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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Lesson Plan – 7-10 Science

Topic area: Stage of Learner: 4 (Year 7) Syllabus Pages: 114


Chemical World CW1- States of
matter
Observations & Inferences
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 1 /3

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students: 20Printing/preparation


Print 22 copies the first two pages of the
worksheet 1.
Check the you tube link is
Working.
Pack the mystery bags (5) for
Activity 2 and print observation
Worksheets (22copies)
Outcomes: describes the observed properties and behaviour of matter, using scientific models and
theories about the motion and arrangement of particles SC4-16CW

Related Life Skills outcomes: Recognises the properties of common substances SCLS-22CW
Explores how common chemicals affect everyday life SCLS-23CW

Content statement/s: CW1 The properties of the different states of matter can be explained in terms of the
motion and arrangement of particles.
Students:
a. describe the behaviour of matter in terms of particles that are continuously moving and interacting
WS4 Students question and predict by:
b. making predictions based on scientific knowledge and their own observations
WS6 Students conduct investigations by:
a. collaboratively and individually conducting a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and
experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed
WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by:
c. using scientific understanding to identify relationships and draw conclusions based on students'
data or secondary sources
Cross-curriculum priorities: Nil

General capabilities: literacy, ICT capabilities, personal and social capabilities, critical and
creative thinking

Assessment: formative assessments through questioning, discussions, worksheets and observations,


and exit slips
Lesson overview: the lesson is divided into two parts. First part students will be learning the basic
concepts of matter and in the second part, they will learn on how to make observations and inferences.
The lesson will build on their prior knowledge on components of matter and different states of matter.
Next focus of the lesson is to develop scientific skills of observing and making inferences.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Time Teaching Learning Assessment


Introduction Give a lesson overview and the lesson
(5min) objectives.

Brainstorming activity:
What is matter? Students to Informal
What are the properties of matter? actively assessment of
Where can you see matter? participate in students’ prior
Do you know the components of matter? the knowledge
Questions can be extended to atoms and discussion.
molecules.

Teacher to ask questions to those are not


involving in the discussion:

What do you think…? Any ideas…?

Activity 1: Play the video Students to Assessment


video & https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wclY8F- watch the for student
worksheet UoTE video and understanding
complete the of the
(10 min) Distribute the worksheet and ask students to worksheet. concepts
Explicit answer the questions.
teaching There is also
Teacher to discuss the major concepts in the a reading in
video and the worksheet. A spider diagram is the
drawn on the board together with student worksheet if
contribution, to incorporate the summary of the they need to
video. clarify
anything they
missed in the
video.
Group Students form group of 4 based on the group
allocation allocation strategy detailed at the end of the
(2 min) lesson plan.
Each table will be given one mystery bag.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Engage activity Display a picture on the projector and ask Students to Assessment of
(8min) students to make maximum number of write down prior
observations (write it down in their and share the knowledge.
workbooks/notebooks) and then derive an observations
inference from it. and
inference.
Share the observations and inferences and give
them a basic idea that observations are what we
see/smell/touch/hear and inference is an
informed guess, and that sometimes the
inference may not be the reality. In this case,
explain that they are not wrong, whereas, the
inference can be an incorrect conclusion based
on available evidence.

Mystery bag Students are to make observations using their Students see, Assessment of
activity (20 senses, but without opening the bags. I use touch and understanding
min) opaque strong paper bags. even shake the concepts
Explore phase the bags to of
Students are to rotate from one table to the make observations
next when prompted by the teacher and observations. and
complete the observation column of the The inferences.
worksheet. They will have 2min each for one worksheet
bag (10 min in total for observation of 5 bags). will be
completed
After observations, they will use rest of the time for
to write inferences. observations
and
inferences at
this point.
Discovering Collect the bags back and then start the extend Students to Re-enforce the
the mystery activity to make some guesses and then finding fill up the relation
(10 min) out the actual thing in the bag. rest of the between
Explain & worksheet observation-
extend inference-
reality

Conclusion 5 Lesson summation Students to Assessment


min Ask students to complete the exit slips in their fill the exit for
(evaluate) google classroom slips understanding
Links to next lesson: we will be looking at states if the main
of matter and how it is affected by heat. concepts
discussed.

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Inclusion and differentiation

Students with disabilities: students with reading or learning disabilities will be closely monitored
and group allocation practises in the class will be done based on help being available to those who
need it. Students with visual impairment will be given worksheets with larger font size and all the
activities will be clearly explained more times if they need. More attention can be given to these
students as the activity in lesson is simple and of minimal risk.

Higher order thinkers: students can move on to writing a scientific report including an aim/inquiry
question, materials required, methods, observations, inferences and conclusion (template can be
distributed). This will also link to their learning in the following lessons, where they design an
experiment. There are also online quizzes available for students which they can try.

Group allocation:

Students will have numbers at the back of their seats (1,2,3,4). Each group will be formed of all the
4 numbers. The roles associated with each number will be given to them before they start the
experiment. Here there are no specific roles assigned, the group makes observations and
inferences.

Reflection
What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?

Basic concepts that are already introduced still need a recap and an explicit teaching strategy to
lay the foundations strong. Developing scientific skills and concepts are essential to further learn
and develop their content knowledge. Hence it is essential to incorporate basic scientific skills in
lessons before they explore the concepts in the topic. As the first lesson of chemical world module
in stage 4, it is important to refresh the basic scientific skills for the class. In order to achieve this,
the lesson was based on simple activities to incorporate scientific investigation.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording


Basic concepts of Matter Guided discussion and worksheet
Understanding of Hands on activity, worksheet and discussions
observations and inference

Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating
and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the standard.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards
2.1, 2.2 The syllabus contents are deeply aligned with lesson activities along with
working scientifically skills.
2.3 The lesson plan was aligned with the curriculum and syllabus
2.4 Literacy has been given a major focus in the lesson through worksheets,
concept maps, key words, scientific reporting etcetera.
5.1, 5.2, 5.3 Formal and informal assessments through out the lesson

WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the key
WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?
The activity in the lesson have minimal risks associated. Safety guidelines are given
and managed through clear instructions and time keeping while students move from
one table to the other.

References (In APA)

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d.). Curriculum. Retrieved from
http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. (2011). Australian Professional Standards for
Teachers. Retrieved from https://www.aitsl.edu.au/teach/standards
Zimmerman, A. (2014, January 8). Mystery bags to develop observation and inference skills. Retrieved from
https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/alycia-zimmerman/mystery-bags-develop-
observation-and-inference-skills/
New South Wales. Board of Studies (201). Science K-10 syllabus (incorporating Science and Technology K-
6) : NSW syllabus for the Australian curriculum. Retrieved from
syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/assets/sciencek10/downloads/sciencek10_full.pdf

Resources:
Worksheet for Activity 1

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Pictures to display in engage activity:

Mystery bags activity:

Reference: Zimmerman, A. (2014, January 8). Mystery bags to develop observation and inference skills.
Retrieved from https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/alycia-zimmerman/mystery-bags-develop-
observation-and-inference-skills/

Materials required:

Opaque paper bags x 5

Stapler to seal bags X 1

Different things to fill the bags such as paper clips, marshmallows, beads, coins, paint brushes.
Worksheet for students

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Worksheet 2: Observations and Inferences


Bag # Observations Inference Actual item in
(Informed guess) the bag

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Extension activities for higher order thinkers:


Link to online quiz: https://www.proprofs.com/quiz-
school/quizshow.php?title=observations-inferences&q=1

Scientific report:

Inquiry question/ Aim:

Hypothesis (if any):

Materials required:

Observation table: (you can copy your worksheet table here)

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Inferences:

Conclusion:

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Exit slip question:

Reference: https://betterlesson.com/lesson/resource/3214167/observation-and-
inference-quiz

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Lesson Plan – 7-10 Science

Topic area: Chemical World CW1- Stage of Learner: 4 (Year 7) Syllabus Pages: 114
States of Matter
Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 2 /3

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students: 20 Printing/preparation


Print out the worksheets for
Engage activity and the
experiment. Write down class
agenda on one side of the board.

Outcomes: describes the observed properties and behaviour of matter, using scientific models and
theories about the motion and arrangement of particles SC4-16CW

Related Life Skills outcomes: Recognises the properties of common substances SCLS-22CW
Explores how common chemicals affect everyday life SCLS-23CW

Content statement/s: CW1 The properties of the different states of matter can be explained in terms of the
motion and arrangement of particles.
Students:
a. describe the behaviour of matter in terms of particles that are continuously moving and interacting
b. relate an increase or decrease in the amount of heat energy possessed by particles to changes in
particle movement
c. use a simple particle model to predict the effect of adding or removing heat on different states of
matter
WS4 Students question and predict by:
d. making predictions based on scientific knowledge and their own observations
WS5.2 Students plan first-hand investigations by:
a. collaboratively and individually planning a range of investigation types, including fieldwork, experiments,
surveys and research
WS6 Students conduct investigations by:
b. collaboratively and individually conducting a range of investigation types, including fieldwork and
experiments, ensuring safety and ethical guidelines are followed
WS7.2 Students analyse data and information by:
e. using scientific understanding to identify relationships and draw conclusions based on students'
data or secondary sources
WS9 Students communicate by:
a. presenting ideas, findings and solutions to problems using scientific language and representations using digita
technologies as appropriate

Cross-curriculum priorities: Nil

General capabilities: literacy, ICT capabilities, personal and social capabilities, critical and

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creative thinking
Assessment: formative assessments are done throughout the lesson through discussions, questioning,
experiment observations and inferences. The evaluate phase of the lesson provides an assessment of
the students’ understanding on the lessons concepts as well as scientific methods.

Lesson overview: The lesson focus on the concepts of states of matter, specifically on the changes on
the states of matter. The lesson uses the 5E ways to establish the concept. The take away message is
that all substances are made up of matter and matter exists in different states. These phases of matter
can be affected by heat.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Time Teaching Learning Assessment


Introduction Settling down.
(2min) The lesson title/topic and a general
lesson agenda with timings will be
displayed on the board.

Engage Establish and connect with prior Formative


(15min) knowledge: assessment of
Teacher led discussion prior knowledge
To get students thinking about how
this topic relates to their interests
and lives as the questions:

Can you distinguish the things that Students answers


you see in the room to solids, liquids the questions and
and gases? contribute to the
concept map.
How do you use solids, liquids and
gases in your everyday life?

What do you think happens when


you eat your meals? What physical
changes occurs to the food?

Concept Map
Tell the students that they are
learning about Matter and ask them
What are some words related to
matter?

List students’ responses on the


board and together construct a
concept map linking different words
to Matter in the centre. Students are to
complete the
Worksheet 1: ask students to worksheet in 2
complete batches

Explore Matters on the move experiment: Students are to Students are


20 min Students will be doing the join the groups assessed on their
experiment in a group of 3-4 (2 they are allocated understanding of
groups may have 4 members if the and do the the concepts and
class strength remains 20 on the experiment in 2 also on
day). whole batches. distinguishing on
The whole class will be doing the observations and
experiment in batches. While first The first 10 inferences( which
half will be completing their starting from the was already dealt

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

worksheet 1, the next group will be first row/table to in lesson 1)


guided to different stations in stay back while
groups of 3-4 to perform the the rest do the
experiment. Clear instructions will experiment.
be given on the procedure and
safety, both orally and on
worksheet.

Once the first batch have collected


their equipment and started, the
second batch will be taken for the
experiment.

Students come back and work on


Worksheet 2 on observations and
inferences. First batch can later
move on to worksheet 1 when they
finish worksheet 2.

Teacher walks around the classroom


guiding the experiment and helping
the students at different levels of
work

Explain & Extend Together with class draw the main Students to Assessment of
10 min concepts involved in the experiment, actively the concepts
through discussing the questions on participate in the involved in the
the worksheet. discussions. experiment and
Students may be further
Teacher performs a demonstration picked to give establishing
to show that heating also affects their ideas in through a
gases. between. demonstration.

Further discuss questions 3,4 and 5 Students to form


on the worksheet 2. a circle around
the teacher’s
table to see the
demonstration.
Evaluate Teacher ask the questions: Students to A formative
8 min Does heat affect solids? actively assessment on
contribute to the the scientific
Can you give an example? discussion methodology
based on critical
How can you demonstrate this to and creative
your class through an experiment? thinking.
Students can
Ask students to design a basic work in their
experiment to show the effect of groups to design

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

heat on solids and upload their an experiment.


experiment design to google They can
classroom. complete it at
Students should be given the home if they
instruction that they have to give a need more time.
name to the experiment and briefly However, it
explain on their plan to conduct the should be
experiment (4-5 sentences) uploaded before
9 am the
following day.
Conclusion 5 min Lesson summation:
A quick recap of the major concepts
learned- All substances are made up
of matter. Three states of matter.
Heat affects these states matter.

For next lesson: we will be looking at


processes involving changes in states
of matter.

Inclusion and differentiation:

Students with difficulties: students with visual difficulties will be given worksheets with writings of
larger fonts. There are pictures already included in worksheet to understand the major concepts.
The experiment procedures will be read out for them by a group member/teacher. It will be made
sure that students have enough time to do things.
Any students with reading or understanding difficulties will be closely monitored and given extra
instructions for the experiment.

Higher order thinkers: There are extended questions in the textbook which they can try. The
‘evaluate’ activity gives them a good opportunity to further expand on their scientific skills for
designing an experiment. The experiment suggested in question number 5 in worksheet 2 can also
be done if the students are interested.

Group Allocation:

Students will have a number at the back of their seats (1,2,3,4). 1-team leader, 2-technician, 3-
Materials manager, and 4- Recorder. Team leader reads the directions of the investigation and
collaborate ideas of doing the tasks. Materials manager collects the required materials for the
experiment. Technician sets the investigation. Recorder records the observations on the
worksheets. This is the usual group allocation strategy which can be modified for the needs of
each experiment. I may ask the team leader and technician to do the experiment together in this
case. If there are only three people, the person at number 3 will act as materials manager and
recorder. This is followed through out all the lessons.

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Reflection
What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this lesson?
Every lesson in science can be taught in an inquiry based learning environment. It all needs
proper planning and sequencing of lessons. Students should be given explicit knowledge in both
concepts and skills, which is most of the time the actual challenge. I felt many a times assuming
students to have some basic knowledge and had to re structure each lesson numerous times so
that I don’t keep gaps in the content and skills.

How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording


Understand the concepts of The teacher led discussions and concept map is the first
matter, solids, liquids and step to establish the prior knowledge. Worksheet 1 gives
gases more defined descriptions on the concepts.
relate an increase or decrease The experiment and observation worksheet help students
in the amount of heat energy to critically think and understand the concept. Further,
possessed by particles to teacher demonstration and guided discussion helps them
changes in particle movement develop deeper knowledge.

use a simple particle model to The experiment, demonstration, ‘Evalute’ activity and
predict the effect of adding or question number 5 in worksheet 2 is establishing this
removing heat on different concept. This understanding will be established through
states of matter guided discussions.

Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are demonstrating
and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with the standard.

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards
2.1, 2.2 The syllabus contents are deeply aligned with lesson activities along with
working scientifically skills.
2.3 The lesson plan was aligned with the curriculum and syllabus
2.4 Literacy has been given a major focus in the lesson through worksheets,
concept maps, key words, scientific reporting etcetera.
4.4 Student safety was ensured for the lab experiment
5.1, 5.2, 5.3 Formal and informal assessments through out the lesson

WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated in this
lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS policy- Outline the key
WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?
The experiment has minimal risk associated. Safety precautions are clearly identified
before the experiment for both batches and is also listed out in the worksheet.
Group allocation and management is done by the teacher strictly to avoid chaos.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

References (In APA)

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d.). Curriculum. Retrieved from
http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. (2011). Australian Professional Standards
for Teachers. Retrieved from https://www.aitsl.edu.au/teach/standards
Kessler, J.H., & Galvan, P.M. (2007). American Chemical Society- Inquiry in action- investigating
matter through inquiry third edition. Retrieved from
www.inquiryinaction.org/pdf/InquiryinAction.pdf
New South Wales. Board of Studies (201). Science K-10 syllabus (incorporating Science and
Technology K-6) : NSW syllabus for the Australian curriculum. Retrieved from
syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/assets/sciencek10/downloads/sciencek10_full.pdf
Rickard, G., Burger, N., Clarke, W., Geelan, D., Loveday, D., Monckton, S.,…Whalley, K. (Ed.) (n.d).
Solids, liquids and gases. In Science Focus 1(pp. 34-40).
Resources:
Class Agenda:
Activity to connect to prior knowledge (engage)- 15 min
Hands on activity (explore)- 20 min
Discussion and teacher demonstration (explain & extend)- 10 min
Activity to deeper understanding and assessment (Evaluate)- 8 min
Lesson summation and links to next lesson- 5 min

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Worksheet 1. States of Matter

Reference: Rickard, G., Burger, N., Clarke, W., Geelan, D., Loveday, D., Monckton, S.,…Whalley, K.
(Ed.) (n.d). Solids, liquids and gases. In Science Focus 1(pp. 34-36).

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1. Describe matter in your own words (1-2 sentences).

2. List three types of models used in science

3. Compare the properties of solids, liquids and gases to complete the table below

(Refer Science Focus 1 pages 35-37 for any missing information to complete the questions.)

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Name: ______________________________

Worksheet 2: Matter on the move


Inquiry question: Does heating have an effect on matter?

Materials required for each group:


Hot tap water
Cold water
Blue food colour
Yellow food colour
2 droppers
2 tall clear plastic cups

Method:
1. Collect the required materials from the materials table.
2. Label the two cups as hot water and cold water using markers. You just keep two sheets of
paper labels underneath the cups.
3. Fill hot and cold water in the labelled cups. Water needs to be filled half way of the cups.
4. 2 students from each group are to perform the following steps simultaneously and the rest of
the group can write down the observations.
5. 2 students should add 2 different food colours to the cups holding hot and cold water. This
should be done at the same time. The observer can make a count down to drop the colour.
6. Clean up your workstation.
7. Fill out the questions on your individual worksheets.
Safety:
1. Wear your safety glasses and gloves.
2. Be careful when you fill hot water from the tap.
3. Avoid spillage.
4. Be careful while filling and squeezing your dropper with food colour.
5. Report if something goes wrong.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

1. In the experiment, you saw food colour move in hot and cold water. What difference did you
notice in the way the colour moved and mixed in the two cups.

2. Adding heat energy makes water molecules move faster. Use this fact to explain your
observations.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________

3. In the second demonstration, you saw your teacher put a bottle with an upside down lid into hot
water. Describe what happened.
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________

4. Adding heat energy makes the gas molecules in air move faster. Use this fact to explain your
observations.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

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Try this!
5. Assume that you are doing an activity like the one your teacher did with the bottle. But instead of
using a lid, you will place a film of bubble solution over the opening of the bottle. What do you
think will happen to this film of bubble solution when you place the bottle in hot water?
_____________________________________________________________________

What makes you think that?


_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

6.Draw a line from each bottle to the picture of particles that shows how fast they are moving.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Reference for teacher demonstration


Procedure
1. Add hot tap water to a wide cup until it is about 1/3 full. Make sure students realize you are
using hot water.
2. Use your finger and a little water to moisten the rim of the bottle and the top surface of the
lid. Then, place the lid upside down on the bottle so that there are no leaks.
3. Carefully push the bottle down into the hot water.
Expected results: The lid rises and falls making a tapping sound.
Note: If you would like to show the demonstration again, you can uncover the opening and let
some more air in. Then repeat Steps 2 and 3. If the lid does not tap, check to see that the lid
is positioned directly over the opening of the bottle forming a seal.

Reference for worksheet 2 and teacher demonstration: Kessler, J.H., & Galvan, P.M. (2007).
American Chemical Society- Inquiry in action- investigating matter through inquiry third
edition. Retrieved from www.inquiryinaction.org/pdf/InquiryinAction.pdf

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Lesson Plan – 7-10 Science

Topic area: Chemical World CW1- Stage of Learner: 4 (Year 7) Syllabus Pages: 114-115
States of matter- evaporation

Date: Location Booked: Lesson Number: 3 /3

Time: 60 minutes Total Number of students Printing/preparation

Outcomes: Explains how scientific understanding of, and discoveries about, the properties of elements,
compounds and mixtures relate to their uses in everyday life SC4-17CW

Related Life Skills outcomes: Recognises the properties of common substances SCLS-22CW
Explores how common chemicals affect everyday life SCLS-23CW

Content statement/s: CW3 (b) describe aqueous mixtures in terms of solute, solvent and solution

Cross-curriculum priorities: Nil

General capabilities: literacy, ICT capabilities, personal and social capabilities, critical and
creative thinking

Assessment: informal assessment through discussions, quiz and experiment observations

Lesson overview: the lesson introduces the different phase changes in matter and the process
Involved such as melting, freezing, evaporation, condensation and sublimation. Melting point, freezing
point and boiling point are defined. Students explore the question does heating increases the rate of
evaporation, through designing an experiment themselves and conducting it. They will also perform an
another experiment with explicit guidance to observe the results.

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Time Teaching Learning Assessment


Introduction Give a lesson overview and the lesson
(5min) agenda.

Start the lesson by linking to what they have


already learned.

Ask the questions Students to Assessment of


What are the 3 states of matter? give answers. prior
What the difference between observation knowledge.
and inference?
Does heat affect states of matter? How?

The main ideas are noted on the side of the


board (a student volunteer can be called to
write this down)

Explicit The inquiry question is does matter change Students to Assessment of


teaching & its states? contribute their
engage activity their ideas background
(10min) Justify your answer with an example. knowledge.

The common answer would be ice-water-


vapour
Power point presentation: Students to
Teacher to build on that to explain the take down
process involved in during these changes: notes.
melting, freezing, evaporation, condensation
and sublimation.
Reference: science focus 1 pp- 45,46,47

Engage activity Ask the question: Assessment of


Does adding heat to water increase the rate their
of evaporation? understanding
of the concepts
If you forget your towel when you go taught before
swimming, you can dry off by just standing
around. How does that happen?

Confirm that students have understood the


concept of evaporation and vaporisation.
Establish the idea that water changes to gas,
the water vapor, and this is a common
invisible gas in the air.

Explore Students form groups of 4 (group allocation Students to


activity is mostly fixed in the same pattern, however follow the

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(40 min) students do not have a fixed seat and so their instructions
role changes as they change their seats) carefully and
ask questions
Distribute the worksheet for explore activity. if they have
Ask students to think about an experiment any.
10 min for that can be done in the class to investigate
designing the whether heating increases evaporation. They
experiment. can use the worksheet and provided
materials as a guide.

Listen to group’s plans. Guide them through


corrections and ideas.
Safety should
 Remind them that they need 2 be of prime
samples of water concern if
 Are you putting the water in using Bunsen
beakers/containers? burners.
 Students should realise that they
need to heat one of them.
 Remind them that they must start
with same amount of water, same
temperature and same type of
containers.
 Suggest them to take small amounts
30 min to do of water to see quick results.
two Experiment:
investigations Groups to approve their design from the
(student teacher.
designed
experiment (1) The teacher to show a quick demonstration
& experiment of the experiment 2 from making water bags
2- procedure to placing the paper towels on the water
given) bags.

Instructions given to students for conducting Students


2 investigations simultaneously. should
carefully
2 students from each group can set up their watch the
own experiment, while the other 2 can start demonstration
the preparations (collect materials and make
water bags). Then the group comes together
and do the second experiment (procedure
given in the worksheet). They can conduct
this experiment while they wait for the
results from their own experiment. Students to
take charge of
Don’t forget to note the time when you their roles in
the groups to

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

started the first experiment (student get the tasks


designed experiment) and follow up on the done in the
status. Take responsibility. It is your given time
experiment. frame.
Follow the procedure for second experiment
carefully- read the instructions on the
worksheet. Record the time taken for the
water droplets to disappear.

Explain & Discuss the student designed experiment Students to Assessment of


Extend with the whole class and ask them to share write down understanding
(10 min) their inferences: the strengths and level of
Does the temperature of the water influence and skills
rate of evaporation? weaknesses of
Can you explain the inference using the their design
movement of molecules? and suggest
one
improvement
Discuss the design of experiment 2 and the they would
results. make if given a
Ask questions such as the following: second chance
● How did you confirm which sample to conduct it.
evaporated fast? (this notes to
● Why do you think you used the same be uploaded to
amount of water on each paper towel? google
● What is the purpose of the bag of room- classroom
temperature water in this experiment? along with
their
Students should recognise that they used experimental
stop watch to calculate the time took for design within
each droplet to disappear. 24 hours)
Since the investigation is on the difference of
rates of evaporation, all conditions should be
same other than the temperature.

Conclusion 5 Lesson summation Students to Assessment for


min Kahoot quiz to wind up login using the 3 lessons.
https://create.kahoot.it/share/states-of- their full name
matter-ibl-wind-up/2deab139-f152-44a4- and complete
a74c-0e2db4990668 the quiz.

Inclusion and differentiation:

Special accommodations for students with difficulties will be considered. Larger


fonts will be used in worksheets. Power points are designed with this consideration.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Some explicit teaching is done within the lesson to help students in all levels of
understanding and difficulties to learn. Teacher will provide additional support to
students who need this.
The lesson is paced at a higher level for easy accommodation of higher order
thinkers. This lesson is a challenging opportunity for other students to learn, through
group work and many ideas.
Reflection
What have I learned about the teaching and learning process when preparing this
lesson?

Students need good guidance while they learn the basic concept and the scientific
skills. It is essential to incorporate explicit learning time within the some lessons to
confirm that students do not have any misconceptions on the major processes and
scientific terms.
How am I measuring the outcomes of this lesson?

Learning Outcome Method of measurement and recording


Understand the major Quiz at the end of the powerpoint presentation and the
processes in states of matter kahoot
and the scientific terms used
Understand the relationship Experiment observation and inference
between heat energy and
evaporation
Design an experiment that The explore activity assess these components and evaluate
can be conducted in a the efficacy of the experiment. The extend activity helps
classroom/school lab them to re design for improvement.

Other considerations

Complete the table blow by inserting the AISTL graduate standards that you are
demonstrating and indicates the evidence from this lesson that should comply with
the standard.

Graduate Evidence within this lesson


Standards
2.1, 2.2 The syllabus contents are deeply aligned with lesson activities along with
working scientifically skills.
2.3 The lesson plan was aligned with the curriculum and syllabus
2.4 Literacy has been given a major focus in the lesson through worksheets,
concept maps, key words, scientific reporting etcetera.
4.4 Student safety was ensured for the lab experiment
5.1, 5.2, 5.3 Formal and informal assessments through-out the lesson

WHS
What are the key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced/eliminated
in this lesson? Using your syllabus and support documents as well as other WHS
policy- Outline the key WHS considerations that are to be applied in this lesson?

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Since students are designing an experiment and conducting that in the labs, safety
precautions are discussed with each group and designs are approved before they
start. Class is also given lab safety rules will before the start of the module during
their lab orientation. Experiment 2, where the procedure is given, there is minimal
risk involved. However, care will be taken to avoid spillage and cautious handling of
hot water.

References (In APA)

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (n.d.). Curriculum.


Retrieved from http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum
Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. (2011). Australian
Professional Standards for Teachers. Retrieved from
https://www.aitsl.edu.au/teach/standards
Kessler, J.H., & Galvan, P.M. (2007). American Chemical Society- Inquiry in action-
investigating matter through inquiry third edition. Retrieved from
www.inquiryinaction.org/pdf/InquiryinAction.pdf
New South Wales. Board of Studies (201). Science K-10 syllabus (incorporating
Science and Technology K-6) : NSW syllabus for the Australian curriculum.
Retrieved from
syllabus.nesa.nsw.edu.au/assets/sciencek10/downloads/sciencek10_full.pdf
Rickard, G., Burger, N., Clarke, W., Geelan, D., Loveday, D., Monckton, S.,…Whalley,
K. (Ed.) (n.d). Solids, liquids and gases. In Science Focus 1(pp. 34-40).

Resources for the lesson:


Power point presentation:

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Worksheet for Explore Activity:

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Experiment 1: student design

Materials provided:
Beakers, water, test tubes, china dishes, hot bags, paper towels, cloth, droppers,
bunsen burners, lighters
(students to choose items from the list and then desin the experiment.

Experiment 2: Does adding heat to water increase the rate of evaporation

Materials required

Hot water
Room temperature water
2 x zip lock bags
2 X droppers
2 X brown paper towels

Method:

1. Add about 1 cup of room-temperature water to a zip lock plastic bag. Get as
much air out as possible and seal the bag securely. Lay the bag down flat.
2. Add about 1 cup of hot tap water to a zip-lock plastic bag. Get as much air out
as possible and seal the bag securely. Lay the bag down flat. This bag will
serve as a heat source.
3. You and your partner should each use a dropper to place 1 drop of room-
temperature water in the centre of 2 separate pieces of brown paper towel
at the same time. Allow the drops to spread for about 10–20 seconds until
they don’t seem to be spreading any more.
4. At the same time, place 1 paper towel on each bag.
5. Observe every few minutes. Compare the amount of water on each paper
towel.
6. Answer the following questions

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

Inquiry based learning


Through these years of significant changes in education, the meaning of
knowing things changed from being able to memorise and repeat to find out things
and use it for real purpose (National Research council, as cited in Lutheran Education
Queensland, n.d.). Inquiry based learning (IBL) is a constructivist approach of
teaching and learning where the teacher sets the parameters of classroom inquiry
and guidance, through students make the meaning of an internally motivated inquiry
(Lutheran Education Queensland, n.d.). Inquiry in science education can be
considered as a way of learning/undertaking science practices to understand
scientific concepts and the nature of science. Hence it incorporates pedagogy and
learning outcome (Brown, 2017). This critique analyses the benefits as well as
limitations of IBL in science education and outlines the major implications of IBL with
regard to student achievement and engagement in science classrooms.
Inquiry based learning in science enables students to learn about a topic
through self- directed investigations (Lazonder & Harmsen, 2016). This is the major
benefits of IBL; that it promotes autonomous learning. Moreover, students conduct
investigations by “acting like a scientist” and hence learn the scientific process
involved in investigations (Achieve, as cited in Lazonder & Harmsen, 2016). IBL has
proved to stimulate students’ motivation, their application of research skills, finding
the meaning and acquiring scientific knowledge (Alake-Tuenter, et al., 2012) (Suduc,
Bizoi, & Gorghiu, 2014). Inquiry learning uses skills through exploring, questioning,
predicting, discovering and testing; which enhances the problem solving and critical
thinking skills (Lemlech, 2009). IBL also helps students to evaluate their
responses/inferences and provides opportunities to clearly communicate and
support their answers with evidence (Spencer & Walker, 2011). Arnold et al., (2014)
when studying students’ ability to design an experiment found that students had
improved abilities in an IBL environment, however, scaffolding was essential for
students to achieve deeper understanding of complex concepts.
Bayram et.al. (2013), through the literature review highlights that in
traditional way of conducting lab work, students follow the step by step procedure
and often focus on completing the experiment, rather than learning the process in

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

depth. IBL proves to be more effective when compared to traditional lab work, as
they help students in comprehending scientific questions and discover answers.
Holfstein, Nahum and Shore, as cited in Bayram et al. (2013), found that student
participation was high in inquiry-based lab setting and developed an interest or
positive attitudes towards laboratories. A study undertaken in small sample also
statistically proved that IBL learning improved students’ extrinsic goal orientation,
which is regarded as a pointer of student motivation (Bayram et.al., 2013). In
addition, IBL benefits students with improved engagement and knowledge, as well as
motivation and satisfaction (Zafra-Gomez et.al., 2015).
Despite these findings, the efficacy of inquiry-based learning has been
continually challenged. Critics of IBL argue that minimally guided IBL do not provide a
systematic learning platform for students to understand the important concepts and
procedures of science (Kirschner, Sweller & Clark, as cited in Furtak et.al., 2012). The
challenges in proving IBL efficacy is further dependent on the disagreements on
what features define IBL approach (Furtak, Shavelson, Shemwell & Figueroa, 2012).
Lazonder and Harmsen (2016) points out some major critics of IBL, which argues that
IBL is only appropriate for students with formal operational reasoning (concrete
operational stage of development. IBL is also considered to be ineffective as it
ignores the limitations of a working memory. A very recent study also found that IBL
instruction was not related to improved student achievement. Moreover, only IBL
with high level guidance showed moderate positive effects (Jerrim et al., 2019).
Even though, the evidence for the efficacy of IBL have mixed results, it is
regarded as one of the best strategies of teaching and learning in science. The term
inquiry has become a central part of mission statements, general outcomes, syllabus
content (investigating science syllabus in Australian curriculum) and program
documents in many countries like the United States, Canada and Australia (Friesen &
Scott, 2013). The meta- analysis by Furtauk et al., (2012) found positive effects
between IBL and student achievement. However, it is significant to note that
teacher- led inquiry and inquiries where students draw evidence-based conclusions
were most effective. This is also evident in the study conducted by Arnold et al.
(2014), which showed that students perform well when proper scaffolding is done at
different steps. These evidence highlights the importance of teacher guidance and

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

scaffolding in IBL for higher student achievement. Hence, IBL can be made effective
in classrooms with proper planning, differentiation, scaffolding and systematic
guidance.
A recent study also analysed the student engagement in IBL science lesson
and reported that 91% percent of the student feedback pointed out that it was
highly important to participate in enjoyable science lessons, and IBL activities met
the expectations in terms of enjoyability for 80% of the students (Dumitrescu,
Olteanu, Gorghiu, & Gorghiu, 2014). Smallhorn et al. (2015) studied undergraduate
first year biology students before and after redeveloping IBL laboratories and found
that IBL endorsed higher levels of student satisfaction, engagement and significant
improvements in learning outcomes. IBl laboratories have also helped in deeper
understanding of scientific concepts, increased students’ confidence and lowered
attrition rates (Brownell et al., 2012).
In conclusion, despite the widespread acceptance of inquiry- based learning,
there are critical arguments against the effectiveness of IBL in student learning and
skill development. This can be attributed to the complexity of inquiry-based learning,
which has different approaches to teaching and learning in classrooms (unguided,
minimally guided, guided, teacher led, student driven etcetera). It is evident from
closer analysis that inquiry-based learning is highly effective and beneficial with
systematic teacher guidance at various levels, depending on the content, the
background knowledge and skills of students and investigations undertaken. From
the favouring and opposing evidence, it is important to plan, differentiate and
scaffold the lessons if IBL is to be beneficially executed.

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102088 Curriculum 1B- Science 18158263 Nimmi Ann Varghese

References

Alake-Tuenter, E., Biemans, H. J., Tobi, H., Wals, A. E., Oosterheert, I., &
Mulder, M. (2012). Inquiry-Based Science Education Competencies of
Primary School Teachers: A literature study and critical review of the
American National Science Education Standards. International Journal of
Science Education, 34(17), 2609-2640.
Arnold, J., Kremer, K., & Mayer, J. (2014). Understanding Students' Experiments—
What kind of support do they need in inquiry tasks?. International Journal of
Science Education, 36(16), 2719-2749, DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2014.930209
Bayram, Oskay, Erdem, Özgür, & Şen. (2013). Effect of Inquiry based Learning
Method on Students’ Motivation. Procedia - Social and Behavioral
Sciences, 106(C), 988-996. doi: 10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.12.112
Brown, J.c. (2017).A metasynthesis of the complementarity of culturally
responsive and inquiry-based science education in K-12 settings:
Implications for advancing equitable science teaching and learning.
Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 54(9), pp. 1143–1173.
DOI10.1002/tea.21401
Brownell, S., Kloser, M., Fukami, T., & Shavelson, R. (2012). Undergraduate
biology lab courses: Comparing the impact of traditionally based
"cookbook" and authentic research-based courses on student lab
experiences. Journal of College Science Teaching, 41(4), 36-45.
Dumitrescu, C., Olteanu, R., Gorghiu, L., & Gorghiu, G. (2014). Learning
Chemistry in the Frame of Integrated Science Modules - Romanian
Students’ Perception. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 116,
2516 – 2520.

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Friesen, S., & Scott, D. (2013). Inquiry based learning: A review of research literature.
Alberta Ministry of Education. Retrieved from https://galileo.org/focus-on-
inquiry-lit-review.pdf
Furtak, E. M., Shavelson, R. J., Shemwell, J. T., & Figueroa, M. (2012). To teach
or not to teach through inquiry: Is that the question? In S. M. Carver & J.
Shrager (Eds.), The journey from child to scientist: Integrating cognitive
development and the education sciences (pp. 227–244). Washington,
DC: American Psychological Association.
Furtak, E. M., Seidel, T., Iverson, H., & Briggs, D. C. (2012). Experimental and
quasiexperimental studies of inquiry-based science teaching: A meta-analysis.
Review of Educational Research, 82(3), 300–329. DOI:
10.3102/0034654312457206
Jerrim, J., Oliver, M., & Sims, S. (2019). The relationship between inquiry-based
teaching and students’ achievement. New evidence from a longitudinal PISA
study in England. Learning and Instruction, 61, 35-44.
Lazonder, A. W., & Harmsen, R. (2016). Meta-Analysis of Inquiry-Based Learning:
Effects of Guidance. Review of Educational Research, 86(3), 681–718. DOI:
10.3102/0034654315627366
Lemlech, J. K. (2009). Curriculum and Instructional Methods for Elementary and
Middle School (7th Edition). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson.
Lutheran Education Queensland. (n.d). Approaches to learning. Inquiry based
learning. Retrieved from
https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/media/1360/lutheran-
education-queensland-inquiry-based-learning.pdf
Smallhorn, M., Young, J., Hunter, N., & Da Silva, K. (2015). Inquiry-based
learning to improve student engagement in a large first year topic. 6(2),
65-71.
Spencer, T. S., & Walker, T. M. (2011). Creating a Love for Science for
Elementary Students through Inquiry-based Learning. Journal of Virginia
Scence Education, 4(2), 18-21.

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Suduc, A., Bizoi,M., & Gorghiu, G. (2015). Inquiry Based Science Learning in
Primary Education. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 205, 474-
479.
Zafra-Gómez, J., Román-Martínez, I., & Gómez-Miranda, M. (2014). Measuring
the impact of inquiry-based learning on outcomes and student
satisfaction. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 1-20.

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