly to a nuclear connection but highlighted the military relationship between Burma and North Korea. “We know there are also growing concerns about military cooperation between North Korea and Burma which we take very seriously,” Clinton said. AP, 23 July 2009 Meanwhile, The US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton signed a symbolically important treaty with members of Asean. The Treaty of Amity and Co-operation binds the US more closely into the regional security architecture – something previous US administrations had fought shy of. “I want to send a very clear message that the United States is back, that we are fully engaged and committed to our relationships in South East Asia,” she said before the signing the treaty in the resort of Phuket. Mrs Clinton also said the Obama administration would soon appoint a permanent ambassador to Asean headquarters in Jakarta. Asean comprises Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Burma, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam. BBC, 23 July 2009 The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) should consider expelling Burma if it does not release imprisoned Aung San Suu Kyi, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said yesterday. Asked on Thai Page 158 of 226

television whether ASEAN should kick out the military-ruled member state if it does not free the prodemocracy leader, Clinton replied: “It would be an appropriate policy change to consider.” AFP, 23 July 2009 The Association of Southeast Asian Nations won’t consider expelling Burma over the detention of prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, rejecting U.S. calls, Thailand’s prime minister said Thursday. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told Thai television Wednesday that the regional bloc should consider kicking out the military-ruled member state if it doesn’t free the Nobel laureate, who is on trial in prison. But Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, speaking as current chair of the 10-state grouping, said that while Asean and the West “have the same goal, we cannot implement the same policy.” “There are not enough grounds to do that. We have already done what we can under the Asean mechanism,” said Abhisit, referring to the group’s public statements expressing concern over Suu Kyi’s detention. AFP, 23 July 2009

24 July 2009, Friday
After several delays, the trial of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi entered its final phase Friday as her lawyer delivered closing arguments under tight security at Rangoon’s Insein Prison. Only Suu Kyi’s lawyer delivered a final argument Friday. Arguments by lawyers of the others charged were scheduled for Monday. CNN, 24 July 2009 Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s celebrated democracy campaigner, on Friday called for “rule of law” and a “balance” among the institutions of state such as the executive and judiciary. Ms. Suu Kyi’s plea was read out by her lawyer, Kyi Win, in a trial court in Rangoon. She was present during the hearing. Mr. Kyi Win was winding up defence arguments in the case about her alleged violation of terms of a recent phase of her house arrest which ended on May 27. Defence counsel will resume the concluding arguments on July 27. And, no date was set for the verdict. The Hindu, 25 July 2009 The trial in Burma of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been postponed. Suu Kyi, 64, was “abolutely dissatisfied” with the decision of an army-ruled court in Rangoon, Burma’s capital, to allow prosecutors more time to prepare their final arguments in the case, said Nyan Win, one of her lawyers. Lawyers for the Nobel peace laureate early on Friday gave their closing arguments in the trial that could lead to Suu Kyi being jailed for five years if she is found guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest. Win told the Reuters news agency that prosecutors had been told to deliver their final arguments on Monday. aljazeera.net, 24 July 2009 “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said she was absolutely dissatisfied with the arrangement - giving more time for the prosecution to prepare the argument,” Nyan Win said. He said that to insure fairness the usual practice is for courts to have both parties give closing arguments on the same day. On Monday, Suu Kyi’s two female companions, who are also on trial, are to give their statements, and a lawyer for American John W. Yettaw, who is charged with trespassing, is to present his argument. The defense has not contested the facts of the case but argues that the law used by the authorities against Suu Kyi is invalid because it applies to a constitution abolished two decades ago. It also says that government guards stationed outside Suu Kyi’s compound should be held responsible for any intrusion in her property. Security was tight around Insein Prison – where Suu Kyi is being held and also the site of the trial – with roads blocked with barbed wire barricades manned by police. Seven truckloads of riot police were deployed around the compound. journalgazette.net, 24 July 2009 Many observers believe the trial is a blatant ploy by Burma’s military rulers to keep Mrs Suu Kyi in detention and that the outcome is a foregone conclusion, but her lawyers tried to strike an optimistic note before going to court to present a 23-page closing address. “We are very optimistic because our arguments Page 159 of 226

are based on solid legal points,” Mrs Suu Kyi’s main lawyer, Kyi Win, said. “We have the law on our side, but we don’t know if the judges are on our side.” The defence has argued that it is Mrs Suu Kyi’s guards, not her, who should be held responsible if someone was able to penetrate the security to reach her house. The Telegraph, 24 July 2009 On Friday, the country’s English-language state newspaper The New Light of Burma criticised foreign calls for Suu Kyi's release from Insein prison, saying they showed “reckless disregard for the law.” But Suu Kyi’s lawyers hailed international calls for her freedom as they gave their closing arguments in a bid to prevent her being jailed for five years on charges of breaching her house arrest rules. Yahoo.com, 26 July 2009 The sale of a plot of land in detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s house compound has been opposed by her lawyer through an official letter on Thursday. “We have sent our opposition to the two lawyers, whose names were in the announcement. We said the plot of land cannot be sold as it is owned by our client. We have sent a letter opposing it,” Nyan Win, Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyer told Mizzima. The July 24, issue of the state-run newspaper “Mirror” carried an announcement stating that a plot of land in the compound of House No 54 in Rangoon’s University Avenue has been sold and anybody, who objects to the sale, can oppose it within seven days. The announcement said, a plot of land – 40 A, 41, 42, 42 A, 44 B, 44 C, and 64 C – 200 feet in length and 70 feet wide in Rangoon’s Bahan township has been sold-off by Khin Maung Aye and that any objection can be lodged within a week. But following the announcement, Khin Maung Aye’s wife Daw Tin Tin Oo, living separately, made an announcement objecting to the sale of the plot of land and the constructions on the land. Khin Muang Aye is the foster son of late Thakhin Than Tun and Daw Khin Gyi, who was the sister of detained Aung San Suu Kyi’s mother Daw Khin Kyi. He is a retired army officer and also a writer. Though the announcement, signed by High Grade Pleaders Cho Thae May and Wai Wai Aung said opposition to the transfer can be made, it made no mention of the buyer. “The plot of land mentioned in the notice is the area that has not been divided. But the notice does not name the buyer. They have hidden the name of the buyer. We are worried about the notice. We cannot divulge what we will do but we have our plans,” Nyan Win said. The sale of the plot of land comes at a time when Aung San Suu Kyi, who lived in the compound, is awaiting a verdict at the Insein prison court. Earlier, Aung San Suu Kyi’s brother Aung San Oo, claiming to be the rightful heir to the compound of House No. 54, filed a lawsuit. Mizzima, 30 July 2009 Despite suffering from ill-health, veteran journalist and prominent National League for Democracy (NLD) personality Win Tin on Friday arrived outside Insein prison as an expression of solidarity with party leader Aung San Suu Kyi, whose trial has reached its final stages. Win Tin, along with about 300 other supporters, on Friday waited outside Insein prison where the court is hearing the final arguments of lawyers from both sides. Win Tin arrived at Insein prison at about 1 p.m. and left around two. “Lawyers went into the prison compound at about 2 p.m. There were about 300 supporters waiting outside. It might be more I am not sure. I think there were more people than other days, both old and young,” the 80-year old Win Tin told Mizzima by telephone. “As I have said time and again, this is a master-minded, trumped-up case, so we are calling for the withdrawal of the case and the release of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,” Win Tin elaborated. He added he was joined by several other members of the NLD, including Ye Htut, advocate Khin Maung Shein, Aung Thein, Member of Parliament elect Ohn Maung and women’s activist Naw Ohn Hla. En route to Insein prison, Naw Ohn Hla and about ten of her friends were taken to Bayintnaung police station and briefly questioned before being allowed to join their fellow supporters. Mizzima, 24 July 2009 An article published in the US and reprinted in a Burmese state-run newspaper that appeared to criticise Aung San Suu Kyi’s political tactics has been met with alarm by Burmese politicians and exiled activists. The Huffington Post, a liberal online magazine based in New York, last week carried an opinion piece entitled ‘The Future of Burma Cannot Be Tied to Aung San Suu Kyi’. The author, Virginia M Moncrieff, said that Suu Kyi’s imprisonment has only added to her “near-secular saint status”, a tactic that is “selfdefeating”.“There are groups and individuals working to bring democracy to the country and Daw Aung San Page 160 of 226

Suu Kyi is a leading role model for all these people,” said Aye Tha Aung, secretary of the Committee Representing the People’s Parliament (CRPP). Khin Omar, head of the Network for Democracy and Development who read both versions of the article, said that she “completely disagreed” with the criticisms of Suu Kyi, particularly those that claim she doesn’t favour negotiation with the regime. “In reality, she was the one holding a non-violence policy and has been fighting to find an answer to the problems through dialogue with all political and ethnic groups participating,” she said. It is widely expected that Suu Kyi’s trial will end in a guilty verdict, and the charges brought against her carry a maximum five year sentence. DVB, 24 July 2009 Australia’s Foreign Minister Stephen Smith, says Asian leaders will continue to keep pressuring Burma over its human rights violations and the detention of pro democracy leader Aung Sung Suu Kyi. His comments come after a meeting of 27 Asian leaders at the Association of South East Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) summit on the island of Phuket in Thailand. Mr Smith has told ABC correspondent Karen Percy there was an overwhelming view from ASEAN ministers that Burma needs to make progress on democratic reforms. “The ASEAN ministers are fully expecting the Burmese administration to make real progress and not to believe or think they can get away with what they’ve been doing for a long period of time,” he said. Radio Australia, 24 July 2009 Burmese authorities have permitted a representative from the Norwegian Embassy to be present at the last court sitting in the case against opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi who has been detained the last 19 years. Norway has repeatedly demanded the immediate release of Suu Kyi and all other political prisoners, and have also asked that international observers be allowed to be present in the court. We see it as positive that this request has been met for Norway, says Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Stoere. The British Ambassador in Rangoon has also been given permission to be present at the last sitting on Friday July 24th. The Norway Post, 25 July 2009 Diplomats from the embassies of Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Norway have been permitted to attend the hearing although most of the trial has been held behind closed doors. AFP, 24 July 2009 Amid reports that Burma may be aspiring to join the nuclear club with help from North Korea, Japanese police on Friday served a fresh arrest warrant on a Tokyo trader on suspicion of illegally exporting to Rangoon a machine that can be used for developing missiles. Ri Gyong Go, 41, president of Toko Boeki trading company here, is suspected of exporting a small-sized cylindrical grinding machine in violation of Japan’s foreign exchange and foreign trade law. He allegedly shipped the machine to Burma from Nagoya port on November 20, 2008, without permission from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, police said. Ri has admitted to the allegations, Kyodo news agency quoted police as saying. Cylindrical grinders can be used to develop missile control systems and centrifuge machines for uranium enrichment. The devices are used to grind magnets. Ri was first arrested on June 29 on suspicion of attempting to export also to Burma a separate instrument that can be used to produce weapons without a government permit, the report said. Ri allegedly received an order for the cylindrical grinder from a North Korean-affiliated trading house in China. He then placed an order with a machinery maker in Japan and shipped the device to Burma’s Ministry of Industry No 2, according to investigations. Zee News, 24 July 2009 Russia’s state-controlled Novosti news agency has declared that Moscow’s cooperation with Burma on commercial nuclear development does not contravene international treaties on preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. The agency this week quoted a Russian foreign ministry spokesman, Andrei Nesterenko, on the issue at the same time the US expressed concerns about a possible liaison between the Burmese and North Korean regimes. Rosatom, Russia’s state-owned nuclear energy corporation, signed an agreement in 2007 to help construct a nuclear research center in Burma, and Moscow will stand by this agreement, Nesterenko said. The deal, which is supposed to cost tens of millions of dollars, envisages developing a reactor with an energy capacity of 10 megawatts. Weekly Business Roundup, 24 July 2009 Page 161 of 226

Thai Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva indicated that ASEAN was not willing to discharge Burma from the group and would not be able to force its government to release the opposition leader, Ms Aung San Suu Kyi. After US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged the ASEAN members to pressure the Burmese government for a release of Ms Suu Kyi, Prime Minister Abhisit insisted that Ms Clinton was only expressing the US’s standpoint on democracy. Thai Press Reports, 24 July 2009 East Timor President Jose Ramos-Horta on Friday urged Australia to learn from the past and push harder for reform in military-ruled Burma. The Nobel Peace laureate said Australia had turned a “blind eye to blatant human rights abuses” during Indonesia’s 24-year occupation of East Timor and should not repeat the mistake. “Australia can, working together with Indonesia for instance… help bring an end to that ugly situation in Burma,” he told reporters. Australia has imposed financial sanctions and visa restrictions on members of the regime in Burma, and banned all defence exports to the country. It also called last month for the release of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, the democracy icon who has spent most of the past 19 years in detention. But Ramos-Horta said “occasional statements” were not enough and urged Australia to apply consistent pressure for reform in the country. “It’s been going on for over two decades with the imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi and there is no light at the end of the tunnel,” he said. “Here is where Australia can be more proactive and not only be happy with occasional statements.” Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League of Democracy won a landslide election victory in 1990 that the junta, in power since 1962, refused to recognise. AFP, 24 July 2009 The US Senate has approved a one-year renewal of sanctions banning the import of Burmese goods to the US, and will now look to Congress for an extension to the boycott. The decision belonged to the Senate Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over United States’ international trade. The current resolution on Burma, contained in the 2003 Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act, authorizes Congress to renew the import ban each year through to 2012. DVB, 24 July 2009 A ban on imports from Burma has been renewed for one year by the US House of Representatives. The ban affects a range of products but especially Burmese gemstones via third countries, said the Voice of America radio station. The house action seeks to renew the import bans contained in the Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act, which was due to expire on July 26. The sponsor of the renewed import ban, New York Democrat Joseph Crowley, said it was justified because the “junta has also rejected recent diplomatic outreach” on the Suu Kyi issue. Weekly Business Roundup, 24 July 2009

27 July 2009, Monday

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Aung San Suu Kyi’s supporters in front of the Insein prison. AP, 27 July 2009 A court in army-ruled Burma heard final arguments on Monday in a case involving opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who faces five years in prison if found guilty of breaching a draconian security law. Lawyers read closing arguments for the other defendants, two of Suu Kyi’s housemaids and John Yettaw, an American intruder whose two-night stay at Suu Kyi’s home in May could land all four defendants in jail. The prosecution may wrap up its case against Suu Kyi later on Monday, court officials said. However, Suu Kyi’s lawyer, Nyan Win, told Reuters he did not believe a verdict was imminent. “I expect all the arguments will be made today but I think the verdict might take as long as two or three weeks,” he said. A guilty verdict is widely expected in a country where courts are known to rule in favor of the army, which has governed the former Burma for nearly 50 years. Reuters, 27 July 2009

28 July 2009, Tuesday
The high-profile trial of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi concluded Tuesday with the court announcing it will deliver its verdict at the end of the week, officials and diplomats said. Judge Thaung Nyunt said the court will make its ruling on Friday, according to an Asian diplomat in the courtroom and a government official. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. Suu Kyi’s lawyers had expected a verdict next month. Details on why the court set the earlier date were not immediately available. Defense lawyers gave their final statements Tuesday in the case that has drawn international condemnation from world leaders, Hollywood celebrities and the United Nations. Defense lawyer Nyan Win said before the start of Tuesday’s session that he held out hope for a verdict in Suu Kyi’s favor. “We are confident that we will win the case if things go according to the law.” Suu Kyi and three other defendants were scheduled to reply to arguments presented Monday by prosecutor Myint Kyaing, the lawyer said. Diplomats from Japan, Singapore, Thailand and the United States were allowed to attend the trial Tuesday, one of the diplomats said, citing embassy protocol for speaking on condition of anonymity. Suu Kyi won London-based Amnesty International's highest award Monday for her defense of human rights, underscoring international support for her struggle to bring democracy to the military-ruled country. At a concert Monday in Dublin, Ireland, U2’s Bono publicly announced the award — Amnesty’s Ambassador of Conscience Award — before 80,000 cheering fans. The rights group said it hopes its highest honor would help deter Burma’s junta from imposing any harsh new punishments on her. But neither international outrage, nor offers of closer ties with the US if Suu Kyi is freed, appear to have deflected the ruling junta's determination to neutralize — if not imprison — her. AP, 28 July 2009 Page 163 of 226

29 July 2009, Wednesday

NLD Statement dated 29 July 2009 Page 164 of 226

US President Barack Obama extended sanctions against Burma, including a ban on gem imports, as the military regime prepares a verdict for democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The White House in a brief statement said Obama signed into law a bill overwhelmingly approved by Congress that would prolong sanctions on all imports from Burma for three years. The sanctions were due to expire this week. The measure also confirms a ban on US sales of Burma’s gems, which had until last year still entered the US market due to a now-plugged loophole. Congressman Joseph Crowley, who introduced the bill in the House, said that the junta in Burma “must be stopped.” “We must show the military regime currently ruling with an iron fist in Burma that there are consequences for their actions,” said Crowley, a New York lawmaker from Obama’s Democratic Party. He denounced Burma’s “brutal campaign against its own people,” which has triggered a major refugee problem, along with the regime’s refusal to let UN chief Ban Ki-moon even see Aung San Suu Kyi on a recent visit. AFP, 29 July 2009

30 July 2009, Thursday
Military-ruled Burma’s state media on Thursday warned citizens against inciting protests as democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi began stockpiling supplies ahead of a possible five-year jail term. A conviction is widely expected in the two-and-a-half-month trial, which has sparked international outrage. It has been repeatedly delayed as the junta fended off criticism and calls for the release of Suu Kyi. The 64-year-old opposition icon has asked for English and French novels and Burmese-language books including dictionaries and religious works to help her pass the time if she is jailed, her lawyer Nyan Win said. “I think Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is preparing for the worst,” Nyan Win, who is also a spokesman for her National League for Democracy (NLD), told AFP. Daw is a term of respect in Burmese. “She has said that if she has to stay in prison for a long time, she has only one thing to do and that is reading.” AFP, 30 July 2009 The novels of John le Carré and biographies of Winston Churchill are among the books that Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese democracy leader and Nobel Prize winner, is assembling in anticipation of a long prison sentence when a court in Rangoon delivers its verdict on her tomorrow. Her lawyers say that she has resigned herself to a guilty verdict, after her two-and-half-month trial for allegedly breaking the terms of her house arrest. If her fears are realised, she will be confined, not in the large house where she was formerly detained, but in one of Burma’s jails, where more than 2,000 other political prisoners also languish. Times Online, 30 July 2009 Fears that Suu Kyi will be jailed are proving too much for some of the female supporters in her party, who said they had wept when the court announced on Tuesday that it would deliver a judgement this week. “We cried as we feel really sorry for her in our heart. But we will remember her words that we should hope for the best and prepare for the worst,” Aye Aye Mar, a senior NLD member, told AFP. “We felt so sad when we heard the verdict will come. Our leader is always thinking for the benefit of the country. Although we know that the truth will come out one day, we can’t do anything apart from pray for her release.” 30 July 2009 Activists on Thursday evening distributed leaflets in Rangoon’s Tamwe Township urging the people to wage war against the military junta if the verdict on Friday finds opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi guilty and sentences her to a prison term, eyewitnesses said. The letters, signed by the ‘Committee leading peoples’ movement to destroy military rule and to restore democracy,’ says that “As Aung San Suu Kyi will be sentenced to a prison term on July 31, we urge everybody to take up the war in their respective capacities.” The distribution of the leaflets came despite authorities maintaining tight security in and around Rangoon to prevent any form of movement prior to the day the Insein prison court is to pronounce a verdict on Aung San Suu Kyi. Mizzima, 30 July 2009 Page 165 of 226

Nyi Nyi Htwe, a lawyer belonging to the opposition camp, recently released from jail and forced out of his profession, alleged he is finding it difficult to continue with his present calling of selling government lottery tickets because he is being hounded by authorities. His business associates have been warned against dealing with him. He is currently finding it extremely difficult to franchise government lottery tickets and hiring a push-cart, given the harassment by the authorities. Nyi Nyi Htwe was sentenced to a six-month prison term on October 30, 2008 by the northern District Court in Rangoon’s notorious Insein prison on charges of ‘contempt of court’. He was, at the time, defending three National League for Democracy members including Yan Naing Tun, who were arrested and were facing trial for praying at the Pagoda for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners. During the trial, the judge told Nyi Nyi Htwe to tell his three clients to change their sitting postures, where they had turned their backs to the judge. But the young lawyer said “they have their rights to sit the way they want.” The judge charged him with ‘contempt of court’ and under Article 288 and sentenced him to six-months in prison. While he served the prison term, authorities revoked his bar license. He was released on April 28, after he completed his sixmonth term. Mizzima, 30 July 2009 Humankind has the ability to live in freedom and in peace. We have seen that goodness has triumphed over evil; we have witnessed political transitions in South Africa, and elsewhere, evidencing that we live in a moral universe. Our world is sometimes lacking wise and good leadership or, as in the case of Burma, the leadership is forbidden to lead. More than anything, the new trial and detention of Aung San Suu Kyi speaks volumes about her effectiveness as a leader. The only reason the generals need to silence her clarion call for freedom is because they fear her and the principles she stands for. She is the greatest threat to their continuing rule. Her only crime is that if she is allowed to stand for elections, she will definitely win. The universal demand for human freedom cannot be suppressed forever. This is a universal truth that Than Shwe, the dictator of Burma, has failed to understand. How frustrated must he be that no matter how long he keeps Aung San Suu Kyi in detention, no matter how many guns he buys, and no matter how many people he imprisons, Aung San Suu Kyi and the people of Burma will not submit. The demands for the freedom of Aung San Suu Kyi and all political prisoners of Burma grow louder and echo around the world, reaching even his new capital hidden in central Burma. Words, however, are not enough. Freedom is never given freely by those who have power; it has to be fought for. Aung San Suu Kyi and the people of Burma deserve nothing less than our most strenuous efforts to help them secure their freedom. Every day we must ask ourselves: have we done everything that we can? I pledge that I will not rest until Aung San Suu Kyi, and all the people of Burma, are free. Please join me. Desmond M Tutu, guardian.co.uk, 30 July 2009 China appears to be making alternative plans in case its Middle East oil transshipment port and pipeline project in Burma fails because of regime change. The Chinese state-owned oil and gas conglomerate China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) is spending at least US $1.5 billion to use Burma as a conduit for oil shipments from the Middle East and Africa. But as a backup in case this scheme has to be abandoned it is now also investing in a multibillion dollar oil project in northern Malaysia. The CNPC is to play a central role in a regional oil processing and transshipment hub link between the Middle East and China on the northwest coast of Malaysia facing the Indian Ocean just like the port development at Kyaukpyu on Ramree Island on the central Burma coast. Irrawaddy, 30 July 2009 U.S. President Barack Obama and Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo agreed Thursday to join forces in tackling the issues surrounding Burma and North Korea. Arroyo became the first leader of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to meet Obama. “We stand behind the United States on the position that it has taken with regard to Burma and with regard to North Korea’s nuclear adventurism,” Arroyo told reporters with Obama at the White House. Obama thanked Arroyo for her support on U.S. policies in Asia. “We are very grateful for the strong voice that the Philippines has provided in dealing with issues in Asia, ranging from the human rights violations that have for too long existed in Burma to the problems that we’re seeing with respect to nuclear proliferation in North Korea,” he said. AP, 30 July 2009 Page 166 of 226

31 July 2009, Friday
31st JULY Black Friday Or Bloody Friday. Let’s strike. It must be “Fightday”. Aung Way, MMK, 30 July 2009

The Burma court scheduled to deliver a verdict in the high-profile trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi said Friday it was not yet ready to make a decision and adjourned until Aug. 11, diplomats said. Suu Kyi rose to her feet after the judge’s announcement, turned to foreign diplomats in the courtroom and said jokingly, “I apologize for giving you more work,” a Western diplomat said on condition of anonymity, citing protocol. The 64-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate is charged with violating the terms of her house arrest by harboring an American man who swam to her house uninvited. She faces up to five years in prison. Her trial has drawn international condemnation since it opened May 18. Critics have accused the military government of using the bizarre incident as a pretext to keeping Suu Kyi behind bars through the country’s planned elections next year. Friday’s hearing lasted only a few minutes. “The presiding judge walked into the courtroom and said the verdict will be postponed until Aug. 11 because the court is not ready to give the ruling,” a foreign diplomat who attended the hearing told The Associated Press. The court was closed to journalists. Another diplomat said the judge added that the ruling required “further deliberation.” The diplomats interviewed asked not to be named because of the sensitivity surrounding the trial. Security was heightened Friday ahead of the expected verdict, with teams of riot police stationed nearby. All roads leading to Rangoon’s Insein prison – where the trial is being held in a court inside the compound – were blocked by barbed-wire barricades. Suu Kyi’s lawyers had said they were cautiously optimistic about the outcome. “The charges against our client are not strong and we are confident that we will win if things go according to the law,” lawyer Nyan Win said early Friday as he entered the prison. AP, 31 July 2009 The verdict in the trial of Noble Peace Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi has been postponed to August 11, 2009. Meanwhile, the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) has learnt that the regime arrested at least 30 NLD members in the early hours of this morning, between midnight and 1 am. Three of those arrested were later released. The reason for their arrest is not clear. 1. Ko Myint Ngwe (Yenangyaung Township, Magwe Division) 2. Ko Tint Lwin (Yenangyaung Township, Magwe Division) 3. Ko Than Aung (Yenangyaung Township, Magwe Division) 4. Ko Khin Win (Yenangyaung Township, Magwe Division) 5. U Aye Myint (Aunglan Township, Magwe Division) 6. U Min Maung (Aunglan Township, Magwe Division) 7. Ko Soe (Taungdwingyi Township, Magwe Division) 8. Ko Par Lay (Taungdwingyi Township, Magwe Division) 9. Ko Kyaw Naing (Taungdwingyi Township, Magwe Division) 10. U Tha Aung (MP) (Myothit Township, Magwe Division) 11. Ma Zin Ma Ma Tun (Myothit Township, Magwe Division) 12. Ko Than Soe Myint (Myothit Township, Magwe Division) 13. U Pike Ko (Pakokku Township, Magwe Divison) 14. U Kyaw Nyunt (Pakokku Township, Magwe Divison) 15. U Tin Myint Aung (Pakokku Township, Magwe Divison) Page 167 of 226

16. U Thaung Soe (Chairparson of Minbu Township, Magwe Division) 17. Ko Nay Myo Kyaw (Saku Township, Magwe Division) 18. Ko Aung Win (Pwintbyu Township, Magwe Division) 19. Mg Thu Ya (Pwintbyu Township, Magwe Division) 20. Ko Htay Win (Kamma Township, Magwe Division) 21. Ko Htein Win (Dagon Myothit Township, Rangoon) 22. Daw Khin Win Kyi (Dagon Myothit Township, Rangoon) 23. Ma Khin Myat Thu (Mingaladon Township, Rangoon) 24. Ko Nay Lin Kyaw (Dawbon Township, Rangoon) 25. Ko Nay Lin Soe (Thaketa Township, Rangoon) 26. Ko Sai Kyaw Kyaw (Tamwe Township, Rangoon) 27. Ko Tin Min Naing (North Okkalapa Township, Rangoon) Three NLD members were arrested then later released. 28. Daw Naw Ohn Hla (North Okkalapa Township, Rangoon) 29. U Nyunt Hlaing (MP-Aunglan) 30. Ko Myint Aung (Sanchaung Township, Rangoon) Aung Myo Thein, aappb.org, 31 July 2009 Philippines President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo called Friday for the immediate release of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, saying that Burma should demonstrate whether it has a legitimate hold on power by accelerating a “road map” to democracy and by permitting the full participation of Suu Kyi’s party in elections. “The best way to find out whether the government is legitimate would be to accelerate the road map and have elections being conducted in an atmosphere and an environment in which Aung San Suu Kyi and her party are able to participate fully,” Arroyo said in an interview. “It would help to promote human rights, democracy and peace and stability in the region.” Washington Post, 31 July 2009 Last Friday, Indonesia’s electoral commission certified the winner of the country’s recent presidential election, a free and fair contest that demonstrated the strength of democratic norms in a country ruled for decades by strongmen supported by Washington. Meanwhile, next door in Burma, a political show trial is preparing to convict that country’s legitimately elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, of “crimes” she did not commit, most likely renewing her jail sentence to prevent her from contesting elections next year. Curiously, the US President Barack Obama administration is flirting with the idea of normalizing relations with Burma’s military junta, at a time when Indonesia’s example – and Indonesian leaders’ outspokenness about Burma’s repressive political system – should be spurring the United States toward greater support for Southeast Asian democrats, rather than legitimizing the notion that Burma should be governed by the kind of strong hand that has been thoroughly discredited in Indonesia and across the region. Dan Twining, shadow.foreignpolicy.com, 31 July 2009

1 August 2009, Saturday
Burma’s isolated military junta is building a secret nuclear reactor and plutonium extraction facilities with North Korean help, with the aim of acquiring its first nuclear bomb in five years, according to evidence from key defectors revealed in an exclusive Herald report today. The secret complex, much of it in caves tunnelled into a mountain at Naung Laing in northern Burma, runs parallel to a civilian reactor being built at another site by Russia that both the Russians and Burmese say will be put under international safeguards. Two defectors were extensively interviewed separately over the past two years in Thailand by the Australian National University strategic expert Desmond Ball and a Thai-based Irish-Australian journalist, Phil Thornton, who has followed Burma for years. One was an officer with a secret nuclear battalion in the Burmese army who was sent to Moscow for two years’ training; the other was a former executive of the leading regime business partner, Htoo Trading, who handled nuclear contracts with Russia and North Korea. Page 168 of 226

Their detailed testimony brings into sharp focus the hints emerging recently from other defector accounts and sightings of North Korean delegations that the Burmese junta, under growing pressure to democratise, is seeking a deterrent to any foreign “regime change”. Their story will ring alarm bells across Asia. smh.com.au, 1 August 2009 UN Chief Ban Ki Moon pressed for the immediate release of detained democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi during a meeting with Burma’s UN ambassador ahead of the verdict in her trial, a UN spokesman said on Friday. Farhan Haq told reporters that Mr Ban met with Ambassador Than Swe on Thursday and ‘reiterated his clear expectation and that of the international community that the government of Burma will give careful consideration to the implication of any verdict in the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi and exercise its responsibility to ensure her immediate release.’ Burma’s junta has kept Ms Suu Kyi in detention for nearly 14 of the past 20 years, since it refused to recognise the NLD’s landslide victory in elections in 1990. In his meeting with Mr Than Swe, Mr Ban also reiterated the international community’s expectation that the military regime ‘will act in Burma’s interest by taking timely and positive steps’ in following up specific proposals he made during his recent visit there, ‘starting with the release of all political prisoners’. Mr Haq said the UN secretary general was informed during the meeting that the verdict in Ms Suu Kyi’s trial was being postponed. Earlier on Friday, a Burmese court postponed its verdict in the trial until Aug 11, adding to uncertainty over the ruling junta’s plans for the democracy icon. straitstimes.com, 1 August 2009

2 August 2009, Sunday
“We hope that she will be freed unconditionally,” said Nyan Win, one of Suu Kyi’s lawyers and a spokesman for her National League for Democracy. “We have nothing much to do. We are just waiting for the next trial date. Tomorrow we will submit an application to the authorities to meet Aung San Suu Kyi and we hope to meet her on Wednesday or Thursday,” he said. He said Suu Kyi, currently detained at Rangoon’s notorious Insein prison, had instructed her defence team to visit her before August 11. deccanherald.com, 2 August 2009 Burma’s junta showed rare concern for foreign opinion by delaying the Aung San Suu Kyi verdict, but only because it wants to minimise the fallout while pursuing its hard line against her, analysts said. The postponement of the judgment until August 11 is a sign that normally intransigent military ruler Than Shwe is at least partly considering the domestic and international uproar a long jail term would provoke, they said. But the regime’s apparent indecision over the trial is about balancing its determination to have Ms Suu Kyi locked up during elections next year with its desire to give the trial a veneer of legitimacy abroad, analysts added. “It’s international pressure and they’re worried about domestic anger,” Thailand-based Burma analyst and academic Win Min told AFP. 2 August 2009 Burma’s military regime has collaborated in recent years with North Korea and Russia to develop a reactor capable of producing one nuclear bomb a year by 2014, a news report based on the testimony of two defectors claimed Sunday. The report, published in the Bangkok Post’s Spectrum magazine Sunday after a similar article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald, was the result of a two-year investigation into Burma’s nuclear ambitions by Desmond Ball, a regional security expert at the Australian National University, and Phil Thornton, an Australian journalist based on the Thai-Burma border. Basing their report primarily on the testimony of two defectors from the Burmese regime, including one army officer and a book keeper for a trading company with close links to the military, the report claimed that Burma is excavating uranium in 10 locations and has two uranium plants in operation to refine uranium into “yellowcake,’ the fissile material for nuclear weapons. To have a capacity to make nuclear weapons Burma would need to build a plutonium reprocessing plant. Such a plant is planned in Naung Laing, central Burma, where Russian technicians are already “teaching plutonium reprocessing,” the army defector Moe Jo, an alias, told the investigators. Burma signed a memorandum of understanding with Russia’s atomic energy Page 169 of 226

agency in May, 2007, to build a 10-megawatt light-water reactor unsing uranium. The report suggests that Burma’s non-military nuclear ambitions are nonsense. “They say it’s to produce medical isotopes for health purposes in hospitals,” civilian defector Tin Min, a former employee of the junta-connected Htoo Trading Company, told Spectrum. “How many hospitals in Burma have nuclear science? Burma can barely get electricity up and running. It’s nonsense,” Tin Win, an alias, said. Htoo Trading, owned by Burmese business tycoon Tay Za, who has close connections with the military, is handling shipments of yellowcake to both North Korea and Iran, the report claimed. It speculated that in the future North Korea might provide Burma with fissionable plutonium in return for yellowcake. The report’s two authors urged Burma’s neighbours in the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) to closely monitor Burma’s nuclear programme, the subject of much speculation in the past. earthtimes.org, 2 August 2009

3 August 2009, Monday

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NLD Statement dated 3 August 2009 Pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi said at her recent trial that the charges against her over the American intruder bring into question Burma’s judiciary and constitution, according a statement by her party, the National League for Democracy (NLD), on Monday. Suu Kyi reportedly said at the trial on July 24 that unless Burmese courts did something about her current period of detention, the current charge against her—harboring American intruder John W Yettaw—could not be examined correctly and completely. “Equally critical is the principle that justice must not only be done, but must be seen to be done, clearly and unequivocally,” she said in the statement before the court. She said that in Burma, there is misuse of the definition of the word “constitution,” which calls into question “the credibility of the government’s dignity.” In her statement, Suu Kyi said that Yettaw entered her compound that she acted carefully so as not to endanger the intruder and the security guards who were responsible for preventing people from entering her compound. Irrawaddy / Burmanet, 3 August 2009 The absurd and ultimately self-defeating harassment of Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi is to be dragged out for another two weeks. The dictators of that sad country were unable or unwilling to meet the promise of a verdict in her case. So the world will wait until at least next week for the judges to read the next justification for jailing and further impeding Mrs Suu Kyi. By tossing her into the infamous Insein prison and forcing her to appear at a trial, the Burmese generals seem to be trying to increase her intimidation. They have succeeded instead in further shaming their own country and increasing the sympathy around the globe for their prisoner. Editorial, Bangkok Post, 3 August 2009 Indonesian Foreign Affairs Minister Hassan Wirajuda said over the weekend that he hoped the postponement of the verdict in the trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi was due to the Burmese government’s concern over international reaction, particularly from the Association of Southeast Asian Page 171 of 226

Nations. Hassan said he found it odd that the guards at Suu Kyi’s house were not prosecuted for their negligence in allowing an American man stay at her house in early May after swimming across a lake. Suu Kyi was charged with harboring the American at her home. At her trial, Suu Kyi said she did not know the man and had no idea he was coming. “There has been no news of the house guards being prosecuted,” Hassan said, adding that the Burmese government has been intransigent despite regional pressure and sanctions. “I do not want to speculate so let’s just wait and see what the outcome will be on August 11,” Hassan said, referring to the date of the verdict, adding that he hoped the court would clear Suu Kyi of the charges. Jakarta Globe, 3 August 2009

4 August 2009, Tuesday
The American man on trial in Burma for swimming to the lakeside home of Aung San Suu Kyi was hospitalised overnight after having convulsions in prison, a hospital worker told AFP Tuesday. John Yettaw, 54, who is known to have diabetes and other health problems, was taken from Insein prison to Rangoon General Hospital on Monday night, the worker said, and is now recovering after treatment. “Mr Yettaw was hospitalised since last night. He is getting better now,” said the hospital worker on condition of anonymity. Yettaw was taken to hospital by police after having a fit, and has been kept under guard in the hospital, away from other patients, the source said, adding that his condition was not serious but not giving further details. Yettaw, a former military veteran from Falcon, Missouri, is on trial alongside opposition leader Suu Kyi and two female aides of Suu Kyi's after he donned homemade flippers to swim to her home in May. The devout Mormon said he embarked on his mission to warn Suu Kyi of a vision that she would be assassinated. He faces charges of abetting Suu Kyi’s breach of security laws, immigration violations and a municipal charge of illegal swimming. All four defendants face up to five years in prison. Yettaw was arrested just days before the most recent, six-year spell of Suu Kyi’s house arrest was due to expire in the military-run nation. mp.com.ph, 4 August 2009 Voicing concern over the deteriorating health of Burma’s pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, former Nepalese Premier Girija Prasad Koirala has appealed to Rangoon’s military regime to immediately release her from detention. “It has been a matter of widespread concern for the supporters of human rights and democracy around the world that Suu Kyi’s long-term house arrest has led to deterioration of her health. So, I appeal to the government of Burma for her immediate release,” Koirala, the President of the Nepali Congress (NC), said in a statement. PTI, 4 August 2009 The Thai government is investigating suspected nuclear collaboration between Burma’s military regime and North Korea following media reports here that Burma is building a secret nuclear reactor with Pyongyang’s help. However, Thai National Security Council chief Thawil Pliensri said a probe by national intelligence agencies has not yet found any indication that the reports were true. Thai Foreign Ministry spokesperson Vimon Kidchob said the Thai embassy in Burma had not found any evidence of nuclear collaboration between North Korea and Burma. Ms Vimon said Bangkok believed that Burma would adhere to the Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapons Free Zone (SEANWFZ) agreement which came into force in 1997 after being signed by all members of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). “I am confident that all members of the SEANWFZ are adhering to this principle,” she said. The New Kerala, 4 August 2009 The United States Monday reiterated concerns over military cooperation between North Korea and Burma, but fell short of elaborating on what kind of cooperation the two reclusive regimes are seeking, according to Yonhap News. “We do have concerns about the nature of cooperation between both Burma and North Korea, and North Korea and any other country,” Philip Crowley, assistant secretary of state for public affairs, told a daily news briefing. “I think, over time, we would like to clarify with Burma more precisely the nature of its military cooperation.” Crowley was responding to reports that Burma has an underground nuclear facility built with the help of North Korea. Koreaherald.co.dr, 4 August 2009 Page 172 of 226

5 August 2009, Wednesday
Daryl Kimball, of the Arms Control Association, told the Nelson Report, an influential online security report, that although there had been no evidence of a Burmese nuclear-weapons quest, whatever the North Koreans were doing must be made a priority by the International Atomic Energy Agency, of which Burma is a member. “The report is probably enough cause for the IAEA director-general and Russia to seek clarification from Burma and request a special inspection,” Mr Kimball said. Brisbane Times, 5 August 2009 UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon won support Wednesday from key nations for his appeal to Burma’s government to free detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and release all political prisoners — and he said he expects a positive response from the country’s military rulers. The U.N. chief told reporters after chairing a closed-door meeting of the Group of Friends on Burma that he was pleased at their support which he said confirmed the international community’s desire for Burma to respond positively “to our concerns, expectations and encouragements.” The Group of Friends includes about 15 countries — Burma’s neighbors, interested Asian and European nations, and the five permanent U.N. Security Council members, the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France. Ban said he told the group that he reiterated to Burma’s U.N. ambassador on July 31 his expectation and that of the international community that careful consideration be given to the implications of the verdict in Suu Kyi’s trial, which could come on Aug. 11, and to “use this opportunity to exercise its responsibility to ensure her immediate release.” “I expect that the authorities of Burma will respond positively and in a timely manner to the expectations and concerns and repeated calls of the international community to release all political prisoners, and particularly Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,” Ban said. Soon after Ban returned to New York, Burma’s U.N. Ambassador U Than Swe promised the Security Council that the government will free some political prisoners and allow them to participate in 2010 elections, but he gave no numbers. The secretary-general said he had no firm indication either. “I hope they will take necessary measures to implement their commitment,” he said. When a reporter noted that he appeared more optimistic about a positive response from the government than he was last week, Ban said: “I am working very hard to, first of all, mobilize the necessary political support for the democratization of Burma.” “I am representing the will and expectations of the whole international community, particularly the members of the Group of Friends of Burma to convey this message correctly to the Burmese authorities so that they can respond positively,” he said. “This is what I am expecting.” He said participants at the meeting agreed that the Group of Friends would meet again on the sidelines of the ministerial meeting of the U.N. General Assembly which begins Sept. 23.

6 August 2009, Wednesday
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi met her four legal counsels today afternoon to discuss the case relating to the sale of a part of her residential plot. Her lawyers Kyin Win, Nyan Win, Hla Myo Myint and Khin Htay Kywe discussed the case with her in Insein prison for over two and-a-half hours. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi explained to her lawyers the background of the case and the ownership of the residential plot. “We mainly discussed the case over her residential plot. In brief, Daw Suu said that her younger brother had no right to sell the plot. He cannot sell this part of the plot on his own or on her behalf, which is in the physical possession of Daw Suu. She said that she would take necessary action in consultation with her lawyers if such a situation arises,” her lawyer Nyan Win told Mizzima. “We sent an objection letter ‘as per instruction given by client’ on July 30 to two higher grade pleaders, Cho The May and Wai Wai Aung, which says the sale of the plot is unlawful. But we have not yet received any reply from the two women lawyers”, Nyan Win said. In the classified advertisement column in ‘The Mirror’ on July 24, a notice appeared which said some parts of a plot situated on No. 54, University Avenue had been sold and anyone can object to the sale Page 173 of 226

within a week. The notice said their client Khin Maung Aye had sold the undivided part measuring (100’x70’) of Bahan Township, Plot No. 40 A, 41, 42 A, 44 B, 44 C and 64 C and anyone can send his/her objection to them within seven days. Khin Maung Aye is the adopted son of late Thakin Than Tun and Daw Khin Gyi, who was a retired army officer and writer. Daw Aung Suu Kyi’s mother Daw Khin Kyi and Daw Khin Gyi were sisters. In the year 2000, her elder brother Aung San Oo filed a suit for taking possession of this plot from her. Mizzima, 6 August 2009 A local woman in Mongkeung Township, southern Shan State was beheaded by the Burma Army troops that have been launching a four-cut campaign since 27 July , according to villagers who recently fled to Thailand. In the morning of 3 August, Nang Hsoi, 29, from Wan Kart village, Ho Khai village tract was arrested in her village by soldiers from Mongkeung based Light Infantry Battalion (LIB) # 514 after falsely accusing her as the wife of a Shan State Army (SSA) ‘South’ fighter and collaboration with the SSA, said a local villager who asked not to be named. “In the evening soldiers took her to a bridge nearby the village, cut her head down and threw it into the creek,” he said. Two days before her death, over 10 villagers from Wan Kart, Wan Kawng and Wan Long village were detained on suspicion of being SSA spies at the army base. The Burma Army that has been the four-cut campaign (cutting food, funds, intelligence and recruits to the armed resistance by local populace) had ordered villagers in Mongkeung, Kehsi and Laikha townships to leave their homes within 5 days, from 1 to 5 August. Since then, at least 300 houses in the three townships were razed to the ground and more than 300 villagers were forcibly relocated to the town, said a source. The campaign drive was led by the Mongnawng – based Military Operations Command (MOC) # 2 command: Loilem based IB#9, and #12, Laikha based IB#64 and LIB#515, Namzang based IB#66, #247 and LIB#516, Mongnai based IB#248 and LIB#518, Panglong based LIB#513, Mongkeung based LIB#514 and Mongpawn based LIB#517. To date, 21 villages from Panghsang village tract and 9 villages from Wan Htee village tract in Laikha township alone were forced to resettle in Marklang quarter of the town. During the drive some were beaten and some were reportedly killed, forcing many others to hide in the jungle, said another villager who is seeking asylum on the Thai-Burma border. “There were some people who are hiding in the jungle preparing to seek refuge in Thailand,” she said, “Many people will be coming soon.” Currently, about 10 people are seeking asylum in areas near Thailand. During the last engagement on 15 July, the Burma Army’s LIB 515 suffered 11 killed, 1 captured and 5 assorted weapons lost. During the 1996-98 campaign against the SSA, 1,500 villages were destroyed and more than 300,000 in southern and eastern Shan State were forcibly relocated, a third of which had escaped into Thailand. SHAN, 6 August 2009 Democratic US Senator Jim Webb will travel to Burma over the next two weeks, becoming the first US lawmaker to visit the country in more than 10 years, his office announced on Thursday. Webb – a Vietnam war veteran who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on East Asia and Pacific affairs – leaves Sunday and will also visit Thailand, Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia over a two-week span. The Virginia lawmaker, whose precise itinerary was not disclosed, aims “to explore opportunities to advance US interests in Burma and the region,” his office said in a statement. AFP, 6 August 2009

7 August 2009, Friday
Latest reports of the Burmese Army’s four-cut campaign revealed that a Shan woman from Shan State South’s Laikha township was gang-raped in front of her husband, by personnel of the Burmese Army, which has been waging a four-cut campaign since late July. “License to Rape,” a report by the Shan Women’s Action Network (SWAN), which was published in 2002, detailing 173 incidents of rape and involving 625 women and girls, had shaken the international community. SHAN, 7 August 2009 Armed conflict will reignite in Burma if the ruling junta continues to force ceasefire groups to transform into border guards, a key armed ethnic group warned yesterday. The New Mon State Party (NMSP) said in Page 174 of 226

a statement that it is keen to maintain its 14-year-old ceasefire agreement with the Burmese government, but will not accept the dissolving of its armed units before self-determination is achieved. Burma’s ruling State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) has embarked on a campaign to transform ceasefire groups into border guards in an attempt to reduce their numbers and return them to the ‘legal fold’. Ceasefire groups have said however that agreeing to the proposals would weaken the groups and effectively make them subordinated wings of the Burmese army. “Our Central Executive Committee has decided not to go along with the plan to transform us into a border militia as it promises no insurance for the people of Mon state and to ourselves,” said the NMSP’s Nai Hong Sa Boung Khine. He added however that pressure from the junta had eased recently regarding border guard transformation. The NMSP also said in its statement that existing peace in the country will be seriously threatened should the authorities resort to coercion to achieve their objective. The public declaration by the NMSP followed a similar announcement by another influential ceasefire group, the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO). The KIO said it agreed in principle with the border guard proposal but suggested that step should be taken only when the nation is at peace and after a popularly elected democratic government is in place. ”No one likes the idea about the border guard force,” said James Lum Dau from the KIO. “When the majority is opposing it and only one party likes the idea, it is not practical to be pushing for a result.” Reports surfaced last month of a campaign by the junta to use religious leaders and influential businessmen to convince ceasefire groups in Kachin state to become border guards. According to a resident of Kachin state’s capital Myitkyina, government officials had been meeting with church pastors and business owners to help put pressure on the KIO. DVB, 7 August 2009 Christian Solidarity Worldwide (CSW) is calling on the international community to unite to bring change to Burma, on the 21st anniversary of the military crackdown on pro-democracy protests. CSW’s East Asia Team Leader Benedict Rogers said: “It is essential that we do not simply remember this anniversary as yet another in Burma’s tragic history of brutal oppression. The most fitting tribute the world could pay to those who sacrificed their lives would be to unite and take concrete steps to support the brave Burmese people in their struggle for freedom. We call on the international community, working through the UN Security Council, to prioritise the release of all political prisoners in Burma, including Aung San Suu Kyi. We urge countries with influence on the regime, such as China, India, Russia and members of ASEAN, especially Singapore and Thailand, to recognize the severity of the political and humanitarian crisis in Burma, which affects the whole region, and to act to bring about change. We call on the EU, including the United Kingdom, and the United States to work with Burma’s neighbours to secure the release of political prisoners, the introduction of a universal arms embargo and the establishment of a commission of inquiry to investigate crimes against humanity in Burma. These are the steps that are required if we are to prevent another 21 years of torture, rape and murder with impunity in Burma.” CSW, 7 August 2009 Sixty five international women’s groups called on the UN Security Council on Friday to initiate action to bring Burma’s junta leaders before the International Criminal Court. “We call for the UN Security Council to start with a Commission of Inquiry to investigate the horrific campaign of terror by the military regime and to refer Senior General Than Shwe and his cronies to the International Criminal Court for all crimes including for the imprisonment of Nobel Laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in violation of international law,” the groups said in a joint statement. The statement—also signed by the Thailand-based Women’s League of Burma (WLB)—was sent to all members of the UN Security Council and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. The statement said strong international intervention in Burma was needed to end systematic human rights abuses by the Burmese junta. Irrawaddy, 7 August 2009

8 August 2009, Saturday
Exiled opposition leaders from Burma came together at the UN on Friday to present a plan for a democratic future in their homeland and ask the UN to transmit it to the country’s military rulers. The opposition leaders called for the release of Nobel Prize-winning pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other Page 175 of 226

political prisoners, a dialogue with the regime, credible elections in 2010 and a review of the constitution adopted last year. The alliance of political parties and ethnic groups asked the UN Security Council and Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon to send its reconciliation plan to the military regime in Burma. Sein Win, a cousin of Suu Kyi and head of the National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma, which describes itself as the country’s government-in-exile, called her trial a “mockery of justice.” He said the regime “has made a lot of promises, but if you look at the facts, it’s not getting any better” as human rights are violated, villages are destroyed and the country becomes more militarized. He condemned the regime’s purported nuclear ambitions. Jeremy Woodrum, co-founder of the Washington-based US Campaign for Burma, said it’s significant that Burma’s diverse political and ethnic groups joined in support of the reconciliation initiative. He said the Security Council should focus on issues it has ignored like the use of child soldiers, the rape of women from minority ethnic groups, forced labor and the destruction of villages. An arms embargo would severely undermine the military regime, he said. Irrawaddy, 8 August 2009 The Coast Guard on Thursday detained a “suspicious” North Korean ship, which had dropped anchor off Hut Bay in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, after more than six hours of high drama that ended with Indian sailors firing in the air. Officials of Army intelligence, Intelligence Bureau and other agencies are set to inspect the ship and interrogate its occupants. K R Nautiyal, DIG, Coast Guard, Andaman and Nicobar Region, told TOI over phone that “several things were amiss” about merchant vessel MV Musen, which later declared that it was carrying 16,500 tonnes of sugar from Thailand to Umm Qasr in Iraq. “She shouldn’t have dropped anchor here in the first place, she didn’t respond to our signals, and her log book was found to be vague,” Nautiyal said. North Korean ships have often been found to be involved in ferrying nuclear and missile components for regimes clandestinely seeking to acquire such arsenals. Early on, it was a recipient of clandestine transfers of weapons technology and materials from China. It has since emerged as a major source of proliferation; its alleged clientele include Pakistan, Syria, Iran, and now, Burma. In fact, some years ago, India had detained another North Korean ship that was carrying missile components for Pakistan. Concerns about North Korean vessels have heightened since reports of Pyongyang’s help to Burma’s nuclear bomb-making programme have appeared. Burma’s nuclear ambitions are also reportedly helped by some Pakistani nuclear scientists. article.wn.com, 8 August 2009 Dreams of revolution die hard in the silences of this city’s monsoon-soaked streets. Under cover of night, on a wet, deserted strip of jetty, a young opposition activist gazed toward the ragged lights on the opposite bank of the Rangoon River and talked into the wind that blew through a pair of coconut trees. “I am not afraid, but I do not want to be arrested, not at this time,” said the activist, 27, who had fled Rangoon days earlier, trailed by an intelligence agent. A flickering neon bar sign caught the contours of his disguise – a baggy anorak, a pair of glasses, a hairnet to mask his thick, dark mane. “If I’m arrested, I cannot take part in demonstrations or campaigns.” On the run or under watch, Burma’s semi-clandestine opposition activists have struggled to rouse action while their leader, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, languishes in Rangoon’s Insein Prison. She is being tried on charges that she broke the terms of her house arrest when a U.S. citizen swam across a lake in May to visit her in the compound where she has been confined for 14 of the past 20 years. For an issue as emotive as the fate of the leader whom Burmese refer to in whispers simply as the Lady, the general inaction has in many ways revealed the fragility of long-cherished visions of toppling the junta from the streets, born of memories from the mass pro-democracy protests of 1988. Some, such as the young activist, have ventured from remote village hideouts back into the cities to launch protests. In the past two months, dozens have defied barriers and a heavy police presence to hold a vigil outside Insein Prison, where Suu Kyi is being held. Others have distributed pamphlets or photos of her, and some have tried to trigger spontaneous marches with what they call “flash strikes” – unfurling banners in crowded markets in the hope that people will follow. washingtonpost.com, 9 August 2009 / Neill Staurland, D4B

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9 August 2009, Sunday
Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi faces fresh uncertainty this week over her internationally condemned trial, with her US co-defendant’s illness threatening to further delay the verdict. Suu Kyi’s lawyers have hailed the repeated delays as a sign that the judges have ‘serious legal problems’ - but analysts say the real decisions are being made by reclusive junta leader Than Shwe from the bunker capital Naypyidaw. Burma’s regime ‘has a window from August 10 and 20 because after that all the governments come back to normal and then early September you have the UN General Assembly,’ the Western diplomat said. A prison court is scheduled to hand down judgment on Nobel Peace laureate Suu Kyi and American John Yettaw when it meets on Tuesday for what was expected to be the final episode in the nearly threemonth-long legal imbroglio. But diplomats and officials said it could be postponed once again because Yettaw - who sparked the case by swimming to her lakeside home in May - remains in hospital after suffering repeated epileptic seizures. Burmese officials, also speaking anonymously, had said on Saturday that Yettaw’s health was improving slightly and that he was ‘eating well’ after fasting for weeks, but said the trial could be delayed at least another week. ‘If Yettaw’s health does not improve or deteriorates we are heading towards a postponement. We will know more on Monday,’ added a Western diplomat, asking not to be named. ‘But if his condition improves during the weekend Burma’s ruling junta have no interest in delaying further the verdict,’ the diplomat said. AFP, 9 August 2009 Exiled Burmese nationals in Bangkok on Saturday called for democracy at home as they marked the 21st anniversary of the 1988 uprising with their leader Aung San Suu Kyi behind bars. About 50 activists outside the Burmese embassy in the Thai capital donned white T-shirts and red head scarves, shouting: “We want democracy!”, with similar actions planned around the world, including Japan, Canada and France. The demonstrations mark the anniversary of the student-led uprising against Burma’s military rulers that began on 8 August 1988, and was crushed that September by the army, killing more than 3 000 people. However, in Burma’s main city of Rangoon on Saturday, the streets were quiet amid tightened security for the anniversary, with police trucks patrolling overnight as state media denounced anti-government groups. mg.co.za, 9 August 2009 Saturday was the 21st anniversary of the first popular uprising in Burma that was violently crushed by the country’s military regime.The response was so brutal that even two decades later the Burmese people continue to live in fear. Thousands of people were gunned down like flies and despite the fact that more than two decades have passed, the junta hasn’t let up on its brutal tactics. August 8, 1988, commonly referred to as “8888”, was the start of a long revolution for the Burmese people against an awful regime. More than 3,000 people’s lives were brutally cut short for simply demanding a freer society and that the government cater to their needs. In short, all the people wanted was a decent government that could provide them with the basic goods and services. However, apparently meeting these needs was far too difficult for the military junta, so they responded with bullets and tanks. Still, more than two decades later, the spirit of Burma’s democracy shows no signs of waning. Young activists continue to work hard, putting their lives on the line to tell the world about the atrocities being committed by the government against its own people. The “8888 generation’ continues in its quest for political freedom and openness despite the great risks they face. Two years ago, Burmese people from all walks of life, together with thousands of Buddhist monks, took to the streets to once again call for change. They came face to face with the soldiers who, as video footage has shown, did not once hesitate in using violent means to crush the demonstration. When the dust settled, there were reports that demonstration leaders, including saffron-robed monks, had been hunted down one by one, snatched from their beds and never seen again. As in the past, this wave of violence caused an international outcry and forced the UN Security Council to sit up and take notice. Still, progress has been slow. Early last May Cyclone Nargis devastated more than 1.2 million villagers, and the international community responded with great sympathy and an influx of humanitarian assistance. Some of this aid arrived on naval ships, but as expected the junta preferred to see its own people rot to death rather than allow alien ships to dock on its shores to unload food and medical supplies. In fact, the ships weren’t even allowed to enter Burmese Page 177 of 226

territorial waters. Asean hoped that it could use the incoming foreign assistance as a catalyst for some sort of political change. Yet the grouping and the rest of the international community learned that giving the Burmese junta the benefit of the doubt can be quite costly. No amount of pressure from Asean or even international sanctions has worked. Economic rehabilitation and restructuring, as expected, have been used as tools to strengthen the regime’s grip on power. Besides a generation of activists with an unwavering commitment to peace and national reconciliation, the 8888 Generation also brought to the forefront Aung Sang Suu Kyi, one of Burma’s best-known political prisoners. Suu Kyi, currently being subjected to a farce of a trial, faces the prospect of going to prison yet again. However, the recent decision to postpone the verdict on her suggests that the junta is wondering how to deal with a case as sensitive as hers. In a country where every little move is analysed from top to bottom, the decision could be a cause. The presiding judges said they had decided to postpone the verdict because they needed to review several “legal problems”. Strangely, in a country where the judiciary system and the junta leadership are more or less two sides of the same coin, the idea of them reviewing legal problems might offer a glimmer of hope. Editor, The Nation, 9 August 2009 Hours before the performance art show was to open to the public, the censors arrived and the grilling began. Under their watchful gaze, the nine artists performed parts of their works, aware that every movement could arouse suspicion. It is the high-stakes ritual that every public art exhibition must undergo in military-ruled Burma – scrutiny by the Ministry of Information’s censorship board. Any politics or criticism of the government can close a show and land an artist in jail. So can sexual content. For Burma’s small but vibrant arts community, the risks have never been higher. Government censorship has always been a part of life under the junta, but last year, the regime cast a wider net for its critics, jailing hundreds including comedians, writers and musicians. Saw Wai, a poet, was jailed for two years for publishing a love poem with a hidden message calling the country’s top general, Than Shwe, “power crazy.” Maung Thura, a comedian who goes by the name Zarganar, is serving a 35-year term for criticizing the government’s slow relief effort in last year’s cyclone disaster. Zeyar Thaw, a popular hip-hop musician suspected of leading an underground student movement, was sentenced to six years. For the show’s organizer, Moe Satt, the censors’ visit made for a nerve-racking morning. All the money and work he had put into coordinating the show could be undone in a single decision. In the end, he grasped the government’s official permit with a sense of relief. “There are many restrictions,” he said during an interview days later. “You never know what they are thinking. But I don’t confront. I find ways to dialogue with them. I find other ways to do what I want.” magicvalley.com, 9 August 2009 The delay in the trial of Burma’s democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has fuelled intense speculation about why the military junta is dragging out the court ruling and what its real agenda is. As Burma’s top general Than Shwe has often told subordinates, international pressure “is like an elastic band” - when it’s pulled tight nothing should be done as it only makes matters worse. When the elastic band is relaxed “we proceed with our plans”. There is no doubt that the international pressure is very taut at the moment, and the delaying tactics appear to fit neatly into Than Shwe’s strategy of dealing with the opposition leader’s continued detention. But he must know that the campaign in support of Aung San Suu Kyi will not subside. At least 30 National League for Democracy (NLD) activists were arrested in Rangoon and other towns on the eve of the original verdict hearing, although many have since been released. Some Burma watchers say that Aung San Suu Kyi being found guilty is a fait accompli. Public sentiment echoes that of the diplomats. “No one is in any doubt about the outcome,” said Moe Moe, a taxi driver in the country’s main commercial city. “Those men in green in Naypyidaw know she is the people’s hero and the real leader of this country.” Than Shwe plans to announce the formation of an interim government that will hold administrative power for at least one year, until the elections are staged, according to senior military sources in Naypyidaw. He and other senior generals around him, especially Maung Aye, plan to stand down when the time is right, after the elections planned for next year. New houses are being built for them near Maymo. The regional commander has confiscated large tracts of land there and new residences for the top military brass are already being built, according to Burmese military sources. All government ministries have been told to Page 178 of 226

complete all their outstanding work by the end of August, especially the preparation of statistical information. Aung Thaung, the minister and a close confidant of Than Shwe’s, recently told his deputies that there would be a new government soon, and he may no longer be the minister. Most of the current crop of ministers have also told their staff they will no longer be ministers by the end of the year. It is understood that members of the interim government will not be allowed to run in the elections, which is why the ministers will resign their posts and not take part in the pre-election administration. Many analysts believe Than Shwe has been waiting for the verdict to further marginalise Aung San Suu Kyi before proceeding with his plans for a a civilian administration ahead of the elections. For Than Shwe, there is another major consideration - what to do with Aung San Suu Kyi after the elections. While it may be relatively easy to keep her locked up until then, the problem is that releasing her afterwards would only ensure she would be an enormous thorn in the side of any civilian government. So Than Shwe’s plans must involve finding a way to neutralise her and at the same time give her her freedom. That is the key issue Than Shwe now has to grapple with, and until he decides what to do with her, she will remain in detention. Larry Jagan, bangkokpost.com, 9 August 2009 The United States called on Friday for the unconditional release of Burma democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi and urged the country’s military rulers to begin a process of national reconciliation. “As the world honours the long struggle of the Burmese people for a better future, we renew our call on the Burmese authorities to begin a process of national reconciliation and a genuine transition to democracy,” State Department deputy spokesman Rebert Wood said in a written statement made public on Friday. smh.com.au, 9 August 2009 / Henry Soe Win, D4B

10 August 2009, Monday
Verdicts in the trial of Burma’s democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi may be postponed again because of the continued hospitalization of the American defendant who swam to her home, a lawyer and hospital sources said Monday. AP, 10 August 2009 The delays in the court proceeding against Aung San Suu Kyi are caused by disagreements within the military regime over how severely to punish her, according to Burmese army sources. Some generals— notably Gen Thiha Thura Tin Aung Myint Oo, Secretary 1 of the ruling military council—are said to want to see her imprisoned. The general is also close to Aung Thaung, minister for Industry (1), an extreme nationalist believed to be one of the masterminds of the Depayin massacre in May 2003, when Suu Kyi’s motorcade was ambushed in central Burma. He is said to harbor a deep hatred of Suu Kyi. Observers inside Burma say Aung Thaung and Tin Aung Myint Oo are working together with the police and ministry of interior to influence the outcome of Suu Kyi’s trial. Police Chief Gen Khin Yi and Minister of Home Affairs Maung Oo are close to the Tin Aung Myint Oo faction, and Khin Yi had been holding press briefings on Suu Kyi. It is believed that hardliners have instructed the police chief to concoct the case against Suu Kyi. Last Friday, Gen Khin Yi claimed in comments to reporters that John William Yettaw, the American whose intrusion into Suu Kyi’s home initiated the case against her, had connections with Burmese exiled groups. The police chief also denied media reports that the regime had plotted with Yettaw. Speculation continues to circulate in Rangoon that Yettaw had received a large sum of money from regime leaders to intrude into Suu Kyi’s home in May. It’s also speculated that Aung Thaung collaborated with Than Shwe and Tin Aung Myint Oo to concoct the case against Suu Kyi. Others are reportedly in favor of a more lenient sentence for the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, who was being held in house detention until the start of her trial in May. Among those who appear to be reluctant to commit Suu Kyi to prison is Gen Thura Shwe Mann, Coordinator of Special Operations, Army, Navy and Air Force, according to the army source—who told The Irrawaddy he wanted to see Suu Kyi sentenced “within the framework of the law.” Irrawaddy, 10 August 2009 Page 179 of 226

Two days ahead of the scheduled verdict in the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, US Sen Jim Webb arrived for a personal visit in military-ruled Burma. Webb, the chairman of the East Asia and Pacific Affairs Subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, is known to support a pro-engagement policy with the military regime. Burma is the first country he will visit on an Asian fact-finding tour. According to the senator’s official Web site, his trip is to “explore opportunities to advance US interests in Burma and the region.” The Democratic senator of Virginia is well-known in Washington for his pro-engagement stance on Burma. He is scheduled to meet regime officials in Naypyidaw. Irrawaddy, 10 August 2009 “The Burmese are too divided to suddenly put all their history behind them,” said retired Rutgers University professor and Burma expert Josef Silverstein in an email message. The Jakarta conference was planned in part “to stay relevant to meet the criticism” that older dissident groups are too inflexible, said Sean Turnell, a Burma expert at Macquarie University in Sydney. Dissidents are considering new approaches “probably because things are looking so dire” in the country, with little change in recent years, forcing exiles to look “for a new way,” said Monique Skidmore, a Burma expert at the University of Canberra in Australia. “I’m pleased it’s happening,” she said. online.wsj.com, 10 August 2009

11 August 2009, Tuesday
At 10 a.m. word was out that at least 30 reporters and several international diplomats were to be allowed to witness the final day’s proceedings at Aung San Suu Kyi’s trial. Although cameras and mobile phones were prohibited inside the courtroom, security personnel were on hand to video everyone entering. The “special court” inside the prison compound had been elaborately and garishly decorated for the occasion. It looked like the Vaudeville Theater with the invited guests seated on red chairs staring at a stage framed in garish yellow curtains. The court convened at 10:45 a.m. when John W Yettaw, who has been receiving medical treatment recently for a stroke, was led into the court wearing a blue and white long-sleeved shirt and milkcolored trousers. Aung San Suu Kyi entered the court at 10:50 a.m. She was wearing a traditional pink blouse and a brown sarong. She looked pale and rather frail. As soon as she came in, she offered a few words of thanks to the diplomats for coming to the trial, and apologized for being late. Her companions Khin Khin Win and Win Ma Ma followed her in. At 11 a.m., the judges began reading out the case history of John W Yettaw. They concluded with the verdict: for violating the Immigration Act, he was sentenced to three years in prison with hard labor. For violating the Municipal Act which prohibits swimming in Inya Lake, he was sentenced to one year in prison with hard labor. The judges then turned to the case of Aung San Suu Kyi and everyone in the courtroom maintained a heavy silence. The diplomats and journalists concentrated intently. Suu Kyi’s lawyers stood up to pay respect to the court. The Lady also stood up for a short while. Her mood was calm. Yettaw, on the other hand, sat forlorn with his head bowed, although his lawyer was standing. The judge proceeded to read out the case history. It took quite some time. He concluded by stating that it was incorrect to assert that the 1974 constitution had been abolished; it is still in effect. Therefore, he said, Aung San Suu Kyi, Khin Khin Win and Win Ma Ma were each sentenced to three years in prison with hard labor under Section 22 of the Law to Safeguard the State against Dangers of Those Desiring to Cause Subversive Acts (1975). Yettaw was also sentenced to another three years in prison for violating Section 22 of the same act. After reading out the verdicts, the mood among the diplomats became anxious and agitated, but the judges left the courtroom immediately. Then, while Suu Kyi was talking to her lawyers and preparing to leave the courtroom, Minister for Home Affairs Maj-Gen Maung Oo walked in and announced that he had a prepared statement that the diplomats and journalists might like to hear. He read out an order by Sr-Gen Than Shwe stating that if the court found Suu Kyi guilty, he would reduce the sentence in half and suspend it. If she would live “well” at her Inya Lake home under the restrictions imposed on her, she would be granted amnesty before her suspended sentence had expired. He stated that the restrictions that Aung San Suu Kyi, Khin Khin Win and Win Ma Ma must follow are: they must live in her residence located on University Avenue; they are only allowed to go out into the house’s yard; they can get access to doctors and nurses for health reasons; Suu Kyi can meet guests in accordance with permission Page 180 of 226

from the authorities concerned; she can watch local TV channels such as Myawaddy and MRTV (Myanmar Radio and Television), as well as local newspapers and journals; and she can request paper if she needs to write something. Apart from the above restrictions, if she wants to do something, she can do it if she gets permission from the authorities concerned, and she must live under these restrictions for the next 18 months, Maung Oo said. Everyone filtered out the courtroom at 12:30. Irrawaddy, 12 August 2010 Suu Kyi was sentenced to three years jail and hard labour by a court in Rangoon on Tuesday, but the head of the ruling military junta commuted the punishment to 18 months house arrest. The court sentenced her on charges of breaching the terms of her house arrest after a bizarre incident in which an American man, John Yettaw, swam to her lakeside house in May this year. ANI, 11 August 2009 A Burmese court has found pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kui guilty of violating her house arrest, but the head of the military-ruled country says she can serve out a 1 1/2-year sentence under house arrest. The court initially sentenced Suu Kyi on Tuesday to a three-year prison term. But after a five-minute recess, the country’s home minister entered the courtroom and read aloud a special order from junta chief Than Shwe. The order said Than Shwe was cutting the sentence in half to 1 1/2 years and that it could be served under house arrest. Suu Kyi has been in detention for 14 of the last 20 years, mostly under house arrest. Tin Win, Federation of Workers’ Union of Burmese Citizens (in Japan), 10 August 2009, 11:24 PM. 1. The Burmese military dictators constantly attempt to keep Daw Aung San Suu Kyi out of the people’s struggles for democracy and freedom, by any means, includingcommitting a plot to endanger her life and her unjust detention. 2. Such attempts were evidently proven by the following incidents either committed or engineered by the regime. • Various forms of obstruction during the organizing trip of the National League for Democracy (NLD) in Irrawaddy Division on April 5, 1989 and particularly, she was even threatened at gunpoint by a military officer • The attack on the convoy of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her entourage by members of pro-regime Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA) in Rangoon on November 9, 1995 • The assassination attempt near Depayin village in Upper Burma orchestrated by military generals on May 30, 2003 • Her terms of house arrest since July 20, 1989 After the failed attempt to end her life at the ‘Depayin Massacre’ in 2003, she has unjustly been put under detention for almost six and half years, and even in accordance with their legal reference applied to her detention, her terms of house arrest would end soon. 3. With no more legal ground for the SPDC government to continue to detain Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, it would be forced to release her, so the regime has used the case of Mr Yettaw invading her home in order to keep her away from the NLD and the people. This is just a political plot made by the SPDC regime. This is just another shocking crime committed by the Burmese military government against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. 4. It is obvious that this unjust imprisonment of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is for no other reason than to weaken the NLD’s political leadership and the struggle of the people of Burma including ethnic groups for equality and democracy; ensuring the regime's political agenda for permanent military rule in Burma. 5. We, the people of Burma, will never be freed from an oppression of military dictators if we continue to passively let their acts of terror against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the NLD, the ethnic groups, and all walks of lives in the country carry on. 6. Therefore, the All Burma Monks Alliance (ABMA), 88 Generation Students and All Burma Federation of Student Unions (ABFSU) strongly condemn the Burmese military dictators for their unjust imprisonment of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. Page 181 of 226

Furthermore, we hereby state that we will double our efforts for release of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and political prisoners, and together with all the people of Burma, continue unwaveringly our struggle for democracy. 11 August 2009 The Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) (AAPP) today strongly condemned the guilty verdict and three year jail term with hard labour - commuted by Senior General Than Shwe to 18 months under house arrest - handed down to Nobel Peace Laureate and democratic opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and her two live-in party members Daw Khin Khin Win and Daw Win Ma Ma. American man John Yettaw was also found guilty of intruding into Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s home, and sentenced to seven years with hard labour. “There is no justice, no rule of law, and no independent judiciary in Burma,” said Tate Naing, Secretary of AAPP. “The continued detention of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is the jailing of Burma’s future. She is the true leader of Burma.” The trial has been yet another travesty of justice perpetrated by the regime since it illegally assumed power in 1988. Since then, more than 10,000 people have been arrested and jailed for advocating for democracy and human rights. Today there are more than 2,100 political prisoners in Burma’s detention centres, labour camps and jails. Bo Kyi, Joint Secretary of AAPP, said, “The fact that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has been sentenced to house arrest rather than jail is immaterial. The point is the regime wants her to have a criminal record so they can prevent her from standing as a candidate in future elections.” Bo Kyi continued, “It is only through the Burmese people’s efforts – backed by the international community - that Burma will move towards a new political system where the rule of law prevails, equality reigns and the right to live free from fear is fully realized.” AAPP today calls on the UK and US to show international political leadership on Burma at the United Nations. The UK chairs the UN Security Council in August whilst the US has its turn in September. Together they should press the UN Security Council to pass an arms embargo on Burma, and initiate a Commission of Inquiry into crimes against humanity in the country. AAPP, 11 August 2009 / Aung Myo Thein Dr Myint Cho, who represents exiled Burmese parliamentarians in Australia, says the court’s decision is outrageous and politically motivated. “I know it is a deliberate act to keep Aung San Suu Kyi confined so she can not participate in the planned elections in 2010,” Dr Cho said. “We call on the international community, particularly the Australian Government, to act on Burma now, to secure release of Aung San Suu Kyi and all remaining political prisoners in Burma.” Burma Campaign Australia co-ordinator Zetty Brake says the sentence and continued detention of Suu Kyi is a travesty of justice. “Unfortunately we’re not surprised by this verdict. It had been the regime’s plan all along to ensure that Aung San Suu Kyi was further isolated from the people of Burma and excluded from their sham 2010 elections,” she said. abc.net.au, 11 August 2009 / Henry Soe Win ASEAN-based activists today reiterated their support for an international arms embargo and a UN Security Council Commission of Inquiry into crimes against humanity in Burma, in the wake of the sentencing of Burmese democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. The sham trial, farcical verdict, and illegitimate jail sentence that was bizarrely ‘commuted’ to house arrest is the latest in a series of ploys designed by Burma’s military regime to ensure that the most viable pro-democracy candidates are excluded from the upcoming 2010 elections. “The SPDC may hope that its twisted version of mercy to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will convince the international community to ease off the pressure. The international community must not be fooled. Even now, the regime continues to commit atrocities against ethnic communities in Eastern Burma, torturing and killing defenseless men, women, and children,” asserted Debbie Stothard, Coordinator of the Alternative ASEAN Network on Burma (Altsean-Burma). 11 August 2009 The Internationa Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) categorically denounces this Tuesday’s verdict against Aung San Suu Kyi and demands her immediate and unconditional release. After what the ITUC regards as a mock trial, the leader of the Burmese opposition was initially sentenced to three years in prison with forced labour for breaching the terms of her house arrest, though the sentence was subsequently commuted by the head of the junta Than Shwe to 18 months’ house arrest. For the ITUC it is quite clear that Page 182 of 226

this mock trial was mainly aimed at ensuring that the key figure in the Burmese opposition could play no part in the forthcoming national “elections”, due to be held in 2010. Unless some form of pardon is announced between now and 2010, today’s sentence is indeed likely to prevent Aung San Suu Kyi from standing in those elections. ituc-csi.org, 11 August 2009 The European Union is preparing sanctions against Burma that include restricting trade with state-owned firms and barring certain individuals from entering the bloc, Sweden said on Tuesday. The planned measures are in response to the sentencing of opposition leader Aung Suu Kyi to 18 months in detention for violating an internal security law. Fredrik Reinfeldt, prime minister of Sweden, which currently holds the EU presidency, said in a statement the sentence was “unlawful” and said the EU called on the unconditional release of Suu Kyi. “These sanctions include measures such as trade restrictions against certain state owned companies and prohibition of entry into the EU for the four key individuals responsible for the decision,” he said. Reuters, 11 August 2009 French President Nicolas Sarkozy on Tuesday condemned the ‘brutal and unjust verdict’ handed to Burma human rights activist Aung San Suu Kyi by a Rangoon court and called for new sanctions against Burma’s military regime. An Elysee Palace statement said Sarkozy urged that the sanctions must in particular ‘strike the revenues from the exploitation of forests and rubies’ in Burma. The only aim of the ‘political trial’ of Suu Kyi was to prevent the Nobel Peace Prize laureate from continuing her battle for a free Burma, the statement said. monstersandcritics.com, 11 August 2009 BAN KI MOON DEPLORES AUNG SAN SUU KYI VERDICT; URGES HER IMMEDIATE RELEASE • Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is deeply disappointed by the verdict in respect of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. The Secretary-General strongly deplores this decision. • The Secretary-General urges the Government to immediately and unconditionally release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and to engage with her without delay as an essential partner in the process of national dialogue and reconciliation. • Unless she and all other political prisoners in Burma are released and allowed to participate in free and fair elections, the credibility of the political process will remain in doubt. UN Statement, 11 August 2009 / Ko Ko Lay US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, in a statement released during her tour of Africa, said Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi ‘should not have been tried and should not have been convicted.’ Reacting to the new 18-month house arrest sentence, Clinton again called on the Burma military rulers to lift Suu Kyi’s house arrest, and also to release the more than 2,000 political prisoners being held in the country’s prisons. ‘The Burmese junta should immediately end its repression of so many in this country, start a dialogue with the opposition and the ethnic groups,’ said the statement issued from Washington. Failure to do this, Clinton warned, would mean ‘the elections they have scheduled for next year will have absolutely no legitimacy.’ monstersandcritics.com, 11 August 2009 World leaders have reacted with anger and disappointment to the conviction of Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi for violating security laws. The UN called for her immediate release after she was sentenced to a further 18 months of house arrest - where she has spent 14 of the past 20 years. The US, the European Union, Britain and France were among those who condemned the verdict. But trading partners China and India have made no public comment. The UN Security Council adjourned an emergency session without agreeing a response to the sentencing, and will resume deliberations on Wednesday. Britain’s ambassador to the UN, John Sawers, who is head of the Security Council this month, said some countries, including China and Russia, had asked for more time to consider a draft statement condemning the verdict. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said he “strongly deplores” the verdict and called for Ms Suu Kyi to be freed. “Unless she and all other political prisoners in Burma are released and allowed to participate in Page 183 of 226

free and fair elections, the credibility of the political process will remain in doubt,” he said. The UN special envoy to Burma, Ibrahim Gambari, said Ms Suu Kyi was “absolutely indispensable to the resumption of a political process that can lead to national reconciliation”. In Asia, the governments of Indonesia and the Philippines have been outspoken in condemning the sentence. But, says the BBC’s Jill McGivering, it is notable that two of Burma’s biggest trading partners and allies - India and China - have avoided public comment on the trial. India and China, with Thailand, have been accused by critics of propping up the military government, especially in recent years as growing economic sanctions have strangled its trade relationship with the West. BBC, 11 August 2009

12 August 2009, Wednesday

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NLD Statement dated 12 August 2009 No. 24 Page 185 of 226

NLD Statement dated 12 August 2009 No. 25

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“It was at least a relief that Daw Suu is kept in her house. I had thought the government would keep her inside Insein prison,” said Moe Moe, a 45-year-old school teacher. Her conviction and continued detention were condemned by world leaders and sparked demonstrations in cities from London to Japan on Tuesday. The European Union began preparing new sanctions against the country’s military regime, and a group of 14 Nobel laureates, including the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, called on the U.N. Security Council to take strong action against the country. President Barack Obama termed the conviction a violation of the universal principle of human rights and said Suu Kyi should be released immediately. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton called for the release of more than 2,000 political prisoners, including Yettaw, who was convicted along with Suu Kyi and sentenced to seven years’ imprisonment with hard labor. Yettaw’s lawyer, Khin Maung Oo, said Wednesday that he was preparing documents to file an appeal. “I will try my utmost to get my client deported as quickly as possible, especially because of his health condition,” Oo said, adding that he did not immediately know whether Yettaw was being detained in a cell or at the prison hospital. Yettaw, 53, spent a week in the hospital for epileptic seizures before the verdict. He is also said to suffer from asthma and diabetes. “How is he going to do hard labor if he is so ill?” his former wife, Yvonne Yettaw, told The Associated Press by telephone from Palm Springs, California. “Maybe they’ll realize he won’t make it seven years, and they’ll send him home.” Virginia Sen. Jim Webb will visit Burma later this week as part of a five-nation Asia tour, prompting some speculation that he will try to negotiate Yettaw’s handover to the U.S. AP, 12 August 2009 As chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Thailand released a statement on Wednesday in which it expressed “deep disappointment” at the Burmese court’s ruling on Tuesday and stressed Burma hold free and fair elections by including all political parties when the country goes to the polls next year. Bangkok Post, 14 August 2009 Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd declared himself to be “deeply dismayed” by Suu Kyi’s conviction and sentencing under Burma’s “Law Protecting the State Against the Dangers of Subversive Elements.” “The Austarlian Government is convinced that Aung San Suu Kyi was tried on spurious charges and not granted a fair hearing,” Mr Rudd said. Foreign Minister Stephen Smith said yesterday he had instructed the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to call in Burmese Ambassador Hla Myint to express Australia’s “dismay” at Suu Kyi’s conviction and sentencing. Mr Smith said Suu Kyi’s sentence would remove any protect of her participating in Burma’s elections, scheduled for next year. He said Australia’s Ambassador to Burma, Michelle Chan, would also convey the Australian Government’s views directly to the Burmese regime. Mr Smith said the Governmnet would update Australis’s financial sanctions against the Burmese regime, while Mr Rudd announced that Radio Australia would resume transmissions to Burma. Coalition foreigh affairs spokewoman Julie Bishop also condemned the sentencing. Meanwhile, Burma Campaign Australia spokeswoman Zetty Blake said the regime “never had any intention of releasing Aung San Suu Kyi because they know that she will unite the country and lead the people in their struggle for democracy.” The Canberra Times, 12 August 2009 / U Kin Oung Four independent United Nations human rights experts on Wednesday deplored the confinement of Aung San Suu Kyi to 18 months of house arrest, and reiterated their call for her immediate and unconditional release. “This was a baseless trial convened by the Government of Burma to exclude Aung San Suu Kyi from the 2010 elections,” the mandate holders stated. The charges laid against the leader of the National League for Democracy and Nobel Peace Prize laureate were in violation of international human rights law. “The court was not independent, judicial guarantees were disregarded, and charges under the State Protection Act were unsubstantive. As we have stated time and again, this trial should never have occurred in the first place,” the four UN experts said. This view was confirmed by the most recent opinion adopted by the UN Working Group on arbitrary detention on Aung San Suu Kyi, which declared the continuation of her house arrest to be arbitrary (Opinion 46/2008). Aung San Suu Kyi was sentenced under article 22 of Burma’s State Protection Law 1975 after an uninvited intruder swam across Lake Inya and spent two nights at Aung San Suu Kyi’s home. “If the State assumes the responsibility to prevent access to the house of Aung Page 187 of 226

San Suu Kyi and has disciplined, even punished, 20 security officials in connection with the incident,” the experts said, “how can she then be held criminally liable for an unwanted intrusion?” The State Protection Law 1975 is based on Burma’s 1974 Constitution, which was annulled when the military government took power in 1988, prompting the Working Group on arbitrary detention to conclude that Aung San Suu Kyi’s continuing house arrest lacks any legal basis (Opinions Nos. 9/2004 and 46/2008). “In addition to the fact that the holding of this trial was unlawful,” the experts said, “we are also deeply concerned about numerous reports of irregularities in the way it was conducted.” “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights guarantees the right not to be arbitrarily detained, as well as the rights to due process and a fair trial, and to freedom of opinion, expression and assembly,” the experts said. “None of these have been complied with.” They rejected the suggestion that the trial was a purely internal affair as is also evidenced by three statements concerning the situation in Burma and Aung San Suu Kyi in particular issued by the United Nations Security Council on May 25, 2009; May 2, 2008; and October 11, 2007. Aung San Suu Kyi has been subjected to house arrest for almost 14 of the past 20 years. She was rearrested on May 10, 2003, and her house arrest was subsequently extended until it reached the maximum term permitted under Burma’s own laws in May 2008. It was then illegally extended for another year by the authorities. Aung San Suu Kyi was sentenced for violating the terms of this house arrest order. Two of her aides were also sentenced under Section 109 of the Penal Code for aiding and abetting another in committing a crime. “This case has been riddled with irregularities from start to finish,” the four experts concluded. The four Special Procedures mandate holders making the statement were the Vice Chairperson-Rapporteur of the Working Group on arbitrary detention, El Hadji Malick Sow; the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, Frank La Rue Lewy; the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Margaret Sekaggya; and the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Burma, Tomas Ojea Quintana. KUNA, 12 August 2009 From the streets of London to the White House in Washington, calls are multiplying for the immediate and unconditional release of Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. But the generals ruling Burma appear indifferent to the outcry over the latest sentence handed down to her. But international protests in support of Suu Kyi are being accompanied by calls for tougher santions against the regime, with the European Union set to lead the way. The Burmese pro-democracy leader has already spent 14 of the past 20 years in detention. She was sentenced to a further 18 months of house arrest for violating security laws after an American man swam uninvited to her lakeside home in May. He has been given seven years hard labour. The junta stands accused of delivering a sentence designed to keep the Nobel peace laureate out of next year’s elections. An emergency UN Security Council meeting was adjourned, with no official statement on the verdict. Euronews.net, 12 August 2009

13 August 2009, Thursday
The Burmese junta’s latest scorched earth campaign in Shan state has in the last three weeks destroyed 500 homes and uprooted around 10,000 civilians, according to a data released today. Burma’s eastern Shan state has long been a site of conflict between the Burmese army and armed opposition groups, driven in part by its abundance of opium poppy plantations. Data compiled by Shan Human Rights Foundation (SHRF), the Shan Women’s Action Network (SWAN) and other Shan community-based organizations show that since 27 July, around 40 villages have been relocated by the army. According to the groups, it is the single largest forced relocation in Shan state since a campaign from 1996 to 1998 saw the uprooting of 300,000 villagers, many of whom fled to Thailand. Much of the campaign has focused on Laikha township, where over 100 villagers, including women, have been arrested and tortured, and three have died. Many of these were displaced by the previous campaign. “One young woman was shot while trying to retrieve her possessions from her burning house, and her body thrown into a pit latrine,” said a joint press release. “Another woman was gang-raped in front of her husband by an officer and three of his troops.” The groups have called on the UN Security Council to set up a Commission of Enquiry to investigate what they believe to be crimes Page 188 of 226

against humanity. They have also demanded that members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) “seriously review their engagement with this pariah nation”. “The regime brazenly committed these crimes even as the whole world was watching them during the trial of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,” said Charm Tong of SWAN. “They are thumbing their noses at the international community.” DVB, 13 August 2009 In a process of ganging up, which could put the Burmese military junta on the back foot, four ceasefire ethnic armed groups, which rejected the regime’s proposal to transform into a ‘Border Guard Force’ (BGF), formed a military alliance last month to counter the junta’s military overtures. The formation of the military alliance was disclosed by the United Wa State Army (UWSA). The ceasefire groups, which rejected the junta’s proposal of changing to BGF are the Kachin Independence Organization (KIO), the United Wa State Army (UWSA), Myanmar Nationalities Democratic Alliance Army (MNDAA) and the National Democratic Alliance Army (NDAA). “We reached an agreement about two months ago. We don’t want any more war. We want peace. But we have to defend ourselves. Having reached an agreement, however, we are united,” an officer of the UWSA told Mizzima. According to the agreement, if one of the ceasefire groups breaks the agreement with the junta, other ceasefire groups will presume their ceasefire agreements with the regime have also broken, he added. Sino-Burma border based Burmese observer Aung Kyaw Zaw said that this military alliance may be based on their common position of respective national objectives and rejection of the junta’s proposal to transform their armies into BGF. “There are basically common central works along the border. They have a common national objective. They have mutual understanding of mutual assistance among them if it is necessary. Rather than having an agreement, they have many common positions among them. Moreover they have the same military experience over the years,” he said. Mizzima, 13 August 2009 Lim Kit Siang, vice-president of the ASEAN Inter-Parliamentary Caucus on Burma, said the junta had shown “utter contempt” for the organisation’s ideals and that regional governments must now respond with more than words. “The time has come for ASEAN to seriously consider expulsion or at least suspension of Burma from ASEAN,” he said in a statement. Analysts said the timing of the latest drama was unfortunate as ASEAN members had just forged agreement on the human rights body. AFP, 13 August 2009 The European Union on Thursday extended its sanctions against the Burmese regime following the trial of Aung San Suu Kyi, slapping a visa ban and asset freeze on members of the judiciary. The 27 EU nations also widened their existing assets freeze to cover all businesses owned and controlled by members of the regime and their associates. The moves were taken “in reaction to the verdict against Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and given the gravity of the violation of her fundamental rights,” the European Council said in a written statement approved by all 27 EU capitals. Under the new restrictive measures “members of the judiciary responsible for the verdict are added to the existing list of persons and entities subject to a travel ban and to an assets freeze,” the statement said. The move comes after Tuesday’s conviction of opposition leader and Nobel Peace Laureate Suu Kyi and an American man who swam to the lakeside home where she was already under house arrest. indiatimes.com, 13 August 2009 Two days after Burma sent opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi into further house arrest, regional governments are fine-tuning their responses. The Indonesian government has been criticised for returning to the dictatorship era after it blocked a meeting of Burmese exiles in Jakarta. Indonesia has stopped a twoday conference of exiled Burmese opposition groups that was due to discuss plans for a possible future transition to democracy in Burma. The Indonesian authorities said foreign groups that question other governments were not allowed to operate in Indonesia. But a member of parliament in Jakarta, Eva Kusuma Sundari, accused the authorities there of caving in to pressure from Burma. She said she had seen a letter from the Burmese embassy objecting to the meeting and threatening damage to Burma-Indonesia relations if it was allowed to continue. She expressed amazement that the Burmese Embassy could dictate Indonesian government policy, and said the embassy was clearly interfering in Indonesia's domestic affairs. She said Page 189 of 226

some of the Burmese meetings would continue, but in an informal capacity. The Jakarta Globe newspaper described the government’s move as draconian, and “harking back to the New Order era under former dictator Suharto”. BBC, 13 August 2009 Ministry of Foreign and Trade Spokesperson’s Comment on the Verdict against Aung San Suu Kyi 2009-08-13 15:26 Spokesperson’s Office 1. The Government of the Republic of Korea deems it regrettable that the Burmese government has convicted and sentenced Aung San Suu Kyi to 18 months of house arrest. 2. The Government of the Republic of Korea urges the Burmese government to release Aung San Suu Kyi and all other political prisoners and hopes that it will take the path toward genuine national reconciliation and democratization through substantive dialogue with all of its political groups. MOFAT, 16 August 2009 / Yan Naing Htun International responses to Tuesday’s sentencing of Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s pro-democracy leader, to an extended period of house arrest have split on Asian and Western lines. The leaders of Britain, France and the United States all strongly condemned the one-and-a-half-year sentence as a travesty of justice and the trial as a sham. United Nations secretary general Ban Ki-moon added his voice to renewed calls for her immediate release. Most Asian countries - apart from the Philippines and Indonesia - have been more muted in their response, labeling the decision more diplomatically as “a mistake”. Suu Kyi’s detention is certain to increase divisions between the West and Asia on how to encourage genuine political reform in military run Burma. At least that is what the junta’s top general Than Shwe appears to be counting on, as he moves forward with plans to introduce “guided democracy”, including tentative multi-party elections scheduled for later next year. Suu Kyi was handed an additional 18 months under house arrest after being convicted of violating state security laws. Her alleged crime: to offer food and shelter to an uninvited US citizen, John Yettaw, who secretly swam to enter her lakeside residence in the old capital of Rangoon. Suu Kyi denied abetting Yettaw, though she always expected to be convicted, her lawyers told Asia Times Online. According to her Burmese lawyers, she will challenge the verdict in the High Court. She has also instructed her defense counsel to exhaust all legal avenues in challenging the regime, according to her American lawyer, Jared Gensher. “A shamefully predictable verdict, and a sentence shamelessly designed to constitute a concession to international pressure and concern,” said Amnesty International’s Bangkok-based Burma researcher, Benjamin Zawacki. The international hue and cry may not force Burma’s generals to reconsider their decision, but it may yet force them to revise their strategy. The entire purpose of the junta’s touted “roadmap to democracy” was to give international credibility to the civilian government installed after next year’s elections. Polls that exclude Suu Kyi, analysts say, will not pass the democratic sniff test with most Western democracies. “The military rulers are frightened of her because they know that if she was allowed to run in the elections, the whole country would vote for her,” claimed Soe Aung, a spokesperson for the exiled political opposition based in Thailand. By sentencing her to 18 months, the regime will effectively keep her out of public sight until after the election is held next year. According to sources in Naypyidaw, Than Shwe is still open to some sort of a rapprochement with Washington. China and Singapore, key Burma allies, apparently earlier urged the junta to seize the opportunity presented of a possible US review of its Burma policy in exchange for certain concessions, including the release of political prisoners. But judging by Obama’s and other Western leaders’ strident response to Suu Kyi’s sentencing, that deal is off the table. Larry Jagan, Asia Times Online, 13 August 2009 The United Kingdom supports Thailand’s call for the Burmese junta to release all political prisoners from detention, British ambassador to Thailand Quinton Quayle said after a meeting with Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva on Thursday. Thailand, as chair of the Assocation of of Southeast Asean Nations, on Wednesday issued a statement calling for the immediate release of all political prisoners, including opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, to enable them to participate in the general election due next year. Mr Quayle said he and Mr Abhisit discussed the sentence the court at Rangoon’s Insein Prison gave to Mrs Suu Kyi - three years in jail with hard labour for breaching the terms of her house arrest after an American, John Yettaw, Page 190 of 226

swam uninvited to her lakeside home in May. The sentence was later commuted by Than Shwe, chairman of the ruling State Peace and Development Council, to 18 months under house arrest. “I agree with the statement issued by Thailand, as the Asean chair, for all political prisoners to be released. The court sentence will not help ensure any political progress in Burma in the future,” said the ambassador. Mr Quayle said the European Union and the United Nations were considering imposing sanctions which would not be aimed at Burma but at the Burmese government, especially the military. “We are considering what to do to spur international reaction against the Burmese court’s ruling,” he said. Bangkok Post, 13 August 2010 The U.N. Security Council agreed after two days of talks to issue a statement Thursday calling on Burma’s military government to immediately release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and all other political prisoners. The council's 15 member nations voiced “serious concern at the conviction and sentencing of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and its political impact” and reaffirmed three previous statements since 2007. They also urged the ruling junta to begin a genuine dialogue with the Nobel Peace Prize laureate and other political parties and ethnic groups. A Burma court on Tuesday convicted the Nobel Peace Prize laureate of violating the terms of her previous house arrest by sheltering an uninvited American visitor. In a nod to Burma’s colonial past, the council’s member nations again pledged a commitment to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Burma, but said that “the future of Burma lies in the hands of all of its people.” AP, 13 August 2009

14 August 2009, Friday
A report in the Jurist notes that lawyers for Burmese opposition pro-democracy advocate Aung San Suu Kyi and American John Yettaw have said that they will file appeals against Tuesday’s guilty verdicts. Suu Kyi and Yettaw were convicted of violating state security laws after Suu Kyi, who was under house arrest, allowed Yettaw to stay in her home after he swam across a lake to visit her. Suu Kyi was sentenced to 18 more months of house arrest, and Yettaw was sentenced to seven years in prison, with four years of hard labour. Meanwhile, world leaders and human rights groups have continued to criticise Suu Kyi’s trial and conviction. The Dalai Lama is quoted as saying he was ‘deeply saddened’ by the sentence and called for her release. A spokesperson for UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon said he ‘strongly deplores this decision’, and that he ‘urges the government to immediately and unconditionally release’ Suu Kyi. The report also quotes Amnesty International as calling the verdict ‘shameful’. legalbrief.co.za, 14 August 2009 Win Tin, an 80-year-old veteran opposition member released from jail last year after serving 19 years in solitary confinement, said: “Of course, we have to struggle, not just for democracy but for the release of our leader. It’s almost impossible – the regime has a very detailed plan to keep her detained. They want to keep her out of politics because she is so powerful and so popular.” The Independent, 14 August 2009 Burma Prime Minister General Thein Sein met with visiting Democratic Senator of the United States Jim Webb in the new capital of Naypyidaw Friday afternoon, the state-run Burma Radio and Television reported. Webb also met with the State Constitution Drafting Commission, led by Chief Justice U Aung Toe, the report said. chinaview.cn, 14 August 2009 Thailand, as chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, sought a consensus Friday from the other nine ASEAN members as to whether the group should seek a pardon for Burma’s democratic icon Aung San Suu Kyi. Thai Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya told reporters by telephone from Kuala Lumpur that he had sent out a letter to all the other nine ASEAN members to seek the consensus. The Philippines denounced the court ruling as “incomprehensible and deplorable” and renewed its call for Suu Kyi’s “immediate and unconditional release.” Malaysia expressed “deep disappointment” and said it would consult with other ASEAN members on the development. While Singapore also expressed disappointment Page 191 of 226

and hope that Suu Kyi will be allowed to participate in the political process as soon as possible, it commended Burma’s generals for reducing her sentence and keeping her out of jail. Indonesia’s Foreign Ministry said it is “strongly disappointed” with the court verdict. Vietnam did not comment directly on the ruling but urged Rangoon to “adopt measures to promote national reconciliation and dialogue between concerned parties in Burma.” Kyodo, 14 August 2009 China may well be backing Naypyidaw, when it comes to democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi and the over 2,000 political prisoners in Burma, but it has adopted a tough stance, twice in a week, when the Burmese Army tried to impose itself on one of the former communist armies, according to sources on the Sino-Burma border. On August 8, it had successfully convinced the Burmese Army, which had entered the Kokang territory “without our permission” to carry out an inspection on a location suspected to have an arms factory. “Due to China’s intervention, the Burmese Army pulled out,” said a local source. China was the only country which supported Naypyidaw’s decision to continue Aung San Suu Kyi’s house arrest on August 11. SHAN, 14 August 2009 / Hla Kyaing, burmanet.org Countries around the world have condemned the sentence. US President Barack Obama said the sentence was “unjust” and called for the release of Suu Kyi and thousands of other political prisoners. “Suppressing ideas never succeeds in making them go away,” he said. The European Union said it would reinforce sanctions against the regime and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, of which Burma is a member, issued an expression of disappointment, an unusual move for the regional group. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who has shown keen interest in getting the Burmese government to release Suu Kyi, demanded her unconditional release. Korea Herald, 14 August 2009 / Tin Kyi, Burma Related News The European Union has added four state-run media outlets to its list of Burmese sanctions targets in response to the court ruling against pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Four media enterprises – the Myanmar News and Periodicals Enterprise, which publishes three state-run newspapers; the Tatmadaw Telecasting Unit, which runs Myawaddy Television; Myanmar Radio and Television; and the Myanmar Motion Picture Enterprise—were added to the revised sanctions list published on Friday. The EU stated that it put the media organizations on the list because they have been involved in promoting the regime’s policies and propaganda. Wai Moe, Irrawaddy, 14 August 2009 The guilty verdict issued by Burma’s military junta against Aung San Suu Kyi has made the country’s political weather gloomier and murkier. Most citizens, including military officials, are upset at the unjust and arbitrary decision of the court. It is likely to engender more social unrest in the near future. The verdict handed down by the Insein Prison Court on Tuesday found the Nobel laureate and key opposition leader guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest. The only significant rival to the ruling junta has been consigned to another 18 months of house arrest. The scene in the court was very theatrical. First Thaung Nyunt, the puppet judge, stated the anticipated sentence – three years in prison with hard labor. Next, the junta’s Home Minister Maung Oo read out an order from Senior General Than Shwe, commuting the sentence to 18 months under house arrest. Than Shwe cautiously adjusted the sentence to deliver the word that he is not a stupid villain and he does not want to quarrel with the international community. But his attempt was in vain. In essence, Than Shwe wanted the Lady to remain in custody until after the 2010 election. In fact, what both the international community and the people of Burma want is to free Aung San Suu Kyi immediately without any condition. The verdict was strongly opposed by a group of Nobel laureates including the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. “This illegal verdict is just one more instance of the junta’s contempt for justice, security and democracy for the Burmese people,” pronounced Nobel laureate Jody Williams. The group of Nobel laureates demanded that the U.N. Security Council investigate “war crimes and crimes against humanity” committed by the military junta that rules Burma. The leaders of Britain, France and the United States all strongly condemned the 18-month sentence as contempt for justice and the trial as a sham. U.N. SecretaryGeneral Ban Ki-moon added his voice to renewed calls for her immediate release. In conclusion, Burma is Page 192 of 226

at a crucial crossroads now. Than Shwe’s verdict against Aung San Suu Kyi will have an enduring impact on the unfortunate nation. This verdict will create more civil defiance and new civil wars in Burma. All ethnic nationalities, including the Burmese, have a strong determination to fight for their freedom, justice and equality. They also know clearly that the junta’s 2010 election is a pair of iron shackles to enslave them. Therefore, since Than Shwe has rejected the Lady’s offer of national reconciliation, it is unavoidable that he will face new challenges including civil disobedience and rebellion. Zin Linn, upiasia.com, 14 August 2009 Thailand is continuing to oppose sanctions against Burma’s gems to put more pressure on the military regime after the sentence imposed on opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi this week. Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva said yesterday Thailand had no problem with other countries beefing up arms sanctions against Burma but banning gems would affect the Kingdom. Thailand and China are the two main importers of gems from Burma. The US has banned imports of rubies, jade and other stones direct from Burma and through third countries. Mr Abhisit made clear Thailand’s position on gems sanctions in talks with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Bangkok on July 21. Burma faces stiffer sanctions after it confined Mrs Suu Kyi to her house for a further 18 months. A court found her guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest when US national John Yettaw swam across a lake to stay uninvited at her villa for two days in May. The Burma issue is on the agenda at a meeting today in Manila between Mr Abhisit and Philippine President Gloria Arroyo. British ambassador to Thailand Quinton Quayle said after talks with Mr Abhisit that more measures would be imposed on Burma if the junta continued to ignore calls for Mrs Suu Kyi’s release. “We will consider measures shortly to put more pressure on Burma because the international community disagrees with this kind of verdict,’ Mr Quayle said after his meeting with the prime minister. Britain now holds the presidency of the United Nations Security Council. I think Prime Minister Abhisit and his foreign minister, Kasit Piromya, will have to hold talks with all Asean country leaders in order to find out what next steps can be taken, apart from issuing a Asean statement,” Mr Quayle said. As chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, Thailand released a statement on Wednesday in which it expressed “deep disappointment” at the Burmese court’s ruling on Tuesday and stressed Burma hold free and fair elections by including all political parties when the country goes to the polls next year. Bangkok Post, 14 August 2009 The Obama administration gave its blessing to Democratic Sen. Jim Webb’s trip to military-run Burma, a visit criticized by dissident groups and conservatives who argue that it validates a violent junta accused of massive abuses against its people. Webb’s visit comes amid world anger at the conviction Tuesday of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi along with an American citizen, and the beginning of another 18month house arrest for the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. In a letter to Webb, three Burmese dissident groups expressed amazement that the senator would visit Burma, so close to the verdict against Suu Kyi. “We are concerned that the military regime will manipulate and exploit your visit and propagandize that you endorse their treatment on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and over 2,100 political prisoners, their human rights abuses on the people of Burma, and their systematic, widespread and ongoing attack against the ethnic minorities,” the letter said. Walter Lohman, director of the conservative Heritage Foundation’s Asian studies center, said the meeting “will certainly serve to validate the junta at a time when international revulsion has reached one of its periodic, crisis driven peaks.” AP, 14 August 2009 / Tin Maung Thaw The UN Security Council belatedly issued a statement on Thursday expressing “serious concerns” over the sentencing of opposition Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi for a further 18 months under house detention. The 15-nation council had considered a stronger statement that would have condemned the conviction and verdict by a Burmese court against Suu Kyi, leader of the National Luegue for Democracy. The statement issued by British Ambassador John Sawers, the council president, swapped “condemnation” for “serious concerns” because of objection by some unnamed countries. Those countries had demanded that the council not interfere with Burma’s judicial system and internal matters. The statement was hammered out and watered down during private consultations between Sawers and other council members since Monday. He said all 15 council members supported the text before he made it public. Sawers said council members Page 193 of 226

stressed the importance of releasing “all political prisoners” in Burma. “The members of the UN Security Council express serious concerns at the conviction and sentencing of Daw Aung San Kyi and its political impacts,” said the statement, which Sawers read to reporters. nationmultimedia.com, 14 August 2009 Meanwhile, the US ambassador to the UN, Susan Rice, said Aung San Suu Kyi’s conviction is a violation of universal principles of human rights. “The Burmese regime should immediately and unconditionally release her and the more than 2,100 other political prisoners currently being held,” she said. “Aung San Suu Kyi’s sentencing also precludes her from taking part in the elections scheduled for next year, and thus undermines the legitimacy of those elections,” Rice said. Rice said: “Rather than using this moment to create the necessary conditions for a genuine dialogue and inclusive political process with all actors, the Burmese authorities have now moved further away from national reconciliation and deepened their isolation from the rest of the world.” Irrawaddy, 14 August 2009 A US Senator has arrived in Burma to meet military ruler Than Shwe. Democratic Senator Jim Webb, who will be the most senior US official to meet Than Shwe, chairs the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on East Asia and Pacific affairs. He is close to President Barack Obama. Senator Webb is not expected to meet Ms Suu Kyi. bignewsnetwork.com, 14 August 2009

15 August 2009, Saturday
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi was positive and cheerful after returning to her Inya Lake residence, one of her lawyers, Kyi Win, told The Irrawaddy on Friday. “She was not dejected and I was surprised to see that, on the contrary, she appeared cheerful and was laughing,” the lawyer said. Suu Kyi met with her lawyers on Wednesday around the dining table in her lakeside house, he said, adding that Suu Kyi appeared upbeat as she spoke of the trial. Suu Kyi knew the verdict would be “guilty,” but was not upset and showed no signs of bitterness, Kyi Win said. The lawyer also said that the defense team was surprised to learn that Sr-Gen Than Shwe’s letter to the court was dated and issued on the August 10th and not on August 11th, the day the judge read out the final verdict. Suu Kyi initially received a three-year prison sentence, but that was immediately commuted to 18 months under house arrest when Home Affairs Minister Maung Oo read out Than Shwe’s letter to the courtroom announcing his decision to cut her three-year sentence in half. The suspended sentence was also applied to the verdict against Suu Kyi’s two companions, Win Ma Ma and Khin Khin Win. Suu Kyi is now a prisoner again in her own house, but her lawyer said that she is preparing to appeal. “Suu Kyi wants to appeal and she is correct,” he said. “But the chances of success are very slim – she was convicted even before she was arrested.” Kyi Win likened the house arrest restrictions imposed on Suu Kyi to keeping a child in a boarding school. The restrictions against the opposition leader and her two companions are: they must only live in Suu Kyi’s residence located on University Avenue; they are only allowed to go out into the house’s yard; they can get access to doctors and nurses for health reasons; Suu Kyi can meet guests in accordance with permission from the authorities concerned; she can watch local TV channels such as Myawaddy and MRTV (Burma Radio and Television), as well as local newspapers and journals; and she can request paper if she needs to write something. “Suu Kyi doesn’t usually watch television, but is an avid reader and spends most of her time reading books during her house arrest,” the lawyer said. When asked whether they could bring her foreign newspapers and magazines, her lawyers were told that all materials must be submitted to the authorities for screening. Her lawyers have also noticed that local security forces and the police have elevated the watchtower which overlooks Suu Kyi’s compound. Another noticeable change at her home since she was detained in May is that all the bushes have been cleared. Suu Kyi is aware of the outpouring of support and the international reaction to the verdict against her, said the lawyer. “But she is always looking forward to a dialogue,” Kyi Win added. When asked about China’s stance toward Burma and Suu Kyi, the lawyer warned that China is playing with fire. Political observers have said that because of the highly publicized trial and the international attention that she received during the trial, Suu Kyi’s status is strengthened both inside and Page 194 of 226

outside Burma and that she has gained a stronger position in Burmese politics than before. “She was almost forgotten before the trial,” a diplomat in Rangoon said, adding that the irony is the regime has promoted her status and international standing. Suu Kyi has already spent nearly 14 of the past 20 years under house arrest, although Tuesday’s conviction was the first time she has been found guilty of any offense. Irrawaddy, 15 August 2009 A five-day public movement known as the White Campaign has been launched in Burma following the imprisonment of Aung San Suu Kyi and will be carried out across four of Burma’s principle divisions. The campaign was organiseed by a group who have continually held prayer ceremonies every Tuesday since Suu Kyi’s first incarceration, and includes members of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party. Myint Myint Aye, NLD secretary in Mandalay division’s Meiktila township, who is one of the organisers of the campaign, urged the public to join. “From 15 to 19 August, we will be wearing white and holdng prayers at pagodas,” he said. “This is to peacefully express our will to bring our leader to freedom. We urge our NLD members across Burma to join in with the campaign.” Anyone can join in with the campaign by wearing white, offering white flowers at pagoda and by painting houses and fences with the colour white, she said. The campaign will be carried out in around 20 different townships in Pegu, Mandalay, Magwe and Rangoon divisions. Pegu NLD women’s wing leader Khin Nyunt Mu said the campaign “is not a demonstration, this is not an act against the government – we are to only show our will from inside the law.” “We urge the people to use everything white during the campaign – wear white, ride white and also offer white flowers at the pagoda as well as painting your house white or hang white plastic bags by your doors.” DVB, 15 August 2009 Buddhist monks, angered by the Burmese junta’s decision to place democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi under a further 18 months of house arrest, may be preparing to take to the streets again in protest, according to sources in Rangoon. Burma’s monasteries, some with as many as a thousand monks, have been largely silent since a crackdown on monk-led protests nearly two years ago. But some monks say that simmering resentment could come to a head again over the August 11 court ruling, which found Suu Kyi guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest. “We can’t accept the court’s shameful verdict,” said a monk from a monastery near Rangoon’s famous Shwedagon Pagoda. “The military government has angered us again.” “Local authorities are closely watching young monks and their monasteries,” said a resident of North Okkalapa Township, on the outskirts of Rangoon. “There are plainclothes security forces keeping an eye on them. I’m not sure if the monks will take to the streets again or not.” There are more than 400,000 monks in Burma – roughly equal to the number of personnel in the armed forces of the military-ruled country. They have always played an important role in Burma’s social and political affairs, often in opposition to oppressive regimes. Since the 2007 uprising, dubbed the Saffron Revolution, the Burmese authorities have applied pressure on senior monks to control younger monks. “Local authorities and the township Sangha Mahanayaka Committee [the state- sponsored Buddhist monks’ organization] have asked monasteries to submit the personal details and three photos of every monk,” said a monk from Zabuaye Monastery in North Okkalapa Township. “The authorities have also warned senior monks that if any monk from their monastery becomes involved in anti-government demonstrations, the senior monks will be either disrobed or sentenced to three years in prison,” said the monk. The monk also said that the authorities have strictly restricted travel by monks, who are no longer allowed to go anywhere without a letter of recommendation from their monastery. Irrawaddy, 15 August 2009 The international lawyer for Aung San Suu Kyi says Australia’s Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, could play a key role in pushing for her release. The Australian Government has urged the United Nations to impose an arms embargo on Burma in response. In an interview with the Australia Broadcasting Corporation, Ms Suu Kyi’s lawyer Jared Genser says the Prime Minister should also pressure China to intervene. “Because China is really key, sharing a border with Burma as it does, with substantial investments in the country particularly in oil and gas, if China can be made to see the wisdom in doing more internationally, that along Page 195 of 226

with India, Thailand, Singapore and other countries in ASEAN that could be very very helpful to moving towards a process of national reconciliation in Burma.” radioaustralianews.net.au, 15 August 2009 The wide-spread protests by monks and civilians in August/September 2007, and ensuing violent crackdown, has opened a new window of opportunity to end impunity for the ongoing crimes being perpetrated by Burma’s military leadership. Burma was added for the first time to the United Nations Security Council Agenda last year. Special powers are granted under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter which allow the Security Council members heightened power to address situations that constitute a threat to international peace and security. These powers encompass addressing the most serious crimes in countries such as Burma.The Burmese military junta, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), continues to exercise dictatorial control over the lives of the people of Burma as it has done with impunity for over forty years, routinely employing torture, rape, slavery, murder, and mass imprisonment as tools to consolidate its power and silence any dissent. These acts go far beyond a repudiation of democracy; they are criminal violations of international humanitarian and human rights law, including violations of the Geneva Conventions. The Global Justice Center is working with the Burma Lawyers’ Council to push for accountability and stronger action by the United Nations Security Council for the ongoing heinous crimes in Burma. The Project on Criminal Accountability for Heinous Crimes in Burma aims to uphold international commitment to the rule of law and to enforce the rights to redress and criminal accountability of the people of Burma through the creation by the United Nations Security Council, under its Chapter VII power, of an Independent Commission of Inquiry to investigate possible war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide. A focus on criminal investigation will reframe the dialogue from democracy and human rights to criminal accountability and will put pressure on the SPDC by alienating it from political and economic friends, such as China and Russia. There is a growing international consensus that no safe harbor should exist for perpetrators of heinous crimes. The Project on Criminal Accountability for Heinous Crimes in Burma seeks to raise international awareness and commitment to ending impunity for the most serious crimes of concern to the international community, which threaten the peace, security and well being of the world. Burma Digest, 15 August 2009 / Minye Kyawswar, New Generations Thailand, as chair of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, has proposed that other Asean members ask the Burmese government to give a pardon to its opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. But two Asean members - Vietnam and Laos - oppose Thailand’s move, saying Asean should not interfere in the affairs of Burma. Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya said Thailand has written to other Asean members seeking a consensus to demand that the Burmese government considers giving a pardon to Mrs Suu Kyi.Vietnam state media reported yesterday that Vietnam did not support calls by other Asean member states for Burma to free Mrs Suu Kyi. The state-run Viet Nam News said Vietnam had no criticism of Burma’s decision on Tuesday to place Mrs Suu Kyi under house arrest for the next 18 months, effectively barring her from elections next year. “It is our view that the Aung San Suu Kyi trial is an internal affair of Burma,” Vietnamese government spokesman Le Dung said on the website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Laos said it shared the same view as Vietnam. Vientiane said the trial of Mrs Suu Kyi took place in accordance with the country’s law. It was opposed to interfering in neighbouring nations’ affairs. “As a member of Asean, we uphold the basic principles of Asean as stipulated in the Asean Charter, particularly the principle of non-interference in each other’s internal affairs,” said Lao foreign affairs spokesman Khenthong Nuanthasing. On Wednesday, the Thai government called on Burma to release Mrs Suu Kyi immediately and allow her to participate in next year’s elections, echoing its own statements and those of other Asean members at the group’s regional forum last month. bangkokpost.com, 15 August 2009 Next Tuesday’s deportation of a Burmese refugee and former child soldier Nay Myo Hein has been halted following the intervention of Immigration Minister Jason Kenney and Public Safety Minister Peter Van Loan who have agreed to let the 25 year old Saskatoon resident stay in Canada on humanitarian grounds. Minister Van Loan has issued a stay of deportation and Minister Kenney has granted Nay Myo Hein a temporary resident permit which crucially paves the way for Nay Myo Hein’s permanent residency in Page 196 of 226

Canada. Canadian Friends of Burma especially thanks Minister Kenney for his vital role in Nay Myo Hein’s case and consistent support for the democratization process in Burma. Ye Yint, yeyintnge.com, 15 August 2009 U.S. Sen. Jim Webb obtained the release Saturday of American John Yettaw, who had been sentenced to seven years of hard labor in Burma for visiting detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, his office said. Webb, who chairs the East Asia and Pacific Affairs subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will accompany Yettaw to Bangkok, Thailand, on Sunday aboard a military aircraft, his office said. It is the second success in a day for Webb, a Democrat from Virginia, who earlier held separate meetings with Suu Kyi and Burma’s top official, junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe. “It is my hope that we can take advantage of these gestures as a way to begin laying a foundation of good will and confidencebuilding in the future,” Webb said in a statement. Webb met with Suu Kyi for nearly an hour Saturday, his office said. He described the meeting as “an opportunity for me to convey my deep respect to Aung San Suu Kyi for the sacrifices she has made on behalf of democracy around the world.” Webb is also the first American official ever to meet with Than Shwe. Webb said he requested that the country’s leadership release Suu Kyi from her 18-month house arrest. Webb is the first member of Congress to visit Burma, in more than a decade. Though he is not in the country on behalf of the State Department, he is there in his official capacity as a senator, and his trip may indicate a shift in America’s hard-line stance against the reclusive country. “He has been very consistent in his view about the need for aggressive diplomacy with these kind of authoritarian regimes around the world,” Webb’s spokeswoman, Jessica Smith, told CNN from Washington. She said Webb believes that “if we engage with Burma, it will benefit all countries involved if we speak to Burma’s leadership.” Webb’s discussions with the country’s leaders were “very frank,” Smith said. CNN, 15 August 2009 / Richard Aung Myint

Political Prisoner PM Aung San Suu Kyi and Senator Jim Webb, MMK, 16 August 2009

U.S. Sen. Jim Webb is going to meet with UMFCCI (Union of Myanmar Federation of Chamber of Commerce and Industry) members tomorrow morning. He requested the authority to meet with U Win Tin and U Khin Maung Swe. He also requested to meet with jailed 88 GS student leaders and activists but not allowed. Shwe TSL, 8888 People Power, 15 August 2009 Former U.S. President Bill Clinton coming home with two released journalist from Pyongyang indicate a sign of thaw with North Korea, on the other hand Burma not only refused to have any rapprochement but did not respect the wishes of the Burmese people and international community particularly the UN by sentencing Daw Aung San Suu Kyi again to one and half years to confinement. Is it a sign of new and softer approach by the Junta or a tactical manoeuvre to ease international pressure? Anyhow, dictators often like to make concessions to well-connected and influential foreigners who beat a path to their door asking for a favour. In as much as the release of the two American journalists from North Korea does not indicate that North Korea is suddenly going to change its nuclear policies, so also the release of John Yetaw will not Page 197 of 226

move the Junta as prove can be seen in its refusal to release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi who should not be arrested just because she soundly beat them in an open election. Any how the first visit by the chairman of the Senate foreign Relations Committee seems to indicate that the Obama administration is attempting steer the regime towards a new era of engagement and reward the dictators. One wonders what is the long term policy of the US towards Burma? The world knows the obstinacy or the cruelty of the thuggish power maniacs Burmese generals, who have subjugated the 50 million plus people and fully supportive at the UN by China, did not care the UN nor the civilized international community. One could recollect that the International Labour Organization said that it would seek to “prosecute members of the ruling Burmese Junta for crimes against humanity.” And in 2007, anti-government protests by Burmese monks and people were brutally suppressed. As if all this isn’t bad enough, in May 2008, the ruling thugs prevented international assistance to survivors of Cyclone Nargis, greatly exacerbating a situation which resulted in 400,000 people dead and 1 million homeless. Obviously the Burmese people were quite bewildered when the Secretary of State outlined the 3 Ds policy (Defence, Diplomacy and Development) and the crucial aspect of the 4th D (Democracy) was conspicuously left out. The US had made it clear that neither sanctions nor engagement has worked in Burma. Moreover at the Asian Regional Forum the Secretary of State seems to send the wrong signal for after chastising Burma for its nuclear connection with North Korea eulogise the Junta for enforcing the UN resolution 1874 designed to prevent the spread of nuclear arms. American nonproliferation experts have called on the international nuclear watchdog to seek clarification from the Burmese Regime over its nuclear program after a report that quoted defectors claiming there was a secret military nuclear program not subjected to IAEA inspection. The reclusive Burmese Junta knew that with the world full-blown economic crisis, international community will not pay much attention to Burma. The policies and measures adopted by the West, ASEAN and other major countries will inevitably benefit them since these players do not have unified positions and coordinated approaches. Each thinks its policy is better and result-oriented than others. Sad but true, that policy-makers on Burma have spent more time discussing their differences than trying to bridge perception gaps or consolidating tangible engagements that could immediately impact on the Burmese Generals. Even in some quarters of the international community have come round to accept that the Burmese generals will not change any time soon and it is better for them to show flexibility and understanding of the Burmese quagmire and help the Burmese people even though the regime will benefit from such generosity. In such a backdrop, General Than Shwe had made a well calculated risk of the domestic and global response with a sugar coat of leniency of 18-month sentence, long enough to keep Suu Kyi in custody in the next year election which will formalize the military’s grip on power. As long as there is no concerted approach and policy coordination, the regime is safe because, after all more than two decades China and India, the two most powerful Asian players, are still in two minds about their own roles regarding Burma. They have their own interests to protect in supporting the regime as can be clearly seen at the UN Security Council. Amid the shifting caprices of a regime that lacks any legitimacy, a lone object of trust among Burmese, repeatedly credited as the sole figure capable of bridging deep divides fomented since a 1962 coup, amplifying her status as a beacon of resistance is a reminder to the people of Burma and the international community of the military Junta’s penchant for Kafkaesque distortions of justice and its intransigence in the face of widespread international condemnation. Yet Senator Jim Webb will be warmly shaking the hands of Than Shwe whose hands are soak with blood. The problem of Burma is a constitutional and not an ethnic problem like a horizontal one in the Balkans but a vertical one with the ethnic nationalities together with the pro democracy movement struggling against the Burmese army. The crux of the problem is the broken concordat of the 1947 (the Panglong Conference). Until and unless one can solve the very root of the problem, no lasting peace can be found in this a geo strategically important area of the Southeast peninsular. The current Junta will not let go of its power or negotiate until and unless it is forced to. With the US concentrating on Afghanistan there is every possibility that it will soon become the highest producing narco country whose windfall will shore up the coffers of the Junta who is a nuclear aspirant and as such the problems should be nib in the bud before it become like North Korea. It is high time for the US to have a sustained concentrated Burma policy. “Smart Targeted Sanctions” that aim at crippling the financial dealings of the Junta and its associates, particularly in S’pore while at the same time send the right message to the people of Burma, e.g. blocking certain bank transactions and visa Page 198 of 226

permits. Embargoes on trade and investment that are hurting the Burmese Generals and not the people should be reinforced. More humanitarian aid including higher education via the NGOs directly to the local and international NGOs working inside and the peripherals with a check and balance system is recommended. While explaining Burma’s motive behind its nuclear ambition it reveals that it was basically the inability of the Junta to compete with neighbouring Thailand on conventional weapons as the border clash of 2002 demonstrates compelled the Generals to acquire nuclear capability to ‘play power like North Korea. The Junta aspires to become nuclear for the dual purpose of international prestige and strategic deterrence. It has also become clear that under growing pressure to democratize may seek a nuclear deterrent to any foreign moves to force regime change. It remains undoubtedly true that just like Pyongyang; Rangoon too would like to have a nuclear bomb so that they can challenge the Americans and the rest of the world. Will America stand up to its ideal? Ba Thann Win, 15 August 2009

16 August 2009, Sunday
Well-informed sources told The Irrawaddy that before Webb’s non-official visit, Sr-Gen Than Shwe authorized secret discussions between Burmese and US representatives in a calculated diplomatic maneuver to deflect international pressure stemming from the sentencing of Suu Kyi. The Burmese side gave the green light to the senator’s visit shortly after her bizarre trial ended last week. Webb arrived days after the conviction, and Yettaw’s release came a few days later. In the past, the regime has played similar tactical maneuvers to dilute international pressure. Burma watchers recall that in February 1994, US Rep Bill Richardson was allowed to meet Suu Kyi for more than five hours at her house. This newest gesture comes at a moment when the Obama administration is set to release its new Burma policy, following rising signals that US officials are open to new approaches on Burma, including, perhaps as a first step, the lifting of visa bans on Burmese officials and restoring the post of ambassador in Burma. Yettaw’s release sends a conciliatory signal to the US and European Union and carries the potential to deflect stronger sanctions. The US expanded its sanctions only last month. Burma watchers warn that Yettaw’s release is purely superficial because Suu Kyi and 2,100 other political prisoners remain in prison. Real substance is needed to justify US, or international, policy changes, and yet there’s a danger that the regime could manipulated the event to its advantage. “It is important for the Burmese leadership to hear the strong views of American political leaders about the path it should take toward democracy, good governance and genuine national reconciliation,” said Mike Hammer, a spokesman for the National Security Council. On Saturday, Fred C. Lash, a state department spokesman, reiterated that Yettaw’s release was a welcome step but more is needed. “We also call on Burmese authorities to release unconditionally Aung San Suu Kyi and all of Burma’s more than 2,100 political prisoners in order to begin a process of national reconciliation and inclusive political dialogue,” he said. Chiang Mai-based Burma analyst, Bertil Lintner, a Swedish journalist and author of several books on Burma, said, “It is naïve to expect these generals to listen to America and change their course.” Regime watchers noted that a background drama involving Burma and China was also unfolding during Webb’s visit. China’s unchallenged economic influence in Burma is growing, and Asia’s largest power clearly enjoys a regional strategic advantage in its unchallenged relationship. Webb noted in an earlier statement: “As the United States continues its attempt to isolate Burma due to the human rights policies of its military regime, China’s influence has grown exponentially.” However, Lintner said, “There’s no way that Burma will give up China because of America.” Burma’s main concern, he said, is to maintain its good relationship with China and India, its two powerful neighbors, followed by Asean and a good relationship with the rest of the world including the U.S and EU. A veteran Burmese journalist told The Irrawaddy that the regime’s relationship with China is deeply rooted, but even so Than Shwe and other top leaders are unhappy that China lends its political support to ethnic armed groups along the Sino-Burma border, in fear that clashes between the junta’s troops and ethnic armies could unleash a wave of refugees seeking safety in China, much like what has happened on the Thai-Burmese border. Only this month, about 10,000 people, including Kokang and Chinese migrants, sought shelter in China after tensions increased between government troops and the Myanmar [Burma] National Democratic Alliance Army, a Kokang Page 199 of 226

ceasefire group.“Than Shwe is a clever chess player, and he may want to send a signal to China that he could have better relations with America,” said the Rangoon-based journalist. However, considering the regime’s heavy reliance on China in terms of military hardware, trade and investment, plus a planned gas pipeline into Yunnan Province, he said, “The 20-year-old girl [Burma] is now pregnant, and she is not going to leave her husband [China] anytime soon.” Aung Zaw, The Irrawddy, 16 August 2009 Burma is following the North Korean style maneuvering with the West but every country has its own unique position and political back ground. The Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been under house arrest since 1993 and her term was nearly expired at that time John Yettaw incident occurred. The Burmese regime has a hard time to make an excuse to extent her house arrest according to their chosen law which only allow 5 years terms of house arrest. When Yettaw illegally entered her lake house, the regime grabbed the opportunity and put her on trail. Now Yettaw is free, but Aung San Suu Kyi has to spend her time under house arrest for another one and half year. It is like the regime is using one stone to hit two birds. Extending ASSK house arrest until their plan election in 2010 is over because ASSK has tremendous support from Burmese people. At the same time releasing John Yettaw is a wise move to defuse the heat from the US government. The Burmese regime knows that if they do not release Yettaw, they have to take care of him and face more pressure from the US. Indeed, they are thanking Yettaw for doing his stupid stunt to swim across the lake and enter the opposition leader house at night which gave them a golden opportunity to lock their feared opponent. Yettaw is free and the US government is happy but Burmese beloved lady is still living in isolation. It is ironic to see Yettaw enter Aung San Suu Kyi’s lake house uninvited and was set free based on humanitarian grounds. On the other hand, three innocent women were put under house arrest for uninvited guest. Rationally, if the Burmese Generals freed the guilty one, why not Aung San Suu Kyi? North Korea is still standing tall while its people are starving to death. Burma generals are enjoying the income from gas deal with Thailand and China while the whole world has been criticizing the regime without appropriate action since 1990. Htun Aung Gyaw, 16 August 2009 A Thai government proposal for ASEAN to write to Burma’s junta to seek a pardon for democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi has gained support from Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, Singaporean Foreign Minister George Yeo said late Saturday. Yeo made the comments after meeting Thai counterpart Kasit Pirompya who was on a two-day visit to Singapore after calling on his counterparts in Malaysia and Indonesia to consult other Association of Southeast Asian Nations members about the situation in Burma. Singapore’s Foreign Ministry has made the transcript of the comments available to the media Sunday. Kyodo, 16 August 2009 A US citizen jailed for swimming to the house of Burmese democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi was set to fly out of the army-ruled nation Sunday with a visiting American senator who secured his release. John Yettaw was handed over to US embassy officials at Rangoon’s notorious Insein prison after Democrat Senator Jim Webb persuaded the military junta to spare him from a sentence of seven years’ hard labour, officials said. thejakartaglobe.com, 16 August 2009 / Salong, Shwe Gas Movement-India U.S. senator Jim Webb said on Sunday he had asked Burma to free opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and let her take part in politics during talks that secured the release of an American jailed for visiting her. The Democratic senator landed in Bangkok, capital of neighboring Thailand, with John Yettaw, whose swim to Suu Kyi’s home in May led to her renewed detention after authorities said his uninvited stay had breached the terms of her house arrest. Suu Kyi was sentenced last week to another 18 months under house arrest, and Yettaw’s action is widely seen as having given the junta a pretext to keep Suu Kyi out of politics until after an election due next year. Webb said he had raised the issue. “I’m hopeful as the months move forward they will take a look,” he said. “With the scrutiny of the outside world judging their government very largely through how they are treating Aung San Suu Kyi, it’s to their advantage that she’s allowed to participate in the political process.” “What I said to the leaders of Burma is that I believe that it will be impossible for the rest of the world to believe the elections were free and fair if she was not released.” He Page 200 of 226

said the United States stood ready to help Burma. Yettaw was not at the news conference. He went immediately to hospital after landing in Bangkok, where he walked from the plane to a waiting vehicle with a steadying hand from officials. He spent several days in hospital this month in Rangoon. Yettaw had been sentenced to seven years’ hard labor on three charges, including immigration offences. “I believe what happened was regrettable,” Webb said. “He was trying to help. He’s not a mean-spirited human being.” Some in Burma remained bitter at the treatment of Suu Kyi. “The most tangible outcome of his visit is the release of John Yettaw, who caused the mess,” said Thakhin Chan Tun, a former ambassador to North Korea. “However, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who is completely innocent in this incident, is still under house arrest.” Reuters, 16 August 2009 Some of the junta’s critics have expressed disappointment with the latest developments. “I don’t think Sen. Webb can be proud for the release of Mr. John Yettaw, while our leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who is the real victim of this conspiracy and injustices, and two women colleagues, are still under detention,” said Aung Din of the U.S. Campaign for Burma, a Washington-based group. Daw is a term of respect used for older women. “This will surely make a negative impression among the people of Burma. They will think that Americans are easy to satisfy with the dictators when they get their citizens back,” he said. examiner.com, 16 August 2009

17 August 2009, Monday
“It was my clear impression from her that she is not opposed to lifting some sanctions,” Sen. James Webb (D-Va.) told journalists on Monday. Webb met with Suu Kyi for 40 minutes at her home in Rangoon during a weekend trip to Burma, but he declined to comment further for fear of misrepresenting her position. Suu Kyi has always been represented as a staunch supporter of sanctions, but given that she has been held almost incommunicado for most of the past six years, there is little consensus on whether her position might have changed. Webb also said he brought up the recent allegations that Burma might be pursuing some kind of military nuclear capability, perhaps with assistance from North Korea. “It was communicated to me early on that there was no truth to that,” he said. Washington Post, 17 August 2009 The government of Burma has released the American citizen John William Yettaw. The authorities should immediately release the democracy icon Dawn Aung San Suu Kyi said that U Nyan Win, the spokesman of the National League for Democracy (NLD). On 14 August 2009, the American Senator Jim Webb arrived in Burma and met Senior General Than Shwe. The American citizen John Yettaw was released not long after the meeting. A week ago Yettaw was sentenced to 7 years of hard labour on charges for illegally intruding Suu Kyi’s house while she was under house arrest. “The Burmese government released the American, why don’t they release Aung San Suu Kyu. She did not do anything wrong. She should be also released”, U Nyain Win said. During his stay in Burma Senator Jim Webb met general Than Shwe and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the representatives of other ethnic parties. “In my opinion, Senator Webb came to Burma to achieve an understanding with the military government. The senator’s visit was not beneficial for the Burmese people. There is no progressive development in Burma”, U Nyain Win added. The Secretary General of the Committee Representing the People’s Parliament (CRPP) U Aye Tha Aung said Senator Webb came to Burma to understand more about the current situation and to pave the way for new political approach to the Burmese government. “Mr. Yettaw would have been driven out of the country no matter with or without the visit of Mr. Webb. It is not important whether Yettaw would be punished or not. The important fact is that SPDC managed to keep Daw Suu off the campaign trail ahead of next year’s elections”, U Aye Tha Aung stated. The former member of the New Mon State Party expressed an opinion that Webb’s visit to Burma was a tactical approach to the Burmese military government. “There is no point for them to held Yettaw prisoner for a long time. They try to use his release in order to stabilize their positions abroad”, he added. IMNA, 17 August 2009 Page 201 of 226

While it looks good on the surface, that in Korea, Clinton actually got a face-to-face meeting with Kim and effected the release of the two prisoners and in Burma, Webb likewise met with Than Shwe and got the release of Yettaw on the surface, it looks good that the US and these two nations have gotten off on a good start with their relationships. The hard truth is, with North Korea, the US was so busy getting the release of the two American women they did not get a chance to address the issue of nuclear weapons, rockets and the ongoing hostilities and human rights in North Korea. Similarly, Webb was so engaged in getting Yettaw released and getting a meeting with DASSK, he was not able to get her release, nor any other political prisoners, nor even mention the ongoing attacks in Shan and Karen states where there are over tens of thousands new refugees, nor the ongoing suffering of the Rohingyas and Chins getting persecuted and facing starving as well as Kachins and many other ethnic groups across the nation. And as for the new weapons of mass destruction, rockets, tunnels from North Korea, he was far from even thinking about it. All he could think of was dropping sanctions and doing business, and cited Vietnam as a showcase. Vietnam government has prospered due to open trade, but as for human rights and freedom, it is still as repressive as ever. Vietnam and Laos were the ones that opposed any action from ASEAN when the Thai recently mentioned ASEAN should do something for Aung San Suu Kyi’s release. The US is about to give up its biggest card, sanctions, and does not have anything to show for it except for the release of one misguided wanna-be hero. He is coming back home free, while the Lady he says he admired so much, whom he said he wanted to help so much, gets another 18 months along with her two colleagues. So much for Cetana becoming Wedana. Dr. David Law, 17 August 2009 The release of John W Yettaw, the American who got Aung San Suu Kyi into trouble by intruding into her home, has puzzled and angered many Burmese. Bo Kyi, joint-secretary of the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, a Burmese human rights group based on the Burmese-Thai border, said Yettaw’s release came as no surprise. “I think the regime just wanted to use him. Everybody knows that the regime wanted Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, not Yettaw.” Bo Kyi was accused by the regime of sending the American to Burma, where he entered Suu Kyi’s home illegally at the beginning of May and gave the regime a pretext for arresting her and putting her on trial. She was sentenced to three years hard labor, but had her sentence cut to 18 months house arrest. Yettaw was sentenced to seven years imprisonment, but a US senator, Jim Webb secured his release after a meeting with junta leader Snr-Gen Than Shwe. Several Burmese, both within the country and in exile, likened the drama to a Hollywood farce. One wrote on the Web site of The Irrawaddy: “Webb’s performance reminds me of Patti Page’s song ‘How much is that (Yankie) doggie in the window” and a ‘Saving Private Yettaw’ movie directed by Than Shwe. Perhaps, they might win Oscars next year.” A Rangoon physician said it was “unreasonable that the main culprit in the case was released but Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, who is totally innocent, is still detained.” Win Tin, a prominent opposition leader said the Burmese were interested not in the release of Yettaw but in Suu Kyi’s fate. A veteran Rangoon journalist speculated that Webb’s success in securing Yettaw’s release was “part of the packages from America to restore a normal relationship with the regime.” Speculation continued that Yettaw’s venture had been orchestrated—also with help from the US—to create a legal case against Suu Kyi. There were suggestions, not supported by hard evidence, that Yettaw had been paid by the regime to undertake it? Yettaw claimed he entered Suu Kyi’s home to warn her after dreaming that she was in danger of assassination. Wai Moe, Irrawaddy, 17 August 2009 While the sight of a freed American prisoner landing on home soil is a celebrated victory, recent highprofile diplomatic rescues in North Korea and Burma can also complicate U.S. diplomacy. The release Sunday of an American man from Burma after a visit there by Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia follows closely on the heels of a similar rescue of two journalists by former President Bill Clinton in Pyongyang earlier this month. Both gained their public goal – the freedom of U.S. captives. But both also nudged open a diplomatic door that could either invite welcome change or slam shut on President Barack Obama’s emerging foreign policy. With their timing so close, the Clinton and Webb missions may suggest to other rogue nations that in dealings with the Obama administration, holding American hostages can be a profitable political ploy. “They can look at this and say, there’s a new game afoot,” said John Bolton, Page 202 of 226

former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. “They think, we can get legitimacy and high level attention by using Americans as pawns.” Such visits, argue experts, can give regime leaders an aura of respect and recognition that may make it harder for the U.S. to press for sanctions or continue isolation policies aimed at forcing change in everything from humans rights to nuclear power. At the same time, Bolton said, there is the risk that other would-be heroes across the Washington power spectrum may also decide that they too could wage “publicity hound diplomacy.” AP, 17 August 2009 In exchange for the release of John Yettaw, the American who provided Burma’s ruling junta an excuse to extend the house arrest of democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi, Senator Jim Webb provided the junta an opportunity for saturation media coverage of what will pass there as US endorsement of its rule. This was a simple transaction. Junta chief Than Shwe got what he wanted, and he gave up something (someone) that had already served the regime’s purpose. It will not lead to a new opening in US-Burma relations - unless of course, the US is prepared to pare its objectives in a way that ensures the regime meets them. As Senator Webb has indicated before, this would entail accepting elections next year under a sham constitution. And, as things now stand, a lowered standard would also have to allow for the continued detention of Suu Kyi, detention of more than 2000 other political prisoners, and Suu Kyi’s prohibition from competing in the elections. That is not a road map. It is capitulation. The Obama Administration claims it simply gave Senator Webb the customary support the State Department gives to any traveling Senator. Maybe so. But it may also be a no-lose effort to facilitate a change in policy without really taking a stand in favor of it. “Engagement” and meetings with dictators do not constitute policy unto themselves; they are diplomatic tools. In the most recent expression of policy, the House, Senate, and White House just weeks ago renewed sweeping sanctions against Burma. Until the Administration takes a clear stand on a new policy, Burma, the world, and concerned Americans can only assume that the policy of bringing maximum pressure to bear on Burma’s ruling generals stands. The Administration has amply demonstrated that it can secure the release of Americans in difficult circumstances abroad. The verdict is still out on whether it can secure American national interests in the process. Deals like this are a bad sign. Either it is allowing others to drive US policy or it is confusing what is essentially consular work with foreign policy. It is time for the Administration to lay its cards on the table, complete its review of America’s Burma policy and let Washington fight it out. Heritage, 17 August 2009

18 August 2009, Tuesday
Walter Lohman, director of the Asia Studies Center at the Heritage Foundation, wrote last week that the State Department long ago ceded Burma policy to Congress, where support for sanctions is strong. While Webb, a Vietnam War veteran and “a serious student of Southeast Asia,” should be commended for his military service and his commitment to the region, Lohman said, his “views on Burma are his own” and do not represent U.S. policy. “Than Shwe, our adversaries, challengers, allies and friends should well take note.” Henry Soe Win, D4B, 18 August 2009 The time to end sanctions is after Suu Kyi and her 2,100 fellow political prisoners are freed, and the junta enters a genuine political dialogue with ethnic minorities and Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy, winners of Burma’s last free election in 1990. Webb may mean well, but he risks playing the dupe to a vicious dictatorship. bostom.com, 18 August 2009

19 August 2009, Wednesday
Serious confabulations are on in some Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA) battalions under the command of the Karen National Union’s 6th Brigade, where ways are being explored to reunite with its breakaway faction the Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA). Should the exploratory moves bear fruit, Page 203 of 226

it will be a blow to the Burmese military junta, which has been pitting the two Karen groups against each other. The Democratic Karen Buddhist Army (DKBA) led by Tha Htoo Kyaw split from the mother unit the Karen National Union (KNU) in 1994. They are now based in Myaing Gyi Ngu village, Hlaing Bwe Township, Karen State. Mizzima, 19 August 2009 In the wake of the sentencing of National League for Democracy (NLD) leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH), Altsean-Burma, and the Burma Lawyers’ Council (BLC) urge the European Union (EU) to support the establishment of a UN Security Council Commission of Inquiry into crimes against humanity and war crimes in Burma. The EU responded to the verdict of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi with additional targeted measures against Burma’s military regime, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), including new restrictions on the four judges responsible for the verdict. In addition, the EU imposed an asset freeze on four SPDC-run media companies. “The EU must not be fooled by the SPDC’s phony attempt to show leniency on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. The SPDC has fulfilled its strategy to keep Daw Aung San Suu Kyi out of the picture while, at the same time, the SPDC tells the world that Burma is on the path to democracy. How can the SPDC’s planned elections be given any credence when war still rages in Eastern Burma?” questioned Debbie Stothard, Coordinator of Altsean-Burma. In June, SPDC Army attacks against Karen villagers forced over 6,000 civilians to seek refuge across the border in Thailand. In late July, the regime forcibly displaced over 10,000 villagers in Central Shan State. Since 1997, the regime has destroyed over 3,000 villages and displaced over half a million civilians in Eastern Burma. FIDH, Altsean-Burma, and BLC firmly believe that there must be a UN Security Council Commission of Inquiry into crimes against humanity and war crimes in Burma. It is the only way to show that the international community is serious about stopping the SPDC’s human rights violations and ending impunity in Burma. FIDH, Altsean-Burma, and BLC urge the EU to take the lead on this issue. “This is a critical juncture that requires leadership from the European Union members. The EU must set an example for the international community and urge others to follow. With the SPDC’s planned elections growing near, time and pressure are of the essence,” said Aung Htoo, Secretary General of BLC. Neill Staurland, 19 August 2009

20 August 2009, Thursday
About 70 Chin teenagers in Matupi Township in Chin State in western Burma have been forced into military training, according to Chin sources. Local sources said soldiers from Infantry Battalion No.304, which is based in Matupi Township, ordered nine villages to select at least eight youths over 18-years-old per village for military training. “People have to work in the fields to grow paddy at this time of year, the rainy season. We are short of food and no one wants to go for military training,” said a Chin resident in Matupi. Matupi is one of seven townships in Chin State facing food shortages due to plagues of rats destroying crops. Similar conscription took place in the northern part of Ye Township in Mon State in southern Burma in July, when Light Infantry Battalion (LIB) No. 343 ordered 200 youths to go for military training, according to Lawi Oung, a resident in Ye Township. “The participants were taught how to beat people, how to handle riots and how to hold guns,” he said. “The training took one month, but the participants were only given fake bamboo guns during training.” The families of those who refused to join had to pay 6,000 kyat [US $5..50] for exemption, according to Lawi Oung. The villages where conscription took place are in a “black area,” which is close to a Mon rebel-controlled area, according to Thailand-based the Human Rights Foundation of Monland (HURFOM). Analysts said that the junta is training militias to prevent any uprising in the planned 2010 election, but they may also be preparing them for use as frontline troops when they attack Mon rebels. Junta troops have conducted similar military training in several townships in Shan Sate in Northern Burma in recent months, according to the Chiang Mai-based Shan Herald Agency for News. About 100 youths in Muse Township near the Chinese border in northern Shan State were forced to undergo military training. Speaking to The Irrawaddy on Thursday, Saengjuen, an editor for the Shan Herald Agency for News, said: “an estimated 1000 people have been forced into Page 204 of 226

training. Many are former members of forces loyal to the drug lord Khun Sa who died in Rangoon in 2007. “More people have been conscripted this year for basic military training, and to be taught how to collect news, organize campaigns and prepare military operations,” he said. Saengjuen believes such militia troops will be used to attack armed ethnic ceasefire groups in Shan State, such as those in the Wa, Kokang, and Mong La areas, if tension keeps mounting. Meanwhile, about 500 private mercenaries from Tang Yan Township in eastern Shan State were forced to join junta troops in preparation for a possible attack on the United Wa State Army (UWSA). Tension between junta troops and ethnic ceasefire groups has been mounting after the latter refused to transform their troops into border guard forces in Shan State in July. Irrawaddy, 20 August 2009 Claiming that Nagas living in Burma enjoy no basic rights, Nagaland Chief Minister Neiphiu Rio has appealed to the Centre and the junta in Rangoon to do the needful for the welfare of the tribals. Rio said he has met Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Home Minister P Chidambaram and Burma’s Ambassador to India and requested them to take initiatives for recognition of Nagas living in the neighbouring country and ameliorate their sufferings. “The Nagas living in Burma do not enjoy any basic rights. There is no school, no college, no health centre, no drinking water. They are living a primitive life. We want the end of the problems of our brethren in that country,” he said. A total of six lakh Nagas, belonging to 12 different tribes, live in Burma in 254 villages in a territory three times bigger than Nagaland, the Chief Minister said. PTI, 20 August 2009 Persecuted and oppressed in Burma, Rohingya Muslims are fleeing across the border into Bangladesh. Starving and stateless, they live in squalid makeshift camps. And yet, as Cyrus Shahrad discovers, they have not lost hope. The discrimination and violence against the Rohingyas began in Burma's western Rakhine State following the 1962 coup, when the military junta that still reigns first seized power. Marriages became subject to costly and time-consuming applications for licences; similar permissions were required for travel, so that many Rohingyas never left their villages until the day they fled their country. Land rights were revoked, leaving farmers helpless as government officials occupied fields and repossessed livestock. Boys and men were routinely rounded up and forced to work on government projects from construction to jungle clearing; many of the mothers, wives and daughters they left behind were raped by soldiers. Those who refused to work were sent to prison, where they were beaten or tortured. The unofficial number of refugees is, however, far higher thanks to a second wave of border crossings in the past two years. It is hard to put even a rough figure on the scale of the influx: Bangladesh's refusal to accede to the 1951 Refugee Convention gives it no legal obligation to guarantee the status or safety of refugees, and no Rohingya has been formally registered since 1992. Moreover, the similarities between the Rohin-gyas and the Chittagonian-speaking natives of Cox’s Bazar make it hard to distinguish asylum-seekers from local people. But the numbers are growing. The official Kutupalong camp is now surrounded by a nebulous shanty town, whose mud and thatch homes make the original wicker and galvanised steel houses look luxurious by comparison. The 200 refugees arriving at the camp in 2007 were followed by 2,000 more in 2008; by March 2009, more than 20,000 unofficial settlers were ranged around Kutupalong, and hundreds more are turning up every week. Conservative estimates now put the total number of Rohingyas in Bangladesh back at around 250,000. newstateman.com, 20 August 2009 / Zin Linn, NCGUB: New & Articles on Burma General Than Shwe is a master of deception and psychological warfare. Divide and rule has long-dominated the Burmese general’s strategic options. His chauvinism and xenophobia makes him extremely cautious about being over-reliant on any one ally. At present there are growing concerns at the top of the military about China’s position, and the top general is looking at how to balance Beijing’s growing influence in the country. Relations with Asean, India and to some extent Russia, were meant to do that. But over the last 12 months China’s economic and military role has grown out of all proportion, dwarfing the position of other Asian allies. “More critically, China has not backed the regime strongly enough in its efforts to disarm the ethnic cease-fire groups,” said Win Min, a Burmese academic at Chiang Mai University. “This has angered Than Shwe, who may now be looking for alternative ways to rein in the rebel groups.” “The warm reception Page 205 of 226

given to the US delegation led by Senator Webb, including the diplomatic staff based in Rangoon who are normally shunned or called in to get a dressing down, was a clear signal to the Chinese: ‘See, if you don’t help us we can turn to other powerful friends’,” said an Asian diplomat based in Rangoon. So the Burmese military regime seems to be trying to make some international re-alignments. And if they are serious about engaging the international community, especially the US, they may even heed some of its concerns, and then they will have no alternative but to deal with Aung San Suu Kyi. Gen Than Shwe, at the behest of some of Burma’s Asian allies, is keen to improve relations with the US, according to military sources in the Burmese capital Naypyidaw. The senator’s visit makes this extremely evident. “You cannot fail to see in this that the junta is keen to tell the world that sanctions do not work and we are open to dialogue,” said a Western diplomat based in Rangoon. One of the key obstacles is certainly the continued detention of Aung San Suu Kyi. Aung San Suu Kyi will be released before the elections next year, a senior military source told the Bangkok Post. The elections are expected to be held late next year. But now it seems possible that “The Lady”, as she is frequently referred to in Burma, may be freed before the end of the year. Larry Jagan, Bangkok Post, 20 August 2009 The Senate Functional Committee on Human Rights on Wednesday condemned the detention of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and demanded that the government sever diplomatic ties with Burma’s military regime. In a unanimous resolution, the committee that met under the chairmanship of Afrasiab Khattak observed that Burma’s military rulers had not only trampled the democratic aspirations of their people, but had also ignored the demands of the international community. The committee expressed its solidarity with the people of Burma in their struggle for fundamental rights and demanded that the government end diplomatic ties with the military regime in Burma until Suu Kyi and other political prisoners were released and democratic rights and constitutional rule restored. “The despotic dictatorship has crossed all limits in violating international norms of democracy, civilised governance and human rights,” the committee said. The Daily Times, 20 August 2009

21 August 2009, Friday
Burmese authorities have freed John Yettaw, who was convicted and sentenced following his uninvited visit to pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s house. In charges stemming from that incident, Ms. Suu Kyi was given an additional 18-month sentence, extending a detention that has lasted for much of the last 19 years. While the United States welcomes Mr. Yettaw’s release, it remains very concerned about the continued detention of Ms. Suu Kyi and more than 2,100 other political prisoners, including Min Ko Naing, Ko Ko Gyi, and Su Su Nwe, who have been denied their liberty because of their pursuit of a government that respects the will, rights, and aspirations of all Burmese citizens. VOA, 21 August 2009 Burma’s exiled prime minister Sein Win explains how Aung San Suu Kyi is dealing with her sentence – and argues that, as long as the junta is around, Burma has no hope. The guilty verdict handed down last week came as no surprise to those following the bizarre case brought against Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi by the country’s military government. The junta – in power since 1962 – claimed that the Nobel Peace Prize winner broke the rules of her house arrest when she allowed American John Yettaw into her house after he swam across a lake to see her last May. Her original sentence was three years’ hard labor, but in a PR play, Gen. Than Shwe, the junta leader, commuted it to 18 months’ house arrest. Suu Kyi, who was elected prime minister in 1990 when her National League for Democracy party won the elections, has been under house arrest for 14 of the past 20 years. Her first cousin Sein Win—who in January was re-elected prime minister of the exiled Burmese government—was in Indonesia last week to launch the Movement for Democracy and Rights for Ethnic Nationalities, a coalition of major Burmese ethnic and pro-democracy parties, both exiled and within Burma. Newsweek, 21 August 2009 / bignewsnetwork.com / burmanet.org

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Senior South-East Asian officials recommended Friday that their foreign ministers issue a joint appeal to Burma’s military rulers for the release of detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, an Indonesian official said. Suu Kyi has spent 14 of the past 20 years under detention and last week received an additional 18 months of house arrest for violating the country’s security laws after an uninvited US man swam to her lakeside home. Officials from the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN), of which Burma is a member, met Thursday and Friday to debate a proposal for a common regional stance on Suu Kyi’s continued detention by Burma’s military regime. ‘The officials agreed that such a joint appeal is a good idea, and they recommended the foreign ministers to take follow-up action,’ Indonesian Foreign Ministry spokesman Teuku Faizasyah said. He declined to elaborate on details of the recommendation, saying that Thailand, which now holds the rotating chairmanship of ASEAN, would make a statement on the matter. Earlier, Faizasyah said that amnesty for Suu Kyi was among the issues discussed by the officials. The spokesman said Indonesia had urged Burma to review the sentence for Suu Kyi and allow her to decide whether she would take part in an election scheduled for next year. Rights activists have said that the sentence was aimed at preventing Suu Kyi from taking part in the election. monstersandcritics.com, 21 August 2009 / Neill Staurland, D4B Tourism Concern has welcomed the closure of a legal loophole targeted at operators offering tours of Burma. Director Tricia Barnett said the Burma (Financial Restrictions) Regulations 2009 makes it an offence for UK firms, including tour operators, to provide financial benefits for prominent members of the country’s military regime and their associates. It is one of a series of measures deployed by the European community in a bid to force Burma's military junta to introduce democratic reform in the country. Travel Weekly, 21 August 2009 Philip Crowley, US State Department spokesman, said: “We remain very concerned about the continued detainment of Aung Sun Suu Kyi and more than 2,100 prisoners that are in detention. We continue to look for signs that the Burmese government is prepared to embark on a meaningful dialogue with Aung Sun Suu Kyi, along with the rest of the democratic opposition. “And obviously, Burma needs to have a dialogue with a full range of ethnic minority leaders in Burma, and move towards a peaceful transition to genuine democracy and national reconciliation.” As for a more comprehensive indication of US policy going forward, it remains a waiting game. A US State Department official said the review continues and gave no date for when the results might be announced. Channel News Asia, 21 August 2009 When former US President Bill Clinton traveled to North Korea earlier this month to win the release of two imprisoned American journalists, he probably didn’t realize that he was setting a trend. But less than two weeks after his high-profile visit to Pyongyang, another US politician had embarked on a similar—but even more ambitious – mission. Unlike Clinton, Senator Jim Webb was not acting as an official emissary of the Obama administration when he went to Burma last week. This meant that he was free to set his own agenda, which went far beyond extracting an American citizen from a foreign prison. Although the release of John Yettaw enabled him to declare his visit a “success,” it was, in fact, only incidental to his mission, the real purpose of which was to set the stage for US engagement with Burma’s pariah regime. Webb, who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs, is a prominent critic of US sanctions on Burma who has long argued that they are counterproductive to political progress in the country and not conducive to American interests. It came as no surprise, then, that the Burmese junta welcomed him with open arms. If Webb wants to help Burma, he needs to send an unequivocal message to the regime that Washington will not be satisfied with anything less than the release of the country’s 2,100 political prisoners, including Suu Kyi. If he’s not prepared to make that demand, he should congratulate himself on the “success” of his mission, and leave it at that. Irrawaddy, 21 August 2009 For the record, let me summarise the pertinent facts: Mrs Suu Kyi’s detention was due to expire on May 27: the junta was searching for an excuse to extend her detention beyond the 2010 election. The eccentric Mr Yettaw, who believed he was “sent by God” to save her from assassination, was arrested on May 3. As a Page 207 of 226

main defendant, he was sentenced along with Mrs Suu Kyi, who received a three-year sentence on Aug 11. Mr Yettaw was released on Aug 16. To see Mr Yettaw walk out of prison wasn’t a surprise, but it reeked of bitter irony. Senator Webb was Mr Yettaw’s saviour; Mr Yettaw was the junta’s saviour. In twisted logic, the junta might even have seen his release as a reward for being the “Godsend,” the unwitting tool of Gen Than Shwe’s devious plotting. Behind this deeply dramatic story, however, there are two specific moments that we must not forget. Before May 3, Mrs Suu Kyi was scheduled to be released; after Aug 11, she is under a new period of house arrest until 2011. More interestingly, Senator Webb told reporters in Bangkok on Sunday: “I don’t want to misrepresent her views, but my clear impression is that she is not opposed to the lifting of some sanctions.” But the next day that interpretation began to unravel. What Mrs Suu Kyi said to Senator Webb was that “interaction” between the junta and the domestic opposition must occur before sanctions are lifted. The senator may have believed that the “interaction” referred to the junta and the international community’s sanctions, according to Nyan Win, a spokesperson of her party, the National League for Democracy, who met with Mrs Suu Kyi on Monday. “She told me that when she met with Senator Webb she reiterated the need for the Burmese regime to first interact ‘inside the country’. She said only when that happens ‘will Burma benefit from relations with the international community’,” Mr Nyan Win told The Irrawaddy. He said the Nobel Peace Prize laureate who is regarded as a strong supporter of economic sanctions, also told Senator Webb: ‘She was not the one who imposed sanctions against the Burmese regime. She is not in a position to lift those sanctions.” As for US Senator Jim Webb’s “breakthrough”, there is no such thing. The future will be more of the same: a manipulative junta set in its ways, determined to form a military-dominated parliament next year, determined to ignore the calls of the international community. Kyaw Zwa Moe, Irrawaddy, 21 August 2009 How was a retired bus driver from Missouri able to make a flipper-clad, two-kilometer swim to the heavily guarded house of Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung Sang Suu Kyi, one of the world’s most famous dissidents? While John Yettaw languished in Burmese jail during his trial for “illegal swimming,” all we could do is speculate. But now, in an exclusive interview with NEWSWEEK, Yettaw has offered an explanation: Burmese security officials let him. “I don’t know why they didn’t stop me,” he says. “The man with the AK-47 shook my hand and let me in.” In his first full-length interview, conducted by telephone from his home in central Missouri, Yettaw addressed the rationale for his undiplomatic dip, responding to critics and speaking at length about his commitment to Burma. “I want to free Burma. I want to stop the suffering there. I am antijunta. I will never be at peace, emotionally or psychologically, until that woman is free, until that nation is free,” he said. Late Thursday night, the 53-year-old Missourian remained an enigmatic figure, failing to clarify lingering questions and offering rambling and occasionally contradictory responses. Yettaw declined to say where he initially got the idea to visit Suu Kyi by crossing the lake. But according to one Western diplomat, who requested anonymity in order to speak freely, intelligence reports show that senior Burmese officials were told to come up with a way to keep the Lady incarcerated, as her May 27 release date loomed. Around a week before Yettaw’s second swim, this person says, two men posing as members of the reform-minded National League for Democracy allegedly approached Yettaw in Mae Sot, an untidy border town in Thailand, and told him that the Lady was ready to receive him. The Burmese government did not respond to requests for comment. Would he go back to Burma? “Not without my family,” he said, “and not without an invitation.” Newsweek, 21 August 2009

23 August 2009, Sunday
After years of brutally suppressed street protests, many Burmese have adopted a new strategy that they say takes advantage of small political openings to push for greater freedoms. They are distributing aid, teaching courses on civic engagement and quietly learning to govern. “We are trying to mobilize people by changing their thought process,” said an entrepreneur in the city of Mandalay who is setting up classes on leadership. He added half in jest, “Civil society is a guerrilla movement.” Government critics including many Burmese say opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi's return to house arrest this month underscores the junta’s resolve Page 208 of 226

to keep her out of reach of the population ahead of parliamentary elections next year that many dismiss as a sham. But a growing number of educated, middle-class Burmese are pinning their hopes on what they call “community-based organizations,” finding outlets for entrepreneurship and room to maneuver politically in a country with one of the world’s most repressive governments. At first light on a recent Sunday, a dozen doctors piled into two old vans, stopped for a hearty breakfast of fish stew and sticky rice, then headed out to dispatch free medicine and consult villagers an hour outside Rangoon. The group first came together two years ago to care for demonstrators beaten by security forces during monk-led protests. When Tropical Cyclone Nargis hit in May 2008, killing an estimated 140,000 people, the doctors joined countless Burmese in collecting emergency supplies for survivors while the junta rebuffed foreign aid dispatches. Like many of those ad hoc groups, the doctors have since developed an informal nonprofit organization, meeting regularly and volunteering at an orphanage and in villages near Rangoon. The group’s leader secured funding from a foreign nonprofit agency and named his team “Volunteers for the Vulnerable,” or V4V. But to avoid having their activities labeled as activism, the leader negotiates weekly with the authorities for access to the villages under cover of an anodyne Burmese fixture -- the abbot of a local Buddhist monastery. For their own safety, the V4V founder said, “not even all our members know the name of the group.” Washington Post, 23 August 2009 Some 300 Burmese people held a rally in central Tokyo on Sunday, demanding the military junta release pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, whose house arrest was extended this month. The demonstrators, many wearing T-shirts with her picture, marched through the streets of the Shibuya district in downtown Tokyo, shouting slogans in unison and handing out leaflets to weekend shoppers. They carried signs saying ‘Unjustice Court of Burma’ or ‘Free Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,’ using a Burmese honorific for Suu Kyi, who has been detained for 14 of the past 20 years. Earlier this month a prison court in Rangoon convicted the Nobel Prize laureate for breaching security laws and sentenced her to house arrest for 18 months, drawing international condemnation. straitstimes.com, 23 August 2009 Burma and South Korea have been striving for enhancing bilateral relations especially bilateral cooperation in a number of sectors such as economy, investment, education, tourism and culture. According to the official statistics, Burma-South Korea bilateral trade amounted to 252 million U.S. dollars in the fiscal year of 2008-09 (April-March), significantly increasing from 108.2million dollars in 2007-08. Of the total, Burma’s export to Korea took 63.7 million dollars while its import from the East Asian country stood 188.48 million dollars. South Korea has become the 8th largest trading partner of Burma which exported to Korea about 3,000 items of goods covering agricultural produces, marine and forest products, and garments, while it mainly imported from Korea steel, garment, electrical and electronic goods. In a bid to boost trade with Burma, South Korea granted import duty free and quota free on 253 more Burmese goods items for this year which include agricultural produces, marine and forestry products, textile and traditional handicraft products. Xinhua, 23 August 2009

24 August 2009, Monday
Burma’s Censorship Board banned the Rangoon-based Weekly Journal, Phoenix on August 21, citing violation of censorship rules and regulations. The Censorship Board, under the Burmese Ministry of Information, said that the weekly journal, published every Thursday, has been banned as the publication was found to have violated the rules set by the board. “Yes, it has been put up on the notice board that the weekly has been banned from publishing,” said an official at the Board, but declined to provide details of the violation of the rules. However, an official at the Phoenix Journal said, “Our officials are still trying to negotiate to get back the license for publication. But, there are only about 30 per cent chances that we will be allowed to publish.” Phoenix, which has been into publication only for about seven months, was also banned earlier from publishing one of its issues, which carried news and articles sensitive to censorship. The notice, which was undersigned by the Director of the Censorship Board, Maj Tint Swe, states that the Page 209 of 226

weekly was banned for violating the rules and regulations of censorship time and again. The notice was circulated on August 20 and on August 21 and was put up on the notice board. The publisher of the Weekly Phoenix Journal is a former Air force officer. It is published by Maj Mar-J, who is also popularly known as writer Mar-J. He was removed from his official post after writing satires on the Burmese junta’s shifting of the capital to Naypyidaw. Besides, his writings were also banned from being published in any other journals or publications. Mizzima, 24 August 2009 A delegation from Burma led by a top official of a group linked to attacks on supporters of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi is in Japan on an agricultural mission at the invitation of the Foreign Ministry. The visit has angered supporters of democracy campaigners in Burma, coming soon after a court ruling led to the extension of Suu Kyi’s house arrest by 18 months. The group is led by Burma’s minister for agriculture and irrigation, Htay Oo, secretary-general of the Union Solidarity and Development Association (USDA), a political group that supports the country’s military junta. The USDA is reported to have been involved in the May 2003 attack on Suu Kyi and members of her group, leaving many dead or injured. Its senior officials are subject to sanctions by the United States and the European Union, including entry bans and the freezing of assets. Asahi Shimbun, 24 August 2009

25 August 2009, Tuesday
The conditions of Burmese democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s detention have gotten “worse” since her conviction this month for violating terms of her previous house arrest, her lawyer said Tuesday. Burma’s military government has not responded to Suu Kyi’s request for a visit by her personal physician, said Nyan Win, her lawyer and spokesman for her National League for Democracy party. Nyan Win also said he and his colleagues have not yet been given permission to meet the Nobel Peace Prize laureate since her Aug. 11 conviction to consult on filing an appeal. “The present regulations imposed on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi are worse than the previous rules,” he said. AP, 25 August 2009 Demands for an international blockade against weapons sales to Burma, in response to the military regime’s detention of Aung San Suu Kyi, will face difficult challenges from defiant Chinese, Russian, East European and North Korean arms dealers. “Nothing less than a worldwide ban on the sale of arms to the regime will do, as a first step,” said British Prime Minister Gordon Brown after Burmese authorities sentenced Mrs. Suu Kyi on August 11 to an additional 18 months house arrest. scoop.co.nz, 25 August 2009

26 August 2009, Wednesday
The debate over United States and European Union-led sanctions against doing business in Burma is set to intensify in the wake of US Senator Jim Webb’s recent high-profile meeting with Senior General Than Shwe and detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Webb spoke out against the sanctions and Burma’s junta echoed that call through state media. As US policymakers weigh the pros and cons of economically re-engaging the ruling junta, the process will necessarily take into account that a handful of military linked businessmen, many allegedly involved in illegal activities, including drug trafficking, dominate Burma’s underdeveloped economy. For US investors eyeing business opportunities that the cessation of sanctions would present, dealing with Burma’s top military and business leaders would be key to gaining market access. Burma is one of the world’s most corrupt countries, according to Transparency International, an independent corruption watchdog, and US businesses would enter Burma at great risk to their corporate reputations. In Burmese business circles, the most talked about businessman is Tayza, who owns the Htoo Trading Company Ltd, also known as the Htoo Group of Companies. Htoo maintains large logging, construction, property development, import-export, aviation, transportation, shipping and mining operations. Tayza has also made recent forays into telecommunications and banking, and established Page 210 of 226

Burma’s first privately invested airline, Air Bagan. The US Treasury Department placed five of those companies, along with Tayza, his wife, and eldest son, Pye Phyo Za, on a sanctions list in October 2007 because of their financial connections to the regime and Tayza’s alleged role as an arms broker. In February 2008, the US stepped up those sanctions by putting several more companies and Tayza’s business associates in both Burma and Singapore on a black list, including Tayza’s brother and business partner Thiha. Htoo Trading Company Ltd, which includes Ayer Shwe Wah Company Ltd, Myanmar Avia Export Company Ltd and Pavo Aircraft Leasing Company Ltd, are all currently under US sanctions. US sanctions, first imposed broadly in 1995, have since 2007 targeted specific generals and their associated business interests by freezing their assets in American financial institutions. The restrictions also prohibit any commercial or financial transactions between American individuals and Burmese firms named in the sanctions order and ban named individuals from travel to the US. Asia Times Online, 26 August 2009 A consortium led by South Korea’s Daewoo International will invest about $5.6 billion to develop Burma gas fields as part of a 30-year natural gas supply deal with China, a group member said yesterday. The investment comes just a week after China signed a $41 billion liquefied natural gas import deal with Australia. The Burma gas development plan will allow the consortium to supply natural gas to China’s top oil and gas firm, China National Petroleum Corp (CNPC), with a peak daily production of 152.4 million cu m, or about 3.8 million tons annually. A CNPC spokesman yesterday said he is not aware of the deal. The supply, due to be available from 2013 from the Shwe and Shwe Phyu fields in Burma’s A-1 offshore block and Mya field in A-3 offshore block, amounts to about 7 percent of China’s current gas consumption of about 2.225 billion cu m per day. China Daily, 26 August 2009

27 August 2009, Thursday
Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has agreed to appeal a recent court decision that put her under house detention for the next 18 months, her attorneys said Thursday. “We will file the appeal to the Divisional Court for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi on Monday or Tuesday next week,” Nyan Win, one of Suu Kyi’s three lawyers, said after meeting with the Nobel Peace Prize laureate to discuss her appeal. Suu Kyi, 64, who has spent 14 of the past 20 years under detention, has also requested that authorities allow her personal doctor Tin Myo Win to be allowed to visit her regularly for check-ups as was permitted under the previous rules of her detention. topnews.in, 27 August 2009 Delhi University’s Lady Shri Ram College for Women is organising a cross-country run this Friday to campaign for release of Burma’s pro-democracy crusader Aung San Suu Kyi, an alumna of the institution. A large number of students are expected to take part in the run. thehindu.com, 27 August 2009 More Indian companies are to invest in Burma’s information technology (IT) and education sectors this year, a local weekly The Burma Post reported Thursday. Being one of the IT power countries, India is willing to support Burma in the advancement of IT sector if Burmese side propose for the assistance, the report quoting the India embassy, adding that India has also planned to grant more scholarships to Burmese students who desire to pursue their further education in the country. India has so far awarded scholarships to over 150 Burmese students, it added. During last year, Burma and India cooperated in implementation of setting up 11 centers for enhancement of IT skill in key cities of Rangoon, Mandalay and others. The project, implemented by the Centre for Development Advanced Computing (CDAC) of India and the staterun Burma Posts and Telecommunications, started at the end of last year and with regard to the project, Burma sent 100 government servants to India to undergo the training. Meanwhile, Burma and India also cooperated in implementing cross-border optical fiber link between the two countries to boost information link which started in December 2006, according to the earlier report. Xinhua, 27 August 2009

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28 August 2009, Friday

U Win Tin, Hla Hla Htay, AFP / Getty Images / amnesty.ca, 23 September 2008 Tom Parry speaks with U Win Tin, a senior member of the National League for Democracy (NLD) who spent 19 years in prison until his release last year. Tom Parry: What has kept you going for so long, considering all your years in prison? Win Tin: Well, my opinion is that when you have to face a military government, you need a little bit of courage, some sort of confrontation, because if you are always timid and afraid and intimidated, they will step on you. Sometimes you have to force yourself to be courageous and outspoken. Parry: Aren’t you worried about your own security? Win Tin: People tell me I should keep a low profile because they are very anxious about my security. You can be snatched back to prison at any time, but you can’t help it. Parry: You have made some difficult decisions in your life. If you could do it again differently, would you? Win Tin: No, I wouldn’t. You see, formerly I was a journalist and I had no such difficult dilemmas. I could write and meet people and so on. But when I became a politician in 1988, things became very difficult. I was not just joining a political party, I was joining an uprising—a people’s uprising. I was one of them. I was one of the journalists who joined them—the whole country’s uprising. Then, of course, I was dragged away from political life and sent to prison. I am now 80 and my health is not very good, but still I don’t mind going back to prison. I don’t want to be intimidated or reverse my way of thinking. Parry: Over the next 10 years, what would be the best thing that could happen in Burma, and what would be the worst thing? Win Tin: The best thing that could happen would be if the junta went away and there was some form of democratic change. Of course, that is the best scenario. The worst is that we just go into the election under the terms of the new constitution, which is more or less a prolongation of military rule. That would be the worst thing because in the next decade there will be no change in the lives of ordinary people. That’s why we are calling for a review of the constitution, at the very least. We are the ones who have the right to draw up a constitution after the 1990 election. They forgot about us and started convening the National Convention. Then they drew up this constitution, which only the military can accept because it prolongs their rule. Parry: If the elections do happen, how can the NLD make a difference? How can you stop the continuation of tight military control? Win Tin: If we stand firm – because we’ve got the people’s support – in the end, we’ll get the international community’s support. Now look at the Aung San Suu Kyi case. They tried to snatch her and send her to prison. And we are making a very loud protest all over the world and also inside the country. Now the military authorities are rethinking it. I think we should try to convince them that if they go on, it won’t last long. Even after the elections there will be more uprisings. We have to convince them that this is not the way they should behave. Parry: Do you think there is any scope for compromise? Win Tin: Yes, that is possible. That is why we are asking for the release of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the start of a dialogue. Parry: Do you think there is any compromise to be had regarding the constitution? Win Tin: That is possible, of course, if they agree to the dialogue and if they agree to make some amendments to the constitution. It is possible the NLD could participate in the election. That’s the compromise. It’s very difficult. Of course, they are determined to make the constitution legal, to ratify the constitution in parliament. They are at the point of ratification. There are going to be elections, then there will be a parliament and then the parliament will ratify the constitution. They feel they are safe. We don’t Page 212 of 226

want to have another uprising or anything like that. People are reluctant. For myself, I am rather hard on the army, I have to admit. But Daw Suu has a very kind attitude toward the army. They should have negotiations, enter into a dialogue. But they don’t want to talk with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, they don’t want to let her play a role in our national politics. Parry: These aren’t the elections we all want to see, but after the elections, do you think they might be more willing to negotiate with her? Win Tin: But the thing is, you see, after the election is over, the constitution is in force. Parry: Forty UN envoys have visited Burma over so many years without having any effect. The trip by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was also a failure. What do you think the UN needs to do? Win Tin: Ban Ki-Moon should say to the Security Council: “We should pick up the Burma issue. We should take the Burma issue to the Security Council.” The last time Burma went to the Security Council was 50 years ago, in 1957/58, when the Chinese occupied Shan State. That’s the only time the Burma question was sent to the Security Council and they made a resolution. In 2007, at the time of the Saffron Revolution, the Burma question was sent again but there was no resolution. What we ask the UN and Ban Ki-moon to do is put the Burma question to the Security Council again and request the Chinese and Russian not to use their vetoes. Parry: Wouldn’t it be better to try and build a consensus on how to push for the release of political prisoners, how to help encourage a review of the constitution and help encourage dialogue? Win Tin: Well, you see, in this situation, when Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is behind bars and there are more than 2,000 political prisoners in jail, we have to push harder. If they release all the political prisoners and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and make some amendments and make a very amicable environment, of course we can engage in dialogue and make concessions. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi can do it, because she has the charisma, so people would accept it. If I made concessions, people wouldn’t accept it. Parry: It has been a great honor to meet you. Thank you for your time. Win Tin: The media and those kinds of well-wishers are the only friends we have now. Inside we can’t do anything at all and at the same time some people would like to silence us. Tom Parry is a freelance journalist based in London. He contributed this interview to Irrawaddy. 28 August 2009 Lawyers for Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi are set to appeal her sentencing next week, following complaints that new conditions of her house arrest are stricter than before. Suu Kyi met with her lawyers yesterday at her Rangoon compound where she has been sentenced to 18 months under house arrest. “We mainly discussed an appeal to reconsider her sentence passed by the Insein district court,” said lawyer Nyan Win. “We brought along the draft version of the appeal we wrote which is to be amended in the next few days.” A finalised version of the appeal will be submitted next week. Nyan Win said lawyers also talked with Suu Kyi regarding the new house arrest conditions set by the government. “In her previous house detention, she was allowed to meet with family members and also granted a regular medical checkup, but she doesn’t get these under the new conditions,” said Nyan Win, adding that a lot of the wording in the new conditions is unclear. Webb, who also met with Suu Kyi, stirred controversy following the visit with claims that Suu Kyi had hinted at a change in her pro-sanctions stance. This provided the basis for a commentary published in the New York Times yesterday. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi said she did not see his remarks as reflecting the Obama administration’s policy,” said Nyan Win. Nyan Win said the National League Democracy (NLD) party was informed by the US embassy in Rangoon that three humanitarian experts from the US senate will be meeting with the party today. DVB, 28 August 2009 Members of Burma’s opposition National League for Democracy have met with staff members of a key U.S. congressional committee. The American officials arrived in Rangoon on Friday. They work for the Foreign Relations Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The U.S. embassy in Rangoon says the committee staffers are visiting Burma as part of a regional tour to assess U.S. public diplomacy and assistance programs. VOA, 28 August 2009 Page 213 of 226

Three staff members of the US House of Representatives Foreign Relations Committee met Friday with leaders of Burma’s main opposition party. ‘They wanted to know the political situation of Burma and also the health of the political prisoners, including the condition of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi,’ National League for Democracy (NLD) spokesman Nyan Win said after meeting with the three Americans, Lynne Weil, Jessica Lee and Dennis Halpin. A US embassy official in Rangoon denied that the trip was a follow-up to this month’s visit of US Senator Jim Webb in which he secured the freedom of American national John William Yettaw. monstersandcritics.com, 28 August 2009 Three US Congress staffers met with representatives from the opposition National League for Democracy (NLD) in Rangoon for talks about political prisoners including Aung San Suu Kyi, and the US policy review on Burma, an NLD spokesman said. “We met with the Congress staffers at NLD headquarters at 4 p.m. on Friday. The main reason for their trip is to discuss humanitarian issues,” NLD spokesman Nyan Win said. “We talked about Burmese politics—the first issue they raised concerned the political prisoners.” The US Congress staffers also asked about Suu Kyi’s detention, he said. During the meeting, the staffers told the NLD policymakers are still discussing a US policy shift in Washington. “But they said they did not think a decision on the Burma policy review will come soon,” Nyan Win said. After US Senator Jim Webb’s recent trip and article in the New York Times, Nyan Win said he told the Congress staffers that Suu Kyi said she did not think his trip and his writing reflected the policy of the Obama administration. “I think the staffers came to Burma to survey the facts for the policy review or for Congress,” he said. Irrawaddy, 28 August 2009 The regime is not afraid to insult any international organisation, including Asean, the EU and UN. A recent example of how the regime blatantly fouled the international community was during UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s trip to Burma in early July. Most people assumed that pre-arrangements for his visit included securing the freedom of Aung San Suu Kyi, or at least meeting with her. The regime easily snubbed the secretary-general by denying him a meeting with Aung San Suu Kyi. But the regime knows that it is difficult for it to insult the US the same way. Of course, it is up to the US to determine whether it will allow itself to be insulted. Khin Maung Win, DVB, Oslo, The Nation, 28 August 2009 Resumption of hostilities between the Kokang-Wa-Mongla forces and the Burma Army (after 20 years of an uneasy but working truce) started yesterday morning when a police patrol that had strayed too near the Kokangs’ temporary headquarters was attacked. Three policeman were reportedly killed and the rest fled across the border where they were disarmed by the People’s Liberation Army. Kachin News Group reported they were soldiers in police uniforms. Meanwhile, the Burma Army that had ousted Kokang leader Peng Jiasheng has appointed his former deputy-turned-defector Bai Souqian as the new leader. “The Kokang Army has about 1,000 troops,” said a businessman who had just gone out of business in Kokang. “Not more than 200 had joined Bai. The rest are still with Peng.” The Burma Army’s next target after Kokang that covers the Wa’s northern border could be Mongla that protects the Wa’s southern border, said a the antiRangoon Shan State Army (SSA) ‘South’ source. The closure of two borders could have strangled the UWSA to death without fighting, according to a Thai security source. However, according to reports coming from the Thai-Burma border, the Burma Army’s next target could also be the UWSA’s 171st Military Region, opposite Thailand’s Maehongson, Chiangmai and Chiangrai provinces. The Operations Commander in Mongton, opposite Chiangmai, reportedly demanded on 26 August that the Wa withdraw from all their bases west of the Mongton-BP1 (Thai border) road. “He didn’t give any deadline as in the past,” said an informed source in Mongton. “He just said ‘at once’. Naturally, the Wa, instead of complying with his order, merely reinforced their positions.” On the other hand, no reports of the new Burma Army units into the area have been received, said the SSA South. “But all our units have been placed on the alert,” said Col Yawdserk, the SSA’s supreme commander. Meanwhile, Hkun Okker of the National Council of the Union of Burma (NCUB) said Burma’s military rulers could find itself fighting on two fronts as in 1988. “September is the second anniversary of the Saffron Revolution,” he told SHAN. “I certainly hope the two Page 214 of 226

parties (those protesting in the towns and cities and those fighting on the borders) can find ways to cooperate and coordinate their activities.” SHAN, 28 August 2009 The United Nations refugee agency today voiced its concern about reports that between 10,000 and 30,000 refugees have fled violence in Burma north-eastern Shan state in recent weeks and headed to China’s Yunnan province. Andrej Mahecic, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told reporters in Geneva that the agency is liaising with the authorities to investigate what the needs of the refugees are. “Our information is that as many as 30,000 people may have taken shelter in Nansan county since 8 August, saying they were fleeing fighting between Burmese Government troops and ethnic minority groups,” he stated. According to information received by UNHCR, local authorities in Yunnan Province have already provided emergency shelter, food and medical care to the refugees. “UNHCR has reiterated its readiness to provide support to the authorities in responding to the needs of these refugees,” said Mr. Mahecic. UN News Centre, 28 August 2009

29 August 2009, Saturday
The man who swam to the lakeside home of Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has spoken of his sorrow that his action led to her arrest and trial. John Yettaw told the BBC that he had a dream that Ms Suu Kyi was going to be murdered, and swam to her home wearing home-made flippers to warn her. Mr Yettaw was sentenced to seven years in prison but is now back home after US Senator Jim Webb intervened. Ms Suu Kyi was sentenced to 18 months’ further house arrest. Mr Yettaw, a devout Mormon from Falcon, Missouri, told the BBC’s Newshour programme that he had had many strong visions or dreams which he called “impressions” or “camcorder moments”. In one he says he foresaw an official plot to murder Ms Suu Kyi and this prompted him to swim twice to her home to warn her of the danger. On the first occasion he says he left some Mormon scriptures for her but did not enter her home. As he left he was challenged by an armed guard. He says he shook hands with the guard who then walked away and he took a taxi away from the scene. But he again swam to her house in May after another dream. “I had been researching Burma and researching about the internally displaced families and about the numbers of people who had been murdered and then about the numbers of people through the Cyclone Nargis and then about Aung San Suu Kyi’s release date and I went to sleep that night and I had a dream that when she was released she was going to be murdered and I saw a plot,” he said. He said that he believed the inevitable publicity surrounding his trips would make it impossible for the Burmese military authorities to carry out their alleged plan to assassinate her. BBC, 29 August 2009 Fresh fighting erupted Saturday in northeastern Burma after days of clashes between government troops and ethnic rebels drove tens of thousands of people into China, and a bomb tossed across the border killed one person and injured others. Up to 30,000 people have fled into China from Burma’s Kokang region, according to reports received by the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. Most of the people injured in the clashes and in the hospital are ethnic Chinese from Burma, said an official from Zhenkang County People’s Hospital, who refused to give her name. At least 25 people have been admitted, she said. Chinese soldiers are now guarding the border area, which has been sealed off, said a staffer at the Zhenkang County Public Security Bureau, who only gave his surname, Hui. The camps where some refugees are being housed are under strict control, he said. “Ordinary people cannot go near this area. Even police must be in uniform and police vehicles to come close.” The fighting near the border has threatened communist China’s goal of stability ahead of the sensitive Oct. 1 celebration of its 60th anniversary. It also could strain China’s close relationship with Burma’s military junta. Already, China has told Burma to stop the fighting. miamiherald.com / bignewsnetwork.com / Hla Kyaing, Recent Burmese News, 29 August 2009 The battle between Burmese troops and ethnic Kokang rebels is becoming fiercer and intensifying in the rebel territories along the Sino-Burma border in northeast Shan State, said frontline sources. Chinese Page 215 of 226

authorities have opened seven refugee camps in its territory bordering Kokang and are supplying food, drinking water, first aid and providing huts. The Chinese are also dropping food from military aircraft to Kokang refugees outside refugee camps in different areas, said border sources. According to sources close to rebels, more than 240 bodies of Burmese soldiers including those of 20 policemen were found in three battle zones in yesterday’s clashes. Dozens of Burmese soldiers have been captured by the rebels. On the Kokang side, over a dozen soldiers died and dozens were injured in yesterday’s battle, said sources close to the rebels. Many Burmese soldiers are abandoning their arms and fleeing to Monggo and Muse areas near the war zones, said residents in these areas. Yesterday, over 2000 United Wa State Army (UWSA) troops, an ally of the Kokang rebel, launched a swift offensive against Burmese troops in Chinshwehaw, another Kokang base and recaptured it from the Burmese troops. Chinshwehaw is now with UWSA. It was captured from the rebels early this week by Burmese troops, said sources close to UWSA. Over 4,000 Burmese troops have arrived as reinforcements from Meiktila in Mandalay Division to the Teinni (Hsenwi in Shan and Sinli in Kachin) on Mandalay-Muse border trade route yesterday, according to local eyewitnesses. A resident of Kutkai on Mandalay-Muse border trade route told KNG today that Burmese soldiers are forcibly using civilians as porters for carrying military rations and weapons since yesterday morning. There are also civilian casualties in the three-day battle between the Burmese troops and rebels but exact numbers cannot be stated, said rebel sources. At the same time, another ally of Kokang, Kachin Independence Army (KIA) is on high alert in Kachin State and Northeast Shan State. They are authorized to shoot all Burmese troops who intrude to the KIA’s territories without waiting for the first shoot policy from Burmese soldiers, said KIA officials in Laiza headquarters in Kachin State. Chinese security agents are closely watching the battle between the Kokang rebel and the Burmese troops, said border sources. Border based ethnic armed groups’ sources said, China views Burma’s ruling junta being responsible for the current battle with the Kokang because the war was started following dishonestly capturing the rebel’s headquarters Laogai on Monday. Earlier, China warned both ethnic armed groups along with its border and the junta to avoid conflicts, said border sources. kachinnews.com / Shan-EU / Democracy for Burma, 29 August 2009 Burma has established diplomatic ties with Zimbabwe at ambassadorial level, bringing the total number of countries in the world with which Burma has such links up to 98 since it regained independence in 1948, China’s Xinhua news agency said quoting reports in state-run newspaper the New Light of Burma Saturday. An agreement on the establishment of diplomatic ties was signed by the ambassadors of Burma and Zimbabwe to India in New Delhi Thursday, the report said. According to the Foreign Ministry, Burma has so far set up embassies in 30 countries and two permanent missions in New York and Geneva, and three consulates-general in China’s Hong Kong and Kunming and India’s Calcutta, respectively. Meanwhile, 28 countries have their embassies in Burma. In addition, China and India have respectively set up consulatesgeneral in Burma’s Mandalay, the second largest city. Bernama, 29 August 2009

31 August 2009, Monday
Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi plans to renovate her lakeside home-cum-prison, where she has spent 14 of the past 20 years under detention, media reports said Monday. ‘Now that her trial is over, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi wants to repair her house,’ Nyan Win, Suu Kyi’s spokesman, told The Myanmar Times. ‘She wants to mount iron grills in the windows,’ he said. No renovation work has been done on the house since Suu Kyi began living there in 1988, when she returned to Burma, after spending much of her adulthood in England where she attended Oxford University and married a British professor. Suu Kyi is the daughter of Burma independence hero Aung San. ‘She will spend her own money on the renovation,’ Nyan Win said. He added that according to city regulations, property owners must apply for a permit themselves, but given her situation, the permit can be sought by ‘the authorities who are responsible for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s house arrest.’ Authorities erected two fences on the lake side of the compound after Yettaw’s infamous swim. It was widely believed that Yettaw’s bizarre escapade provided Burma’s junta with a Page 216 of 226

pretext to keep Suu Kyi out of the political picture until after a planned general election next year. Monstersandcritics.com, 31 August 2009 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon responded to Norwegian criticism of his leadership on Monday by saying he had his own style and charisma. Ban met Norway’s Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg to discuss climate change during a visit that followed the leak of a scathing memo in which Norway’s deputy U.N. Ambassador Mona Juul said Ban suffered from “a lack of charisma” Juul accused Ban, a former South Korean foreign minister, of weak, ineffective and at times counterproductive leadership, Norwegian daily Aftenposten had reported. Norway has stressed that the letter was an internal diplomatic memo and not a statement by the government. “We all have a different background, leadership styles. We must respect each others’,” Ban told a news conference. “I have my own leadership style, my own charisma.” Juul reportedly wrote that Ban was a mere “passive observer” after Burma’s arrest of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and that his visit there to meet the hardline generals was fruitless and could create problems for lower-level diplomats. The secretary-general pointed to his diplomatic efforts last year, when he persuaded Burmese Senior General Than Shwe to lift humanitarian aid restrictions after Cyclone Nargis. Ban said he was committed to work for democratization of Burma. Reuters, 31 August 2009

2 September 2009, Wednesday
The recent decision by Burma’s government to sentence pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi to a further 18 months’ house arrest shows how difficult it is to deal with that country’s ruling generals. Yet the first steps toward a new approach may already have been taken. The clearest sign comes from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), of which Burma is a member. At first, most of ASEAN’s member governments responded mildly to the verdict, expressing their “disappointment” -- a stance that reflects the group’s principle of noninterference in fellow members’ internal politics. But Thai Foreign Minister Kasit Piromya then consulted his counterparts in Cambodia, Indonesia, Singapore and Vietnam. As current ASEAN chair, he floated the idea of concertedly requesting a pardon for Aung San Suu Kyi. ASEAN government officials have since met to draft a text. Approval by the association’s foreign ministers may come in September, with ASEAN leaders tackling the issue in October. Todayszaman.com, 2 September 2009

3 September 2009, Thursday
Burma’s detained pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi on Thursday appealed against her conviction on charges of sheltering an eccentric American man who swam to her lakeside house, her lawyers said. The Nobel peace laureate was ordered to spend 18 more months under house arrest after a court on August 11 found her guilty of breaking security laws following the bizarre incident involving US national John Yettaw. The verdict sparked international outrage at Burma’s ruling military junta, which has already kept the 64year-old opposition leader locked up for 14 of the last 20 years in its bid to crush all dissent. “We have submitted the appeal to the court,” her lawyer Kyi Win told AFP. Appeals had also been lodged on behalf of two female aides who live with Suu Kyi and had also been convicted and handed a similar sentence, he said. The court would hear initial arguments from Suu Kyi’s lawyers on Friday before deciding whether to officially consider the appeal, said Nyan Win, another of her lawyers and the spokesman for her National League for Democracy. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is not guilty. The main person is the intruder,” Nyan Win said. Critics have accused the junta of using the charges against Suu Kyi as an excuse to keep the influential activist locked up during elections due to be held next year. AFP, 3 September 2009 Lawyers for Burma pro-democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi said they would lodge an appeal Thursday against her conviction on charges relating to an incident in which an American man swam to her home. The Page 217 of 226

Nobel laureate was ordered to spend 18 more months under house arrest after a court on August 11 found her guilty of breaking security laws by giving shelter to US national John Yettaw at her lakeside residence. “We will submit the appeal this afternoon. Aung San Suu Kyi’s conviction is not in accordance with the law but we will have to wait to see whether the court agrees to hear the appeal,” her main lawyer Kyi Win told AFP. He said the appeal would focus on the fact that a 1974 constitution under which the ruling junta had detained Suu Kyi had been superseded by a new constitution that was approved in a controversial referendum last year. “Altogether there are 11 reasons for the appeal, but the main thing we will point out is about the constitution,” Kyi Win said. AFP, 3 September 2009

4 September 2009, Friday
A Burmese court agreed Friday to hear an appeal by the detained opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi of the criminal conviction that extended her house arrest by 18 months, one of her lawyers said. The Divisional Court in Rangoon set a Sept. 18 date for the appeal after lawyers formally presented their request Friday, the lawyer, Nyan Win, said. nytimes.com, 4 September 2009

8 September 2009, Tuesday
Lawyers for Aung San Suu Kyi said they have sought permission to meet with the detained Burmese democracy leader ahead of an appeal hearing scheduled for September 18. “We asked the authorities for permission to discuss the appeal and receive further instructions from her, but so far we have not received a reply,” Nyan Win, a lawyer for Suu Kyi, told The Irrawaddy on Tuesday. The Rangoon Division court agreed last week to hear an appeal against an August 11 judgment that found Suu Kyi guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest. The appeal was submitted on September 3 and was accepted by the court the next day. Meanwhile, diplomats in Rangoon and Bangkok have asked Burma’s ruling junta to allow Suu Kyi to receive visitors, according to diplomatic sources. When Suu Kyi was sentenced to a further 18 months of house for allowing an American intruder to shelter at her home, the regime said she would be permitted to meet guests at the discretion of the relevant authorities. Irrawaddy, 8 September 2009

18 September 2009, Friday
Lawyers for detained Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi appealed the recent conviction that extended her yearslong house arrest Friday, a day after the ruling junta announced it was releasing thousands of prisoners. The Rangoon Divisional Court said it would deliver its verdict Oct. 2, lawyer Nyan Win said. “I have done my best. I have done my duty,’ chief defense lawyer Kyi Win said after the one-day, closed-door hearing that Suu Kyi and reporters were barred from attending. AP, 18 September 2009

2 October 2009, Friday
Detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyer on Friday said the Rangoon division court’s decision to reject the appeal against her sentence is “legally flawed” as the court arrived at its verdict on a constitution that it acknowledges being non-existent. Kyi Win, a member of Aung San Suu Kyi’s legal team, said the divisional court acknowledged that the 1974 constitution is no longer in effect, but said the 1975 law, which is based on the constitution, is still in effect and under which the lower court’s verdict on August 11 is legally binding. “It is a serious legal fraud. If the constitution is no longer in effect, the law based on that constitution cannot be alive, and thus Aung San Suu Kyi cannot be detained,” Kyi Win told Mizzima on Friday. According to the law enacted in 1975, Aung San Suu Kyi had been deprived of her fundamental rights, which are stated in the 1974 constitution. The district court in Rangoon’s Insein prison on August 11 Page 218 of 226

sentenced the Nobel Peace Laureate to three years, on charges of violating her detention regulations, which is prescribed in the 1975 law. Despite the argument by defence lawyers that the 1974 constitution is no longer in vogue, the district court did not acknowledge it and handed down the verdict, Kyi Win said. Following the sentence, the defence team appealed to the divisional court, citing mainly that Aung San Suu Kyi cannot be sentenced and must be acquitted as the law, under which she was charged is no longer in effect. “It is bizarre. I am a high court lawyer and I have also served as a judge but I do not understand how the 1975 law can restrict the fundamental rights prescribed in the 1974 constitution, which is no longer in effect,” Kyi Win said. He added that the defence will continue appealing to the high court and will focus on the flaws of interpreting the law and the constitution. After independence from the British, Burma had its first constitution in 1947, but following a military coup led by General Ne Win in 1962, the constitution was scrapped. Under the Newin regime, a new constitution was drafted and approved in 1974. But in 1975, the Ne Win regime promulgated a set of laws based on the constitution. “The division court’s argument is that though the 1974 constitution is dead, Aung San Suu Kyi is charged with the 1975 law,” said Kyi Win. Mizzima, 2 October 2009 A court in military-ruled Burma turned aside opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s latest bid for freedom Friday, rejecting an appeal against her most recent sentence of house arrest, government sources said. Suu Kyi was convicted and sentenced in August for sheltering an uninvited American at her home for two days earlier this year, in a verdict that drew international condemnation and ensured that she would not be able to participate in elections scheduled for next year. She argued in an appeal that the conviction was unwarranted, but the Rangoon Division court ruled against the appeal Friday, said the sources, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the case. Suu Kyi’s lawyer Nyan Win said ahead of Friday’s ruling that the defense would take the case to the Supreme Court if her appeal is rejected. “We have made all necessary plans for any outcome,” Nyan win said. Security was tight Friday, with riot police ringing the courthouse. Burma’s courts almost always follow the same hard line toward Suu Kyi and the country’s democracy movement, which the military government often accuses of collaborating with the country’s enemies to destroy the nation. AP, 2 October 2009 The Burma Center Delhi (BCD) on behalf of 58 Indian and International organizations submitted an appeal letter to Sonia Gandhi, President of All India Congress Committee (AICC) and Chairperson, UPA on Friday urging her to draw attention to Aung San Suu Kyi and to revise Indias foreign policy and promote human rights in order to restore peace, harmony and fraternity in the region. Dr. Alana Golmei, Coordinator of BCD, along with a group of Burmese activists submitted the appeal letter to Sonia Gandhi at her residence. She said that the appeal letter was warmly accepted by the concern staff in the office. We have great expectations from Madam Sonia Gandhi to take prompt action for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi as well as restoration of democracy in Burma. Kim, New Delhi-based and exile Burmese and Campaign Coordinator of BCD recalled that during nationwide peoples uprising in Burma in 1988, the then Prime Minister of India, Rajiv Gandhi not only supported the peoples movement but also offered shelter to democracy activists to continue for democracy in Burma. Even Indian embassy in Rangoon provided financial support to activists who were fleeing Burma to continue their struggle in India, he added. The appeal letter was endorsed by prominent Indian and International organizations as well as India-based Burmese organizations. ANI, 2 October 2009 China and other allies of the military government in Burma have joined an international call for the release of jailed opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. India and Russia also aligned themselves with European countries and the U.S. to demand that Burma release all political prisoners and allow them to take part in next year’s elections. The U.N. Human Rights Council’s 47 members unanimously adopted the resolution in Geneva as a court in Burma rejected Suu Kyi’s latest appeal for freedom Friday. Beijing in particular has traditionally protected its southerly neighbour from criticism in the global body. Suu Kyi has been detained for about 14 of the last 20 years. Toronto Star, 2 October 2009 Page 219 of 226

3 October 2009, Saturday
Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada on Saturday urged Burma’s military government to release Aung San Suu Kyi and all other political prisoners in the country before a general election set for next year. Okada made the demand during a meeting with Burmese Foreign Minister U Nyan Win on the sidelines of a foreign ministers meeting involving Japan and Mekong region countries, saying political prisoners including Suu Kyi should be allowed to participate in the election. japantoday.com, 3 October 2009

14 November 2009, Tuesday
Lawyers representing Burma’s detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has filed an appeal to the Supreme Court on Friday against the Nobel Laureate’s earlier conviction to an extended period of house arrest. chinlandguardian.com, 14 November 2009

4 December 2009, Friday
Military-ruled Burma’s supreme court has agreed to hear an appeal against the extended house arrest of prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, an official said Friday. The Nobel laureate, 64, was ordered to spend another 18 months in detention in August after being convicted over an incident in which a US man swam to her lakeside house. A lower court rejected an initial appeal in October. “The supreme court decided to hear Aung San Suu Kyi’s request. Lawyers have to present arguments before the court on December 21,” the official said on condition of anonymity. The decision had been posted on the noticeboard of the court in the former capital Rangoon on Friday, the official added. Nyan Win, a spokesman for Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD), confirmed that the top court had agreed to hear the appeal but said he had no further details. AFP, 4 December 2009

21 December 2009, Monday
Burma’s highest court agreed Monday to review the most recent extension of democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s house arrest. Suu Kyi’s lawyers appealed to the Supreme Court last month after a lower court upheld a decision to sentence her to 18 more months of house arrest. She had been convicted for violating her previous term by briefly sheltering an American intruder who swam uninvited to her lakeside home. The legal team argued that her house arrest extension was unlawful as it was based on provisions from the 1974 Constitution that was no longer in existence, Suu Kyi’s chief lawyer Kyi Win told reporters after emerging from the court Monday. The court posted an announcement on its notice board that it had agreed to hear the appeal. Final arguments are to take place at a later date. The court also agreed to review the house arrest of Suu Kyi’s two female companions, who are also ordered confined for 18 months at her compound in Yangon. Suu Kyi’s sentence ensures she cannot participate in Burma’s first elections in two decades that are scheduled for next year. Her party swept the last elections in 1990, but the results were never honored by the military, which has ruled the country since 1962. AP, 21 December 2009

13 February 2010, Saturday
In a statement, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed Tin Oo’s release and said he hoped it would promote “substantive dialogue” between the National League for Democracy and the government. He Page 220 of 226

also urged the lifting of restrictions on Suu Kyi “without further delay” and the release of other political prisoners. AP, 13 February 2010

15 February 2010, Monday
UN Human Rights Envoy to Burma Tomás Ojea Quintana on Monday condemned the ruling military government for detaining Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi under a 1975 law that is now obsolete. He made the comment during a one-hour meeting with Suu Kyi’s lawyers on Monday afternoon, according to lawyer Nyan Win who is also an NLD spokesman. “He told us that the law of 1975 was obsolete and that the use of it to keep Daw Aung San Suu Kyi under house arrest is outwith international law,” Nyan Win said after emerging from the meeting with Quintana. Quintana also requested that the military government meet with Suu Kyi on Feb. 18, Nyan Win told The Irrawaddy. The UN envoy was not allowed to meet with her during previous visits. Nyan Win said the UN envoy held discussions with him and Suu Kyi’s other lawyers, Kyi Win, Khin Win Kyi and Hla Myo Myint, about the justice system in Burma under military rule. Irrawaddy, 15 February 2010

26 February 2010, Friday
Burma’s Supreme Court on Friday rejected an appeal by Aung San Suu Kyi against her extended house arrest, an official said, keeping her in detention ahead of elections promised by the junta this year. A lower court rejected an initial appeal in October. “The appeal was rejected,” the Burmese official said on condition of anonymity, adding that the appeals of Suu Kyi’s two female assistants against similar periods of detention were also thrown out. Foreign ambassadors including the British, French and Australian envoys went to the court in the former capital Rangoon to hear the verdict, witnesses said. AFP, 26 February 2010 During a meeting with her lawyers Thursday, Suu Kyi jokingly asked them if she had been behaving well, as junta chief Than Shwe had said she could receive amnesty if she serves her time according to the prescribed regulations. Defense lawyer Nyan Win told reporters he would launch one final “special appeal” before the court after determining why the recent appeal had been rejected. “The court order did not mention any reasons,” he said. “Although the decision comes as no surprise, it is deeply disappointing,” said British Ambassador Andrew Heyn, who attended the court session along with diplomats from Australia, France and the United States. “We continue to believe that Suu Kyi should be released immediately along with the other 2,000 and more other prisoners of conscience.” French Ambassador Jean Pierre Lafosse said Suu Kyi was “the victim of a sham trial.” “Than Shwe already made the verdict for Suu Kyi and no judge will have the nerve to change it,” said Aung Din, executive director of the U.S.-based U.S. Campaign for Burma, a lobby group. “The judiciary system in Burma is just a part of the regime’s oppressive mechanism,’ he said. “The only way to make the release of Suu Kyi and all political prisoners in Burma is to keep putting maximum pressure on Than Shwe and his cronies until they feel the heat.” AP, 26 February 2010 The Prime Minister has expressed his disappointment on hearing that an appeal against Aung San Suu Kyi’s sentence has been denied. Burma’s Supreme Court rejected an appeal to end the opposition leaders’ 14 years of house arrest, according to her lawyer. Gordon Brown said the sole purpose of last year’s “show trial” has been to prevent Aung San Suu Kyi from taking part in elections later this year. Burma Related News, 26 February 2010 Singapore said Friday it was disappointed that Burma’s Supreme Court had rejected an appeal by democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi against her extended house arrest. “It is of course very disappointing that her appeal did not succeed,” the foreign ministry said in a statement. Singapore said a dialogue between Burmese authorities, Suu Kyi and other political groups before planned elections this year would offer “the Page 221 of 226

best prospects for national reconciliation and the long-term political stability.” Burma’s military rulers have promised to hold a vote this year under a “roadmap to democracy” but have not set a date. They have repeatedly rejected international appeals for Suu Kyi to be released ahead of the elections. AFP, 26 February 2010 UN Chief Ban Ki Moon is ‘disappointed Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s appeal against her extended house arrest was dismissed, his press office said on Friday. “The Secretary General is disappointed to learn that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s appeal against her continued house arrest was again rejected today,’ a UN statement said. Mr Ban ‘reiterates his call for the release of all political prisoners and their free participation in the political process,’ calling them ‘essential steps for national reconciliation and democratic transition in Burma,’ according to the statement. UN, 26 February 2010

27 February 2010, Saturday
The United States on Friday criticized Burma’s Supreme Court for not releasing Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, with one lawmaker saying the time had come to tighten sanctions. “We condemn the Supreme Court’s decision,” a State Department official said, saying that Aung San Suu Kyi was being held under house arrest “for purely political reasons.” The official, who by protocol could not be named, said that the United States “strongly’ urged Burma to free other political prisoners and allow them to participate fully in the political process. Representative Joe Crowley, a Democrat who has long championed Aung San Suu Kyi, said the time had come for the United States to implement tighter sanctions that target military leader Than Shwe’s regime. “Aung San Suu Kyi’s 14-year imprisonment has been a sham from day one,” Crowley said. “The cruel military junta must face consequences for violating the human rights of the Burmese people,” he said. AFP, 27 February 2010

1 March 2010, Monday
Burma opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi is to take a special appeal over her house arrest to Burma’s supreme court after it was last week rejected. Her lawyers said that the new appeal would go through two stages: acceptance by the court, and then a final presentation by lawyers at the court. Analysts have said the appeal will effectively be made to junta chief Than Shwe, who is seen as the main architect behind her sentencing. Courts in Burma have been criticised as puppets of the government. “There will be two judges deciding on [he acceptance] and we [lawyers] are to make an argument statement before them,” said lawyer Nyan Win. “If they accept it, the appeal will be heard before three judges in Naypyidaw. This is the current legal system procedure.” Nyan Win said that judges last Friday only read out the ruling that rejected the previous appeal, but did not give any reasons for why it was rejected. DVB, 1 March 2010

9 March 2010, Tuesday
Nobel Laureate and Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi will file a law suit against Khin Maung Aye, one of her relatives, because he has been trying to sell some land in her current place of residence. Kyi Win, her lawyer told Mizzima that she will file a case against Khin Maung Aye because he had tried to make the sale with the help of false documents to prospective buyers. “Though news of a section of the land where her house is situated being sold was announced through newspapers in July last year by Khin Maung Aye, she could not initiate action because she was facing a trial in the bizzare case of US citizen John Yettaw intruding into her house and staying for two days,” her lawyer Kyi Win said. “We were discussing whether she shall file a case. If Daw Suu agrees to what we have drafted, we will submit it in court,’ he said. Aung San Suu Kyi’s mother Khin Kyi had lived in the house numbered 54 and 56 till she Page 222 of 226

died in January 1989. “Khin Maung Aye claimed that Khin Kyi had given him 170 feet of land. But later we heard that Khin Kyi threw him out of the house because she had only allowed him to stay temporarily. Khin Maung Aye is now claiming that he was given the land by Khin Kyi and therefore is trying to sell it,” Kyi Win said. “Khin Maung Aye has already taken some money from the buyer, a person supposedly from the literacy circle,” he added. Former Prime Minister U Nu gave the house and the land to Khin Kyi, when she was the Burmese Ambassador to India in 1960. Suu Kyi has lived in this house since she came back to Burma in 1988. Mizzima, 9 March 2010

14 May 2010, Friday
The Supreme Court in military-ruled Burma has allowed the detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi to submit a “special appeal” for her unconditional release from house arrest in Rangoon, after similar appeals lodged earlier were rejected twice by military courts. According to her lawyers, the court has not set any date to hear arguments on the admissibility of the petition, expected to be the last opportunity to seek her release ahead of the junta-promised elections later this year. Nyan Win, her political associate and lawyer, said Thursday from Rangoon the petition was based on Suu Kyi’s innocence and the prosecution’s failure to produce clinching evidence during the trial last year. The latest appeal came just days after Kurt Campbell, U.S. assistant secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, met with Suu Kyi in Rangoon and expressed concern about election preparations in Burma, under military rule since 1962. RTT, 14 May 2010

26 June 2010, Saturday
The Group of Eight rich nations on Saturday condemned North Korea for an attack that sank a South Korean naval ship and called on Iran’s leaders to respect the rule of law and freedom of expression. In a draft communique seen by Reuters at the summit in Huntsville, north of Toronto, the G8 also asked Afghanistan’s government to be ready by a July conference in Kabul to demonstrate to its allies tangible progress that it is taking on greater security responsibility, key to U.S. plans to begin drawing down troops in mid-2011. The G8 called on Burma’s military rulers to quickly release all political prisoners, including opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, a Nobel laureate who has spent 15 of the past 21 years in detention. Reuters, 26 June 2010

13 July 2010, Tuesday
U Nyan Win, a lawyer and NLD Spokesperson, stated that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi told him to submit a complaint regarding the military regime’s restriction imposed on him not to talk about politics, but the cases when he meets with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, and the restriction was not in accordance with the law. DVB, 13 July 2010

29 July 2010, Thursday
Detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi said that the Burmese election is “absolutely unlikely” to be free and fair because the election date has not been set and political parties will not have enough time to campaign, according to a spokesperson who met with her on Wednesday. Nyan Win, who was a senior official in the disbanded National League for Democracy (NLD) met with Suu Kyi on Tuesday. He told The Irrawaddy that her health is good, and that they also discussed the appeal of the 18-month extension of her house arrest and renovation work that was needed on her home. Irrawaddy, 29 July 2010 Page 223 of 226

13 August 2010, Friday
Burma’s first election in two decades will be held Nov. 7, the junta announced Friday. The brief announcement was carried on state TV and radio, marking the first time the junta has given a date for the first polls in the country, also known as Myanmar, since 1990. “Multiparty general elections for the country’s parliament will be held on Sunday Nov. 7,” according to the announcement from the Election Commission, which also called on political parties to submit their candidate lists between Aug. 16 and Aug. 30. Ahead of the polls, the ruling military junta has passed numerous laws and rules criticized by detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and the international community as undemocratic and unfair. Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy is boycotting the polls. AP, 13 August 2010 The Union Election Commission announces the election will take place on Nov. 7, a week before the scheduled release of Suu Kyi. Parties complain they have insufficient time to prepare. Reuters, 14 August 2010

16 September 2010, Saturday
The Police Special Branch summoned U Nyan Win, NLD spokesperson and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s layer and informed about the case with Daw Suu to wait and see the ‘warning list’ at the Court. NLD News Bulletin, September 2010

30 September 2010, Thursday
Democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi will be released just days after Burma’s first election in two decades, officials said Thursday. “November will be an important and busy month for us because of the election and because of Aung San Suu Kyi’s release,” a Burmese official told AFP, noting the release would come soon after the country’s 7 November poll. DVB, 30 September 2010

8 October 2010, Friday
Burma’s Supreme Court announced on Friday that it would hold a hearing on October 18 on detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s latest appeal against her house arrest. The judges will decide whether to consider the “special appeal”, according to a notice posted in front of the Supreme Court in the former capital Rangoon. The Nobel peace laureate’s current term of house arrest is due to end on November 13, just days after national elections that critics said are aimed at simply entrenching the junta’s power. Suu Kyi lodged the last-ditch appeal in May. She has already had her appeal rejected twice, most recently by the Supreme Court in February. The democracy icon, who has spent most of the past two decades locked up, had her detention lengthened by 18 months in August last year after being convicted over a bizarre incident in which a US man swam to her lakeside home. Suu Kyi on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against the junta at the Supreme Court for dissolving her party ahead of the widely criticised polls. Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD) has been forcibly abolished for boycotting the November 7 vote. Channelnewsasia.com, 8 October 2010

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18 October 2010, Monday
Burma’s detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi wants to start using Twitter when she is released from house arrest to communicate with people around the world, her lawyer said on Monday. Suu Kyi, whose current term of house arrest is due to end next month, has been locked up in her lakeside home with no Internet access since 2003, long before the popular micro-blogging website was launched. “Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has said to me that she wants to have a Twitter account to speak and discuss with the world’s teenagers,” her attorney Nyan Win said after visiting the Nobel Peace Prize winner. “She said she wanted to talk with youths as she wanted to know their opinions regarding political, economic and social issues. She said she can be in touch with them every day if she has this account.” Suu Kyi is due to be released on November 13, just days after the military-ruled country holds its first election in 20 years, although some fear the generals may find an excuse to keep her locked up. The pro-democracy icon’s party won the last election in 1990 but was never allowed to take power, and several periods of confinement mean she has spent most of the past two decades in detention. Burma’s Supreme Court held a hearing Monday on Suu Kyi’s latest appeal against her house arrest, but did not announce a decision on whether they would agree to consider the application. “We have to wait about two weeks for the judgement,” said Nyan Win. “We are satisfied with our arguments. We’re hoping they will accept the case.” AFP, 18 October 2010

21 October 2010, Thursday
Burma’s highest court has agreed to hear a final appeal to release opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest, her lawyer said Thursday, pressing forward with the case despite her scheduled release in less than a month. “We believe that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi will be released on Nov. 13, but we are pursuing this legal battle to prove her innocence,” lawyer Nyan Win told reporters. He said the High Court posted an announcement Wednesday night that it would hear the special appeal on behalf of Suu Kyi, who has spent most of the past 15 years under house arrest. Nyan Win said lawyers will have to present their argument before the Special Appellate Bench, a multi-judge panel in the remote administrative capital of Naypyidaw, on a date that has not yet been set. This will be Suu Kyi’s last legal option to appeal her 2009 conviction for violating the terms of her house arrest for briefly sheltering an American who swam uninvited to her home. Suu Kyi’s lawyers have argued that her house arrest was unlawful since it was based on provisions of the 1974 constitution which was abolished after a ruling military junta seized power in 1988, said Nyan Win. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate has already lost two appeals against the conviction and her 18-month house arrest expires on Nov. 13, a week after the country’s first election in two decades. Irrawaddy, 21 October 2010

29 October 2010, Friday
Burma’s Supreme Court is today to hear opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s final appeal against her house arrest, due to end days after controversial elections next month. Burma has said that Suu Kyi may be freed after November 7 elections, as it attempts to deflect a barrage of criticism over the discredited polls. The detention of the Nobel Peace Prize laureate has kept her off the scene for the country’s first polls in 20 years, which have been dismissed by critics as a charade aimed at putting a civilian cloak over military rule. Suu Kyi’s lawyers will present their argument to a panel of three judges in the capital Naypyidaw at the hearing, which was due to start at 10 am (0330 GMT). It is unclear when a verdict will be announced. “We have prepared everything,” one of her lawyers, Nyan Win, told AFP. “We will argue that she is not guilty. We are hoping for her acquittal.” The democracy icon’s current term of detention is due to end on November 13, although some fear Burma’s ruling generals may find an excuse to extend it. Suu Kyi lodged the last-ditch appeal in May. She has already had her appeal rejected twice, most recently by the Supreme Court in February. Court verdicts in the army-ruled country rarely favour opposition activists. Suu Kyi’s Page 225 of 226

lawyers say the current period of detention started with her imprisonment on May 14 last year and expect her to be freed next month, but they are continuing their efforts to have the conviction quashed. Burma’s Foreign Minister Nyan Win told his Southeast Asian counterparts at a meeting in Hanoi this week that Suu Kyi may be released after the November 7 poll. There was a cautious response to his comments from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) but the United States accused Burma of “craven manipulation” of its election. Bangkok Post, 29 October 2010 Opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi looks set for release before nationwide elections to be held in a matter of days, according to one of her lawyers outside Burma’s top court in Naypyidaw, where the special appeal against her house arrest began today. “I believe that Aung San Suu Kyi will be free before the election,” Nyan Win, one of three lawyers representing her, told Mizzima. Khin Htay Kywe and Kyi Win joined Nyan Win as assistant counsel before the Special Appellate Bench of the Supreme Court in the junta’s capital, which had accepted the special appeal after two lower courts rejected the basis of arguments made by Suu Kyi’s legal team. Chief Justice Aung Toe led Deputy Chief Justice Tun Tun Oo and Justice Kyaw Win on the three-member panel in the three-hour hearing amid calls yesterday and today by respectively US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for release of all political prisoners in Burma, Suu Kyi’s current sentence was due to expire on November 13, six days after Burma’s first elections in 20 years. Party members and supporters were expecting her to be released from detention at her home on Rangoon University Avenue road. Nevertheless, the court had failed to fix a date for the next hearing, as was the junta courts usual practice, her lawyer said. “The appeal is to test the state of Burma’s law and order. We seek not only the freedom of Aung San Suu Kyi but also to restore the rule of law,” Nyan Win highlighted repeatedly. The leader of the National League for Democracy party has spent most of her life in detention of various forms since her party won the last national elections in a landslide in 1990. Party members Han Thar Myint, May Win Myint, Win Myint, Thein Oo, Aye Aye Mar, Khin Saw Mu, Dr. Myo Aung, Lawyer Khin Maung Shein, Saw Nai Nai, and youth-wing members Myo Nyunt, Myint Myint Aye, Thuza Lwin, and Min Maw Oo were permitted to attend the trial. Authorities imposed no unusual security arrangements during the trial or near the court, a 1990 elected member of parliament Saw Nai Nai told Mizzima. Suu Kyi’s earlier failed appeals were submitted at district and division level courts. Mizzima, 29 October 2010

The truth shall make you free. John 8:36 / Rev. Fr. John Sue, Revolutionary Priest Burma Compatriots Citizens for Peace, Liberty, Justice, Equality, Stability, and Prosperity Revolutionaries against censorship, lawlessness, slave labor, rape, torture, corruption, and crony capitalism Contact Info: burmacompatriots@gmail.com Note: In honor of the strong will of the Burmese people, we would like to use the conventional English only in all of our documentations regarding Democracy for Burma.

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