Report

Hawaii Superferry Commitments and Actions to Address Environmental Concerns

Prepared for

Hawaii Superferry, Inc.
1 Waterfront Plaza 500 Ala Moana Blvd., Suite 300 Honolulu, HI 96813

February 2007

1132 Bishop Street Suite 1100 Honolulu, HI 96813

HAWAII SUPERFERRY COMMITMENTS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS FEBRUARY 2007

Contents
1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Document Purpose ................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Background................................................................................................................ 1 1.3 Vessel Information.................................................................................................... 2 1.4 Harbor Information .................................................................................................. 4 1.4.1 Honolulu ....................................................................................................... 4 1.4.2 Kahului .......................................................................................................... 4 1.4.3 Nawiliwili ..................................................................................................... 4 1.4.4 Kawaihae....................................................................................................... 5 1.5 Schedule of Service ................................................................................................... 5 1.6 Check-in and Screening Process ............................................................................. 6 Hawaii Superferry Commitments .................................................................................. 7 Hawaii Superferry Actions .............................................................................................. 8 3.1 Marine Mammals ...................................................................................................... 8 3.2 Invasive Species......................................................................................................... 9 3.2.1 HSF Invasive Species Policies and Procedures........................................ 9 3.3 Harbor Users............................................................................................................ 10 3.4 Traffic........................................................................................................................ 10 3.5 Security ..................................................................................................................... 10 3.6 Public Safety ............................................................................................................ 11 3.7 Hazardous Materials .............................................................................................. 11 3.8 Vessel ........................................................................................................................ 12 3.9 Public Consultation and Outreach ....................................................................... 12 3.9.1 Advisory Boards ........................................................................................ 12 3.9.2 HDOT Public Meetings ............................................................................. 13 3.9.3 HSF Public Meetings and Presentations................................................. 14 3.9.4 Public Outreach.......................................................................................... 19 3.10 Agency Consultation .............................................................................................. 19 Hawaii Superferry Route Maps Hawaii Superferry Vessel Profile Hawaii Superferry Vessel Dimensions Hawaii Superferry Proposed Schedule Public Utilities Commission Decision Hawaii Superferry Tariff Hawaii Department of Transportation Exemption Declarations U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration Record of Categorical Exclusion Determination Court Rulings

2.0 3.0

Figures
1 2 1 2 A B C D E

Tables

Appendices

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F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T

Operations Plans Whale Avoidance Policy Maui Invasive Species Council Presentation to Hawaii Superferry Hawaii Superferry Presentation to Coordinating Group of Alien Pest Species Harbor Users Principals Working Group Meeting Mercator Report Harbor Users Meeting Summaries Traffic Studies Presentation to U.S. Coast Guard, December 2005 Presentation to the Law Enforcement Group, February 2006 Notices for HDOT Public Meetings Sign-in Sheets for HDOT Public Meetings Presentations at HDOT Public Meetings Questions and Answers from HDOT Public Meetings Public Outreach

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Abbreviations and Acronyms
A&B CATRALA CGAPS CFR DAR DLNR DMO DWT EA EIS EMS HDOA HDOT HHLA HHUG HIDTA HISC HOST HSAC HSF HWICA ID ILWU KEDB KISC MARAD MARPOL MISC Alexander and Baldwin Car and Truck Rental and Leasing Association Coordinating Group of Alien Pest Species Code of Federal Regulations DLNR, Division of Aquatic Resources State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Director of Marine Operations Deadweight Environmental Assessment Environmental Impact Statement Emergency Medical Services State of Hawaii Department of Agriculture State of Hawaii Department of Transportation Hawaii Hotel & Lodging Association Hawaii Harbor Users Group High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, Office of National Drug Policy – U.S. Dept of Justice Hawaii Invasive Species Committee Hawaii Ocean Safety Team Hawaii State Association of Counties Hawaii Superferry, Inc. Hawaii Wall & Ceiling Industry Association Identification International Longshore and Warehouse Union Kauai Economic Development Board Kauai Invasive Species Council U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships; Maritime Pollution Maui Invasive Species Council

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MSO NMFS NOAA OMPO CAC

Marine Safety Office National Marine Fisheries Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Oahu Metropolitan Planning Organization, Citizen Advisory Committee Public Utilities Commission Small Business Administration Small-Waterplane-Area-Twin-Hull United States Coast Guard United States Merchant Marine Academy Alumni Association

PUC SBA SWATH USCG USMMAAA

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1.0 Introduction
1.1 Document Purpose
Hawaii Superferry, Inc. (HSF) has undertaken and commissioned studies, sought public input, and crafted policies on issues relating to the operation of the ferry service between the four main Hawaiian Islands. This document provides a brief background on HSF and its operations, presents a summation of study efforts and findings, and provides the relevant documentation.

1.2 Background
Hawaii Superferry, Inc. will provide interisland vehicle and passenger ferry service between four Hawaiian Islands. The four ports of call are Honolulu Harbor (Piers 19 & 20) on Oahu; Kahului Harbor (Pier 2) on Maui; Nawiliwili Harbor (Pier 1) on Kauai; and Kawaihae Harbor on the Big Island of Hawaii. HSF proposes to provide initial interisland ferry service between Honolulu/Kahului and Honolulu/Nawiliwili once per day. Initial operations will be conducted with one ferry vessel beginning in 2007. A second vessel will be put in service in early 2009, at which time a Honolulu/Kawaihae route would begin as well as a second daily trip to Kahului. (See Figure 1 for routes.)

FIGURE 1

Hawaii Superferry Routes

As a water transportation company, HSF filed an application with the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to engage in operations as a Water Carrier. HSF participated in public hearings on four islands and received a decision granting the certificate on December 30, 2004. See Appendix A for

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the PUC Decision. HSF also filed a tariff with the PUC that stated HSF’s operating commitments and policies. See Appendix B for the tariff. In February 2005, the State of Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) found that an Environmental Assessment (EA) was not required and issued exemption declarations for each harbor. See Appendix C for these exemption declarations. In March 2005, the U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration (MARAD) determined, through a categorical exclusion, that an environmental review was not needed for a federal loan guarantee (see Appendix D). There have been two separate legal challenges to these exemptions, one in federal court and one in state court. On both legal challenges, the courts affirmed that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was not required. The final rulings are contained in Appendix E.

1.3 Vessel Information
The vessels used by HSF are approximately 106-meter (350-foot) high-speed vehiclepassenger, small-waterplane-area-twin hull (SWATH) type vessels with aluminum hulls built by AustalUSA in Mobile, Alabama. The following section provides a description of the physical characteristics and operations of the vessel during its sailing. The principal dimensions of the HSF vessel are summarized as follows:
TABLE 1 Hawaii Superferry – Vessel Dimensions Dimension Waterline Length Molded Beam Molded Depth Overall Length Maximum Draft Length 92.4 meters (303’01”) 23.8 meters (78’1”) 9.4 meters (30’10”) 106.5 meters (349’4”) 3.65 meters (11’8”)

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Hawaii Superferry Vessel Profile

FIGURE 2

The ferry consists of four decks: bridge deck which contains the vessel controls passenger deck where all passengers will be required to be during sailing mezzanine deck for passenger vehicles main deck for both passenger and commercial vehicles, including trucks and buses The total passenger capacity of the vessel is 866 persons and the maximum vehicle capacity is 282 passenger cars with no tall vehicles present (vehicles greater than 8 feet clear height which cannot traverse the main deck freely without overhead interference). The number of passenger cars that the vessel can hold is inversely proportional to the number of tall vehicles. The service speed of the HSF vessels is 35 knots in smooth water with a load of 400 tons Deadweight (DWT). Travel speed in shallow waters (less than 100 fathoms) will be reduced during whale season to 25 knots or less, which is considered by to be a similar speed of some other vessels (such as cruise and cargo ships) using Hawaiian waters. With a National Humpback Whale Sanctuary in Hawaiian waters, the ferry design itself can help reduce impact to whale habitat and reduce the chance of striking a whale. These features include: No discharged wastewater into Hawaiian waters Slender hulls with shallow draft that reduce the “swept area” which may strike a whale, thereby reducing the chance of strikes No propellers which have in the past produced lacerations High maneuverability with the ability to turn, slow, and stop quickly

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1.4 Harbor Information
Hawaii Superferry will operate in ports owned and managed by the HDOT – Harbors Division. These areas are improved, and are currently used by other harbor tenants. The ferries will be accessed by State-owned barges and ramps. HSF completed Operations Plans for each harbor in November 2006. The Operations Plans provide a detailed description of the planned terminal and vessel operating procedures. These are contained in Appendix F.

1.4.1 Honolulu
Honolulu Harbor is one of the largest container handling ports in the United States with over 8 million short tons of cargo handled annually. The harbor encompasses over 200 acres of container yards and 30 major berth facilities with over five linear miles of mooring space. It is the primary shipping link between the United States and the Pacific Rim countries, as well as the neighbor island ports. The Honolulu Ferry Terminal will be situated on Piers 19 and 20. Piers 19 and 20 are located in the central portion of Honolulu Harbor, just west of downtown Honolulu. Landside access occurs off of Nimitz Highway at two locations: Kukahi Street, and a driveway access, approximately 200 feet east of Kukahi Street. A Passenger Terminal building, initially built by DOT for other users, is located on the Pier 19 site. The area on Pier 20 that will be utilized for vehicle queuing is paved and lighted. HSF will ensure that light levels are adequate and compliant to conduct operations. The yard area is also equipped with fire hydrants. Additional existing utility connections include electrical power, communications, and water.

1.4.2 Kahului
Kahului is the only commercial harbor on the island of Maui. It is located on the north side of the island, within Kahului Bay. It is approximately 89 nautical miles from Honolulu Harbor. A full range of maritime services and facilities are provided at the Harbor, including a cruise ship terminal. The harbor consists of three piers with over 3,000 feet of berthing space. HSF will have a split operational area at Kahului Harbor. HSF will operate from Pier 2B which is located on the west side of the harbor, at the makai end of the pier. The overall length of Pier 2 (A and B) is 894 feet. The ferry loading barge will be situated along Pier 2B which has a length of 295 feet. The makai end of Pier 2 will be utilized for vehicle queuing and passenger loading/unloading from an HSF shuttle. HSF will also operate from an area adjacent to Kaahumanu Avenue, bound by Wharf Street and Pu'unene Avenue. These areas will be utilized for passenger pick-up/drop-off, passenger and vehicle check-in activities and as a waiting area.

1.4.3 Nawiliwili
Nawiliwili is the island of Kauai’s primary port and commercial harbor. It is located on the southeast coast of Kauai, 1 mile from the county seat of Lihue and approximately

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96 nautical miles from Honolulu Harbor. Facilities include piers for the handling of both overseas and inter-island containerized and general cargo. The harbor consists of 3 piers with over 1,800 feet of berthing space. The HSF will operate from Pier 1 and the adjacent yard located on the jetty. Pier 1 is located on the east side of the harbor. It has a berth length of 704 feet at a depth of 35 feet. The yard area contiguous to Pier 1 is approximately 20.5 acres.

1.4.4 Kawaihae
Kawaihae is one of the two deep draft harbors on the Island of Hawaii. It is located on the northwest coast of the Big Island, approximately 132 nautical miles from Honolulu Harbor. Facilities in Kawaihae Harbor include piers for the handling of both overseas and inter-island containerized and general cargo. The harbor consists of two piers with over 1,150 feet of berthing space. HSF was to operate from Pier 1 which is located on the west side of the harbor, near the harbor entrance channel. However, the earthquake of October 15, 2006, damaged Pier 1 and is no longer usable. HDOT – Harbors Division is currently determining an alternate operating area for HSF at Kawaihae Harbor.

1.5 Schedule of Service
Initial service is to begin in July 2007. One ferry vessel will provide service to three ports: Honolulu, Oahu; Kahului, Maui; and Nawiliwili, Kauai. A second ferry vessel and service to Kawaihae, Big Island is projected to begin in early 2009. The proposed inter-island passenger and vehicle ferry service schedule to and from the four major ports was established in coordination with HDOT-Harbors and the PUC.
TABLE 2 Hawaii Superferry Proposed Schedule Vessel 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 Departure Port Honolulu Kahului Honolulu Nawiliwili Honolulu Kawaihae Honolulu Kahului Departure Time 6:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m. 12:45 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 10:30 p.m. Destination Port Kahului Honolulu Nawiliwili Honolulu Kawaihae Honolulu Kahului Honolulu Arrival Time 9:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 10:00 p.m. 11:45 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 1:30 a.m.

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1.6 Check-in and Screening Process
Most HSF customers are expected to hold ticketed reservations before their arrival at the respective ferry terminals. This will speed the check-in process, as well as minimize the space required for ferry terminal operations and short-term waiting area. Advanced ticketing will be the primary means of reserving space on the ferry voyage and providing payment. Passengers will be able to purchase tickets via the HSF website, by phone, or in-person at the dock. Vehicle and passenger information will be collected at the time of ticketing. Passengers will be made aware of vehicle, plant, and animal restrictions at the time of ticket purchase. Any person or vehicle that does not comply with restrictions will not be allowed on the ferry, and will be required to leave the terminal area. Each passenger will be issued a reservation number. This number or a pre-printed boarding pass and government-issued photo identification (ID) are needed to board the ferry. Luggage will be checked at the ticketing counter and is subject to screening. Vehicle drivers must provide a valid driver’s license, vehicle registration, and proof of insurance. The vehicle must be free of mud and caked-on dirt to help prevent the spread of invasive species. All compartments must be unlocked for easy inspection. Everything in the vehicle, including all containers and carry-ons, is subject to security inspection.

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2.0 Hawaii Superferry Commitments
Hawaii Superferry is committed to addressing a wide range of measures to address environmental concerns. Following is a list of those commitments.

Marine Mammals
To develop and implement whale avoidance policies to avoid harming whales.

Invasive Species
To develop and adopt screening procedures and a passenger education program necessary to help prevent the spread of alien species between islands.

Harbor Users
To collaborate with both commercial and recreational users for existing harbor space and study how to coordinate the conflicting needs of harbor users.

Traffic
To complete analyses of the traffic data of the project and develop and implement measures to manage traffic flow.

Security
To develop a security plan for the HSF vessels and facilities on each island that includes passenger and vehicle screening.

Public Safety
To inform, cooperate, and interact with local police and fire departments and emergency medical services on all islands.

Hazardous Materials
To manage and minimize risks of hazardous material handling.

Vessel
To create a vessel that is environmentally friendly to the Hawaiian Islands and its surrounding oceans and marine life.

Public Consultation and Outreach
To consult with, and invite comments from, the general public about HSF policies and procedures where appropriate.

Agency Consultation
To consult with, and invite comments from agencies and coordinate reviews of HSF policies and procedures where appropriate.

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3.0 Hawaii Superferry Actions
Following is a list of actions undertaken by HSF to follow through on commitments to address environmental concerns.

3.1 Marine Mammals
Congress, in consultation with the State of Hawaii, designated the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary on November 4, 1992. The Hawaiian Islands National Marine Sanctuary Act identified the following purposes for the sanctuary: to protect humpback whales and their habitat within the sanctuary; to educate and interpret for the public the relationship of humpback whales and the Hawaiian Islands marine environment; to manage human uses of the sanctuary consistent with the Hawaiian Islands National Marine Sanctuary Act and the National Marine Sanctuary Act; and to provide for the identification of marine resources and ecosystems of national significance for possible inclusion in the sanctuary. Hawaii Superferry worked actively with whale researchers and other experts to develop their Whale Avoidance Policy and Procedures, which were finalized in May 2005 (see Appendix G). This policy contains procedures to avoid whales, what to do if whales are sighted, and specific routes designed to avoid whales during whale season (generally from January through April). HSF continues to explore additional methods of whale avoidance that would enhance the current policy such as communicating with companies who are researching forward-looking sonar and exploring the use of a “Whale Spotter Boat Alert System” developed by whale researchers. The ferry routes are primarily in deep waters where whale concentrations are smaller. Routes will be changed during whale season to avoid the more densely concentrated areas in the Maui area and Penguin Banks. Travel speed will be reduced during whale season in shallow waters (less than 100 fathoms) to 25 knots or less, which is a similar speed as other vessels using Hawaii waters, such as cruise and cargo ships. Two dedicated whale lookouts will be on the bridge during whale season, in addition to the Captain and an officer. High tech motion stabilizing and night vision binoculars will be used in addition to radar to help avoid whales. In addition, the design of the ferries can themselves help reduce impact to whale habitat and reduce the chance of harming a whale. These features include: No discharged wastewater into Hawaiian waters Slender hulls with shallow draft that reduce the “swept area” which may strike a whale, thereby reducing the chance of strikes No propellers which have in the past produced lacerations The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council supports the HSF Whale Avoidance Policy (see Appendix G).

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3.2 Invasive Species
Hawaii Superferry has developed policies and procedures in collaboration with the State of Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) and invasive species experts to help prevent the movement of invasive species. These policies are detailed below in Section 3.2.1. HSF collaborated with the public outreach workgroup of the Hawaii Invasive Species Council (HISC) to develop an education program for all ferry passengers. The program has components at time of reservation, on the website, in the terminals, and on-board the vessel with video. Passengers will be instructed on how to help prevent the spread of invasive species between islands. HSF held meetings with many different groups to help understand the invasive species issue and craft their invasive species policies and procedures. These activities included: Held numerous meetings with HDOA in 2006. These meetings occurred in March, June, September, October, and December. These meeting were a collaborative effort to ensure that the HSF tariff was in compliance with HDOA regulations. Formed a special invasive species workgroup with experts around the state to assist it with the issue. This group was established in October 2006, and includes representatives from Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR)Aquatic Resources, DLNR-Invasive Species, Fish and Wildlife Service, Invasive Species Committees, and the Nature Conservancy. Invited the Kauai Invasive Species Council (KISC) and Maui Invasive Species Council (MISC) to give presentations to HSF. See Appendix H for the presentation given by MISC on invasive species. Presented information to the Coordinating Group of Alien Pest Species (CGAPS) and requested feedback. This presentation is presented in Appendix I.

3.2.1 HSF Invasive Species Policies and Procedures
Passengers will be made aware of vehicle, plant, and animal restrictions at the time of ticket purchase. Any person or vehicle that does not comply with restrictions will not be allowed on the ferry, and will be required to leave the terminal area. HSF staff will conduct agriculture screening before passengers board. Screening will be monitored by the HDOA. Plants and propagative plant parts (for example, roots and root stock) must be inspected at the HDOA Plant Quarantine Office and will only be permitted onto the Hawaii Superferry if accompanied by a signed HDOA certificate of inspection. (Plant Quarantine inspection offices are near each port.) No other plants will be permitted on board.

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Domestic cats and dogs (and service animals with verification) and certain livestock will be allowed on board subject to HDOA regulations. Domestic livestock and poultry may travel in a vehicle if accompanied by a HDOA Certificate of Ownership & Movement. This is limited to domestic cattle, horses, donkeys, goats, sheep, and chickens. No reptiles, snakes, birds (except HDOA registered poultry transported by registered growers), rodents, or exotic species of animals of any kind are allowed onboard. Vehicles will be screened before boarding to ensure compliance. Dirty or muddy vehicles with accumulated or caked dirt will not be allowed aboard.

3.3 Harbor Users
HSF is a founding member of the Hawaii Harbor Users Group (HHUG). HHUG is a non-profit maritime transportation industry group whose members include key harbor users. HHUG works collaboratively with the Department of Transportation, Harbors Division to help identify and prioritize desired improvements for commercial harbors state-wide. The Hawaii Harbor Users Group commissioned studies to help identify harbor improvements and funding (see Appendices J and K). Meetings notes and summaries are included in Appendix L.

3.4 Traffic
A traffic impact study was completed for each harbor in November 2006 (see Appendix M). These studies were conducted assuming a maximum load of passengers and vehicles during the busiest traffic times. Analyses were performed according to the procedures developed in the Highway Capacity Manual for unsignalized and signalized intersections. As a result of these studies, HSF revised its departure schedules to avoid the busiest times of the day. HSF is working with the HDOT-Highways Division to address traffic impacts. Port facilities were designed to accommodate expected vehicle loads. HSF staff will manage traffic entering and exiting each facility to help prevent traffic congestion.

3.5 Security
As required by the Department of Homeland Security, there will security procedures for passengers and vehicles, while at the terminals and on the vessel. Security plans will be approved by the United States Coast Guard (USCG), which is the agency for Homeland Security that oversees maritime security.

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3.6 Public Safety
HSF will coordinate with HDOT; the Hawaii State Department of Motor Vehicles; and local, state, and federal law enforcement for screening procedures. Meetings have been held with local police on Big Island, Kauai, and Oahu; HSF is trying to arrange a meeting with the police on Maui. In addition, meetings were held with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and fire departments on each of the four islands. The ferries are built to the latest and most stringent ocean safety standards. Satellite navigation systems will know where the ferry is at all times. Each of the four diesel engines and water jet propulsion systems is independent. Each of the two catamaran hulls includes eight watertight compartments. And the ferry uses fireproof and fireresistant materials throughout, along with automatic fire control systems, and the most advanced evacuation and life raft systems available. Crew areas are securely locked and separate from passengers and there will be a security officer onboard. All crew members will be trained in security measures. The ferry is monitored by a network of video cameras and alarms. In addition, passengers are not allowed on the vehicle deck while the ferry is under way. Boarding tickets will be matched with picture IDs for adults. Vehicles and their drivers must have a current license, proof of car insurance, and motor vehicle registration, which will have to be shown at the time of boarding. Vehicles will be inspected by security staff and all compartments of vehicles must be unlocked for inspection. See the Operations Plans in Appendix F for more specific check-in information. Owners or operators of ferry vessels are required to designate security officers and develop security plans based on Coast Guard requirements and assessments measures specific to the vessel’s operations. The security plan must address measures for the interface of the vessel as well as the terminal. HSF has contracted with Hornblower Marine Services to provide facility security plans and services. A presentation was made to the U.S. Coast Guard in December 2005, and to the Law Enforcement Group in February 2006. See Appendices N and O, respectively, for these presentations.

3.7 Hazardous Materials
Hawaii Superferry, Inc. developed a hazardous materials (HazMat) plan that dictates what, if any hazardous materials can be brought aboard the Superferry. (See the HSF tariff in Appendix B for more details.) These include refrigerator trucks, propane, and fireworks. Any hazardous materials will be in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Legal firearms must be declared and left in the vehicle. Explosives and hazardous materials are not permitted in luggage or carry-ons.

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3.8 Vessel
Fueling will occur only after the last voyage of the day at the Honolulu Ferry Terminal. These operations will not take place during vehicle/passenger loading activities, and will comply with HDOT, USCG, and International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) regulations. Wastewater will be stored onboard, and released to a dockside tanker truck that will discharge the wastewater into the municipal system in accordance with Federal, State, and local regulations. Vessel specifications and basic operations were discussed in Section 1.4. More specific information is contained in the Operations Plans in Appendix F.

3.9 Public Consultation and Outreach
Hawaii Superferry participated in four levels of public outreach: Advisory Boards; HDOT public meetings; public meetings sponsored by, and put on, by HSF itself; and information about HSF, invasive species, and other subjects disseminated through HSF’s website and newspaper advertisements. In addition, HSF has consulted with agencies throughout its process.

3.9.1 Advisory Boards
HSF established Advisory Boards on the Big Island, Kauai, and Maui. These advisory boards were established to guide HSF in addressing community issues on each island. They consisted of community members on each island from a variety of backgrounds. Topics discussed included traffic issues, invasive species concerns, whale avoidance policies, and harbor planning and use. Advisory boards serve as volunteers and receive no compensation from HSF. Board members were initially selected by HSF; however, any board members subsequently appointed were suggested and agreed on by each board. Advisory Board meetings are held on a regularly scheduled basis with frequency determined by each board. The Advisory Board on the Big Island began meeting monthly in March 2006, and in May 2006, switched to bi-monthly meetings. Their meetings involved discussions about traffic, discussions about the Kawaihae Harbor, and a site visit. The Kauai Advisory Board began meeting monthly in March 2006. Topics of their meetings included traffic, invasive species, and social impact issues. The Advisory Board on Maui began meeting in March 2006. They met at least monthly, though occasionally more frequently. Paramount topics at their meetings were traffic issues, canoe paddlers in Kahului Harbor, the need to address environmental concerns, and ways to help prevent the spread of invasive species.

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3.9.2 HDOT Public Meetings
In June and September 2006, HDOT conducted public meetings which invited feedback on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Kauai, and the Big Island of Hawaii. Following is a list of those meetings. Big Island of Hawaii June 19, 2006 – Kealakekua June 20, 2006 – Hilo June 20, 2006 – Waimea September 26, 2006 – Kailua-Kona Kauai June 26, 2006 – Kapaa June 27, 2006 – Eleele June 27, 2006 – Lihue September 25, 2006 – Lihue Maui June 21, 2006 – Lahaina June 22, 2006 – Kahului June 22, 2006 – Kihei September 27, 2006 – Wailuku Oahu June 29, 2006 – Honolulu July 5, 2006 – Honolulu July 6, 2006 – Kaneohe September 28, 2006 – Honolulu By law, public notice was required to be given at least 10 days prior to each meeting. Appendix P contains the text of the Pubic Notices published for these meetings and a list of their publication date and location. Appendix Q provides the sign-in sheets for these meetings. See Appendix R for the presentations given. Questions and comments were also taken and given subsequent answers, which were posted to the HSF website. See Appendix S.

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3.9.3 HSF Public Meetings and Presentations
In addition to the HDOT public meetings, HSF conducted meetings and gave presentations that solicited feedback and encouraged discussion on the Big Island of Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu. Those HSF-conducted meetings included the following: 2002 Governor Linda Lingle 2003 Alexander and Baldwin City and County of Honolulu Councilman Mike Gabbard Governor Linda Lingle HDOT Senator Daniel Inouye Staff 2004 Ala Moana Rotary Alexander and Baldwin Car and Truck Rental and Leasing Association (CATRALA) Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii Downtown Honolulu Rotary Financial Executives International Hawaii Chapter Governor Linda Lingle Governor’s West Hawaii Advisory Committee Governor's Maui Advisory Committee Hawaii Economic Association Hawaii Transportation Association Hawaiian Canoe Club Hawaiian Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary HDOT US Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration Hawaii Hotel & Lodging Association (HHLA) Honolulu/Pier 19 Community Hawaii Ocean Safety Team (HOST) Hawaii State Association of Counties (HSAC) International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) Maui Economic Development Board Maui Tomorrow Mayor Allan Arakawa Marine Safety Office (MSO) Honolulu Na Ka 'Ewalu Canoe and Cultural Club

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HAWAII SUPERFERRY COMMITMENTS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS FEBRUARY 2007

Oahu Metropolitan Planning Organization, Citizen Advisory Committee (OMPO CAC) PUC and Consumer Advocate State of Hawaii Representative Joe Souki Rotary Club of Honolulu Small Business Administration (SBA) Entrepreneur’s Conference Senator Daniel Inouye Senator Roz Baker State Private Investment Fund Hawaii Angels United States Coast Guard (USCG) 2005 Department of Transportation - Harbors Division - Maui East Kauai Lions Club Ewa Beach Community Exchange Club Hawaii Association of County Building Officials Hawaii Business Travelers Association Hawaii Developers Council Hawaii Island Economic Development Board Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council Hilo Rotary Club Honolulu Pier 19 Community House of Representatives Committee on Transportation Hawaii Society of Public Accountants 45th Annual Conference Hui Wa'a Kahului Rotary Club Kauai Chamber of Commerce Kauai County Council Planning Commission Kauai Rotary Club Lions Club Maui Chamber of Commerce Maui County Councilmember Robert Carroll Maui Invasive Species Committee Maui Rotary Club Maui Senior Citizen Planning & Coordination Council Maui Economic Opportunity Inc. Mililani Mauka/Launanani Valley Neighborhood Board Nature Conservancy Maui Office of the Mayor Maui Canoe Clubs Senate Committee on Transportation and Government Operations

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HAWAII SUPERFERRY COMMITMENTS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS FEBRUARY 2007

State Legislature Superintendent of Haleakala National Park USCG United States Merchant Marine Academy Alumni Association (USMMAAA) Waianae Coast Neighborhood Board West Hawaii Taxpayers Association West Maui Taxpayers Association 2006 A&B Properties, AJA Baseball, Kauai Aaron Leong, Senator Daniel Inouye staff in Honolulu Agriculture Conference, Annual Statewide Conference Agriculture Leadership Foundation of Hawaii Air Cargo Association Big Island Farm Fair, Kona Big Island Farm Bureau Business Overview CATRALA Chamber of Commerce 3rd Quarter Membership Meeting City and County of Honolulu Commission on Transportation Councilchair Stacy Higa, Big Island Councilmember Bob Carroll, Maui Councilmember Charmain Tavares, Maui Councilmember Danny Mateo, Maui Councilmember Donald Ikeda, Big Island, South Hilo Councilmember Fred Holschuh, Big Island, North Hilo Councilmember Gary Safarik's legislative aide, Big Island Councilmember Jo Ann Johnson, Maui Councilmember Joann Yukimura, Kauai Councilmember Peter Hoffman, Big Island, Kawaihae District Councilmember Virginia Isbell, Big Island, Kona District DLNR, Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) Drs. Lou Herman and Adam Pack Exchange Club of Bishop Street Federal Law Enforcement Agencies Hawaii County Council Hawaii County Fair, Hilo Hawaii Harbors Users Group Hawaii HIDTA (High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, Office of National Drug Policy – U.S. Dept of Justice) HISC Public Outreach Workgroup Hawaii Seniors Institute Hawaii Sheriff (Pier 19)

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HAWAII SUPERFERRY COMMITMENTS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS FEBRUARY 2007

Hawaii Telecommunications Association Hawaii Transportation Association Hawaii Venture Capital Association Hawaiian Canoe Club, Maui Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary HDOA - Plant Quarantine & Animal Industries Division HDOT - Oahu Honolulu Advertiser Editorial Board Honolulu Board of Realtors Honolulu Fire Department, Chiefs/Operations Honolulu Fire Department, Planning Office Honolulu Harbor Users Honolulu Police Department Honolulu Star Bulletin Editorial Board Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association, Maui Hawaii Wall & Ceiling Industry Association (HWCIA) International Administrative Assistant Professionals International Facilities Management Association Joint House/Senate Transportation Committees Kahului & Maui Mall Marketing & Lease Managers Kahului Harbor Users Kahului Master Planning Meeting Kaipo Asing, Kauai County Council Chair Kauai Board of Realtors, Community Issues Committee Kauai Chamber of Commerce Kauai County Farm Bureau Fair Kauai County Fire Department Kauai County Police Department Kauai County Council Members Individual Meetings Kauai Economic Development Board (KEDB) Kauai Economic Opportunity Kauai Farm Bureau Board of Directions Kauai Fire Department Kauai Planning & Action Alliance Kauai Police Department Kawaihae Business Group Kawaihae Canoe Club Kawaihae Local Resources Council Ken Stokes, Environmental Economist, Kauai Kihei Sunrise Rotary Club Kihei Wailea Rotary Club Kona Mauka Rotary Kona/Kohala Chamber of Commerce Lahaina Restoration Association

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HAWAII SUPERFERRY COMMITMENTS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS FEBRUARY 2007

Lahaina Town Action Committee Law Enforcement Group Legislative and Senate Committees on Transportation & Government Operations Lihue Business Association Liquor Commissions 54th Annual Convention, Kauai Lloyd Nekoba, Representative Neil Abercrombie Staff in Honolulu Marine Technology Society Maritime Insurance Market Mark Hubbard, Community Leader, Kauai Mattie Yoshioka – Kauai Economic Development Board Maui Arts and Cultural Center Maui Chamber of Commerce Maui County Emergency Medical Service Maui County Fair Maui County Fire Department Maui County Council Maui Economic Development Board Maui Economic Opportunity Maui Farmers Coop Exchange Mayor Arakawa, Maui Mayor Bryan Baptiste, Kauai Mayor Harry Kim and Cabinet, Big Island Mayor's Anti-Drug Coordinator, Kauai Milton Arakawa, County of Maui, Director of Public Works Ne Kai Ewalu Canoe Club, Maui National Association for Purchasing Management Nature Conservancy Nawiliwili Harbor Users National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) - Pacific Island Region Oahu Metropolitan Planning Organization Pacific Business News Editorial Board Pacific Manta Ray Foundation Poipu Beach Rotary Club Queen Kaahumanu Center, Maui Riki Hokama, Maui County Council Chair Rob Parsons, Environmental Advisor to Mayor Arakawa of Maui Rotary Club of Diamond Head Rotary Club of Kahului Rotary Club of Lahaina Soroptimist International of Maui State Farm Bureau Street Bikers United, Maui

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HAWAII SUPERFERRY COMMITMENTS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS FEBRUARY 2007

Sue Kanoho, Kauai Visitors Bureau Sunrise Rotary Club, Maui Sunset Rotary Club, Oahu Temporary Director of Maui Hotel & Lodging Association USCG Honolulu Wailuku Main Street Association, Maui West Maui Taxpayers Association

3.9.4 Public Outreach
In addition to public meetings, HSF published information about invasive species and HSF’s operations on its website and in newspapers across the state. See Appendix T for this information.

3.10 Agency Consultation
As mentioned throughout this document, agencies were consulted by HSF for applicable functions.

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