You are on page 1of 15

KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No.

 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

WUWEI IN THE THOUGHTS OF ZUANG ZI
      
         Ranie B. Villaver
University of San Carlos
     Cebu City

I aim in this paper to present and explicate the various conceptions of  wuwei, a major 
Daoist doctrine generally thought of as the principle of  non­doing  and  effortless action, in the 
Zhuangzi    hua.1 Through a discussion of the dimensions of Zhuangzian wuwei and by recounting 
some of the  Zhuangzi’s unsophisticated yet atypical tales, I shall expose  wuwei’s connotations, 
which includes the following: the Daoist notion of light, vibrant (also redemptive) attitude one 
ought to exhibit amidst the chaotic universe, the principle as the purgation of one’s thoughts and 
desires, and wuwei as easy, prudential action achieved by constant practice of one’s craft and by 
intelligent, alert, and respectful cognizance of and flexibility to the daos of things.

It   is   in   the  Zhuangzi  where   one   finds   the   stoic,   “who   cares?”   outlook   and   funny 
disposition of the early Daoists. 2  The classic’s both explicit and implicit behavioral advice of 
wuwei  proves   this.   As  wuwei’s   kindred   concepts,   indifference,   humor,   and   carefree­ness 
(xiaoyaoyou,   see   the  Zhuangzi’s   first   chapter)   express   “non­doing”   for   they   connote   non­
interference as well as well­founded tolerance toward what exists and toward whatever comes.3
However,  the idea of attaining  this easygoing  disposition  or philosophy of life is not 
shared by all the early Daoist thinkers. Wuwei as lightheartedness and apathy isn’t the principle’s 
original, erstwhile meaning and use.4 In his work, the Zhuangzi, Master Zhuang   ,   5 radicalized 
wuwei by maneuvering it to support the mystical direction of his thought. 6 Like his predecessor, 
he used wuwei as a tool. But unlike Laozi    a, he used it to reject the mundane world in order to 
transport the self to a place where the playful, transcendent dao     “dwells.”7 For Zhuangzi, wuwei 
is not so much an expedient means to manage a kingdom as it is a way towards true freedom.  
Zhuangzi made  wuwei  a means to numb or “anesthetize,” so to speak, the human self 
from cosmic harshness just so one will become like the “wandering” (probably, to describe it 
anthropomorphically, unsympathetic and thoughtless) dao. By numbing oneself, that is by taking 
on the wuwei mode, Zhuangzi reckoned, one frees herself from the snares of the ominous world. 
As   Liu   Xiaogan  says,  whereas  Laozi  used  wuwei  as  a leadership  device,  “Zhuangzi,  on   the 
contrary, [thru wuwei] wanted to transcend the everyday [absurd and sinister] world regardless of 
concrete   considerations.”8  Accordingly,   this   “otherworldly”   yet   relaxed,   i.e.   unserious 
perspective of the theory as a mystical, liberating access led Master Zhuang to also propose it as 
a way towards happiness and balance in life.9
Because  Zhuangzi  wanted  nothing  but  transcendence  that   entails  freedom   from   life’s 
complexities and adversities, his wuwei then also implies the Buddhist­like state of vacuity, the 
state of “no­mind, no­emotion.”10 This is one of the central notions of his philosophy.11 And this 
“empty” state, in turn, necessitates ineluctably the mention of the so­called Daoist  wu­forms: 
wuxin ww (no heart­mind), wuzhi       (no knowledge, or now understood appositely as un­principled 
knowing), and wuyu     (no desires).12 These wu­forms, to explain them, correspond to Zhuangzi’s 
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

insistence on respecting the  ziran    i of things, including man’s (here, meaning human being). 


This is so because if one’s personal intentions (will), know­how, and desires (mind/heart) – that 
is, one’s zhi, wei, zhi, yu   , and xin x – are abandoned and purged from the self, what’s left is only 
nature’s ziran or “spontaneity.”13
Zhuangzi valued the natural essence and processes of the “ten­thousand things” (wanwu w
w) just as he valued non­doing and effortless action.14 Thus, the condition of nothingness (wu    ) 
not only is a state of emptiness, it is also a state that moves one towards becoming more like the 
spontaneous, insouciant, and unstable dao, or towards remembering, and then (clever) assuming 
of, the (in­active) Way of tian.

Whoever is unclear about Heaven is impure in his Power, whoever is unversed in the Way is at fault 
whatever course he takes. Alas for the man who is unclear about the Way! What do we mean by the 
‘Way’? There is the Way of Heaven [tian dao      ], there is the Way of Man [ren dao      ]. To be exalted 
by Doing Nothing [wuwei wu] is the Way of Heaven, to be tied by doing something is the Way of Man 
….15

Furthermore,  tian dao’s  wuwei  way, it must be noted, is understood yet again through the  wu­


forms we have identified. This is because Zhuangzi’s wuwei, according to Watson, is “a course 
of action that is not founded upon any purposeful motives of gaining or striving.” His  wuwei, 
therefore, advances the sage towards the mystical emulation and union with dao:16 “[Zhuangzi] 
uses  wu­wei  to   characterize   a   sublime   level   of   the   mind   attained   when   the   individual   has 
successfully extricated himself from the bondage of selfhood and its attendant attachments and is 
free to find communion with the cosmic whole.”17
In   sum,   Zhuangzian  wuwei,   we   have   seen,   entails   sagely   transcendence   as   well   as 
indifference before the world’s hustle and bustle. That is, wuwei is “freedom,” it’s “a life of non­
bondage   and   limitless   possibility.”18  Non­action   as   that   is   demonstrated   moreover   in   the 
Zhuangzi’s elucidation, as will be seen below, of the following themes: “forgetting of one’s own 
life/self (waisheng    a),” “fasting of the mind (xinzhai      ),” “sitting and forgetting (zuowang    u),” 
and going beyond (or “mastering cessation” of ) likes and dislikes, useful and useless, right and 
wrong.19

II

In this section, I shall present anecdotes from the  Zhuangzi and also some Chinese and 
non­Chinese   stories   from   other   sources   that   mention  wuwei.   These   will   illustrate  wuwei  as 
thought and developed by Zhuangzi and (concomitantly) by his later followers.20
The first one is from the nineteenth chapter of the Zhuangzi. This tale tells of a man who 
is well­versed of the way and who lives the principle of doing nothing.

Confucius   looked  at  the  view  in Lü­liang. The  waterfall   hung down  three  hundred  feet,   it 
streamed foam for forty miles, it was a place where fish and turtles and crocodiles could not swim, but 
he saw one fellow swimming there. He took him for someone in trouble who wanted to die, and sent a 
disciple along the bank to pull him up. But after a few hundred paces the man came out, and strolled 
under the bank with his hair down his back, singing as he walked. Confucius took the opportunity to 
question him.
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol
‘I thought you were a ghost, but now I see you close up you’re a man. May I ask whether you 
have a Way to stay afloat in water?’
‘No, I have no Way. I began in what is native to me, grew up in what is natural to me, matured 
in what is destined for me. I enter with the inflow, and emerge with the outflow, follow the Way of 
the water and do not impose my selfishness upon it. This is how I stay afloat in it.’21

Benjamin Hoff’s translation of the man’s reply says:

... I go down with the water and come up with the water. I follow it and I forget myself. I survive 
because I don’t struggle against the water’s superior power. That’s all.22

This story depicts wuwei really well that it deserves here our first attention. Now, to proceed to 
its implication, we infer that what this simple, also unusual tale conveys is that a person does not 
need to exert needless effort and coercion to be happy with life and its circumstances. What she 
must do, as she releases her selfishness, is “nothing” – for when one tries too hard, things will 
rebel, naturally, against her. What must be considered is solely the ultimate reality’s way. To 
reach the level of wuwei, Daoists would learn to let alone, i.e., not intervene with the way things 
are and with the laws operating naturally around her, and then comply with them.23 Fox and Hoff 
call this the act of “blending in” with What’s There, with dao. Fox explains,

Instead of obstinately and vainly persisting against the tide of inevitability, which will only wear us 
out,   Zhuangzi’s   ideal   person   adapts   and   conforms,   reflectively   and   reflexively,   operating   in   an 
effortless, responsive, unobtrusive fashion, by finding the fit [shi h].24

Life is easy, but, according to the Daoists, it is only when you know how stuffs in the 
world work, when you know what dao is and how it moves. By acquainting yourself with what’s 
real and by fashioning your ways to imitate and accommodate  dao, you take advantage of its 
energy and activity for your own good – such as what happens in  taijiquan. And that is truly 
effortless action!
The   frequently   noted   (it’s   at   par   with   the   “Butterfly   Dream”)  Zhuangzi  story   of   the 
butcher Ding (Pao Ding bu) further illustrates the abovementioned points on wuwei:

Cook Ting was carving an ox for Lord Wen­hui. As his hand slapped, shoulder lunged, foot 
stamped, knee crooked, with a hiss! with a thud! the brandished blade as it sliced never missed the 
rhythm, now in time with the Mulberry Forest dance, now with an orchestra playing the Ching­shou.
‘Oh, excellent!’ said Lord Wen­hui. ‘That skill should attain such heights!’
‘What your servant cares about is the Way, I have left skill behind me. When I first began to 
carve oxen, I saw nothing but oxen wherever I looked. Three years more and I never saw an ox as a 
whole. Nowadays, I am in touch through the daemonic in me, and do not look with the eye. With the 
senses I know where to stop, the daemonic I desire to run its course. I rely on Heaven’s structuring,  
cleave along the main seams, let myself be guided by the main cavities, go by what is inherently so. A 
ligament or tendon I never touch, not to mention solid bone. A good cook changes his chopper once a 
year, because he hacks. A common cook changes it once a month, because he smashes. Now I have 
this chopper for nineteen years, and have taken apart several thousand oxen, but the edge is as though 
it were fresh from the grindstone.  At that joint there is an interval, and the chopper’s edge has no  
thickness; if you insert what has no thickness where there is an interval, then, what more could you ask,  
of course there is ample room to move the edge about. That’s why after nineteen years the edge of my 
chopper is as though it were fresh from the grindstone.
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol
‘However, whenever I come to something intricate, I see where it will be hard to handle and 
cautiously prepare myself, my gaze settles on it, action slows down for it, you scarcely see the flick of 
the chopper – and at one stroke the tangle has been unravelled, as a clod crumbles to the ground. I 
stand chopper in hand, look proudly around at everyone, dawdle to enjoy the triumph until I’m quite 
satisfied, then clean the chopper and put it away.’
‘Excellent!’ said Lord Wen­hui. ‘Listening to the words of Cook Ding, I learned from them 
how to nurture life.’ [emphases added]25

Zhuangzi,   by   telling   such   a   story,   according   to   Fox,   demonstrates   the   basic   “cognitive” 
dimension   of  wuwei.   This   aspect   is   manifested   prudential   “adaptability”   or   “reflexivity”   in 
human action:

Wuwei  is not merely a way of  acting, it is a way of approaching the world, of matching attitude to 


circumstance [which] requires a willingness to shift contexts and see things from novel or different 
perspectives, continuously finding new possibilities in things [emphasis added].26

Thus, “the ideal is to ‘follow things as they are’ [attend to the entirety of the presented situation] 
and   therefore   never  confronts  obstacles”  but   acknowledges  their  presence   and  moves  on   by 
‘finding the fit’.27 In A.C. Graham’s words, this wuwei mode of action, of finding the “fit” (shi s), 
of matching up is spontaneous whereby “[p]eople who really know what they are doing, such as 
cooks, carpenters, swimmers, boatmen, cicada­catchers, do not go in much for analyzing, posing 
alternatives and reasoning from the first principles, they no longer even bear in mind any rules 
they were taught as apprentices; they attend to the total situation and respond [adapt, change, or 
reconfigure].”28
This, moreover, means that in order to make the most of life what one must pursue is 
“world­guidedness” or  dao­guidedness, that is, the condition of being guided or led by things, 
conditions, and circumstances.29  Therefore, the sage (shengren     T) must act like the “hinge of 
dao” (daoshu      ) – a metaphor for “open­mindedness,” the condition “which does not obstinately 
insist on the world conforming to our pre­conceived preferences.”30  Like the door’s hinge, the 
hinge of dao forgets instinctively – it doesn’t bother – that the sides of the door or anything are 
opposites;   it   views   them,   on   the   contrary,   as   complements.  Daoshu  allows   “reflexivity,” 
“adaptability,”   “flexibility,”   “yielding   in,”31  or   “giving   way,”   and  wuwei.32  And   finally,   this 
“hinge” represents “openness to the situation at hand,” sensitivity, and situation and  coping with 
the   environment   where   one   is   in   and   to   the   surrounding   entities:   it   proposes   prudential 
reconfiguration of the sage’s cognitive and bodily structure and movements.33
Another famous Zhuangzi story – one on enlightenment – also relates wuwei:

‘I make progress,’ said Yen Hue.
‘Where?’ said Confucius.
‘I have forgotten about rites and music.’
‘Satisfactory. But you still have far to go.’
Another day he saw Confucius again.
‘I make progress.’
‘Where?’
‘I have forgotten about Goodwill and Duty.’
‘Satisfactory. But you still have far to go.’
Another day he saw Confucius again.
‘I make progress.’
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol
‘Where?’
‘I just sit and forget.’
Confucius was taken aback.
‘What do you mean, just sit and forget?
‘I let the organs and members drop away, dismiss eyesight and hearing, part from the body and 
expel knowledge [wuzhi], go along with the universal thoroughfare. This is what I mean by ‘just sit 
and forget [zuowang].’
‘If you go along with it, you have no preferences [wuyu]; if you let yourself transform, you have 
no norms. Has it really turned out that you are the better of us? Oblige me by accepting me as your 
disciple.’34

When one lets things be, that is, when she leaves the world as it is, and tolerates nature to flow 
without hindrance, when one reduces the ego to nothing by releasing its preconceptions, and 
when one goes along with  dao  and practices “nonassertive activity,” he gets the benefits  dao 
offers. Dao does the trick for him.35 It does the work for her: this is because “it is the world (the 
Way or the ‘inevitable movement’ of things) that is providing the motive force and ‘carrying’ the 
Subject in the proper direction.”36 Our next story tells of this providence and guidance the way 
bestows. People just need to trust dao and its power (de   ), and do nothing:

Knowledge roamed north to the banks of the Black Water, climbed the hill of Loom­in­the­gloom, 
and met with Donothing Saynothing there. Said Knowledge to Donothing Saynothing 
‘I have questions I wish to put to you. What should I ponder, what should I plan, if I am to 
know the Way? What should I settle on, what should I work at, if I am to be firm in the Way? What 
course should I follow, what guide should I take, if I am to grasp the Way?’
Three things he asked, but Donothing Saynothing wouldn’t reply. No, he wasn’t that he would 
not reply, he didn’t know how to reply. Knowledge with his questions unanswered returned to the 
south   of   White   Water,   climbed   to   the   top   of   Desert­of­doubts,   and   noticed   Scatterbrain   there. 
Knowledge repeated his questions to Scatterbrain.
‘Ahaa!’ said Scatterbrain, ‘I know it, I’ll tell you!’
Half­way through what he wanted to say he forgot what he wanted to say. Knowledge with his 
questions unanswered returned to the Imperial Palace, saw the Yellow Emperor, and put the questions 
to him.
‘Don’t ponder, don’t plan,’ said the Yellow Emperor, ‘only then will you know the Way. Settle 
on nothing, work at nothing, only then will you be firm in the Way [emphasis added]. Follow no course, 
take no guide, only then will you grasp the way.’
‘You and I know it. The other two do not know it. Which of us are on to it?’
‘That Donothing Saynothing is truly on to it, Scatterbrain seems to be, you and I have never 
been anywhere near it. The knower does not say, the sayer does not know, so the sage conducts a 
wordless teaching ….
… “The doer of the Way every day does less, less and less until he does nothing at all, and in doing 
nothing there is nothing that he does not do.”37

We move on to one short Chinese story that Hoff narrates in The Te of Piglet. It, too, is a 
story that depicts the simple, insightful wisdom of wuwei.

A horse was tied outside a shop in a narrow Chinese village street. Whenever anyone would try 
to walk by, the horse would kick him. Before long, a small crowd of villagers had gathered near the 
shop, arguing about how best to get past the dangerous horse. Suddenly, someone came running. “The 
Old Master is coming!” he shouted. “He’ll know what to do!”
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol
The crowd watched eagerly as the Old Master came around the corner, saw the horse, turned, 
and walked down another street.38

Akin to this humorous tale is a succinct one recounted by Anthony de Mello:

A monkey on a tree hurled a coconut at the head of a Sufi [a Muslim sage­mystic].
The man picked it up, drank the milk, ate the flesh, and made a bowl from the shell.39

According to the Daoists, when humans know how nature activates, life becomes trouble­free. 
Wuwei  means   “making   use   of   the   natural   forces   to   achieve   one’s   object   with   the   greatest 
economy.”40 Hence, they urge that people observe carefully “the natural laws in operation in the 
world around [them] and live by [and with] them.”41 They encourage men and women to smartly 
acquaint themselves with the  ziran  of  dao  and then proactively emulate its ways. There is no 
point tilling a land that’s rocky and infertile. It’s no use to utilize “square wheels” for cars when 
one knows that round one’s work. The benefits come when the natural laws and forces (beings, 
circumstances, situations, and conditions) are honored and obeyed.
What  wuwei  of course demands is difficult to do. People are egoistic and controlling. 
They think they can handle things on their own and that they can get away with anything. Also, it 
is arduous and taxing to follow nature’s fluid ways. As Ing says,

The “way of the Absolute” in nature is easy to see. But in man, it is difficult because man’s activity is 
tainted with artificiality. What is artificial action? It is to act in such a way as to disrupt harmony. 
From experience, we know that there are many chaos­causing acts. These acts come from selfishness 
and greed ….42

Yet, in the end, the person who seeks joyful and harmonious living has to realize that it is only 
by knowing and following the movements of  nature, and, most significantly, by releasing her 
technical (calculative), artificial mindset, and personal desires will she reach and enjoy it.
Now,  the  way  of  wuwei  is  the  way  of acceptance.  When  one  really  knows  the  way, 
“fathoms the essentials,” she would untie herself from “anything irrelevant to life.” 43 The person 
who allows nature to be nature pleases herself with what life gives her, unlike the Stonecutter in 
one known  story.  Envious  of other people’s  fortunate  conditions, he wished to live affluent, 
abundant,  and famous  lives (which were  all granted magically). But, because he was always 
dissatisfied, he ended up being awed by his being, by his very nature as a stonecutter.44 Wuwei 
would simply make people happy, safe, and secure because dao is with them and for them. No 
amount of compulsion will be expended to get what one wants and needs.
Wuwei  is   the   ideal   attitude   that   people   should   exhibit   because   it   is   the   Way   (or   the 
qualities) of Heaven, of dao  d that they are supposed to emulate and “embody.” 45 As such, non­
action and effortless action connote the way of never refusing dao’s promptings:

Wu­wei, or unforced action, means letting things [nature] come to us. Even more, it means letting 
things become us, or – more prosaically – become reflected in us …. We don’t struggle to figure 
things out but allow things to speak to us and tell us what to do with them.46

To explain this further, let’s take one Chinese fable: The Crocodile and the Monkey.
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

A carefree monkey lived in a jungle. He was honest and sincere to others and had many friends. 
He was a smart animal, never had any evil thoughts, and always trusted his friends.
One late afternoon, after jumping around in the trees all day, he went to the river to wash his 
dirty hands. A crocodile swam over. The monkey had no friends in the water, so he said ‘Hello’ to the 
crocodile.
The crocodile was a wicked animal. He was hungry, and he had heard that a monkey’s liver 
was delicious. The crocodile approached the monkey and asked, ‘My dear friend monkey, have you 
ever traveled to the other side of the river?’
When the monkey replied that he had not, the crocodile said, ‘I just came over from the other 
shore. There are many more large delicious peaches over there than on this side of the river.’
‘But I don’t know how to swim.’ The monkey was interested and had to tell the truth.
The crocodile offered that the monkey could stand on his back, and he would take the monkey 
across the river. It sounded like a good idea. The monkey jumped on the crocodile’s back without 
hesitation.
In the middle of the river, the crocodile began to sink into the water, which frightened the 
monkey.
‘Brother  crocodile,’  the monkey begged,  ‘please don’t  keep sinking. I know nothing about 
swimming.’
‘I know you don’t swim,’ the crocodile answered loudly with a vicious laugh. ‘I want to drown 
you so I’ll have delicious monkey liver as my supper.’
At this moment, the monkey realized  that the whole thing was  trick. There  were no larger 
peaches on the other shore. He himself was in immediate danger. But the monkey was smart. He 
calmed down and immediately replied, ‘Brother crocodile, why didn’t you say so earlier? I forgot to 
bring my liver with me. I cleaned it this morning and hung it up on a branch of a tall tree. Let’s go 
back to the shore, and I’ll give it to you right away.’
The crocodile was disappointed, but in order to have delicious monkey liver for dinner, he took 
the   monkey   back   to  the   shore  and   followed  the   monkey   to  a  tall  tree.  While   the   crocodile  was 
watching the monkey jump up on the tree, the careless crocodile did not notice a trap made by a 
hunter to catch animals by the tree.
The crocodile accidentally fell into the deep hole. He yelled for help. The monkey jumped back 
to the edge of the trap and said, ‘Listen, crocodile, I treated you as a sincere friend. But you are not. 
You are but a stupid reptile …. I’m sorry. I cannot help you.’47

Expecting things or persons to be different when one knows “who or what they really are” brings 
troubles. The crocodile will always be a crocodile and the monkey will forever be a monkey. The 
dao  has   set   their   natures   and   the   nature   of   the   whole   reality.   What   one   can   do   then   is   to 
acknowledge,   reconfigure   one’s   ways   and   being   to   accommodate   the   other,   and   live 
harmoniously with their realities. This is the means of efficacy – the way of not forcing, of not 
trying too hard. This is the means of wuwei.48
Finally, our closing story here reveals  that trying to master and control  dao  is indeed 
futile; wuwei should really be the last and the best resort. Though the narrative is sad, it posits 
lessons of  wuwei. It teaches that the principle of  effortless action  exhorts men and women to 
make careful, prudent (not hasty and unwise) decisions upon knowledge of the nature of things. 49 
It is the tale of  “The Scorpion and the Turtle”.

A scorpion needs to cross a river to get to his usual whereabouts, having lost its way out in the 
wilderness for quite some time. Scorpions can’t swim, so it has to find another way across. There are 
no   bridges   or   stepping   stones   in   sight,   and   the   river   is   far   too   wide   to   jump.   Searching   the 
surroundings, the scorpion meets a turtle. It asks the turtle for a ride across the big river. “Not a 
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol
chance. You’ll sting me, and I won’t be able to swim, and then I will drown,” the turtle replies. “I’ve 
got a family to take care of.” The scorpion acknowledges  the turtle’s concern for his family, but 
assures him that he has nothing to fear. “You see, I would drown also, as you sink. It would be very 
stupid of me to sting you,” the scorpion argues in a convincing manner. So the turtle considers. 
After giving the situation some thought, it becomes pure scientific logic to the turtle. What can 
be more valuable than one’s life, or the lives of your loved ones? The turtle asks the scorpion if it too 
has a family. “Certainly I have, and their well­being is more dear to me than anything else in this 
world.” The scorpion pulls out a worn picture of its family and points out the family members to the 
turtle. The scorpion talks in a gentle voice, and by the look of its posture, it seems very sincere. 
“Please,” the scorpion begs, “please help me to get back home.” A desperate look spreads across the 
face of the scorpion as its thoughts wander to its home soil. “There is no­one here but you to help 
me,” the scorpion continues to argue. Touched by this concern for family matters, the turtle finally 
agrees to carry the scorpion across the big wide river.
Once in the water, the waves are tough on the newfound friends, but the turtle keeps the pace up 
with   great   effort   not   to   let   his   passenger   down.   Halfway   across,   the   turtle   suddenly   feels   the 
scorpion’s terminal sting in his neck. “Why, why,” it gasps as the venom paralyses it, “why did you 
do it?” They both begin to sink into the dark waters. “Damned if I know. Guess it’s just in my nature,” 
the scorpion replies.50

After all that’s  said, I hope this work will help men and women become  enlightened 


about the wisdom that early Daoist teachings offer to the present. I hope too, finally, that, as 
they’ll relish the insights of the ancient, practical theory of wuwei, they will heed its challenges.51

BIBLIOGRAPHY

A. Books

Ames,   Roger   T.   and   David   L.   Hall,   trans.  Daodejing:   “Making   This   Life   Significant”:   A 
Philosophical Translation. New York: Ballantine, 2003.

Boldt, Laurence. The Tao of Abundance. New York: Arkana, 1999.

Clarke,   J.J.  The   Tao   of   the   West:   Western   Transformations   of   Taoist   Thoughts.   London: 
Routledge, 2000.

Cook, Scott B., ed.  Hiding the World in the World: Uneven Discourses on the  Zhuangzi. New 


York: State University of New York Press, 2003.

Coutinho,   Steve.  Zhuangzi   and   Early   Chinese   Philosophy:  Vagueness,   Transformation   and 
Paradox. Aldershot, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2004.

Cua, Antonio S. Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy. London: Routledge, 2003.

De Mello, Anthony. The Song of the Bird. New York: Doubleday, 1984.
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

Fox,   Alan.  “Zhuangzi   (Chuang­tzu).”  In  Great   Thinkers   of   the   Eastern   World,   ed.   Ian   P. 
McGreal: 99­103. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.

Graham,  Angus  C.,  trans.  Chuang­tzn: The Inner Chapters.  London:  George  Allen  & Unwin, 


1981; Unwin Paperbacks, 1986.

Hoff, Benjamin. The Tao of Pooh. London: Methuen London, 1982; Egmont, 1998.

________. The Te of Piglet. London: Methuen London, 1992; Egmont, 1998.

Kjellberg,   Paul   and   Philip   J.   Ivanhoe.  Essays   on   Skepticism,   Relativism,   and   Ethics   in   the 
Zhuangzi. New York: State University of New York Press, 1996.

Li, Chenyang. “Zhuang Zi and Aristotle on What A Thing Is.” In Comparative Approaches To 
Chinese Philosophy, ed. Bo Mou: 263­277. Aldershot, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2003.

Lin, Yutang, trans. The Wisdom of Laotse. New York: Modern Library, 1948.

Ma, Tom Te­Wu. Chinese Fables & Wisdom: Insights for Better Living.  New York: Barricade, 
1997.

Mair, Victor H., trans. Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang Tzu. 
New York: Bantam, 1994.

Moeller,   Hans­Georg.  Philosophy   of   the  Daodejing.   New   York:   Columbia   University   Press, 
2006.

Robinet, Isabelle. Taoism: Growth of a Religion. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 
1997.

Sellman,  James  D. “Transformational  Humor  in the  Zhuangzi.” In  Wandering at Ease in the 


Zhuangzi, ed. Roger T. Ames: 163­174. New York: State University of New York Press, 
1998.

Slingerland, Edward.  Effortless Action: Wu­wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in  
Early China. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Schwartz,  Benjamin I.  The World of Thought in Ancient China.  Cambridge: Belknap Press of 


Harvard University Press, 1985.

Timbreza,  Florentino,  trans.  Ang  Tao Te Ching  ni Lao Tzu sa Pilipino. Manila:  De La Salle 


University Press, 1999.

Watson, Burton, trans. Zhuangzi: Basic Writings. New York: Columbia University Press, 1964, 
2003.
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

________, trans.  The Complete Works of Chuang­Tzu. New York: Columbia University Press, 
1968.

Cua, Antonio S. Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy.  London: Routledge , 2003.

B. Periodicals

Ames Roger T. “Wu­wei  in ‘The Art of Rulership’ Chapter of  Huai Nan Tzu: Its Sources and 


Philosophical Orientation.” Philosophy East & West 31, no. 2 (April 1981): 193­213.

________. “The Zhuangzi and the Philosophy of Daoism.” Calliope: Exploring World History 11, 
no. 2 (October 2000): 15.

Fox, Alan. “Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi.” Asian Philosophy 6, no. 1 (1996): 
59­72. Revised and reprinted in Hiding the World in the World: Uneven Discourses on the 
Zhuangzi, ed. Scott B. Cook: 207­225. New York: State University of New York Press, 
2003.

________.  “Process  Ecology  and the ‘Ideal’  Dao.”  Journal of Chinese Philosophy  32,   no.   1 


(March 2005): 47­57.

Grange,   Joseph.   “Zhuangzi’s   Tree.”  Journal   of   Chinese   Philosophy  32,   no.   2   (June   2005): 
171­182.

Hao, Changchi. “Wu­wei and the Decentering of the Subject in Lao­Zhuang: An Alternative App
roach  in the Philosophy  of Religion.”  International Philosophical Quarterly  46,  no.  4 
(December 2006): 445­457.

Ing, Paul  Tan Chee.  “The Principle of ‘Acting By Not Acting,’  Wei Wu Wei, in the  Tao Te 


Ching.” International Philosophical Quarterly 11 (September 1971): 362­371.

Ivanhoe,   Philip   J.   “Zhuangzi   on   Skepticism,   Skill   and   the   Ineffable  Dao.”  Journal   of   the 
American Academy of Religion 61, no. 4 (Winter 1993): 639–654.

________. “Paradox of Wuwei?.” Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33, no. 2 (June 2007): 277­287.

1Liu, Xiaogan. “Wuwei (Non­Action): From Laozi to Huainanzi.” Taoist Resources 3, no. 1 (July 
1991): 41­56.

Mandane, Orlando Ali Jr. “Humor in Zhuang Zi’s Philosophy.” PHAVISMINDA Journal 4 (May 
2005): 51­73.

Møllgaard, Eske. “Zhuangzi’s Religious Ethics.”  Journal of the American Academy of Religion 
71, no. 2 (June 2003): 347­370.
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

Parkes, Graham. “The Wandering Dance: Chuang Tzu and Zarathustra.” Philosophy East & West 
33, no. 3 (July 1983): 235­250.

Slingerland, Edward. “Effortless Action: The Chinese Spiritual Ideal of Wu­wei.” Journal of the 
American Academy of Religion 68, no. 2 (June 2000): 293­328.

________. “Conceptual Metaphor Theory as Methodology for Comparative Religion.”  Journal 
of the American Academy of Religion 72, no. 1 (March 2004): 1­31.

________.   “Conceptions   of   the   Self   in   the  Zhuangzi:   Conceptual   Metaphor   Analysis   and 
Comparative Thought.” Philosophy East & West 54, no. 3 (July 2004): 322­342.

Van Norden, Bryan W. Review of  Hiding the World in the World: Uneven Discourses on the  
Zhuangzi, edited by Scott B. Cook. China Review International 12, no. 1 (Spring 2005): 
1­14.

Villaver, Ranie B. “Daoist  Wuwei and Filipino Gender Sensitivity.” USC Graduate Journal 23, 
no. 1 (October 2006): 1­20.

________.  “Wuwei in the Daodejing: Understanding Daoist Ethics.” PHAVISMINDA Journal 6 
(May 2007): 31­46.

Wu, Kuang­ming.  “Hermeneutic Explorations in the  Zhuangzi.”  Journal of Chinese Philosophy 


33, Supplementary 1 (December 2006): 61­79.

Zhu, Rui. “Wu­Wei: Lao­zi, Zhuang­zi and the Aesthetic Judgement.” Asian Philosophy 12, no. 1 
(March 2002): 53­63.

C. Unpublished Materials

Fox, Alan. “Wuwei in Early Philosophical Daoism.” (Paper presented to the International Society 
for Chinese Philosophy (ISCP) at the 1995 Eastern Division Meeting of the American 
Philosophical Association, 28 December 1995).

Fraser, Christopher J. “Wu­wei, the Background and Intentionality.” (Revised version of a paper 
presented at “Searle’s Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement,” 
2nd   International Society of Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy 
(ISCWP) International Conference, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 
14­15 June 2005).
KINAADMAN An Interdisciplinary Research Journal       Vol. 18, No. 2 October 2007
Holy Name University, Tagbilaran City, Bohol

Krueger,   Joel   W.   “‘Doing   Without   Trying’:   Taoism,   Cognitive   Science,   and   Embodied 
Cognition.”   (Paper   presented   at   the   2005   Eastern   Division   Meeting   of   the   American 
Philosophical Association, New York City, New York, 27­30 December 2005).

Slingerland, Edward Gilman. “Effortless Action: Wu­wei as a Spiritual Ideal in Early China.” 
Ph.D. diss., Stanford University, 1998.

Villaver, Ranie B. “On Ziran and the Daoist Philosophy of Education.” Unpublished manuscript.

D. Electronic Sources

Ames,   Roger  T.  “Daoist  Philosophy.”  In  Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy,  ed.   Edward 


Craig.   London:   Routledge,   1998.   Article   online.   Available   from 
http://www.rep.routledge.com/article/G006; 26 May 2007.

________.  “Zhuangzi.” In  Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. Edward Craig. London: 


Routledge,   1998.   Article   online.   Available   from 
http://www.rep.routledge.com/article/G051; 26 May 2007.

Coutinho,   Steve.   “Zhuangzi.”   In  The   Internet   Encyclopedia   of   Philosophy.   Article   online. 


Available from http://www.iep.utm.edu/z/zhuangzi.htm; 2 March 2007.

Dy, Manuel. “Zhuang Zi’s Perfect Joy: An Answer to the Contemporary Predicament?” In The 
Humanization   of   Technology   and   Chinese   Culture,   eds.  Tomonobu   Imamichi,   Wang 
Miaoyang,   and   Liu   Fangtong.   Book   online.   Available   from 
http://www.crvp.org/book/Series03/III­11/chapter_xix.htm; 15 November 2005.
1
 The Zhuangzi is the second major philosophical Daoist classic after the Daodejing   a    a. The work, as compiled by 
Guo Xiang  Gu, has 33 chapters, of which only the first seven chapters (known as the “Inner Chapters” Neipian    e) is said to 
have been written by Zhuangzi. The other parts of the Zhuangzi include the Outer Chapters, the Waipian  Wa (chapters 8­22) 
and the Mixed or Miscellaneous Chapters,  Zapian    a (chapters 23­33). See Steve Coutinho, “Zhuangzi,” in  The Internet 
Encyclopedia of Philosophy [article online]; available from http://www.iep.utm.edu/z/zhuangzi.htm; 2 March 2007.
2
 The Daodejing, or the Laozi  LLaL, on the other hand, deals with formal, serious propositions on metaphysics and 
rulership,. See James D. Sellman, “Transformational Humor in the Zhuangzi,” in Wandering at Ease in the Zhuangzi, ed. 
Roger T. Ames (New York: State University of New York Press, 1998), 163­174; Orlando Ali Mandane Jr., “Humor in 
Zhuang Zi’s Philosophy,” PHAVISMINDA Journal 4 (May 2005): 51­73.
3
 We recall that the characters  wu  w and wei     literally mean “absence” and “action.” Combined, they mean “no 
action” or “absence of doing.” Rui Zhu, “Wu­Wei: Lao­zi, Zhuang­zi and the Aesthetic Judgement,” Asian Philosophy 12, 
no. 1 (March 2002): 57; Edward Slingerland, “Conceptions of the Self in the Zhuangzi: Conceptual Metaphor Analysis and 
Comparative Thought,” Philosophy East & West 54, no. 3 (July 2004): 334. See also Steve Coutinho, Zhuangzi and Early 
Chinese Philosophy: Vagueness, Transformation and Paradox (Aldershot, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2004), 62­63.
4
 Cf. Ranie B. Villaver, “Wuwei in the Daodejing: Understanding Daoist Ethics,” PHAVISMINDA Journal 6 (May 
2007): 31­46.
5
 Zhuangzi, known also as Zhuang Zhou    Z, is putatively recognized as Laozi’s foremost follower. However, a note 
regarding the relationship of the two thinkers must be mentioned: Other authors, like the late A.C. Graham, theorize that 
Zhuangzi never knew that he was following Laozi and that he never expressed he was a Daoist. Thus, it could even be that 
Master Zhuang was the “original” Daoist. Chad Hansen, “Zhuangzi (Chuang Tzu),” in Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy, 
ed. Antonio S. Cua (London: Routledge, 2003), 911.
6
 This means that Zhuangzian wuwei is Laozian wuwei minus the socio­political aspect. It considered wuwei only as 
a “state of consciousness.” Isabelle Robinet, Taoism: Growth of a Religion (Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 
1997), 31; Zhu, “Wu­Wei,” 55­56.
7
 Liu Xiaogan, “Wuwei (Non­Action): From Laozi to Huainanzi,” Taoist Resources 3, no. 1 (July 1991): 47. Dao, 
oftentimes referred to as nature, the way, or the ultimate reality, is, for the Daoists, the world or the universe, what it is and 
its mechanisms.
8
  Ibid.; Burton Watson, Introduction to  Zhuangzi: Basic Writings  (New York: Columbia University Press, 1964, 
2003), 3.
9
  Alan Fox,  “Zhuangzi (Chuang­tzu),”  in  Great Thinkers of the Eastern World, ed. Ian P. McGreal (New York: 
HarperCollins,   1995),  99­103.   See   also   Manuel   Dy,   “Zhuang   Zi’s   Perfect   Joy:   An   Answer   to   the   Contemporary 
Predicament?,” in The Humanization of Technology and Chinese Culture, eds. Tomonobu Imamichi, Wang Miaoyang, and 
Liu Fangtong [book online]; available from http://www.crvp.org/book/Series03/III­11/chapter_xix.htm; 15 November 2005.
10
 Liu, “Wuwei (Non­Action),” 48.
11
 Zhu, “Wu­Wei,” 56­57. See also Roger T. Ames, “Daoist Philosophy,” in Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 
ed.   Edward   Craig   (London:   Routledge,   1998)  [article   online];   available   from 
http://www.rep.routledge.com/article/G006SECT6; 26 May 2007; Eske Møllgaard, “Zhuangzi’s Religious Ethics,” Journal 
of   the  American Academy  of   Religion  71,  no.   2  (June   2003):   347­370.   Cf.  Ranie   Villaver,   “On  Ziran  and   the  Daoist 
Philosophy of Education,” unpublished manuscript.
12
 These are only among the wu­forms we can identify in Daoist thinking. Wuwei is one of them. For a substantial 
discussion   of   these   forms,   see   Roger   T.   Ames   and   David   L.   Hall,  Daodejing:   “Making   This   Life   Significant”:   A 
Philosophical Translation (New York: Ballantine, 2003), 36­53, and Ames, “Daoist Philosophy,” in Routledge Encyclopedia 
of Philosophy.
13
  According   to   Edward   Slingerland,   one’s   doing  minus  personal   motives   and   desires   is   Zhuangzi’s   idea   of 
naturalness (or wuwei) for Zhuangzian wuwei, according to him, “requires a transcendence of the human.” The wu­forms are 
qualities of  dao. By incorporating the  wu­forms, one then goes beyond what is human. He becomes like  dao. Edward 
Gilman Slingerland, “Effortless Action: Wu­wei as a Spiritual Ideal in Early China” Ph.D. diss. (Stanford University, 1998), 
270. 
14
 Note too that both concepts, wuwei and ziran, are synonyms in the eyes of the Daoists. For illustrations, see A.C. 
Graham, trans., Chuang­tzŭ: The Inner Chapters (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1981; Unwin Paperbacks, 1986), 189, 
200­201.
15
 Graham, Chuang­tzŭ, 268.
16
  Watson, Introduction to  Zhuangzi: Basic Writings, 6; Benjamin I. Schwartz,  The World of Thought in Ancient  
China (Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1985), 234.
17
  Roger T. Ames, “Wu­wei  in ‘The Art of Rulership’ Chapter of  Huai Nan Tzu: Its Sources and Philosophical 
Orientation,” Philosophy East & West 31, no. 2 (April 1981): 196.
18
  Zhu, “Wu­Wei,” 57.0 Cf. Changchi Hao, “Wu­wei and the Decentering of the Subject in Lao­Zhuang: An Alterna
tive Approach in the Philosophy of Religion,” International Philosophical Quarterly 46, no. 4 (December 2006): 445­457.
19
 Graham, Introduction to Chuang­tzŭ: The Inner Chapters, by Zhuangzi (London: George Allen & Unwin, 1981; 
Unwin Paperbacks, 1986), 6; Liu, “Wuwei  (Non­Action),” 48­49. Cf. Hans­Georg Moeller,  Philosophy of the  Daodejing. 
(New York: Columbia University Press, 2006), 87­97.These themes, thru Zhuangzi’s paradoxes and strange tales, gained 
Zhuangzi the reputation, the “great anti­rationalist who derides the claims of reason and offers only knacks and skills of a 
distinctly non­intellectual kind.”
Also, Zhuangzi uses wuwei as a general term to express these relative metaphors: “being at ease,” “wandering” or 
“playing,” “following” or “leaning upon,” and “riding upon.” J.J. Clarke,  Tao of the West: Western Transformations of 
Taoist Thought (London: Routledge, 2000), 166; Slingerland, “Self in the Zhuangzi,” 334.
20
  In   this   essay,   the   “Schools   of   Zhuangzi”   chapters   in   the  Zhuangzi  are   taken   entirely   as   Zhuangzi’s.   This, 
however,  is  not  the true  case  since  the “Outer”  and the “Miscellaneous”  Chapters,  though syncretic,  were  written by 
Zhuangzi’s   later   followers.   Yet,   this   approach   may   still   be   considered   valid   in   studying   Zhuangzi’s   philosophy.   Liu, 
“Wuwei  (Non­Action),” 45. See also Edward Slingerland, “Effortless  Action: The Chinese Spiritual Ideal  of Wu­wei,” 
Journal of the American Academy of Religion 68, no. 2 (June 2000): 308.
21
  Graham,  Chuang­tzŭ, 136. See also Victor H. Mair, trans.,  Wandering on the Way: Early Taoist Tales and  
Parables of Chuang Tzu (New York: Bantam, 1994), 182.
22
 Benjamin Hoff, The Tao of Pooh (London: Methuen London, 1982; Egmont, 1998), 69.
23
 Hoff, Tao of Pooh, 69, 76. Cf. Dy, “Zhuang Zi’s Perfect Joy.”
24
  Alan Fox, “Reflex and Reflectivity:  Wuwei  in the  Zhuangzi,”  Asian Philosophy  6, no. 1 (March  1996): 62; 
Benjamin Hoff, The Te of Piglet (London: Methuen London, 1992; Egmont, 1998), 178.
25
 Graham,  Chuang­tzŭ, 63­64. Stories about the bellstand maker, the ferryman, the hunchback catching cicadas, 
and the skilled carpenter, as many scholars explain, also resonate wuwei. See Graham, Chuang­tzŭ, 133­140.
26
 Fox, “Wuwei in the Zhuangzi,” 61. “This means that the sage is able to immediately establish a ‘grip’ on every 
situation she encounters. … [I]n other words, [there’s] alertness and readiness­to­respond that attunes the sage to both the 
practically and morally salient features of encountered situations.” Joel W. Krueger “‘Doing Without Trying’: Taoism, 
Cognitive Science, and Embodied Cognition” (paper presented at the 2005 Eastern Division Meeting of the American 
Philosophical Association, New York City, New York, 27­30 December 2005).
27
  Alan Fox, “Wuwei  in Early Philosophical Daoism” (paper presented to the International Society for Chinese 
Philosophy (ISCP) at the 1995 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, 28 December 1995). 
Cf. Chenyang Li, “Zhuang Zi and Aristotle on What A Thing Is,” in Comparative Approaches To Chinese Philosophy, ed. 
Bo Mou (Aldershot, United Kingdom: Ashgate, 2003), 265.
It is no wonder that after examining the story scholars emphasize what Lord Wen­hui have learned – he learned 
“not just a lesson on butchering, but a lesson on life,” the lesson of wuwei. Cf. Fox, “Zhuangzi (Chuang­tzu),” 99­103.
28
  A.C.   Graham,  Disputers   of   the   Tao  (Illinois:   Open   Court,   1989),   186   quoted   in   Fox,   “Wuwei  in   Early 
Philosophical Daoism.” These skilled men are able to adjust effortlessly and move easily, according to Bryan Van Norden, 
because they have reached the state of “no­mind and no­emotion,” the level or disposition of  wuwei  we have elucidated 
here. By emptying their minds and hearts (wuxin  ww), i.e., by relinquishing individual intentions and preconceptions, they 
have become “more open and responsive” to the situations they are confronted with. Bryan Van Norden, review of Hiding 
the World in the World: Uneven Discourses on the Zhuangzi, edited by Scott B. Cook, China Review International 12, no. 1 
(Spring 2005): 1­14.
29
  Christopher J. Fraser, “Wu­wei, the Background and Intentionality”  (revised version of a paper presented at 
“Searle’s Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement,” 2nd  International Society of Comparative Studies 
of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) International Conference, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, 
14­15 June 2005). Cf. Hansen, “Zhuangzi,” in Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy, 917­918.
30
 Fox, “Wuwei in the Zhuangzi,” 64.
31
 This, for Joel Krueger, is the “deep [uncalculated and uncalculative] bodily and perceptual attunement [emphasis 
added].” For him, to explain what he means by wuwei  as well, the principle (on a practical level) refers to “spontaneous 
action or ‘skill­knowledge’: an embodied and engaged form of activity consisting of bodily practices that restructure one[’s] 
perceptions and creative responses.” Krueger, “‘Doing Without Trying’.” See also Roger T. Ames, “The Zhuangzi and the 
Philosophy of Daoism,” Calliope: Exploring World History 11, no. 2  (October 2000): 15.
32
  Fox, “Wuwei  in the  Zhuangzi,” 65­68. Slingerland discusses this as the quality of a tenuous or adaptive self 
“capable of listening to things and responding appropriately.” Slingerland, “Effortless Action: Wu­wei as a Spiritual Ideal in 
Early China,” 291.
33
 Krueger, “‘Doing Without Trying’.”
34
 Graham, Chuang­tzŭ, 92.
35
 One must see that this tale of awakening also illustrates the other aspects of Zhuangzian  wuwei: it tells of the 
dropping or dismissal of everything and desertion of know­how (wuzhi     ) to reach the state of no­mind and no­emotion, and 
no­self.
36
 Slingerland, “Self in the Zhuangzi,” 334.
37
 Graham, Chuang­tzŭ, 159.
38
 Hoff, Te of Piglet, 149­150.
39
 Anthony de Mello, The Song of the Bird (New York: Doubleday, 1984), 163.
40
 Lin Yutang, The Wisdom of Laotse (New York: Modern Library, 1948), 229­230.
41
 Hoff, Te of Piglet, 148.
42
 Paul Tan Chee Ing, “The Principle of ‘Acting By Not Acting,’ Wei Wu Wei, in the Tao Te Ching,” International  
Philosophical Quarterly 11 (September 1971): 367.
43
 Hoff, Te of Piglet, 181.
44
 Hoff, Tao of Pooh, 118­119.
45
 After all, nature is “the ultimate paradigm for wuwei behavior.” Philip J. Ivanhoe, “Paradox of Wuwei?,” Journal 
of Chinese Philosophy  33, no. 2 (June 2007): 284; Slingerland, “Effortless Action: Wu­wei as a Spiritual Ideal in Early 
China,” 155.
46
 Laurence Boldt, The Tao of Abundance (New York: Arkana, 1999), 87.
47
 Tom Te­Wu Ma, Chinese Fables & Wisdom: Insights for Better Living (New York: Barricade, 1997), 37­38.
48
 Roger T. Ames, “Zhuangzi,” in Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ed. Edward Craig (London: Routledge, 
1998) [article online]; available from http://www.rep.routledge.com/article/G006SECT6; 26 May 2007.
49
 Cf. Florentino Timbreza, Introduction to Ang Tao Te Ching ni Lao Tzu sa Pilipino, by Laozi (Manila: De La 
Salle University Press, 1999), 36.
50
 “The Scorpion and the Turtle” [article online]; available from http://home.planet.nl/~omar/ scorpio_story.htm; 1 
August 2005.
51
  I am grateful to Professors Joel Krueger, Liu Xiaogan, Changchi Hao, Chenyang Li, James D. Sellman, and 
Hans­Georg Moeller for sharing their works (the ones used in this project) with me.