You are on page 1of 71

ANNEX A

European Commission

Food Facility

Facility for rapid response to soaring food prices in


developing countries

Restricted Call for Proposals 2009

Grant Application Form (Parts A and B)

Budget line 21.02.03

Reference: EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi

Deadline for submission of Concept Notes:


24/06/2009

Dossier No
(for official use only)

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form i


NOTICE
Evaluation grids and application forms have been modified for this Call in order to give more weight
to relevance in the Concept Note evaluation. Relevance will therefore constitute the major criterion in
pre-selection. Relevance will not be evaluated again when assessing the Full Application. It is
therefore of utmost importance that applicants use the correct application form for this call.

Registration by applicants and partners in PADOR, EuropeAid's on-line database, is obligatory for
this Call for Proposals: http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/onlineservices/pador/index_en.htm.

All personal data (such as names, addresses, CVs, etc.) mentioned in your application form will be
processed in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the
Council of 18 December 2000 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of
personal data by the Community institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data. Your
replies to the questions in this form are necessary in order to assess your grant application and they
will be processed solely for that purpose by the department responsible for the Community grant
programme concerned. On request, you may be sent personal data and correct or complete them. For
any question relating to these data, please contact the Commission department to which the form must
be returned. Beneficiaries may lodge a complaint against the processing of their personal data with the
European Data Protection Supervisor at any time (Official Journal L 8, 12.1.2001).

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form ii


TABLE OF CONTENTS

II. THE ACTION .................................................................................................................................. 3

IV. DECLARATION BY THE APPLICANT FOR CONCEPT NOTE ........................................ 11

I. GENERAL INFORMATION ......................................................................................................... 12

II. THE ACTION ................................................................................................................................ 18


1. DESCRIPTION................................................................................................................................. 20
1.1 Description of the action and its effectiveness (max 14 pages) ............................................................. 20
1.2. Methodology (max 4 pages) ................................................................................................................. 33
1.3. Duration and indicative action plan for implementing the action......................................................... 37
1.4. Sustainability (max 3 pages)................................................................................................................. 40
1.5. Logical framework ............................................................................................................................... 43
2. BUDGET FOR THE ACTION.......................................................................................................... 43
2. EXPLANATION AND JUSTIFICATION FOR MAIN COSTS INCLUDED IN THE BUDGET.............................. 43
3. EXPECTED SOURCES OF FUNDING ........................................................................................... 44
4. APPLICANT'S EXPERIENCE OF SIMILAR ACTIONS ................................................................ 45

III. THE APPLICANT........................................................................................................................ 51


1. IDENTITY ....................................................................................................................................... 51
2. INFORMATION WITH REGARD TO ACTIONS IN THE FIELD OF MICROFINANCE (IF FORESEEN
BY THE ACTION) .......................................................................................................................................... 52
1. DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTNERS............................................................................................. 54
2. INFORMATION WITH REGARD TO ACTIONS IN THE FIELD OF MICROFINANCE (IF FORESEEN
BY THE ACTION) .......................................................................................................................................... 55
3. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT....................................................................................................... 59

V. ASSOCIATES OF THE APPLICANT PARTICIPATING IN THE ACTION ....................... 61

VI. CHECKLIST................................................................................................................................. 62

VII. DECLARATION BY THE APPLICANT................................................................................. 63

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form iii


ACRONYMS

AFD Action for Development


AHTs Animal Health Technicians
AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
ARDCO Agriculture and Rural Development Coordination Offices
ASE Agric Service Ethiopia
BoFED Bureau of Finance and Economic Development
CACC Central Agricultural Census Commission
CAHWs Community Animal Health Workers
CBI Community-based institutions
CBPP Contagious Bovine Pleuro-pneumonia
CCCA Comprehensive Community Conversation for Action
CCPP Contagious Caprine Pleuro-pneumonia
CLAs Cluster Level Associations (formed from a group of SHGs)
CoLFs Community learning forums (method of training and community discussion)
COMPO Cooperative Organisation and Management Promotion Office
CSA Central Statistics Agency
CSC Central Statistics Commission
CSSGs Community Self-help Saving Groups
DCA Dan Church Aid
DFs Development Facilitators
EBSN Employment based safety-net
EC European Commission
EECMY/SES Ethiopia Evangelical Church Mekane Yesus, South Ethiopia Synod
EPaRDA Ethiopian Pastoralist Research and Development Association
EU European Union
FFHC Freedom from Hunger Campaign
FGM Female genital mutilation
FMD Foot and Mouth Disease
GBV Gender-based violence
HDWs Hand-dug wells
HH Household
HIV Human Immunodeficiency Virus
HTPs Harmful traditional practices
IFAD International Fund for Agricultural Development
IGA Income Generating Activities
IUAs Irrigation User Associations
LSD Lysosomal Storage Diseases
MFIs Microfinance institutions
MGDs Millennium Development Goals

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form iv


MoFED Ministry of Finance and Economic Development
NGO Non-Governmental Organisation
PASDEP Plan for Accelerated and Sustained Development to End Poverty
PEACE Poverty Eradication and Community Empowerment (a microfinance organization created
by ASE, one of the partners in this project)
PID Participatory Innovation Development
PLHA People living with HIV and AIDS
PMIA Participatory Monitoring and Impact Assessment
PRA Participatory Rural Appraisal
PSC Project Steering Committee
PSNP Productive Safety Net Programme
RIR Red Island Rhode
RMC Rangeland management committee
SACCOS Saving and credit cooperative societies
SEED Skill Enhancement and Entrepreneurship Development
SGAS Seed growers association
SHG Self-Help Group
SIM Serving In Mission
SNNPR Southern Nations, Nationalities and People Regional State
SNV Netherlands Development Organisation
SOPDA South Omo People’s Development Association
TBD Tuberculosis disease
USAID United States Agency for International Development
WIDP Woreda Integrated Development Plan
WOWD Woreda Office of Water Development
WSA Women Support Association
WUAs Water User Associations

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form v


ANNEX A

PART A – CONCEPT NOTE

I. APPLICANT AND PARTNERS

Christian Aid
Name of the applicant:

Nationality [1] of the applicant and British


date of establishment:

Applicant's EuropeAid ID number [2]: GB-2007-DOG-2711191461

Ongoing contract /Legal Entity File 6000059497


number (if available) [3]:
Non profit making
[4]
Legal status :

Name: Agri Service Ethiopia (ASE)


Partner 1: EuropeAid ID number: ET-2008-BDC-0310690158
Nationality and date of establishment: Ethiopia, December 1969

Legal status: Registered local NGO at federal ministry of Justice, No. 131

Name: Action for Development (AFD)


Partner 2: EuropeAid ID number: ET-2008-DUQ-1211755771
Nationality and date of establishment: Ethiopia, July 1997

Legal status: Registered local NGO at federal ministry of Justice, No. 83

Name: Women Support Association (WSA)


Partner 3: EuropeAid ID number: ET-2008-GRE-1806372675
Nationality and date of establishment: Ethiopia, 1997

Legal status: Registered local NGO at federal ministry of Justice, No. 39

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 1


Applicant's contact details for the purpose of this action

Postal address
Christian Aid, 35 Lower Marsh, London SE1 7RL

Telephone number: Country


+44 (0)20 7523 2362
code + city code + number

Mobile: Country code + N/A


number

Fax number: Country code +


+44 (0)20 7620 0719
city code + number

Contact person for this


Dominic Brain
action

Contact person’s e-mail


dbrain@christian-aid.org
address

E-mail address of the


info@christian-aid.org
organisation

Website of the organisation http://www.christianaid.org.uk/

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 2


II. THE ACTION

The applicant must ensure that the present section of the Concept Note:

 does not exceed 5 full pages (A4 size) of Times New Roman 11 characters with 2 cm margins and
includes the following subsections:
1. Summary of the action
2. Description of the action
3. Relevance of the action
 Responds, in the same sequence, to the headings listed below. It is expected that the size of each
section will reflect the relative importance of each heading (ref. max scores in the evaluation grid in
the Guidelines). The evaluation will be carried out in accordance with the evaluation grid (evaluation
network) and it will be based solely on the information provided by the applicant in the Concept
Note.
 Is drafted as clearly as possible to facilitate its assessment.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 3


1. Summary of the Action

Title of the action: Community Productive Capacity Enhancement Project, Ethiopia

Dasenech, Maale and South Ari Woredas of South Omo, Southern Nations, Nationalities
Locations and People Regional State (SNNPR), Ethiopia
Total duration/End date 20 months, October 31, 2011
Total eligible cost in € € 1,500,000
Amount requested from € 1,350,000
the EC in €
% of total eligible cost 90%

Microfinance Provision of micro credit


Overall Objective Overall Objective: To develop and strengthen the productive and technical agricultural
of the action capacities of rural communities in SNNPR to mitigate the volatility of food prices and
natural shocks.
Specific objective: Specific objective: Sustainable changes in the livelihoods of 50,000 direct beneficiaries and
37,300 indirect beneficiaries in 15 kebeles as a result of improvements in their productive
and technical agricultural capacities.
Target group(s) 10,000HHs (2,000 in Dasenech woreda, 4,500 in South Ari, 3,500 in Maale) from 15
kebeles
Final beneficiaries 87,300 people
Estimated Results Result I: Agriculture intensification and diversification in 15 kebeles:
Increased crop yields of up to 15 quintals per hectare for maize, sorghum and at least to
raise teff production to 10quintal teff ha;
Improved livestock productivity for 100,000 animals through better access to water and
veterinary services and through improved rangeland management;
Greater take up of fishery opportunities: 400 HHs to benefit from increased income from
selling or eating fish as livelihood diversification option.
Result II: Increased household income diversification in 15 kebeles:
Support and training provided to develop alternative income generating activities including
live animal trading, beekeeping, fishery and small scale trading;
Access to credit services improved through 80 community managed micro credit schemes;
Primary level marketing cooperatives stabilised price of food and agricultural products and
enhance the bargaining power of producers.
Result III: Increased productive and technical agricultural capacities:
Capacity of local government staff in programme planning and implementation increased;
disaster risk reduction capacity increased to plan for natural disaster and mitigate their
impact; Community productive and technical capacity enhanced through tailor made
training.
Main activities Result I: Small scale irrigation development on 50 hectare of land; Construction of 6 sand
dams, rehabilitation of 15 hand-dug wells with cattle troughs; material and financial support
to 400HHs on fishery related activities; training of 30 community animal health workers;
rangeland development and management on 150 hectare of land
Result II: Skills training and provision of start up tools and working capital, establishment
and support of 80 SHGs, establishment and support of 14 primary marketing cooperatives,
strengthening 9 existing saving and credit cooperatives
Result III: Training of local government centres involved in the Productive Safety Net
Programme; Strengthen the existing extension system and Capacity building for CBO/CBI/
MFI.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 4


2.0 Description of the Action

South Omo Administrative zone located in the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People Regional State
(SNNPR) is home to 18 ethnic minorities. The region’s challenging, remote location geographically,
politically and economically has left it underserved by governmental and non governmental development
agencies. Due to this social and economic marginalisation, the vulnerability to and impact of frequent
droughts and floods is heightened and life threatening. Specifically, the target woredas of Dasenech, Maale
and South Ari are characterized by a chronic food shortage period of six to nine months per year, creating a
dependency on external food assistance. According to the Ethiopian government’s 2009 appeal for food aid
and support, 20% of the population in the target woredas of Dasenech, Maale and South Ari require
emergency relief assistance.

Despite these severe constraints, the target woredas have huge potential for crop and livestock development,
with vast fertile, irrigable land along the Omo River basin and the river itself representing enormous
opportunities for irrigation, fishing and marine transport. The capacity of communities technically in
agricultural extension is limited, and therefore the potential for sustainable livelihoods is not currently
fulfilled. This action has been designed to address these gaps in capacity and to promote sustainable changes
in the livelihoods of 50,000 direct beneficiaries and 37,300 indirect beneficiaries in 15 kebeles as a result of
improvements in their productive and technical agricultural capacities.

Christian Aid and its partners Action for Development (AFD) Women Support Association (WSA) and Agri
Service Ethiopia (ASE) have been working in the SNNPR to support communities in food security and
livelihoods development on a long term basis. 1 With extensive experience of project implementation in
livelihoods, disaster risk reduction (DRR), microfinance and gender based violence / empowerment
programmes, the synergies between the areas of expertise of these agencies will, in this action, provide a
package of services to raise the production in three target woredas to feed the community year round without
additional food aid from external sources.

Following needs assessments carried out by AFD in Dasenech and Maalee and WSA in South Ari woreda
during the first quarter of 2009, the above agencies led by Christian Aid formed a consortium with the
objective of developing and strengthening the productive and technical agricultural capacities of rural
communities in SNNPR to mitigate the volatility of food prices and natural shocks. The 2009 base line
surveys which have informed the project preparation included consultations with Zonal authorities, elders,
traditional/ village leaders and chairpersons of the Kebeles as well as private actors, NGOs and other
associations. Women and men were included in the PRA processes which identified needs, area selection,
targets, type of inputs and services. The local communities are very positive towards the proposed action
particularly as development services are very limited in the region. Their willingness to participate was
voiced during the PRA processes and needs assessment. The Action is a 20 month agricultural extension and
training project, to be implemented by the above agencies through the following activities:

Result I: Agriculture intensification and diversification in 15 kebeles: AFD and ASE lead
 Intensification of field and horticultural crop production - maize, sorghum, teff, pulses, vegetables,
fruit trees - both rain fed and using small scale irrigation schemes (wind propelled and using pump
generators);
 Extension services supporting fisheries, beekeeping, value chain development and tailored producer-
led training on farming and/or rangeland management.
 Establishment of 30 seed grower groups and multiplication centres.
 Establishment of a mobile veterinary service facility, through training of 30 community health
animal workers and 15 vet health posts with vaccination crushes. Private drug vendors will be
supported to establish vet drug dispensary sites in the three target woredas;

1
The partnership of AFD and CA goes back to the 1987s and the former has been implementing CA-supported community
empowerment projects and Disaster Risk Reduction project in the above mentioned woredas since 2005. CA is also supporting WSA
implemented community based microfinance project in South Ari woreda since 2007. Agri Service was recruited as CA’s partner in
early 2009 as this organisation has rich experience in Action Oriented Capacity Development and long years of experience in building
the capacity of community based institutions (40 years).
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 5
 Review and assessment of existing rangeland management practices in three woredas, will be carried
out, as well as the design of appropriate rangeland improvement and management systems and
introduction of improved forage species and possible utilization of crop residue in South Ari and
Maale woreda. This will be implemented across all three woredas;
 Construction of 6 sand dams and rehabilitation of 15 hand-dug wells in Dasenech woreda.
Construction of animal troughs to support livestock development;
 Stock assessment, supply of appropriate fishing nets, hooks and boats, establishment self help groups
for fishermen;
 Organise capacity development exchanges with Arba Minch, where fisheries activities are well
developed.
.
Result II: Increased household income diversification in 15 kebeles – WSA Lead
 Provision of skills training schemes relevant to alternative livelihoods:
management: bookkeeping, basic business skills, IGA management, saving and credit management
particularly for women which will facilitate successful micro credit schemes.
vocational: weaving, fishing net making, sewing, beehive making, to provide new skills sets to
diversify sources of income;
 Organizing target groups under 80 Self Help Groups i.e. different alternative income generating
activities with separate self help groups per type of livelihood;
 Establishing women’s saving and credit groups focused on facilitating economic empowerment for
women that reduce female poverty and marginalisation;
 Establishment of two primary livestock marketing cooperatives, two primary honey marketing
cooperatives and four primary fishery marketing cooperatives;
 WSA will strengthen the existing saving and credit cooperatives in the three target woredas.

Result III: Increased productive and technical agricultural capacities: AFD and ASE lead
 Equipping of functional information system at woreda, zonal and regional government level of the
pastoralist and rural development offices. Provision of information and communication and data
recording systems - three computers, three printers and transportation facilities such as motor bikes
(three) and pedal bicycles (for CAHW-8 for Dasenech woreda only) will be provided.
 Training of 120 local government officers in vulnerability assessments, disaster risk reduction,
climate mitigation approaches, post harvest losses, value chain development, animal health services,
drought cycle management and community dialogue facilitation.
 Education on HIV prevention and care will be integrated into activities as appropriate. 2 This task
will be led by WSA, a well experienced organisation in HIV prevention and control.

Risks and assumptions


 There is a risk that, having received their training and become better qualified, some of the
governmental technicians and administrative staff responsible will seek and find jobs elsewhere. The
kebele authorities and the partner NGOs will monitor this and train new staff, if necessary.
 There is a risk that there will not be enough women willing to come forward for training and
participation in the programmes provided. By encouraging and helping those less well-educated
women who might be willing but do not have the confidence to put themselves forward numbers are
foreseen to increase.
 There is a risk of conflict over use of land and resources. The project will organise community
dialogues, based on local norms and experience, to minimise the risks that may lead to conflicts
between the ethnicities. The societal systems and norms such as taking care of and efficient
utilization of communal resources, effective local mechanisms of managing conflicts and indigenous
knowledge of animal husbandry are great social capitals that provide a very good foundation to build
on to bring about transformation in target woredas.

2
Partners will learn about the nutritional needs of people living with HIV and other chronic diseases, and enable people
taking ARVs to eat a well-balanced diet.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 6
3.0 Relevance of the action

3.1 Relevance to the objectives/sectors/themes/specific priorities of the call for proposal


In line with Regulation (EC) No 1337/2008, this action will support activities designed to increase and
diversify agricultural in the South Omo region of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and People Regional
State (SNNPR), Ethiopia. The overall outcome of the project to develop and strengthen the productive and
technical agricultural capacities of rural communities in SNNPR to mitigate the volatility of food prices and
natural shocks is in line with objectives b) and c) of this call 3. The action will include vocational training at
community and local government level, investment in equipment and resources for agriculture and fisheries,
microcredit schemes to support diversification as well as support to and by professional groups in the
agricultural sector, particularly veterinary services. All of the above are in line with activities permitted
under this call. By working to increase food security from 6 to 12 months, this action is also in line with the
Millennium Development Goal #1, to reduce by half the proportion of people who suffer from hunger by
2015. The action will also strongly support the Ethiopian Government’s Plan for Accelerated and Sustained
Development to realize food security through intensification and diversification of agriculture, income
diversification and capacity building of local government structures. The overall objective of the action is
congruent with Christian Aid’s corporate strategic directions of working with marginalized and vulnerable
group of the community to secure livelihoods, through local partners.

3.2 Relevance to the particular needs and constraints of the target country and region
The findings of the 2009 baseline surveys conducted in the three target woredas (Dasenech, Maalee and
South Ari) indicate the prevalence of high level of marginalisation, vulnerability to structural food insecurity
and alienation from the development endeavours and information. The assessment revealed that 57.8% and
54.4% of the population in Maalee and Dasenech respectively live below poverty line. Change in climate
variables - drought and flood - and conflict, coupled with limited income sources, poor agricultural extension
services and inadequate social services are among the major factors contributing to poverty and vulnerability.
Specifically, the target woredas characterize a chronic food shortage period of six to nine months, creating
dependency on external food assistance. For example, according to the Government of Ethiopia’s appeal for
food aid support in 2009, 20% of the population in the action’s target woredas required emergency relief
assistance.

In terms of resources, the woredas have huge potential for livestock development, vast irrigable land along
the Omo River basin and the river itself which represents enormous opportunities for irrigation, fishing and
marine transport that has not yet been exploited effectively and efficiently. Moreover, the two agro-pastoral
woredas (South Ari and Maalee) have fertile land for crop production and rivers and streams to be used for
small scale irrigation to increase the production at least by producing twice a year. Through the
implementation of this project it is possible to raise the production in three target woredas to feed the
community year round without additional food aid from external sources. The potential for expanding
production is there, the capacity to exploit this potential is lacking.

Ethiopia has a generalised HIV epidemic with adult prevalence estimated to be 2.1% in 2007. There are
approximately 980,000 people living with HIV but only 38% in need of treatment receiving ARVs. The
rural epidemic appears to be relatively low but varies across the country. Only 15.8% of women and 28.7%
of men aged 15-49 years have comprehensive knowledge of HIV and AIDS. Additionally, despite an
increase in condom use, high rates of unprotected sex persist. 4 HIV tends to affect the productive members
of the family and, if unable to access treatment, negatively affects their ability to improve their agricultural
output and quality of life. In the project target areas risk of HIV infection is exacerbated by widespread
gender inequality, high levels of stigma and discrimination towards PLHA, and high levels of gender based
violence in the target areas.

Thus, this action will focus directly to address the root causes that hinder agricultural production and
productivity, constrain the diversification of livelihoods and impede proper and appropriate services delivery

3
b) Support activities to respond rapidly and directly to mitigate the negative effects of volatile food prices on local populations in line
with global food security objectives, including UN standards for nutritional requirements and (c) Strengthen the productive capacities
and the governance of the agricultural sector to enhance the sustainability of interventions
4
UNAIDS Country Report Ethiopia, 2008.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 7
to the community by respective bodies. The action is designed in such a way as to supplement and
complement each other to address the root cause of the problems and constraints facing the target groups. In
terms of the wider programme of the partners in this region, Action for Development is currently
implementing a community empowerment project, focusing on provision of social services, water supplies
for domestic use and livestock and strengthening community based organizations in Maale. The proposed
action will not duplicate this current project because the activities of the ongoing projects are mainly on
water development for human, community empowerment (more of organisational type) and alternative basic
education in Maale woreda and gender based violence in South Ari woreda.

3.3 Define and describe the target groups and final beneficiaries their needs and constraints and how
the project will address these needs

Target Group 1: Agro pastoralists, farmers and fisherman: The recent high increase in food prices
affects mainly groups who are already food insecure. This target groups does not produce adequate food for
the year round and this makes them dependent on food aid which is usually a meagre resource. Livestock is
the primary livelihood base for majority of the target group, with the majority of ownership being in the
hands of men. These valuable livestock resources have been decreasing constantly during the past 10 years.
People in general and women in particular in the targeted woredas therefore face serious constraints on their
potential for increasing their income to lead a better and more dignified life. Veterinary support is required as
well as improved range management. 30 pastoralists (at least 30% of whom will be women) will be trained
in community animal health workers training providing service for 100,000 animals. Droughts and floods are
increasing in frequency, and impact heavily on crop farming, with needs for technical skills, equipment and
organisational development required for irrigation schemes, (200HHs agro pastoralists out of which women
are 80), seed multiplication (600HHs farmers out of which women are 240) and input supplies (2,400 agro–
pastoralists, of which 960 are women and 1440 men). To support the diversification of livelihoods 400 (of
which 50% are women) people will receive training on fisheries processing and marketing. 100 Artisans (60
are women) making local beehives, fishing boats, fishing nets and 30 (50% women) blacksmith skills
training and material support to produce farm tools and implements. 6 livestock marketing cooperatives with
600 members (240 are women) and 4 honey marketing cooperatives with 400 (300 are women) members and
4 fish marketing cooperatives with 400 members (200 are women) will be supported.

Target Group 2: Women as micro-credit entrepreneurs and self help group members: Organising
women into self help and micro credit groups will support women to be economically independent, and
provide a safe space for discussion on key issues affecting their lives, including Gender Based Violence
(GBV) and HIV prevention and care. 1600 beneficiaries (1100 are women) will receive entrepreneurial skill
training with micro credit support. Opportunities will also be identified to provide behaviour change
communication on gender based violence to men in the target areas, as GBV cannot be addressed by
targeting women only. Men must also be involved, as they are, after all, the perpetrators.

Target Group 3: Local government officers: Having the responsibility for disaster risk reduction (DRR)
and response, this target group requires specific technical capacity. Therefore training of 120 local
government officers (10% are women) in a range of DRR and climate adaptation approaches will be of great
value, and will support target groups 1 and 2 in their activities at an institutional level.

Target group selection: The selection of target groups is based on levels of vulnerability, including limited
livelihood diversification, low access to off-farm income, limited access to social services, geographical
marginalisation (isolation from markets/market outlets), as well as absence of other interventions in the area.
Priority will be given to women headed households, people with chronic illnesses including HIV, households
with orphans and vulnerable children, and those with little experience in some activities such as fisheries.
Skills training and other support will be provided according to needs and physical ability of the target
groups. Where possible sites will be located close to or on land that is already joining irrigation scheme
activities.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 8


EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 9
BEFORE SUBMITTING YOUR CONCEPT NOTE, PLEASE CHECK THAT EACH OF THE FOLLOWING To be filled in by the applicant
COMPONENTS IS COMPLETE AND RESPECTS THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

Title of the Proposal: Yes No

PART 1 (ADMINISTRATIVE)
1. The instructions for concept note, published for this call for proposals, have been followed.

2. The Declaration by the applicant has been filled in and has been duly signed and is included with the Concept
Note.
3. The proposal is typed and is in one of the languages of the Call for Proposals (English, French, Spanish or
Portuguese).

4. One paper original is included (only required if not submitting by email).

5. An electronic version of the Concept Note (CD-Rom or USB) is enclosed (only required if not submitting by
email).
PART 2 (ELIGIBILITY)
6. The proposed action will be implemented in an eligible country/ies listed in section 1.2 of the
Guidelines for grant applicants.

7. The implementation of the proposed action will be finished by 31/10/2011.

8. The requested contribution is equal to or higher than the minimum grant amounts allowed per country under
section 1.3 of the Guidelines for grant applicants.
9. The requested contribution is equal to or lower than the maximum grant amount allowed per country under
section 1.3 of the Guidelines for grant applicants.
10. The applicant is registered in PADOR and all supporting documents have been uploaded.

11. If the applicant is requesting a derogation from PADOR registration, Annex N1 and all supporting documents
have been submitted with the Concept Note.
12. The partner(s) is/are registered in PADOR and all supporting documents have been uploaded.

13. If a derogation from PADOR registration is being requested for the partner(s), Annex N2 and all supporting
documents have been submitted with the Concept Note.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 10


IV. DECLARATION BY THE APPLICANT FOR CONCEPT NOTE

The applicant, represented by the undersigned being the authorised signatory of the applicant, and, in the
context of the present call for proposals, representing any partners in the proposed action, hereby declares
that

 the applicant has the sources of financing and professional competence and qualifications specified
in Section 2 of the guidelines for applicants;

 the applicant undertakes to comply with the obligations foreseen in the partnership statement of the
grant application form and with the principles of good partnership practice;

 the applicant is directly responsible for the preparation, management and implementation of the
action with its partners (if any) and is not acting as an intermediary;

 the applicant and its partners are not in any of the situations excluding them from participating in
contracts which are listed in Section 2.3.3 of the Practical Guide to contract procedures for EC
external actions (available from the following Internet address:
http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/procedures/implementation/practical_guide/index_en.htm)Furthe
rmore, it is recognised and accepted that if they participate in spite of being in any of these
situations, they may be excluded from other procedures in accordance with section 2.3.5 of the
Practical Guide;

 the applicant and each partner (if any) have submitted the supporting documents as stipulated under
section 2.4 of the Guidelines for Applicants;

 the applicant and each partner (if any) are eligible in accordance with the criteria set out under
sections 2.1.1 and 2.1.2 of the guidelines for applicants;

 if recommended to be awarded a grant, the applicant accepts the contractual conditions as laid down
in the standard contract annexed to the Guidelines for grant applicants (Annex F);

 the applicant and its partners are aware that, for the purposes of safeguarding the financial interests
of the Communities, their personal data may be transferred to internal audit services, the European
Court of Auditors, the Financial Irregularities Panel or to the European Anti-Fraud Office.

Signed on behalf of the applicant

Name Dominic Brain

Signature

Position Head of Programme Funding Division

Date 23 June 2009

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 11


PART B – FULL APPLICATION FORM

TO BE SUBMITTED ONLY BY THOSE APPLICANTS WHO


RECEIVE AN INVITATION TO SUBMIT A FULL PROPOSAL

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Reference of the Call for EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi


Proposals
Title of the Call for Food Facility - Facility for rapid response to soaring food prices in
Proposals developing countries
Name of the applicant: Christian Aid

Title of the action: Community Productive Capacity Enhancement Project, Ethiopia

Location of the action: Dasenech, Maale and South (Debub) Ari woredas of South Omo,
- specify country(ies) that Southern Nations, Nationalities and People Regional State (SNNPR),
will benefit from the action Ethiopia
Number of the proposal 5: DCI/FOOD/2009/357

5
Proposal number as allocated by the European Commission.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 12
A. BACKGROUND

(i) Livelihood Strategies and Vulnerabilities in the Targeted Project Area

South Omo Administrative Zone, the targeted area for this project, is located in the south-western corner of
Ethiopia. It is one of the 13 Zones of Southern Nations and Nationalities Peoples Region (SNNPR). The
Zonal Administration Office is in Jinka Town which is 525 km from Hawassa, the regional capital and
781kms from Addis Ababa. The total area of the Zone is 22,360 km2, constituting about 18.95% of the
Region by size. The Zone has a total population of 577,673 of which 50.03% are female 6. It mainly has an
arid climate with modest and erratic pattern of rainfall. Like most of Ethiopia, South Omo Zone has two
rainy seasons, i.e. ‘Belg’, the short rainy season that occurs mostly from February to May, and ‘Meher’, the
main rains season, which is mainly from July to October. The rainfall varies between the Woredas.

The main source of livelihood is crop production and livestock husbandry. The main crops are maize,
sorghum, teff, barley, wheat, finger millet, potatoes, sweet potatoes, Ethiopian cabbage, “taro” and “godere”
(root crops). The main livestock are cattle, poultry, sheep, goats and asses, with cattle being the most
predominant. According to the Bureau of Finance and Economic Development (BoFED) for SNNPR, 76.2%
of the farmers in South Omo Zone are involved in crop production and livestock husbandry, 14.7% on crop
production only and 9.1% on livestock husbandry only.

South Omo Zone has almost 17% of the livestock population of Region and produces about 7% of the grain
7
crop yields of the Region , even though its area size is almost 18.95% of the land area of the Region. The
major breeds of cattle in the area include highland breeds - Boran, Murssi and Surma. Somali black leg,
Konso and Guji breeds are the dominant sheep and goat breeds in the area. There are also some commercial
activities in the Zone such as grain, livestock and commodity trading.

According the website of BoFED in SNNPR, which was developed with EC funding through Christian Aid,
8
South Omo Zone has a very high degree of poverty . Recurrence of intermittent drought and flood disrupts
livelihoods, often decimating the productive resources of the people and accentuating their vulnerability.
According to the Humanitarian Requirements – 2009, Joint Government and Humanitarian Partners’
Document, January 30th 2009, Ethiopia, “In 2008, the total failure of belg rains in most parts of the country
and the absence of the short rainy season …in the Somali Region and SNNPR compounded by high food
prices contributed to a significant increase of emergency caseloads: from 2.2 million in April to 4.6 in June
and 6.4 in September…” that “Food insecurity affected most parts of Somali region, central and southern
part of SNNPR…” where South Omo Administrative Zone is located.
9
The Central Statistics Agency (CSA) of Ethiopia, also shows that for Meher 2008/2009 season, the yields
per ha for the 5 major cereals in the country is lower in South Omo Administrative Zone compared to the
national average yields of these crops per ha. For instance, while the average national yield per ha for maize
is 22.24 quintals (1 quintal = 100 kg) per ha, in South Omo, it is 16.49 quintals per ha, for teff, the average
national yield per ha is 12.20 quintals as against 10.85 quintals per ha for South Omo, and finger millet
stands at 13.98 quintals per ha national average compared 2.78 quintals for ha for South Omo. Moreover, in
Dasenech Woreda, the production per ha for sorghum and maize is still lower than the average for South
Omo Zone, i.e., at 12 and 14 quintals per ha respectively.

6
Summary and Statistical Report of the 2007 Population and Housing Census: Population Size by Age and Sex, Ethiopia,
URL: http://www.csa.gov.et/pdf/Cen2007_firstdraft.pdf, accessed August 27th 2009.
7
Calculated from Agricultural Sector Information on SNNPR by BoFED; URL:
http://www.snnprbofed.gov.et/other_statistics.htm, accessed August 25th 2009.
8
Bureau of Finance and Economic Development for SNNPR, URL: http://www.snnprbofed.gov.et/images/Maps/
Demographic/Degree%20of%20poverty.jpg, accessed August 26th 2009.
9
Central Statistical Agency, Agricultural Sample Survey 2008/09 by CSA, Ethiopia, Volume II: Report on Area and
Production of Crops (Private Peasant Holdings, Meher Season), May 2009, p. 17 & 74.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 13
Table 1.1: Percentage Yield Difference:-
South Omo Vs National Level
A further analysis of the yield data of the five major crops of the area as they
Crop Type % Yield Diff.
obtain in Central Statistics Agency Report on Livestock and Livestock
Teff 10.98%
Characteristics (Private Peasant Holdings), Volume II, shows that on
Barley 21.81%
average, they are almost 22.48% lower in South Omo than the national level
Wheat 21.99% average. For example, the yield for maize is 25.85% lower in South Omo
Maize 25.85% than the national average; teff is almost 11% lower; and for finger millet the
Sorghum 7.72% differential is about 46.5%. This is summarised on Table 1.1. Moreover, in
Finger Millet 46.49% Dasenech Woreda, productivity is still lower than the average for South Omo
Average 22.48% Zone at 12 and 14 quintals per ha for sorghum and maize respectively.

Source: Developed from data in Agricultural Sample Survey 2008/09, CSA, Ethiopia, Volume II: Report on Area and Production of Crops
(Private Peasant Holdings, Meher Season), May 2009, p. 17 and 74.

The Zone’s challenging and remote location geographically, politically and economically has left it
significantly underserved by governmental and non governmental development agencies. Due to this social
and economic marginalisation, the vulnerability to and impact of frequent droughts and floods is heightened
and life threatening. The people in the Zone also face a lot of constraints in accessing services.

For instance, an analysis of the Agricultural Sample Survey 2008/09 by Central Statistics Agency (CSA),
10
Ethiopia , shows that only about 6.6% of the cattle in the Zone were vaccinated, and that while almost 18%
(144,139) and 20% (175,943) of the total cattle and goat populations respectively were afflicted or diseased
in 2008/09, only 30.5% (44,015) and 8.5% (14,594) of the afflicted/diseased cattle and goats in 2008/09
11
respectively did receive treatment . This is despite the fact that 85.3% of the productive population are
either crop producers, pastoralists or both.

Specifically, the 3 project target Woredas of Dasenech, Maale and Debub (South) Ari are characterized by a
chronic food shortage period of six to nine months per year which has been worsened by the increase in food
prices. The baseline surveys conducted by the three partners to this project, Action for Development (AFD),
Agric Service Ethiopia (ASE) and Women Support Association (WSA), also show that that communities in
targeted 15 Kebeles live below the absolute poverty line as they could not get the minimum income of Birr
12
943, adjusted for the requirement of non-food items expenditure, per adult equivalent per year needed to
afford the minimum calorie requirement of 2,200 kcal per day per adult.

The baseline survey report for Malee Woreda shows that the respondents were asked to rank the key
production-related constraints in the Woreda that limit the involvement of males and females in productive,
reproductive as well as community roles. The survey result for that Woreda showed that 90%, 82% and 78%
of the male respondents indicated feed shortage, lack of drinking water and lack of working capital as the
most important production constraints respectively; compared to 98% and 86.7% of the female respondents
who indicated that lack of drinking water and lack of financial capital, respectively, were the most important
production constraints.

The 3 targeted Woredas also suffer from poor agronomic practices, poor storage facilities, low levels of
skills for the development of alternative sources of income, and poor supply of agricultural inputs to increase
crop production and productivity, and pasture lands which are dilapidated and underdeveloped and poorly
managed. Water for both human and livestock consumption is inadequate. For instance, only 37% of the
13
population of South Omo Zone has a source of clean water supply . There are also gender-disparities in

10
Central Statistics Agency Report on Livestock and Livestock Characteristics (Private Peasant Holdings), Volume II,
2009, p. 38 and 120.
11
Agricultural Sample Survey 2008/09, CSA, Ethiopia: Report on Livestock and Livestock Characteristics (Private
Peasant Holdings), Vol. II, Feb. 2009, p. 128 & 130.
12
The World Health Organization (1985) adult equivalent scale has been used to determine adult equivalent size.
13
BoFED in SNNPR, URL: http://www.snnprbofed.gov.et/other_statistics.htm, accessed 25th August 2009.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 14
terms of access and utilisation of production resources, HIV/AIDS prevalence rates are high, harmful
traditional practices (HTPs) are common. For example during a discussion with some line Departments at
Malee Woreda Office, the Christian Aid Team which visited the area in July/August 2009 was informed that
there are up to 60 HTPs in the Woreda which need to be eradicated. Environmental degradation such as soil
erosion which forms huge gullies is also common in the 3 targeted Woredas. Consequently, the project will
mainstream these cross-cutting issues in addressing food security in the targeted project area.

The shortage of water supply is chronic. According to the baseline survey reports, for Dasenech Woreda, the
mean distance to the nearest water source is 17.56km and for Malee, 34% of the population have a reliable
and safe water supply in the form of pipe borne water. The records of Woreda Office of Water Development
(WOWD) also show that 19 of the 20 boreholes and 1 of the 4 hand-dug wells (HDWs) in Malee Woreda are
not functioning. As a result, the percentage of people who have access to protected water in the Woreda,
even if the non-operating water sources are included, is five times lower than the 76.8% targeted by the Plan
14
for Accelerated and Sustained Development to End Poverty (PASDEP) .

Hence, for Dasenech Woreda, most of the people use the Omo River as a source for potable water and for
domestic use despite the apparent risks. Furthermore, despite the fact that animal husbandry is the main
occupation in Dasenech Woreda, the baseline survey report for this Woreda also revealed 11.1% of the
livestock of the respondents did not receive the required annual vaccinations over the last five years 25.6%
of the sample HHs did not even know the kind of meagre vet services available in the Woreda. According to
the baseline survey for Malee Woreda, 71% of sample respondents reported that they never had their
livestock vaccinated during the last five years.

The baseline survey results also show that the average distance to the nearest veterinary service facility is
almost 16 km. The Malee Woreda Office of Agriculture and Pastoral Development Strategic Plan (2006)
shows that the livestock health service coverage was just 6%. Although there are Community-based Animal
Health Workers (CAHWs) in the Woredas, they lack equipment and medicines as revealed by the baseline
survey reports. The survey reports show that the livestock diseases in Malee Woreda mainly include Poxes,
Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), Contagious Bovine Pleuro Pnemonia (CBPP), Contagious Caprine Pluero
Pneumonia (CCPP), Trypanosomiasis, Anthrax, Black leg, Pasteurellosis, TBD (Babesiosis, Anaplasmosis)
and internal and external parasites, while in Dasenech Woreda, they include Contagious Caprine Pluero
Pneumonia (CCPP), CBPP, Anthrax, Trips, LSD (Lysosomal Storage Diseases), external parasite, internal
parasite, Bruccliosis, and Babesiosis. There is significant poor access to vet services to address such diseases
due to the extremely weaknesses of the institutional veterinary facilities.

The pasture is dilapidated due to frequent droughts, it is also poorly managed and the forage quality is poor
as some of the forage is thorny and highly unpalatable. Hence, pastoralists move to moist pasture areas
along the Omo River and Turkana Lake. Such movements increase the Livestock Unit (LSU) 15 which
sometimes results into ungovernability of pasture land and violent conflicts among the pastoralists.
According to the Central Statistics Commission (CSC), 55.9% of the population in agricultural HHs in
SNNPR are unpaid family workers, 5.1% of the farmers are employees and employment in the agricultural
16
sector in the Region is 4.5% . According to BoFED’s 2005 Summary of Employment Created by Zone and
by Sector, 4 hotel and industry based and 2 social service projects were created in South Omo employing 262
people for a population of 460,751. Such employment is higher only to Konso Special Woreda for the whole
of SNNPR.

There is also poor access to credit facilities and services which limits people’s capacity to increase their
production and/or enable them to be involved in off-farm activities so as to diversify their livelihood base

14
Ethiopia’s 5 year strategic development framework, 2005/06 – 2009/10, ULR:
http://planipolis.iiep.unesco.org/upload/Ethiopia/Ethiopia_PASDEP_2005_2010_Policy_Matrix.pdf, accessed 28/08/09.
15
LSU is usually defined as the equivalent grazing area for one adult dairy cow.
16
Central Statistics Commission, Ethiopian Agricultural Sample Survey, 2001/02, Statistical Report on Socio-
Economic Characteristics of the Population in Agricultural Households, Land Use, and Area and Production Crops, Part
I, July 2003, p. 63.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 15
17
and reduce vulnerability. According to CSA’s Agricultural Sample Survey Report, 2007/08 , in South Omo
Zone, only 1,782 holders (which CSA defines as a person who exercises management control over the
operation of an agricultural resource; land and/or livestock) use credit services and only 22,521 holders use
credit advice. An analysis of the report shows that a total of 16.2% of the population of South Omo of
577,673 do not use credit service either because the service is not available, it is inadequate or due to
ignorance; and that 15.6% of the population also do not use credit advice due to the same reasons as shown
on Table 1.2 on the left.

Table 1.2: Poor Utilisation of Credit Advice and Services in South Omo Zone
No. of % of S/Omo
Holders Population
Service not Available 54,328 9.4%
Reasons for Not Using Credit Inadequate Service 16,018 2.8%
Service Ignorance 23,258 4.0%
Total 93,604 16.2%
Service not Available 32,140 5.6%
Reasons for Not Using Credit Inadequate Service 41,548 7.2%
Advice Ignorance 16,146 2.8%
Total 89,834 15.6%

Total (Using Neither Credit Advice Nor Credit Service) 183,438 31.8%
Source: Developed from data in Ethiopian Agricultural Sample Survey, 2001/02, Statistical Report on Socio-Economic Characteristics of
the Population in Agricultural Households, Land Use, and Area and Production Crops, Part I, July 2003, p. 63.

(ii) Opportunities for Poverty Reduction in the Targeted Woredas

However, despite these severe constraints, the 3 targeted Woredas have huge potential for crop and livestock
development, with vast fertile, irrigable land along the five river basins in the project area. These rivers are
the Omo River in Dasenech Woreda, Bezo and Demeker Rivers in Malee and Baki and Abinet Rivers in
Debub Ari Woreda. Table 1.3 below which is taken from BoFED for SNNPR website shows that in South
Omo Zone, 26% of the land is cultivated, while 22% is cultivable. Vast lands are therefore available for the
expansion of agricultural production. This project will put some of these lands under cultivation through the
establishment of 3 irrigation schemes, and through the provision of agricultural inputs and implements to
enable the farmers to increase their cropped areas.
18
Table 1.3: Agriculture in South Omo: Land Use/Access and Farmers Activities

Land Utilisation Pattern <> Farmers Having Land <> Farmers Activities
Land Use % <> Area Owned % <> Type of Activity %
Cultivated 26% <> Less than 0.1 ha 9.2% <> Crop & Livestock 76.2%

Cultivable 22% <> 0.1 - 0.5 ha 46.0% <> Crop only 14.7%

Grazing 12% <> 0.51 - 1.0 ha 25.6% <> Livestock only 9.1%

Forest, Bush, Shrubs 19% <> 1.1 - 2.0 ha 14.7% <> – –

Other 21% <> More than 2.0 ha 4.7% <> – –

Total 100% <> 100% <> 100%

Source: Renditioned from BoFED, SNNPR, URL: http://www.snnprbofed.gov.et/other_statistics.htm, accessed 26/08/09

17
Central Statistics Agency+, Agricultural Sample Survey 2007/08, Ethiopia: Report on the Farm Management Practices
(Private Peasant Holdings, Meher Season) Vol. III, August 2008, p. 328.
18
URL: http://www.snnprbofed.gov.et/other_statistics.htm, accessed 24th August 2009.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 16
A rapid assessment by the irrigation engineers of two of the partner organisations, ASE and AFD, which will
be the implementing small scale irrigation schemes, shows that there are huge irrigation potentials in the
targeted area for both pump irrigation and river diversion. The targeted area also has huge land area for the
development of rangeland, which the agro-pastoralists are enthusiastic about given the enormous problems
they face in feeding of their livestock. For fisheries, the Omo River, which traverses Dasenech Woreda and
empties into Turkana Lake, accords the Woreda good fishery development opportunities. The Ethiopia side
of Turkana Lake, unlike the Kenya side, is non-saline and is the main source of fish for the people in the
area.

The vegetation in the 3 targeted Woredas is also conducive for beekeeping which is being promoted and
supported by the 3 woredas. The effect of “neonicitinoids”, which are being blamed for the massive declines
in bee numbers in Europe, has not affected the bee population in these areas. Colony collapse disorder, a
phenomenon affecting bee colonies in America, has also not been experienced in the targeted areas. The
Debub Ari Woreda Integrated Development Plan (WIDP) analysis, conducted for the agricultural and non
agricultural sector by AWS Consulting (2009) has indicated that investment on this farm and non farm
commodity is highly viable. The same study further revealed that there is a potential for the existing local
market to support greater supply of off-farm (bees, poultry and small livestock) products. Recent studies
conducted by USAID demonstrated that there are promising overseas marketing opportunities in Kenya,
Middle East and EU member countries, for bees products. Similarly, the regional honey market survey by
SNV found that Honey Care, which is based in Amhara Region, and the biggest firm buying farmers honey,
is short of its demand for honey by 30%.

The bridge that is under construction in Omorate will create more communication and commercial
opportunities and will enable Omorate Town, one of the Woreda capitals, to serve as a dry port town that
connects with Kenya and the other all-weather roads network that is currently being constructed. The 3
Woreda Administrations also have policies, strategies and development plans which are very conducive and
will be supportive of the activities proposed by this project. There also exist traditional and task-oriented
structures in the proposed intervention Kebeles which will enhance the formation and strengthening of social
capital by the project.

In its Five Year Strategy Plan – 2006/2007 to 2011/2012, Malee Woreda, among other activities which this
project will compliment, the Woreda for instance aims to increase the area under irrigation by 20% (i.e.
increase from 815ha to 1630 ha) quadruple the current rangeland area (i.e. from 824 ha to 3200 ha) and also
increase vet service coverage by 20% during the five year strategy period. According to the baseline survey
reports, Malee Woreda for example has 3 Animal Health Technicians (AHTs) and 6 community animal
health workers (CAHWs) while Dasenech Woreda has four AHTs and 29 CAHWs. Such staff and Woreda
staff in the Agricultural office and Cooperative Organisation and Management Promotion Office (COMPO)
and Rural Development Office, for instance will be enormous assets to the implementation and success of
this project.

Debub Ari Woreda WIDP also asserts that apiculture and poultry production schemes are recommended
income generation activities in the Woreda and the Woreda Agricultural and Rural Development Office aim
to increase honey production in the Woreda by 50% (Debub Ari WIDP, 2009, p. 78 – 86 and 175). Some of
the women in the targeted the area who the project will support to be engaged in income generation activities
have good entrepreneurial mindsets. For instance, among other income generation activities, some of women
are currently engaged in the preparation and sale of local drinks such as Arekie, Tela and Teji. On supporting
women, the PASDEP framework is affirmative as one of its objectives is to liberate women from low-
productivity tasks and increase their participation in the work force.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 17


II. THE ACTION

B. THE PROJECT: AN INTRODUCTION

(i) An Overview
The objective of this project is to make sustainable changes to the livelihoods of 50,000 direct beneficiaries
and 37,300 indirect beneficiaries (at least 30% of whom will be women) in Dasenech, Malee and Debub Ari
Woredas in South Omo Administrative Zone. The direct beneficiaries are in 10,000 agricultural and agro-
pastoral households (HHs) in 15 Kebeles. Specifically, the project targets 2,000 HHs in 4 Kebeles in
Dasenech Woreda, 3,500 HHs in 5 Kebeles Malee Woreda and 4,500 HHs in 6 Kebeles in Debub Ari woreda
as shown on Table 1.4 below. The Table also presents the population of and number of HHs in these
Kebeles, the number of project beneficiaries in each Kebele and the partner that will be operating in the
respective Woredas. A total of 7,400 HHs are expected to benefit indirectly from the project.

Table 1.4: Demographic Data Summary on the 15 Targeted Kebeles

Name of Population Total Implementing


Name of Woreda No. Kebele Male Female Population Partner
1 Asheker 1,095 1,140 2,235 AFD & WSA
2 Beneta 2,102 2,187 4,289 AFD & WSA
3 Beshkero 1,095 1,140 2,235 AFD
Malee Woreda
4 Goloberendo 1,338 1,392 2,730 AFD
5 Koybe 1,828 1,903 3,731 AFD & WSA
Sub-Total 7,458 7,762 15,220
1 Delegnmur 1,130 1,177 2,307 ASE
2 Locheber 648 675 1,323 ASE
Dasenech
Woreda 3 Torengole 429 446 875 ASE
4 Akudergole 910 948 1,858 ASE
Sub-Total 3,117 3,246 6,363
1 Beza 1,053 1,966 3,019 WSA & AFD
2 Tolta 1,001 9,096 10,097 WSA & AFD
3 Shesher 1,935 1,963 3,898 WSA & AFD
Debub Ari
4 Shekemere 1,854 1,860 3,714 WSA & AFD
Woreda
5 Wuseti 8,947 9,569 18,516 WSA & AFD
6 Gyidamere 1,399 1,486 2,885 WSA & AFD
Sub-Total 16,189 25,940 42,129
Grand
Total 15 Kebeles 26,764 36,948 63,712

The project, under EC’s Food Facility for rapid response to soaring food prices in developing countries, has a total
budget of €1,509,437 million with EC contributing €1,358,493 EUR (90%) and Christian Aid contributing
€150,944 (10%). Christian Aid, the lead organisation on this project, will work with AFD, ASE and WSA to
compliment the development activities of the Zonal and Woreda and Kebele Administrations so as to reduce the
vulnerability of the people in the targeted Woredas by enhancing their production and income generation
capacities.

For an updated information on the livelihood strategies, vulnerabilities and opportunities in the 3 targeted
Woredas in South Omo Zone, and for more realistic and relevant development intervention, in February
2009, Christian Aid, which has been providing development support in Ethiopia since 1974 and South Omo
Zone since 2006, funded AFD and ASE to undertake baseline surveys in Dasenech and Malee Woredas
respectively. Both of these surveys were done by Mela Development Training and Consultancy Service Pvt.
Ltd. Co., Ethiopia, in February 2009. Poverty Action Network Ethiopia (PANE) also supported WSA to
conduct a baseline survey in Jinka Town and Debub Ari Woreda in January 2009 which was done by two
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 18
consultants, Mr Abate Zewdu and Mr Tefera Tegegne. In February 2009, ASE also conducted a Participatory
Rural Appraisal (PRA) in Dasenech Woreda.

The findings of these three surveys and the PRA, information obtained during a one week field visit to the
targeted project area by the Senior Programme Officer and one of the Livelihood Programme Officers of
Christian Aid Ethiopia in July and August 2009, the WIDPs and Woreda Strategic Plans, together with
updated information received from the three partners to this project and the Zonal and Woreda
Administrations in July and August 2009 and survey data on agro-livestock and income such as those
conducted by the Central Statistics Agency (CSA) and the Central Agricultural Census Commission
(CACC), form the basis of this project.

(ii) Overall Project Objective


To develop and strengthen the productive and technical agricultural capacities of rural communities in
SNNPR to mitigate the volatility of food prices and natural shocks.

(iii) The Specific Project Objective


Sustainable changes in the livelihoods of 50,000 direct beneficiaries and 37,300 indirect beneficiaries in 15
kebeles as a result of improvements in their productive and technical agricultural capacities.

(iv) Project Outputs and Results


The project aims to achieve three main Results as indicated below. Each of the results will be based on the
respective Outputs which are directly indicated under it.

1. Result I: Agriculture Intensification and Diversification in 15 Kebeles: AFD & ASE


Outputs: Increased crop yields of up to 15 quintals per hectare for maize, sorghum and at least to raise teff
production to 10 quintal (100kg) per ha; improved livestock productivity for 100,000 animals
through better access to water and veterinary services and through improved rangeland
management, 400 h/hs benefiting from increased income from selling fish as a result of greater up
take of fishery opportunities as a diversification option.

2. Result II: Household Income Increased and Diversified 15 Kebeles: WSA Lead
Outputs: Support and training provided to develop alternative income generating activities including live
animal trading, beekeeping, fishery and small scale trading; access to credit services improved
through 80 community managed micro credit schemes; Primary level marketing cooperatives
established, stabilised price of food and agricultural products and enhance the bargaining power
of producers.

3. Result III: Improved Productive and Technical Agricultural Capacities: AFD and ASE Lead
Outputs: Capacity of local government staff in programme planning and implementation increased; disaster
risk reduction capacity increased to plan for natural disaster and mitigate their impact improved;
Community productive and technical capacity enhanced through tailor made training.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 19


1. DESCRIPTION

1.1 Description of the action and its effectiveness (max 14 pages)

Description of the Project Activities

The project has 3 main work packages with cross-cutting issues such as environmental issues, gender,
HIV/AIDS and harmful traditional practices (HTPs), e.g., female genital mutilation (FGM) and gender-based
violence (GBV) mainstreamed. Although Capacity Building is also cross-cutting, it is however given
prominence as one of the project work packages. This is essentially based on the relevance of the capacity
building in enabling an effective complimentarily of the project with the WIDPs and strategic plans of the
targeted Woredas and an efficient integration of the project activities and outcomes with those of the Woreda
agricultural enhancement programmes to ensure the continuity of the benefits of the schemes, systems and
institutions that this project will establish. The 3 work packages of the project, which relate to the above
results, are:

 The Enhancement of Agricultural Production, through (a) crop production, (b) livestock productivity,
and (c) fishery;
 Livelihood Diversification and Income Generation which is concerned with (a) beekeeping, (b)
unleashing human potentials through self-help and institutional development, (c) small scale business,
and (d) artisan skills development; and
 Capacity Development for Sustainability for relevant (a) beneficiary communities, (b) staff of Woreda
and Zonal offices and (c) staff of implementing partner.
The activities of the project are described below based on its 3 work packages. In Dasenech Woreda where
the Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP) exists, a linkage will be made between the project and the
PSNP for possible cash for work for the project beneficiaries for labour intensive activities such as the
constriction of distribution canals for the irrigation scheme, the rehabilitation of HDWs, construction of sand
dams and pasture development. This will enable responding to transient food shortages and realization of the
intended project activities.
The identified project activities will be undertaken with the relevant Woreda and Kebele Offices to ensure
integration of the project into the develop activities of the Government as indicated above. The project also
aims to enhance the implementation and monitoring capacities of local government for effective delivery on
Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP). Some of the products which are to be produced by the project
will be provided with appropriate packaging and branding for visibility of the project, EC funding and in the
marketplace.

Package 1 Enhancement of Agricultural Production:

1.1 Food Crop Production and Productivity – AFD and ASE


The potential of increasing crop production and productivity exists in the targeted Woredas so as to reduce
the chronic food shortage in the area and reduce the prices of food. The activity entails the following
components: development of small scale irrigation schemes, multiplication of improved seed varieties,
promotion of organic fertilizer production and usage, and reduction of post harvest losses, and support with
agricultural inputs to 2,400 agro–pastoralists (960 women and 1,440 men).

(i) Development of Small-Scale Irrigation Schemes – AFD and ASE


The project will develop and irrigate of 60 ha of land through river diversion and pump irrigation in three
sites in Dasenech and Malee Woredas to benefit 240 HHs. The targeted sites are 10 ha along Omo River for
40 HHs in Delegmur Kebele in Dasenech Woreda, to be conducted by ASE; and 20 ha along Demeker River
in Beshkoru Kebele and 30 ha along Bezo River in Ashekor Kebele (both Kebeles are in Malee Woreda) to
be conducted by AFD and to benefit a total 200 HHs. This activity will be sub-contracted and it will be
coordinated and directly supervised by AFD and ASE, both which have many years of developing and
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 20
supporting the management of irrigation schemes. A land survey and an irrigation system design will be
conducted for the 3 identified irrigation sites during the first two months of the project.
The site Dasenech along Omo River which is a plain slope of less than 0.001% as indicated in the
topographic map by the Ethiopian Mapping Agency, with a scale of 1:50,000, ASE will develop the
irrigation scheme based on pump irrigation. A 4.7 KW or 6.4 HP diesel engine generator, which will have a
water discharge capacity of 24 lit/sec., a suction head of 5m – 6m and a delivery head of 10m, will be
provided. The irrigation works at site will consist of a lined main canal of 250m and earthen distribution
canals of 2,000m.
The two irrigation sites in Beshkoru and Ashekor Kebeles in Malee Woreda, AFD will use river diversion
and the works will include the construction of 1 small diversion weir for each of the sites in of about 5m
wide and 1m in height 2 canals each of about 1500m in length. For all the three sites, the beneficiary farmers
will be responsible for the construction of distribution channels to their respective fields for direct water
delivery to the crops. The sites in Malee Woreda, where the land is owned by the respective targeted HHs,
each targeted farmer will have 0.25 ha of irrigated land. In Dasenech Woreda where the targeted land for
irrigation is communally owned, the developed land will be allocated in consultation with the clan leaders
and the Kebele and Woreda Administrations.
The project will establish and train one Irrigation User Associations (IUAs) of 6 members for each of the 3
irrigation sites. The training of the IUAs will involve water management and irrigation agronomy,
horticulture. AFD will also conduct 5 days train for 240 irrigation beneficiaries (at least 30% of whom will
be women) on irrigation agronomy, horticulture, irrigation scheme management, water use efficiency,
rehabilitation and construction of irrigation structures and institutional and organizational aspects and
environmental management. Experience sharing visit will be organised by AFD for 50 farmers for 5 days to
enhanced irrigation sites which are compatible to the three sites to be established by the project. The direct
beneficiaries of the irrigation schemes will be supported with improved seeds and assorted fertilizer and
other inputs to intensify productivity.

ASE will train 8 irrigation beneficiaries on the maintenance and upkeep of the pump generator. The
beneficiaries of the irrigation scheme in Dasenech Woreda will be responsible for the maintenance
and upkeep of the generator when the project ends and it will be provided with the appropriate
toolkit for this purpose. The beneficiary farmers of irrigation schemes in each of the two Woredas will also
be organised in associations and trained on cooperative principles and preparation business plan to further
enhance the intensification of their production and marketing. The cooperatives will also be supported with
legal registration with Local Government.
The wind propelled irrigation which was indicated in the Concept Note has been replaced with river
diversion irrigation scheme in the full project proposal. This is to avoid undue delays in implementation as
the windmill, which would have been required for this, is not currently available in country and importing it
may take up to 6 months. The costs of importing and installing the windmill were part of the of the
considerations in increasing the targeted area to be irrigated from 50 ha, as it obtains in the Concept Note, to
60 ha for the maximisation of irrigation outputs.

(ii) Community-Based Seed Multiplication – AFD


In order to enable the project beneficiaries to have easy access to affordable improved seed varieties, 30 seed
multiplication centres will be established producing 10 quintals of improved seeds per year. These will be 22
centres in 11 Kebeles in Malee and Debub Ari Woredas and 8 centres in 4 Kebeles in Dasenech Woreda to
benefit 600 farming HHs. The centres will be used for both seed multiplication and demonstration. A total of
520 farmers will be trained at the centres on good seed selection and management. The farmers will be
trained and organised into 10 seed growers associations (SGAs) and they will be provided with small farm
implements, seed, fertilizer and other agricultural inputs. The seed multiplication centres will be linked with
agricultural research stations for technical advice. A farmers’ field will be held for the seed growers and
experience sharing visits to relevant sites where AFD has established successful SGAs, will be conducted.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 21


(iii) Improved Agronomic Practices: Horticulture and Field Crop Production - ASE
The project will establish 1 ha field demonstration and horticultural nursery at Omorate Town in Dasenech
Woreda to serve as source of seedlings for the large number of horticultural produces along the Omo River.
The centre will also serve as a practical training venue and it will be provided with nursery tools such as
spade, hoes, forks, watering cans, wheel barrows, polyethylene bags, etc. and supplied with improved seeds
and planting materials. A total of 300 farmers will be trained on improved agronomic practices in the area of
vegetable, fruit and field crop production.

Farmer-to-farmer training will also be facilitated for farmers in Dasenech Woerda, especially with the
‘Erbore’ people in the adjacent Hammer Woreda who are acquainted with ploughing with oxen driven
ploughs and who also speak Dasenechigna, the major language of the area. A field day will also be
organized for interested farmers in the Woreda to the irrigation site in which agricultural extension
professionals and researchers in the Zone and Region will be invited, for reflection, learning and sharing of
best practices. Farmers will also be linked to the market.

(iv) Organic Fertilizer Production - AFD


As inorganic fertilisers continue to get more expensive, the need for farmers to be able to produce their own
organic fertilisers to increase crop yields also becomes more expedient. As a result, organic fertilizer
production training and the importance of organic farming including environmental issues will be provided
to 700 farmers in Malee and Debub Air Woredas. The farmers will be supported with technical skills of raw
materials and use locally available materials for compost making. Such farmers are expected to demonstrate
the results in peer education sessions and at annual farmer days to be organised by AFD. Inorganic fertiliser
production will be encouraged at irrigation sites and horticulture centre. Those trained are expected top
disseminate the skills learnt to at least another 2,100 farmers.

(v) Reduce Crop Post Harvest Loses - AFD


Post harvest losses in the targeted project area are estimated to be more than 35% (Annual Report, 2008;
Agricultural Office of South Omo Administrative Zone). To reduce these losses, the project will identify 55
active model farmers in 5 Kebeles for training on integrated pest management and post harvest crop
handling, participation in demonstrations of constructing appropriate HH stores and in experience sharing
visit. Each model farmer is expected to train another 30 farmers (i.e. 1650 farmers). This means a total 1,705
farmers will benefit from training on post harvest management. The project will construct 10 seed stores to
serve the storage needs of the 10 seed multiplication groups which will be established by the project.
Training to all irrigation users & grain fed producers will be given

1.2 Livestock Husbandry


According to the baseline survey reports, 100% of the sampled HHs in Dasenech Woreda are involved in
livestock husbandry while 30% of the sampled in Malee Woreda are involved in livestock trading. The
project will therefore support the pastoralists in improving the health, pastures and market chain of their
livestock by strengthening the existing the vet services in the Woredas, developing some rangelands and
conducting a value chain study and analysis on livestock marketing. The poor and unpalatable pastures
create a lot of problems for the pastoralists leading over-crowing of pasture lands and water sources which
results into ungovernability and conflicts.

(i) Livestock Health Improvement – AFD and ASE


Livestock in the targeted area face a lot of health problems, ranging from low coverage to the availability of
vet drugs and equipment, as discussed under the Background section above. The baseline survey reports also
show that pastoralists have to travel up to 16 km to access a vet facility. This activity therefore aims to
improve the animal health delivery services of the Woredas and bring vet services to the “door-steps” of the
pastoralists. It entails training and equipping of 30 CAHWs, i.e, 8 in Dasenech Woreda and 22 in Malee and
Debub Ari Woredas, to serve as mobile vet service providers in 15 Kebeles in the 3 Woredas.

The CAWHs will receive two rounds of 15 days training each from professional vet doctors who have the
experience in training adults. The first training will focus on basic animal health management with a view to
providing elementary services such as castration, dehorning, blotting and hoof trimming. The second
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 22
training will mainly be on symptomatic disease diagnosis, preventive techniques and curative services
including injections and vaccinations against common and less complex diseases. They will also be provided
with vet kits/tool sets such as bourdizo and trocar canula that are used for castration and hoof trimming and
other materials that enable them deliver simple preventive and curative animal health services.
The following items will also be supplied to CAHWs: 8 pedal bicycles (for Dasenech Woreda only), and
user manuals and uniforms like overalls, caps and gloves. The provision of bicycles will enable the CAHWs
to easily travel from one village to the other or from one crush to the other with the required materials and
equipment. However, as per Government policy, the CAHWs shall not have the authority to administer
antibiotics. A total of 30 cattle crushes be established, i.e., 8 in 2 Kebeles in Dasenech Woreda by ASE and
11 cattle vaccination crushes. Four of these crushes will be in Dasenech and the rest in Malee and Debub Ari
Woredas.
Access to vet drugs and service will further be improved by providing the CAHWs with initial stock of
essential vet drugs which they will sell to the pastoralist with a marginal profit. The proceeds will be used as
a vet revolving fund for each Kebele. The Woreda vet clinics will also be supported with essential equipment
and drugs and the vet staff supported with logistics during vaccination campaigns. A motor cycle will be
provided to each of the Woreda vet offices to facilitate the supervision of the CAHWs and the dispensation
of vet services in the Woredas. In Dasenech Woreda, where the nearest vet vendors are in Jinka, 172 km
away, a private vet vendor will be supported to provide drugs and to increase access and reduce the time
spent on travelling to access vet drugs. A memorandum of understanding will be signed with the vendor to
that effect.

(ii) Range Land Development and Management – ASE


This will be focused on Dasenech Woreda which has the highest pastoralist community among the targeted 3
Woredas. For instance, while only 1.8% (4,170 ha) of the total land area of Dasenech Woreda is under
19
cultivation, 24.9% of the land area is for livestock grazing . The baseline survey results for the Woreda
show that the “Unavailability and/or drying-off of grazing land … [were] considered more seriously by men
(100%) than women (75%)….” The poor state of the pastures in the targeted Woredas forces pastoralists to
move to greener pasture lands leading to severe overcrowding and conflicts.

The project will develop 150 ha of rangeland in this Woreda to be conducted by ASE. The project will
introduce appropriate forage species and train 222 farmers on fodder production, rangeland management and
natural resource management and environmental issues for 10 days. An assessment of the rangeland
practices in the area will be conducted to better inform the rangeland management system that would be
appropriate for the area. Each of the Kebeles benefiting from rangeland development will establish a
rangeland management committee (RMC). As the pasture lands are communally owned, clan leaders and
Woreda and Kebele Administrations will be involved in this for the development of by-laws for the
management of the rangelands by the RMCs. The project will also promote the utilization of crop
residue in Malee and Debube Ari Woredas as animal feed.
(iii) Livestock Water Provision – ASE
The project will rehabilitate 15 HDWs and provide cattle troughs to each by ASE. Water committees will be
trained to manage the water schemes and conduct minor maintenance. AFD will also tap 1 spring by gravity
in Beneta Kebele in Malee Woreda as was requested by the Woreda in August 2009 during the field visit by
Christian Aid staff. The project will sub-contract the construction of six cost-effective sand dams in 6
Kebeles Dasenech, as innovative means of addressing water problems. The sand dams are expected to raise
the water table in the long-term for more crop production, create a conducive environment for animal
husbandry and encourage biodiversity in the long-term.. Community members will be trained in the
management and maintenance of the sand dams. Each of the 11 Kebeles benefiting from this will have Water
User Associations (WUAs) established and trained.

19
Agric Service Ethiopia, Summary of PRA Findings of Dasenech Woreda, February 2009, p. 3

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 23


(iv) Livestock Marketing – ASE and AFD
In Dasenech Woreda, for example, there is only 1 cattle marketing centre located in Omorate Town and it
lacks the required infrastructure such as shelter, feed and water. These conditions result into loss of animal
weight which contributes low price. A PRA study by AFD in 2009 showed that it’s the middle persons who
are benefiting more from the current livestock market arrangement. Hence, the project will support a
livestock marketing study to better understand the existing structure and to design commercially informed
marketing mix and value chain. The project will also establish and train 11 livestock marketing as indicated
below under the Cooperative Development sub-section.

1.3 Fishery Development – ASE


Although Turkana Lake accords Dasenech Woreda good fishery opportunities as already highlighted above,
fishery is considered a poor-person’s job in the Woreda because of poor equipment, inadequate support, and
until a few years ago, i.e., before Ethio-Fish, Weldemichael and Fish Resource Development Corporation
started operating in the area, very poor access to markets. For instance, according to the PRA report for
Dasenech by ASE (February 2009) a kg of fish in the Woreda until very recently was Birr 3.00, but now it
costs Birr 9.00.

The project will work to develop the fishery sector in the area through awareness-raising of 1,200 people and
training 400 people from 400HHs on fishery resources development, cost-effective fish preservation methods
such as drying, the application of salt and smoking, and management and value chain establishment and
management. A value chain study to enable the promotion of fishery value chain will be undertaken and to
determine the volume of fish stock which will determine sustainable fishing. The trained persons will be
organised into 4 fishery cooperatives and supported to develop by-laws. They will also be supported with
equipment such as fishing boat, fishing net, shelter/slaughter house and fishing slaughtering utensils. The
fishery cooperatives will be linked to the market to microfinance institutions (MFIs) and saving and credit
cooperatives.

Capacity development exchange visit will be organised with Arba Minch, where fisheries activities are well
developed. A total of 400 HHs to benefit from increased income from selling or eating fish as livelihood
diversification option. A rapid stock assessment and socio-economic baseline survey will be conducted to
determine the sustainable annual fish yields in the Woreda and establish bench marks for impact
measurement.

Package 2 Livelihood Diversification and Income Generation – WSA Lead

a) Unleashing Human Potentials – WSA


The project will use the Self-Help Group (SHG) approach which has been promoted in developing countries
in Asia and Africa by Kindernothlife, a Germany NGO. This approach has proven to have the ability to
unleash human potentials, especially women who are seriously under represented in the established
cooperatives. For instance, out of a total membership of 3,065 in the 32 cooperatives established in Debub
Ari Woreda by Government, only 163, i.e., 5%, of these members are females.

The establishment of SHGs in Debub Ari Woreda will target mainly women to compliment the Woreda’s
plan of empowering and building the capacity of 2,350 women association leaders. WSA, which is the lead
for the livelihood diversification and income generation work package, has been working on the SHG
approach and on income generation in South Omo, South Wollo, North Wollo and North Shoa in SNNPR
and Amhara Regions since 2003. It has created 451 SHGs and 449 of these are successful and 2 failed
because of the migration of about half of their members. The successful SHGs, as at end of August 2009, had
generated Birr 1,622,122.00 from voluntary and mandatory savings from their members as shown on Table
2.2. WSA has also created 32 successful CLAs in 33 Kebeles from some of the successful SHGs as indicated
on Table 2.3 and has linked 3 of the CLAs that it created in Jinka with Omo Microfinance.

WSA will provide the necessary collaborative and integrative support to ADF and ASE in the areas of
livelihood diversification and income generation. It will work closely with the Agricultural and Rural
Development Office and Vet Office of the Woredas in implementing the agro-business enterprises, and with
ARIKA Agricultural Research Centre in Wailaka, Wollayta Zone, for effective scientific monitoring and
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 24
management of the Red Island Rhode (RIR) hybrid chicken and Edilo sheep to be supplied to the SHG agro-
business entrepreneurs by the project.

(i) Establishment of Self-Help Groups – WSA


A rapid assessment by WSA demonstrated the need for the establishment of 80 SHGs in 6 Kebeles in Debub
Ari Woreda. Each SHG will constitute of 15-20 members with a management committee consisting of a
leader, a book writer and a cashier. Each SHG will also have a control group, resource mobilisation group,
conflict resolution group and a committee responsible for monitoring and reporting on the activities of the
Cells which will be created for the management and reproduction of the initial stocks of chicken and sheep
that will be provide by the project as elaborated below.
The SHGs will conduct regular saving (both optional and mandatory). These savings will serve as a source
of credit for the SHG members to enable them to initiate and/or expand on their economic activities. Each
member will have a passbook for her savings at SHG level. Each SHG will meet weekly to discuss and
address social issues such as gender, HTPs, HIV and AIDS and environmental issues which will be
facilitated by a Development Facilitators (DFs) under the supervision and coordination of WSA. WSA will
support each SHGs to obtain land for the cultivation of group farms and for horticultural production.
Interested members of the SHGs in Debub Ari Woreda will be supported with chicken, small ruminants and
beehives to be engaged in income generation activities in line with the Woreda strategy as further describe
below.

(ii) Cluster Level Associations – WSA


After a minimum of 6 months, and after fulfilling the criteria established by the SHG approach, a cluster of 8
– 12 SHGs will be supported by the project to form Cluster Level Associations (CLAs). The project expects
to support the formation of 8 such CLAs with their own by-laws. Each SHG will have 2 representatives to
the CLA. The project will support each CLA with an initial capital of Birr 50,000 to start up a saving and
credit scheme. Each CLA will also be trained on group management, financial management and business
management. The CLAs will be linked to MFIs for possible credit for its members based on their
institutional collateral capacity among other factors. According to the SHG manual by Kindernothlife, after
2-3 years and upon meeting the established criteria 8-12 CLAs could form a Federation.

b) Hybrid Poultry Farming and Marketing – WSA


A total of 2,100 RIR hybrid chickens (1,575 pullets and 525 cocks) will be provided by the project to 400
women of the 80 SHGs to be established by the project as discussed above. The mortality for chicken in
Debub Ari Woreda according to the Woreda WIDP, March 2009, p. 176, is 5%. As a result, 100 chickens,
which represent 5% of the 2000 total stock required for distribution, has been added to address the effects of
chicken mortality on this activity. The RIR hybrid chickens are good for both meat and egg production and
each female can produce between 200 – 250 eggs a year compared to the local variety which produces
between 70 – 110 eggs per annum. Hence, the breed variety will increase egg production by 40 to 65 % per
year. The 400 women beneficiaries will be trained on poultry management and marketing. Each beneficiary
will be supplied with one locally made egg tray to ease transportation and minimise post-harvest losses. Such
trays will have labels indicating that the project producing them is being supported by EC. CLAs will be
supported to enable them to provide marketing support to their SHG members involved in poultry
production.

c) Production and Marketing of Improved Small Ruminants – WSA


In the highland Woreda of Debub Ari, a total of 1,440 local female sheep will be provided to 720 SHG
members as primary beneficiaries to help them to build their family assets. Each primary beneficiary will pay
10% of the cost of each sheep which will be kept by the SHG as insurance for risks associated to death and
lose of the sheep. The primary beneficiaries are to pass on six months old offspring of the sheep they are
provided with to another 720 secondary beneficiaries. The sheep will be purchased from the local markets by
the identified SHG members, Woreda Vet Technician, Kebele leader and the primary and secondary
beneficiaries. Vet services will be provided through the Woreda Vet Unit by the project.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 25


d) Enhancing Apiculture – WSA
Honey is a highly priced apicultural product in international markets and the potential for Ethiopia’s
competitiveness in honey and its production is recognized by many actors in the private sector, government
and development community. The climatic condition of the target area for this activity, Debub Ari Woreda,
is conducive for honey production as fora is abundant in Woreda. For instance, South Air Woreda envisages
the distribution of 4,000 beehives during its 1st five years (Debub Ari, WIDP, p. 176). The project will
promote the beekeeping activities using the Kenya top bar beehive model since it can be easily be managed
in the homestead. It will provide 164 beehives (33 modern and 131 transitional) to 164 women. The project
will develop innovative alliances with the private sector to facilitate market linkage women groups and
cooperatives.
While the traditional beehive is estimated to produce 5-7kg of honey per harvest, which is most of the times
of poor quality and is only harvested ones per year, the intermediate (Kenyan model) beehive can produce
25-35kg of honey for 2 harvests per year and the modern bee hive is capable of producing between 45-55kg
of honey for 2 harvest per year. With the intermediate beehive, harvest is expected to increase five-fold over
the harvest from the traditional beehive. While for the modern beehive, the harvest per hive will be increased
by almost eight times over the traditional beehive. The quality of honey harvested from both the intermediate
and the modern beehive is much better than that from the traditional and hence, sells at a better price.
With good management, both the intermediate and the modern beehives can have 2 harvest cycles per year.
However, the traditional beehive is harvested only once a year and it produces 20 – 25 kg of honey. The
traditional beehive is the most common type of beehive in South Omo Zone. For example, we gather from
CSA’s Agricultural Sample Survey, 2008/09, Report on Livestock and Livestock Characteristics (Peasant
Private Holdings), Vol. II, (p. 78) that out of the total annual honey production of 628,217, 627,519 (i.e.,
20
99.89%) is produced from traditional beehives. The project therefore expects to increase honey production
by at least 5-8 fold.

The project will work on improving the colonisation of the beehives in the three Woredas by supporting the
relevant Woreda technicians in the multiplication of queen bees, which are in short supply, and by
encouraging the women beneficiaries to plant more gerewa and adeyabeba flowers close to their beehives to
serve as raw materials for the honey bees. The quality of honey will be improved to improve market price of
the honey. The project will also provide training on apiculture and honey processing to improve production
and reduce post harvest loses which is currently estimated at 20% by Debub Ari Woreda.

e) Artisan Skills Development – WSA


The project will train a total of 130 people, i.e., 100 artisans (60% women) on making beehives, fishing
boats, fishing nets, masonry works and another 30 (50% women) on blacksmith skills. The Farmer Training
Centres, where some of the skills training will be conducted will be supported with basic equipment relevant
for the identified skills-sets. The trained artisans will be provided with materials and equipment to enable
them to produce farm tools and implements, beehives, fishing materials and be engaged in masonry works.
Some of the trained artisans may be engaged to work in some of the projects such as sand dam construction
and rehabilitation of HDWs. They will also be linked to other projects and institutions in the Zone.

f) Cooperative Development – AFD and WSA


All the 3 Woredas have conducive policy frameworks for the revitalisation and creation of new cooperative
societies as strategic alliances and enhanced value chain relations that are capable of mobilising social
resources and tapping embedded resources in social networks for the realisation of positive community
development outcomes. In partnership with the Woreda COMPOs, the project will establish and/or
strengthen total of 23 cooperative societies. These are (i) 9 saving and credit cooperative societies
(SACCOS), (ii) 6 livestock primary marketing cooperatives of 600 members (240 of whom will be women)
(iii) 4 fishery cooperatives in 4 Kebeles in Dasenech Woreda to be undertaken by ASE; and (iv) 4
beekeeping cooperatives in the 3 targeted project Woredas. These cooperatives will be supported with seed
money.

20
The report did not indicate whether the production is in kg, although we think it is safe to assume so.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 26
Package 3 Capacity Building
a) Training
The project will train a total of 120 relevant Woreda and Kebele staff on various aspects of capacity needs.
The training will include areas such as agricultural development and management, office administration,
participatory extension methods with emphasis on communication, facilitation and innovation skills, drought
cycle management, vulnerability assessments, disaster risk reduction (DRR) and response to strengthen
development intervention such as PSNP, climate mitigation approaches, post harvest losses, value chain
analysis and development, animal health services, community dialogue facilitation, and cross-cutting issues
such as gender and HIV/AIDS and HTPs. Thirty (30) DAs will also be trained by the project.
AFD will train 60 government staff in Malee and Debub Ari Woredas, WSA, which will focus on training
staff on the cooperative package, will train 45 Woreda staff, and ASE will train 25 staff. ASE will also train
5 of its frontline extension workers. The project will also train 18 staff, i.e., 3 staff from each partner
organisation and 3 staff from each Woreda on project monitoring and reporting to help improve the quality
of reports from the field. All training activities will include gender, HIV and AIDS, and environmental
issues. The project will also provide various training to the final beneficiaries and the community based
institutions (CBIs) as described above. Training in various areas will also be conducted for the final
beneficiaries as discussed above.

b) Support with Equipment, Materials and Logistics


Each Woreda office will be supported with logistics during livestock vaccination campaigns and each
Woreda vet clinic will also be supported with equipment and vet drugs as already discussed above.

How the Action will Improve the Situation in the Targeted Project Area
This project is targeting 26% of the total population of the 3 Woredas of 348,605 inhabitants. The direct
target beneficiaries in the 3 Woredas are 50,000 farmers in 10,000 HHs who constitute 14.3% of the total
population in the 3 targeted Woredas and the indirect beneficiaries are 35,000 in 7,400 HHs making up
12.7% of the total population of the 3 Woredas. As the action encourages sedentary live styles through crop
production and the availability of pastures and water, it is envisaged that in the long-term, this will open up
opportunities for children to go to school, the maternal needs of women to be adequately attended to, the
initiation of more viable agro-businesses and increased access to social amenities and economic services
which are being enjoyed by other sedentary populations.
The availability of water through the rehabilitated HDWs and the 6 sand dams will also mean a reduction in
the drudgery of women and more opportunity for children to go to school as they will no longer to be
required to take care of younger siblings for a quarter of the day while their mothers walk for hours to get
water for the HH. Furthermore, as no society will develop when the production potentials of half of its
population remains un-harnessed, in the long-term, the social and economic empowerment of women will
increase the production outputs of the three Woredas as women are able to fully contribute to the social and
economic development of the area.
Awareness on HIV and AIDS and HTPs will be raised so as to reduce the rates and incidences of these. The
project will contribute to the positive transformation of the environment in the long-term to encourage
biodiversity as the presence of the 6 dams enhances the vegetation cover which in turn decreases run-off
water. This consequently increases the percolation of water which contributes to the recharging of
the ground water. According to Excellent Development in Kenya, such raised water table “increases the
tree survival rate and allows other crops to grow that would not normally survive. More trees and plants…
[mean] more food for humans and animals, increasing overall biodiversity and making it possible for people
21
to create a sustainable livelihood in harmony with their environments” . The analysed value-chain
frameworks which the action will undertake will also help to transform livestock herding in the area from a
“survival enterprise” into a cogent livestock and livestock-related economic industry in the medium-term.

21
Excellent Development, The UK Charity Awards 2008 Winner, URL: http://www.excellentdevelopment.com/dams.php, accessed
July 28th 2009. Interesting video commentary on the impact that sand dams create.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 27


The establishment of livestock marketing cooperatives will increase the marketing of livestock and
reduce pressure on rangelands.

Overall, and in the short-term, this project will reduce the chronic food shortage period in the targeted 15
Kebeles by half, that is, from 6 – 9 months to 3 – 6 months by (a) increasing grain crop production, (b)
improving health and livestock productivity; (c) diversifying the livelihood systems and strategies of the
target beneficiaries; (d) increasing their income levels; and (e) strengthening the productive capacities of the
target beneficiaries and implementation capacity of local government to be able to robustly respond to and
address the development needs of the people in the area.

The project will therefore make measurable changes to the lives and livelihoods of the two main targeted
groups of final beneficiaries. These two groups are (a) agro-pastoralists, farmers and fishermen and (b)
women as agro-business entrepreneurs and SHG members. The project will also make considerable
improvement to the technical and strategic resource development and management capacities operations of
local government, local NGO partners, Kebele-based institutions and networks to enable them to better
deliver sustainable development outcomes. As a result, in order to make such measurable impact both in the
short and in the long term, based on its three work packages described above, the project will implement core
activities which:

 Are institutionally, financially and technically attainable within the current conditions;
 Are highly integrated with the present government development policies and Woreda development
and plans and activities to ensure enhanced synergetic impact; and
 Will result into manageable outcomes and sustainable benefits which are replicable by local
government, national NGO partners and community-based institutions once their capacities have
been strengthened by the project;

Target Group 1: Agro-Pastoralists, Farmers and Fishermen

As a result of the inadequate enhancement of the huge agricultural production potential, this target group of
final beneficiaries are currently unable to produce enough food and generate adequate incomes which can
serve them for the year round. Hence, for a number of months in the year, they depend on meagre food aid.
This project will make viable changes in enhancing the capacities of this target group to tap into their natural,
economic and social potentials to measurably improve on their lives and livelihood activities and systems so
as to reduce their vulnerabilities, long periods of food shortages and dependency on food aid. Through these
envisaged changes, up to 10,000 farming HHs will benefit from different agricultural technologies and
livelihood diversification support which will improve crop and livestock production and productivity and
enhance their HH livelihood strategies.

The project will make such viable changes by (a) enabling the grain crop production and productivity to be
doubled; (b) increasing the productivity of livestock; (c) unleashing the productive potentials of all the able
bodied irrespective of gender; (d) building and strengthening community-based institutions as enabled-
economic vehicles for community development; (e) enhancing the value-chain frameworks of the producers
and agro-businesses by linking their outputs to profitable market resources to maximise the returns on their
production and business investments; and (f) adding value to nature through enabling farmers to undertake
environmentally friendly agricultural production practices, producing and utilising organic fertilisers and
promoting practices of that improve vegetation cover, such as the construction of sand dams which can raise
the water table and create a micro-climate for conductive human, livestock and plant survival.

Specifically, with this target group of final beneficiaries, the project will make the following changes:

1) Increase the yield of the main grain crops in the area by 11% to 25% (see Table 1.1 above) per production
period.
2) 240 HHs directly benefiting from doubled production in 60 ha of irrigated farmland.
3) 169.8 metric tonnes of improved crop seeds available to 600 farming HHs per year from the 30 seed
multiplication centres which will be established by the project.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 28
4) 2,400 agro–pastoralists (960 women and 1,440 men) having access to agricultural inputs.
5) 300 farmers in 300 HHs undertaking recommended agronomic practices to improve crop productivity.
6) 700 farmers producing 28.0 tons (i.e., 40 kg per farmer) of organic fertilizer per year to increase their
food production.
7) Post harvest losses in the 15 targeted Kebeles reduced to 10% from 35%.
8) Access to veterinary services increased by 50% in the 15 targeted Kebeles and by 25% in the rest of the
Kebeles in the 3 Woredas.
9) A total of 7,000 livestock accessing nutritious forage on and/or from the 150 ha of developed rangeland.
10) The productivity of livestock in the 15 targeted Kebeles improved and their mortality reduced.
11) 10,000 HHs have better returns for their produce and outputs as a result of enhanced product value-
chain frameworks and increased access to markets.
12) The cumulative percentage share of cooperatives in marketing outputs in the 15 project Kebeles
increased to 60% (in line with PASED target) from 10%.
13) Clean water provided to 10,000 HHs and their livestock, nurseries and trees through the rehabilitation of
HDWs, the tapping of springs and the construction of sand dams.

Target Group 2: Women as SHG Members and Agro-Business Entrepreneurs


By organising women in the 15 Kebeles into SHGs and cost-effective agro-business entrepreneurs, the
project will transform the agricultural and pastoral outputs of the women from undervalued social and
survival products into financially-viable and valuable economic products which are capable of earning the
women tangible fiscally-profitable returns in the marketplace. During the process, there will be positive
changes in the organisational and entrepreneurial skills of the women and their production dexterity and
business adroitness enhanced. In the medium term, this will give the women the financial and economic
prowess they deserve and make them acknowledged pecuniary contributors to the wellbeing of their HHs
and to community development efforts of their Kebeles. The project will also raise the awareness of the
women on HIV/AIDS, the environment and HTPs.

The project will afford such changes by (a) harnessing the embedded social capital in the community by
organising the women into SHGs which will initiate savings and credit enterprises, as described above. Such
SHGs will be capable of according micro-credit to their members to enable them to venture into and/or
strengthen their agro-businesses, (b) organising SHGs into CLAs and providing SHGs members with agro-
business inputs and the CLAs with start up capital both as economic business enterprises themselves and as
sources of micro-credit for their members, (c) Training and linking CLAs to MFIs to access more financial
resources to boost their economic production and the agro-businesses of their members, (d) training female
artisans to improve their skills, innovativeness, employment opportunities and incomes, and (e)
mainstreaming gender, HIV/AIDS, HTPs and environmental issues into the activities of this target group,
which mainstreaming will be facilitated by trained DFs under supervision of development professionals.

Specifically, with this group of target final beneficiaries, the project will make the following changes:

1) Between 1,200 and 1,600 women, that is, between 5% and 6% of the female population of the 6 targeted
Kebeles in Debub Ari Woreda are organised into 80 SHGs which are serving as savings and credit units
and as agro-business bases for their members.
2) 80 SHGs enabling 5% to 6% of the female population of 6 targeted Kebeles in Debub Ari Woreda to
access savings facilities and micro-loans of Birr 500 – 800 per year.
3) 400 SHG women members engaged in gainful poultry projects with a total of 3,520 – 3,840 RIR hybrid
pullets (i.e., 11-12 pullets per entrepreneur) with a market value of Birr 176,000 – 192,000 during the
project period.
4) 400 women members of SHG producing 900,000 eggs from their poultry project, during the project
period, with a current market value of Birr 1.26m.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 29


5) 720 women members of SHG involved in small ruminant production and marketing to increase their
incomes.
6) 8 CLAs supporting agro-business women entrepreneurs by linking them to market outlets such as hotels
and supermarkets in the Region and in Addis Ababa for the supply of eggs and other poultry products and
the marketing of their small ruminants.
7) 164 women producing good quality honey, benefiting from the marketing support of cooperatives and
earning an estimated total of Birr 262,400 per year from the sale of honey.
8) Honey production per hive will increase between 5-8 fold from the current production from traditional
beehives, with a total estimated production of 26,240kg honey produced at the end of 2011 and 656kg
wax produced at the end of 2011, with an estimated income from the sale of such honey at Birr
1,049,600.00.
9) 15 women trained on blacksmith work as a live-long marketable skill.
10) 60 women trained on making beehives, fishing boats, fishing nets, masonry works or a combination of
each two of these skills to improve their industrial and/or organisational employment, self-employment
and income generation opportunities.
11) 1,200 to 1,600 women have an increased awareness on gender issues, HTPs, HIV/AIDS and
environmental issues.

Target Group 3: Improving the Technical and Management Capacities of Target Groups and Local
Partners

This target group includes local government, local implementing partners and community-based institutions.
The project will improve the technical and management capacities of each of these groups of partners in the
following ways.

(a) Improving the Technical and Management Capacities of Local Government Partners
In order to cost-efficiently improve the technical and management capacities and development delivery
proficiency of local government partners, the project will be implementing development activities which are
relevant to the local government and the communities that they serve in line with the development strategies
and plans of the Woredas. The project will therefore afford relevant training and other capacity development
opportunities to local government staff pertinent to the realisation of the envisaged project outputs and
results to enhance the sustainability of the benefits, schemes and systems that will be created by this project.

As already described above under sub-section 1.1.6.3, the project will undertake the following specific
activities to improve the technical and management capacities of local government partners in the three
targeted Woredas by:

1) Training of a total 120 relevant Woreda and Kebele staff on various aspects of management capacity
needs such as on (a) agricultural development and management to improve the agricultural services and
resource management skills of the Woredas and (b) administration to reduce bureaucracy and enhance
administrative effectiveness and efficiency; (c) coordination, supervision and integration of development
interventions in order to create enhanced synergetic results.
2) Technical training in areas such as (a) participatory extension methods with emphasis on communication,
facilitation and innovation skills to ensure that development interventions address the real needs of the
people in a cost-effective and sustainable manner, (b) drought cycle management and vulnerability
assessments to help prepare their constituencies on survival strategies during droughts and to enable the
timely identification of the most vulnerable members of their communities for support; (c) DRR strategies
to enable timely responses and to strengthen and integrated development interventions such as PSNP into
Woreda activities, (d) climate mitigation approaches to increase technical skills in integrated
environmental issues and responses in Woreda development plans and activities; (e) post harvest losses to
transfer such skills to the farmers to reduce unwarranted losses of their produce, (f) value chain analysis
and development to enable the farmers to get value for their produce and products; (g) animal health
services to improve the diagnostic skills and technical responses of the Woredas, (h) community

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 30


dialogue facilitation skills to improve the conflict resolution; and (i) on cross-cutting technical issues such
as gender and HIV/AIDS and HTPs to ensure their strategic and operational mainstreaming in Woreda
development actions, and specifically as they apply to the current project.
3) 45 local government staff in Debub Ari Woreda, who are part of the 120 staff indicated above, will also
have their technical capacities on cooperative development and management by WSA through training on
the cooperative package to help improve their supervision of the cooperatives which will be established
and strengthened by this project.
4) 30 DAs will also be trained by the project on some of the managerial and technical aspects identified
above and on time management and participatory planning and reporting.
5) 30 CAHWs will be trained in the technical areas of (a) basic animal health management such as
castration, dehorning, blotting and hoof trimming; (b) on symptomatic disease diagnosis, preventive
techniques and curative services including injections and vaccinations against common and less livestock
complex diseases; and management areas (c) on basic financial management, accounting and
accountability to enhance their management of the vet revolving funds.

(b) Improving the Technical and Management Capacities of Local NGO Partners
The planned training for local NGO partners will improve the technical skills of their staff to enable to
manage and implement the project effectively, conduct indicator-based monitoring and enable them to
produce timely and standard reports. The training will also improve on the technical skills in the areas
specific areas of training started above. The project will also improve the technical and management skills in
implementing a contract of this nature by building their expertise in result-based reporting and compliance
issues. Through the support with vehicles, computers and, increase in number of staff, the project will also
build the technical and operational capacity of the partners.

(c) Improving the Technical and Management Capacities of Targeted Final Beneficiaries
The project will improve the technical and management capacities of the targeted final beneficiaries through
training (which will include farmer-to-farmer training), experience sharing visits, demonstrations,
establishment and training of new CBIs and strengthening existing CBIs, sharing the results of studies
conducted under the project.

(i) Training and Awareness Raising


The training will be in areas which will help to ensure that the final beneficiaries have the technical skills and
management competencies required to make sure that they are capable of managing the schemes and systems
which will be established by the project so as to continue to enjoy the benefits of such schemes and systems
in a sustainable manner. There will also be awareness-raising sessions on topical issues such as (a) fishing
and fishery development for 400 and (b) gender, HIV and AIDS, HTPs and on environmental issues as
already discussed under sub-section 1.1.1.3 above.
The training will entail technical skills required in managing (a) irrigation schemes among other things to
ensure water use efficiency which will involve 240 farmers, (b) irrigation generators management and
maintenance for 8 people, (c) seed selection and management for 220 farmers, (d) improved agronomic
practices for 300 farmers, (e) integrated pest management and post harvest crop handling for 220 active
model farmers, (f) fodder production, rangeland management, natural resource management and
environmental issues for 222 farmers, (g) fishery resources development, cost-effective fish preservation
methods such as drying, the application of salt and smoking, and management and value chain establishment
and management for 400 people, (h) poultry management and marketing for 400 SHG agro-business women
entrepreneurs, (i) management of small ruminants and marketing for 720 SHG women agro-business
entrepreneurs, and (j) artisan skills training for 130 artisans on various skill areas.
Agro-pastoralist-to-agro-pastoralist training will also be undertaken. For instance (a) in the area of pest
management and store construction, the 30 farmers who will be trained b y the project are in turn expected to
train another 30 farmers each with a multiplier effect of 1,650 farmers having the skills and knowledge in
integrated pest management, post harvest crop handling and appropriate store construction, and (b) to
facilitate the farmers in Dasenech Woerda to adopt ploughing with oxen, farmer-to-farmer training will be

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 31


undertaken with the ‘Erbore’ people in the adjacent Hammer Woreda who are acquainted to ploughing with
oxen driven ploughs.

(ii) Experience Sharing Visits


This will include capacity development exchange visits for (a) 25 fishermen from Dasenech Woreda to Arba
Minch to be organised by ASE, and (b) 50 farmers to suitable sites in SNNPR to be organised by AFD.
(iii) Field Demonstrations
This will include (a) organising some farmers in Dasenech Woreda to visit the 1 ha horticultural nursery to
be established at Omorate Town for practical sessions on nursery management and horticultural production,
(b) annual farmers days to be organised by the project in Dasenech Woreda to which researchers and
agricultural experts in the Zone and the Region will be invited for learning and sharing, (c) demonstrations
on constructing appropriate HH stores in Malee Woreda, and (d) demonstrations at the 30 seed
multiplication centres to be established by the project.

(iv) Establishment and Strengthening of CBIs


One of the main five capitals that the project will be creating is social capital through enhanced CBIs. This
will be through establishing and training new CBIs and strengthening existing ones to ensure that they have
the requisite technical expertise and managerial competencies to be able to deliver on the social facets of the
market economy by creating vibrant social and economic spaces, tapping on embedded social resources and
encouraging cooperative behaviour in order to actualise the expected development outcomes in their
respective areas of specialisation.
The CBIs will include creating, supporting and training (a) IUAs for management and maintenance of the
irrigation schemes to be established (b) WUAs for the management and maintenance of the water points to
be rehabilitated and the news water points to be established by the project, (c) rangeland management
committees for the upkeep of the rangeland that will be development by the project, and (d) four types of
cooperative societies: 6 livestock primary marketing cooperatives, 4 fishery cooperatives, 4 beekeeping
cooperatives, and 9 SACCOS. Each of these cooperatives will be trained on the technical and managerial
aspects of the cooperative package to enable them to effectively and efficiently transform their shared
interests into shared economic and financial outcomes.

(v) Sharing the Results of Analytical Studies, Surveys and Assessments


The sharing of such studies and surveys will be for all the targeted groups under this project to further
enhance their understanding of analysed development issues to enable them to maximise the outcome of their
activities. These studies and surveys will include:
1) Land survey and technical design of the irrigation systems to ensure cost-effective and efficient design.
2) Marketing study to better understand the existing livestock structure and to design commercially informed
marketing mix and value chain.
3) A study to understand the rangeland management practices in the targeted areas so as to inform the
development of a rangeland management strategy with established by-laws.
4) A fishery value-chain study to enable the promotion of fishery in Dasenech Woreda.
5) The assessment of potential fish resources in the area in order to better promote sustainable fishing.

Monitoring, Reporting and Evaluation


Routine monitoring will be conducted by project staff. Regular reports will be submitted to EC and there will
be both a mid-term review and a terminal evaluation of the project. Project expenditure verifications will
also be undertaken by qualified auditors as required.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 32


1.2. Methodology (max 4 pages)

1.2.1 The Methods of Implementation and Reasons for the Proposed Methodology

1.2.1.1 Methods of Increasing in Agricultural Production and Productivity


(a) Establishing Small-Scale Community-Based Management Schemes
According to the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), it is not a question of whether to
22
include small-scale irrigation in Ethiopia “but how to do so more effectively” as it reduces the effect of
drought on the farmers. Based on the assessed suitability of the 3 sites targeted for irrigation, the project will
implement 2 types of irrigation methods, i.e., river diversion and pump irrigation through sub-contracting to
specialised institutions in irrigation works. This will make the work faster given the fact that the project is for
20 months. It will also allow time for the envisaged technical training and institutional development as a
means of ensuring sustainability.
(b) Establishment of Seed Multiplication and Horticultural Nursery Centres
The seed multiplication centres will make improved seed varieties accessible to the farmers to help increase
crop yields per ha. The training on seed management will also improve the efficiency of crop production.
The horticultural nursery centre will enable farmers to access seedlings to increase cropped area and
production. These centres will also serve as demonstration and training venues.
(c) Training on Green Technologies and Integrated Pest Management
The project will train some farmers on green technologies such as organic fertilizer production to boost crop
production without increasing production costs. Moreover inorganic fertiliser is currently unaffordable by the
average farmer. Training on green technologies will gradually expose the farmers to the green global
movement for environmental justice. The training on integrated pest management will help to increase their
production and reduce post harvest loses from 35% to 10%.
(d) Training on Enhanced Agronomic Practices and Support with Agricultural Inputs
The training on enhanced agronomic practices will help improve production efficiency. For instance, the
majority of the farmers in Dasenech Woreda are yet to adopt ploughing by oxen ploughs. It will also
maximise returns and improve the health of the soils. The support with agricultural inputs will reduce the
direct production costs on the farmers and enable them to increase their yields.
(e) Training and Material Support on Fishery Development
The training will help to enhance fishery resource development and management and cost-effective methods
of fish preservation. The support with fishing materials will reduce the direct production costs on the
fishermen and help to increase their production. Fishery development will also help to attract more people to
fishing for livelihood diversification and reduction of vulnerability. The organising of the fishermen into
cooperatives will improve their economies of scale.
1.2.1.2 Methods of Improving Livestock Production and Productivity
(a) Improving Access to Vet Services
A further analysis of the CSA’s Agricultural Sample Survey, 2008/09, Report on Livestock and Livestock
Characteristics (Peasant Private Holdings), Vol. II, (p. 64, 66, 68 & 132) shows that out of the many causes
of livestock death, 10.7%, 30.38% and 15.28% of the cattle, sheep and goats population in South Omo Zone
died of diseases. The project will improve access to vet services by improving the capacity of the Woreda
Vet Offices, increasing the number of CAHWs, provide them with vet drugs to start-up for vet revolving
funds, vet materials and mobility (Dasenech Woreda only).

(b) Development of Rangelands and Training to Improve Grazing Land Management


This will introduce more nutritious and palatable forage species to improve the quality of the fodder in the
vast grazing lands of the targeted area. In Dasenech Woreda for instance, 24.9% of the total area of the

22
IFAD, URL: http://www.ifad.org/evaluation/public_html/eksyst/doc/profile/pf/ethiopia.htm, accessed 01/09/09
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 33
Woreda of 234,274 ha is devoted for grazing. Good fodder will improve the weight of the animals to enable
pastoralists to get better prices for their livestock. It will help improve the health of the livestock for better
production and productivity. The training that will be provided and the RMC to be established will improve
the grazing land management practices and techniques to consequently reduce violent conflicts over grazing
in the area.
(c) Improving Access to Water through HDWs Spring and Sand Dams
The rehabilitating of some of the dilapidated HDWs is cheaper than digging new ones. Spring tapping and
the construction of sand dams are cost-effective technologies of providing water to large and diverse human
populations and their livestock. According to Excellent Development in Kenya, in addition to its potentials to
tremendously improve the environment, a sand dam is capable of providing clean water supply for up to
1,200 people, animals and nurseries. Moreover, since it improves “water availability in a 20km radius” this
23
means “a sand dam may indirectly benefit up to 100,000 people” . AFD has a water engineer who has many
years experience in water works and sand dam construction. The communities have agreed to provide labour
for these labour intensive schemes. The construction of the sand dams will be sub-contract for faster
delivery.

1.2.1.3 Methods of Livelihood Diversification and Increasing Income


(a) Building and Strengthening Business-Oriented Institutions
The project will enhance social capital through establishing business-oriented cooperatives and savings and
credit organisations and strengthening existing ones to enable them to cooperatively enlarge the social and
economic spaces of the area and ensure growth and prosperity for their members and the communities. As
vehicles for social and economic transformation, they will be trained and supported with initial capital to
enable the cooperatives to engage in the marketing of inputs and outputs in their communities and the
savings and credit organisations to build revolving funds.
(b) Economic Empowerment of Women
The project will reduce their gender disadvantages of the women and increase their incomes. This will be
through forming them into SHGs and CLAs which will enable them to establish and manage savings and
credit services, establish individual agri-businesses and be involved in other off-farm activities. WSA, the
lead organisation for the project in this activity, has 8 years experience in SHGs, CLAs and micro-credit
work. Its current women empowerment coordinator has an MA in Saving and Credit and Cooperative
Management and 6 years work experience in micro-credit work. See Part IV, sub-section 2.2, for more
details on WSA’s experience and expertise in micro-credit.
(c) Training on Entrepreneurial Skills and Artisan Works
The project will provide training on various aspects of business development and management to increase
the effectiveness and efficiency of the CBIs, SHGs, CLAs and savings d credit organisations. The project
will also increase HH incomes by developing the skills of artisans to enable them to be employed by projects
operating in the area or to create self-employment opportunities for themselves.
(d) Value Chain Development
The project will also improving overall performance and efficiency of income generating activities by
conducting value chain studies, analysis and development for honey, fishery and livestock marketing to
transform these from survival enterprises into economic enterprises. It will also undertake value adding such
as processing and packaging/canning for products such as honey.

1.2.1.4 Methods of Capacity Building


For partner staff and staff of Woredas, participatory conventional training sessions will be conducted by
experienced facilitators and trainers to improve knowledge and skills in the respective areas. For the capacity
building of the final beneficiaries in the various technical and managerial areas, the project will use both
conventional and innovative training methods such as community learning forums (CoLFs) and
Comprehensive Community Conversation for Action (CCCA). CoLF is a participatory learning and sharing

23
Excellent Development, URL: http://www.excellentdevelopment.com/dams.php, accessed July 28th 2009.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 34
forum for 25-30 local people and facilitators and has the components of Social learning, Skill Enhancement
and Entrepreneurship Development (SEED) and Participatory Innovation Development (PID). CCCA is a
process of engaging communities for 2-3 hours in interactive discussions creating deep understanding mainly
on HIV and AIDS, reproductive health, gender and HTPs. Farmers days will be organised for social
discourse and learning for action.
1.2.2 The Procedures for Follow Up, Monitoring and Internal/External Evaluation
Christian Aid has overall contractual responsibility and will use its extensive experience of monitoring and
evaluation. The project use 3 complementary methods to monitor, evaluate and assess the changes and
impact made by the project. Routine reports will be produced by the project.
1.2.2.1 Participatory Monitoring and Impact Assessment (PMIA)
The project technical team, with the participation of the target beneficiaries and other relevant stakeholders
will facilitate the PMIA design and application based on the set of verifiable indicators in the logframe. The
PMIA will produce information to assess if the project is making the desired changes, meeting the stated
objectives and to identify problems.
1.2.2.2 Mid-Term Review
As an output-to-objective exercise, the mid-term review will assess the competences in the management of
the project, appropriateness, robustness of the methods of implementation, how well the roles of the partners
and stakeholders are being fulfilled, whether the activities are producing the expected results and the
potential of the project to achieve its objectives within the stated timeframe.
1.2.2.3 End of Project External Evaluation
This will provide an independent assessment of the project implementation and management using a multi-
disciplinary team of professionals to assess the effects and impacts of the project on the target groups,
sustainability, relevance, the implementation efficiency and effectiveness, and to draw key lessons for future
action.
1.2.3 Effective Involvement of the Various Actors and Stakeholders and Target Groups

This proposal was formulated in consultation with all relevant government, non government and private
actors at Zonal, Woreda and community level. The project will be officially launched during a workshop to
which all the development actors in the area will be invited.
1.2.3.1 Implementing Partners
ASE will be operating in Dasenech Woreda, AFD in Malee and Debub Ari Woredas and WSA at Debub Ari
Woreda. ASE and AFD will be mainly concerned with agricultural intensification and diversification while
WSA will lead on the livelihood diversification and income generation.
1.2.3.2 Local Government
The project will work with the Office of Finance and Economic Development (at zone level) through its
Office of NGO Service in facilitating the signing of the project agreement at regional level, the coordination
of the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the project, and in the resolution of any disputes.
BoFED will organise the line bureaus to appraise the project and facilitate the signing of the project
agreement and support the project in the importation of the project vehicles and other equipments. It will also
be BoFED role to organise terminal evaluation of the project and document the project lessons learned into
the web site that was established by EC funding through Christian Aid.
Agriculture and Rural Development Coordination Offices (ARDCO), specifically, the Irrigation Department,
Livestock Unit, Crop Production Unit and the Cooperative Desk, in South Omo Zonal office and the three
Woreda Offices will be the main government counterparts for the implementation of the project. They will
provide technical support in their respective areas of specialisation, facilitate some of the training, be
involved in community mobilisation and formation of CBIs. They will also be responsible for monitoring
and supervising the schemes, systems and institutions established by the project when the project ends.

1.2.3.3 Other NGOs Operating in the Targeted Area


EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 35
Effective partnerships will be built with other NGOs and CBIs in the 3 targeted Woredas such as South Omo
People’s Development Association (SOPDA), Ethiopian Pastoralist Research and Development Association
(EPaRDA) Serving In Mission (SIM) and FARM-Africa to ensure synergetic collaboration, efficient use of
resources and pro-poor delivery of development objectives.

1.2.4 The Organisational Structure and Team Proposed for Implementation of the Action
The organisational structure of the project will consist of a Governance Team consisting of the heads of
organisations of the 3 implementing partners and the Senior Programme Officer for Livelihoods, Christian
Aid. Please see Annex 1A for details of the organisational structure of the project. As the project is to be
implemented in 3 Woredas, a Project Steering Committee (PSC) will be formed at zone level. The PSC will
be compose of South Omo Zone Administrator or his chosen representative (1) as chair, representatives of
ARDCO from the 3 Woredas (3), Office of NGO-Service from South Omo Zone (1), Woreda Project
Coordinators for the 3 partners (3) and the Project Coordinator (1) as Secretary.
The duties and responsibilities of the steering committee will include: (a) ensuring that the project activities
are being implemented on time and on budget, (b) recommendations in implementation which are within the
contractual agreement with EC, (c) securing oversight support from government and (c) ensure the wellbeing
and safety of the action and its staff. It will meet every month for the 1st quarter of the project and the
quarterly thereafter to monitor the progress of the action, approving the quarterly reports and planned
activities of the action. Extra-ordinary meetings may also be held. Steering Committees may also be
established by partners at Woreda level.

1.2.5 The Main Means Proposed for the Implementation of the Action

The main equipment, materials, supplies and rent to be acquired by the project are:
1.2.5.1 Two (2) vehicles rented at the start of the project for a period of 6 months.
1.2.5.2 Two (2) new vehicles to be managed by the Project Coordinator and used on a poll bases.
1.2.5.3 Three computers and three printers – i.e., 1 for each implementing partner.
1.2.5.4 One (1) new laptop for the Project Coordinator.
1.2.5.5 Five (5) new motor cycles: 2 each for Malee and Dasenech Woredas and 1 for Debub Ari Worea.
1.2.5.6 Eight (8) bicycles for CAHWs in Dasenech Woreda.
1.2.5.7 Rent of office space for ASE in Dasenech Woreda.
1.2.5.8 One (1) office generator for the office to be rented for ASE in Dasenech Woreda.
1.2.5.9 Two (2) pump generator for irrigation in Dasenech Woreda.
1.2.5.10 Office furniture.
1.2.5.11 Rent of office for ASE in Dasenech Woreda.
1.2.5.12 Digital camera and video.

1.2.6 Activities in Order to Ensure the Visibility of the Action and of the EC Funding
To ensure that project beneficiaries are aware of the role of the EC in supporting the project, visibility
methods will include the creation of:
a) billboards at each of the proposed project sites and at major junctions leading to such sites;
b) distribution of T-shirts and other IEC materials during farmers’ days;
c) packaging of project products, such as honey and eggs; and
d) liaison with community groups and other representative (including local government) structures.
To ensure that EC support is promoted to other stakeholders and the general public in a way that will
enhance the credibility of the project, visibility methods will include:
a) a project launch to which both regional and federal radio and TV will be invited for subsequent
broadcasting;
b) development and distribution of leaflets; and
c) sharing of project success stories through the dissemination of case studies and reports. Partners will
collect case studies and take photos for use in the visibility activities. Christian Aid staff will provide
the technical support to ensure the high standard of the materials to be developed for these activities.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 36


1.3. Duration and indicative action plan for implementing the action

The duration of the action will be 20 months. NB: The action should be finished by 31 October 2011. Below
is an implementation schedule for the first 12 months of the project.

Year 1
Semester 1 Semester 2
Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Implementing body
PREPARATORY PHASE
Preparation, appraisal and signing of All 3 partners
agreement with regional Bureau
All 3 partners and
Recruiting project staff Christian Aid
Renting of vehicles All 3 partners
Vehicle purchase Christian Aid
Launching Planning workshop, All 3 partners
IMPLEMENTATION PHASE
Irrigation Schemes
Small scale irrigation study and design and AFD and ASE
detail feasibility
Visibility action(leaflets, sign posts, bill All partners
boards)
Hand tools for irrigation users ASE
Construction of diversion weirs and canals AFD
for irrigation schemes
Organise and train Irrigation users AFD and ASE
Experience sharing visit for IUA AFD and ASE
Purchase and installation of diesel pumps ASE
Training on Pump management ASE
Inputs, Seed multiplication Pest
Management and Field Days
Establish seed multiplication centres AFD
Organize and training of seed growers AFD and ASE
Support with farm inputs AFD and ASE
Experience sharing visit for seed growers AFD and ASE
Support for on farm demonstrations ASE
Organize farmers field day AFD and ASE
Train and support organic fertilizer target AFD
groups
Farmers training and support on crop post AFD
harvest practices
Support on farm demonstrations ASE
Livestock
CAHWS selection and first round training AFD and ASE
Cattle crush Construction AFD and ASE
Support livestock vaccination AFD and ASE
Rehabilitate hand-dug wells AFD and ASE
Spring tapping AFD
Construction of 6 sand dams ASE
Train water committee members AFD and ASE
Range land development and enclosure AFD and ASE
Enclose range land AFD and ASE
Training of RMC AFD, ASE
Organize and train bee keeping cooperatives AFD
Beekeeping and Fishery
Supplies for beekeepers AFD
Experience sharing visit for beekeepers AFD
Conduct study on potential fish resource on ASE
Omo River

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 37


Year 1
Semester 1 Semester 2
Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Implementing body
Income Diversification – SHGs, CLAs and
Cooperatives
Skill training for community members AFD and ASE
Organize, train and support SHGS WSA
Formation of CLA and provision of
revolving fund WSA
Form and train primary level livestock
marketing cooperatives AFD and WSA
Form and train primary level honey
cooperatives AFD and WSA
Form and train primary level cereal
marketing cooperatives AFD and WSA
Form and train primary level fishery
marketing cooperatives ASE and WSA
Strengthen saving and credit cooperatives WSA and AFD
Establish market linkage for the fishery
cooperatives ASE
Capacity Building
Technical training for line department staff AFD and ASE
on fishery and livestock
Technical training on cooperatives WSA
Technical training on crop production AFD and ASE
Material support for line department AFD and ASE
Training on Gender and HIV/AIDS
mainstreaming WSA
Support existing early warning systems in
Dasenech Woreda ASE
Logistic support for livestock vaccination
campaign ASE and AFD
All 3 partners and
Training of partner staff on various issues Christian Aid
All 3 partners and
Submission of reports Christian Aid
Mid-term review Christian Aid

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 38


For the remaining implementation period:
Semester 3 Semest
er 4
Activity 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Implementing body
Agricultural input distribution for irrigation users AFD and ASE
Farmers field day for organic fertilizer groups and post harvest
technology AFD
Value chain and market linkage for beekeepers AFD
Value chain and market linkage for livestock cooperatives AFD and ASE
Value chain development for fishery ASE
CAHWS second round training AFD and ASE
Strengthen and follow up primary level livestock marketing
cooperatives AFD and WSA
Strengthen and follow up primary level honey cooperatives AFD and WSA
Strengthen and follow up primary level cereal marketing
cooperatives AFD and WSA
Strengthen and follow up primary level fishery marketing
cooperatives ASE and WSA
Strengthen saving and credit cooperatives AFD and WSA
Follow up for IGA groups AFD and WSA
Strengthening IGA AFD and WSA
Enclose range land AFD and ASE
Enriching the enclosed range land AFD and ASE
All partners and
Submission of reports Christian Aid
SMOOTH HANDING OVER
Terminal evaluation
Final expenditure verification
Final asset inventory
Handing over of project assets to government
Development of final project report begins

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 39


1.4. Sustainability (max 3 pages)

Expected Impact

1.4.1.1 Technical Level


The project management understands that most of the technical failures of projects have an institutional
origin. Consequently, the design of the project is focused on efficacy, relevance and effectiveness in order to
maximize sustainable benefits from this project. The proposed scale of activities, their physical design and
choice of technology, can be managed by enhanced technical local capacities which the project will create.
As a result, strategy for capacity building, awareness raising and widening the knowledge base and skills sets
of the beneficiaries has been designed to ensure the sustainability and functionality of the project outputs and
impact.

The project will increase access and availability to improved agricultural inputs, techniques and services for
building individual and communal assets. Over all, project expects to increase the technical capacities of the
target beneficiaries by 30%. Hence the expected impact of the action at technical level will entailed
developing the technical and skills capacities of the final beneficiaries and the relevant local government
staff.
(a) Final Beneficiary Level
This will entail the following technical skills: (i) 700 farmers in making of organic fertiliser, (ii) 240 on
irrigation scheme management rehabilitation, (iii) 1,650 farmers in integrated pest management and
appropriate post harvest handling, (iv) 18 farmers and agro-pastoralists on pump generator management and
maintenance, (v) 220 farmers on seed selection and management, (vi) 300 farmers on improved agronomic
practices (vii) 222 farmers on fodder production, rangeland management, natural resource management and
environmental issues, (viii) 400 people fishery on cost-effective fish preservation methods, (ix) 400 SHG
members and agro-business women entrepreneurs on poultry management and marketing, (x) 720 SHG
women entrepreneurs on the management and marketing of small ruminants, and (xi) 130 people having the
technical skills in various artisan works.
(b) Local Government Level
The technical skills of 120 improved on areas such as (i) cost-effective and sustainable manner and
participatory extension methods (ii) DRR strategies, (iii) climate mitigation approaches (iv) post harvest lose
reduction and control, (v) value chain analysis and development, (vi) animal health diagnostics and
responses, and (vii) cross-cutting technical issues such as gender and HIV/AIDS and HTPs; (vii) 45 Woread
staff on the sustainable cooperative development and management; and (viii) 30 CAHWs on basic animal
health to increase the productivity of livestock.

1.1.4.2 Economic Level


The project will improve livestock productivity and increase food production in the target Kebeles by 35%;
increase incomes by least by 25% (from an average Birr 800 to Birr 1,000 per annum); and the economic
output of the targeted Kebeles by 40% to change the living status of more than 50, 000 direct beneficiaries
and 35,000 indirect beneficiaries. More specifically, the project is expected to (i) double productivity of
crops (ii) improve productivity and marketability, (iii) make seeds affordable (vi) foster an enterprising spirit
through the 23 cooperatives; and (vii) the ensure production, processing and packaging of honey, beeswax
and poultry products to help the take-off of the development of market niches at national and international
levels for the economic development of the targeted Woredas.
1.1.4.3 Social Level
The project has been designed in such a way that it also uses the indigenous knowledge and skills of
traditional institutions and systems such as clan leaders and traditional religious leaders which have been
sustained in the communities for decades and centuries. These will be relevant the development and in the
management of communally owned grazing lands and the distribution of the 10 ha of land to be irrigated in
Dasenech Woreda, which is also communally owned. The proposed action will principally work either with
existing institutional structures of the community and the government and user groups which will be

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 40


established and trained by the project, such as IUAs and WUAs, will help to foster the sustainability of the
project.
1.1.4.4 Policy level expected impact

The project will proactively engage in policy advocacy to create favourable investment climate for the private
sector and ensure the national and international market systems work for the benefit of the poor. This project
will serve as an example of how to transform such gender policies in the PASDEP into a pragmatic code of
conduct and enhanced outcomes. Debub Ari Woreda for instances encourages the COMPO office to support
cooperatives and other enterprises by reducing the bureaucracy for their registration. It will show by example
how to make policies agricultural and rural development Strategies, food security strategies, pastoralist
development policy, water resources management policy, and also development programmes such as PSNP and
OFSP (Other Food Security Programmes) and MDGs to be more pro-poor and more gender focused during
implementation.
Describe a Dissemination Plan, Replication and Extension of the Action Outcomes
These will be through (a) Organising farmers’ field days for the target beneficiaries and other neighbouring
Kebeles, (b) Farmer-to-farmer and pastoralists-to-pastoralists training and dissemination of information to
enable easy replication beyond the three Woredas, (c) technical and management training for local
government staff to used for all the Kebeles in the 8 Woredas of the Zone; (d) the support to 720 women
members with small ruminants to benefit another 720 women through passing of off-springs, (e) the 700
farmers to be trained on organic fertiliser production to train another 2,100 farmers; (f) other NGOs
participating in the implementation of the project may adopt approaches of the project and replicate; and (h)
there some of the activities encourage the participation of private sector and entrepreneurs which will be
replicated in the Zone.
Risk analysis and Contingency Plan.
(a) Economic Risks
The global economic crisis may led to a shortage of foreign currency in the country that may constrain
timely implementation of some of the planned activities that require imports such as fertilizers, vehicles and
construction materials. Hence, taking stock of lessons from the on-going projects funded by EC, Christian
Aid and its implementing partners will monitor the situation closely and adopt alternatives plan in
consultation with the EC.
(b) Physical Risks
Poor infrastructures and services and marginalization of the targeted may be a challenge for staff retention or
even to get the right staff. CA and its implementing partners have identified these ahead of time and will use
different strategies to attract and retain qualified staff. The staff turnover of the collaborating line
departments is also a risk and close work with Woreda, zone and regional concerned offices and the
submission updated plans and reports will foster better communication on this.
(c) Environmental Risks and Natural Hazards
These include droughts and floods and livestock disease outbreaks. Drawing lessons from its previous and
on-going projects in the operation areas, CA has developed and early DRR warning and response system.
There are functioning information centres established by Christian Aid and AFD in Dasenech and
Nyangatom Woredas that are managed by the Woreda Spokesperson since the beginning of 2008. The
centres report on the type of impeding disaster with the kind of response to be taken. This action will also use
this information and replicate it Malee and Debub Ari Woredas.
(d) Social Risks
This include conflicts with neighbouring country around border during water and pasture stress periods. CA
and its implementing partners will closely work with local administrative structures and local leaders to
avoid such conflict. Conflict among pastoralists will be minimised by developing rangelands and improving
access to water and by improving the management of these resources by the communities in the 3 Woredas
themselves and enhancing the skills of relevant Woreda staff in community dialogue.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 41


(e) Political Risks
The project will start major labour intensive works before the political campaigns heat-up and monitor such
campaigns so that it is aware of political events in the area and plan accordingly to reduce the risks of
conflict of interest between community mobilisation for project work and political mobilisation for election
campaigns. Due to the new NGO legislation work on conflict, advocacy and policy will not be done through
the local government structures in the Zone.

Main Preconditions and Assumptions During and After the Implementation Phase
These include (a) the continued participation of the concerned Zonal line department staff during the
implementation; (b) the cooperation and good facilitation role of SNNPR line bureaus and department; (c)
the hope that the peaceful co-existence of the various ethnic groups in the project target Woredas will
continue and the political atmosphere will remain supportive to NGO operation; (d) the current peaceful
condition across the Kenyan and Sudanese borders remain the same; (e) the current administrative setup
remains the same or at least any change does not adversely affect the project implementation and the
sustainability plans; (f) recent government attention to integrate the marginalised communities and
pastoralists such as those in the targeted areas into the national economy continues.

How Sustainability will be Secured After Completion of the Action.

(a) Financial Sustainability

Since its shift to focus on marginalised areas of Ethiopia such as South Omo Woreda in its current Strategic
Plan, Christian Aid will continue this commitment into its 2011-2015 Strategic Plan. It will therefore be in a
position to ensure the financial sustainability of the project by continuing to work with the implementing
partners and the Zonal and Woreda offices to ensure sustainability. The revolving funds support to and
training of the CLAs and cooperatives will enable them to develop concrete financial bases for the continuity
of their activities. The SHGs will be technically and managerially capacitated so that they are able to build
their own financial bases for savings and credit activities for foster enterprising spirit in the communities.
The benefiting farmers will be responsible for financing the needs of the two pump generators.

(b) Institutional Sustainability

In partnership with AFD and WSA, Christian Aid is implementing programmes in the areas with 4 partners
which experiences and strengthens this project will build on. Consequently, the institutional presence and
development programming of Christian Aid and the 3 implementing partners will continue in the targeted
Woredas working with the local government to ensure that the institutions and schemes that will be
established by the project continue to remain viable, robust and beneficial.

(c) Policy Level Sustainability

The Economic policy of the country is Agricultural Led Industrialisation in which the focus given to
agriculture and rural development and activities such as those proposed by this project is very high. The
proposed project is therefore on a very sound and supportive policy footing, as all the planned activities are
in line with those the government in promoting and encouraging NGOs to undertake poverty reduction work
in food insecure and marginalised areas such as the areas targeted by the project. Consequently, the
government new NGOs-civil society organisation legislation also supports the types of activities planned by
the action; hence, the unreserved endorsement of the action by the government of Ethiopia as shown by the
attached letter from South Omo Zone.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 42


1.5. Logical framework
24
Please fill in Annex C to the Guidelines for applicants. The Logical Framework should be completed
with care in the proposed format and results should be quantified. See Annex C for logframe.

2. BUDGET FOR THE ACTION


Fill in Annex B (worksheet 1) to the Guidelines for grant applicants for the total duration of the action
and for its first 12 months. For further information see the Guidelines for grant applicants (Section 1.3,
2.1.4, 2.2.1 and 2.2.5). See Annex B for details of the budget.

2. Explanation and Justification for Main Costs included in the Budget


The total budget for action is €1,509,437 million (€1,358,493 million to be contributed by the European
Commission and the remaining €150,944 by Christian Aid, the applicant). Below is an explanation and
justification for the main costs included in the action.
2.1 Human Resources (€222,627)
The action will be implemented by a consortium of Christian Aid and its three implementing local partners.
The main reasons for deploying three partners and the human resources proposed are (a) the relatively short
period (20 months) (b) the remoteness of and nature of the terrain in the three targeted Woredas, (c) limited
capacity of the local government to implement the project without adequate external technical support.
Moreover, the respective competencies of each partner are required for implementing the various work
packages required in the respective Woredas assigned to each.
The Project Coordinator will help to ensure that all the three partners are on-course in the implementation of
their respective activities supported by the three Woreda Project Coordinators of each partner. Adequate
technical input by staff to be recruited, backstopping and oversight by the management and senior
programme staff of the three organizations and Christian Aid staff both from Addis Ababa and London
offices are also required for effective delivery on tangible, technical and institutionally benefits of the action.
2.2. Transportation and Logistics (2 vehicles & 5 motorbikes = €81,825 & vehicle rent = €22,200)
The provision of these is to be subcontracted. The targeted Kebeles one of the remotest parts of the country,
where local infrastructure and public transport services are the least developed. Hence, the need for the
purchase of two vehicles to be used on a poll bases by the 3 partners and the Project Coordinator, and 5
motorcycles, 2 each for AFD and ASE which are in more remote Woredas and 1 for WSA to enable their
field staff to facilitate community mobilisation to implement the project and for p monitoring and
supervision Vehicle renting is necessary as it will take 6 months or more to import the new vehicles into the
country. The continuous rent of vehicle is also not cost-effect as the rent of a vehicle for a period of 6 months
is almost 67% of the cost of a new one. The vehicles and the motorcycles will also be used in monitoring and
supervising the established schemes and systems when the project phases out to ensure sustainability of the
benefits.
2.3 Agricultural Intensification and Diversification (€ 444,531)
As the major objectives of the action is to increase agricultural production to reduce the soaring price of
food. Hence, it has the greater share of the budget for various input supplies and technical capacity support to
undertake activities.
2.3.1 Small Scale Irrigation (3 river diversions = €90,000 & 2 pump irrigation = €20,400)
These will be subcontracted. A preliminary survey on Dameker and Ashokore Rivers in Malee woreda,
which are suitable river diversion, estimated the cost of constructing an irrigation scheme at each site at EUR
30,000 each. The total potentially irrigable land is about 6 times larger than 50 ha targeted by the project.

24
Explanations can be found at the following address:
http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/multimedia/publications/publications/manuals-tools/t101_en.htm

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 43


However, given the resources and the time available, the project will be able to do the 50 ha effectively to
mitigate the vulnerability of 200 direct beneficiary farm families to frequent drought, with each benefiting
from 0.25 ha of irrigated and developed land. A similar survey on Omo River also identified 2 sites suitable
for pump irrigation. The technical skills for managing the irrigation schemes will be institutionalised through
the formation and training of a IWA for each site.
2.3.2 Agricultural Input Supply (€164,181 for seeds and €114,750 for fertiliser) - Subcontracted
Budget for agricultural inputs (seeds and fertiliser) have been allocated both for the beneficiaries using
irrigation and for those under rain fed agriculture to help increase crop production as these are unaffordable
by most farmers. Thirty (30) seed grower associations will be established to ensure improved local seed
production in the future in the targeted Woredas. The provision of the improved seeds will build the seed
reserve in general and ensure HH food security. The price of improved seeds and fertilisers are expensive
and the transportation cost has also been included in the budget.
2.3.3. Seed store Construction (€29,400)
Various studies indicated that post harvest loses of agricultural products rise to 30-35%. To avoid such loss,
sample grain/seed stores have been planned as a demonstration to be later replicated by farmers. The
construction of the seed stores is also aimed to build the community communal assets.
2.4. Livestock Productivity Enhancement (€207,032)
The livestock sector is the major livelihood source for communities in Dasenech woreda and significantly
contributes to the economy of Malee woreda as well. Cognizant to this fact, livestock health, rangeland
development, fishery development, water development for communities and livestock have been planned.
Among the livestock related project components such as sand dams (€70,560), spring development
(€35,000), are the major costs under this activity.
2.5. Income diversification €234,362)
Income diversification activities mainly address the financial, economic and organisational needs of women
beneficiaries. As a result, (a) €23,880 has been allocated for financial support to CLAs to establish savings
and credit schemes for their SHGs, which are established by and for women. This will enable the women,
who are grossly under-represented in the cooperatives in the area, to access credit facilities to enable them to
be engaged in income generating activities as describes under sub-section 1.1.1.2 (a); (b)an amount of
€29,520 for the purchase of 1,440 small ruminants to be distributed to 720 primary women beneficiaries who
will transfer the first offspring to the other 760 secondary and tertiary women beneficiaries; (c) €36,800 for
livestock marketing as there is no organised livestock market in all woredas, particularly the case of
Dasenech, where the livelihood base is livestock, the market does not function properly and the pastoralists
are always at the disadvantage side in marketing their animals; (d) €20,700 primary fishery cooperatives to
organise and further commercialise fishery in Dasenech Woreda; and (e) €25,870 for skills training to
increase the number of skilled people in the areas of fishing boats making, fishing net making, making of
beehives, masonry, blacksmith works and other local crafting skills to increase employability and the
opportunities for self-employment.

3. EXPECTED SOURCES OF FUNDING


Fill in Annex B (worksheet 2) to the Guidelines for applicants to provide information on the expected
sources of funding for the action.
# Source Amount (in EUR) Percentage
1. 1. Commission’s contribution sought in this application 1,358,493 90%
2. 2. Applicant's financial contribution 150,944 10%
3 3. Partner's financial contribution 0 0%
TOTAL 1,509,437 100%

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 44


4. APPLICANT'S EXPERIENCE OF SIMILAR ACTIONS

Project title: Food Security Capacity Sector (see section II, 2.2): 121 (Health general); 12240 (basic nutrition); 5150 (Strengthening civil
Enhancement Programme society); 52 (DEVELOPMENTAL FOOD AID/FOOD SECURITY); 311 (Agriculture);
Location of the Cost of the Lead manager Donors to the action Amount contributed (by Dates (from dd/mm/yyyy to
action action (EUR) or partner 25 donor) dd/mm/yyyy)
(name)
Kachabira, Lanfaro 1,200,000 SOS Sahel European Commission 1,050,000 01/02/2005 - 31/03/2008
and Sashogo (budget line 21.0202)
Woredas, Southern Christian Aid 150, 000
Nations,
Nationalities and
Peoples Region
(SNNPR), Ethiopia
Object and results of the action
The overall objective of the project is to promote measurable and sustainable reductions in food insecurity in Ethiopia.

The specific objective is to achieve measurable and sustainable improvements in food security of vulnerable people in Lanfaro, Kachabira and Sashogo
and other Woredas, SNNPR, Ethiopia.

Results:
1. Decentralised Woreda level government engages with constituencies to deliver effective services and sustainable interventions for short/long term
household food security.
2. Increased community capacity to demand and obtain government services.
3. Proven agricultural/NRM technologies replicated by farmers and supported by market-oriented cooperatives.
4. Employment-based safety nets and social schemes to protect and create household assets for vulnerable groups.
5. Women’s and marginalised groups’ practical and strategic needs addressed via income generation and training.
6. SOS Sahel and Christian Aid micro-macro policy work linking field best practice to the policy-making level.

25
If the Donor is the European Commission or an EU Member States, please specify the EC budget line, EDF or EU Member State.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 45
Project title: Wulbareg and Sankura 26
Sector (see section II, 2.2): 121 (Health general); 14 (WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION); 16064 (Social
Woredas Water Supply, Health and mitigation of HIV / AIDS); 41 (GENERAL ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION);
Environmental Development Project,
Ethiopia
Location of the Cost of the Lead manager or Donors to the action Amount contributed (by Dates (from dd/mm/yyyy
action action (EUR) partner 27 donor) to dd/mm/yyyy)
(name)
Southern Nations, 2,608,490 Water Action European Commission 1,779,562 01/01/2008 - 01/01/2011
Nationalities and (ACP-EU water facility)
People’s Regional
State (SNNPRS); 5828,928
Wulbareg and Christian Aid
Sankura Woredas
(districts), Ethiopia
Object and results of the action
The overall objective of the action is sustainable changes in the livelihoods of disadvantaged rural communities in SSNPRS, as a result of improvement
in their health knowledge and status and their environment.

The specific objective of the action is sustainable changes in the livelihoods of 54,160 rural people in 20 kebeles (sub-districts) of Wulbareg and Sankura
Woredas in Siltie zone, SNNPRS by the year 2010, as a result of improvements in their health knowledge and status and their environment.

Results:
1. Water Supply. 54,160 people in the 20 target kebeles with an adequate safe water supply within 1000m for themselves and for 35,000 livestock
(77,264 people by 2021). 45 water distribution points (34 with washing basin/shower).
2. Natural Resources Conservation and Development. Soil erosion prevented and soil sustainably conserved by physical and biological means in 200
hectares of the source-spring watershed, with the spring potential maintained.
3. Health and Sanitation. Percentage of people over 10 years old in the target kebeles with improved knowledge of and practice in hygiene, sanitation,
reproductive health, HIV and AIDS and other STIs increased from 20% to 80% by the end of Year 3. 50% of the target kebele population benefiting from
improved sanitation and environmental conditions by the end of Year 3.
4. Community Development. Effective community organisations established or strengthened in the 20 kebeles by the end of Year 3, with full participation
of the beneficiaries ensuring the sustainability of the Action. Competent, self-reliant beneficiaries, including those from marginalised groups, involved in
decision-making and managing their organisations effectively.

26
See the standard list of sectors in PADOR or in Annex N to the Guidelines for grant applicants.
27
If the Donor is the European Commission or an EU Member States, please specify the EC budget line, EDF or EU Member State.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 46
Project title: Increasing Sector (see section II, 2.2): 121 (Health general); 12240 (basic nutrition); 5150 (Strengthening civil society); 52
Agricultural Production and the (DEVELOPMENTAL FOOD AID/FOOD SECURITY); 311 (Agriculture);
Transformation and
Commercialisation of Agricultural
Products in South Kivu
Location of Cost of the Lead manager or Donors to the action Amount contributed (by Dates (from dd/mm/yyyy to
the action action (EUR) partner 28 donor) dd/mm/yyyy)
(name)
Kabaré and 2,156,300 ASOP, CDI, European Commission 2,156,300 01/01/2009 - 31/12/2012
Walungu FECOPS, GASAP, (budget line 21.02010-
territories, OCET C1-AIDCO
South Kivu,
DRC

Object and results of the action


Overall objective: The food security of the populations of two territories of South Kivu and the towns of Bukavu and Uvira is strengthened. The economic
activity of the populations of 2 territories of South Kivu and the towns of Bukavu and Uvira is reinvigorated.

Specific objective: Income generated by the agricultural activity of small producers in two territories of South Kivu is increased.

Results:
1. Base organisations are strengthened and organised into Local Development Committees (LDC) and LDC federations.
2. Market garden production is increased (tomatoes, cabbage, leaks, onions, garlic, aubergine, amaranth and potatoes).
3. Food and fruit crops are increased (haricot beans, soy, maize, manioc and bananas).
4. Livestock production is increased (cattle, goats).
5. Storage, transformation and commercialisation of seeds and agricultural products is increased.
6. Producers know and can defend their rights, and are able to secure their investments.

28
If the Donor is the European Commission or an EU Member States, please specify the EC budget line, EDF or EU Member State.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 47
Project title: Food security in the Sector (see section II, 2.2): 121 (Health general); 12240 (basic nutrition); 14 (WATER SUPPLY AND
context of decentralisation SANITATION); 15150 (Strengthening civil society); 52 (DEVELOPMENTAL FOOD AID/FOOD SECURITY); 311
(Agriculture);
Location of Cost of the action Lead manager or Donors to the action Amount contributed (by Dates (from dd/mm/yyyy to
the action (EUR) partner 29 donor) dd/mm/yyyy)
(name)
Sahel 6,871,700 Senegal : RADI and European 4,383,880 01/03/2004 - 28/02/2009
(Senegal; USE Commission 1,700,253
Mali and Mali : AED, GRAT; Christian Aid 304,898
Burkina Faso) Burkina Faso : RMARP ICCO 91,469
CIMADE 276,863
Local contributions
Object and results of the action
The overall objective of this project is to improve food security for the populations of Mali, Burkina Faso and Senegal in the context of decentralisation.
The specific objectives of this proposal are 1) protect natural resources and improve productivity, 2) reinforce technical, organisational and advocacy
capacities of local development actors, 3) increase investments and financial resource mobilisation in the agricultural sector, 4) Promote local participation
in development plans, 5) promote exchanges and learning in regional advocacy initiatives.
Results:
1. Partners in Burkina, Mali and Senegal have worked with target communities to implement sustainable local environment management methods.
Sensitisation work carried out by partners has increased women’s access to land and involvement in decision making. In Senegal, activities have included
extensive rehabilitation and development of rural hydrological works including the construction of 4 water towers for irrigation purposes. In Mali, 12 wells
have been created increasing water supply and quality. Groups of women have been trained in hygiene and sanitation as well as basic water management
to ensure that these wells are maintained.
2. Target communities in the three countries included in the action have been very receptive to the training in environmental protection, agricultural
diversification, production and planting methods for higher yield seeds and income generating activities. Literacy classes and organisational capacity
building for local organisations have contributed to improving local development plans.
3. The creation of communal structure has entailed a dynamic response in many communal groups and networks. This has increased local population
participation in the design of local development plans which respond to the need of poor and marginalised people.
4. An advocacy campaign on the impact of cheap imports on local production, on subsidies and privatisations has started in Senegal. Regional partners
have met to exchange their experiences.

29
If the Donor is the European Commission or an EU Member States, please specify the EC budget line, EDF or EU Member State.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 48
Project title: Strengthening food Sector (see section II, 2.2): 121 (Health general); 12240 (basic nutrition); 15150 (Strengthening civil society); 311
security in the Bandiagara circle, (Agriculture); 92010 (Support to national NGOs)
Mopti region, Mali

Location of Cost of the Lead manager or Donors to the action Amount contributed (by Dates (from dd/mm/yyyy to
the action action (EUR) partner 30 donor) dd/mm/yyyy)
(name)
Mopti, Mali 1,078,049 Action pour la European Commission 924,966 01/08/2009 - 31/07/2012
Promotion Humaine (EDF) 153,083
(APH) Christian Aid

Object and results of the action


Overall objective: To contribute to a sustainable improvement in food security for the poor and vulnerable populations in the Bandiagara circle in the
Mopti region.

Specific objectives: The food security of children aged between 0 and 5 years and of pregnant and lactating women is strengthened through malnutrition
prevention actions in 8 communes in the Bandiagara circle in the region of Mopti in Mali.

Results :
1. Food security of the populations of 8 communes is strengthened in a sustainable way.
2. A monitoring system for the prevention of malnutrition is installed and implemented at the village and commune level.
3. Household nutrition, hygiene and sanitation practices are improved.
4. The organisational capacities of community and state structures, of RIN-CB members and APH, in terms of malnutrition prevention are strengthened.

30
If the Donor is the European Commission or an EU Member States, please specify the EC budget line, EDF or EU Member State.
EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 49
Project title: Reducing Sector (see section II, 2.2): 121 (Health general); 12240 (basic nutrition); 15150 (Strengthening civil society); 311
malnutrition in the Kolondieba (Agriculture); 92010 (Support to national NGOs)
circle of the Sikasso region of Mali
Location of Cost of the Lead manager or Donors to the action Amount contributed (by Dates (from dd/mm/yyyy to
the action action (EUR) partner 31 donor) dd/mm/yyyy)
(name)
Kolondieba 1,086,336 L’Association pour le European Commission 816,336 01/02/2008 - 31/01/2012
circle, Développement et (budget line 21.0202)
Sikasso l’Appui aux Christian Aid 270,000
region, Mali Communautés
(ADAC)

Object and results of the action


The overall objective of this action is to strengthen food security for rural populations in the Sikasso region of Mali.
The specific objective of this action is to reduce malnutrition for children between 0 and 59 months and other vulnerable groups by strengthening family
reserves and improve nutritional practices in six communes of the Kolondieba circle in the Sikasso region of Mali.
Results:
1. Target women producers manage and maintain their plot effectively
2. Target women producers have access to agricultural inputs and equipment and use appropriate agricultural methods
3. Conversion, stock keeping and commercialisation capacity of women producers are developed
4. Women’s knowledge of nutrition, hygiene and sanitation have improved
5. Communal structures are reinforced to take questions of malnutrition into account
6. ADAC institutional capacity is reinforced.

31
If the Donor is the European Commission or an EU Member States, please specify the EC budget line, EDF or EU Member State.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 50


III. THE APPLICANT

EuropeAid ID number GB-2007-DOG-2711191461

Name of the organisation:


Christian Aid

1. IDENTITY
Information requested under this point need only be given in cases where there have been modifications or
additions as compared to the information given in the Concept Note Form.

Applicant's contact details for the purpose of this action:

Postal address:
Christian Aid, 35 Lower Marsh, London SE1 7RL

Telephone number: Country


+44 (0)20 7523 2362
code + city code + number

Mobile: Country code + N/A


number

Fax number: Country code +


+44 (0)20 7620 0719
city code + number

Contact person for this


Dominic Brain
action :

Contact person’s e-mail


dbrain@christian-aid.org
address :

E-mail address of the


info@christian-aid.org
Organisation

Website of the organisation: http://www.christianaid.org.uk/

Any change in the addresses, phone numbers, fax numbers and in particular e-mail, must be notified
in writing to the European Commission. The European Commission will not be held responsible in
case it cannot contact an applicant.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 51


2. INFORMATION WITH REGARD TO ACTIONS IN THE FIELD OF
MICROFINANCE (IF FORESEEN BY THE ACTION)

As foreseen in annex M of the Guidelines for grant applicants (under ‘additional eligibility criteria’),
please supply hereafter all relevant information with regard to sector-specific experience and expertise
of the applicant organisation.

2.1 Experience and Expertise of Christian Aid on Micro-Credit

As already described under sub-section 1.1.1.2 (f) above, the project will establish and/or strengthen 23
cooperative societies. Nine (9) of these cooperatives are SACCOS. Christian Aid and two of the three
partners in this project, AFD and WSA, will use their extensive experience and expertise in supporting the
targeted SACCOS. ASE, which also has significant microfinance experience and expertise, will provide
integrative technical support to WSA and AFD in their revitalisation of the 9 SACCOS. For instance, ASE
established Poverty Eradication and Community Empowerment (PEACE), a microfinance organization,
which has become an independent NGO. PEACE is now operating successfully and with its head office in
Addis Ababa, and 5 sub-offices in ASE operated areas.

Currently, Christian Aid has partnerships with AFD and WSA which among other activities involves the
strengthening of SACCOS. Christian Aid’s work with AFD on savings and credit activities started in 2003
with support to 11 SACCOS in Bolososore Woreda in Wolayta Zone and Gofa and Boroda Woredas in
Gamu Gofa Zone. These SACCOS were provided with seed money which enabled them to be involved in
savings and credit activities. They were handed over to government in 2005 after their successful
revitalisation. Christian Aid has also worked with SOS Sahel on strengthening cooperatives the basic
information and financial situation some of which are presented on Table 2.1 below. Some of these
cooperatives were supported under the Food Security Capacity Enhancement Programme 2005 – 2008,
which was financed by EC.

Table 2.1: Basic Information and Financial Position of Three Christian Aid Supported Cooperatives
Financial Worth External Loans
Zone Name of Membership February 2009 Obtained (in
(in SNNPR) cooperative Woreda Male Female Total (in Birr) Birr)

Kembata Ashra Kacha Birra 951 109 1,060 614, 95.00 100,000.00

Hadia Hule Deneba Shashgo 630 33 663 518,000.00 0.00


Meded
Silti Bodity Lanfaro 805 101 906 420,000.00 100,000.00

TOTAL 2,386 243 2,629 938,000.00 200,000.00

The partnership between Christian Aid and WSA on savings and credit activities is based on the SHG
approach. Through this partnership, a total of 51 SHGs have been formed in Debub Ari so far, and 38 of
these SHGs are in Jinka Administration. The 51 SHGs have a total membership of 682 people. As at the end
of August 2009, these SHGs had a total financial worth of Birr 144,999.00 in their books, which was
generated from the mandatory and voluntary weekly savings of the members and interest levied on credit
given out to the members, with no external financial support.

Even though, August is not a high rate business month in Debub Ari, Birr 39,642 (i.e., 27% of the total
funds) was given on credit to the members as presented on Table 2.2 below. These loans are taken by 99
people (15% of the membership). Due to the vibrancy of the SHGs, WSA has facilitated the creation of 3
CLAs from some of the most robust SHGs that it has established in Debub Ari with the support of Christian
Aid. These CLAs have received a total financial support of Birr 150,000, i.e., Birr 50,000 per CLA, from
Christian Aid through WSA as shown on Table 2.3 below.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 52


Box 1: A Case Study

The Experience of a 75-Year Old Woman in Micro-Credit Support from Christian Aid

Christian Aid also has a partnership with Ethiopia Evangelical Church Mekane Yesus, South
Ethiopia Synod (EECMY/SES) in a rehabilitation project in Borena which has been transformed
into a development project by Borena Women Group. This group was supported with Birr
120,000 in 2008 to serve as a revolving fund for its women members who want to engage in petty
trading. By August 2009, the group had tripled this revolving fund and repaid all the Birr 120,000
to EECMY/SES so as to enable EECMY/SES to support other groups Region which are also
interested in micro-credit activities for self and community development.

During one of their field visits to the Region, Christian Aid staff talked to one 75-year old lady in
Borena, who is involve in the buying and reselling of salt in different markets as a result of the
loan she obtained from the revolving fund established by the partnership between Christian Aid
and EECMY/SES. According to the 75-year old lady, she was able to triple the Birr 1,000 loan
she obtained from the revolving fund within a period of 2 months. The 75-year old lady further
asserted that before she obtained the loan and her consequent business experience, she thought
that she was now useless.

However, with the loan, which she has since repaid in full, she now has the conviction that she can
still very productive. She further indicated that if she had such opportunities when she was
younger, she would have made a world of difference to her life. In short, such is the power of
enhanced rural micro-credit: bringing hope to the hopeless; inspiration to the dispirited and dignity
and self-worth to those who think that they have very little to live for. It revitalises lives and
livelihoods by enabling poor and marginalised people to tap into embedded economic and market
opportunities in their communities and beyond….

The 3 Programme Officers in Christian Aid, who will be involved in technically supporting, supervising and
monitoring this activity, have significant work experience and expertise in establishing, strengthening and
creating regulatory frameworks for rural-based SACCOS in particular and cooperatives in general. One of
the Programme Officers has a total of 17 years work with SACCOS and other forms of cooperatives at
various levels. He has worked as a Savings and Credit Specialists for 3 years, Community Based Savings and
Credit Technical Specialist for Community Self-help Saving Groups (CSSGs) for 2 years. These CSSGs are
linked with MFIs, he also worked as Master Trainer for 32 local NGOs on the CSSG approach for many
years. He has a BSC in Agricultural Economics in 1992 and expects to complete an MSc in Rural
Development next year.

The second Programme Officer also has a BSC in Agriculture, Plant Science, in 2000 and expects to obtain
his MA in Economics in December 2009. He has 7 years of work experience in cooperatives and cooperative
related issues as a Frontline Facilitator responsible for organising solidarity groups, interest groups and
village banks some of which were successfully linked with MFIS for credit based on their group and
institutional collaterals. He also worked as Programme Coordinator responsible for Frontline Facilitators and
Programme Manager responsible for a programme supporting solidarity groups, interest groups and village
banks, which established and managed savings and credit schemes.

The third Programme Officer is the co-author of Cooperative Proclamation No. 85/86. Among his many
years of experience on savings and credit and cooperatives, is his work as Senior Cooperative Expert with
the Ministry of Agriculture and his work with an international NGOs supporting MFIs. He has BA in
Sociology and Social Administration, MA in Social Work and two Diplomas in Cooperative Management,
one of which was obtained nationally and the other was obtained from the Moscow Cooperative Institute, in
the then USSR. These 3 Programme Officers will be supervised by a Senior Programme Officer for
Livelihood, who is currently the longest serving staff in Christian Aid Ethiopia. He has 6 years of work
experience in the area of microfinance. His academic qualifications include MSc in Agriculture, MSc in
Natural Resources Management and a Diploma in Development Studies. These staff will ensure that AFD
and WSA succinctly delivered the micro-credit component of this project.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 53


IV. PARTNERS OF THE APPLICANT PARTICIPATING IN THE ACTION

1. DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTNERS

This form must be completed for each partner organisation within the meaning of section 2.1.2 of the
Guidelines for Applicants. You must make as many copies of this table as necessary to create entries for
more partners.

EuropeAid ID number ET-2008-DUQ-1211755771


Action for Development (AFD)
Name of the organisation

Nationality Ethiopia

Experience of similar actions, in relation (a) Has worked on similar agricultural actions since its inception in 1997, (b)
to the role played in the implementation of Currently part of a consortium of a Pastoral Food Security Partnership Project
the proposed action funded by EC and implementing €512,000 worth of the project budget, (c)
Food security project of Birr 2.5m with CARE Ethiopia funded by USAID
and implemented Birr 1.5m of the project budget which ended in June 2009.

History of cooperation with the applicant Since 1983

EuropeAid ID number ET-2008-BDC-0310690158


Agri Service Ethiopia (ASE)
Name of the organisation

Nationality Ethiopia

Experience of similar actions, in relation to the (a) Has been implementing similar actions since 1969, and recently
role played in the implementation of the implemented (b) Amaro Integrated Food Security Programme funded by
proposed action EC with Trocaire and CAFOD as partners. In 2 phases – phase 1, Birr
11,659,286 (2003-06), and phase 2, €1,216,213 (2008-09), (c) Gelana
Drought Preparedness Programme (2008-09), €300,000 with Dan
Church Aid (DCA) as partner.

History of cooperation with the applicant January 2009

EuropeAid ID number ET-2008-GRE-1806372675


Women Support Association (WSA)
Name of the organisation

Nationality Ethiopia

Experience of similar actions, in relation to the (a) Has been engaged on micro-credit based on the SHG and CLA
role played in the implementation of the approach since 2002, and worked with the following partners on the SHG
proposed action and CLA approach (b) Concern International, 2007 to date; (c) DCA,
2006 to date; (d) IND Spain, 2007 – December 2009; PACT Ethiopia,
2002 to date, (e) Christian Aid, 2007 to date.

History of cooperation with the applicant 2007

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 54


Important: This application form must be accompanied by a signed and dated partnership
statement from each partner, in accordance with the model provided.
2. INFORMATION WITH REGARD TO ACTIONS IN THE FIELD OF
MICROFINANCE (IF FORESEEN BY THE ACTION)

As foreseen in annex M of the Guidelines for grant applicants (under ‘additional eligibility criteria’),
please supply hereafter all relevant information with regard to sector-specific experience and expertise of
the partner organisation(s).

2.2 WSA’s Experience and Expertise on Microfinance Activities


As indicated under sub-section 1.1.1.2 (a), WSA will be responsible for the establishment of the 80 SHGs
under this project. Each SHG is expected to establish its own saving and credit scheme from the routinely
mandatory and voluntary savings of their members without any external financial support. The role of WSA
in this is to provide training, technical advice and supervision of the savings and credit activities of the SHGs
and to ensure that the required financial records are being kept accordingly, that the structures of these SHGs
such as the leadership and the various committees are performing their duties as required, and that all the
systems and resources are well under control for the benefit of the total membership of the SHGs. Under this
project, WSA will also support interested SHG members with business-oriented poultry and small-ruminant
projects as described under sub-section 1.1.62 (b) above.
WSA adopted the SHG approach in 2002. It is as a fundamental component of the current five main
programmes of the organisation. These programmes are (a) Women Empowerment, (b) GBV, (c) HIV and
AIDS, (d) Livelihood and (e) Reproductive Health. WSA currently operates in 6 Woredas in South Omo
Zone, in SNNPR and North Shoa, North Wollo and South Wollo Zones in Amhara Region. During the past 7
years of its engagement on the SHG approach, it has established 449 successful SHGs in 33 Kebeles in the 6
Woredas that it is operating. This is in through its partnerships with Christian Aid in Debub Ari Woreda as
already described under sub-section 2.1 above, PACT Ethiopia Eferatagedem Woreda, Concern International
in Disse Zuria Woreda and Oxfam Canada and DCA in Haberu and Guba Woredas, as presented on Table
2.3 below.
As presented on Table 2.2 below, these SHGs have generated a total of Birr 1,622,122.00 from the routinely
mandatory and voluntary savings of their membership of 8,005 and from the interests levied on the loans.
SHGs have a high rate of savings as exemplified the SHGs in Efferatagedem Woreda, North Shoa Zone,
2008, where savings increased to 87%. Table 2.2 also shows the financial position of these SHGs as at the
end of August 2009 which highlights that 83% of the funds of these SHGs was on loan to the members with
a total of 4,696 members (i.e., 59% of the membership) benefiting, even though August is not a high rate
business month for the area.

Table 2.2: Status of SHGs Established by WSA at the End of August 2009
Savings Current Current Current
Name of Year # of # of Total Generated Loan Liquidity % on Loan
Region Zonal Established Woreda Kebeles SHGs Members (in Birr) Portfolio (in Birr) Loan Beneficiaries

2008 Jinka Adm. 3 38 432 76,345 23,692 52,653 31% 70


South
SNNPR Omo 2008 Debub Ari 1 13 250 68,654 15,950 52,704 23% 29
Sub-
Total 1 2 4 51 682 144,999 39,642 105,357 27% 99
North Eferataged
Shoa 2004 em 4 58 996 240,579 139,000 101,579 58% 900
North
Wollo 2007 Disse Zuria 11 118 2,940 120,449 80,853 39,596 67% 560
Amhara
2003 Haberu 11 196 2,807 1,066,797 1,049,469 17,328 98% 2,707
Region South
Wollo 2006 Guba 3 26 580 49,298 29,700 19,598 60% 430
Sub
Total 2 4 29 398 7,323 1,477,123 1,299,022 178,101 88% 4,597

Total (in
Birr) 3 6 33 449 8,005 1,622,122 1,338,664 283,458 83% 4,696
Source: Women Support Association Office in Addis Ababa

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 55


WSA has also established a total of 32 CLAs in 33 Kebeles from some of the SHGs that it has established
across the 4 Zones it is operating in SNNPR and Ahmara Regions. In partnership with the 4 international
NGOs that it is working with, each CLA was supported with Birr 50,000.00 as seed money to establish a
revolving fund. As at the end of August 2009, these revolving fund was Birr 885,000.00 as indicated on
Table 2.3 below.
During high-rate business months, CLAs use the revolving funds and loans that they obtain from MFIs to
provide loans to their respective SHGs to boost the SHGs financial base so as to be able provide micro-credit
to the individual members enable the to be involved in various income generating activities such as trading in
clothes, vegetables, small livestock, poultry, distillation, petty shops and mills. In addition to managing such
micro-finances, two of the CLA’s in Efrata Gidem Woreda obtainee 140m2 of land from the government for
the construction of offices, 24m2 of land for a market outlet, and 9,000m2 of land and pump generator for
vegetable production. Moreover, almost all CLAs have created linkage with local MFIs which enables them
to support some of the micro-credit needs of their SHG members.

Table 2.3: Status of CLAs Established by WSA at the End of August 2009

# of Amount of
Name of Year Name of # of CLA Revolving Fund International
Region Zonal Established Woreda Kebeles Support (in Birr) NGO Partner
SNNPR South Omo 2008 Debub Ari 4 3 150,000 Christian Aid
Sub Total 1 1 4 3 150,000

North Shoa 2004 Eferatagedem 4 4 120,000 PACT Ethiopia


Concern
North Wollo 2007 Disse Zuria 11 11 68,000 International
Amhara Oxfam Canada
Region 2003 Haberu 11 13 655,000
and DCA
South Wollo 2006 Guba 3 1 0
Sub Total 2 4 29 29 735,000

Total 3 5 33 32 885,000
Source: Women Support Association Office in Addis Ababa

Having experienced an increase in number of staff from 4 in 1 Kebele to a current staff number of 117, and
having increased its budget 10-fold within 5 years, i.e., from less than Birr 0.8 million in 2003 to more than
Birr 8 million during the year 2008, WSA is indeed a growing organisation. Consequently, its programming
has also significantly increased both in proficiency and in scale, carving a niche on micro-credit through the
SHG and CLA approach. The experiences and expertise of its 14 staff who are going to be involved in the
day to day implementation of the project are summarized on Table 2.4 below. The current Coordinator of its
SHG approach has 6 years work experience in this field. His academic expertise includes MA in Saving &
Credit Coop Management.
Table 2.4: Experiences and Expertise of WSA Staff in Micro-credit and the SHG Approach
No Education No. of Employees Work Experience Academic Qualification
1 MA Degree 1 6 MA in Saving & Credit Coop Management
2 BA Degree 4 3-7 BA in Business Management, Marketing
Management ,Sociology, Rural Development
3 Diploma 6 4-11 Management, agriculture, etc
4 Certificate 3 4-8 SHG, Saving & Credit Management, etc.
TOTAL 14

2.3 AFD’s Experience and Expertise on Savings and Credit Cooperative Societies
AFD evolved from the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)-operated Freedom from Hunger Campaign
(FFHC). FFHC started operating in Ethiopia in 1983. In June 1997, it was into a national NGO and
registered as AFD. AFD is implementing integrated development programmes of in two Zones, Borena and
South Omo, in Oromia, and SNNPR Regions respectively, directly operating in 13 Woredas in these Zones.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 56


In South Omo Zone, it is operating in 4 Woreedas. AFD’s activities are based on 5 programmatic areas.
These are (a) livelihood security, (b) water resources, (c) community managed DRR, (d) capacity building
for community and for the government, and (d) cross-cutting issues such as gender and HIV and AIDS.

On of the activities in its livelihood security programme is to organise the rural poor, on voluntary basis, into
various cooperative societies, including SACCOS. AFD organizes and supports SACCOs in collaboration
with the Regional and local government actors. Its work with SACCOS is based on the operational
guidelines and cooperatives proclamations issued by the Federal Government of Ethiopia. For instance, its
technical operations to organize and support SACCOs starts from baseline studies pertaining to potential
business opportunities of the area and gaps to be bridged internally such as, technical and managerial skills
and structural competencies, and externally such as access to the inputs and outputs required for the
SACCOS.

The actual operation commences from awareness-raising with community groups to enable them to
understand and decide on the formation of SACCOs. Once a minimum of potential 20 members are
identified and registered as a SACCO, support is provided by AFD in fulfilling the necessary conditions for
legal certification which includes the development of by-laws, development of articles of association,
contribution of share capital and registration fee by individual members, election of various management
committees, establishment of office and office facilities, procurement of financial, property and membership
registration documents, etc.

In practice, AFD provides capacity building support to SACCOS in the form of:

 Office construction
 Supply of office facilities
 Supply of financial and other documents
 Seed capital provision
 Training of committee and other ordinary members,
 Facilitation of experience sharing tours
 Hiring and training of bookkeepers,
 Facilitation of audit services
 Linking SACCOs with local and Regional support systems to ensure smooth operation, continuity of
the benefits of SACCOS and technical sustainability.
 Frequent technical support pertaining to saving and credit operations, governance, reporting and
accountability mechanisms.
AFD work in organising, training and providing financial support to SACCOs started in 1998 in SNNPR
where, through its partnership with Christian Aid, it organised and assisted 11 SACCOS in Bolososore &
Ofa Woredas in Wolayita Zone and Gofa and Boproda in Gamu Gofa Zone. These 11 SACCOS were handed
over to the government agency responsible for cooperatives, the Cooperative Promotion Office in the Zone
in 2005. Furthermore, in 2008, through funding from Christian Aid, AFD also revitalised 5 SACCOS in
Malee Woreda, one of the 3 Woredas targeted by this project. This brings the total of SACCOS that AFD
supported so far in partnership with Christian Aid to 16.

AFD has also worked with other NGOs in 4 other Woredas in Borena Zone in organising and supporting
SACCOS. Consequently, over the years AFD has organised, revitalised, trained and provided financial
support to a total of 85 SACCOS as presented on Table 2.5 below. The support is still continuing for 74
SACCOS which are yet to be handed over to government. The 9 SACCOS targeted for organisation,
revitalisation and support by this project are not included in the 74 SACCOS that are currently being support
by AFD, and they are not receiving support from any other NGO.

Table 2.5: SACCOS Organised and Revitalised by AFD in SNNPR and Borena Regions

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 57


Name of Woreda No. of SACCOs Commencement International NGO
No. Zone Supported of Assistance Partner
1 Borena Yabelo 13 1998 ActionAid
2 Borena Arero 12 2005 CordAid & DCA
3 Borena Trocaire, CAFOD
Dirre 40 2002 and Oxfam Britain
4 Borena Bule Hora 6 2005 Care International,
5 South Omo Maale 5 2008
6 Wolayita Bolososore & Ofa
11 2005 Christian Aid
Gamu Gofa Gofa & Boroda

Total 85

Currently, AFD has 140 staff and 7 of these staff, who have a wealth of experience and expertise in
SACCOS training, support and development, will be directly involved in implementation of the SACCOS
component of this project. Three of these staff are based at AFD head office in Addis Ababa. These are (a)
the Planning, Research Department Head, who has more than a 10 years of work experience including work
with SACCOS, has MA in Development Studies and a BSc in Agricultural Economics; (b) the Livelihood
Officer, who has 11 years of work experience including 3 years as Marketing Department Head for Oromia
Region based in Addis Ababa, he has both MSc and a BSc in Agricultural Economics, (c) the Planning,
Monitoring band Evaluation Officer, who has 12 years of work experience including SACCOS work in the
Oromia Region, he has BA in Sociology and a Post Graduate Certificate in Cooperative Development.

The remaining 4 AFD staff are based at South Omo Zone and they are (d) the Field Coordinator based in
Jinka, who has 20 years of work experience including 8 years work at the Regional Cooperative Office for
Oromia Region and as Head of the Cooperative Office in West Harerga in Oromia Region, he has a BA in
Sociology; (e) the Development Coordinator for the South Omo Zone for AFD, who was the Cooperative
Department Head for South Omo Zone for 19 years, he has MSc in Agronomy; and (f) the two (2) DFs, each
of whom has more than 10 years of work experience in cooperative development and support to SACCOS
and each posses a Diploma in Agriculture.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 58


3. PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT

A partnership is a relationship of substance between two or more organisations involving shared


responsibilities in undertaking the action funded by the European Commission. To ensure that the action runs
smoothly, the European Commission requires all partners to acknowledge this by agreeing to the principles
of good partnership practice set out below.

1. All partners must have read the application form and understood what their role in the action will
be before the application is submitted to the European Commission.

2. All partners must have read the standard grant contract and understood what their respective
obligations under the contract will be if the grant is awarded. They authorise the lead applicant to
sign the contract with the European Commission and represent them in all dealings with the
European Commission in the context of the action's implementation.

3. The applicant must consult with his partners regularly and keep them fully informed of the
progress of the action.

4. All partners must receive copies of the reports - narrative and financial - made to the European
Commission.

5. Proposals for substantial changes to the action (e.g. activities, partners, etc.) should be agreed by
the partners before being submitted to the European Commission. Where no such agreement can
be reached, the applicant must indicate this when submitting changes for approval to the
European Commission.

6. Where the Beneficiary does not have its headquarters in the country where the action is
implemented, the partners must agree before the end of the action, on an equitable distribution of
equipment, vehicles and supplies for the action purchased with the EU grant among local
partners or the final beneficiaries of the action.

I have read and approved the contents of the proposal submitted to the European Commission. I undertake to
comply with the principles of good partnership practice.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 59


EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 60
V. ASSOCIATES OF THE APPLICANT PARTICIPATING IN THE ACTION

This section must be completed for each associated organisation within the meaning of section 2.1.2 of the
Guidelines for Applicants. You must make as many copies of this table as necessary to create entries for
more associates.

Associate 1

Full legal name


32
EuropeAid ID number:

Nationality
33
Legal status

Official address

Contact person

Telephone number: country code + city code + number

Fax number: country code + city code + number

E-mail address

Number of employees

Experience of similar actions, in relation to role in the


implementation of the proposed action

History of cooperation with the applicant

32
If existing. Associates do not need to register in PADOR.
33
E.g. non-profit-making organisation, private company, governmental body, etc.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 61


VI. CHECKLIST
BEFORE SUBMITTING YOUR PROPOSAL, PLEASE CHECK THAT EACH OF THE FOLLOWING COMPONENTS IS To be filled in by the applicant
COMPLETE AND RESPECTS THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA :

Title of the Proposal: Yes No

PART 1 (ADMINISTRATIVE) Yes


1. The correct grant application form, published for this call for proposals, has been used
2. The Declaration by the applicant has been filled in and has been duly signed and is included with the full application form. Yes
3. The proposal is typed and is in one of the languages of the Call for Proposals (English, French, Spanish or Portuguese)
Yes
4. One paper original is included (only required if not submitting by email). N/A
5. An electronic version of the proposal (CD-Rom or USB) is enclosed (only required if not submitting by email). N/A
6. Each partner has completed and signed a partnership statement and the statements are included. (Please indicate "Not applicable"
Yes
NA if you have no partner).
7. The budget is presented in the format requested, is expressed in EUR and is enclosed. Yes
8. The logical framework has been completed and is enclosed. Yes
PART 2 (ELIGIBILITY)
Yes
9. The action will be implemented in an eligible country(ies) listed in section 1.2 of the Guidelines for grant applicants.
10. The implementation of the proposed action will be finished by 31/10/2011. Yes
11. The requested contribution is equal to or higher than the minimum grant amounts allowed per country under section 1.3 of the
Guidelines for grant applicants. Yes

12. The requested contribution is equal to or lower than the maximum grant amount allowed per country under section 1.3 of the
Guidelines for grant applicants. Yes

13. The requested contribution is equal to or less than 90% or 50% of the total eligible costs (maximum percentage allowed in line
with section 1.3 of the Guidelines for grant applicants). Yes

14. The contribution requested from the European Commission does not vary by more than 20% from the estimation presented in
the corresponding Concept Note or a justification has been provided under section II.2 of the Full Application Form. Yes

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 62


VII. DECLARATION BY THE APPLICANT

The applicant, represented by the undersigned being the authorised signatory of the applicant, and, in the
context of the present call for proposals, representing any partners (if any) in the proposed action, hereby
declares that

 it has the sources of financing and professional competence and qualifications specified in section 2
of the Guidelines for Applicants;

 it undertakes to comply with the obligations foreseen in the partnership statement of the grant
application form and with the principles of good partnership practice;

 it is directly responsible for the preparation, management and implementation of the action with its
partners and is not acting as an intermediary;

it and its partners are not in any of the situations excluding them from participating in contracts
which are listed in Section 2.3.3 of the Practical Guide to contract procedures for EC external actions
(available from the following Internet address:
http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/work/procedures/index_en.htm. Furthermore, it recognizes and accepts
that if it participates in spite of being in any of these situations, it may be excluded from other
procedures in accordance with section 2.3.5 of the Practical Guide;

 the applicant and each partner (if any) have submitted the supporting documents as stipulated under
section 2.4 of the Guidelines for Applicants;

 it and each partner are eligible in accordance with the criteria set out under sections 2.1.1 and 2.1.2
of the Guidelines for Applicants;

 if recommended to be awarded a grant, the applicant accepts the contractual conditions as laid down
in the standard contract annexed to the Guidelines for Applicants (Annex F);

 it and its partners are aware that, for the purposes of safeguarding the financial interests of the
Communities, their personal data may be transferred to internal audit services, the European Court of
Auditors, the Financial Irregularities Panel or to the European Anti-Fraud Office.

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 63


The following grant applications have been submitted (or are about to be submitted) to the European
Institutions, the European Development Fund and the EU Member States in the last 12 months.

Grant
requested Submission
Title Country Donor in € date
Haiti ECHO Global Plan
Haiti ECHO 508,716 26/06/2009
Food Facility Haiti
Haiti EuropeAid 1,170,000 24/06/2009
Food Facility Afghanistan
Afghanistan EuropeAid 1,215,000 24/06/2009
Food Facility Nicaragua
Nicaragua EuropeAid 1,120,000 24/06/2009
Food Facility Ethiopia
Ethiopia EuropeAid 1,350,000 24/06/2009
Food Facility Senegal
Senegal EuropeAid 1,000,000 23/06/2009
Food Facility Burkina Faso Burkina
Faso EuropeAid 1,500,000 23/06/2009
Projet de renforcement de la sécurité
alimentaire
Mali EuropeAid 1,078,048 15/06/2009
Strengthening Capacities for Sustainable
Livelihoods
Jamaica EuropeAid 315,000 18/05/2009
Sustainable development for indigenous
communities
Bolivia EuropeAid 600,000 20/03/2009
Renforcement de la capacité agricole
dans la périphérie de la capitale, Port-au-
Prince
Haiti ECHO 328,457 23/12/2008
Consolidation phase of nutrition project
Mali ECHO 300,000 23/12/2008
Projet de renforcement de la sécurité
alimentaire
Mali EuropeAid 1,078,049 09/12/2008
Improving livelihoods and food security
Afghanistan EuropeAid 810,000 05/11/2008
DRC EC FS 2008
DRC EuropeAid 1,832,855 05/11/2008
Projet d’urgence: Renforcement de la
capacité de production dans le bas Nord-
Ouest d’Haïti
Haiti ECHO 214,000 29/09/2008
Bonthe Food Security Project Sierra
Leona EuropeAid 197,000 10/09/2008
Emergency Food Relief in Madhepura
District Bihar
India ECHO 197,000 10/09/2008

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 64


The applicant is fully aware of the obligation to inform without delay the European Commission if the same
application for funding made to other European Commission departments or Community institutions has
been approved by them after the submission of this grant application.

If any elements included in the concept note have had to be modified in the full application form please
specify and justify below:

The irrigation through (a) wind propelled power that was indicated in the concept note has been replaced
with river diversion technology and (b) the 50 ha that were targeted in the concept note also increased to 60
ha. These modifications have been necessitated by the fact that the project is only for duration of 20 months
and the windmill which would be required for the wind propelled power for the irrigation may take 6 months
or more to import. This will significantly lessen the time for the irrigation works and putting in place the
required sustainability structures and systems. Since river diversion is less costly, the decision was made to
increase the area to be put under irrigation from 50 ha to 60 ha to allow for the maximisation of irrigated area
without financially straining other essential project activities.

The applicant declares that the information provided in the grant application form and in this declaration is
correct and does not vary (except for the possible changes specified above) from the one given in the
Concept Note form in the first phase of this Call. The applicant understands that any change between the
Concept Note and the Full Application not brought to the attention of the European Commission may lead to
the rejection of the proposal.

Signed on behalf of the applicant

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 65


ANNEX 1A: Organisational Structure

EuropeAid/128608/C/ACT/Multi – Annex A – Grant application form 66