~ __......

, ~ Traditional Studies Press

The Twelve

Guiding Energy

Sitting Meditations

of

Yin Style Ba Gua

By Xie Peiqi

Translation: Andrew Nugent-Head

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations of

Yin Style Ba Gua

By Xie Peiqi

Translation Andrew Nugent-Head

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations of Yin Style Ba Gua. By Xie Peiqi. Translation by Andrew Nugent-Head. ISBN# 1-888179-51-1

The Traditional Studies Press is the publishing house of the Association for Traditional Studies.

First Edition 1995. Second Printing 1995 ©Association for Traditional Studies. All rights reserved.

Association for Traditional Studies Traditional Studies Press 601 Van Ness Ave. #E3 519

San Francisco, California, 94102

The authors and publishers et a1 are not responsible for any injury or other problem that may arise from the contents contained within this book.

Translator's note

Xie Peiqi has been one of the great finds from the work the Association for Traditional Studies has been doing in China to document its traditional arts and knowledge. Xie Peiqi is incredibly rare, as he does in fact know the full system of Yin style Ba Gua as passed down from Yin Fu, for whom this style ofBa Gua is named after, via Men Baozhen, his most thoroughly taught disciple.

As always, the great difficulty in providing a translation for people of a different culture is how faithful to keep the translation as literal as possible, and how much explaining should the translator do to familiarize readers with the concepts and terminology. While, on the surface, the easy answer is explain everything, that may not actually be what is best, or what was meant by the authors and teachers. It is important to remember that this is profound material and that it requires a certain amount of familiarity with the framework it was built in as well as the particular subject discussed. Going one step further, the reader must understand that there are many native readers who would be at just as much of a loss of understanding the contents, even if they were reading it in the original language. Authors in any country are aware of that and make their own decisions as to how much of their work should be dedicated to pulling the reader along, and how much should actually be their work. I have chosen to respect that, and have kept myself out of the way as much as possible, and translated as literally as possible. Where I have added a few words for explanation or grammatical reasons, they are in parentheses.

Classical Chinese as a language is much more rich and expressive than contemporary Chinese, allowing for both a clarity and a vagueness that lends itself to the study of the spiritual. For this reason, many practitioners of traditional arts continue to write their knowledge in this style. The style of writing is often like speech, as most ancient books of know 1-

edge were meant to be read aloud. There were very few copies of books back then, so the style had to lend itself to memorization, following a rhythm and rhyme scheme that was easy to remember and stressed the important points. Classical Chinese, like classical Greek, French, English, or German, sounds archaic to our contemporary ears and halting to our contemporary eyes. If the reader finds a section like this, my suggestion is to read it out loud. This is also a useful technique when trying to digest its knowledge.

Readers will also find that there is a small glossary explaining some of the terms used in Qi cultivation and in Chinese medicine which often seem so confusing to people not involved with the Oriental arts. Once again, I come across the same problem as above. Many native readers also don't know what a "Dan Tian" is. A Westerner who practices Oriental medicine or is familiar with its philosophy will require much less of a glossary than the native reader who isn't. Finally, there is the reality that this author has a different understanding of some of these concepts than other native authors addressing these terms. As a translator and a person deeply involved in these subjects, I am very aware of this. Every person I have worked with has slightly different understandings of these concepts. Do I translate each person's own understanding? If I do that, do I add a note saying that this is different? Different from what? Do I forgo their understanding and take definitions from traditional text? If so, from which dynasty, as there were subtle differences in each time? So much depends on one's own understandingof the framework the material came from.

Therefore I give this advice and ask for this help: if you are interested in this material but find things you don't understand, then begin to read about the subject and discuss it with similarly interested persons; if, after that, you find that there is something you would like to see in thisglossary, send it to me via ATS. With this information, I will create an updated glossary and include it in a future edition.

Contents

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations of Yin Style

BaGua 16

Opening the Three Passes of the Back Meridian 18

The Three Passes 21

The Lower Pass of the Tail Bone and Gate of Life 21

The Middle Pass of the Spine at the Middle of the Back. 24

The Upper Pass at the Base of the Skull 27

Sealing in the True Qi and Gathering it in the Three Dan

Tians 30

The Three Dan Tian Exercises 33

The Lower Dan Tian 33

The Middle Dan Tian 37

The Upper Dan Tian 40

Maintaining the Five Organs 44

Liver, Spleen, Lungs, Heart, and Kidneys 44

Method of Exercise for Comforting the Qi of the Liver and

Stomach 44

Herbs often used to treat the liver 47

Method of Exercise for Strengthening the Spleen and Nour-

ishing the Stomach 49

Method of Exercise for Strengthening the Qi of the Lungs 56

Method of Exercise for Nourishing the Heart and Storing the

Heart to Nourish the Nature (of the person) 61

Method of Exercise for Warm-Nourishing the Kidneys .. 67

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Method of Exercise for Creating Essences,Tonifying Marrow, Nourishing the Brain,and Reversing the Pre-Natal

Order 73

Glossary 78

Appendix I: The Points 86

Appendix II: The Meridians 89

The Lung Meridian 90

.:f. ~ ~ JJi1i ~ ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••..•••••. 90

The Large Intestine Meridian 91

.:f.~ijJ.J*.~ 91

The Stomach Meridian 92

~~ijJ.J ~ ~ 92

The Spleen Meridian 93

~~~.~ 93

The Heart Meridian 94

.:f.1->~J~'~ 94

The Small Intestine Meridian 95

.:f.~~/J\.~ 95

The Bladder Meridian 96

~~~ • .f.b'f~ 96

The Kidney Meridian 97

"'@'1->~~~ 97

The Pericardium Meridian 98

.:f.~~JL\'E!~ 98

The Triple Burner Meridian 99

.:f.p~=~~ 99

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The Gall Bladder Meridian 100

~1->~JJfS~ ....................•...................................... 100

The Liver Meridian 101

"'@'~~ff~ 101

The Front Meridian......................................................... 102

ffJ.lT.ii. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 102

The Back Meridian 103

• J.lT.ii. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 103

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The photographs in this book are meant to be viewed in filmstrip fashion, the eyes running top to bottom, left to right.

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Origin of Ba Gua Zhang

Ba Gua Zhang, literally Eight Diagrams Palm, was created by one of China's great martial art masters, Dong Haichuan (1804-1880). Though relatively young as a school of martial arts, the philosophy it was developed from lies at the foundation of traditional Chinese culture: the Yi Jing, or book of Changes, and its teachings ofWuji (the Emptiness or Void), Taiji (the ultimate state), Yin-Yang (the balance), the Four Directions and the Eight Diagrams.

Dong Haichuan was a very bright and talented child, learning everything, especially the martial arts, with voracity. When he was eighteen, he was already a highly skilled fighter, and a very upright and respected man. That was not enough for Dong, who wanted to learn more, and so he set off to find the reclusive martial art masters who hid in the mountains of China. All through the Qing dynasty, many Chinese heros remained in the mountains, as they were opposed to the Manchu rulers and worked to return China to the Ming dynasty, whose rulers were ethnic Chinese. While in the mountains, Dong met two teachers, one Daoist and one Buddhist, and spent many years learning from them. Afterwards he came down from the mountains and his martial skills went on to become Chinese legend.

Dong travelled to Beijing and served the imperial court. It was during this time that he began teaching Ba Gua Zhang, which was the culmination of all that he had learned. His first student, and the only one to learn Dong's complete system, was Yin Fu, for whom the Yin style of Ba Gua is Dong Haichuan 1804-1880 named after.

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Yin Fu and the Yin Style of Ba Gua

Yin Fu was Dong Haichuan's first and best taught student. Yin spent twenty years with Dong, including many of them collecting taxes for the court in Inner Mongolia. There it is said that they practiced morning, noon and night, and it was during that time that Yin learned the entire system.

Yin became quite famous as well, and the style and flavor of Ba Gua that he began to teach became known as Yin Style Ba Gua. He became a body guard for wealthy and powerful people and also taught martial arts in the Imperial Palace. After Dong passed away, the Yin Style became the main style of Ba Gua, but it was also the most secretive and conservative with teaching its students deeply, later becoming almost unknown as other styles ofBa Gua became widespread both in China and abroad.

Yin passed on the whole system to his student Men Baozhen, who became very close with Yin. As Men was a very bright and well rounded man, he spent as much time learning the healing and philosophical sides of Ba Gua as he did learning the martial aspect. Men went on to become quite famous, and later passed on the Yin system to Xie Peiqi.

Yin Fu 1841-1909

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations of Yin StyleBa Gua

Among the sitting meditations of Yin Style Ba Gua are twelve methods of internally moving, guiding and regulating Qi. The three treasures of a human are the Essences, Qi, and the Spirit-"'~:MI. The life of a human has at its foundation Qi and blood. Qi is the master of blood, thus when the Qi travels (its normal paths) the blood flows comfortably. When the Qi and blood flow comfortably, the Essences and Spirit gather internally.

Before beginning these exercises, it is important to first understand the concepts of "moving with the natural order" and "reversing the natural order".

Moving with the natural order-JIli:

The heart is created from the form (of the person), the mind is born from the heart. Shifts in the mind are the emotions, and the emotions create rashness. This is what is moving in the natural order, and is also the way of life in nature. Thus the Chan master Ling Run said: "As soon as thinking is rash, there will be ten thousand (many) forms (situations, reactions ... ) created.

Reversing the natural order-l2!:

Reversing rashness to return to the emotions, reversing the emotions to attain the mind, absorbing the mind to calm the heart, thus the heart returns to its place in the form (of the person). Thus the Daoist Bo Yang said: "Practising Essences becoming Qi, Qi nourishing the Spirit, the Spirit returning to

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Xie Peiqi

the Void, this is breathing with the natural order. Breathing in reverse of the natural order is holding the breath, regulating the breath, breathing deeply, and fetal breathing (a state in which, like a fetus, the body absorbs air through the navel, skin and other orifices). (Breathing in) this manner postpones aging and can reverse old age and return to youth.

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Opening the Three Passes of the Back Meridian

Moving with and in reverse of the natural order

Dao gives birth to One, One gives birth to Two, Two gives birth to Three, Three gives birth to all things. This is the natural order that creates humans, creates things. Essences change to Qi, Qi changes to Spirit, Spirit gathers inside the form, this is in the natural order. Spirit changing into Qi, Qi changing into Essences, Essences then being able to change into form, this is the reverse of the natural order. In reversing the natural order, it is possible to become an immortal or a Buddha.

Practising the Lower Pass is that of Essences becoming Qi. Practising the Middle Pass is that of Qi becoming Spirit. Practising the Upper Pass is that of the Spirit returning to the Void, guarding (remaining in the state of) One and holding (keeping the state of) Emptiness.

Building the Three Passes from "being" (state of existence) into "nothing" (the void, nonexistence), it is a gradual process. In practising the Upper Pass, the other two passes can be simultaneously opened. All practitioners of returning the Spirit to the Void must practice in a time (and state) of extreme tranquillity and sincerity, and the Essences will by themselves become Qi, and Qi by itself will become Spirit, and in this way approach the aim of surpassing (going beyond) life.

The Three Passes, they are the Lower Pass at the Gate of Life and Tailbone, the Middle Pass at the middle of the back, and the Upper pass at the base of the skull. Opening the Lower Pass can practice Essences becoming Qi, opening the Middle Pass can practice Qi becoming Spirit, and opening the Upper Pass can practice the Spirit returning to the Void.

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Beginning

Before actually starting these exercises, the practitioner must first practice the Empty State standing meditation. Begin in a standing position, feet shoulder width apart, front facing South and back facing North. The ten toes of the feet grasp into the earth and the Y ong Quan point is raised to be in empty space, both knees are slightly bent but not extended past the toes, draw back the hips, raise (inward) the anus, and push the lower back out as if sitting. Gather in/close the brain, pull the chin slightly, the top of the head straight up and feeling as if being slightly lifted up, sink down the shoulders and bring in the elbows, the five fingers relaxed, naturally open and extended, the middle fingers next to their respective Feng Shi points (Gall bladder meridian, located on the thigh). Both eyelids close naturally, the eyes "come in" to the body (looking inward), the ears "reverse" listen (listen inward), the Qi sinks to the Dan Tian (lower abdomen), breath naturally, slow and long, even and steady. Relaxed and quietly standing, facial expression contented.

Main points: body position must be correct, practice environment must be tranquil, the Spirit of the heart must be held in check, the entire body must be relaxed. The Empty State form is held for one minute or so.

After finishing the Empty State meditation, cross the left leg over to the right side, so that the left knee is in front of the right knee, with the left foot past the right side of the body, and the right foot past the left side of the body. Holding this position, slowly sit down so that both hips are on the floor, the left leg resting on the right leg, the left knee directly over the right knee, and the left foot on the ground to the right of the body. The right leg is under the left leg, the right knee directly under the left knee, and the right foot resting on the ground to the left of the body. This is called the Aligned Knee Meditation position. After taking a moment to relax in this position, the practitioner then grasps the back of the right foot with the

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left hand, so that the thumb is placed directly onto the bottom of the foot at the Yang Quan point. The right hand does the same with the left foot. The thumbs then press into the Yang Quan point thirty-six times.

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The Three Passes

The Lower Pass of the Tail Bone and Gate of Life

After pressing the Yang Quan point, the practitioner places both hands behind the back, the left hand holding the right, the back of the left hand (outside Lao Gong point) placed on the Gate of Life, between the kidneys. The practitioner wants to develop the sensation of lifting the anus into the body. Once this has been achieved, the practitioner leans forward so that the chin goes just beyond the top knee. After briefly holding the position in order to feel the sensation of opening the Lower Pass, the practitioner sits back straight up and leans slightly back, holding the position in order to feel the sensation of closing the Lower Pass. Opening then closing the Lower Pass is considered one time, thirty-two complete times is considered on full set, though one should stay within one's limits and not immediately try to reach this number. After finishing, the hands of the practitioner move to the navel, left hand over right. Thepractitioner then proceeds to the next meditation.

This exercise can cause the Essences and Qi to rise upwards inversely, practising Essences becoming Qi, the Essences changing and the Qi increasing. If the Essences and Qi are moving and changing, then the hundred (all) diseases cannot be manifested.

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Middle Pass of the Spine at the Middle of the Back

The second meditation opens the spine at the middle of

the back. Still holding the aligned knee meditation position, the practitioner places the tips of the fingers of the hands on their respective shoulders and brings the elbows in so that they touch. The practitioner again leans forward so that the chin goes just beyond the top knee, the elbows parting to allow the movement. After briefly holding the position in order to feel the sensation of opening the Middle Pass,the practitioner sits back straight up and brings the elbows back together, then leans slightly back, holding the position in order to feel the sensation of closing the Middle Pass. This process of leaning forward and holding and then leaning back and holding is repeated forty times to make a complete set, or to one's own limit. After finishing, the hands of the practitioner move to the middle Dan Tian at Tan Zhong, left hand over right, the position held for a bit. The practitioner then proceeds to the

next meditation.

This exercise practices Qi becoming Spirit, and Spirit

returning to its proper place. With the Spirit in its proper place one can have a long life, extending the years.

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The Upper Pass at the Base of the Skull

The third meditation opens the Yu Chen pass of the Back Meridian at thebase of the skull. Remaining in the aligned knee meditation position, the practitioner places both hands behind the head at the base of the skull, the left hand over the right hand. The practitioner leans forward so that the chin goes just beyond the top knee. After briefly holding the position in order to feel the sensation of opening the Upper Pass, the practitioner sits back straight up and leans slightly back, holding the position in order to feel the sensation of closing the Upper Pass. This process of leaning forward and holding and then leaning back and holding is repeated thirty-six times or one's own limit. After finishing, the hands of the practitioner move to the navel, left hand over right, where they remain for a bit. The practitioner then proceeds to the next set of meditations or goes directly to the closing exercise of the

meditations.

Leaning backwards can flow the Front Meridian, lean-

ing forwards can open the Yu Chen, or Upper Pass, connecting to Heaven, entering the Earth, in this way practising the Spirit returning to the Void, (and) naturally developing the "have"mind becoming the empty mind; Being changing into Nothingness; the three Yangs (three Yang meridians) opening and closing; the Essences, Qi, and Spirit gathering/guarding inside; the Qi of the three Yangs protecting the outside; returning old for youth; strengthening the body; protecting the outside (of the body) sothat no pernicious influences can enter and all things are in their (proper) place.

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Sealing in the True Qi and Gathering it in the Three Dan Tians

Form, Spirit, Essences, Qi

Daoists (of long ago) said, "The ancients (could/did) close completely with Yin, and open completely with Yang, and were able to achieve no Happiness. Thus there was no Unhappiness: no Unhappiness also is the extreme of happiness. This is internal happiness spreading to the outside, (and) is not outside happiness moving to the inside, thus there is happiness from oneself. Thus one has one's own thoughts, and is valued under Heaven. In this way all things under Heaven are as Heaven wants them (to be), are not with others but with oneself, are not· with the person but with the body, and thus the body is prepared for all things. Those who achieve this philosophy, they are outside likes, desires and hatred. Thus (they) know not like, know not anger, know not happiness, know not bitterness. (They) do not seek power but are listened to, do not seek fortune but have wealth, do not seek strength but are strong, are not drawn to material riches, do not seek fame, do not seek wealth to be tranquil, nor are anxious at poverty. The Form, Spirit, Qi, and Thought, each is housed in its ideal place.

The form of the person, it is the sheltering place for Life; Qi, it is the primary force of Life; the Spirit, it is the controller of Life. Once the Spirit loses its place, all three come to harm. Thus when the Spirit is the master, the Form complies and is well; if the Form is master, the Spirit follows and there is calamity. A person with many desires, who seeks power and fame, though s/he may be wiser than many and become famous and have a high position, his/her Essences and Spirit

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will be pushed farther and farther away, leaving and not returning. The Essences and Spirit of person, if they are tranquil, they will circulate every day and be strong. Thus the ancients sought to nourish the Spirit, calm their Qi, and keep the form in an even state, being with the Dao superficially and deeply, and in this way could accommodate all changes, could accustom themselves to all changes.

The Three Dan Tians

The Daoist theory of Three-One (is): Upper (Dan Tian is) one, Middle (Dan Tian is) one, Lower ( Dan Tian is) one, this is what is called the three Dan Tians. Those who understand the Dao can cause the three (Dan Tians) to be one, one return to three. As to the three Dan Tians, they are the houses for the Essences, Qi, and Spirit. The lower Dan Tian behind Du Qi point, it houses the Essences; the middle Dan Tian behind Tan Zhong point, it houses the Qi; the upper Dan Tian behind Yin Tang point, it houses the Spirit.

There are those who say that the lower Dan Tian houses . Qi and is at is Qi Hai (lit. the sea of Qi, below the navel). But if it houses Qi, then where do the Essences reside? To say the Essences reside in the middle Dan Tian isn't possible, and to say they reside in the upper Dan Tian is also not possible. Thus though (we) know that the lower Dan Tian is often called Qi Hai, (but) it actually houses the Essences, for the lower Dan Tian does not tum (spin, rotate, revolve) at Qi Hai, it is behind the navel between the kidneys, and as the navel and kidneys are the beginning place where life is received, thus (we know) the lower Dan Tian houses the Essences, and cannot be disputed. I also say that there are two Qi Hai' s, the one stated long ago (which is) below the navel, and the one Su Wen (* Fp~, Literally, questions asked of Suo This is the title of a section in the Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine, in which Su, a female advisor, answers the Emperor's questions)

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refers to as Qi Hai, located at Tan Zhong, directly between the nipples. In accordance with what Su Wen says, the Middle Dan Tian must house Qi, and is undisputable. (Thus) Essences are housed in the lower Dan Tian, Qi in the middle Dan Tian, and the Spirit in the upper Dan Tian.

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The Three Dan Tian Exercises

Beginning

These exercises begin in the same manner as the Three Passes exercises do. After becoming tranquil, the practitioner assumes the aligned knee meditation position and either massages the Y ong Quan point if just beginning or goes directly into the exercise if continuing from the previous exercises of the Three Passes.

The Lower Dan Tian

This exercise begins with the back of the left hand resting on the Xing Jian and Tai Chong points of the Liver meridian and the Tai Bai and Gong Sun points of the Spleen meridian. The palm should be relaxed and open, the Lao Gong point concave and empty. The right hand should be in the exact same position on the left foot. The hands are placed palm up as if they were lotus flowers- the palm concave and the fingers curved and facing up, as if they were the leaves growing up around the precious center of the flower. This is the "lotus hand" position. The hands then go up the inside of the body to chest height, then go under their respective armpits to the back of the body and back down to the ground, the fingers resting on the ground behind the body, the palms concave and facing the earth. The practitioner leans backward with the head looking skyward, raising the chest and the lower back so that the ribs and spine are stretched open in a curve. After holding this position for a moment, the practitioner relaxes back down and brings the hands to the navel, left over right, then slightly leans forward, concaving the chest. In this manner, first stretching up so the Qi "tumbles" down into the

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lower Dan Tian, and then leaning forward so the Qi is forced down into the lower Dan Tian, the practitioner causes Qi to gather in the lower Dan Tian. The anus must be drawn in forcibly, bringing the Qi up to the Lower Pass (at the tailbone). The method of breathing is to inhale deeply while leaning back so that the Qi gathers in the lower abdominal area, and then, after holding for a moment, exhale lightly while leaning forward. One should inhale more and exhale less. One inhalation while leaning back, one exhalation while leaning forward is considered one time, sixty-four times being a complete set. The practitioner, however, should begin with an amount that is decided by the condition of the body. This exercise is finished by placing the left hand palm over the back of the right hand, which rests on the Lower Dan Tian. The practitioner then proceeds to the next meditation.

At the Lower Dan Tian is Qihai (one of two, cf. 3-1

theory above) the sea where a person stores Qi. If the Qi in the lower Dan Tian is full, then the lower half of the body has roots and has foundation (is strong). A full (of Qi) lower Dan Tian is the source of life, causing the Essences and Qi of a person to be full, enabling a rich birth and growth. Qi is the master of blood, and as Qi interconnects the system and blood travels with it, (they) flow through the entire body. Practising exercises that (gather and) transform Qi is practising the source of

life.

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The Middle Dan Tian

Still holding the aligned knee sitting meditation position, the practitioner's hands go up the sides of the body, past their respective ear and straight above the head. The palms of the hands face upwards, as if holding up the sky, the middle fingers touching, aligned with the Bai Hui point. Once in this position, the practitioner leans slightly backward, inhales, and then holds the breath for a moment, feeling the Qi gather in the middle Dan Tian before exhaling and lowering the hands back to the starting position. In practising, one should inhale more and exhale less, inhale deeply and exhale lightly. One hands up and then down is considered one time, fifty-six times to one complete set. The practitioner, however, should begin by choosing an amount suitable to his or her body and slowly work up to the full number. The amount of time the breath is held is also decided by the practitioner, beginning by only holding it a brief moment and then slowly working towards holding for longer and longer periods of time. After finishing, the hands, left over right, should cover the middle Dan Tian at the Tan Zhong point and remain still for a bit, the actual length of time to be decided by the comfort of the body. The practitioner either then closes or proceeds to the next meditation.

The middle Dan Tian practices Qi nourishing the Spirit.

Qi enters the body and thus there is life, Spirit leaves the body and thus there is death. The (ancient Chinese classic) Xi Sheng Ii Ciffifl- fcn states, "The body, it is the house of the Spirit; the Spirit, it is the master of the house. If the host (person) is calm, the Spirit remains; if the host is restless, the Spirit leaves." If the Spirit leaves, the Qi dissipates. The body, arms and legs of person, none of them can move by themselves, they must have the Spirit to drive them. People who study the Dao and nourish (practice their) life (force), often practice Qi nourishing the Spirit, and restraining the Spirit in its proper place.

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The Upper Dan Tian

The practitioner places the left hand straight up above the head, with the upper arm near the left ear and the middle finger in a straight line above the Bai Hui point. The palm of the hand faces the sky and is slightly concave, as if holding a peach. The right hand reaches down along the right side of the body, the fingers lightly placed on the ground, so that the palm of the right hand is also concave and directly facing the earth. The practitioner then gathers/draws in Qi to the Lao Gong points of both hands, but particularly focusing on that of the left hand. After having a strong sensation of Qi in the hands, the practitioner places both hands on top of the head at the Bai Hui point, the left hand over the right hand. The elbows are drawn towards each other until they are almost touching, causing the chest to be sunk in and the back rounded out. The practitioner then inhales and holds the breath for a bit before exhaling. One should inhale more, and exhale less, holding the breath after inhaling, and then locking the breath out for a moment after exhaling. One hand above the head/on the ground and then one hands together on the Bai Hui point are considered one time, thirty-six repetitions making one full set. The practitioner, however, should choose the amount to be done according to his/her condition. Practising too much, or with over diligence, can harm the person, and has no benefits. After finishing, either continue to the next exercise or to the closing exercise. This exercise practices the Spirit returning to the Void. The exercises of Essences, Qi, and Spirit actually practice Essences growing Qi, practice Qi nourishing the Spirit, and practice the Spirit returning to the Void.

Practising the Spirit returning to the Void involves understanding that there is no "I", that I am here and I am not here, in existence there is nonexistence, in nonexistence there is existence, those with thought have no thought, and those without thought are as with thought, that concerns turn to non

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concerns, the heart does not move the emotions, there is no going nor coming, no exiting nor entering, and thus (one) can stay (in the state) for a long time. Those whose hearts have wishes that come and go, enter and exit, cannot stay (in the state) for a long time. If the Spirit is residing and the Qi is residing, then there is no coming nor going, no exiting nor entering. Practising this exercise is that of Qi covering (protecting) the Spirit. It can tum back aging, return to youth, and have a long life. Those who can keep the two concepts of Emptiness and Nonexistence, (and use them to) nourish the Spirit and the Qi, this is the true path of practising this (these) exercise, practising over a long period of time, not only to nourish the body when unhealthy, but to have the ability to practice (literally "fix" in Chinese) the Form and the Force of Life.

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Maintaining the Five Organs

Liver, Spleen, Lungs, Heart, and Kidneys

Beginning

These exercises begin in the same manner as the Three Passes exercises do. After becoming tranquil, the practitioner assumes the aligned knee meditation position and either massages the Y ong Quan point if just beginning or goes directly into the exercise if continuing from the previous exercises of Closing the Three Dan Tians.

Method of Exercise for Comforting the Qi of the Liver and Stomach

Turning the torso of the body to the left so that it faces directly East (the knees should still be facing directly South), both hands are placed with the backs of the hands on the ground and the palms facing upwards, Lao Gong points slightly concaved and empty. The five fingers are fully opened and separated, the Zhong Chong point of the middle finger of the left hand should be facing the Tai Chong point of the Liver Meridian on the right foot; the Zhong Chong point of the middle finger of the right hand should be facing the Xian Gu point of the Stomach Meridian on the right foot. The practitioner should inhale so that the abdomen is full, then hold the breath a bit before exhaling a "Xu" sound. After exhaling the sound completely, the practitioner returns to the starting position. One turning of the body, inhaling, exhaling, then returning to the starting position is considered one complete time, with a completion of twenty-four times making a full set. New practitioners, however, should choose the amount to be

44

Xie Peiqi

completed according to their condition. It is not necessary to reach a fixed or particular number.

This exercise comforts and flows the Qi of the liver and stomach, (and thus) nourishes the liver and harmonizes the stomach. Individuals who practice this exercise over a long period of time will not suffer liver diseases

Individuals suffering from heat in the liver, (their) left cheek (is) green (in tint). Sufferers of liver diseases, (their) eyes are strange and there is a pain below the ribs that affects the lower abdomen, (and they) often have the habit of becoming angry. Liver deficiency causes dread, as if the person was to be arrested. Excess in the liver causes anger. Liver deficiency causes (a feeling of) Cold, Cold causes the Yin Qi to be strong, (the person) often having forests and mountains in their dreams. Liver Qi going in the wrong direction causes headaches, deafness, and swelling of the cheeks.

45

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

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Xie Peiqi

Herbs often used to treat the liver

Herbs for flowing (out) Wind in the liver:

Bo He (Herba Menthae), Ju Hua (Flos Chrysanthemi),

Fang Feng (Radix Lebedouriellae), Qiang Huo (Rhizoma seu Radix Notoptergii), Bai Ji Li (White Fructus Tribuli), Man Jing Zi (Fructus Viticus), etc.

~ffm~~: ~~, ~~, ~m, ~m, 8~~, .~

r, ~.

Herbs for dissipating Heat from the liver:

Huang Qin (Radix Scutellariae), Zhi Zi ( Fructus

Gardeniae), Xia Ku Cao (Spica Prunellae), Qing Xiang Zi (Semen Celosiae), etc .

• ff~~~: .~, ~r, I~., .Mr, ~.

Herbs for descending (removing) Fire in the liver:

Long Dan Cao (Radix Gentianae), Da Qing Ye (Folium Isatidis), Qing Dai (Indigo Naturalis), Lu Hui (Aloe Vera),

etc.

~ff*~~: ftm., *.~, •• , ~~, ~.

Herbs for cooling the blood in the liver (including Liver Yang in excess):

Dan Pi (Cortex Moutan Radicis), Zi Cao (Radix Arnebiae

seu Lithospermi), Di Yu (Radix Sanguisorbae), Ce Bai

(Cacumen Biotae), etc.

~ff~(~ff~~~)~~: n~, _., ~., .~,

~.

Herbs for dispersing stasis (of blood) in the liver and for enlivening (moving) blood:

Shui Zhi (Hirudo), Zhe Chong (Eupolyphaga Sinensis),

Tao Ren (Semen Persicae), Hong Hua (Flos Carthami), Chi

47

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Shao (Radix Paeoniae Rubra), Xuan Hu Suo (Corydalis), San Qi Shen (Radix Notoginseng), Niu Xi (Radix Achyranthis

Bidentatae), etc.

~MKm~~~: *~, .~ .t, tt~, $~, ~ m~, ~-t~, If:~, ~.

Herbs for flowing the liver, removing depression, and governing Qi:

Xiang Fu Mi (Rhizoma Cyperi), Chai Hu (Radix

Bupleuri), Qing Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Viride), Yu Jin (Curcuma Longa), Jin Ling Zi (Melia Toosendan), etc.

.MM •• ~~~: .ffl*, .M, W~, .~, ~~

~, ~o

Herbs for making the liver Even:

Bai Shao (Radix Paeoniae Alba), Gou Teng (Ramulus

Uncariae cum Uncis)

fBf~~: E3~, itJiio

Herbs for Calming the liver:

Mu Li (Concha Ostreae), Bie Jia (Carapx Trionycis),

Gui Ban (Plastrum Testudinis), Shi Jue Ming (Concha Haliotidis) .

• M~~: ti~, ." _&, ~~~.

Herbs for Stopping Wind in the Liver:

Tian Ma (Rhizoma Gastrodiae), Ling Yang Jiao (Cornu Saigae Tataricae), Quan Chong (Scorpio), Jiang Can (Bombyx Batryticatus).

A~~~: **, *$M, ~~, .~o

Herbs for tonifying blood in the liver:

Dang Gui (Radix Angelicae Sinensis), Bai Shao (Radix Paeoniae Alba), Gou Qi (Fructus Lycii), E Jiao (Colla Corii Asini), Zao Ren (Semen Zizphi Spinosae), etc. f~Bf1in.~~: ~V3, EI~, ~u]*2., jrnJ~, ~t, ~.

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Xie Peiqi

Method of Exercise for Strengthening the Spleen and Nourlshlng the Stomach

After assuming the position and remaining tranquil for a bit with the left hand over the right hand on top of the navel, the practitioner waits until there is a feeling of Qi and then begins the exercise. Turning the torso of the body to the right so that it faces directly West (the knees should still be facing directly South), the hands are placed palms down, the middle finger of the left hand pointing to the Chong Yang point of the Stomach Meridian on the left foot, and the middle finger of the right hand pointing to the Shang Qiu point of the Spleen Meridian on the left foot. The practitioner inhales so the abdomen is full and holds the breath a bit before exhaling a "Hu" sound, paying attention that the sound is not too loud. After the exhalation, the practitioner returns to the starting position. One turning to the side and inhaling, one exhaling and then returning to the starting position is one complete time, with a repetition of forty times as one full set. Individuals just beginning this exercise should not immediately attempt to attain this number, but determine the amount to be done by his or her body condition.

It is Heaven's unhealthy environmental influences that harm the Upper (part) of a person, Earth's unhealthy environmental influences that harm the Lower (part) of a person, but harm sustained in the Middle, it is caused by the unhealthy influences of Heat and Cold in water and grains (food), which is controlled by the person, himlherself! If the Middle has no harm, then despite the harms of Heaven and Earth, none (of them) can enter- thus doesn't that make the stomach and spleen the source of the hundred (many/all) illnesses? The spleen is the mother of ten thousand (many/all) things, thus if the spleen is robust, then it protects the five (Yin) organs, the six (Yang) organs, the four limbs and all the bones. Spleen illnesses are best treated by using herbs that strengthen it and

49

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

remove water (cause urination).

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Herbs often used to treat illnesses of the Stomach and

Spleen ..

Herbs for treating Heat in the Stomach:

, Shi Gao (Gypsum Fibrosum), Huang. Bo (Cortex

Phellodendri), etc. .

m~~~~: :0., jitli3, ~.

Herbs for Descending Heat in the Stomach:

Da Huang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei), Mang Xiao (Natrii Sulfas), etc.

~~*~~: *ft, cliJ!], ~.

Herbs for Nourishing the Yin of the Stomach:

Mai Men Dong (Radix Orphiopogonis), Shi Hu (Herba Dendrobii), Hua Fen (Trichosanthes Kirilowii), Yu Zhu (Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati), etc.

~~~~~: Ztn~, :Of(#, :m15t, rfi, ~.

Herbs for Healthening the Spleen:

Cang Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis), Hou Po (Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis), Sha Ren (Fructus Amomi), Bai Kou (Fructus Amomi Rotundus), etc.

fitH'~~: 1f*, JIj[f~, ftPt, 8~, ~.

Herbs for Tonifying the Spleen:

Shan Yao (Rhizoma Dioscoreae), Bian Dou (Semen Dolichoris Album), Lian Zi (Semen Nelumbinis), Qian Shi (Semen Euryales), Yi Yi Ren (Semen Coicis),Yun Ling (Poria), Jing Mi (Oryza Sativa), etc.

*~H'~~: t1J~, ffiBR, ~-f-, JZ~, J:mt L"~

tf*, ~. ' ,

Herbs for Warming the Spleen (including warming the Middle Qi and stomach):

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Xie Peiqi

Xian Jiang (Fresh Zingiber Officinale), Gan Jiang (Dried Zingiber Officinale), WuZhu Yu(Fructus Evodiae), Hu Jiao (Fructus Piperis Nigri), Hua Jiao (Pericarpium Zanthoxyli), Rou Gui (Cortex Cinnamomi), etc. m~H~(~m~~~~.): .~, f~, ~*., -g1Hl, :m«, ~tE, ~.

Herbs Benefiting the Qi of the Spleen (including tonifying Qi, Healthening the middle, tonifying Middle Qi):

Dang Shen (Radix CodonopsisPilosulae), Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae), Huang Qi (Radix Astragali seu Hedysari), Da Zao (Fructus Ziziphi Jujubae), etc.

jd~~H~ (~P*~~, {l~, *~9='~): 1l:~, 8*, .~, *J!C, ~.

Herbs for Governing Qi (including moving Qi, Regulating the Middle, refreshing the spleen):

Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae), Mu Xiang (Radix Aucklandiae), Huo Xiang (Agastache Rugosae), Su Geng (Perilla Frutescens), Ding Xiang (Flos Caryophylli), Liang Jiang (Good Zingiber Officinale), Qing Teng Xiang (Aristolochia Calciola), etc.

~~~~(.fi~, .9=', ~~): ~~, *~, .~, ~f1!, Tw, 1l~, •• w, ~.

Herbs for Reviving the Middle:

Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae), Da Zao (Fructus Ziziphi Jujubae), Feng Mi (Mel), etc.

~9='H~: 1:t1it, *J!C, !l$m, ~.

Herbs for Rising the Yang:

Sheng Ma (Rhizoma Cimicifugae), Ge Gen (Radix Puerariae), etc.

7tmH~: 7tJ#, lHtt ~.

53

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Herbs for Dispersing phlegm:

Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae), Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae), Dan Xing (Arisaema Consanguineum), Zhu Huang (Bambusa Textilis), Zhu Ru (Caulis Bambusae in Taeniam), Zhu Li (Phyllostachys Nigra), Bei Mu (Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae), Bai Jie Zi (Semen Sinpis Albae), etc. ~~~~: ~~, *I, m£, ~., tt~, tt~, m -Hj:, SftT, ~o

Herbs for purging fluids:

Jiao Mu(Zanthoxylum Bungeanum), Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atracty lodis Macrocephalae), Da Ji (Radix Euphorbiae), Yuan Hua (Flos Genkwa), Gan Sui (Radix Euphorbiae Kansui),

Sh!n; L~ _<Radix Phyt?~accae1.. etc~

~tx~ml. ~ §, S*, xU, :m:tE, 1t~, 1flj1W, ~o

Herbs for stopping Sour stomach:

Wu Zhu Yu (Fructus Evodiae), Bei Mu (Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae), Huang Lian (Rhizoma Coptidis), Sha Ren (Fructus Amomi), Mu Li (Concha Ostreae), WaLeng Zi (Concha Arcae), etc.

~~.~~: ~*., m-Ht, •• , ~t, ttW, =M o ~

, "'To

Herbs for promoting digestion:

Shan Zha (Fructus Crataegi), Shen Qu (Massa Medicata Fermentata), Mai Ya (Fructus Hordei Germinatus), Ji Nei Jin (Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli), Zhi Ke (Citrus Aurantium), Ah Wei (Ferula Assafoetida), Zao Jia (Gleditsia Sinensis), Lai Fu Zi (Semen Raphani), etc. m~~~~~: ili., ~~, ~~, .~~, m~, " ft, -%~, ~nT, ~o

Herbs for Drying Dampness from the spleen and stomach:

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Xie Peiqi

Cang Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis), Cao Guo (Fructus Tsaoko), Sha Ren (Fructus Amomi), Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae), etc. ~ .

.~~~H~:~*, •• , ~t, *I, ~o

Herbs for drawing Dampness out:

~i Yi Re? (Semen Coicis),Dou Juan (Glycine Max), Yun LIng (Pona), Dong Gua Pi (Exocarpium Benincasae),

etc. .

~~~~: .mt, li~, A~' ~~~, ~o

Herbs for passing Dampness out of the body:

Shu Ling (Polyporus Umbellatus), Ze Xie (Rhizoma Alismatis), Mu Tong (Caulis Akebiae), Yin Chen (Herb a Artemis~e Scopariae), Bian Xu (Polygonum A viculare), etc. ~~~~: .~, ~~, *D, S~, ~~, ~o

Her~s fO.r Harmonizing the stomach and descending (things) moving In the reverse order:

Sheng Jiang (Fresh Zingiber Officinale), Ding Xiang (Flos Caryophylli), Shi Di (Calyx Kaki), Huo Xiang (Agastache Rugosae), Dai Zhe Shi (Haematitum), Dao Dou Zi (Canavalia Gladiata), Pi Pa Ye (Folium Eriobotryae), etc. ®~~~~~: ~~, Tw, ~~, .w, ft~E, n liT, mffiut, ~o

55

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Method of Exercise for Strengthening the Qi of the Lungs

After assuming the position and remaining tranquil for a bit with the left hand over the right hand on top of the navel, the practitioner waits until there is a feeling of Qi and then begins the exercise. The hands travel up the front of the body, palms up and fingertips touching, to the Zhong Ting point, and then tum and go under their respective armpits and around to the back of the body at Fei Shu points. The backs of the hands are against the back with the tips of the middle fingers touching. Once the hands are in position behind the back, the arms and elbows are pulled behind the body, opening the chest as much as possible. While opening the chest, the practitioner breathes in through the nose, filling the abdomen, and then exhales an "Ah" sound. When the Ah sound is completely exhaled, the elbows are brought back to the sides of the body, and then the hands trace back the path they took to the starting position. This is practised a total of fifty-six times, or to the level of the practitioner. It is particularly important with this exercise to stay within one's limits and to not force the position.

The life and death of a person are based on two things:

Qi and Spirit. The lungs, they are (the) Qi; the heart, it is (the) Spirit. The lungs are the canopy above the organs. They are in charge of breathing and the movement of Qi. There is no place Qi does not go (in the body). Lung Qi travels through the pores of the skin of the entire body. Thus it is said the lungs are the line of prevention (against entry of illness) of the person. If the Qi of the lungs are full and its movement and interchange strong, then a hundred (many/all) illnesses can not be manifested.

56

Xie Peiqi

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

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Xie Peiqi

Herbs commonly used to treat the lungs:

Herbs for strengthening the lungs:

Jie Geng (Radix Platycodi), He Ye (Folium Nelumbinis), Cong Bai (Bulbus Allii Fistulosi), Dan Dou Chi (Glycine Max), etc.

f§Br!f~&lt: IJjIJ , ~nt, ~E3, r~Rf!t, ~.

Herbs for opening the Surface (of the skin):

Ma Huang (Herba Ephedrae), Su Ye (Folium Perillae), Bai Zhi (radix Angelicae Dahuricae), Jing Jie (Herba Schizonepetae), Bo He (Herba Menthae), etc.

~~~&lt: •• , $~, E3~, m~, .~, ~.

Herbs for clearing the lungs:

Sang Ye (Folium Mori), Huang Qin (Radix Scutellariae), Lu Gen (Rhizoma Phragmitis), Zhi Mu (Rhizoma Anemarrhenae), Shi Gao (Gypsum Fibrosum), etc.

m~~&lt: .~, .~, ~., ~~, E_, ~.

Herbs for moistening the lungs:

Mai Dong (Radix Ophiopogonis), Yu Zhu (Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati), Bai He (Bulbus Lilii), Xuan Shen (Radix Scrophulariae), Tian Hua Fen (Radix Trichosanthis), etc. ~~~&lt: ~4, ~~, W~, ~#, *m5, ~.

Herbs for astringing the lungs:

He Zi Rou (Fructus Chebulae), Wu Wei Zi (Fructus Schisandrae), Wu Mei (Fructus Mume) , Mi Ke (Pericarpium Papaveris), etc .

• ~~&lt: W~~, E~~, ~., *~, ~.

Herbs for Removing (Heat) from the lungs:

Ting Li Zi (Semen Lepidii seu Descurainiae), Sang Bai Pi (Cortex Mori Radicis), Xi Gua Pi (Exocarpium Citrulli), Bai Qian Gen (Radix Cynanchi Stauntonii), etc.

59

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Herbs for stopping cough:

Bai Bu (Radix Stemonae), Zi Wan (Radix Asteris), Dong Hua (Flos Farfarae), Ma Dou Ling (Fructus Aristolochiae), etc.

~~~~: W$, •• , ~~, ~~~, ~.

Herbs for Calming asthma:

Ma Huang (Herba Ephedrae), Xing Ren (Semen Armeniacae Amarum), Su Zi (Fructus Perillae), Pi Pa Ye ( Folium Eriobotryae), etc.

fP#ij~~: ~jit, ~t:, W-T, titffillt, ~.

Herbs for removing phlegm:

Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae), Dan Nan Xing (Rhizoma Arisaematis), Qian Hu (Radix Peucedani), Bei Mu (Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae), Zhu Ru (Caulis Bambusae in Taeniam), etc.

~~~~: *I, mm£, BuM, m~, n~, ~.

Herbs for tonifying the Qi of the lungs:

Ren Shen (Radix Ginseng), Huang Qi (Radix Astragali seu Hedysari), Ge Jie (Gecko), etc.

*~JtrIj~~~: J...~, J!tm, ~AA, ~.

Herbs for clearing the large intenstines:

Huang Bo (Cortex Phellodendri), Da Huang (Radix et RhizomaRhei), Huang Lian (Rhizoma Coptidis), Pang Da Hai (Stericulia Scaphigera), etc.

~*~~~: jitffi, *jit, jita, M*~, ~.

Herbs for moistening the large intestines:

Huo Ma Ren (Fructus Cannabis), Gua Lou Pi (Exocarpium Fructus Trichosanthis), Rou Cong Rong (Herba Cistanches), Dang Gui (Radix Angelicae Sinensis), etc.

~*~~~: *~t:, m~t:, ~~~, ~~, ~.

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Xie Peiqi

Method of Exercise for Nourishing the Heart and Storing the Heart to Nourish the Nature (of the person). '.-

After assuming the position and remaining tranquil for a bit with the left hand over the right hand on top of the navel, the practitioner waits until s/he is in good spirits, and then begins the exercise. The practitioner breathes naturally, and then, while continuing to breath unconsciously, the hands naturally rise up so that the palms are facing the face, the backs of the hands pointing South. The tip of the right middle finger should be opposite the right eye, and the tip of the left middle finger should be opposite the left eye. The eyes should be focused on the Zhong Chong points of the tips of the middle fingers. The elbows should be brought together so that the tips of the elbows are at the solar plexus. Breathing in through the., nose and filling the abdomen, the practitioner holds the breath for a moment and then in a relaxed manner exhales. Inhalations should be deeper than the exhalations. One inhalation and held breath as the eyes look at the fingertips, one exhalat~on as t.he hands return to the starting place is one complete =. ~Ighty-one repetitions is one full set, but beginning practitioners should not seek numbers but the comfort of the body as a guide to how many to complete,

Gathering in the heart to nourish the Nature: The storage place o~ the body of a person is the kidney, the (organ) responsible for removing and dredging is the liver. The liver and the kidneys both have Fire, but that Fire is controlled by the heart, as the Fire of the heart is the General. If the Fire of the heart moves, then the dependent Fires also move, and if they move the Essences are able to travel easily. Even if the dependent Fires are not working in balance, they can still be moved to clear, remove and dredge (by the General of Fire), thus the ancient sages and individuals of virtue only taught gathering in the heart to nourish the nature.

61

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

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Xie Peiqi

Herbs Commonly Used to Treat Heart Illnesses

Herbs used to remove Fire from the heart:

Huang Lian (Rhizoma Coptidis), Zhi Zi (Fructus Gardiniae), etc.

fl§JL\;k~Jh: :l'a, ;fJB-f-, ~o

Herbs used to clear the heart:

Xi Jiao (Cornu Rhinocerotis), Zhu Ye Xin (Phyllostachys Nigra), Lian Zi Xin (Plumula Nelumbinis), Lian Qiao Xin (Center of Fructus Forsythiae), large amounts of Sheng Ma (Rhizoma Cimicifugae), etc. Using large amounts of Sheng Ma (Rhizoma Cimicifugae) has the same results as using Xi Jiao (Cornu Rhinocerotis) and thus can be substituted in its place.

$JL'~~: jW it, 1tntJL', ~-f-JL" a*!JL', ~JfltH~,

Herbs used to open the aperture of the heart:

Bing Pian (Borneolum Syntheticum), She Xiang (Moschus), Chang Pu (Acorus Calamus), Su He Xiang (Storax), large amounts of Bai Zhi (Radix Angelicae Dahuricae), etc. Using large amounts ofBai Zhi (Radix Angelicae Dahuricae) has the same results as using She Xiang (Moschus) and thus' can be substituted in its place.

Herbs used for clearing pain in the heart:

Zhu Li (Phyllostachys Nigra), Niu Huang (Calculus Bovis), Zhu Huang (Bambusa Textilis), Dan Xing (Rhizoma Arisaematis), Bei Mu (Bulbus Frutillariae Cirrhosae), Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae), Zhi Shi (Fructus Aurantii hnmaturus), etc.

63

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Herbs used to calm the heart:

Zhu Sha (Cinnabaris), Ci Shi (Magnetitum), Tie Fen (powdered iron), Long Gu (Os Draconis), Mu Li (Concha Ostreae), Zhen Zhu (Concha Margaritifera Usta), etc.

Herbs used to stop (control) blood in the heart:

San Qi (Radix Notoginseng), Pu Huang (Pollen Typhae), Bai Ji (Bletilla Striata), Oi Yu (Radix Sanguisorbae), Xiao Ji (Herba Cephalanoploris), Ou Jie (Nelumbo Nucifera), etc .

....

Herbs use to cool the blood of the heart:

Dan Pi (Cotrex Moutan Radicis), Chi Shao (Radix Paeoniae Rubra), Zi Cao (Radix Amebiae seu Lithospermi), Sheng Di Huang (Radix Rehmanniae), etc.

Herbs used to liven the blood of the heart:

Tao Ren (Semen Persicae), Hong Hua (Flos Carthami), Chuan Xiong (Rhizoma Ligustici Chuanxiong), Niu Xi (Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae), etc.

Herbs for purging clots in the heart:

Shui Zhi (Hirudo), Meng Chong (Tabanus Bivittatus), Wu Ling Zhi (Faeces Trogopterori), Zhe Chong (Eupolyphaga seu Steleophaga), etc.

Herbs for dissipating (blood) stasis in the heart:

E Zhu (Rhizoma Zedoariae), San Leng (Rhizoma Sparganii), Bie Jia (Carapax Trionycis), Chuan Shan Jia

64

Xie Peiqi

(Squama Manitis), etc.

Herbs to astringe the Yin of the heart:

Wu Wei Zi (Fructus Schisandrae), Bai Shao (Radix Paeoniae Alba), Zao Ren (Semen Ziziphi Spinosae), Wu Mei (Fructus Mume), etc.

Herbs for tonifying the blood of the heart:

Dang Gui (Radix Angelicae Sinensis), Dan Shen (Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae), Ji Xue Teng (Spatholobus Suberectus), Di Huang (Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata), etc.

Herbs for Nourishing the heart and Calming the Spirit:

Fu Shen (Poria Cocos), Zao Ren' (Semen Ziziphi Spinosae), Hu Po (Succinum), Bai Zi Ren (Semen Biotae), etc.

Herbs for tonifying the heart and helping Qi:

Yuan Zhi (Radix Polygalae), Ren Shen (Radix Ginseng), Long Yan Rou (Arillus Longan), Zhi Gan Cao (Prepared Glycyrrhiza Uralensis), etc.

Herbs for warming the Yang of the heart and helping Qi:

Rou Gui (Cortex Cinnamomi), Chuan Fu Pian (Slices of Aconitum Carmichaeli), Yi Zhi Ren (Fructus Alpiniae Oxyphy llae), Zi Shi Yin (Fluorite), Zi Bei Chi (Erosaria Caput Serpentis), etc.

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Herbs for removing fluids and tranquillizing the heart:

Yun Ling (Poria), Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae), Mu Tong (Caulis Akebiae), Gui Zhi (Ramulus Cinnamomi), etc.

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Xie Peiqi

Method of Exercise for Warm-Nourishing the

Kidneys ,

After assuming the position and remaining tranquil for a bit with the left hand over the right hand on.top of the navel, the practitioner waits until there is a feeling of Qi and then begins the exercise. The hands come together in front of the body, palms touching, and rub vigorously back and forth to create heat. Once hot, the hands move to the back of the body and the palms cover the Shen Yu points, warming the kidneys. Once the hands have been placed on the kidneys, the practitioner breathes in completely, filling the abdomen, and then lightly exhales a total of eight times before returning the hands to the starting position. A repetition of seventy-two times is considered a full set, but practitioners should choose the amount done by gauging the comfort of the body and not the number completed.

The Kidneys are the Sea of the Body

The Kidneys, they are the sea of the body. The source of the flow at the bottom of the sea, (it is) the joining of the waters of a thousand rivers and ten thousand tributaries that creates it. Though wide and vast, it (the sea) must have its places of drainage. This drainage has two paths: one belongs to ruin, draining down and entering into the middle of the earth, never returning; one drains up and then comes out on the ground, dispersing among the rivers and streams and returning to the sea. This is water which is between Heaven and Earth, and thus does not dry up nor overflow. Thus it is also with the kidneys. The Essences of the meridians, tendons and vessels of the body, (they) all concentrate in the kidneys. The kidneys gather the Essences of the meridians. Its drainage also has two paths: one which is what excessive Fire compels, thus causing (the Essences) to drain down through the Root of Yin (sexual organ), and once exited, cannot return, like the drainage of the

67

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

sea which leads to ruin; one which is what the True Qi absorbs, thus (the Essences are) caused to reach up to the mouth, return via the throat to the stomach, irrigating the five organs and nourishing the hundred (all) vessels, and gathering again in the kidneys. This is like the sea draining up to the Heavens (and then returning to the source). Those desiring to maintain life, (they must) close the lower flow and open the upper flow, causing the matters (Essences) to complete the circuit and gather, and not have leakage, so the Essences are full to excess, the inside is full and thus controls Fire, and the outside is full and thus prevents harmful environmental influences from entering. This is the art of expelling diseases and pro-

longing the years.

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Xie Peiqi

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Herbs Commonly Used to Treat the Kidneys

Herbs for tonifying the kidneys and the Yin of the kidneys:

Di Huang (Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata), Gui Ban (plastrum Testudinis), Gou Qi Zi (Fructus Lycii), Sang Shen (Fructus Mori), Nu Zhen Zi (Fructus Ligustri Lucidi), Chu Shi Zi (Boussonetia Papyrifera), etc.

~'lff~'If~~~: Jt!!.ff1tli, fii];fcT, ~m, }z:"Y! T, ;jf~T, ~o

Herbs used for warming the kidneys, strenghtening the Yang, and tonifying the True Fire of the Ming Men (Gate of Life):

Chuan Fu Pian (Slices of Aconitum Carmichaeli), Tu Si Zi (Semen Cuscutae), She Chuang Zi (Fructus Cnidii), Ba Ji Tian (Radix Morindae Officinalis), Rou Cong Rong (Herba Cistanches), Lu Jiao Pian (Cernu Cervi Pantotrichum), Jiu Xiang Chong (Aspongopus Chinesis), Mian Hua Zi (Gossypium Herbaceum), Lu Jiao Jiao (Colla Cernu Cervi Pantotrichum), etc.

ifill'lftt~B, fhftfJl:k, ~~: JII~ Jf, f1i.f:~T, !l!ttf(T, BD~, ~~~, ~~Jf, nW$, m~T, ~~, ~ jij~, ~o·

Herbs used to fortify the kidneys, increase its astringent function, stop discharge, and control urination:

. Lian Xu (Nelumbo Nucifera), Zao Pi (Exocarpium Fructus Ziziphi Jujubae), Yi Zhi Ren (Fructus Alpiniae Oxyphyllae), Wu Wei Zi (Fructus Schisandrae), Jin Ying Zi (Fructus Rosae Laevigatae), Fu Pen Zi (Fructus Rubi), Sang Piao Xiao (Ootheca Mantidis), etc.

~R, ~m, ~*, ~~~~~~: ~~, ~~, ~W t, li~T, ~.T, .aT, ••• , ~o

Herbs used to fill the Essences of the kidneys and tonify the marrow of the bones:

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Lu Rong (Cernu Cervi Pantotrichum), Lu Jiao Jiao (Colla Cernu C;ervi Pantotrichum), Gui Ban Jiao (Colla Plastrum Testudinis), Yu Biao Jiao (Colla Pseudosciaena Crocea), Zi He Che (Placenta Hominis), Dong chong Xia Cao (Cordyceps), Dong Wu Ji Sui (Spinal chord of animals), Nao Sui (Brains), etc.

tJf;'lfm, f~tfa~~: }f'glf, }f'g~Hlt, ff1tliHlt, iBfI~, ~fJlJ$, q:. !1Ur~, 79J!Jm~a, lmiR, ~o

Herbs used to increase the absorption of Qi and returning it to the kidneys:

Chen Xiang (Lignum Aquilariae Resinatum), Gei Jie (Gecko), Zao Pi (exocarpium Fructus Ziziphi Jujubae), Wu Wei Zi (Fructus Schisandrae), Bu Gu Zhi (Fructus Psoraleae), etc.

~~»3'lfm~~: mW, ~M, ~Bl, li'*T, f~tfHlj, ~,

Herbs used to activate (stimulate into movement) the Qi of the bladder:

Rou Gui (Cortex Cinnamomi), Gui Zhi (Ramulus Cinnamomi), Xiao Hui Xiang (Fructus Foeniculi), Tai Wu Yao (Radix Linderae), Mu Xiang (RadixAucklandiae), Ju He (Citrus Tangerina), Li Zhi He (Litchi Chinensis), Jin Ying Zi (Melia Toosendam), etc.

1tJmJm~~~: ~fi, tttt, IJ\IIDW, E1~~, *W, i1Jf~, ~tt~, ~$tT, ~,

Herbs to clear Heat from the kidneys:

Zhi Mu (Rhizoma Anemarrhaenae), Huang Bo (Cortex Phellodendri), Di Gu Pi (Cortex Lycii Radicis), Han Lian Cao (Eclipta Prostrata), etc.

m~~~~: ~~, MM, Jt!!tf~, .~., ~,

Herbs for Removing Fire from the Kidneys:

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Da Qing Yan (Clerodendron Cyrtophyllum), Shi Yan (Table Salt), Qiu Shi (Prepared mix of white and table salt), Tong Bian (urine of boys under twelve), etc.

~1~*-~rftJ: *~:Mi:, 1t:Mi:, fk:E, .1f, . ~o

Herbs for passing fluids from the bladder and Triple Burner:

Zhu Ling (Poly porus Umbellatus), Ze Xie (Rhizoma Alismatis), Fu Ling (Poria), Mu Tong (Caulis Akebiae), T~~g Cao (Tetrapanax Papyriferus), Hai Jin Sha (Spora Lygodii), Bian Xu (Herba Polygoni Avicularis), Bi Xie (Rhizoma DioscoreaeHypoglaucae), Hua Shi (Talcum), etc.

~~~~~~~rftJ: ~~, ~~, ~~, *~, ~~, 7ii~~, .~, .t, ffi":fi, ~o

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Method of Exercise for Creating Essences, Tonifying Marrow, Nourishing the Brain, and Reversing the Pre-Natal Order (Closing Exercise)

This exercise can be practised by itself or as the closing exercise after practising some or all of the other exercises. If it is being practised by itself, then one should begin with the Empty Mind meditation and then proceed into the exercise. If this is being used as a finishing exercise, the practitioner should assume the new foot position and then remain tranquil for abituntil there is a feeling of Qi before beginning the exercise.

In this exercise, the bottoms of the feet are touching, the feet directly in front of the body, the knees out to either side of the body (in what Westerners often call a butterfly position). The palms of the hands grasp the backs of the toes of their respective feet so that the fingers overlap each other, left over right, and the thumbs are crossed, also left over right. The heels of the feet are then brought in as close to Hui Yin point as possible. The practitioner then pushes the heels as far away from Hui Yin as possible, and then pulls them back in as close to Hui Yin as possible. One out and one back is one complete time, eighty-one times being on complete set. Beginners should choose the number completed according to their own level. This exercise creates Essences, tonifies the bone marrow, and stimulates the Spirit in the brain. After finishing, the heels are brought in to Hui Yin, the hands remain on the toes, and the knees are pushed down to the ground and then brought upward, (a motion that) first opens and then closes. This is repeated for a bit, then the practitioner lightly pats the legs, paying particular attention to the meridians. After patting, the practitioner slowly stands up and walks about naturally, patting the whole body or not as seen fit.

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The Essences and Qi of a person are stored in the kidneys. Well water goes down to the Nine Sources, and that well water goes down and then is able to come up is because of the rope (of the well). That Essences and Qi go down and then can come back up is due to breathing, (for breathing) it is the rope of the body. If the rope is long, it can bring water (from all nine sources or levels) up, if it is short, it does not have the same effectiveness. Those who breathe deep, the sources are all flowing and the Essences are used throughout the body. Those who breathe shallowly stop halfway along the path, the essences do not reach the whole form and diseases come forth. Zhuang Zi said, "Real People (euphemism for those who have attained the Daolbecome enlightened), they breathe deeply." He also said, " Enlightened individuals breath to the heel, those who are not breath to the throat." In youth, the breathing is long, the Qi is strong and the form robust; in old age, the breathing is short and the Qi and body suffer. Thus one should practice Essences feeding the Qi, Qi nourishing the Spirit, Spirit returning to the Void, Reversing the prenatal order, strengthening the Essences and Qi, tonifying the marrow, a full marrow nourishing the brain.

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Glossary & Appendices

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

Glossary

"One gives birth to Two, Two gives birth to Three, Three gives birth to all things ... "

LaoZi

The following glossary is provided to help the readers get a feeling for some of the terminology and concepts that one comes across when learning about China's traditional arts. I have kept the descriptions of these words brief and not overly detailed. They are not definitions, as the definitions of many of these concepts changed over the thousands of years. Also, exactly how they are interpreted by the practitioners of these arts is different from person to person. This difference is a result of how they use these concepts in their art, and how far they have travelled into their own art. Not only are there subtle differences between how practitioners view these concepts, but often there are subtle differences as to how any single practitioner views them over time.

Therefore, I have chosen not to have any particular person's definitions, giving the reader instead a simple glimpse into these concepts with the encouragement of pursuing them deeper by reading other books and possibly studying the language to be able to make one's own definitions. Most importantly, however, for native and non native alike, the understanding of these concepts is found and refined in exposure and practice, not in reading.

Qi: ~ Qi has many meanings in Chinese, and is not limited to the definition of "energy" so often used in English. Combined with other characters in Chinese, it can mean gasoline, oxygen, atmosphere of a room, anger, weather, and many other

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things. In the traditional arts, Qi is often used as a general concept for energy, be it one's own or from nature. The concept of Qi as energy can be kept vague or broken down into specific kinds of Qi, such as the Qi from the air, the Qi from food eaten, the Qi of the liver, or the Qi under the skin that defends the body from cold and other pernicious influences. Qi can run the full scale- it can be said there is but one Qi which is that of the universe and exists in all things; it can be said that there are infinite Qis, as everything has its Qi. This is because of the underlying concept that all came from one, and that one therefore still exists in all.

Dao Yin: ~~ I Dao Yin literally means to draw along or lead something. In energy cultivation, it is a term often used to describe an exercise which involves the movement and/or. guiding of Qi. In fact, the term many people are familiar with today, Qi Gong, is very recent, as in the ancient classics Qi cultivation exercises were generally referred to as Dao Yin.

Dan Tian: ff~ The Dan Tians, in a simplified view, are the three major gathering places of energy and force within the body. There is the lower Dan Tian, directly in from the navel; the middle Dan Tian, which exists directly in the center of the chest at the height of the nipples; and the upper Dan Tian, which exists in the center of the head at the height of the beginning of the eyebrows above the nose. While all three are energy centers, each has its own special gathering abilities. For the most part, the Dan Tian referred to the most is the lower Dan Tian, therefore any reference to an unspecified Dan Tian is usually referring to the lower Dan Tian.

Gate of Life:lfPr~ The Gate of Life is thus called because it is where life begins for the fetus and where the True Yin and Fire of the body reside. When the Gate of Life becomes weak through age or misuse, then the lower back will be vulnerable

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and the entire body will lack vitality. The Gate of Life has a very close connection to the kidneys.

Jing:_ Jing is often translated as the Essences of the body. This concept refers to all of the fluids of the body that are not directly ingested but created through the functions of the organs. In males, Jing most often refers to semen.

Spirit:~ The Spirit is the soul of the energy that exists in the body, and its general state of health depends of the health of the entire body. It is also a reflection of the overall vitality of the body, existing in a symbiotic relationship of being nourished by the health of the body and thus guiding the body's emotions and reactions, which in turn effect the health of the body.

Empty State:.8i The Empty State is the state of the universe before there was a universe- when there was nothing, only the great void. It is from this void that the Dao emerged, so practicing returning to the Empty state is practicing returning to the source of all things.

Tai Yin meridians:*~~ The 12 major meridians of the body are broken down as follows: 6 Yin meridians and 6 Yang meridians. Each of these 6 are further divided into 3 Yin meridians of the hand (upper body) and 3 Yin meridians of the leg (lower body), and 3 Yang meridians of the hand (upper body) and 3 Yang meridians of the leg (lower body). Each of these three has a title, which for the Yin meridians are: Tai Yin, Shao Yin, Jue Yin; and for the Yang meridians: Yang Ming, Tai Yang, Shao Yang. Therefore, the Tai Yin meridians refer to the two Tai Yin meridians of the body, one the hand Tai Yin meridian of the lung, and the other the leg Tai Yin meridian of the spleen.

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Yin and Yang:~1fj Commonly viewed as the balance of opposites, Yin and Yang are the Two that Lao Zi refers to when he said, "One gives birth to Two." The earliest meaning of Yin was the dark side (north side) 'of a mountain, and of Yang was the sunny side (south side) of a mountain. Yin came to categorize winter, cold, stillness, water, darkness, feminine, the moon, etc., while Yang categorized summer, hear, movement, gas/air, brightness, masculine, the sun, etc. All things are viewed as being either more Yin or more Yang, bu t containing both, as the two mutually define each other and cannot exist separately. The health of the human can be: described in terms of its balance -of Yin and Yang. When the Yin and Yang are in balance, the body is healthy, when they are not, the body is not. In terms lof conditions and symptoms of illness, the symptoms/conditions are classified as being a result of either deficient or surplu s Yin or Yang, and treated by lowering one and strengthening the other.

Five Elements:1ifi A further breakdown of the essential parts of the universe. Aside belonging to either Yin or Yang, all things are said to be made up of one of the 5 elements, which are: Earth, Metal, Water, Wooel, Fire. They are interconnected to each other in a pattern of creation and "blockation", so that they form a self regulating chadn. There are books available in English on the Five Elements and their applications in diagnosis and treatment of illness, choice of diet, etc ...

I

Post Heaven:J§"7i: Post Heaven refers to after the Universe went from One to Two to All Things. Thus Post Heaven refers to a reality that has shape and form, and is what we experience now.

Pre Heaven:9C7i: Pre Heaven refers to before the Universe split and divided into all things. Thus Pre Heaven refers to what existed before there was anything, the original state of no

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time or space.

Postnatal:Fo:]i2 Postnatal is a reflection of Post Heaven, but on the scale of our bodies and our existence. Postnatal refers to the individual human (body) and its pattern of existence post birth.

Prenatal:$t:]i2 Prenatal is a reflection of Pre Heaven, but on thescale of our bodies and our existence. Prenatal refers to the individual before its birth, both in utero and before procrea-

. tion.'

Triple Burner:=~ The Triple Burner is the collective term for the three "Burners" of the body, which are: the Upper Burner, which is the area inside the chest from the neck to the nipples; the Middle Burner, which is the area inside the chest and abdomen from the nipples to the navel; and the Lower Burner, which is the area inside the abdomen from the navel to the bottom of the genitals. It is important to understand that each burner represents an area of the body and not an actual organ. Together, they are called the Triple Burner and represent the whole body insides. The Middle Burner is the one most often referred to, as within its area are the stomach and spleen. Aside from location, the Triple Burner is attributed to the function of passing water and its derivatives through the body. As a burner, it must have the right "temperature" to insure that 1) each area and the organs contained within are doing their functions properly 2) that the three areas and their organs are capable of passing on their substances easily.

Yin Qi & Yang Qi:~~~~ Above there are descriptions of Yin and Yang, and of Qi. As all things can be divided into Yin and Yang and then subdivided, ad infinitum, Qi can also be separated into Yin and Yang Qi. Yin Qi represents the Qi of the Yin organs, and also represents all the Qis of the body that

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fit within the Yin categorization-less movement, slow, deep, cold, etc. Finally, an important distinction is that Yin Qi descends. Yang Qi is the opposite, rising in the body, represents the Qi of the Yang organs, and contains all the Qis that fit within the Yang categorization.

True Qi:Jt~ True Qi refers to the original and source Qi at the Gate of Life, being different from all the other Qis of the body, which came postnatal.

Turbid Evils:1I»m\ Turbid Evils refer to all of the bad, unclear substances of the body that need to be passed out or cause illness/loss of balance within the body. These can come from the food we ingest, or as a by-product of the function of the organs. Often blockages within the body are caused by Turbid Evils, influencing the flow of Qi and the meridians.

Gate of Heaven:~r' The Gate of Heaven is the place at the top of the head where the body can exchange Qi with the sky and all that is above. As the name Gate implies, it must be opened, and it must be closed. A gate must be opened to allow things out and in, and a gate must be closed to keep things in and things out.

Eight Extraordinary Meridians:if~J\)!Jjf The Eight Extraordinary Meridians refer to the meridians outside of the 12 organ meridians and the 2 meridians running the front and back of the body. Readers are referred to books on meridians and acupuncture for location and function.

Vital Energy: Jt!IJ Vital Energy of the body refers to the energy of life. It can be viewed as resulting from Qi, Jing , and Shen functioning together to create the force of the body.

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Wind:M Wind (drafts, breezes, etc.) is the most common of the external Pernicious Influences which can enter the body and cause loss of balance and illness.

Exterior:~ Exterior refers to the surface of the body, which is the first line of protection against Pernicious Influences and consequently the first place breached when they do enter the body.

Void: 11 The Void is that which was before the One separated, before there was time and space.

The Three Passes:=1IS The Three Passes are three major places where Qi flows through the body, located at the tailbone/Gate of Life, the upper back, and the base of the skull. They need to be opened in order for the Qi to reach its maximum flow.

Three Yang Meridians:=:~ (JiIit) The three Yang Meridians are Yangming (large intestine, stomach), Taiyang (small intestine, bladder), and Shao Yang (Triple Burner, gall bladder). See Tai Yin meridians for desciption of how the meridians break down.

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Appendix I: The Points

The following list of points are the points mentioned in this book. This appendix will enable the reader to match the point from the text with the meridians in the next appendix. The points are listed in the order they appear in the text.

Tan Zhong point: Front Meridian

Du Qi: the navel, which is on the Front Meridian

Y ong Quan point: Kidney Meridian

Feng Shi point Gall Bladder Meridian

Lao Gong point/external Lao Gong point Lao Gong point is on the Pericardium Meridian. External Lao Gong point is in the exact same location on the back of the hand, and is outside the Meridians.

Gate of Life: Ming Men in Chinese. Back Meridian

Yin Tang: Located directly between the inside tips of the eyebrows. Outside the Meridians

Xing Jian: Liver Meridian

Tai Chong: Liver Meridian

Tai Bai: Spleen Meridian

Gong Sun: Spleen Meridian

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Bai Hui point: Front Meridian

Zhong Chong: Pericardium Meridian

Xian Gu: Stomach Meridian

Chong Yang: Stomach Meridian

Shang Qiu: Spleen Meridian

Zhong Ting: Front Meridian

Fei Shu: Lung point. Bladder Meridian

Shen Shu: Kidney point. Bladder Meridian

Hui Yin: Front Meridian

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

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Appendix II: The Meridians

In Chinese medicine, there are twelve major meridians which correspond to what are defined as the Yin and Yang organs of the body. There are also eight Extra Meridians, two of which, the Front and Back Meridians (usually called the Governing Vessel and the Conception Vessel in English acupuncture books) are arguably the most important meridians of the body. These twelve plus two meridians are often collectively referred to as the fourteen meridians or major meridians and almost always grouped together.

I have included pictures with labelled points of these fourteen meridians below. They should be appreciated and used as a reference. The pictures themselves date from the Qing dynasty, and while at first they may seem hard to learn from, once an appreciation for the location of points has been found, they are much more pleasant to use.

The fourteen meridians detailed here are as follows: -The Lung Meridian- shou taiyin fei jing

-The Large Intestine Meridian- shou yangming da chang jing

-The Stomach Meridian- zu yangming wei jing

-The Spleen Meridian- zu taiyin pi jing

-The Heart Meridian- shou shaoyin xin jing

-The Small Intestine Meridian- shou taiyang xiao chang jing

-The Bladder Meridian- zu taiyang pangguang jing

-The Kidney Meridian- zu shaoyin shen jing

-The Pericardium Meridian- shou jueyin xinbao jing

-The Triple Burner Meridian- shou shaoyang sanjiao jing

-The Gall Bladder Meridian- zu shaoyang dan jing

-The Liver Meridian- zu jueyin gan jing

-The Front Meridian (aka Conception Vessel)- ren mai

-The Back Meridian (aka Governing Vessel)- du mai

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The Lung Meridian Sholl Taiyin Fei Jing -¥*~HiP~

Shaoshang

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The Large Intestine -, Meridian

Sholl Yangming Da Chang Jing -¥lIIijij*~~

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Stomach Meridian Zu Yangming Wei Jlng '@1II~'F.f~

Biguan -t- __ -P

Futu ----+---0

Xie Peiqi

The Spleen Meridian 'Zu Taiyin Pi Jing '@::*:~JM!~

O-+---Lougu \9+----Sanyinjiao

93

The Heart Meridian Sholl Shaoyin Xin Jing =¥y~JL\~

Xie Peiqi

The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Small Intestine ' .. Meridian

Sholl Taiyang Xiao Chang Jing =¥*I{I'J\JlI~

94

b-+--- Qingling \.0.-.+--- Shaohai

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Bladder Meridian Zu Taiyang Pangguang Jing J1!:;t~&~~

Tongtian

Q~I=~=~ Chengfu

Yinmen

1IIIr+~J---- Fuxi

fH---1t---Weiyang tit-t---tl'--- Wei zhong

Heyang ~_~

Chengjin -;:=:li;:::::~ Chengshan

Feiyang--+~ Fuyang-- ..... O

Kunlun __ ...,..--y

Pucan--+~

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Xie Peiqi

The Kidney Meridian zu' Shaoyin Shen Jing J1!1l~.~

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Pericardium Meridian Shou Jueyin Xinbao Jing =¥~~J~"E!~

Laogong ----:z:lW'toll Zhongchong ---"IWlr,

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The Triple Burner . Meridian

Shou Shaoyang Sanjiao Jing =¥Yl$~~~

Ennen

Tianyou ---~-o ~-+- __ Tianliao

Jianliao ---~~...o Naohui ----1--+-0

Qinglengyuan ----'....--JW\ Tianjing --+---t--i~ Sidu --l-~!) Sanyangluo _---JI---+-I)

Huizong --~~rt') _-'--_" «3"""",... ....... 1--- Zhigou ~_-+ __ Waiguan 1Mr---t---Yangchi ~~-+- __ Zhongzhu GIIM- ....... --Yemen

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Gall Bladder Meridian Zu Shaoyang Dan Jing .@1JI3JWti

9-'r-_-t __ ~Zhejin e-~--+--- Riyue

~-~~M--- Juliao

&----.,__...;;... Huantiao

e-__,,__ Fengshi

~-+------- Zhongdu

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Xie Peiqi

The Liver Meridian Zu Jueyin Gan Jing .@lfMtJJf!.l

Zuwuli -----h.~I---CI Yinbao

Ququan -_,.~ Xiguan ----+~

Zhongdu Ligou ------H

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The Twelve Guiding Energy Sitting Meditations

The Front Meridian RenMai

ffJilll

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The Back Meridian DuMai

1i1Jlji

Xinhui Shangxing

Dazhui===-=11 Taodao

Shenzhu __ ---..,N

Shendao ----4/

Zh· . Lingttarut:· =====lfl iyang .~

Jinsuo -------,11

ZhongshJUu====~~ Jizhong -

Xuanshluu======11 Mingmen-

yaoyangguan--------w

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