You are on page 1of 5

 

Nutrition aspects and

fertilizer recommendations on

MANGO
(Mangifera indica)

Contents:

1. General features ……………………………………………………….……………………………………….....… 2
2. Main factors affecting mango production ……………….……………………………………….......… 2
3. Plant nutrition ………………………………………………….…………………………………………………..... 3
4. Fertilizer recommendations ……………………………………………………………………………..…… 3
5. References .......................................................................................................................................................... 5

 
 
 
 
1. General features
Mango (Mangifera indica, L.) belongs to the family of Anacardiaceae. 
It is an perennial crop: life cycle depends on the geographical area where it grows but generally it can be 
divided in four stages as shown in figure 1:  
 

 
Figure 1 – Productive life cycle of Mango plants 
 
Its origin is in the Indomalayan region and now it is one of the most cultivated fruit crops in the tropical and 
sub‐tropical areas. 
Global production of mango in 2010 overcome 30 million tonnes, mainly subdivided in Asia and the Pacific 
region (78%), Latin America and the Caribbean (13%) and Africa (9%). In 2010 India was the largest world 
mango producing nation, accounting for 40% of total global output, while the most significant increase in 
mango production was China and Mexico in Asia and the Pacific region and Latin America and Caribbean 
respectively.  
In Peru mango production covered 16 500 ha in 2008 in the regions of Piura (75%), Lambayeque (19%) and 
Ancash (6%). The main varieties cultivated in Peru are Kent (82%), Haden (11%) and T. Atkins (7%). 
Average yields range between 7.5 and 15 Mt/ha. 
 
2. Main factors affecting mango production
Mango prefers clay‐loam soils, well drained with a pH between 5 and 7. It grows at altitudes ranging 
between 0 and 1 200 m a.s.l. Optimal mean temperatures are 20‐26°C.  
It is important that two conditions are respected to ensure a good production: 
 At least 3 months of dry during the flowering stage; 
 A mean temperature of 24‐26°C during the ripening stage. 

2
 
In Peru crop cycle follows the scheme shown in figure 2: 
 

 
Figure 2 – Crop cycle of mango in Peru 
 
3. Plant nutrition
In  literature  data  referred  to  leaf  analysis,  nutrient  uptake  and  removal  are  very  heterogeneous: 
however in table 1, 2 and 3 average values of plant nutrient analysis and removal are reported. Generally 
the ratio N:P:K is 1:0.5:1.2. 

Table 1 – Plant Analysis – Macronutrients (% of dry matter) 

N  P  K  Ca  Mg  S 
1.0‐1.2  0.1‐0.2  0.8‐1.2  2.0‐3.3  0.2‐0.3  0.1‐0.2 
 
Table 2 – Plant Analysis – Micronutrients (mg/kg of dry matter) 

Cu  Fe  Mn  Zn  B  Mo 


9‐18  120‐190  170‐450  30‐75  40‐80  0.3‐0.6 
 
Table 3 – Nutrient removal in fruits (kg/t of fruits) 

N  P2O5  K2O  CaO  MgO  S 


4.0‐6.25  1.8‐3.1  4.9‐7.5  7.0‐7.7  4.0‐5.0  0.5‐0.6 
 
4. Fertilizer recommendations
In  the  countries  where  mango  is  cultivated  the  use  of  manure  is  widespread  (generally  10 
kg/plant/year). Mineral fertilization ensures average amounts of nutrients as reported in table 4: data are 
referred to crops of plants in full production. 
 

3

Table 4 – Recommended fertilizer schedule (g/plant/year) 

N  P2O5  K2O  MgO  S 


300‐400  120‐240  320‐440  40‐80  80 
                                                                                         
Fertilizer applications are generally split in 2‐4 times after the harvesting and before the flowering. 
Root system is very deep and broad (up to 300 cm); however the more intense activity is concentrated in 
120 cm: then fertilizers should be put in holes around the plant in this area. 
Ilsa fertilizer programs may include two fertilizers (table 5): 
 PROGRESS  MICRO  6.5.13  is  a  pelletizer  organo‐mineral  NPK  fertilizer.  It  only  contains  organic 
Nitrogen deriving from Agrogel® and it is allowed in organic agriculture.  
 FERTIL  N  12.5  is  a  pelletizer  organic  Nitrogen  fertilizer  that  contains  exclusively  organic  Nitrogen 
deriving completely from Agrogel® and it is allowed in organic agriculture.  
 
Table 5 – Nutrient content of PROGRESS MICRO and FERTIL 

Fertilizer  Nutrient content (kg/100 kg of product) 
N  P2O5  K2O  SO3  MgO 
Progress Micro  6  5  13  10  2 
Fertil  12.5  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐ 
 
Ilsa fertilizers are characterized by slow release of the organic Nitrogen: Nitrogen is released mainly in the 
first period, then its release is lower but constant; periodical applications ensure a constant availability of 
Nitrogen. 
A feasible Ilsa fertilizer program is synthesized in table 6. 
 
  Table 6 – Ilsa fertilizer program 

Dose  Nutrient amount (g/plant/year) 
Fertilizer 
(kg/plant/year)  N  P2O5  K2O  MgO  S 
PROGRESS MICRO  min.  2.5  150  125  325  50  250 
max. 5  300  250  650  100  500 
FERTIL  min.  1.5  190  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐ 
  max. 1  125  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐ 
Total nutrient amount  min. 340  125  325  50  250 
(g/plant/year) 
max. 425  250  650  100  500 

 
 
 
4

5. References
 
IFA, 1992. IFA World Fertilizer Use Manual. International Fertilizer Industry Association, Paris. 
Van Ee S., 1999. Fruit Growing in the Tropics. Agromisa Foundation, Wageningen, 1999. 
Griesbach J., Mango growing in Kenya. 
Xiuchong  Z.,  Guojian  L.,  Jianwu  Y.,  Shaoying  A.  And  Lixian  Y.,  2001.  Balanced  Fertilization  on  Mango  in 
Southern China. Better Crops International, Vol. 15, N. 2, 2001. 
Avilan  L.,  Fertilizacion  del  Mango  en  el  Tropico.  Centro  Nacional  de  Investigaciones  Agropecuarias, 
Maracay, Venezuela. 
Kumar  N.,  2007.  Training  Manual  on  “Role  of  Balanced  Fertilization  for  Horticultural  Crops”, 
H o r t i c u l t u r a l   C o l l e g e   a n d   R e s e a r c h   I n s t i t u t e Tamil Nadu Agricultural University Coimbatore, 
Sponsored by I n t e r n a t i o n a l   P o t a s h   I n s t i t u t e  Switzerland