W W W. S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E .

O R G
SECURI TY
A P U B L I C A T I O N O F T h E N A T I O N A L A S S O C I A T I O N O F S E C U R I T Y C O M P A N I E S
eXeCUti ve
D E C E M B E R / J A N U A R Y 2 0 0 7
A L S O I N S I D E …
> P R O T E C T T h E C O U N T R Y —W h I L E P R O T E C T I N G Y O U R S E L F 1 6
> I N T h E N E W S 4
> L E G I S L A T I V E U P D A T E 2 0
THREAT
SECURITY, SYSTEMS & THE INSIDER
As one of the leading providers of
insurance to security guard firms,
Brownyard Group is skilled in writing
insurance policies that consider
the unique exposures and risks of
your industry.
Brownyard Group’s custom insurance
packages are tailored to meet the
complex needs of our nation’s leading
security guard firms. In addition,
Brownyard’s admitted, A-rated carriers
provide the kind of security that your
business needs.
Your business is a specialized one.
Brownyard has been providing
specialized insurance coverage for
more than 50 years. Isn't it time they
became your partner?
For more information on how we can
help you, please have your agent or
broker call the Brownyard Group.
21 Maple Avenue, PO Box 9175
Bay Shore, NY 11706
Call Toll Free (800) 645-5820
www.brownyard.com
Pi oneer s i n t he Past . I nnovat or s f or t he f ut ur e.

Commercial General Liability
Business Auto
Excess & Umbrella Liability
First & Third Party Dishonesty
Commercial Property
Workers’ Compensation
Inland Marine
License Bonds
In-House Claims Facility
Brendan Brownyard
Consider
Your Liability
Insurance
Just Once.
Consider
Your Liability
Insurance
Just Once.
BROWNYARD_9_06_SEC_EX 8/31/06 10:35 AM Page 1
Table of Contents
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
1
cover photograph: Jean schweitzer | agency: dreamstime
Protect the Country—While
Protecting Yourself
Changes to SAFETY Act application help
foster better security.
By Brian Finch
16
Security, Systems & The
Insider Threat
Today’s automated society is giving rise to a
new breed of security professional.
By Edward J. Appel
12
FEATURES
IN EVERY ISSUE
2 Calendar of Events
4 In the News
TAKING INITIATIVE: IACP to Reinvigorate Public-Private Summit
Initiatives
LEAD THE WAY: Why Do Employees Fail?
TAKE NOTE: New Federal Spending Resource Online
KICK IT UP: CALSAGA Conference Recap
BOOKMARK IT: Security Author Publishes Fictional Murder Mystery
FRONT LINES: Right Management Survey Says “Trust Me”
THAT’S A WRAP: IASIR Conference Wrap Up
LEADING MAN: AlliedBarton Appoints Gane to Lead Chemical
Service Sector
BUSINESS’ BEST: NRCC Names Dolan 2006 Businesswoman of
the Year
ON THE JOB: In the Line of Duty
8 NASCO News
ON TASK: NASCO Conducts Federal Protective Service Working
Group
GETTING INVOLVED: NASCO Representatives Participate in
Industry Leadership Events
PLAN AHEAD: NASCO to Conduct Strategic Planning Sessions
20 Legislative Update
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • V O L U ME 2 , N O . 1
WWW. S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G

E D I T O R I A L
Publisher
Joseph Ricci, CAE
jricci@nasco.org
Editor
Jennifer Sikorski
editor@securityexecutive.org

D E S I G N & P R O D U C T I O N
Art Director
Jacki Silvan
art@securityexecutive.org
A D V E RT I S I N G S A L E S
Joan Daly
joan@securityexecutive.org
B O A R D O F D I R E C T O R S
Chair: Martin Herman, Special Response Corporation
1
st
Vice Chair: Heather O’Brien, Security Forces, Inc.
2
nd
Vice Chair: James McNulty, Securitas Security Services USA
3
rd
Vice Chair: Stephen I. Kasloff, Guardsmark, LLC
Treasurer: Lynn C. Oliver, American Security Programs, Inc.
Secretary: Robert Kilbride, The Wackenhut Corporation
Director-At-Large
Dennis Roberts, SecTek
Executive Director: Joseph Ricci, NASCO
Past Chair: G. R. Massimei, U.S. Security Associates, Inc.
Security Executive is published bimonthly by the National Association of
Security Companies (NASCO), the nation’s largest contract security trade
association. Security Executive is designed to provide practical information on
all aspects of security management. Subscription rates: Free for members and
non-members in the U.S., Mexico and Canada; $45 for international members;
$55 for international non-members. Security Executive content may not be
photocopied, reproduced or redistributed without the consent of the publisher.
Copyright 2007. All rights reserved.
Security Executive is distributed to more than 6,000 decision-makers at nearly
3,000 contract security companies.
Opinions or statements of authors and advertisers appearing in Security
Executive are their own and do not necessarily represent the opinions or
statements of NASCO, its board of directors or NASCO staff.

Security Executive welcomes article submissions and reader feedback. Articles
and comments may be e-mailed to editor@securityexecutive.org. Include your full
name, address and phone number.
For questions regarding subscriptions, please call 703.518.1478.
Postmaster: Send address changes to Security Executive, 1625
Prince Street, Suite 225-B, Alexandria, VA 22314.

National Association of Security Companies
1625 Prince Street, Suite 225-B | Alexandria, VA 22314
www.nasco.org
Calendar of events
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
2
FEBRUARY 14
NASCO General Membership Meeting
Bal Harbour, Fla.
www.nasco.org
FEBRUARY 13
NASCO Board of Directors
Bal Harbour, Fla.
www.nasco.org
MARCH 27–30
ISC West
Las Vegas, Nev.
www.iscwest.com
FEBRUARY 6–7
Homeland Security: The Ripple Effect
Washington, D.C.
www.apus.edu/disaster
FEBRUARY 5–7
ASIS Asia-Pacific Security Conference
Singapore
www.asisonline.org
JANUARY 17–19
ASIS International Leadership Meeting
Arlington, Va.
www.asisonline.org
100%
Military & Police Experience.
www.specialresponse.com
4 1 0
.
7 8 5
.
1 2 1 2
When your company
is faced with a crisis,
whether man-made or natural;
trust the experts in security
and executive protection:

Special Response Corporation,
where every security officer
has extensive military or
police experience...
And every one is
a security specialist.
The leader in specialized
security services.
NASCO CEO Briefing
Increasing the Value of Your Private
Security Business
Tuesday, January 23, 2007 • 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m. • New York City
Fax your completed registration form to
703.706.3711
or RSVP at mquaranto@nasco.org or 703.518.1478.
Name
Title
Company
Email address
Phone number
New York City $35
Tuesday, January 23, 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m.
Orange County $35
Tuesday, March 6, 8:00 – 10:30 a.m.
Los Angeles $35
Tuesday, March 6, 12:30 –3:00 p.m.
San Francisco $35
Wednesday, March 7, 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m.
Chicago $35
Wednesday, March 14, 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m.
Atlanta $35
Wednesday, April 4, 11:30 a.m. –2:00 p.m.
REGISTRATION INFORMATION
LOCATIONS
Visa | MC | AMEX | CHECK
Name on card
credit card number exp. date
signature
PAYMENT INFORMATION
NASCO VALUED VENDORS
FRANK ARGENBRIGHT—Chairman and CEO, SecurAmerica
Mr. Argenbright is founder of AHL Services provider of outsourced business
services for Fortune 500 companies; founder of Air Serv Corporation
provider of outsourced business services to aviation companies and founder
of SecurAmerica provider of outsourced security services.

ROBERT PERRY—Principal, Robert H. Perry Associates
Mr. Perry has advised and managed the sale, merger and acquisition of more
than 150 security guard companies across five continents during his 25 year
career.

STEVE FROST— Principal, TCB Services
Mr. Frost has over 36 years in senior management positions at several of
the nation’s largest contract security companies and has participated in 94
security industry acquisitions.
Other sessions to be held in:

ORANGE COUNTY
Tuesday, March 6

LOS ANGELES
Tuesday, March 6

SAN FRANCISCO
Wednesday, March 7

CHICAGO
Wednesday, March 14

ATLANTA
Wednesday, April 4
This interactive session offers participants an overview of private security
trends and issues that impact the business of contract security, including
building and maintaining value and growth. Our distinguished panel of private
security industry leaders includes current and former contract security owners
and creates a forum for information sharing. Additional panelist and special
guests will be announced for each event and will include:
NASCO CEO BRIEFINGS SUPPORTER
summit report
recommendations
A resolution adopted by the International Associa-
tion of Chiefs of Police (IACP) on Oct. 17, 2006,
may bring new energy to the action steps recom-
mended by more than 100 prominent executives
from law enforcement and private security during
a 2004 National Policy Summit. That conference,
“Building Private Security/Public Policing Partner-
ships to Prevent and Respond to Terrorism and
Public Disorder,” focused on the importance of such
cooperative efforts as part of the nation’s homeland
security, as well as on more mundane criminal
conduct.
The U.S. Department of Justice Offce of Com-
munity Oriented Policing Services (COPS) and the
IACP organized the summit. NASCO—along with
ASIS International, Security Industry Association
and International Security Management Associa-
tion—was a corporate sponsor of the event.
The recently approved resolution, submitted to the
general membership by the IACP’s Private Sector
Liaison Committee (PSLC), calls for the IACP to
coordinate with the summit’s other principals a fact-
fnding meeting to determine the current status of
the recommendations. It then will share its fndings
with the PSLC. If the IACP leadership fnds that no
signifcant activity has furthered accomplishment
of the itemized recommendations, it will designate
liaisons from the Board of Offcers and staff, respec-
tively, to assist the PSLC in moving these critical
recommendations forward.
Recommendations from the summit report address
the urgency of developing partnerships and the im-
portant roles of law enforcement and private sector
organizations in guiding the necessary processes to
nurture and support those cooperative efforts. n
IACP to Reinvigorate
Public-Private
Summit Initiatives
T
A
K
I
N
G

I
N
I
T
I
A
T
I
V
E
In the news
Leaders of the major law
enforcement and private
security organizations should
make a formal commitment to
cooperation.
The Department of
Homeland Security and/or
Department of Justice should fund
research and training on relevant
legislation, private security and
law enforcement-private security
cooperation.
The Department of
Homeland Security
and/or Department of Justice
should create an advisory
council composed of nationally
prominent law enforcement and
private security professionals
to oversee the day-to-day
implementation issues of law
enforcement-private security
partnerships.
The Department of
Homeland Security
and/or Department of Justice,
along with relevant membership
organizations, should convene
key practitioners to move this
agenda forward in the future.
Local partnerships should
set priorities and address
key problems the summit
identified. Examples of local
and regional activities that can
and should be undertaken
immediately include the following:
improve joint response to
critical incidents; coordinate
infrastructure protection;
improve communications and
data interoperability; bolster
information and intelligence
sharing; prevent and investigate
high-tech crime; and devise
responses to workplace violence.
The full report can be found at
www.cops.usdoj.gov/mime/open.
pdf?Item=1355.
RESOURCE
LEAD THE WAY
Forty-six percent of new hires fail within 18 months
of their employment, while only 19% achieve
unequivocal success. According to a study by Leader-
ship IQ, poor interpersonal skills, such as the ability
to accept feedback or inability to understand and
manage emotions, account for the majority of failed
employment experiences. n
Why Do
Employees Fail
TAKE NOTE
New Federal
Spending
Resource Online
Find this resource at:
www.FedSpending.org
RESOURCE
According to the study, the top five
reasons for new hire failure are:
Coachability – 26%
Emotional intelligence – 23%
Motivation – 17%
Temperament – 15%
Technical competence – 11%
Find information regarding contracts and grants
issued by federal agencies and departments at www.
FedSpending.org. Developed and maintained by the
Offce of Management and Budget Watch, a private
“watchdog” group, the site’s data comes from the
Federal Procurement Data System and the Federal As-
sistance Award Data System and shows where
money is spent, type of competition
and links companies with their
subsidiaries. n
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
4
In the news
that will further help protect companies from
potential lawsuits.
Other highlights of the conference included
Erroll Southers, former deputy director of
California Homeland Security. Southers cur-
rently is the associate director for California
Risk & Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events
(CREATE) at the University of Southern
California. He presented profles of potential
terrorists and terrorist cells that have been
linked to California from one time or another.
Southers did a fantastic job of clearly outlining
the dangers the country faces.
Guest speaker Mickey Doll also gave a presen-
tation on emergency preparedness and disaster
response lessons learned from Hurricane Ka-
trina. There was also an in-depth discussion on
California workers’ compensation system from
Carrie Nevans, director of the State Division
of Workers’ Compensation, and Mark Webb
with Employers Direct Insurance Company.
BSIS Chief Paul Johnson and Deputy Chief
Rick Fong were on hand to give a report from
the bureau. BSIS also staffed a booth for the
entire conference so that attendees could have
questions answered in person. n
BOOKMARK IT
Ernest C. “Bud” Blount, director of Strategic Part-
nerships for Wackenhut Services Incorporated and
a long-time private security and law enforcement
leader, recently published his frst work of fction.
The novel, “Death is a Window,” is a murder
mystery set in Palm Beach, Fla.
“I’ve written and published several non-fction
security-related books,” Blount says. “I wanted to
stretch myself to write a believable mystery novel.
While all the people, cases and story are fctional,
they are based on real-world experiences and
cases I’ve worked over the years.”
In the book, Palm Beach County Sheriff ’s
detective Jake Cade is tired, divorced and lonely,
oiling his emotional wounds with booze and
thinking suicide. But when a brutal serial killer
starts mutilating young student nurses, Cade is
drawn into a catch-them-before-they-kill-again
time warp that produces a life-changing emo-
tional shift for him. It’s a deadly race with time
and side entangle-
ments with mortal
enemies arise.
As a former criminal investigator, Blount
brings this police-crime saga to life as only a
person with his investigative experience and
writing talent can. The book has received good
reviews and can be purchased at www.eblount.
com or Amazon.com. n
K
I
C
K

I
T

U
P
On Nov. 8 and 9, the California Association of
Security Agencies, Guards, & Associates held its
annual conference, CALSAGA & You: A Security
Partnership for the Future, at the Pechanga Resort
& Casino in Temecula, Calif. Leaders from the
security industry and state agencies joined mem-
bers of California’s private security industry for the
association’s largest event of the year.
The conference brought together industry experts
and private security companies to discuss issues
facing the security industry. Attendees had access
to a wide range of vendors, including companies
providing uniforms, insurance services, meal and
rest break tracking, guard monitoring systems,
merger and acquisition services, consulting and
marketing services, time and attendance software,
taser products, live scan and biometric products
and guard monitoring systems.
CALSAGA President Mark Miller kicked off
the conference by briefng the group on the
progress of CALSAGA in 2006. He also touched
on several issues that are critical to members
and was hopeful that the conference would
create the necessary dialogue needed to address
these problems, specifcally with meal/rest break
period compliance.
In the morning segment on the frst day of the
conference, California Labor Commissioner
Robert Jones specifcally addressed what his
offce is doing with regard to meal/rest break
period compliance-related issues. As expected,
many attendees expressed concern and asked the
commissioner what they can do to protect their
businesses from potential lawsuits associated
with meal/rest breaks. The commissioner was
very forthright with the group on the issue but
vowed to work with the industry and specifcally
encouraged each company to report meal/rest
break lawsuits directly to him and he would
investigate further.
Attorney Laura Innes of Simpson, Garrity &
Innes also addressed the issue of meal/rest break
compliance on the second day of the confer-
ence, promising attendees that she would send
the group a meal/rest break period waiver form
CALSAGA Conference Recap
CALSAGA President Mark Miller kicked
off the conference by briefing the group on
the progress of CALSAGA in 2006.
5
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
Security Author Publishes Fictional Murder
Mystery
Right Management Survey Says “Trust Me”
F
R
O
N
T

L
I
N
E
S
During the past two years, according to a
recent Right Management survey, 37% of
respondents believe trust in the workplace
has remained the same, 34% believe trust has
increased and 29% say trust has decreased.
When it comes to building or destroying trust,
respondents had some ideas:
©

p
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
e
r
:

b
o
r
a

u
c
a
k

|

a
g
e
n
c
y
:

d
r
e
a
m
s
t
i
m
e
.
c
o
m
toP wAys mAnAgers cAn
Lose trust
64% Lying or half-truths
61% Inconsistent behavior between what
you say and do
36% Withholding information
22% Demeaning attitude
19% Failing to develop subordinates
18% Seeking personal gain above shared
interest
14% Rigid, inflexible behavior and close
mindedness
13% Unpredictability
13% Arrogance
toP wAys mAnAgers
cAn BuiLd trust
57% Respect for fellow employees as
partners and equals
52% Honesty
47% Involvement with vision and strategy
30% Information-sharing
21% Commitment to developing people
17% Doing the “right thing” regardless
of personal risk
15% Focusing on shared goals, not
personal agendas
ACCORDING TO RIGHT MANAGEMENT’S SURVEY
THAT’S A WRAP
IASIR Conference Wrap Up
have delayed implementation of the 2004 law
have fnally been cleared at the federal level.
Several state agencies, previously lacking the
authority to conduct federal checks on security
applicants, were pleased to learn that the focus
can now shift to individual states to make this
long-sought procedure a reality.
To learn more about IASIR and to read
about the Halifax conference programs, go to
www.iasir.org. n
At the International Association of Security
and Investigative Regulators (IASIR) an-
nual conference, regulatory offcials from the
United States and the United Arab Emirates
swapped information with their Canadian
counterparts on various licensing and enforce-
ment issues about planning for crises ranging
from an avian flu epidemic to a shrinking
workforce as baby boomers transition to retire-
ment. The conference, held Nov. 7-9, 2006,
in Halifax, Nova Scotia, attracted participants
from the government and the security industry
for a three-day marathon of problem solving,
updating and policy discussions. Regulatory
administrators also embarked on a long-term
project of benchmarking regulatory best
practices.
IASIR has been a strong supporter of the
Private Security Offcer Employment Autho-
rization Act, which allows authorized private
security employers to obtain criminal history
background checks in jurisdictions that lack
the usual state law mandate for background
checks through the Federal Bureau of Investi-
gation’s database. Administrative hurdles that
OFFICERS
President: Marie Ohman, Minnesota Board
of Private Detective and Protective Agent
Services
First Vice President: Wayne Rogillio, Louisiana
State Board of Private Security Examiners
Second Vice President: Rudy Buck, Arizona
Department of Public Safety
Secretary: Karen Forsyth, Department of
Justice, Province of Nova Scotia
Treasurer: Constance Crawford, Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer
Services, Division of Licensing
Past President: Leon D. Baker Jr., Virginia
Department of Criminal Justice Services
DIRECTORS AT LARGE
Arthur Varnadore, Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services, Division of
Licensing
Robert Edwards, Vermont Board of Private
Investigative and Security Services
Ted Williams, Ohio Department of Public
Safety, Homeland Security
Jon Herberman, Ontario Ministry of
Community Safety & Correctional Services
ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS (NON-VOTING)
Electronic Security: Beth Cain
Investigations: Bruce H. Hulme
Security Officers: Gail Simonton
LEGAL ADVISOR
Louis Gurvich, Esq., Louisiana State Board of
Private Security Examiners
ELECTIONS FOR IASIR OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS WERE HELD DURING THE CONFERENCE. HERE ARE THE RESULTS:
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
6
In the news
NRCC Names
Dolan 2006
Businesswoman
of the Year
B
U
S
I
N
E
S
S


B
E
S
T
Tom Reynolds,
chairman of
the National
Republican
Congressional
Committee,
named Lisa
Dolan, CPP,
the 2006 Busi-
nesswoman of the Year for New York. Dolan
is president of Securit, a licensed private
investigations frm located in Flushing, N.Y.
The award recognizes the top U.S. business
leaders who have successfully integrated busi-
ness and fnancial success with the support of
Republican ideals.
Influential community leaders were singled
out to receive this prestigious award because
of their willingness to provide invaluable in-
put to the Business Advisory Council and for
their commitment to the Republican Party. n
l
i
s
a

d
o
l
a
n
LEADING MAN
AlliedBarton Appoints Gane to Lead Chemical
Service Sector
AlliedBarton Security Services, the larg-
est American-owned and managed security
services frm, announced the appointment
of Scott R. Gane, vice president, to lead
AlliedBarton’s Special Service Offering in the
Chemical and Petrochemical industry. Gane
joined AlliedBarton through the acquisition
of Initial Security, where he served as regional
vice president of the East Central Region.
“Scott’s extensive background in plant protec-
tion and safety, including his experience with
nuclear facilities and with working within a
regulatory environment, makes him the ideal
leader to grow AlliedBarton’s specialized ser-
vice offering in the chemical and petrochemi-
cal sector,” says Bill Whitmore, president and
CEO of AlliedBarton Security Services.
“The chemical and petrochemical industries
are essential to the nation’s effciency and
competitiveness as well as overall health and
safety,” Gane says. “AlliedBarton is committed
to ensuring this critical part of our national
infrastructure is protected and well served.” n
In the Line of Duty
During the past few months, several security
offcers have risked their lives to protect
people and property, including during a
bank robbery in Los Angeles and at a FedEx
facility in Maryland.
A 64-year-old security offcer at a Bank of
the Orient 20 miles outside Los An-
geles is being hailed as a hero for
thwarting a bank armed robbery
despite several bullets wounds.
The offcer was shot twice and
still managed to wrestle
a gun from the assailant.
The offcer was frst shot
following his command
to the suspect to drop
to the floor and shot a
second time while trying
to subdue the suspect
using pepper spray. The
name of the offcer and
frm was not released.
A 26-year-old security offcer
working at a FedEx Ground dis-
tribution center in Beltsville, Md.,
was fatally shot while working at
the guardhouse at the entrance to a
fenced facility. The offcer, Reina N. Lynch,
was a school bus driver and the mother of
two children. Police said a fellow security
offcer arriving for the day shift at 7 a.m.
discovered Lynch lying on the ground with
a single gunshot wound in her upper body.
She was pronounced dead at the scene.
Company offcials were providing inves-
tigators with security flms, entry
logs and other information.
Lynch worked for Ronin Risk
International, a security frm
with 600 employees based
in Salt Lake City spe-
cializing in providing
security for goods in
transit and at ware-
houses and distribution
centers. n
ON THE JOB
©

p
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h
e
r
:

I
v
a
n

c
h
o
l
a
k
o
v

|

a
g
e
n
c
y
:

d
r
e
a
m
s
t
i
m
e
.
c
o
m
7
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
O
N

T
A
S
K
The group identifed fve functions as the basic
tasks of the majority of security offcers, as well
as seven basic training areas that are subject to
additional considerations:
Security Officers’ Tasks
1. Access control
2. Visitor processing
3. Screening
4. Patrol and response
5. Control center integration
Training Areas
1. Access control
2. Security patrol
3. Defensive and control procedures
4. Emergency procedures
5. Communications
6. Legal aspects
7. Report writing
The NASCO FPS Working Group will meet
quarterly and communicate regularly to discuss
and refne these initial fndings, including deter-
mining criticality of the identifed functions and
tasks, validation and training. n
NASCO hosted the frst meeting of its Federal
Protective Service (FPS) Working Group to begin
a task analysis process for security guards/offcers
that reaches across federal and commercial mar-
kets, as well as industries and applications, to set a
basic guideline for security functionality.
The process includes identifying basic functions
and tasks, assigning criticality and validating
training to improve operations. The three pri-
mary goals of the group are to:
1. Defne security guard or offcer;
2. Identify security functions and tasks; and
3. Validate these for contract and training
requirements.
“Functions should drive requirements,” says
Fred Muccino, Guard Force Operations Branch,
Security and Law Enforcement Division, inspec-
tor, FPS. “This group can help identify functions,
tasks and skill sets that must be supported by
training.”
The group reviewed several existing defnitions
of security guard and/or offcer under Muccino’s
premise that a “guard is a guard is a guard” focus-
ing on establishing a basic set of tasks and skills
that can be built upon and supplemented based
on assignments.
The discussion also tried to differentiate between
the terms “guard” and “offcer.” Many federal
policies, procedures and documentation refer to
private security “guards” to differentiate them
from law enforcement, police or special offcers
that have additional powers, roles and responsi-
bilities. The industry has long preferred the term
offcer based on the negative connotations of the
term guard. To differentiate the two terms, the
group discussed that perhaps a difference can be
highlighted between guards and offcers based on
“meeting minimal defned standards” as outlined
by federal agencies, departments, state and local
municipalities.
The group established the following working
defnition of private security offcer and will
continue to review and refne the defnition based
on feedback, further research and validation:
A security officer is a natural person assigned
to safeguard persons and property, and reduce
vulnerability and risk of theft and loss. Secu-
rity officers meet minimal defined standards
and are members of a security system.
The “security system” consists of other counter-
measures to reduce and mitigate risk that can be
categorized into seven primary systems:
1. Surveillance
2. Barriers
3. Alarms
4. Access control
5. Communications
6. Screening
7. Security force
NASCO Conducts Federal Protective Service
Working Group
MEmbers of the NASCO FPS Working Group
bud blount
wackenhut
services, INc.
LYNN OLIVER
American security
programs, inc.
MARK porterfield
AlliedBarton
JEFF Roehm
American security
programs, inc.
dennis roberts
SecTek, inc.
Not pictured:
Chair, Shawn Jacquard, The Wackenhut corporation; chris mashburn, international RAM Associates; Fred Muccino, FPS
funcTions should drive
reQuiremenTs. This group
can help idenTify funcTions,
Tasks and skill seTs ThaT musT
be supporTed by Training.
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
8
nAsCo Update
NASCO Representatives Participate
in Industry Leadership Events
NASCO Executive Director Joseph Ricci and
NASCO Director of Government Relations
and Legal Counsel Gail Simonton recently par-
ticipated in several security and security-related
programs with associations impacting private
security operations, including:
U.S. Department
of State Overseas
Advisory Council
(OSAC) promotes
security
cooperation
between American
business and private sector interests worldwide
encompassing the 34-member core council, an
executive offce, more than 100 country councils
and more than 3,500 constituent member
organizations and 372 associates. The objectives
of the council include establishing continuing
liaison and operational security cooperation with
the private sector and provide regular, timely
interchange of information. The recent 21
st

Annual OSAC Briefng attracted nearly 1,200
private security leaders and focused on global
resiliency with presentations by government
offcials such as Director of National Intelligence
Ambassador John Negroponte and business
executives including Fortune 500 Archer Daniels
Midland Company CEO and President Patricia
Woertz regarding the importance of govern-
ment-industry cooperation to improve safety
and security worldwide.
Professional Services Council (PSC) is a
national trade association for the government
professional and technical services industry
focused on preserving, improving and
expanding the federal government market.
NASCO is an association member and
regularly participates in meetings with
government leaders such as an upcoming
January meeting with Jay Cohen, under
secretary for Science & Technology, Depart-
ment of Homeland Security.
ASIS Private
Security
Services
Council
(PSSC) formed
to facilitate the exchange of best practices to
raise the standards and increase productivity of
professional security services, as well as to
increase awareness of their role in protecting
people and property. The PSSC recently
conducted Security Force Management, an
educational program focused on screening,
training and managing security offcers led by
practitioners and experts with government,
contract and in-house security attendees.
General Services
Administration
(GSA) Industry
Government Council
(IGC) is a working
partnership and
information-sharing group concerned with
evolving issues related to the GSA Schedule
and other contracting vehicles. This group
meets quarterly, and recent focuses include the
latest contracting developments such as GSA’s
new structure and direction, marketing
>>continues page 10
g
a
i
l

s
i
m
o
n
t
o
n
j
o
s
e
p
h

r
i
c
c
i
GETTING INVOLVED
SCHEDULING
TIME & ATTENDANCE
PAYROLL
COMPLIANCE
MANAGEMENT
BENEFITS
ADMINISTRATION
PERFORMANCE
TRACKING
REAL-TIME REPORTING
24/7 SUPPORT
Valiant helps more than 60% of
the largest, fastest growing
national and regional contract
security companies harness the
speed and power of technology
to work smarter, more produc-
tively every day!
Don’t let others capture the
competitive advantage, contact a
Valiant Workforce Management
Solutions representative today!
www.valiant.com
800-521-4555
info@valiant.com
nasco represenTaTives
parTicipaTe in securiTy-
relaTed organiZaTions
To advocaTe and serve
The besT inTeresTs of The
conTracT securiTy indusTry.
9
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
P
L
A
N

A
H
E
A
D NASCO to Conduct Strategic
Planning Sessions
>>continued from page 9
channels, quick payment and new rules allowing
state and local governments to purchase off the
GSA Schedule for emergency preparation and re-
sponse (Section 833 of the 2007 National Defense
Authorization Act).
International Association of
Chiefs of Police (IACP)
Private Sector Liaison
Council (PSLC) facilitates
increased communication
and cooperation between
law enforcement and private security. During
IACP’s Annual Conference, the PSLC submitted a
resolution accepted by the general membership to
coordinate with a 2004 National Policy Summit a
fact-fnding meeting regarding the status of recom-
mendations stemming from the National Policy
Summit’s “Building Private Security/Public Policing
Partnerships to Prevent and Respond to Terrorism
and Public Disorder.”
International Association of Security and
Investigative Regulators (IASIR) includes state
and provincial government regulators, private
industry, law enforcement and others interested in
enhancing public safety by promoting professional-
ism in the private security industry through
effective regulation. n
NASCO
Representatives
Participate
in Industry
Leadership, cont.
GETTING INVOLVED
“There are many issues impacting the perfor-
mance and value of contract security on a
daily basis,” says NASCO Executive Director
Joseph Ricci, CAE. “NASCO is trying to
position itself as the advocate and leader of
the contract security industry and provide
a return on investment to members and the
private security community.”
The strategic plan will provide focus and di-
rection for the 30+ year-old trade association
in regards to legislative initiatives, member-
ship growth and development, research,
education and information sharing. n
In an effort to best serve the private
security industry and meet member
needs, NASCO will be conducting several
strategic planning sessions during early
2007 involving members, non-members,
contract security customers (commercial
and federal) and others impacted by private
security. The process will involve telephone
interviews, environment scans, research,
focus groups and meetings to determine
the future of contract security, its position
within private security and NASCO’s direc-
tion to best support emerging, evolving
market demands.
NASCO members include:
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
10
nAsCo Update
A U G U S T / S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 6
W W W. S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
S
E
C
U
R
I T
Y
A P U B L I C A T I O N O F T H E N A T I O N A L A S S O C I A T I O N O F S E C U R I T Y C O M P A N I E S
E
X
E
C
U
T
I
V
E
A L S O I N S I D E …
> S T A N D I N G U P T O B E C O U N T E D X X > I N T H E N E W S X X
> L E G I S L A T I V E U P D A T E X X
A S S T A N D A R D S
R I S E , D E M A N D
F O R T R A I N I N G
S E E S E X P L O S I V E
G R O W T H .
Interested in Advertising in
Security Executive?
www.SecurityExecutive.org
As the official publication
of the National Association
of Security Companies,
Security Executive is
uniquely positioned to bring
our readers content that
they won’t find in other
publications.
To advertise,
contact NASCO at
703.518.1478.
Don’t forget to visit us on the Web
to download the latest rate card
and editorial calendar!
J U N E / J U L Y 2 0 0 6
W W W. S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
S
E
C
U
R
I T
Y
A P U B L I C A T I O N O F T H E N A T I O N A L A S S O C I A T I O N O F S E C U R I T Y C O M P A N I E S
E
X
E
C
U
TI V
E
A L S O I N S I D E …
> P S S S S T …P A S S I T O N ! 1 4
> I N T H E N E W S 2
> L E G I S L A T I V E U P D A T E 1 8
I N T H E WA K E O F 9 / 1 1 , S A F E T Y A C T O F F E R S
P R O T E C T I O N T O A N T I T E R R O R I N N O V A T O R S
S
a
f
e
P l a y i ng I T
P l a y i ng I T
11
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
TODAY’S AUTOMATED SOCIETY IS GIVING RISE TO A
NEW BREED OF SECURITY PROFESSIONAL.
FeAtUreD Arti CLe : : SECURI TY, SYSTEMS AND ThE I NSI DER ThREAT
WRI T T EN BY EDWARD J . APPEL | I L L UST RAT I ON BY ANT ONY PAPANT ONI OU
A
s contract security has dramatically
improved the sophistication
of protection, developments in information
technology and a surge in insider crime have
changed the profession from the inside out as
surely as Sept. 11, 2001 did.
Automation of access control and increased
capabilities of CCTV, alarms, detectors,
biometrics, radio frequency identifcation
(RFID) and a host of other new gadgets allow
all kinds and sizes of organizations to manage
security with intelligent, integrated systems. Yet
the crux of prevention, detection, response and
resolution remains in the brains and hands of
the security personnel involved.
Today, much is asked of the men and women
who stand the night watch. They are often
tasked with protecting hundreds or thousands
of doors, sensors, fences and buildings. Inside
are billions of dollars in assets, not the least of
which are contained in the data and production
capabilities of information and robotic systems
that are networked globally. And the biggest
threats to these are the people who work there.
n e W s t r A t e g i e s
Security teams now include information
technology security specialists who protect the
frms’ systems from all kinds of threats lurking
on the Internet and flowing with the e-mails
and data through the networks. The challenge
of integrating the work of facilities security,
information security, personnel security and
asset protection now must include a thorough
understanding of a company’s virtual, as well
as physical, assets. In addition, the emergence
of automated security systems and new types
of forensic and investigative evidence demand
broader and deeper training for security
professionals. Fortunately, the payoff is clear:
substantial improvements in the level of
protection and in response to incidents.
The improvements we’re beginning to see from
new technologies and security adaptations
include:
• Systems that can detect and alert on signs of
possible misbehavior, helping prevent as well
as respond to an incident. For example, the
24/7 IT security system detects suspicious
12
The challenge of inTegraTing
The work of faciliTies
securiTy, informaTion securiTy,
personnel securiTy and asseT
proTecTion now musT include
a Thorough undersTanding of
a company’s virTual, as well as
physical, asseTs.
13
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
14
activity in off-hours computing, activating the integrated security
management system to inventory people present, capture their
behavior via both digital CCTV recording and digital forensic
keystroke recording, and alerting both IT security personnel and
physical security guards. Smart cards used for physical and cyber
access facilitate knowing who is on the campus.
• Systems that measure activities, alerting and responding when those
activities exceed established norms. For example, in the “old days,”
guards were constantly responding to alarms that malfunctioned, as
well as the comparatively few actual incidents. Based on time of day,
location, value of assets, length of the anomaly (e.g. alarm condition)
and alert status, if any (e.g. high crime area/threat), the security
management system prioritizes alerts, displaying live CCTV and
recording events in an integrated fle viewable from any computer
with authorization and Internet access. Remote monitors allow
direction of a live security response to actual incidents, rather than
false alarms.
• Systems that analyze events in retrospect and can determine with
certainty what happened and who was involved. Among the
technologies facilitating these improvements are digital CCTV
recording, biometric access controls, multi-factor IT systems
authentication, digital forensics (computer forensic analysis) and
several physical forensic capabilities, including DNA, chemical
analysis, geo-locator devices on cell phones, PDAs, vehicles and
business equipment, RFID and embedded identifcation and alert
devices on high-value assets. Today, security can fnd out who did it,
where and when—and locate the missing items.
A P e r s i s t e n t t h r e A t
Among the most costly losses to both business and government are
the few but insidious insiders who steal, commit espionage, embezzle,
sabotage, threaten others and threaten the reputation of their
employers. Unfortunately, insider crime trends have not followed the
major crime statistics, which have dropped in the past decade. Since the
late 1970s, insider crime has risen, yet the metrics are elusive because so
few businesses and agencies report insider crime statistics.
The best indicators of insider crime levels come from surveys and the
FBI’s fnancial crime reports. Because federally insured fnancial services
frms must fle suspicious activity reports (SARs), and because the
FBI and Secret Service investigate fnancial crimes, there are reliable
indicators of insider crime trends. The statistics show that at least one-
third of those convicted annually of crimes against fnancial services
companies are insiders, and often more. Banks and securities frms
conduct background investigations on employees, audit their activities,
MONEY LAUNDERING STATISTICS
0.5
1.5
2.5
3.5
1
2
3
4
In Billions $
2001
600
800
700
900
2002 2003 2004
.859
867
856
868
877
1.9
3.5
2.2
INDICTMENTS FOR
MONEY LAUNDERING
2001 2002 2003 2004
SEIZURES FOR
MONEY LAUNDERING
I
l
l
u
s
t
r
a
t
I
o
n

b
y

J
a
c
k
I

s
I
l
v
a
n
FeAtUreD Arti CLe : : SECURI TY, SYSTEMS AND ThE I NSI DER ThREAT
accordIng to FInancIal crImes report to the publIc, FbI, may 2005
in an era of highly auTomaTed business
and governmenT operaTions, The ThreaT
posed by an insider can increase due
To The poTenTial To use compuTing To
magnify The impacT of The crime and To
hide evidence.
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
15
often monitor them on the job and employ excellent security, yet the
percentage of those involved in fnancial crimes has not substantially
dropped for more than 20 years. Similarly, surveys of many types of
industries by major accounting frms by the Certifed Fraud Examiners
(who investigate major insider crimes) and the retail industry’s surveys
(where employees steal more than shoplifters) report a persistent threat
to all types of businesses from insiders.
In an era of highly automated business and government operations,
the threat posed by an insider can increase due to the potential
to use computing to magnify the impact of the crime and to hide
evidence. Most businesses and government agencies have not yet
employed systems capable of protecting the employer against the
trusted insider. Further, most background investigations lack a focus
on candidates’ life online, where especially young people spend more
time than their older predecessors. If a person has developed a habit of
computer systems misuse (e.g. hacking or using computers to commit
offenses), the person’s misdeeds might go undetected in a background
investigation, since most online criminals are not caught today.
e v o L v i n g t e C h n o L o g y
Again, professional security is contributing to the solution. It is
now possible to prevent, detect and respond to computer crimes in
progress; to warn users before they push the wrong key, mistakenly or
on purpose; to supplement normal vetting by including background
investigations on the Internet; and to search proprietary databases for
indications of prior online misbehavior. These new solutions depend
on automation for immediate response, and on the new breed of
security professional who understands the role that systems play in
crimes, as well as business functions.
As the tools for securing our increasingly automated work environment
continue to evolve, it will be possible to improve crime prevention in
the pursuit of protecting people, information, assets and reputation.
Understanding evolving trends and utilizing the leading-edge tools to
the fullest are the province of today’s security professional. se

Edward J. Appel is senior president and COO of the Joint Council on Information
Age Crime.
Your Resource for Career Connections in Security
Looking for that perfect ft? The National Association of Security
Companies introduces it’s all-new online employment service, the
NASCO Contract Security Career Center - your resource for
career connections in the security industry.
For Employers: This easy-to-use resource is designed to help you
recruit the most qualifed professionals in the industry.
For Job Seekers: Whether you’re looking for a new job, or ready to
take the next step in your career, we’ll help you fnd the opportunity
that’s right for you.
To fnd a job or fll a position, visit http://careercenter.nasco.org today.
Contract Security Career Center
http://careercenter.nasco.org
NASCO H-page ad1.indd 1 8/30/2006 5:17:13 PM
FeAtUreD Arti CLe : : XXXXXX
FeAtUreD Arti CLe : : PROTECT ThE COUNTRY —WhI LE PROTECTI NG YOURSELF
Proec the
Country
While Proecing Yourself
ChANGES TO SAFETY ACT APPLICATION hELP FOSTER BETTER SECURITY.
WRI T T EN BY BRI AN F I NCh | I L L UST RAT I ON BY DUNCAN WAL kER
• Database search software.
• Maintenance services.
• Vulnerability assessment methodologies.
• Certifcation programs.
• Integration services.
• Training services.
Even if the SAFETY Act immunity is
circumvented (which can happen only
if the seller lied or committed willful
misconduct when fling its application),
other protections are still available, such as
a bar on punitive damages and a liability
cap at the amount of the seller’s insurance.
In addition, claims can only be fled in U.S.
federal court.
SAFETY Act protections apply regardless
of whether the customer is a government or
private entity. These incentives are designed
to help ensure that the United States has
as many tools in its arsenal as possible to
deter, defend against and defeat terrorist
activities.
One of the more underreported success stories
of the Department of Homeland Security
(DHS), the Support Anti-Terrorism By
Fostering Effective Technology Act of 2002
(SAFETY Act) is generating great hope. Given
that it provides broad liability protections for
sellers of products or services that help detect,
defend against or respond to acts of terrorism,
many welcomed the passage of the SAFETY
Act. Congress intended these protections to
be applied as broadly as possible in response
to concerns that conducting business in the
homeland security market segment would
expose companies to nearly limitless legal
liability.
The process for obtaining SAFETY Act
protections has been a work in progress.
To that end, DHS recently implemented
signifcant changes to make the SAFETY Act
process easier and more effcient.
Wh A t i s t h e s A F e t y A C t ?
Under the SAFETY Act, the seller of an
“anti-terror technology” (which is either a
product or a service) may apply for liability
protections from the DHS. If the DHS awards
the protections of the SAFETY Act to an
anti-terror product or service, its sellers and
customers are protected from liability arising
out of terrorist attacks. These protections
include the immediate dismissal of claims
alleging liability arising out of the use of a
SAFETY Act-approved technology during a
terrorist attack. Such protections are awarded
only after DHS conducts a thorough review of
the seller’s product or service.
Essentially, any product or service that has
an anti-terror application is eligible for
protections under the SAFETY Act. Examples
of products and services that have been
awarded protections under the SAFETY Act
include:
• Security guard services.
• Explosive-sniffng canines.
• Chemical and biological detection
equipment.
16
17
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
18
The SAFETY Act should be of interest to any entity involved in
anti-terror activities because it will signifcantly increase liability
protections if the seller or customer of anti-terror products or services
face liability claims arising out of acts of terrorism. By simple virtue of
utilizing SAFETY Act-approved products or services, customers will
gain signifcant liability protections. At the same time, they will enjoy
the level of comfort associated with knowing that that the DHS has
thoroughly vetted the items. Finally, utilizing SAFETY Act-protected
technologies and services could signifcantly limit the amount of
terrorism coverage a customer has to obtain, thereby limiting its
concerns about the availability of terrorism insurance.
F i n A L r U L e A n D r e v i s e D A P P L i C A t i o n K i t
DHS recently released both the fnal rule governing the SAFETY Act
and a revised application kit. The documents contain several very-
welcomed new developments. The following are especially noteworthy:
• Pre-Qualifcation of Procurements: Since the SAFETY Act was
enacted, potential applicants have been searching for ways to
better ensure a guarantee that if they submit a bid on a particular
procurement, they will obtain SAFETY Act coverage. Under the
fnal rule, customers now have a way to help ensure that potential
vendors will, in fact, receive SAFETY Act coverage. The new
“Pre-Qualifcation Designation Notice” process gives agencies a
method to submit their potential procurement to DHS for review.
If DHS fnds that the potential procurement merits SAFETY Act
approval, vendors who are ultimately chosen to provide the specifed
technology will essentially be guaranteed SAFETY Act approval.
That process should help bring forward more potential vendors,
increasing choice and the potential that the proper technology will
be deployed.
• Developmental Testing & Evaluation (DT&E) Designations: In
the development phase of any technology, it is quite normal for an
unfnished or unproven product to be feld tested or deployed in
limited circumstances. In the context of anti-terror technologies,
such deployments can be extremely problematic given that terrorist
activity could realistically occur during the deployment. SAFETY
Act protections would obviously be ideal to limit liability, but the
interim fnal rule did not contemplate offering protections for such
deployments. The fnal rule addresses those concerns by creating a
heretofore unavailable liability protection method. The SAFETY Act
protections offered under a DT&E Designation lasts for no more
than 36 months and applies only to limited deployments. While a
DT&E Designation is more limited than full SAFETY Act approval,
it provides a measure of liability protection that otherwise was not
available.
• Changes to the Application Kit: The new version of the SAFETY
Act application kit addresses criticisms that the application
process is confusing and overly burdensome. First and foremost,
DHS has drastically toned down the “pre-application” section
of the kit. Applicants no longer have to fll out a confusing form
that previously often resulted in grand misconceptions about a
particular technology. DHS has also added a section directly asking
what entities have been procuring the technology in question.
Importantly, that section includes categories for commercial
organizations and foreign governments. DHS has also gone to
great lengths to provide a better vehicle for requesting an expedited
review. A specifc section now addresses this issue, which should
make it easier for applicants to explain what pressing deadlines they
face and why DHS should issue a decision in less time than typically
required. In that vein, DHS has also reduced the potential review
time from 150 to 120 days.
While there are many other changes in the fnal rule and application
kit, it is suffcient to note that DHS has gone a long way to address
many of the concerns applicants expressed.
B r o A D e r U s e
Security professionals everywhere have a unique opportunity to take
advantage to the benefts the SAFETY Act offers, particularly those
included in the fnal rule and revised application kit.
Increase utilization of the SAFETY Act inside and outside of the
federal government.
Homeland security as a mission is not the sole responsibility of
DHS. Numerous other members of the federal family play a vital
role in defending the nation from terrorist threats. As such, security
professionals across the board should work with DHS to encourage
the use of SAFETY Act-approved products by private sector partners.
This could take the form, for instance, of the USDA encouraging
companies to use SAFETY Act-certifed companies to perform security
services in order to help reduce the risk of agro-terrorism. Similarly, a
stadium manager could work with DHS to have its security operations
approved under the SAFETY Act or seek to use SAFETY Act-certifed
intrusion detection companies for providing access control. Every
entity should work actively with DHS to increase the utilization of the
SAFETY Act.
One vehicle in particular that should promote the use of the SAFETY
Act outside of DHS is the National Infrastructure Protection Plan
(NIPP). The NIPP explicitly encourages use of SAFETY Act-approved
products to protect critical infrastructure and key resources. Given that
the NIPP is the DHS blueprint for not only protecting the nation’s
critical infrastructure but also partnering with other federal, state and
local agencies as well as the private sector to do so, it only makes sense
to use that vehicle to help promote the SAFETY Act.
Submit “creative” applications to DHS.
Too often, companies mistakenly think that the SAFETY Act is
intended only for cutting-edge widgets. Potential applicants sometimes
shy away from submitting applications for things like engineering
services or even existing technology solutions for fear of being rejected
by DHS.
Such fears are unwarranted. DHS has repeatedly made clear that
it welcomes any application so long as the technology or service in
question can help combat terrorism in some fashion. Applicants
should feel free to think creatively and should strongly consider fling
an application for any product or service they offer or utilize to fght
terrorism. Just reviewing the list of approved products and services
reveals that DHS is willing to offer SAFETY Act protections to a wide
range of products and services.
FeAtUreD Arti CLe : : PROTECT ThE COUNTRY —WhI LE PROTECTI NG YOURSELF
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
19
AppROvED pRODUCT LIST fOR HOMELAND SECURITY
Importantly, companies that provide their own security services
internally should seriously consider fling a SAFETY Act application.
DHS is willing to consider applications for services the company itself
utilizes. Thus, owners of critical infrastructure or even something as
routine as an amusement park that offers its own security services can
obtain SAFETY Act protections, and they should seriously consider
doing so.
h o W t o P r o C e e D
Though at frst blush daunting, the SAFETY Act process can easily be
manageable, and the potential benefts of pursuing an application are
enormous. In return for dedicating some time and resources upfront, a
company can have access to an extremely powerful legal defense should
it ever face a potentially ruinous terror-related liability claim.
In order to determine whether the SAFETY Act is right for you and
your company, here are a few simple steps to follow:
1. Review what you have to offer. Check to see if your product or
service is ready for approval. If you pick a product or service that
is too early in its development, it likely will not be ready for the
SAFETY Act process.
2. Carefully determine what you want to apply for. Think carefully
about what items to include in a SAFETY Act application. Putting
too many dissimilar products or services in one application may lead
to a denial of your application.
3. Have patience in the drafting process. Because the SAFETY Act
application process can be complicated, applicants should plan
to devote a reasonable amount of time for drafting and reviewing
applications. An ill-prepared application likely will not be approved.
4. Explain yourself in the application. The application must contain
persuasive support that justifes SAFETY Act protection. DHS must
understand your product or service and how it works in order to
award approval.
5. Use outside help as needed. There are many potential pitfalls and
blind spots in the SAFETY Act application process. Experts can
assist in drafting and fling applications, and the costs associated
with using them will be more than justifed when your product or
services receives SAFETY Act approval.
While it has had some challenges, the SAFETY Act program is one
of the best offerings available from DHS. On the whole, DHS has
put a great deal of effort into the program and companies should be
lining up to take advantage of the benefts it offers. The opportunity to
receive liability immunity rarely comes along, and so companies should
pursue it with all proper energy. se

Brian Finch (fnchb@dicksteinshapiro.com) is head of the Homeland Security Practice
Group at the law frm Dickstein Shapiro, LLP, in Washington, D.C. He has helped
a wide range of companies obtain SAFETY Act protections and is also an Inaugural
Senior Fellow at the George Washington University Homeland Security Policy
Institute.
Accenture LLP: Biometric Identifcation Systems
Project (IDENT) Support Services
ALLuviAm, LLc: HazMasterG3®
APPLerA corP.: Infectious Disease Identifcation
System
Asset Protection & security services, LP:
Guards
BAe systems informAtion & eLectronic
systems integrAtion, inc.: Infrared
Imaging System (IRIS) Cameras, Matador™ Infrared
Countermeasure (IRCM) System
BioPort corPorAtion: BioThrax®
BLAstgArd® internAtionAL, inc.: BlastWrap®
and BlastGard® Mitigating Trash Receptacles
the Boeing comPAny: Technology Evaluation and
Design Services, Visual Security Operations Console
(VSOC) Sentinel, Anti-Terrorism Integrated Logistics
Support Management Services (AT-ILS)
Bruker dALtonics nBc detection corP.:
Rapid Alarm and Identifcation Device-Manual
cAngene: Vaccinia Immune Globulin Intravenous
(Human) (VIG)
ceiA usA Ltd.: Security Metal Detection Equipment
cePheid: GeneXpert®
comPosite structurAL design, L.L.c.: CSD
Tractor-Trailer Truck Crash Barrier (TTTCB), B123
e-Z-em, inc.: Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion
fedex custom criticAL, inc.: Strategic National
Stockpile Transportation and Distribution
generAL dynAmics ArmAment And
technicAL Products, inc.: Joint Biological Point
Detection System
generAL eLectric comPAny, ge
infrAstructure, inc., ge security, inc.,
And ge invision, inc.: CTX™, EntryScan3 and
EntryScan3-e, Itemiser2 & Itemiser3
hAch uLtrA AnALytics: BioLert™/ Bioni™
hdr security oPerAtions, inc.: HDR Security
Services–Planning; HDR Security Services–Design
idAho technoLogy inc.: RAZOR
internAtionAL Business mAchines
corPorAtion: Risk Assessment Platform, First
Responder Interoperability Solution
iPc internAtionAL corP.: Security Services
itt industries, inc.: Night Vision Technologies,
Force Protection Team
keLLogg Brown & root services, inc.:
Enhanced Filtration Unit System
LAnguAge AnALysis systems, inc.:
NameClassifer™
Lockheed mArtin: Specialized Security Training
Services; Systems Engineering and Integration Services
(SEIS) for the Fixed and Mobile Defender™ Systems;
Systems Engineering and Integration Services for the
Integrated Electronic Security Command/ Control/
Communications System, AN6400 Checked Baggage
Scanner, Marine Traffc Management System, Risk
Assessment Platform
michAeL stAPLeton AssociAtes: SmartTech
System and Explosion Detection Services
mititech, LLc: Safetydrape™
northroP grummAn sPAce And mission
oPtimetrics, inc.: Automated Decision Aid System
for Hazardous Incident (ADASHI) First Response™
PrePAred resPonse, inc.: Rapid Responder
rAPiscAn systems, inc.: Metal Detection Systems;
Conventional X-ray systems
reseArch internAtionAL, inc.: ASAP II™, Smart
Air Sampler System (SASS) 2000 Plus™; RAPTOR™
reveAL imAging technoLogies, inc.: Reveal
CT-80 Explosive Detection System (EDS)
sAfeview, inc.: Scout™ Systems
sAic: Vehicle and Cargo Inspection System
securitAs hoLdings, inc.: Security Services
siemens Logistics And AssemBLy systems,
inc.: Checked Baggage Inspection System
siemens mAintenAnce services, LLc:
Maintenance and Repair Services
smiths detection, inc.: HI-SCAN Conventional
Cabinet X-Ray, Sentinel II™, Hi-SCAN 7555i
strAtegic diAgnostics inc.: Microtox®
systems corPorAtion: Systems Engineering,
Design and Integration Services; Biological Detection
System
thermo eLectron corPorAtion: EGIS, EGIS II,
and EGIS III Systems
triPLe cAnoPy: Security Assessment Services
turner construction co: Checked Baggage
Screening System Services (CBSS Services)
unisys: Registered Traveler Solution
urs corPorAtion: Threat and Vulnerability
Assessment Services
verified identity PAss inc.: Verifed Identity
Pass (Verifed ID)
york internAtionAL corP.: Solution Air Handler
the wAckenhut corPorAtion: Consulting and
Risk Management Services, Security Services
wAshington grouP internAtionAL, inc.:
Container Inspection Services
D E C E MB E R / J A N U A RY 2 0 0 7 • S E C U R I T Y E X E C U T I V E . O R G
Legislative Update
20
Hearing held on Dec. 7, 2006 on proposed changes to board’s rules concerning company license
holder’s replacement, unarmed guards and watchmen, continuing education. Changes were approved
as proposed. Amendments to GAC 509-3-.02, -.12 authorize 180-day grace period (on request) for
replacing company’s qualifed license holder, increase training requirement for all security offcers
to 24 hours of classroom instruction, require registered security offcers to have eight hours of
continuing education for renewal, subject armed security offcers to additional frearms training and
increase investigative personnel training.
Public hearing
on proposed rule
changes conducted by
board Dec. 7, 2006;
changes approved as
proposed.
G
A
C

5
0
9
-
3
-
.
0
2
,

-
.
1
2
SuppoRtive
SuppoRtive
Proposed changes to rules relating to eight-hour basic classroom instruction, written examination,
four-hour assessment module, annual/biennial refresher courses, professional certifcation and in-
structor certifcation. Establishes procedures for accreditation of private security training programs.
Introduced in the
House Sept. 25,
2006 and referred
to Judiciary
Committee.
O
A
R

2
5
9
-
0
6
0
-
0
0
1
0
Proposed amendments to 9 NYCRR 6027.4 would revise the topics and hours of instruction
per topic for the 16-hour security guard on-the-job training course. Proposal would add incident
command system (two hours) and terrorism-related topics (four hours). Training on the existing
mandated topics would be adjusted from nine to six hours, so total hours of the course will remain
16 hours.
Comment period
closed on Dec. 15,
2006. Status of
changes unavailable
at press time.
9

N
Y
C
R
R

6
0
2
7
.
4
NASCO meetings with legislative leadership continue to raise awareness of the private security sales
tax’s negative impact on public safety through resulting cuts in service to accommodate unbudgeted
cost increases. Additional meeting are being scheduled with other key players in the FY 2008 New
Jersey budget process. Meanwhile, the Coalition Against Security Tax has attracted members from the
ranks of NASCO members’ clients and several business-oriented associations.
Approved
P.L.2006, c.44,
on July 8, 2006.
N
J

A
.
B
.

4
9
0
1
NOT
SUPPORTIVE
nasco has retained counsel to help repeal the sales tax on security services. we have
formed coalition against security Tax (casT) for opponents to the new tax. To join
casT, contact gail simonton at gsimonton@nasco.org.
Proposes to allow the use of rifles and shotguns by trained security/armored car guards where the risk
of terrorist activity is high. Delaware Board of Examiners of Private Investigators and Private Security
Agencies will hold hearing on Jan. 25, 2007 at 10 a.m.
Hearing scheduled
for Jan. 25, 2007 at
10 a.m.
D
E

2
4
,

6
1
Proposed amendments to Administrative Rules of Montana include adding a branch offce licensing
fee of $25, clarifes fngerprint check fees as pass-through of state and FBI fees, and provides changes
for frearms instructors, types of frearms, annual requalifcation.
Proposed changes
July 6, 2006;
adopted Nov. 23,
2006
M
T

2
4
.
1
8
2
.
4
0
1
A bill to provide for the protection of health and safety during certain disasters. Would involve coor-
dination among Departments of Health and Human Services, Homeland Security and Environmen-
tal Protection Agency. Bill must be reintroduced before being considered in new Congress. Because
it defnes “participating responder,” NASCO will contact bill sponsor to discuss impact on NASCO
members. Sponsor Rep. Barton (R-Texas), is current chairman of the House Energy and Commerce
Committee.
Introduced
Dec. 5, 2006;
referred to Energy
and Commerce
Committee
U
S


H
.
R
.

6
3
4
7
A bill to direct the secretary of Homeland Security to provide for enhanced security of chemical
facilities and for other purposes. Calls for secretary of Homeland Security to establish risk-based per-
formance standards for security of certain chemical facilities; would also require vulnerability assess-
ments and development and implementation of site security plans for chemical facilities. Homeland
Security would issue regulations within six months of passage. If inspection of a facility resulted in
fnding of noncompliance, owner or operator would receive written notice and opportunity to correct
problems. Failure to satisfy notifcation requirements could result in order for facility to cease opera-
tion until compliant. Bill must be reintroduced before being considered in new Congress. NASCO
will contact bill sponsor to determine likelihood of reintroduction and note NASCO’s interest in
proposal. Sponsor Rep. Barton (R-Texas), is current chairman of the House Energy and Commerce
Committee.
Introduced
Dec. 5, 2006;
referred to Energy
and Commerce
Committee
U
S


H
.
R
.

6
3
4
8
SuppoRtive
NASCO’ S VI EW SUMMARY AND WHAT I T MEANS TO NASCO MEMBERS BI L L STATUS
SuppoRtive
SuppoRtive
All information is accurate as of press time.
Our customized, uniform solutions
support your security objectives
Visit www.unitexdirect.com to purchase and view a complete line
of professional uniforms to convey your officer’s authority instantly.
Extensive inventory for immediate deliveries

Full line of security uniforms, police equipment
and ballistic armor

Personal and prompt attention to each order

Online ordering and private customized e-commerce
stores on request by client

Custom uniform programs
“Unitex Direct’s execution, inventory management and
high quality service are a great help to our organization.”
—President, SecurAmerica, a nationwide contract security firm
For the complete SecurAmerica Case Study and other examples of Unitex Direct’s
customer-focused uniform solutions, visit www.unitexdirect.com.
800. 682. 1606 ext . 230 • www. uni t exdi r ect . com
Responsive, attentive and swift
order fulfillment—Unitex Direct.
Uniform Precision
Si nce 1992 —The Best Val ue and Ser vi ce i n the Industr y
1 . 8 0 0 . 2 1 4 . 0 2 0 7 1 WWW. ML C h A Nl C Ck O0 l . C OM
l NS0kANCL 8kOKLkACL, lkOCkAMS & kl SK MANACLMLNJ lOk J hL SLC0kl J ¥ Olll CLk,
LL LCJ kONl C SLC0kl J ¥- AL AkM, l NvLSJ l CAJ l ON & 8ACKCkO0Nb SCkLLNl NC l Nb0SJ kl LS
J O L L Ak N MOk L , CONJACJ O0k S L kvl CL J L AM: MA1 1 bl 5ÞAR1 £ , Ml K£ L £ HH£ R
Ok 51 £ V£ M£ c HAHl c. l NS 0k ANCL 8 kOKL k S , l L L AS L CONJACJ MARc KA1 2.
WhLN ¥O0k 80Sl NLSS bLMANbS J hAJ ¥O0 AkL LvLk¥WhLkL, ¥O0 NLLb SOML ONL
J hLkL l Ok ¥O0. AJ J hL MLChANl C CkO0l ¥O0k l kLMl 0M 80¥S MOkL J hAN C0S JOMl 7L b
COvLkACLS, l J 80¥S O0k COMMl J MLNJ JO 8Ll NC ¥O0k J k0S J Lb 8kOKLk 365 bA¥S A
¥LAk. WhLN ¥O0 AkL LvLk¥WhLkL, WL AkL hLkL l kOJ LCJ l NC ¥O0k 80Sl NLSS.
nowhere vs. everywhere
kLCOCNl 7Lb 8¥ NASCO
V A L U £ b V £ H b O R

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful