Exhibit 1

St Andrews Harbour

MF-0370

MF-0095 MF-0040 MF-0159 MF-0039

MF-0014 MF-0018

1b

7
MF-0333 MF-0038

MF-0033 MF-0034 MF-0036

2
MF-0256 HW-51 MF-0377 MF-0251

Ile Macks Island

MF-0017 MF-0016 MF-0020 MF-0024 MF-0022 MF-0035 MF-0023 MF-0025

HW-39

3

MF-0228

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4
MF-0060

MF-0179 MF-0046

HW-28 MF-0026 MF-0037 MF-0028 HW-27 MF-0027 HW-38 HW-29 Back HW-31 MF-0029 Bay MF-0032 MF-0042 MF-0276 HW-32 HW-52 HW-37 HW-33 MF-0030 HW-30 HW-53 HW-36 HW-34 HW-35 HW-56 HW-55 MF-0215 HW-54 MF-0045

8

10

HW-40

9

HW-57 HW-58 MF-0044 HW-59 HW-60 HW-61 HW-63

MF-0320

ÎLE DE DEER

HW-76 HW-75 HW-74

HW-77 HW-78 HW-73

6

HW-62 HW-65

MF-0059 MF-0058

ISLAND
HW-70 MF-0057 HW-68 HW-69

HW-64 HW-72 HW-67 HW-71 HW-24 HW-26 HW-66 HW-25

HW-23

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MF-0186

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MF-0049 MF-0051 MF-0050 HW-20 MF-0411 MF-0052 MF-0053 MF-0054 HW-19 HW-18 HW-17

14

ÎLE DE
HW-16

CAMPOBELLO
MFU-0055 MF-0055 MF-0168 MF-0056

HW-15

ISLAND

HW-14 HW-13 HW-12

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1

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5 km

NAD83 (CSRS) NB Double Stereographic N.-B. double stéréographie lnghw_jlb_060420 20 April 2006 20 avril 2006

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Exhibit 2

Exhibit 3

Exhibit 4

Exhibit 5

Exhibit 6

ESA's in Passamaquoddy Area

7 10 6

4 5 2 1 8 11 3

9

ESA Locations

12
0 2,500 5,000 10,000 Meters

1.) WHITE HORSE ISLAND
SITE ID:
PARISH : COUNTY :

886
WEST ISLES H SJ 21-B/15
CRITERION1 : 9 CRITERION2 : 11 CRITERION3 : 12

CATEGORY1 CATEGORY2 CATEGORY3 UTME :

BIRD

IBP

CNA :
REGION :

DOE :
NTS :

75
NBMAPS :

93

667800

LAT :

4459 LONG: 6652

East of Deer Island. DESCRIPTION : This island is noted for its breeding colonies of Guillemots, Double-crested Cormorants (112 nests in 1982) and gulls. A Gannet pair was here for a couple of summers in the 1970s, but did not nest.
LOCATION : NAT_REG : ECOTYPE1 : ECOTYPE2 : SOURCES :

10

FOREST ADMIN : 4-6 WATERSHED ELEVATION : ISL : 30

OWNTYPE :

U

STOCEK, R.F. "ESA'S IN SAINT JOHN PLANNING REGION" D.O.E. 1982. CHOATE (1978); McKAY (1979) CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITATS (NEWBRUN.DBF) THOMAS (1983) PARKS CANADA. "A NATIONAL MARINE PARK CONCEPT" 1983

CONTACTS : LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER : Report Date :

DOE. ESA'S(1982):CHRISTIE

CHIASSON/CRIGHTON
8-Jun-2009

DATE : 12-May-1995

2. WHITE ISLANDSITE ID
PARISH : COUNTY :

887 :

WEST ISLES H SJ 21-B/15

CRITERION1 : 12 CRITERION2 :

CATEGORY1 CATEGORY2 CATEGORY3

BIRD

IBP

CNA : DOE :
NTS :

70
CRITERION3 :

REGION :

78
NBMAPS :

93

UTME :

665400

LAT :

4459 LONG 6654

East of Deer Island. DESCRIPTION : This island supported a pair of breeding Bald Eagles in the past. They have not nested here since about 1990 and the nest went down in 1992, but there is still hope that they will return.
LOCATION : NAT_REG : ECOTYPE1 : ECOTYPE2 : SOURCES :

10

FOREST ADMIN : 4-6 WATERSHED ELEVATION : ISL : 20

OWNTYPE :

P

STOCEK, R.F. "ESA'S IN SAINT JOHN PLANNING REGION" D.O.E. 1982.

McKAY (1979); DIONNE ET AL. (1988) CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITATS (NEWBRUN.DBF) "Status and Breeding Success of New Brunswick Bald Eagles" CDN FIELD NATURALIST 95(4):428-433, 1981.
CONTACTS : LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER :

RUDY STOCEK, MARITIME FOREST RANGER SCHOOL, FREDERICTON

CHIASSON/CRIGHTON

DATE : 12-May-1995

3.) INDIAN ISLAND
SITE ID:
PARISH : COUNTY :

879
GRAND MANAN J SJ 21-B/15
CRITERION1 : 9 CRITERION2 : 11

CATEGORY1

BIRD

IBP

CATEGORY2
REGION :

CNA :
CRITERION3 : 12 NBMAPS :

CATEGORY3 UTME : 660000

DOE :
NTS :

93

LAT :

4456

LONG 6658 Off Deer Island. DESCRIPTION : Indian Island has a low, rocky coastline with narrow wave-cut platforms and rock ledges. Pocket beaches of sand and gravel are locally well developed and a narrow shoreline of boulders, cobble, gravel and sand veneers much of the platform. A tombolo has developed at the southern tip of the island. This island had approximately 10-15 nests of BlackCrowned Night-Heron in 1988.
LOCATION : NAT_REG : ECOTYPE1 : ECOTYPE2 : SOURCES : CONTACTS : LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER :

10

FOREST ADMIN : 4-6 WATERSHED ELEVATION : ISL : 20

OWNTYPE :

M

CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITAT (NEWBRUN.DBF) FUNDY COASTAL ZONE STUDY (1982)

CHIASSON/CRIGHTON

DATE : 14-Jan-1994

4.) DEER ISLAND ARCHIPELAGO
SITE ID:
PARISH :

834
WEST ISLES CATEGORY1 BIRD CRITERION1: CATEGORY2 CATEGORY3 FISH MAMMAL 3 H SJ
CRITERION2 : 11 CRITERION3 : 1

COUNTY : REGION :

DOE :
NTS :

82 21-G/2 4501
NBMAPS :

90

UTME :

661000

LAT :

LONG: 6658
LOCATION : This island archipelago is located close to the New Brunswick shore near the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. It consists of some forty islands, and numerous reefs, shoals, passages and ledges. DESCRIPTION : The coastline is rugged and rocky and presents some of the finest maritime scenery and marine life observation areas in the Bay of Fundy. Inshore areas are characterized by extensive bays and shallows, current velocities as high as anywhere in the world. Areas of high sedimentation are very limited and light penetration is good, making underwater visibility very good for most of the year. Local mixing and upwelling of the cold saline waters contributes to an abundance of zooplankton, the basis of the food chain. The area supports breeding seabird colonies, nesting Bald Eagles (although not in the past few years) and Osprey, and is a feeding area for vast populations of migrating and wintering waterfowl and shorebirds. Major breeding colonies of Black Guillemots, Great and Double-crested Cormorants, Eider, Herring and Great Black-backed Gulls are scattered throughout the archipelago. The endangered Right and Humpback Whales, along with Finback and Minke Whales, are regular visitors to the area. Large numbers of Harbour Seals and Harbour Porpoise also inhabit the waters. NAT_REG : ECOTYPE1 : ECOTYPE2 : SOURCES :

10

FOREST ADMIN : 4-6 WATERSHED ELEVATION : ISL : 70

OWNTYPE :

M

STOCEK, R.F. "ESA'S IN SAINT JOHN PLANNING REGION" D.O.E. 1982. McKAY (1979) CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITAT (NEWBRUN.DBF) BEARDMORE (1985) "Deer Island Field Trip" N.B. NATURALIST 4(5-6) OCT-DEC 1973. "Natural Areas of Canadian Significance" Parks Canada 1976 PARKS CANADA. "A NATIONAL MARINE PARK CONCEPT" 1983 FUNDY COASTAL ZONE STUDY (1982) "Status and Breeding Success of New Brunswick Bald Eagles" CDN FIELD NATURALIST 95(4):428-433, 1981.

CONTACTS :

DOE. ESA'S(1982):CHRISTIE; SMITH RUDY STOCEK, MARITIME FOREST RANGER SCHOOL, FREDERICTON

LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER :

NATURAL AREA OF CANADIAN SIGNIFICANCE CHIASSON/CRIGHTON
DATE : 12-May-1995

5.) ROBERT M. STEWART NATURE PRESERVE
SITE ID: 851
PARISH : COUNTY : REGION : NTS :

WEST ISLES H SJ 21-G/2 LONG 6654 West Isles archipelago.

CRITERION1 : 5 CRITERION2 : 11 CRITERION3 : 3 NBMAPS :

CATEGORY1 CATEGORY2 CATEGORY3 90 UTME :

BIRD AESTHETIC

665000

LAT :

4500

LOCATION :

DESCRIPTION : The four rocky islands making up this preserve - Little Mowat (Birch), Mowat, Barnes and The Nubble -

display a typical Bay of Fundy ecology with high bluffs, White Spruce forest and some coastal salt marsh. They are used by migrating and overwintering waterfowl, sea ducks and sea birds. One pair of Bald Eagle nest on The
SOURCES :

CWS. ATLANTIC REGION CONSERVATION AREAS DATABASE

NATURE TRUST OF NB BINDER & FILE HINDS (1983); (1986) PARKS CANADA. "A NATIONAL MARINE PARK CONCEPT" 1983
CONTACTS :

NATURE TRUST OF NEW BRUNSWICK RUDY STOCEK, MARITIME FOREST RANGER SCHOOL, FREDERICTON NATURE PRESERVE NATURE TRUST OF NEW BRUNSWICK CHIASSON/CRIGHTON
DATE : 12-May-1995

LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER :

6.) ST. ANDREWS HEADLAND
SITE ID:
PARISH : COUNTY : REGION :

824
ST ANDREWS H SJ 21-G/3
CRITERION1 : 6 CRITERION2 : 11 CRITERION3 : 12

CATEGORY1 CATEGORY2 CATEGORY3 UTME :

BIRD GEOLOGY

IBP CNA :

DOE :
NTS :

85
NBMAPS :

89

654500

LAT :

4504

LONG: 6702 Extending into Passamaquoddy Bay.

LOCATION :

DESCRIPTION : An area used extensively by wintering Purple Sandpipers although the coastal flats from Point Lepreau to St.

Andrews are used by these birds as well. The St. Andrews-Chamcook area is a feeding and staging area of regional significance for waterfowl, shorebirds and gulls. Osprey nest on nearby Navy Island. Reliable wintering spot for the rare King Eider. Late Devonian, gently southeast dipping, red sandstone and conglomerate underlie most of the St. Andrews peninsula. At Joe's Point and near the Barr Road, basaltic flows are intercalcated with the redbeds. Small vugs filled with calcite and formerly occupied by volcanic gas are common near the tops of the flows. Cooling fractures that divide the volcanic flows into steeply plunging columns are well exposed near the Barr Road. Joe's Point is preserved as a promontory because the basalts in this area are more resistant to marine erosion than the redbeds.
SOURCES :

STOCEK, R.F. "ESA'S IN SAINT JOHN PLANNING REGION" D.O.E. 1982. CHOATE (1978); McKAY (1979) GEOLOGICAL HIGHWAY MAP OF NB (1985) CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITATS (NEWBRUN.DBF) FUNDY COASTAL ZONE STUDY (1982)

CONTACTS :

DOE. ESA'S(1982):CHRISTIE; HICKLIN; SMITH RUDY STOCEK, MARITIME FOREST RANGER SCHOOL, FREDERICTON JIM GOLTZ, FREDERICTON (PHASE II REVIEW)

LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER :

CHIASSON/CRIGHTON

DATE : 12-May-1995

7.) MINISTERS ISLAND
SITE ID:
LOCATION :

820
An inshore island northeast os St. Andrews.

DESCRIPTION : This island provides feeding grounds for wintering Great Cormorants and Purple Sandpipers that use the tidal

mudflats. Osprey nest on the island during the summer. A residence of historical value (Sir William Cornelius Van Horne) is the only development.
SOURCES :

STOCEK, R.F. "ESA'S IN SAINT JOHN PLANNING REGION" D.O.E. 1982.

McKAY (1979); BEARDMORE (1985) DIONNE ET AL (1988) CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITATS (NEWBRUN.DBF) CWS. ATLANTIC REGION CONSERVATION AREAS DATABASE
CONTACTS : LEGAL : AGENCY : COMPILER :

DOE. ESA'S(1982):CHRISTIE; GORHAM; HICKLIN; STOCEK PROV WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA EST'D 1980 DNRE CHIASSON/CRIGHTON
DATE : 14-Jan-1994

8.)THE WOLVES (SOUTH, FLAT, EAST, SPRUCE ISLANDS) SITE ID: 884
CATEGORY1: BIRD CRITERION1: 11 CATEGORY2: PLANT CRITERION2: 6 CRITERION3: 3 PARISH: PENNFIELD COUNTY: H REGION: SJ LOCATION: A group of islands located northeast of Campobello Island in the Bay of Fundy. DESCRIPTION: Compared to the Grand Manan Archipelago, the Wolf Islands are essentially wild and unspoiled: virgin coniferous forests harbor deep carpets of lichens and mosses; 3 common orchids (Habenaria obtusata, H. clavellata, and Listera cordata) are abundant. Fog is frequent and the maritime climate produces a flora with a decidedly boreal character. This is the most important area for sea bird breeding outside of Grand Manan. Both inshore and pelagic species of birds can be found on the islands, including Eiders, Guillemots, Petrels, Gannets (feeding not breeding), Gulls, and Herons. A pair of Bald Eagles nest on Flat Wolf Island. A few Black-legged Kittiwakes were discovered breeding here in 1992 – the southernmost breeding location for this species. By 1994 there were 78 Kittiwakes on South Wolf Island. These islands are one of the few areas where Harlequin Ducks are known to winter in the Maritimes – eastern North American population estimated at less than 1000 birds. Lomatogonium rotatum – Marsh Feltwort SOURCES: STOCEK, R.F. “ESA’S IN SAINT JOHN PLANNING REGION” D.O.E. 1982 MCKAY (1979) LOCK (1987) SMITH (1980) DIONNE ET AL. (1988) NBM. “Chickadee Notes #9” HINDS (1983) (1996) UNB HERBARIUM SEARCH (1983) CWS. BIRD COLONIES OF THE MARITIME PROVINCES CWS. CRITICAL MIGRATORY BIRD HABITAT (NEWBRUN.DBF) THOMAS (1983) RHODORA VOL 65, 1963. “The Flora of the Wolf Islands” RHODORA VOL 66, 1964. “The Flora of the Wolf Islands” RHODORA VOL 66, 1964. “Additions to the Flora of the Wolves” RHODORA VOL 71, 1969. “Continued Botanizing on the Wolf Islands”
COMPILER :

CHIASSON/CRIGHTON

DATE : 06-June-1995

9. ) FRIAR’S HEAD, CAMPOBELLO ISLAND
SITE ID: 876 CATEGORY1: GEOLOGY CRITERION1: 2 CATEGORY2: PLANT PARISH: CAMPOBELLO COUNTY: H REGION: SJ LOCATION: Between Friar’s Bay and Snug Cove DESCRIPTION: Windswept exposed headland with dry calcareous ledges, site of rare plant Rock-cress Draba (Draba arabisans Michx.). The population of over 100 stems is situated on the rock ledges below the look-out on the Roosevelt property. This plant is rare in NS and Maine, and near the southern limit of its range in NB. Roseroot (Sedum rosea), a stonecrop that is rare in Maine, and only found scattered on the Fundy coast, is found here as well. SOURCES: HINDS (1983) DIONNE ET AL. (1988) “BIRDS OF CAMPOBELLO” COMPILER : CHIASSON/CRIGHTON DATE : 14-Jan-1994

10.) ST. CROIX RIVER ESTUARY
SITE ID: 826 CATEGORY1: BIRD CRITERION1: 11 CATEGORY2: FISH CRITERION2: 3 CRITERION3: 12 PARISH: ST. DAVID COUNTY: H REGION: SJ LOCATION: Between St. Stephen and St. Andrews DESCRIPTION: The St. Croix River is the major freshwater contributor to the Passamaquoddy Bay system. The upper estuary is highly stratified, becoming partially mixed as it widens into Oak Bay. This estuary, especially at and just above St. Andrews, is of regional significance in providing a feeding and staging area for ducks, geese, shorebirds, and gulls. The head of the estuary is important for Black Duck and Goldeneye in spring and fall. Eiders, Scoters, and Bufflehead overwinter in the outer estuary and inner Passamaquoddy Bay with Brant occurring there in spring. One pair of Bald Eagles nest on St. Croix Island; another pair nests on the river east of St. Stephen. The St. Croix was once a major Salmon river, but pollution and damming have led to declines; remedial measures such as restocking are in place. The estuary remains and important site for several other fish species.

  11.) HEAD HARBOUR PASSAGE/QUODDY RIVER REGION
SITE ID: 877 CATEGORY1: BIRD CRITERION1: 1 CATEGORY2: MAMMAL CRITERION2: 11 CRITERION3: 12 PARISH: WEST ISLES COUNTY: H REGION: SJ LOCATION: Waterway between Deer Island and Campobello Island. DESCRIPTION: The passage is subject to strong currents and turbulent surface waters; the southern portion of the passage is known for its whirlpools. The turbulent area is the oceanographic manifestation of the underwater fault geology. It produces upwellings and areas of high marine productivity that attract very large concentrations of seabirds, especially gulls, in late summer and fall. The area is also a very important feeding area for marine mammals, including whales (especially fin and minke), seals and porpoises. During the 1970’s, numbers of Red-necked Phalaropes reported from the area varied between 15,000 and 2,000,000 and were consistently in the hundreds of thousands to one million range. The low number of 15,000+ in 1978 was attributed to a failure o Euphausids that year. Since 1985, very few Phalaropes at all have been seen in the area. The reasons for this major change in numbers or distribution are not yet fully understood.

12.) LIBERTY POINT, CAMPOBELLO ISLAND SITE ID: 877 CATEGORY1: GEOLOGY CRITERION1: 6 CATEGORY2: FOREST CRITERION2: 13 CATEGORY3: PLANT CRITERION3: 3 PARISH: CAMPOBELLO COUNTY: H REGION: SJ LOCATION: The Island is in the southwestern end of the Bay of Fundy, with Liberty Point at the southwestern end of the Island. DESCRIPTION: Situated above a 3m rock cliff, this coastal area has a gentle slope with a distinctive mound-and-hollow microtopography. Large granite boulders, bedrock and sand comprise the shoreline. The tree layer consists primarily of Balsam Fir. Wind is a dominant environmental factor which has greatly stunted the vegetation, caused frequent windfalls and irregular tree crowns. The area would make and appropriate site to study the effects of adverse environmental factors in vegetational growth. The island in general is an important nesting, feeding and staging location for migratory birds, and provides aquatic feeding grounds for fish and marine birds. Bald Eagles and Osprey nest on the Island. Black Guillemot breed at Liberty Point. 13.) BASKET HEATH, CAMPOBELLO ISLAND
SITE ID: 874 CATEGORY1: PLANT CRITERION1: 2 PARISH: CAMPOBELLO COUNTY: H REGION: SJ LOCATION: Just north of Liberty Point and Ragged Point, within Roosevelt Campobello International Park. DESCRIPTION: Carex wiegandii, a rare sedge reported form only a few eastern lowland localities and from Madawaska County grows in the southwestern part of this bog, and has not been found elsewhere in the park. Its small population seems secure, given the low level of hiker traffic here; existing footpaths in the bog skirt the population.

The following information includes feeding areas for whales as well as specific information on the whales, seals and porpoises identified in ESA # 877. Most of the information was retrieved from Department of Fisheries, Environment Canada, Tourism NB, and Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station. If you need these sources, I have dowloaded the files from the internet. Feeding Areas Whales are also a common occurrence in the Bay of Fundy. Two types of whales frequent the coast of New Brunswick: odontocetes (e.g., harbour porpoise) and mysticetes (e.g., mink whales ) (Grand Manan Whale and Seabird Research Station, 2000). The common odonocete found in the Bay of Fundy is the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).This specie feeds on fish, squid and some crustaceans, and breed during the summer months. The common mysticetes found in the Bay of Fundy include minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), and fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) (Grand Manan Whale and Seabird Research Station, 2000). Fin whales are found in all oceans of the world and generally make seasonal migrations from low-latitude wintering areas to high-latitude summer feeding grounds. Winter distribution appears to be less concentrated. The locations of the wintering grounds are poorly known. Summer concentrations in the western North Atlantic are in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, on the Scotian Shelf, in the Bay of Fundy, in the nearshore and offshore waters of Newfoundland, and off Labrador. The mysticetes follow the food source along the coast where the waters are turbulent and production is high. The fin whales tend to remain offshore in deep water, while the other common mysticetes prefer more shallow coastal water, taking advantage of the seasonalcurrents and ample food supply. The whales also typically spend the summer months in the Bay of Fundy’s temperate waters and migrate to tropical and sub-tropical destinations during the winter months (Grand Manan Whale and Seabird Research Station, 2000). During recent years the lower Bay of Fundy has become recognized as a feeding ground for right whales in summer and autumn. The area of Browns Bank (60 km south of Cape Sable, NS) and the vicinity of Grand Manan Island (NB) are visited by a population of approximately 200 right whales. Females and calves tend to congregate inshore beginning in July. Throughout the rest of summer and well into October, they can be observed in Head Harbour Passage and Grand Manan Channel and along the edges of Grand Manan Basin.

Right Whales The right whale has been protected from commercial hunting since 1937, but remains endangered with less than 350 in the western North Atlantic. The right or true whale to hunt, right whales were the first whale to be commercially hunted beginning in the 1100's. By the 1800's the whale was very rare and whalers turned to other species. The whales were prized from the amount of oil rendered from the blubber layer and the baleen which was called "whale bone" and was used in corsets, buggy whips, umbrellas, etc. Up to two thirds of the population visits the Bay of Fundy between June and December. Dive times average 10-20 minutes, longer than the other species of whales because they capture prey by skimming the water with their mouth open. The prey remains on the baleen fringes and the water escapes between the plates.The feeding method extends the dive times. The Bay of Fundy is an important nursery area for right whale mothers and calves. Right whales engage in many types of surface behaviour, including breaching, tail lobbing, spyhopping, flipper waving and slapping. Courtship groups of 2 to 45 whales are sometimes encountered - one of the worlds greatest wildlife spectacles. Right whales are not usually seen from shore, preferring deeper water between Grand Manan and Nova Scotia. A right whale conservation zone exists in the Bay of Fundy. Fin Whales

Both historic and current threats have contributed to the decline of fin whales, resulting in the species being designated as threatened by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) and protected under the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The fin whale (balaenoptera physalus) is the second largest whale in the world, after the blue whale (balaenoptera musculous). Fin whales are characterized by fast swimming speeds and streamlined bodies. Adult fin whales reach physical maturity at 25 years of age, and range in size from 20-27 metres, and 60-80 tonnes, with northern hemisphere populations tending to be slightly smaller than their southern counterparts. They can live for up to 100 years, and females reproduce at two to three year intervals. The species is often confused with blue, sei and Bryde’s whales due to similar sizes and characteristics, though fin whales can be distinguished by the asymmetrical pigmentation on their lower jaws, which is dark on the left and light on the right. Fin whales are found in all oceans of the world, but are more abundant in temperate to polar latitudes. They generally make seasonal migrations from low-latitude wintering areas to high-latitude summer feeding grounds. In Canada, fin whale populations occur in both the North Atlantic and North Pacific. Minkes The minke whale feeds on herring, cod, capelin, Eleginus, navaga, polar cod, pollock, sand lance, krill, and pteropods. Minkes typically filter small schooling fish such as herring by gulping large mouthfuls and squeezing out the water. The prey remains in the mouth because of the baleen fringes which acts as barriers to the prey but not the water. Minkes have also been seen eating individual fish. They can be seen close to shore usually singly or in groups less than three. While minkes may be elusive they are known to breach and approach vessels for a closer look. Minkes dive without lifting their tails and usually submerge for five minutes and less but can hold their breath substantially longer. The blow is visible only in the right conditions of light, humidity or temperature. Minkes populations are not considered threatened. Minkes sometimes swim into herring weirs but with the aid of the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station personnel, weir fishers can release minkes unharmed using a specially designed net and not lose their fish. Harbour Porpoises Harbour Porpoises, considered “threatened” in Canada, are elusive. They are not attracted to motorized vessels or are particularly active at the surface. Porpoises dive for no more than five minutes with most dives between two-three minutes. In that time, they can dive as deep as the Bay of Fundy 227 m (745 ft.). Porpoises are often in small groups and remain within the Bay of Fundy and the Gulf of Maine throughout the year, with many migrating towards Cape Cod in the winter.Porpoises are sometimes caught in bottom set gill nets and die. An international group of fishers, conservationists, government officials and researchers, have been trying to reduce this mortality. Porpoises can easily be seen from shore. The northwest Atlantic harbour porpoise’s most significant threat may be getting caught in bottom-set gill nets intended to capture groundfish such as cod. Other threats to this species include habitat degradation, and loss of habitat due to acoustic harassment devices used by commercial fish-farmers (i.e., salmon producers) to deter natural predators away from their stocks. The northwest Atlantic harbour porpoise is now under consideration for addition to the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) as a species of special concern. The harbour porpoise is protected under the federal Fisheries Act which prohibits destruction of fish habitat and under the Marine Mammal Regulations of this Act. The harbour porpoise is also on the IUCN (World Conservation Union) Red list of Threatened Animals, and is included in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which reduces commercial exploitation of species at risk. Begun in 1991, the Harbour Porpoise Release Program was developed by the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station to assist herring weir operators safely remove harbour porpoises from their weir without loosing the trapped herring. Porpoises swim into herring weirs during the night but most do not swim out again. While they are inside the weirs they are able to swim, breathe and eat. Harbour porpoises trapped in the Bay of Fundy by herring weirs, or herring fish-traps, have been routinely freed and released. In addition, the gillnet ground-fishery has made various efforts to minimize its impact on the harbour porpoise. Other measures to reduce bycatch are being investigated and could include the

use of acoustic deterrents or modified gear, such as barium sulfate coated fishing-nets -- which could give harbour porpoises and other marine mammals an early warning signal of the danger of nets along their swimming route. Harbour Seals
Harbour seals are considered a pest to most fishing practises, especially herring weirs and Atlantic Salmon aquaculture sites. The latter employ underwater sound makers and double nets to keep the seals away. Bounties on harbour seals were in place until the early 1980's. Harbour seals are frequently seen in the water, especially from lookouts and around weirs. When they "haul out" it is usually on rocky ledges and offshore islands rather than populated islands because they are wary of humans, although pups sometimes haul out in unexpected places. Seal pups should be left where they are for at least 48 hours before contacting Fisheries and Oceans or the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station. The pups may just be resting and will return to the water when hungry. After separating from their mothers they tend not to associate with adult seals until much larger. There is a positive attitude toward harbour seals during the summer by whale watch vessels since they often stop to see seals on haul out ledges.

Pups are born on rocky ledges from May to the beginning of June and remain with their mothers for about one month. Recommendations for undertaking projects within ESA # 877 Proponent should be • conducting an inventory of marine mammals in the area • developing a Marine Mammal Monitoring Program • predicting the impacts to the fisheries resources in the vicinity of the proposed terminal and in the new shipping channel approaches to the terminal • developing an underwater acoustic measurement program and site specific sound propagation modeling • designing a plan to ensure minimal impact and interactions to marine mammals (e.g avoid feeding areas, avoid breeding areas, avoid cumulative high noise levels for marine mammals • consulting with the Grand Manan Whale & Seabird Research Station, EC and DFO (Oceans and Environment Branch)

 

Exhibit 7

Page 5 July 6, 2009

 

Downeast   LNG    Terminal 

Deeer Island Ferry  Service Route 
St. Andrews 

Private Ferry   Services 

Grand Manan  Ferry Service  

 

Alternate LNG   Tanker Route  Preferred LNG   Tanker Route 

Alternate LNG   Tanker Route 

 

White Head Island  Ferry Service  

Exhibit 8

Page 4 July 6, 2009

 

Exhibit 9

Exhibit 10

APPENDIX 1: Supporting Documentation and Basic Information on Recorded Archaeological Sites in the Vicinity of the Proposed LNG Vessel Transit. Provide a list of all identified onshore and offshore archaeological sites (historic archaeological sites) in New Brunswick within 1.5 miles (approximately 2.5 kilometres) of the proposed vessel transit route, including:  Name and approximate distance from route: Please see attached Table A for a list of onshore historic archaeological sites; and Table B for a list of shipwrecks potentially within 2.5km of the proposed LNG vessels transit route.
TABLE A Onshore and Offshore Sites Within 2.5km of Route (Historic) Site Name* Site Type Explanation of Significance Estimated Distance from Route 800m 660m 680m 1000m (See Discussion Below) 1200m 1200m

BfDr19 BfDr2 BfDr17 BfDr15 BfDr14 BfDr9 BfDr10 BfDr13

Shipwreck Undetermined Historic Homestead Historic Homestead Homestead Historic Habitation, Homestead Historic Undetermined Underwater site, Anchorage?

900m 1000m

(* Archaeological sites in Canada are identified using an alpha-numeric code).

6

TABLE B Shipwrecks Potentially within 2.5km of Route Shipwreck Name FANNY BRITANNIA TWO BROTHERS MARY CATHARINE ELIZABETH ANN TEMPERANCE BROTHERS JASPER COLONIST HOPE MARTHA BRAY? CAMILLA ELLEN NANCY MYSTIC TIE ROBERT ROSS GENUINE XANTHO C.M. CHANDLER BEN BOLT MOSELLE WELLMAN HALL FLORA MCLEOD BLANCHE & BESSIE #4 MABEL HOWARD COMMODORE GYPSUM EMPRESS BESSIE CARSON ALDINE SILVER LEAF L.M.B. VIKING GRAND MANAN UNKNOWN MERCEDESE RONALD FREDERICK H. Date of Loss 1791 1798 1826 1828 1830 1836 1838 1838 1838 1840 1848 1868 1870 1872 1882 1886 1887 1888 1890 1892 1892 1892 1893 1893 1896 1896 1897 1899 1903 1905 1905 1909 1912 1912 1919 1920 1921 WESTERN END OF PASSAMAQUODDY BAY (Western Passage, Quoddy River, Head Harbour Passage). Area of Loss

7

ADA. M. MCINTYRE GRAHAME M. NANRIK II TEENA & LANE TERRY T. II ANDREW & AARON VENTURA #1 MISS CANDISE CLAUDETTE & JANICE AQUA PROVIDER SEA SERPENT LADY JANE I FUNDY STAR II UTOPIA G.P. PAYZANT LEONA MARY PICKARD

1923 1958 1969 1982 1982 1982 1991 1992 1994 1994 1994 1995 1995 1878 1878 1900 1877

o Explanation of significance (Known or Suspected Archaeological Sites): The majority of archaeological sites along the proposed LNG vessels transit route have not yet been subject of complete archaeological research. Historic onshore sites and underwater shipwrecks are time capsules that hold a wealth of information from the early seventeen century French colonial attempts in the region to British and early Canadian establishments. They contribute to our understanding of early the technological and commercial development of the Quoddy Region which encompasses both Maine and New Brunswick. In some cases, the site is associated with the life or activities of a particular historic figure, group, organization, or institution that has made a significant contribution to, or impact on this area bordering coastal Maine and New Brunswick. In other instances, the site is associated with a particular historic event, whether cultural, economic, military, religious, social or political, that has made a significant contribution to, or impact on this area bordering coastal Maine and New Brunswick.

8

Identify all First Nation Sites (Pre-Contact Archaeological Sites) within 1.5 miles (approximately 2.5 kilometres) of the vessel transit route, including:  Name and approximate distance from route: Please see attached Table C.
TABLE C: Onshore and Offshore Sites Within 2.5km of Route (Pre-contact) Site Name* Site Type Explanation of Significance Estimated Distance from Route 650m 690m 1300m 1200m

BfDr18 BfDr11 BfDr7 BfDr16

Pre-contact camp site Pre-contact Pre-contact Pre-contact and Historic homestead and campsite Artifact Cache Campsite, Sacred, Ceremonial, Archaic Period

BfDr1

1300m

BfDr14 BfDr20 BfDr8 BfDr5 BfDs1 BfDs2 BgDs4 BgDs21

Pre-contact, find spot Pre-contact. Underwater findspot Pre-contact Pre-contact, portage, camp site, Pre-contact shell midden Pre-contact shell midden Shell midden Pre-contact

1200m 300m 900m 500m 1400m 2500m 2400m 1800m

(*Archaeological sites in Canada are identified using an alpha-numeric code).

9

Exhibit 11

Maps Showing Recorded Archaeological Resources in vicinity of Proposed LNG Vessel Transit.

11

12

13

14

( ! ( ! ( ! ( ! ( !

2448000.000000

2449000.000000

2450000.000000

2451000.000000

2452000.000000

2453000.000000

2454000.000000

2455000.000000

2456000.000000

2457000.000000

2458000.000000

2459000.000000

2460000.000000

( !

2461000.000000

( !

2462000.000000
( !

2463000.000000
( !

2464000.000000 ( !
( !

2465000.000000
( !

( !

BgDs-13
( !

BgDr-10
( !

BgDr-14 BgDr-15 ( ! BgDr-16

BgDr-4

2466000.000000

2467000.000000

2468000.000000

2469000.000000

2470000.000000

2471000.000000

2472000.000000

2473000.000000

2474000.000000

2475000.000000

2476000.000000

2477000.000000

2478000.000000 BgDq-31

2479000.000000

2480000.000000

2481000.000000

( !

BgDq-35

2482000.000000

2483000.000000

2484000.000000

7349000.000000

( !

BgDs-6

7348000.000000

( !

( !

BgDq-2 BgDq-37
( !

7347000.000000

( !

( !

BgDs-19

( !

BgDs-27
( !

7346000.000000

( !

( !

BgDs-7 BgDs-31
( !

BgDr-73

7345000.000000

( ! ( !

( !

BgDs-10

BgDs-32 ( ! BgDs-28
( !

BgDs-30

7344000.000000

( !

BgDq-18 BgDq-17

( !

7343000.000000

( !

BgDs-5

( !

BgDq-15 BgDq-14
( ! ( !

( !

BgDq-1
( !

7342000.000000

( !

( BgDs-21!

BgDs-4
( !

( !

BgDs-3
( !

( !

BgDs-34 ( !

( !

BgDs-1
( !

7341000.000000

( !

BgDs-20

( !

BgDq-12

7340000.000000

( !

BgDs-2
( !

7339000.000000

( !

( !

( !

( !

BgDr-58 BgDr-21
( !

( !

BgDr-23
( !

7338000.000000

( ! BgDr-22 ( !

BgDr-42

BgDr-59

( !

( !

( ! BgDr-57

( !

( !

BgDq-28

( !

BgDr-41
( !

7337000.000000

( ! ( !

BgDr-69 ( ! BgDr-44
( !

7336000.000000

( !

BgDr-39 BgDr-48 BgDr-49 ( !
( ! ( !

( !

BgDr-34 BgDr-35

BgDr-65

( !

( ! ! BgDr-71 ( ( ! BgDr-63 BgDr-64 ( ! ( ! ( ! ( ! BgDr-66 ( ! BgDr-60

7335000.000000

( !

( !

BgDr-37

( !

BgDr-36

( !

BgDr-50

7334000.000000

( !

BgDr-68

( !

BgDr-67

7333000.000000

( !

BfDr-12

7332000.000000

( !

BfDs-2

( !

BfDr-4

( !

BfDr-6

7331000.000000

7330000.000000

( !

BfDr-19

7329000.000000

BfDr-18 ( ! BfDr-11
( !

7328000.000000

( !

BfDr-2

7327000.000000

( !

( !

BfDr-13

( ! ( !

7326000.000000

( !

BfDr-5

( !

( ! BfDr-1 ( !

BfDr-14

7325000.000000

( !

BfDr-9

BfDr-10BfDr-8
( ! ( !

( !

BfDr-20

7324000.000000

7323000.000000

7322000.000000

7321000.000000

7320000.000000

7319000.000000

7318000.000000

7317000.000000

7316000.000000

7315000.000000

( !

7314000.000000

7313000.000000

7312000.000000

7311000.000000

7310000.000000

( !

( !

BeDq-2

7309000.000000

7308000.000000

( !

7307000.000000

( !

7306000.000000

( !

BeDq-3

( !

BeDr-1

7305000.000000

( !

BeDq-4

2448000.000000

2449000.000000

2450000.000000

2451000.000000

2452000.000000

2453000.000000

2454000.000000

2455000.000000

2456000.000000

2457000.000000

2458000.000000

2459000.000000

2460000.000000

2461000.000000

2462000.000000

2463000.000000

2464000.000000

2465000.000000

2466000.000000

2467000.000000

2468000.000000

2469000.000000

2470000.000000

2471000.000000

2472000.000000

2473000.000000

2474000.000000

2475000.000000

2476000.000000

2477000.000000

2478000.000000

2479000.000000

2480000.000000

2481000.000000

2482000.000000

2483000.000000

2484000.000000

Legend

Archaeological Predictive Model Map Sheet
Archaeological Services Heritage Branch Department of Wellness, Culture and Sport

( !

Recorded Archaeological Sites

Medium Potential High Potential wetland <all other values> 1 3 2

Roads

TRANSPORTA

waterbody

WATER_CODE
AQ LK

<all other values>

ON PN RV SL

watercourse

WA

WATERCOURS
1 2

<all other values>

utility

( ! ( !

7305000.000000

7306000.000000

7307000.000000

BeDq-1

7308000.000000

BeDq-10

7309000.000000

7310000.000000

BeDq-8 BeDq-9 ( !

7311000.000000

7312000.000000

7313000.000000

7314000.000000

7315000.000000

BfDr-3

7316000.000000

7317000.000000

7318000.000000

7319000.000000

7320000.000000

7321000.000000

7322000.000000

7323000.000000

7324000.000000

7325000.000000

7326000.000000

BfDr-16

BfDr-7

7327000.000000

BfDr-17

7328000.000000

7329000.000000

( !

BfDs-1

7330000.000000

7331000.000000

7332000.000000

7333000.000000

7334000.000000

7335000.000000

7336000.000000

BgDr-70 ( ! BgDr-46 ( ! ( ! BgDr-45 BgDr-40 ( !

BgDr-47

BgDq-6 ( ! ( ! BgDq-4 ( ! ( ! BgDq-5 ( ( ( ! ! ! BgDr-28 BgDq-3

( !

BgDq-24

7337000.000000

BgDq-7

7338000.000000

BgDr-29 ( ! ( ! BgDr-19 BgDr-20

( !

BgDq-9 ( ! ( ! BgDq-8

( !

BgDq-29

7339000.000000

BgDr-51

BgDr-52

( !

BgDr-72 BgDr-54 BgDr-55 ( ! ( BgDr-53! BgDr-56 ( ! BgDq-20

7340000.000000

7341000.000000

BgDq-30

7342000.000000

BgDs-26

( !

BgDs-33

BgDq-13 BgDq-32

BgDq-16
( !

BgDq-21

7343000.000000

7344000.000000

( !

BgDs-12

7345000.000000

7346000.000000

BgDs-29

BgDr-2

7347000.000000

BgDs-16

7348000.000000

BgDr-3

7349000.000000

( !

Exhibit 12

Shipping - Bayside Port, New Brunswick, Canada - 2000-2007 Number of Tonnes Shipped
00-01 Aggregates 1,069,040 Gypsum 201,764 Potatoes 23,345 Fertilizer 30,039 Fish 12,760 Crab Pork 1,485 Poultry 3,466 Paper 1,283 Woodpulp Lumber* Pulpwood* 3,086 Machinery Fishfeed 4,743 Salmon Vehicles 218 Total 1,346,440 * M3, not Tonnes 01-02 1,466,911 138,272 20,974 15,480 18,696 366 2,972 10,708 22,119 498 24,537 16,280 21,325 48,187 18,767 02-03 1,294,696 141,177 20,840 23,840 20,678 03-04 1,732,913 37,730 33,636 23,566 28,460 04-05 1,447,383 27,242 29,341 22,760 577 05-06 1,471,041 15,040 13,947 24,230 3,265 06-07 1,322,724 15,909 28,241 25,703 2,040 07-08 1,460,490 25,392 14,504 24,095

50 13,437 38 1,677,196

2,204

1,923 921 1,859,150

780 1,307 1,540,098

2,415 1,312 1,553,867

710

13,495

1,503,435

1,411,607

1,604,929

Number of Ships
00-01 Aggregates Gypsum Potatoes Fertilizer Fish Crab Pork Poultry Paper Woodpulp Lumber Pulpwood Machinery Fishfeed Salmon Vehicles Total 30 7 5 3 8 1 3 1 01-02 40 4 4 3 13 02-03 34 4 4 4 16 03-04 44 1 6 5 15 04-05 36 5 5 11 2 05-06 35 4 3 11 5 06-07 30 4 4 10 4 07-08 34 7 2 10

3 4 6 1 5 5 6 16 5

1

1 59 68 62 71 63 70 63 74

Exhibit 13

ENTERPRISE CHARLOTTE INTEGRATED COMMUNITY GROWTH STRATEGY FINAL REPORT

Submitted to: Enterprise Charlotte

Prepared by: AMEC Earth & Environmental, a division of AMEC Americas Limited Fredericton, New Brunswick

June 2007 TE610854

Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................ 1 1.2 INTEGRATED COMMUNITY GROWTH STRATEGY............................................... 2 METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................................. 3 PROFILE OF THE REGION .............................................................................................. 4 3.1 LIMITATIONS ........................................................................................................... 4 3.2 POPULATION AND DEMOGRAPHICS .................................................................... 4 3.3 LABOUR FORCE CHARACTERISTICS ................................................................... 5 3.4 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT................................................................................. 5 3.5 EARNINGS ............................................................................................................... 6 DIAGNOSTIC – STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES........................................................ 7 4.1 PEOPLE ................................................................................................................... 7 4.2 LOCATION ............................................................................................................... 7 4.3 NATURAL RESOURCES.......................................................................................... 7 4.4 FINANCIAL CAPITAL ............................................................................................... 8 4.5 INFRASTRUCTURE – INSTITUTIONAL AND CIVIC................................................ 8 4.6 INFRASTRUCTURE – TRANSPORTATION............................................................. 8 DIAGNOSTIC – OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS ......................................................... 9 5.1 POLITICAL ............................................................................................................... 9 5.2 ECONOMIC .............................................................................................................. 9 5.3 SOCIAL .................................................................................................................. 10 5.4 TECHNICAL ........................................................................................................... 10 FUNDAMENTAL PROVINCIAL STRATEGIES............................................................... 11 CORE RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................................................................ 12 GROWTH FOCUS FOR CHARLOTTE............................................................................ 13 8.1 KEY GROWTH SECTORS ..................................................................................... 13 8.2 TOURISM ............................................................................................................... 14 8.2.1 Sector Overview .......................................................................................... 14 8.2.2 Strategy....................................................................................................... 14 8.3 AQUACULTURE..................................................................................................... 15 8.3.1 Sector Overview .......................................................................................... 15 8.3.2 Strategy....................................................................................................... 16 8.4 TRADITIONAL FISHERIES .................................................................................... 17

2.0 3.0

4.0

5.0

6.0 7.0 8.0

TE610854 Charlotte ICGS Final English.doc

Page i

Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 8.4.1 Sector Overview .......................................................................................... 17 8.4.2 Strategy....................................................................................................... 18 MANUFACTURING ................................................................................................ 18 8.5.1 Sector Overview .......................................................................................... 18 8.5.2 Strategy....................................................................................................... 19 RETAIL / SERVICES .............................................................................................. 20 8.6.1 Sector Overview .......................................................................................... 20 8.6.2 Strategy....................................................................................................... 20

8.5

8.6

9.0

SOCIAL, CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENT SECTORS ................................................ 21 9.1 ENVIRONMENT ..................................................................................................... 21 9.1.1 Issues and concerns ................................................................................... 21 9.2 SOCIAL .................................................................................................................. 21 9.2.1 Issues and concerns ................................................................................... 21 9.3 CULTURE............................................................................................................... 22 9.3.1 Issues and Concerns................................................................................... 22

10.0 IMPLEMENTATION ........................................................................................................ 23 11.0 CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................ 24

LIST OF TABLES Table 2.1 Table 3.1 Table 3.2 Table 3.3 Table 8.1 List of Community Meetings ................................................................................ 3 Age Distribution of the Population (2001) ............................................................ 4 Labour Force By Industry (Charlotte County vs. NB, 2001) ................................. 5 Education By Highest Level of Schooling (2001) ................................................. 6 Charlotte County Roofed Accommodations (Places* and Units as of December 2006) ............................................................................................... 14

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

1.0

INTRODUCTION

The Enterprise Network is the association of the 15 Community Economic Development agencies (Enterprise Agencies) within New Brunswick. The Enterprise Agencies are the entry to government for business development and the primary source of information on regional issues and priorities for the business community. In July of 2006 the Enterprise Network issued a request for proposals (RFP). The purpose of the RFP was to select a consultant who would guide each of the agencies in conducting a participative strategic planning process. This process would be driven from the bottom-up and would review each agency’s existing strategic plan to validate the priorities, goals, objectives and strategies to be established for a revised community economic development strategy. The result would be two documents; an Integrated Community Growth Strategy and the updated Strategic Plan of the local Enterprise Agency.

1.1

Background

This document presents the Integrated Community Growth Strategy designed to advance the economic, social, environmental and cultural sustainability objectives of the community within the boundaries of Enterprise Charlotte (Charlotte County). The Integrated Community Growth Strategy is an integrated plan that will provide all three levels of government a more complete picture of how the Charlotte region is developing while highlighting opportunities for growth and investment. The Integrated Community Growth Strategy presents a high level view of relevant issues and desired projects in four principal areas: economic, social, cultural and environmental. The Integrated Community Growth Strategy is the result of a broad-based community consultation process which reflects the views of the stakeholders and the current socio-economic context of the region. The Integrated Community Growth Strategy, prepared in response to a FederalProvincial agreement, is funded by the New Brunswick Department of Local Government, Business New Brunswick and ACOA. The Integrated Community Growth Strategy also influenced a revision of the priorities, goals and objectives of Enterprise Charlotte’s economic development strategy for the region. This planning and consultation process has resulted in the production of two documents: • the Integrated Community Growth Strategy for the region (this document) which was facilitated by Enterprise Charlotte, but it is to be “owned” by the community; and • an updated Strategic Plan developed and owned by the Enterprise Charlotte Board of Directors. The objective is not to expand Enterprise Charlotte’s mandate, but to provide the agency and the community with a tool to better communicate to governments and stakeholders a more integrated approach to economic development.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

1.2

Integrated Community Growth Strategy

Strategic planning for community growth is about making a conscious and deliberate effort to take charge of and give direction to the destiny of the community. Strategy is about making choices. The Integrated Community Growth Strategy is a living, flexible management program which addresses economic variability in the long-term with consideration to a commitment to environmental quality and carrying capacity, and the social and cultural fabric of the region. The Integrated Community Growth Strategy reflects a commitment to building a sustainable region based on the achievement of a positive balance of economic, environmental, cultural and social benefits and to continuous improvement and regular public reporting on the region’s performance. Charlotte County, as a region, must adhere to policies and procedures consistent with financially, environmentally and socially sound principles, ensure meaningful stakeholder engagement, seek to enhance values through continuous improvement and increasing responsibility, into the long term. Providing long term value and attaining community sustainability means developing strong relations, managing a healthy environment, and achieving economic growth.

The Four Pillars of Community Sustainability

Sustainable Community Development

Economic

Social

Cultural

Environmental

The Four Pillars in Balance – A Strong Foundation

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

2.0

METHODOLOGY

The methodology employed to develop the community growth strategy was one of stakeholder involvement and consultation in addition to literature search and documentation review. A total of three community meetings and some 20 personal interviews with key stakeholders including elected officials, municipal representatives, LSD representatives and sector experts were conducted between October and December 2006. The dates, places and numbers in attendance at the community meetings are listed below: Table 2.1
Date October 30, 2006 November 2, 2006 November 7, 2006

List of Community Meetings
Place Grand Manan Blacks Harbour St. Stephen Number of Participants 15 15 19

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

3.0

PROFILE OF THE REGION

This section presents a brief summary of the statistical highlights for the region for: • • • • Population and Demographics Labour Force Characteristics Educational Attainment Earnings

3.1

Limitations

A statistical analysis of trends is hampered by the fact that 2006 census data will not be available until late 2007 / early 2008. Some limited population and housing data at the provincial level may become available in March 2007. A comparison of 1996 and 2001 census data is not considered to be very useful or indicative of current trends.

3.2

Population and Demographics

The population of the Charlotte in 2006 was 26,898, a decrease of approximately 1.7% from 2001 (New Brunswick increased by 0.1% during this period). There were no 2006 data specific to age categories for this region. (Source: Statistics Canada, Demography Division). Charlotte County is one of the smallest counties by area, and one of the least populated counties in New Brunswick with a population density of 8 persons per square kilometer versus the provincial average of 10.2. Charlotte County contains 4.8% of the Provincial land area and approximately 3.8% of the population (2001 census). The table below compares the age distribution in Charlotte County to that of the Province (Source: Statistics Canada). Table 3.1
Age Characteristic of the Population Total – All Ages Age 0 - 14 Age 15 - 19 Age 20 - 24 Age 25 - 44 Age 45 - 54 Age 55 - 64 Age 65 plus

Age Distribution of the Population (2001)
Charlotte County Total % of Total 27,365 100.0 5,075 18.5 1,850 6.8 1,600 5.8 7,855 28.7 3,950 14.4 2,755 10.0 4,285 15.7 New Brunswick Total % of Total 729,495 100.0 130,100 17.8 50,670 6.9 46,765 6.4 216,975 29.7 113,155 15.5 7,910 10.0 98,935 13.6

Some of the major demographic issues for the Charlotte region include: • • • Aging of the population due to declining birth rates, higher life expectancy and youth exodus. Out-migration (all age groups). Exodus of youth to larger centres in NB seeking employment or higher education, and to rest of Canada (Ontario, Alberta) seeking employment.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

3.3

Labour Force Characteristics

In 2001, the Charlotte labour force was 13,490. The only post 2001 labour force data available is at the level of an “economic region”. Charlotte is part of the Saint John – St. Stephen Economic Region (ER 1330). For this region, the age 15+ population was 141,400 in 2006, and the active labour force population was 90,000. 2001 data for this economic region was not available on the Statistics Canada website. In 2001 Charlotte trailed the provincial averages in labour force activity: • Participation rate 62.6% (63.1% for NB) • Employment rate 51.9% (55.2% for NB) • Unemployment rate 17.1% (12.5% for NB) In 2001, the largest labour force base for Charlotte County is in the manufacturing and construction industry at 27.6% whereas provincially it is only 19%. The second largest base is agriculture and other resource based industries at 16%, whereas the provincial average is 7.5%. Table 3.2 Labour Force By Industry (Charlotte County vs. NB, 2001)
Total 13,490 2,155 3,720 1,485 335 1,920 1,495 2,380 Charlotte County Male 7,265 1,750 2,480 650 60 335 935 1,055 Female 6,225 395 1,235 835 275 1,590 555 1,330 Total 365,040 27,415 69,185 5,3625 14,800 64,415 57,435 78,170 New Brunswick Male Female 194,295 170,745 22,635 53,825 27,505 5,540 15,035 33,330 36,420 4,785 15,360 26,115 9,260 49,375 24,100 41,750

Industry Total Labour Force Agriculture and other resource based industries Manufacturing and construction industries Wholesale and retail trade Finance and real estate Health and education Business services Other services

The largest labour force base for Charlotte County is in the manufacturing and construction industry at 27.6% whereas provincially it is only 19%. The second largest base is agriculture and other resource based industries at 16%, whereas the provincial average is 7.5%.

3.4

Educational Attainment

Common concerns expressed during the consultations were the education and skill levels of the work force. The following table notes the education disparity between Charlotte County and the Province for various age groups.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 Table 3.3
Highest Level of Schooling % of population in age group with less than a high school graduation certificate % of population in age group with a high school graduation certificate and/or some postsecondary % of population in age group with a trades certificate or diploma % of population in age group with a college certificate or diploma % of population in age group with a university certificate, diploma or degree

Education By Highest Level of Schooling (2001)
Charlotte County Age Group 20 - 34 35 - 44 23.7 36.1 14.8 15.5 9.6 26.7 28.3 16.5 17.7 10.8 45 - 64 34.9 20.8 16.7 13.1 14.6 New Brunswick Age Group 20 - 34 35 - 44 17.0 34.4 11.1 19.5 18.0 26.0 27.5 13.8 18.0 14.7 45 - 64 37.2 20.1 14.3 13.5 15.0

The largest difference is in the 20 to 34 age group, where 23.7% have less than a high school graduation certificate, compared to 17% provincially. Also, in this age group only 9.6% have a university certificate, diploma or degree versus 18% for the Province. This is particularly notable since this is the age group that is going to be in the work force the longest and will have the greatest impact on the County’s prosperity.

3.5

Earnings

The average earnings (of all persons with earnings) for Charlotte County in 2000 were $23,908 which was moderately less than the provincial average of $24,971. For those who worked full time, full year the average earnings in Charlotte County was $35,184, again, moderately less than the provincial average of $36,094. In Charlotte County, government transfers accounted for 19.2% of personal income versus the provincial average of 17.3%. Also of note is that median family income for couple families was $48,287 versus the provincial average of $49,973, however, for lone parent families the median income was $26,206 in Charlotte versus only $23,260 provincially.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

4.0

DIAGNOSTIC – STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES

This section provides a brief analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the region for: • • • • • People Location Natural Resources Financial / Capital Infrastructure: Institutional, Transportation / Distribution, Technology

4.1
Strengths • • • •

People
small business – entrepreneurial spirit people are passionate about their Community volunteers with a “can do” attitude people with talent

Weaknesses • out migration of workers • work ethic - reliance on employment insurance • poor literacy skills • municipalities do not work together as much as they could • people do not support local businesses enough

4.2

Location

Strengths • lower cost land • property available but there may be a lack of physical structures • proximity to Saint John where many things are happening there now (refinery for example) • proximity to trade centers (New England States) • proximity to US border (both a strength and a weakness) Weaknesses • our geography makes us a challenge

4.3

Natural Resources

Strengths • natural resources (copper, gold, wind power, fish, forestry, etc.) • natural environment – natural scenery • exceptional marine eco-system (bird watching, whale watching, tourism, aquaculture)

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Page 7

Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 • • • • • high tides, surrounded by water lobster fishery there is sufficient wood for a wood working business (but not for saw mill) rockweed is exported some diversified fish species are now viable

Weaknesses • sustainability of the resources

4.4

Financial Capital

Strengths • there is some money available at least for lower risk projects Weaknesses • banks are often reluctant to loan money to new ventures • venture capital is often not available, or if it is, it comes at a high price

4.5

Infrastructure – Institutional and Civic

Strengths • NBCC • Huntsman Marine Science Centre • St. Andrews Biological Station Weaknesses • there are no upgrading programs (GED) in Charlotte County • institutions are not always aligned with regional needs • not enough continuous learning in the area

4.6
Strengths • • • •

Infrastructure – Transportation
Bayside Port number of industrial parks four lane highway much of the County has broadband service

Weaknesses • isolation – transportation to and from the islands • government regulations discourage proper signage (tourism, service) • wharf system is in various states of repair • cell phone service is not adequate • lack of 3-phase power in some parts of the county

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5.0

DIAGNOSTIC – OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS

This section provides a brief overview of the opportunities and threats at four sectors: • Political • Economic • Social • Technical

5.1

Political

Opportunities • the change in government at both the Federal and Provincial level may present opportunities • there may be an opportunity in facilitating business (goods) to cross the border • may be an opportunity in security related businesses Threats • • • • • •

border security and the processing time to get across bureaucracy – rules and regulations between government departments causes delay in making decisions lack of immigration government policies (as they relate to taxation for example) education and healthcare (constraint) trade barriers (even provincial trade barriers)

5.2

Economic

Opportunities • energy mega-projects • interest rates are still low • inflation is low and stable • global markets • adding value to low grade lobster • value added fish products Threats • • • • • • •

value added fish products emerging economies (China, India etc.) out migration – loss of trades people global economy (both an opportunity and a threat) monopolies – lack of competition global labour rates high Canadian dollar

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5.3

Social

Opportunities • to make people more aware of our way of life – heritage, more of our history • recycling can grow, but not all things are recyclable – so bring in other business with it Threats • • •

aging population – there is a worker shortage urban growth in larger centres (Saint John, Fredericton) reduced tax base due to decrease in population growth

5.4

Technical

Opportunities • Internet • computer / information technology related businesses • trend to tele-work • Fundy tidal power • local built lobster traps • manufacturing – automation may be an opportunity • technology may now be available to further process raw products Threats • •

broad band is a REAL problem slow to pick up new technology that is available now

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6.0

FUNDAMENTAL PROVINCIAL STRATEGIES

The following factors are fundamental to economic development in New Brunswick and should be addressed at the provincial level (and Atlantic Canada level). The Enterprise Agencies do not have the resources to directly address these pan-New Brunswick problems. These factors are: • • • • • • Demographics (including immigration) and Labour Force Education, Literacy, Numeracy and Trades Training Local Governance, Regional Planning and Regional Service Delivery Taxation, Fiscal Policy and Business Location Incentives Transportation Infrastructure (roads, airports, ports) Health Care

Many of these areas are currently being studied by various Task Forces and Commissions, such as: • • • • The Self-Sufficiency Task Force Seeking Fiscal Balance Population Growth Secretariat Commission on Post Secondary Education

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7.0

CORE RECOMMENDATIONS

These recommendations are cross-sectoral and apply to many facets of economic development in the Charlotte region. • In terms of the lack of adequate, affordable housing: establish an inter-departmental working group whose mandate is to assess the magnitude of the problem and to develop feasible recommendations to address it In regards to the challenges facing youth: continue to educate youth on substance abuse, conduct research related to the reasons for dropping out of school and set up programs to address them, and continue to improve recreation facilities. There is a change in the traditional family. This situation is certainly not unique to the Region. However it is important to be educated on the effects these changes are having on the education system, the health system, and on the social system In regards to the working poor: assess the magnitude of the problem related to the lack of day cay spaces and establish a mechanism to address it, and research what rural areas in other jurisdictions have done to improve the transportation to work issue. The needs and requirements of immigrants in the Region should be assessed and a plan to address them should be developed. Again, this issue is not unique to the Enterprise Charlotte Region so review of what other rural areas have done should be a part of the process. Ensure protection of the potable water supply. Continue (perhaps beef up) the enforcement of the laws related to disposing of garbage in places other than through the waste management system in place. Educate everyone on just how special the environment is. Invest in upgrading of skills and abilities. Attract workers back to the Region. Consider ways to improve access to capital. Continue to upgrade infrastructure. Focus on tourism, aquaculture and manufacturing for growth opportunities. Ensure traditional fisheries are maintained and consider ways to add value to all products. Support all sectors through business retention and expansion efforts as well as human resource planning initiatives.

• • • • • • • • • •

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

8.0

GROWTH FOCUS FOR CHARLOTTE

The key growth sectors for the region should be selected on the basis of the factors of production that can be influenced at the regional level: people, infrastructure, access to capital, land/location, and natural resources. Competitive factors which are not controllable by the region include: currency exchange rates, labour rates, energy costs, financing costs, transportation costs and offshore competitive forces. Unless there are mitigating and compelling reasons to do otherwise, Enterprise Charlotte should not focus its efforts on the sectors which are highly vulnerable to factors where emerging economies enjoy significant competitive advantage. Enterprise Charlotte should focus attention on sectors where there is critical mass already existing or strongly promising. The prosperity of a region depends on the productivity with which it uses its human, capital and natural resources. This is manifested in the way in which its firms compete. Productivity is a function of macro-environmental factors, the quality of the micro-economic business environment, and the sophistication of company operations and strategy. Together these determine the capacity for a region to produce internationally competitive firms and support rising prosperity. Macro-environmental factors consist of political, economic, social and technical elements that can present enterprises with both opportunities and threats, but over which even the largest of business have little, if any, influence. A stable macro-economic environment featuring low inflation, low and stable interest rates and taxation policy favourable to savings and investment create an environment in which competitiveness is possible. However, prosperity is actually created by the micro-economic foundations of competitiveness: the workers, firms, markets and associated institutions in which competition actually takes place. This is also where Enterprise Charlotte (and supporting organizations) is best able to support the conditions for enterprise development.

8.1

Key Growth Sectors

The suggested key growth sectors for the Charlotte region are: • • • • • Tourism Aquaculture Traditional Fishery Manufacturing Retail and Service

The next sections present the competitive advantages and disadvantages (in comparison to other jurisdictions outside New Brunswick) of each sector, as well as the overall strategy, actions and priorities to foster development of the sector in the future.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

8.2
8.2.1

Tourism
Sector Overview

Tourism was generally felt to be a sector with significant growth potential even though the geopolitical environment of the last several years has decreased travel overall which has been acerbated by the increase in the Canadian dollar relative to its US counterpart. However, Charlotte County has numerous demand generators. It has an exceptional marine eco-system (bird watching, whale watching etc.) as well as two of the province’s Class A attractions (Roosevelt Campobello International Park and Kingsbrae Garden) and three of its Class B attractions (Herring Cove Provincial Park, New River Beach and The Chocolate Museum). It also boasts a wide variety of historic and cultural sites and attractions in addition to many day adventure activities that specifically cater to the “new” tourist who is looking for exceptional experiences coupled with physical activities. In addition to demand generators Charlotte County appears to have sufficient accommodations to satisfy the varied needs of travellers. The following table identifies the number of roofed accommodations (places and units) available, as well as places by combined star grade categories. In addition, Charlotte County also has 11 campsites with a total of 841 units (tent and RV sites). Table 8.1 Charlotte County Roofed Accommodations (Places* and Units as of December 2006)

# of Places by Star Grade Categories Type Places Units 1.5 - 2 2.5 - 3 3.5 - 4 4.5 - 5 Hotels/Motels 19 628 8 8 2 1 B & Bs 27 94 1 15 11 0 Inns 13 128 1 4 7 1 Cottages 47 135 6 36 5 0 Outfitters 7 27 2 3 2 0 Total 113 1012 18 66 27 2 * In keeping with industry terminology the term “places” is used when referring to establishments or locations and “units” when referring to the number of rooms or cottages. Data is from New Brunswick Department of Tourism and Parks.

A major weakness in the current tourism sector in Charlotte County is the high variability of service quality among the various tourism operations. Also, many operators appear to believe that their greatest competition is from each other, rather than from outside the County (Nova Scotia, for example). 8.2.2 Strategy The overall tourism goal is very straight forward - encourage more tourists to come, stay longer, and then return. The overall sector objectives should be to generate new visitations (by effective promotion of the region’s attributes), extend the length of stay (by providing exceptional quality

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 of product and service), expand the shoulder season (through innovative new products and services) and have tourists return (by providing an exceptional experience). According to the Consumer Profile 2005 conducted by the Provincial Department of Tourism and Parks, visitors to the Fundy Coastal Drive are “upscale, highly educated and somewhat older visitors on long trips … above average ratios are from the US, they are visiting for the first time and their travels will include visiting all of the Maritime Provinces. Although their trips are long they are flexible. Nature and attractions are their leading interests. “High quality and good service is essential” (Consumer Profile 2005, NB Department of Tourism and Parks). The following are suggested strategies that the County should consider: • • • • • • Develop a “brand” for the region Update and improve the Charlotte County Tourism Association web site Develop a “Charlotte County as a destination” promotional campaign (annually) Work with government to get Charlotte County on the tourism map Intercept the traveler Encourage more tourism operators (from all sub-sectors) to work together to promote the County as a whole, both during the “regular season” and in developing products to extend the shoulder season Upgrade roofed accommodation facilities as finances allow. Upgrade campground sites to meet the requirements of RVs (electricity, pumping stations, size of sites etc.) Encourage each and every tourism operator to undertake a relentless pursuit of quality in both their product and their service. This will require skills training for staff and human resource training for managers and owners. Educate everyone on what there is to see and do in Charlotte County.

• • •

8.3
8.3.1

Aquaculture
Sector Overview

There are several aquaculture species being farmed in the Bay of Fundy. In 2004, there were 96 cage sites for salmon, 5 for halibut, 3 for haddock and 6 for cod (Sectors in Review 2004, DAFA). However farmed Atlantic salmon is by far the largest aquaculture product in Charlotte County and has helped transform its economy over the last 20 years. The County’s participation rate, its employment rate and the number of individuals who work full time year round have all increased during this period. The spin-off industries are feed production, cage and net manufacturing, boat building, equipment sales and repairs, fish processing, transportation and construction, and research and consulting. The spin-off industries provide some 2,900 indirect jobs in addition to the approximate 1,600 direct jobs in the industry itself (Sectors in Review 2004, DAFA).

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 The major strength of the industry in Charlotte County is its proximity to the lucrative US market for “very fresh” salmon. From a health perspective, salmon is a natural source of protein, vitamins and minerals. It is also a concentrated source of Omega-3 fatty acids which, research has shown, reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes, relative to other seafood products. During the last several years the industry has been facing significant pressure on several fronts. It is facing significant challenge in the marketplace from lower cost foreign competition; negative publicity related to Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs); the rise in the Canadian dollar; and production related constraints. The cumulative impact of these factors has caused substantial erosion of equity in the industry and resulted in a major consolidation of the players with one dominant and very few others remaining in the county. However, more recently there appears to be a significant turnaround of the industry. Although there had been an increase in total volume between 2000 and 2004, the actual farm gate value had declined. However, in 2005 the total farm gate value increased significantly even though the volume from the previous year remained the same. This is reflected in the substantial increase in the average value of a ton of salmon. Salmon Production in New Brunswick* (2000 – 2005)
Volume Farm Gate Value Value / MT (MT) $ (‘000) $ (‘000) 2000 29,100 181,500 6.2 2001 33,900 180,010 5.3 2002 38,900 194,500 5.0 2003 33,100 179,000 5.4 2004 35,000 175,000 5.0 2005 35,000 225,000 6.4 * Source: Sectors in Review 2002-2004, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and Aquaculture 2005, Department of Agriculture and Aquaculture. Year

8.3.2

Strategy

The aquaculture industry has come under significant strain from various sources over the last few years but has weathered the storm and has emerged in a strong position. Public opinion, environmental issues, fish health and the value of the Canadian dollar are ongoing issues that the industry must continue to address. In addition there are certain structural changes that need to be considered, such as moving from a production driven system to more of a market driven system. The industry will need to work with all stakeholders, not only during the transition period, but into the future to ensure sustainability of the industry. The New Brunswick Salmon Growers Association is in a unique position to facilitate this process.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 In addition to addressing the issues noted above, growth for the industry will require a three part strategy: • Increase sales of whole salmon; • add value to the raw product; and • continue to develop new aquaculture products More than 75% of New Brunswick’s farmed salmon is exported to the United States. The major competition within this market is from Chilean salmon. Chilean producers are well financed, their farming costs are lower and they have less exchange rate risk than Canadian producers (New Brunswick Salmon Growers Association web site, www.nbsga.com). A further complicating factor is that price is the most important criteria for purchase decisions and consumers generally do not differentiate between salmon grown in Atlantic Canada with that grown elsewhere. Since we are not the low cost producer, our salmon must be “branded” as being higher quality if it is to receive a premium price. This is where Charlotte County producers have an advantage given that their product can be in (US) stores 2-4 days after harvest, whereas for Chilean salmon it is a minimum of 6-7 days (Atlantic Canada Salmon Farming Sustainability Plan, NBSGA). This provides a significant advantage due to the extended shelf life for consumers. However, as noted, price is a major factor so extensive promotion and marketing efforts will be required in order to reap the benefit. It is also suggested that, rather than rely on a “Charlotte County” brand that consideration be given to an “Atlantic Canada” brand or even to a “Canada” brand. To ensure maximum benefit from any resource it is important to add as much value to the raw product as possible. Although the industry initially marketed most of its product as whole fish, it now processes 40% of salmon into fillets, portions and other consumer products. This has led to a significant increase in the number of processing jobs. The sector must continue to seek new and innovative ways to add value. For example, the industry has significant expertise in growing quality eggs and smolts. There may be an opportunity to increase exports of eggs and smolts. While salmon culture has had the greatest success, there has been significant research and development into various other species such as Atlantic cod, haddock, Atlantic halibut and short nose sturgeon (Task Force on Fostering a Sustainable Salmon Farming Industry for Atlantic Canada, 2005). The future of the industry will be well served by continuing research and development as well as the eventual commercialization of new aquaculture species.

8.4
8.4.1

Traditional Fisheries
Sector Overview

The traditional (commercial) fishery includes ground fish (cod, haddock, halibut etc.), pelagic & other finfish (herring, mackerel, alewife etc.) and shellfish (lobster, scallop, clams etc.) plus a “miscellaneous” category. The commercial fishery for New Brunswick is sub-divided into ScotiaFundy and Gulf, making it very difficult to determine the impact on Charlotte County.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 However, informed opinion suggests that overall, the traditional fishery is holding its own and will continue to be an important sector in the county, but it is not in a growth mode. The backbone of the industry is lobster and herring. The total allowable catch (TAC) for herring has been reduced from some 83,000 tons in the early 2000s to about 50,000 tons currently (source: interview with DAFA official) which is divided up through a quota system among a fairly small group of companies. The lobster fishery is also sub-divided into Lobster Fishing Areas (LFAs). There is no catch limit for any given LFA (i.e. it is not a quota fishery) but there is a limit on the number of traps permitted as well as other regulatory measures such as trap size, lobster size, no landing of egg-bearing females, restricted gear type, fishing seasons determined by district and through limited entry (licensing of fishers). Also, since vessels in some areas are allowed to fish in other areas statistics related to quotas and landings could be very misleading if one does not have a solid understanding on how the system works. The commercial fishery also includes several relatively new species such as sea urchins, dog fish, sea cucumber, rockweed, rock crab, marine worms, eels etc. Rockweed has been particularly successful with about 11,000 tones being landed last year (2005). The strengths of the fishery lay in the increasing markets for fresh seafood, partly due to the aging population and the nutritional health benefits of seafood. The main constraints are the limits to the TACs due to ensuring a sustainable resource. Maintaining sufficient labour has also been identified as a constraint to growth, especially in the value added sector of the fishery. The main opportunities for the fishery are in under utilized fish species (eel, giant welk, dog fish, marine worms etc.) and in possible new value added products (smoked products, brine products, unique presentation of products etc.). 8.4.2 Strategy The traditional fishery is comprised of several fairly large companies and many smaller operators. The sector strategy needs to consider their different needs. It is suggested that the strategy support the larger players in obtaining, training and maintaining human resources. All players would require support for research and development, and commercialization of innovative new value added products. Certainly support for research and development for commercializing under utilized species will be necessary in order to further diversify the industry.

8.5
8.5.1

Manufacturing
Sector Overview

Charlotte County has a significant manufacturing sector comprised of some 40 major employers employing about 3,000 workers (Source: Enterprise Charlotte' 2003-2005 strategic plan). The s manufacturing and construction industry in Charlotte County employs 27.6% of the work force compared to the provincial average of only 19%. Jobs in manufacturing tend to pay more and
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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 provide year round employment. In addition, manufacturing is considered to be a “basic industry” in that businesses within it usually serve markets outside the region (exporting) and therefore bring “new money” into the local economy. Charlotte County’s main strengths in this area are its location to major US markets and an abundance of natural resources. The region has an ample supply of wood (many small woodlot owners) for making secondary wood products and is a large grower of wild blueberries which are now well known for their health effects. There is also a great tradition of boat building in the area. The local transportation system (land, sea and air) is also a significant strength. Weaknesses are mostly related to the skills and availability of the workforce and the availability of capital. Although the rise of the Canadian dollar and the difficulty of transporting goods across the border (especially for smaller companies that do not have sufficient staff to prepare the proper paperwork) present challenges to the sector, there are opportunities as well. Interest rates are low and stable, providing businesses with an ideal time to upgrade plant and equipment and invest in research and development. The globalization of markets presents many opportunities for entrepreneurs with new and innovative products and process. There will be fewer opportunities for those who wish to simply copy what is already available. The following are some of the opportunities put forward during the consultation process: • boat haul – Inglis Head (expand to service sail boats?) • a better way to fish (i.e. a better hauler mechanism, better lobster trap etc.) • products that add value to blueberries • biotech industries that utilize services or ingredients from existing industries • IT industry 8.5.2 Strategy In order to compete in the global economy manufacturers are going to have to continually improve their products and processes. Globally, this will be driven by advanced processing technologies and will involve the manufacture and/or use of new materials. This will result in goods manufactured at higher productivity levels that also meet stringent international quality standards. The overall suggested strategy for the manufacturing sector in Charlotte County is that companies, particularly those involved in exporting, obtain International Standards Organization (ISO) or other internationally recognized certification. They should also commit to expansion, product development, new trading relationships and to continually re-investing in their people, plant and equipment. In addition, manufacturers should consider the merits of joining industry groups or associations that provide opportunities to form partnerships.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 Business New Brunswick has identified and developed strategies for clusters within the Province that promise the greatest opportunity for economic diversification and development. Manufacturers in Charlotte County should ensure that they take full advantage of this process by determining if they fall within the scope of the four primary clusters which have been identified: Knowledge Industry; Life Sciences; Advanced Manufacturing; and Value added Resources. There are various definitions of what constitutes a cluster, but essentially it is defined as a group of inter-related industries that drives wealth creation in a region, primarily through export of goods and services. A cluster consists of a concentration of companies and industries that are interconnected by markets they serve and the products they produce as well as by the suppliers, trade associations, and educational institutions with which they interact.

8.6
8.6.1

Retail / Services
Sector Overview

The retail / service sector is characterized by a preponderance of small businesses as well as some fairly large retail outlets (provincial and national chains) and several international fast food outlets. Wages are generally low, turnover is high and employment tends to be part time and often seasonal. Due to the wages and general working conditions, this sector tends to attract workers with low education and low skills. The retail / service sector is considered to be a non-basic industry since businesses in this sector primarily serve the local market and thereby serve to redistribute the money in the local economy and reduce “leakage” to other markets. It does not, however, bring in “new money” to the region. It is for this reason that the service sector (excepting tourism operations) has generally not received much attention or support from neither economic development nor government agencies. However, since the workers in this sector are often a key contact point with tourists (convenience stores, general merchandise stores, gas stations etc.) the sector does deserve some attention, particularly related to training front line staff. During the consultation process it was evident that people believe that there is a need, or at least a desire, for eating establishments to remain open past 9:00 pm. It was noted that there is a gap in what is available and what people want, so they shop elsewhere, thus not supporting local businesses as much as they could. There were a few opportunities identified such as a business that sells locally made fish products (sardines, other canned fish, etc.) and other locally produced products. 8.6.2 Strategy Due to the nature of the retail / service sector is suggested that there is little to focus on strategically. However, there is a requirement to provide training / education of front line staff related to providing quality service. Educating front line staff on what there is to see and do in Charlotte County would also serve the community well.
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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

9.0 9.1
9.1.1 • • • • • •

SOCIAL, CULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENT SECTORS Environment
Issues and concerns Quantity and quality of potable water Waste water management and treatment: many rural septic systems. This needs to be considered from the whole County perspective. Solid waste management: garbage on the roadside and illegal dumping continues Some felt that we need to set a high bar – in law and in application – and want to make sure government understands this. There is some problem with businesses competing with each other for the same resources (environmental). There needs to be a good balance of interests. The state of the shoreline has gotten better but there is still too much garbage on it. The harbour in Blacks is dirty which is poor for the environment and also bad for tourism. The local environmental is impacted by environmental issues from the states such as the threat of liquefied natural gas (LNG) proposal. This is seen as a significant concern and some people are waiting (before starting a business for example) and not making the investment. People need to be educated more so they have a better understanding on how special the marine environment is.

9.2
9.2.1 •

Social
Issues and concerns There is a lack of adequate, affordable housing, particularly for those who work only seasonally. There are many places available but there appears to be a mismatch between the type of housing available and what is needed. It was also noted that there is a shortage of housing for students in St. Andrews. There are challenges related to youth such as substance abuse, and in keeping them in school. There is a lack of sufficient recreational facilities, at least in some communities. Some thought that it would be useful to have something like a mentorship program – something to engage them more. It was also suggested that the junior achievement program is coming back, but that it takes money and volunteers to help. Some people noted the lack of 24 hour service for hospitals, convenience stores, restaurants etc. The change in the traditional family due to teen pregnancies, divorce rates and couples waiting longer to have children were seen as issues of concern. These increase the cost of social services and cause issues in the education system.

• •

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007 • The working poor. For people with low skills, there is often little incentive to work due to the low wages that are available, the cost of transportation (no public transits system) and the lack of day care facilities. It was pointed out that some people end up quitting their job because of the lack of day care spaces.

9.3

Culture

There was not a great deal of discussions related to cultural issues. Many people considered cultural to be a part of the social issues 9.3.1 • • • • • Issues and Concerns Charlotte has a rich maritime culture, this should be promoted more. The County does not have the structure / associations etc. to meet the social needs of immigrants so it is hard to attract and to convince them to stay. People voiced their opinion that the County’s pride and culture may get lost if we are not careful. People noted that the Heritage Fair Program was a tremendous project. A web site would be useful for fairs, economic forums etc.

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

10.0

IMPLEMENTATION

As indicated in the introduction, the implementation of the Integrated Community Growth Strategy will rest foremost with the proponents of each of the proposed initiatives. This means that the social, cultural and environmental projects will be implemented by the lead organization as identified in the document. However, Enterprise Charlotte will undertake to direct this report and recommendations to the appropriate authorities to ensure they are aware of the region’s needs and expectations, as identified through this process, in each of the targeted areas. Economic related functions, which fall within the mandate of Enterprise Charlotte, will be implemented in accordance with the Board of Directors Strategic Plan. The measurement of performance for economic related functions will be guided by the measurement framework provided in the Board of Directors Strategic Plan. It is suggested that the measurement of the achievement for social, cultural and environmental projects be monitored by a newly formed regional committee, charged with that accountability

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Enterprise Charlotte Integrated Community Growth Strategy Final Report June 2007

11.0

CONCLUSION

The Community Growth Strategy for the Enterprise Charlotte has been developed through an extensive consultative and participatory process. It reflects the thoughts and feeling of many people. Participants took time away from work and family to voice their opinions on what Charlotte County needs to do in the next several years to grow economically, socially, culturally and environmentally. Enterprise Charlotte has facilitated this process and, within their mandate, is committed to following the economic path laid out in the plan. It is also committed to work closely with its partners from both the federal and provincial governments as well as with all community minded organizations to help ensure that all four pillars of the growth strategy work together as a system and thereby ensure sustainable community development.

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Exhibit 14

ENTERPRISE CHARLOTTE

STRATEGIC PLAN
2007-2010

April, 2007

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April, 2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1.1 OUR VISION................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 OUR MISSION................................................................................................................ 1 1.3 OUR VALUES................................................................................................................. 1 1.4 LOGIC MODEL............................................................................................................... 1 1.5 GOALS AND STRATEGIES........................................................................................... 3 1.5.1 Goal #1................................................................................................................3 1.5.2 Goal #2................................................................................................................3 1.5.3 Goal #3................................................................................................................3 1.5.4 Goal #4................................................................................................................4 1.5.5 Goal #5................................................................................................................4 1.6 MEASURING OUR PERFORMANCE ........................................................................... 4 2.0 ANNUAL WORK PLAN.......................................................................................................... 5 3.0 STRATEGIC PLAN REVISIONS.............................................................................................5 4.0 MEASUREMENT FRAMEWORK .......................................................................................... 6

i

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April, 2007

THE STRATEGY

1.1

Our Vision

Charlotte County is widely known as an outstanding community due to its diversity of business, cultural heritage and dedicated people. Enterprise Charlotte is recognized as a leader by providing the platform for community collaboration to support future infrastructure, create opportunities and discover our untapped potential throughout the county.

1.2

Our Mission

Provide leadership to ensure Charlotte County is a prosperous and outstanding place to live and work, by facilitating sustainable economic growth that respects our unique environment.

1.3

Our Values

Commitment Partnerships Open communication Confidentiality Integrity Innovative thinking Professionalism

1.4

Logic Model

Our logic model visually describes what we as an organization do and what we hope to achieve. It identifies the activities we undertake, the sequence of outputs and outcomes that are expected to flow from these activities, and provides the basis for the measurement of our performance.

1

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April, 2007

Enterprise Charlotte Logic Model Resources Activities Outputs Short-Term Outcomes Intermediate Outcomes Long-Term Outcomes

Offer business counselling Facilitate educational and training initiatives
Create strategic partnerships

Meetings with existing businesses and with potential entrepreneurs Courses, seminars etc.

Potential Entrepreneurs receive information and/or guidance

Increased new business

Businesses & workers are better prepared

Increased retention, expansion and results of existing businesses Increased effective use of resources and increased synergy Increased investment in infrastructure and strategic sectors Data utilized and/or gaps bridged

Partnerships formed

Stakeholders are working together

Human, $, physical & information

Promote and market the region Initiate research

Promotional and marketing initiatives

More people are aware of the region’s positive attributes Increased awareness of opportunities and/or resource gaps Increased flexibility to respond to specific situations

Sustainable Community Economic Development

New needs, trends and opportunities identified

Undertake specific projects

Special projects undertaken

Increased success of strategic planning efforts

2

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April, 2007

1.5

Goals and Strategies

Our fundamental purpose is to provide business support services to encourage business development in Charlotte County. To accomplish this purpose we have established the following five main goals:

1.5.1

Goal #1

To increase business development as a result of current and potential businesses being aware of, and taking advantage of programs and services available for starting, maintaining and developing a business in the region. Strategy We will work with all businesses in the region who wish to take advantage of our service. However we will focus our marketing efforts towards those sectors that have been identified through the Community Growth Strategy as being key economic sectors for the region, namely, Tourism, Aquaculture, Traditional Fishery and Manufacturing (including food processing) sectors.

1.5.2

Goal #2

To ensure all stakeholders are working as a team to support economic development in the region. Strategy We will seek out and form partnerships with all stakeholders who have an invested interest in our region and are committed to helping us carry out our mission.

1.5.3

Goal #3

To increase investment in the region. Strategy We will take every opportunity to promote and market the many positive attributes of the region. This will include maintaining our web site as well as taking advantage of opportunities to speak to businesses people, government officials and potential investors.

3

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April, 2007

1.5.4

Goal #4

To ensure businesses and government have the information they require in order to make informed decisions. Strategy We will identify information gaps by consulting with our partners and initiate research in areas that could provide opportunities for business to develop their people, their products or their services. This may include research related to business needs, new trends or opportunities.

1.5.5

Goal #5

To have the flexibility to respond to special situations by undertaking specific projects, even though these were not necessarily a part of our current work plan. Strategy We will always remain open to new ways of doing things and give full consideration to undertaking special initiatives that will address identified special needs in the region.

1.6

Measuring Our Performance

We believe it important to hold ourselves accountable for achieving the goals we have established in our strategic plan. Thus, our performance measurement system considers three areas: economy; efficiency; and effectiveness. Much of the information we collect concerning economy and efficiency is generally internal information we use to monitor our financial performance (staying within budget) and to improve our internal processes (doing more with less). The measurement framework presented in Section 4.0 addresses effectiveness and answers the question: “are we achieving our goals?”. This framework speaks to the goals we have established, and follows the logic model because it is based upon the outcomes we are trying to achieve for our stakeholders. We will further develop the indicators into a balanced set of measures, including targets. Each year we will report on these as evidence of our progress towards fulfilling our mission and achieving our goals.

4

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April, 2007

2.0

ANNUAL WORK PLAN

Enterprise Charlotte will prepare an annual Work Plan, which will be structured similarly to the Strategic Plan. The work plan provides a greater level of planning, operational and financial detail, including those specific performance targets for the year, upon which most of the monitoring and review is based.

3.0

STRATEGIC PLAN REVISIONS

We will review this Strategic Plan on an annual basis. It is anticipated that the Strategic Plan will be completely updated at least every five years.

5

Enterprise Charlotte Strategic Plan - 2007-2010 April 2007

4.0

MEASUREMENT FRAMEWORK
Goals Activities Short Term Offer business counselling Outcomes Intermediate Increased new business Potential entrepreneurs receive information and/or guidance Businesses & workers are better prepared Measuring our Performance (Indicators) - # of counselling sessions held - # of people in attendance at sessions - # of new business start-ups - # of business expansions - # of company visits

To increase business development as a result of current and potential businesses being aware of, and taking advantage of programs and services available for starting, maintaining and developing a business in the region. To ensure all stakeholders are working as a team to support economic development in the region. To increase investment in the region

Facilitate educational and training initiatives

Increased retention, expansion and results of existing businesses Increased effective use of resources and increased synergy Increase investment in infrastructure and strategic sectors Data utilized and/or gaps bridged

Create strategic partnerships

Stakeholders are working together

- # of partnerships - # of meetings with partners - # of joint activities - partner’s perception of reduced duplication - # of inquiries from potential investors - # of web hits - # of new businesses - amount of new public sector investment - amount of new private sector investment - # of opportunities identified - # of gaps identified - # of organizations using the data - # of gaps or issues addressed / reduced - # of special projects undertaken - # of requests for special projects that were not able to be undertaken

Promote and market the region

More people are aware of the region’s positive attributes Increased awareness of opportunities and/or resource gaps

To ensure businesses and government have the information they require in order to make informed decisions. To have the flexibility to respond to special situations by undertaking specific projects, even though these were not necessarily a part of our current work plan.

Initiate research

Undertake specific projects

Increased flexibility to respond to special situations

Increased success of strategic planning efforts

6

Exhibit 15

Statistics Canada - 2006 Community Profiles Charlotte County, New Brunswick, Canada
Charlotte (County) (CD) Population and dwelling counts Population in 2006 1 Population in 2001 1 2001 to 2006 population change (%) Total private dwellings 2 Private dwellings occupied by usual residents 3 Population density per square kilometre Land area (square km) Total 26,898 27,366 -1.7 13,392 11,161 7.9 3,423.52 Male Female New Brunswick (Province) Total 729,997 729,498 0.1 331,619 295,871 10.2 71,355.12 Male Female

Charlotte (County) (CD) Age characteristics Total population 4 0 to 4 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 29 years 30 to 34 years 35 to 39 years 40 to 44 years 45 to 49 years 50 to 54 years 55 to 59 years 60 to 64 years 65 to 69 years 70 to 74 years 75 to 79 years 80 to 84 years 85 years and over Median age of the population 5 % of the population aged 15 and over Total 26,895 1,280 1,470 1,830 1,775 1,340 1,400 1,655 1,810 2,165 2,200 2,165 1,890 1,480 1,255 985 870 675 650 42.2 83.0 Male 12,995 635 740 950 910 665 650 795 890 1,070 1,080 1,100 955 740 595 450 355 260 175 41.3 82.1 Female 13,905 645 730 880 865 675 750 865 920 1,095 1,125 1,070 935 740 665 535 515 410 480 43.0 83.7

New Brunswick Total 729,995 34,435 38,875 44,940 47,700 44,625 41,805 45,695 49,415 60,035 61,435 58,640 54,435 40,330 31,285 25,565 20,485 16,200 14,105 41.5 83.8 Male 355,500 17,555 20,070 23,030 24,465 22,310 20,280 22,015 24,090 29,350 30,100 28,645 27,005 20,085 15,330 11,860 8,765 6,280 4,255 40.7 82.9 Female 374,500 16,875 18,810 21,910 23,235 22,320 21,525 23,675 25,320 30,680 31,330 29,990 27,435 20,245 15,960 13,700 11,715 9,920 9,850 42.3 84.6

Charlotte (County) (CD) Common-law status characteristics Total population 15 years and over 6 Not in a common-law relationship In a common-law relationship Total 22,320 20,535 1,790 Male 10,675 9,790 890 Female 11,645 10,745 900

New Brunswick Total 611,745 550,075 61,670 Male 294,845 264,075 30,770 Female 316,900 286,000 30,900

2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB

1

Charlotte (County) (CD) Legal marital status characteristics Total population 15 years and over 7 Never legally married (single) 8 Legally married (and not separated) 9 Separated, but still legally married 10 Divorced 11 Widowed 12 Total 22,325 5,905 12,055 880 1,660 1,815 Male 10,675 3,150 6,025 410 785 305 Female 11,645 2,755 6,030 475 875 1,510 Charlotte (CD) Occupied private dwelling characteristics Total private dwellings occupied by usual residents 13 Single-detached houses - as a % of total occupied private dwellings Semi-detached houses - as a % of total occupied private dwellings Row houses - as a % of total occupied private dwellings Apartments, duplex - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 14 Apartments in buildings with fewer than five storeys - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 14 Apartments in buildings with five or more storeys - as a % of total occupied private dwellings Other dwellings - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 15 Number of owned dwellings 16 Number of rented dwellings 17 Number of dwellings constructed before 1986 Number of dwellings constructed between 1986 and 2006 18 Dwellings requiring major repair - as a % of total occupied private dwellings Average number of rooms per dwelling 19 Dwellings with more than one person per room - as a % of total occupied private dwellings 19 Average value of owned dwelling ($) 20 Total 11,160 82.4 2.3 0.9 1.4 5.9 0.0 7.1 9,295 1,865 7,970 3,190 12.9 6.7 0.5 128,680 Charlotte (CD) Selected family characteristics Total number of census families 21 Number of married-couple families 22 Number of common-law-couple families 23 Number of lone-parent families Number of female lone-parent families Number of male lone-parent families Average number of persons in all census families Average number of persons in married-couple families 22 Average number of persons in common-law-couple families 23 Average number of persons in lone-parent families Average number of persons in female lone-parent families Average number of persons in male lone-parent families Median income in 2005 - All census families ($) 24 Median income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($) 22 Median income in 2005 - Common-law-couple families ($) 23 Total 8,115 5,940 930 1,245 1,015 235 2.8 2.9 2.6 2.5 2.6 2.2 48,632 57,141 41,364

New Brunswick Total 611,745 197,350 306,025 24,620 41,150 42,595 Male 294,840 104,150 153,075 11,225 18,530 7,860 Female 316,905 93,200 152,955 13,395 22,620 34,735

New Brunswick Total 295,960 71.1 3.1 2.4 4.4 12.9 1.3 4.8 223,375 71,235 211,225 84,730 9.7 6.7 0.4 119,549 New Brunswick Total 217,790 151,210 31,000 35,585 29,150 6,435 2.8 2.9 2.7 2.4 2.5 2.3 52,878 60,726 49,137

2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB

2

Charlotte (CD) Selected family characteristics Total number of census families 21 Median income in 2005 - Lone-parent families ($) Median income in 2005 - Female lone-parent families ($) Median income in 2005 - Male lone-parent families ($) Median after-tax income in 2005 - All census families ($) 24 Median after-tax income in 2005 - Married-couple families ($) 22 Median after-tax income in 2005 - Common-law-couple families ($) Median after-tax income in 2005 - Lone-parent families ($) Median after-tax income in 2005 - Female lone-parent families ($) Median after-tax income in 2005 - Male lone-parent families ($) Total 8,115 27,378 24,562 33,639 43,089 48,638 37,279 26,549 24,479 31,028

New Brunswick Total 217,790 28,416 26,810 35,859 46,198 52,000 43,211 27,375 26,152 32,559

Charlotte (CD) Selected household characteristics Total private households 25 Households containing a couple (married or common-law) with children 26 Households containing a couple (married or common-law) without children 27 One-person households Other household types 28 Average household size Median income in 2005 - All private households ($) 29 Median income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($) 26 Median income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($) 27 Median income in 2005 - One-person households ($) Median income in 2005 - Other household types ($) 28 Median after-tax income in 2005 - All private households ($) 29 Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households with children ($) 26 Median after-tax income in 2005 - Couple households without children ($) 27 Median after-tax income in 2005 - One-person households ($) Median after-tax income in 2005 - Other household types ($) 28 Median monthly payments for rented dwellings ($) 30 Median monthly payments for owner-occupied dwellings ($) 31 Total 11,160 2,880 3,850 2,910 1,515 2.4 40,897 62,629 48,986 20,929 31,484 36,625 54,167 43,248 19,201 29,313 501 441

New Brunswick Total 295,960 79,580 97,290 71,940 47,145 2.4 45,194 69,945 52,132 21,294 36,130 39,984 59,630 45,524 19,580 33,809 558 551

Charlotte (County) (CD) Mother tongue Total population 32 English only French only English and French Other language(s) 33 Total 26,620 25,625 570 25 400 Male 12,865 12,380 270 10 210 Female 13,755 13,245 300 20 185

New Brunswick Total 719,650 463,190 232,980 4,450 19,025 Male 351,150 226,625 113,110 2,060 9,345 Female 368,500 236,565 119,865 2,385 9,680

2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB

3

Charlotte (County) (CD) Knowledge of official languages Total population 34 English only French only English and French Neither English nor French Total 26,620 24,290 0 2,315 10 Male 12,865 11,980 0 875 10 Female 13,755 12,310 0 1,435 0

New Brunswick Total 719,650 405,045 73,750 240,085 765 Male 351,145 201,550 34,590 114,615 390 Female 368,500 203,495 39,165 125,470 375

Charlotte (County) (CD) Language spoken most often at home Total population 35 English French Non-official language English and French English and non-official language French and non-official language English, French and non-official language Total 26,620 26,395 90 100 15 15 0 0 Male 12,865 12,775 35 45 10 0 0 0 Female 13,755 13,625 55 50 10 10 0 0

New Brunswick Total 719,650 494,210 211,665 8,355 4,295 965 130 30 Male 351,145 241,270 103,240 4,210 1,875 455 90 10 Female 368,500 252,940 108,420 4,145 2,420 510 40 20

Immigrant status and period of immigration Total population 36 Non-immigrants 37 Immigrants 38 Before 1991 1991 to 2000 2001 to 2006 39 Non-permanent residents 40

Charlotte (County) (CD) Total 26,620 24,615 1,855 1,305 270 285 145 Male 12,865 11,945 855 590 125 145 65 Female 13,755 12,675 1,000 715 140 140 80

New Brunswick Total 719,650 690,695 26,400 18,070 4,030 4,295 2,560 Male 351,145 337,645 12,190 8,320 1,825 2,045 1,315 Female 368,500 353,050 14,205 9,750 2,205 2,250 1,245

Charlotte (County) (CD) Citizenship Total population 41 Canadian citizens Canadian citizens under age 18 Canadian citizens age 18 and over Not Canadian citizens 42 Total 26,620 25,700 5,500 20,200 925 Male 12,865 12,440 2,835 9,610 425 Female 13,755 13,255 2,670 10,590 495

New Brunswick Total 719,650 708,465 146,275 562,195 11,185 Male 351,150 345,980 75,495 270,480 5,170 Female 368,500 362,485 70,775 291,710 6,010

Charlotte (County) (CD) Generation status Total population 15 years and over 43 1st generation 44 2nd generation 45 3rd generation or more 46 Total 22,025 1,855 2,045 18,125 Male 10,545 885 1,025 8,630 Female 11,480 965 1,020 9,495

New Brunswick Total 601,425 28,330 33,240 539,850 Male 290,500 13,385 16,095 261,030 Female 310,920 14,950 17,150 278,825

2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB

4

Mobility status - Place of residence 1 year ago Total population 1 year and over 47 Lived at the same address 1 year ago Lived within the same province or territory 1 year ago, but changed addresses within the same census subdivision (municipality) Lived within the same province or territory 1 year ago, but changed addresses from another census subdivision (municipality) within the same province or territory Lived in a different province or territory 1 year ago Lived in a different country 1 year ago

Charlotte (CD) Total 26,395 23,510 1,640 Male 12,730 11,420 730 Female 13,665 12,085 910

New Brunswick Total 712,855 626,895 47,960 Male 347,590 306,095 23,110 Female 365,260 320,800 24,850

775

335

440

24,970

11,725

13,240

350 120

180 60

165 60

10,680 2,350

5,515 1,145

5,165 1,205

Mobility status - Place of residence 5 years ago Total population 5 years and over 48 Lived at the same address 5 years ago Lived within the same province or territory 5 years ago, but changed addresses within the same census subdivision (municipality) Lived within the same province or territory 5 years ago, but changed addresses from another census subdivision (municipality) within the same province or territory Lived in a different province or territory 5 years ago Lived in a different country 5 years ago

Charlotte (CD) Total 25,345 18,100 3,995 Male 12,245 8,920 1,865 Female 13,100 9,180 2,130

New Brunswick Total 685,145 462,160 116,530 Male 333,585 226,775 55,655 Female 351,565 235,385 60,870

2,035

890

1,150

67,285

31,660

35,620

935 270

445 120

490 145

31,570 7,600

15,795 3,690

15,775 3,915

Charlotte (CD) Aboriginal population Total Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal identity population 49 Aboriginal identity population 50 Non-Aboriginal identity population Total 26,620 425 26,195 Male 12,865 205 12,660 Female 13,755 220 13,530

New Brunswick Total 719,650 17,655 701,995 Male 351,150 8,645 342,505 Female 368,500 9,005 359,490

Charlotte (CD) Educational attainment Total population 15 years and over 51 No certificate, diploma or degree High school certificate or equivalent 52 Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma 53 University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level University certificate, diploma or degree Total population aged 15 to 24 54 No certificate, diploma or degree High school certificate or equivalent 55 Apprenticeship or trades certificate or 2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB Total 22,025 6,520 5,995 2,605 4,230 580 2,095 3,105 1,390 1,090 130 Male 10,545 3,325 2,730 1,660 1,640 205 980 1,500 775 515 55 Female 11,485 3,195 3,260 950 2,590 375 1,110 1,600 615 580 75

New Brunswick Total 601,420 176,660 156,365 65,075 105,670 19,555 78,110 91,990 38,615 34,770 3,340 Male 290,500 89,390 71,840 42,060 44,790 6,930 35,485 47,150 21,050 17,750 1,895 Female 310,925 87,265 84,520 23,010 60,880 12,620 42,625 44,835 17,565 17,015 1,440 5

Charlotte (CD) Educational attainment Total population 15 years and over 51 diploma College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma 56 University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level University certificate, diploma or degree Total population aged 25 to 34 57 No certificate, diploma or degree High school certificate or equivalent 58 Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma 59 University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level University certificate, diploma or degree Total population aged 35 to 64 60 No certificate, diploma or degree High school certificate or equivalent61 Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma 62 University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level University certificate, diploma or degree 330 25 135 3,050 430 1,020 310 810 55 420 11,640 2,630 3,110 1,700 2,565 345 1,280 115 10 30 1,470 240 615 165 280 15 155 5,745 1,410 1,375 1,140 1,055 115 650 215 10 110 1,580 190 405 145 535 35 265 5,895 1,225 1,735 570 1,510 230 625 Total 22,025 Male 10,545 Female 11,485

New Brunswick Total 601,420 Male 290,500 Female 310,925

8,315 1,305 5,650 86,860 9,525 23,760 7,980 24,005 2,775 18,825 321,350 76,130 81,355 42,570 62,800 11,645 46,845

3,855 630 1,965 41,755 5,660 12,620 4,800 10,520 1,040 7,115 157,130 40,305 35,705 27,790 26,545 4,205 22,580

4,455 675 3,680 45,100 3,860 11,140 3,175 13,485 1,735 11,710 164,220 35,825 45,650 14,780 36,255 7,440 24,270

Charlotte (CD) Major field of study Total population 15 years and over 63 No postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree Education Visual and performing arts, and communications technologies Humanities Social and behavioural sciences and law Business, management and public administration Physical and life sciences and technologies Mathematics, computer and information sciences Architecture, engineering, and related technologies Agriculture, natural resources and conservation Health, parks, recreation and fitness Personal, protective and transportation services Other 64 Total 22,025 12,510 890 120 505 420 2,305 335 250 2,310 350 1,165 860 0 Male 10,540 6,060 295 35 255 155 450 195 80 2,205 250 155 395 10 Female 11,485 6,455 590 80 250 265 1,855 135 170 110 95 1,015 465 0

New Brunswick Total 601,420 333,020 23,875 4,750 11,485 16,905 63,085 5,965 10,695 63,765 6,725 38,730 22,330 85 Male 290,500 161,230 6,160 2,265 5,065 5,570 17,025 3,070 6,155 60,740 5,300 5,750 12,130 30 Female 310,920 171,790 17,720 2,490 6,415 11,340 46,055 2,895 4,535 3,025 1,420 32,980 10,205 50

2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB

6

Charlotte (County) (CD) Location of study Total population 15 years and over 65 No postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree Postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree Inside Canada Outside Canada Total 22,025 12,515 9,510 8,685 820 Male 10,545 6,060 4,480 4,075 405 Female 11,480 6,455 5,030 4,610 415

New Brunswick Total 601,420 333,020 268,400 256,865 11,540 Male 290,500 161,230 129,270 123,225 6,045 Female 310,920 171,790 139,135 133,635 5,495

Charlotte (County) (CD) Labour force activity Total population 15 years and over 66 In the labour force 67 Employed 68 Unemployed 69 Not in the labour force 70 Participation rate 71 Employment rate 72 Unemployment rate 73 Total 22,025 13,605 11,635 1,965 8,420 61.8 52.8 14.4 Male 10,545 7,060 6,135 930 3,480 67.0 58.2 13.2 Female 11,480 6,545 5,505 1,040 4,935 57.0 48.0 15.9

New Brunswick Total 601,420 382,970 344,770 38,195 218,455 63.7 57.3 10.0 Male 290,500 199,945 177,585 22,355 90,555 68.8 61.1 11.2 Female 310,925 183,020 167,185 15,835 127,900 58.9 53.8 8.7

Source: Statistics Canada. 2007. Charlotte, New Brunswick (table). 2006 Community Profiles. 2006 Census. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 92-591-XWE. Ottawa. Released March 13, 2007. http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/index.cfm?Lang=E

(For footnote definitions and symbols see: http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/printimprimer/page_Notes.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CD&Code1=1302&Geo2=PR&Code2=13&Data=Count&SearchText=charlotte&SearchType=Begin s&SearchPR=13&B1=All&Custom=)

2006 Community Profiles - Charlotte County, NB

7

Exhibit 16

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