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English Lesson Planning Sheet

Class: 1/3 Time: 60 mins


Student Outcomes for this Lesson
Shows creative thinking during activity
Can identify at least one literary technique that creates tone
Can make a judgement about tone based on their group work

Syllabus Outcome: S401UA07 identify and evaluate devices that create tone, for
example humour, wordplay, innuendo and parody in poetry, humorous prose, drama
or visual texts

Materials
• Whiteboard and markers
• smartboard/projector
• Magazines
• mobile phone/tablet devices • Scissors
• Internet access
• spare paper

Procedures
Time Organisatio Teaching/ learning activities
n
10 Welcome/w Kahoot assessment - what do we know about tone and
mins hole class the devices that create tone?
activity - Communicate student outcomes by writing them on the
teacher whiteboard (or whatever device available)
directed

5 video shown Recognising humour, wordplay, innuendo, parody etc. in


mins text:
Incredibles 2 movie trailer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5qOzqD9Rms

10 class Class discussion on what tones were created in this.


mins discussion Tones and themes that are recognised will be written on the
board

25 group work students will have their choice of technology (computer) or


mins collage (paper and magazines) to create their own
representations of tone. These tones will be taken from the
ones written on the board from class discussion
10 class these representations will be shown in class and the class is
mins discussion/ to discuss which visual text conveys which tone and why.
farewell

Homework students are to pick one tone from anything they watch
before the next class (can be facebook, television, youtube
etc.) they will share what they found in the next class.

Evaluation/ Extension

Student Evaluation Tool


How well did the Highly Developed Developing Not yet there
student (HD) (D) (NYT)
understand the
concepts?
What did the (teacher evaluation, feedback given to students in the
student do well? lesson)
Question to What literary techniques (e.g. wordplay, innuendo and
prompt feedback parody) are being shown in this trailer of Incredibles 2?
Question to What tone(s) can you see in representations from other
prompt feedback groups?

Follow up tasks and Self reflection


Communicate (Complete the student evaluation tool in class and give
feedback to students feedback throughout the lesson. Communicate
students feedback to parents where necessary)
Set Students are to pick one tone from anything they watch before
homework/follow the next class (can be Facebook, television, youtube etc.) they
up tasks from the will share what they found in the next class.
lesson
What worked well
in this lesson? (In class opportunity to improve on this lesson plan)
What were some
opportunities? (In class opportunity to improve on this lesson plan)
How can I improve
for the next (Self reflection)
lesson?
What do I need to (Individual student needs and how I will meet these for the
add? next lesson)
Workplace Health and Safety
Key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced in this lesson
Professional Standards for Teaching
Professional
Evidence in lesson plan
Standard
2.2 Content This lesson plan is 1/3 of a carefully planned teaching
selection and sequence which aims to build knowledge on literary
organisation techniques and achieve outcome S401UA07
3.3 Use teaching This lesson plan includes a range of teaching strategies
strategies including diagnostic assessment, use of ICT, collaborative
group work, class discussion and teacher directed
5.5 Report on This lesson plan incorporates a student evaluation tool and a
student reflection tool which prompts teacher to record student
achievement achievement, communicate feedback to students and report
to parents where necessary

Follow up tasks and Self reflection


Internet access will be monitored by the teacher and appropriate restrictions
are placed on the browsers at the school
All use of scissors will be monitored by the teacher to ensure they are being used
correctly and no student will hurt themselves
Magazines will be looked through prior to being used to ensure only appropriate
content is being shared with students for the purpose of this task
English Lesson Planning Sheet
Class: 2/3 Time: 60 mins
Student Outcomes for this Lesson
Students show creative thinking during activity
Students use symbols, images, icons, clichés, stereotypes and connotations in
the process of representation during group work
Students understand these different processes of representation

Syllabus Outcome: S402UA08 use processes of representation, including the


creative use of symbols, images, icons, clichés, stereotypes, connotations and
particular aural, visual and/or digital techniques

Materials
• Handout on symbols, icons, clichés, • A3 and A4 paper
stereotypes and connotations. • images for group two
• Whiteboard • cliche sheet for group two
• Emojis worksheet • scissors
• road signs sheet • Glue

Procedures
Time Organisation Teaching/ learning activities

10 Welcome/ Discussion of homework, noting some of student’s


mins teacher answers on the board. Students will be given handout
directed on symbols, icons, clichés, stereotypes, connotations.
Communicate student outcomes by writing them on the
whiteboard (or whatever device available)

40 group work Group One: group will be supplied with emojis and road signs
mins (symbols and icons). This group will create ‘danger’ utilising
these images.

Group Two: group will be supplied with images. Group is to


make a collage that represents ‘Australia’(stereotype).
Students are to then write over this collage overused phrases
(cliche) taken from a list given (not all phrases will be cliche in
this list some movie quotes and song lyrics)
Group Three: group will create a poster using own words or
drawing to convey sad feelings and happy feelings
(connotation).

10 class Students will discuss why each representation shows/does


mins discussion/ not show its intended meaning. Open opportunity for
Farewell questions.

Homework Complete and stick handout in workbook.

Evaluation/ Extension

Student Evaluation Tool


How well did the Highly Developed Developing Not yet there
student (HD) (D) (NYT)
understand the
concepts?
What did the (teacher evaluation, feedback given to students in the
student do well? lesson)
Question to How can you utilise processes of representation to create a
prompt feedback more intense/happy/sad tone?
Question to What other tone(s) could you make using these processes of
prompt feedback representation?
Follow up tasks and Self reflection
Communicate (Complete the student evaluation tool in class and give
feedback to students feedback throughout the lesson. Communicate
students feedback to parents where necessary)
Set
homework/follow
Complete and stick handout in workbook.
up tasks from the
lesson
What worked well
in this lesson? (In class opportunity to improve on this lesson plan)
What were some
opportunities? (In class opportunity to improve on this lesson plan)
How can I improve
for the next (Self reflection)
lesson?
What do I need to (Individual student needs and how I will meet these for the
add? next lesson)
Workplace Health and Safety
Key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced in this lesson
Craft materials and use will be monitored by the teacher to ensure they are
being used correctly and no student will hurt themselves

Professional Standards for Teaching


Professional
Evidence in lesson plan
Standard
2.2 Content This lesson plan is 2/3 of a carefully planned teaching
selection and sequence which aims to build knowledge on literary
organisation techniques and achieve outcome S402UA08
4.4 Maintain This lesson plan includes a workplace health and safety
student safety assessment to pre-plan any potential risks associated in the
lesson, and actions to reduce them
5.2 Provide This lesson plan incorporates a student evaluation tool. This
feedback to tool prompts the teacher to provide the student with what
students on their they have done well in the lesson and also two questions to
learning prompt feedback to assess knowledge of the content point
English Lesson Planning Sheet
Class: 3/3 Time: 60 mins

Student Outcomes for this Lesson


Student works collaboratively with peers
Student uses playbuilding to construct alternate meanings for a text
Student constructs text (turns written into performance)

Syllabus Outcome: S402RC17 use collaborative processes, eg playbuilding,


performances and digital compositions to construct texts

Materials

• Text handout

Time Organisatio Teaching/ learning activities


n
5 Welcome/ Utilising what we have learned in previous two
mins Recollection lessons, students have learned to identify and
of previous evaluate tone. Use processes of representation.
lessons Students are now to create their own representative
text.
Any questions about previous lessons opportunity.
Communicate student outcomes by writing them on the
whiteboard (or whatever device available)
5 divide into Students will be divided into 3 groups, these students will
mins groups be given a text.
Each group will enact the same text and convey different
tones, and representations of the text. Text handed out to
each group

50 Collaborativ first group is to transform the text into a happy one using at
mins e group least one process of representation from lesson 2.
work/
Farewell Second group is to transform the text into a angry one using
at least one process of representation from lesson 2.
Third group is to transform the text into a suspenseful one
using at least one process of representation from lesson 2.
Homework write 3 sentences: One on each of these performances and
how they used representation to create tone and mood.

Write one sentence about your favourite type of


representation so far.
Procedures

Evaluation/ Extension

Student Evaluation Tool


How well did the Highly Developed Developing Not yet there
student (HD) (D) (NYT)
understand the
concepts?
What did the (teacher evaluation, feedback given to students in the
student do well? lesson)
Question to What are some of the types of text that show
prompt feedback representation?
Question to What is a different text you could use to construct multiple
prompt feedback representations that are different from the original?

Follow up tasks and Self reflection


Communicate (Complete the student evaluation tool in class and give
feedback to students feedback throughout the lesson. Communicate
students feedback to parents where necessary)
Set write 3 sentences: One on each of these performances and
homework/follow how they used representation to create tone and mood.
up tasks from the Write one sentence about your favourite type of
lesson representation so far.
What worked well
in this lesson? (In class opportunity to improve on this lesson plan)
What were some
opportunities? (In class opportunity to improve on this lesson plan)
How can I improve
for the next (Self reflection)
lesson?
What do I need to (Individual student needs and how I will meet these for the
add? next lesson)
Workplace Health and Safety
Key risk issues that may appear for and need to be reduced in this lesson
Space will be cleared for students to perform their representation of text.
Teacher will monitor performances to ensure no students are injured when
creating new texts
Professional Standards for Teaching
Professional
Evidence in lesson plan
Standard
2.2 content This lesson plan is 3/3 of a carefully planned teaching
selection and sequence which aims to build knowledge on literary
organisation techniques and achieve outcome S402RC17
4.1 Support student This lesson plan encourages full class participation and
participation provides roles for students for full inclusivity within the
activity
3.1 Establish This lesson plan incorporates student outcomes at the
challenging beginning of the lesson which highlights the syllabus
learning goals outcome and provides achievable targets for students with
varying abilities and characteristics
Appendix

Figure 1.1 - Kahoot sample questions (Lesson 1/3)

No. Question Possible Answers


1 What is representation? 1. Portraying something
in a particular way
2. Showing something
exactly how it is
2 Where can we find 1. In written, visual,
representation? performed or spoken
language.
2. Only in books
3 Why should we learn 1. Because we have to
about representation? 2. To understand how
representation can
create different
meanings
4 What is mode? 1. The way something is
expressed by a
composer
2. How you feel: happy,
sad, angry etc.
5 What is medium? 1. Not big and not small
2. The device used by a
composer (e.g. video, text,
image)
6 What does is mean to be 1. Not influenced by your
‘objective’? own feelings
2. Basing something on
your own feelings and
opinions
7 What does it mean to be 1. Not influenced by your
‘subjective’? own feelings
2. Basing something on
your own feelings and
opinions
8 Representation is not a 1. True
natural reflection of what 2. False
the world is really like
9 Why do composers use 1. To show people,
representation? objects, experiences
and ideas in a different
way
2. To confuse anyone who
sees their text
10 Is representation always 1. Yes
intentional? 2. No
Figure 1.2 - Handout on symbols, icons, clichés, stereotypes and connotations
(Lesson 2/3)
Figure 1.3 - Emojis Worksheet (Lesson 2/3)
Figure 1.4 - Road Signs Sheet (Lesson 2/3)
Figure 1.6 - Images for group two (Lesson 2/3)
Figure 1.7 - Cliché sheet for group two (Lesson 2/3)
Figure 1.8 - Text handout (Lesson 3/3)
Mary Mary - Roald Dahl (Rhyme Stew)

Mary, Mary, quite contrary


How does your garden grow?
“I live with my brat in a high-rise
flat,
So how in the world would I
know.”
Rationale

When teaching concepts, it is important to be clear on the concept and what

students are to learn in the classroom. Engaging students in learning processes allows

them to understand the concepts (Boas & Gazis, 2016). To create a fully engaging

sequence of lesson plans, Figure 1.2 (Boas & Gazis, 2016, p. 3) was utilised to guide

learning activities, syllabus outcomes and sequence. Lesson one aims for students to

understand and engage personally with representation, lesson two aims for students to

connect and engage critically with representation and lesson three aims for students to

experiment and reflect on representation. These lessons encapsulate the relationships

between concepts and processes when responding to and composing texts (Boas &

Gazis, 2016).

The first lesson plan centres around content point S401UA07 “identify and

evaluate devices that create tone, for example humour, wordplay, innuendo and

parody in poetry, humorous prose, drama or visual texts” (New South Wales, 2012, p.

52). This content point was chosen so that students could understand and engage

personally with representation through recognising devices in familiar texts. The

purpose of using multiple modes of teaching is to create a quality teaching

environment (Elements of Learning and Achievement | Quality Teaching Framework)

through engagement, which leads to student understanding of the concept (Boas &

Gazis, 2016). This syllabus outcome will be achieved through teaching the content

point utilising diagnostic assessment, communication of student outcomes,

multimodality in the texts shown, class discussion and collaborative group work. The

purpose of this is to allow students different ways to learn the concept itself so they

can apply this information with ease to new information and ideas they gain during
their study (Boas & Grazis, 2016). Lesson one aims for students to understand and

engage personally with representation to help their understanding of the concept

(Boas & Gazis, 2016). This aligns with the syllabus content where students identify

concepts through the initial class discussion and they evaluate by engaging personally

by creating their own representations of tone in the collaborative group work activity

in the lesson. The purpose of the group activity, which is centred around APST 3.3

(Accessing the curriculum | NSW Education Standards), is to allow students to

evaluate the devices which create tone through examining multiple representations.

This activity relates to the content point by allowing students to evaluate devices that

create tone. Showing these representations in class ensures students have reached the

outcomes written at the beginning of the lesson, and have fully engaged with the

syllabus content point before moving on to the next lesson. To ensure students are

ready to build on their knowledge of representation, they have been asked to identify

and evaluate devices that create tone in anything they watch or read before the next

class, promoting intellectual quality through deep understanding (Elements of

Learning and Achievement | Quality Teaching Framework, n.d.).

Lesson two draws upon syllabus outcome S402UA08 “use processes of

representation, including the creative use of symbols, images, icons, clichés,

stereotypes, connotations and particular aural, visual and/or digital techniques. Lesson

two aims for students to connect and engage critically with representation in texts.

The syllabus outcome when applied builds knowledge of different processes of

representation and how they may be used to create different meanings. Students are

given a hand out as a prompt for response and a tool to guide students through their

group work. The purpose of having three groups doing different activities is to allow

for choice so students can connect and critically engage in representation (Boas &
Grazis, 2016). This lesson was developed so students can build upon the activities in

lesson one and work toward creating their own meaning through representation in

lesson three. Lesson two utilises multiple resources (see appendix) to allow students

to use a variety of techniques to create meaning. Aligning the task with the content

point was done in three different ways, the first was with a handout so the students

can identify and evaluate techniques for representation, the second was group

activities where students used different processes of representation which included

symbols, images, icons, clichés, stereotypes and connotations in a way where they

engaged critically. The third task asked students to discuss these representations

allowed students to connect with the textual concept and share opinions to guide

discussion about different processes of representation.

Lesson three draws upon syllabus outcome S402RC17 “use collaborative

processes, eg playbuilding, performances and digital compositions to construct texts”.

Lesson three aims for students to experiment and reflect on representation in texts.

The activities in the class act sequentially to achieve the syllabus outcome point. The

recollection of previous lessons ensure that student outcomes have been met and

maintained and the students are prepared to move into the collaborative group work

activity. This syllabus outcome calls for use of collaborative processes to construct

texts, which aligns with students experimenting and reflecting on representation in

their own version of a text (Dahl & Blake, 2008). This text was also chosen because it

is familiar from previous study in stage 4 and allows for focus to be placed on the

representation of the text. The homework task set for this lesson is to introduce a

thought to the student about representation, so they are continually engaging with the

textual concept, and thus continuing to understand representation in their every day

life.
Each lesson plan contains a section for evaluation and extension. These lesson

plans have tools developed for succinct and relevant evaluation that can be achieved

during the lesson and post lesson. The student evaluation tool is used to track student

development with the content, to give feedback (Assessment Resource Centre, n.d.),

and pre-think questions to help the students understand the syllabus content point. The

purpose of this is to measure student achievement by reflecting on what students are

expected to learn and how well they have achieved this.

The follow up tasks and self reflection allow the teacher to reflect on

individual student needs, and the gaps that need to be filled for the next lesson.

Because these lessons are sequential this is vital to ensure that students are building

knowledge properly and to the standard that the teacher set. Students are given the

opportunity for an inclusive learning environment (Elements of Learning and

Achievement | Quality Teaching Framework, n.d.) as this section of the lesson plan

allows for adjustments and actions to be taken to ensure all students can access

syllabus outcomes and content and demonstrate achievement of these (Accessing the

curriculum | NSW Education Standards). The workplace health and safety section

allows the teacher to evaluate any risks associated within the class and aligns with the

professional standards for teaching (Australian Professional Standards for Teachers |

NSW Education Standards). The professional standards for teaching acts as a tool to

ensure the teacher is on track with what they are teaching and can act as a starting

point for self reflection post lesson.

Through teaching representation as a concept, these lesson plans have been

clear in how the concept will be taught and what students are to learn in the

classroom. The activities in the lesson plans were formulated to align with the

curriculum content, and reflect readings and research that had been undertaken. A big
focus on engaging students through learning processes to help them understand the

concepts (Boas & Gazis, 2016) was present throughout all three lesson plans. These

lessons encapsulate the relationship between concepts and processes when responding

to and composing texts (Boas & Gazis, 2016).


References

Accessing the curriculum | NSW Education Standards. (n.d.). Retrieved from

http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/k-10/diversity-in-

learning/special-education/accessing-the-curriculum\

ARC :: Assessment Resource Centre. (n.d.). Retrieved from

https://arc.nesa.nsw.edu.au

Australian Professional Standards for Teachers | NSW Education Standards. (n.d.).

Retrieved from http://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/teacher-

accreditation/how-accreditation-works/guide-to-accreditation/professional-

standards

Boas, E., & In Gazis, S. (2016). The artful English teacher: Over a hundred strategies

for the English classroom.

Dahl, R., & Blake, Q. (2008). Rhyme stew. London: Puffin.

Elements of Learning and Achievement | Quality Teaching Framework. (n.d.).

Retrieved from http://www.theelements.education.nsw.gov.au/the-elements-

manual/policy-reforms-and-focus-areas/quality-teaching-framework

New South Wales. (2012). English years 7-10: NSW syllabus for the Australian

curriculum.