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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 1 of 9

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT


FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA
ATLANTA DIVISION

JOHN DOE, )
)
Plaintiff, )
) CIVIL ACTION FILE NO.
v. )
) ________________________
MOREHOUSE COLLEGE, )
JOHN SILVANUS WILSON, )
JR., individually and in his )
capacity as former President of )
Morehouse College, TERRAINE )
BAILEY, individually and in her )
capacity as Title IX Coordinator )
and Compliance Specialist of )
Morehouse College, and DR. )
ROBERT PETERSON, )
individually and in his capacity as )
Assistant Professor at Morehouse )
College, )
)
Defendants. )
)

NOTICE OF REMOVAL
COMES NOW Defendant Morehouse College (“Morehouse”) and, pursuant

to 28 U.S.C. §§ 1331, 1367, 1441, and 1446, hereby gives notice of removal of this

action from the Superior Court of Fulton County, Georgia, to the United States

District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, Atlanta Division, showing this

Court as follows:
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 2 of 9

1.

Plaintiff John Doe (“Plaintiff”) commenced this action on November 5, 2018

by filing a Complaint for Damages and Demand for Jury Trial (the “Complaint”) in

the Superior Court of Fulton County, Georgia.

2.

In the Complaint, Plaintiff asserts five alleged causes of action against

Morehouse: (1) a sexual harassment and discrimination claim pursuant to Title IX

of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §§ 1681 et seq. (“Title IX”); (2)

a hostile educational environment claim pursuant to Title IX; (3) a state law breach

of contract claim; (4) a state law negligence claim; and (5) a state law negligent

hiring, training, retention, and supervision claim.

3.

Plaintiff’s alleged claims purportedly arise from his participation in

Morehouse’s May 2015 Pan-African Global Experience (“MPAGE”) study abroad

program in Brazil. (See generally Compl.) Plaintiff claims that Defendant Dr.

Robert Peterson, a former Associate Professor in Morehouse’s Department of

Sociology, allegedly sexually harassed Plaintiff while traveling to Brazil to begin

the May 2015 MPAGE program. (Compl. ¶ 14.) Plaintiff further contends that

while in Brazil, Defendant Peterson allegedly subjected him to inappropriate sexual

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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 3 of 9

comments and advances. (Compl. ¶¶ 16-17.) Plaintiff also alleges that Morehouse

supposedly was aware of Defendant Peterson’s misconduct and his propensity to

engage in sexual misconduct but failed to take prompt corrective action to stop it.

(Compl. ¶¶ 36, 40, 43, 48-50).

4.

28 U.S.C. § 1441(a) authorizes the removal of a civil action from state court

to federal district court, provided that the federal district court to which the action is

removed has original jurisdiction over the action.

5.

28 U.S.C. § 1331 provides that “[t]he district courts shall have jurisdiction of

all civil actions arising under the Constitution, laws, or treatises of the United

States.”

6.

Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1331, this Court possesses original jurisdiction over

Plaintiff’s sexual harassment, discrimination, and hostile educational environment

claims brought pursuant to Title IX because those claims arise specifically and only

under the laws of the United States.

3
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 4 of 9

7.

28 U.S.C. § 1367(a) provides that “in any civil action of which the district

courts have original jurisdiction, the district courts shall have supplemental

jurisdiction over all other claims that are so related to claims in the action within

such original jurisdiction that they form part of the same case or controversy under

Article III of the United States.”

8.

A federal district court obtains and is vested with supplemental jurisdiction

over a state law claim pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1367(a) when the state law claim

“arise[s] out of a common nucleus of operative facts with a substantive federal

claim.” Parker v. Scrap Metal Processors, Inc., 468 F.3d 733, 742 (11th Cir. 2006).

Federal and state law claims share a common nucleus of operative facts when the

claims arise from the same occurrence and involve the same or similar evidence.

Palmer v. Hosp. Auth. of Randolph Cty., 22 F.3d 1559, 1563-64 (11th Cir. 1994).

9.

Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1367(a), this Court possesses supplemental

jurisdiction over Plaintiff’s alleged state law breach of contract, negligence, and

negligent hiring, training, retention, and supervision claims asserted against

Morehouse because such claims purportedly are associated with and arise from

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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 5 of 9

Plaintiff’s participation in the May 2015 MPAGE study abroad program in Brazil.1

Accordingly, Plaintiff’s alleged state law claims share a common nucleus of

operative facts with Plaintiff’s alleged federal sexual harassment, discrimination,

and hostile educational environment claims against Morehouse brought pursuant to

Title IX. Moreover, the disposition of Plaintiff’s alleged state law claims will

involve the same or similar evidence and information related to Plaintiff’s Title IX

claims and the circumstances related to and actions undertaken in connection

therewith.

10.

Plaintiff served Morehouse with his Summons and Complaint on November

13, 2018. Accordingly, this Notice of Removal is filed within thirty (30) days of

service of Plaintiff’s Complaint and, therefore, is timely pursuant to 28 U.S.C. §

1446(b)(1).

1
In his Complaint, Plaintiff also asserts the same state law claims against all of
the individual Defendants, in addition to asserting intentional infliction of emotional
distress, sexual harassment, sexual assault, and providing alcohol to a minor claims
only against Defendant Peterson, all of which also are subject to the supplemental
jurisdiction of this Court pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1367(a) because such claims
allegedly are associated with and arise from Plaintiff’s participation in the May 2015
MPAGE study abroad program in Brazil. (Compl. ¶¶ 60-74.)

5
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 6 of 9

11.

The removal of this action is made without prejudice to any of Morehouse’s

potential defenses to be asserted in this action.

12.

Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1446(d), Morehouse shall promptly serve a copy of

this Notice of Removal upon Plaintiff, and Morehouse shall promtply file the same

with the Clerk of the Superior Court of Fulton County, Georgia.

13.

Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1446(a), all process, pleadings, orders, and other

papers contained with the Superior Court’s docket as of the date of this filing are

attached hereto as Composite Exhibit “A.”

This 13th day of December, 2018.

Respectfully submitted,

HOLLAND & KNIGHT LLP

s/ Joshua I. Bosin
Joshua I. Bosin
Georgia Bar No. 143054
Juliana Nwafor
Georgia Bar No. 140608

Regions Plaza, Suite 1800


1180 West Peachtree Street

6
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 7 of 9

Atlanta, Georgia 30309


Telephone: (404) 817-8500
Facsimile: (404) 881-0470
E-Mail: joshua.bosin@hklaw.com
E-Mail: juliana.nwafor@hklaw.com

Counsel for Defendant


Morehouse College

7
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 8 of 9

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT


FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA
ATLANTA DIVISION

JOHN DOE, )
)
Plaintiff, )
) CIVIL ACTION FILE NO.
v. )
) ________________________
MOREHOUSE COLLEGE, )
JOHN SILVANUS WILSON, )
JR., individually and in his )
capacity as former President of )
Morehouse College, TERRAINE )
BAILEY, individually and in her )
capacity as Title IX Coordinator )
and Compliance Specialist of )
Morehouse College, and DR. )
ROBERT PETERSON, )
individually and in his capacity as )
Assistant Professor at Morehouse )
College, )
)
Defendants. )
)

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE

I HEREBY CERTIFY that I have this day caused to be served a true and

correct copy of the foregoing NOTICE OF REMOVAL to the Court using the

CM/ECF system, which will automatically send e-mail notification of such filing to

the following Counsel of Record:


Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 9 of 9

R. Cade Parian, Esq. Lindsay Anne Cordes, Esq.


Parian Injury Law, LLC (to be admitted pro hac vice)
One Atlantic Center, Suite 2342 Tad Thomas, Esq.
1201 West Peachtree Street (to be admitted pro hac vice)
Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Thomas Law Offices
Telephone: (404) 795-5035 9418 North Commons Blvd., Suite 200
Facsimile: (404) 953-7020 Louisville, Kentucky 40059
cade@westgalawyer.com Telephone: (877) 955-7001
Facsimile: (502) 791-8352
lindsay.cordes@thomaslawoffices.com
tad@thomaslawoffices.com

This 13th day of December, 2018.

s/ Joshua I. Bosin
Joshua I. Bosin
Georgia Bar No. 143054
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 1 of 218

Exhibit A
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 2 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***TV
General Civil and Domestic Relations Case Filing Information Form Date: 11/6/2018 11:05 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk
H Superior or □ State Court of________ Fulton_________ County

For Clerk Use Only


11/6/2018 2018CV312687
Date Filed Case Number
MM-DD-YYYY

Plaintiff(s) Defendant(s)
Doe, John Morehouse College
Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix
Wilson, John Silvanus Jr.
Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix
Bailey, Terraine________________________________
Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix
Peterson, Robert Dr.
Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix Last First Middle I. Suffix Prefix

Plaintiff's Attorney R- Cade Parian Bar Number 331408_______ Self-Represented □

Check One Case Type in One Box

General Civil Cases Domestic Relations Cases


□ Automobile Tort □ Adoption
□ Civil Appeal □ Dissoluti on/Di vorce/Sepa rate
□ Contract Maintenance
□ Garnishment □ Family Violence Petition
m General Tort □ Paternity/Legitimation
□ Habeas Corpus □ Support - IV-D
□ Injunction/Mandamus/Other Writ □ Support - Private (non-IV-D)
□ Landlord/Tenant □ Other Domestic Relations
□ Medical Malpractice Tort
□ Product Liability Tort Post-Judqment - Check One Case Type
□ Real Property □ Contempt
□ Restraining Petition □ Non-payment of child support.
□ Other General Civil medical support, or alimony
□ Modification
□ Other/Administrative

□ Check if the action is related to another action(s) pending or previously pending in this court involving some or all
of the same parties, subject matter, or factual issues. If so, provide a case number for each.

Case Number Case Number

0 I hereby certify that the documents in this filing, including attachments and exhibits, satisfy the requirements for
redaction of personal or confidential information in O.C.G.A. § 9-11-7.1.

□ Is an interpreter needed in this case? If so, provide the language(s) required.______________________________


Language(s) Required

□ Do you or your client need any disability accommodations? If so, please describe the accommodation request.

Version 1.1.18
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 3 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***TV
Date: 11/6/2018 11:05 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA


136 PRYOR STREET, ROOM C-103, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
SUMMONS
John Doe
) Case 2018CV312687
) No.:__________________________
)
)
Plaintiff, )
)
vs. )
John Silvanus Wilson Jr. )
)
48B Linnaean Street )
)
Cambridge, MA 02138________ )
Defendant )
)
)
)
)
TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S):

You are hereby summoned and required to file electronically with the Clerk of said Court at
https://efilega.tvlerhost.net/ofsweb and serve upon plaintiff’s attorney, whose name and address is:
R. Cade Parian - Parian Injury Law, LLC
1201 West Peachtree Street, NW, Suite 2342
Atlanta, GA 30309
An answer to the complaint which is herewith served upon you, within 30 days after service of this
summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service; unless proof of service of this complaint is not filed
within five (5) business days of such service. Then time to answer shall not commence until such proof
of service has been filed. IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT WILL BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU
FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED IN THE COMPLAINT.
11/6/2018
This________________________day of_______________ , 20_____
/
Honorable Cathelene “Tina’/'Kobinson
Clerk of Superior Court
naMy
Deputy Cleri

To defendant upon whom this petition is served:


This copy of complaint and summons was served upon you 20_

Deputy Sherri ff

Instructions: Attach addendum sheet for additional parties if needed, make notation on this sheet if addendum is used
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 4 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***TV
Date: 11/6/2018 11:05 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA


136 PRYOR STREET, ROOM C-103, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
SUMMONS
John Doe
) Case 2018CV312687
) No.:__________________________
)
)
Plaintiff, )
)
vs. )
Terraine Bailey )
)
830 Westview Drive, SW )
)
Atlanta, GA 30314___________ )
Defendant )
)
)
)
)

TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S):

You are hereby summoned and required to file electronically with the Clerk of said Court at
https://efilega.tvlerhost.net/ofsweb and serve upon plaintiffs attorney, whose name and address is:
R. Cade Parian - Parian Injury Law, LLC
1201 West Peachtree Street, NW, Suite 2342
Atlanta, GA 30309
An answer to the complaint which is herewith served upon you, within 30 days after service of this
summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service; unless proof of service of this complaint is not filed
within five (5) business days of such service. Then time to answer shall not commence until such proof
of service has been filed. IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT WILL BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU
FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED IN THE COMPLAINT.
11/6/2018
This_____________ day of j 20

Honorable Cathelene “Tina’/Zobinson


Clerk of StiMrior Court /Z
by
*
r&ym.
Dpftuty Clerk?

To defendant upon whom this petition is served:


This copy of complaint and summons was served upon you 20_

Deputy Sherri ff

Instructions: Attach addendum sheet for additional parties if needed, make notation on this sheet if addendum is used
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 5 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***TV
Date: 11/6/2018 11:05 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA


136 PRYOR STREET, ROOM C-103, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
SUMMONS
John Doe
) Case 2018CV312687
) No.:_______________________
)
)
Plaintiff, )
)
vs. )
Morehouse College )
)
c/o Dr. Alan D. Robertson, Sr. )
)
830 Westview Drive, SW, Atlanta, GA 30314 )
Defendant )
)
)
)
)

TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S):

You are hereby summoned and required to file electronically with the Clerk of said Court at
https://efilega.tvlerhost.net/ofsweb and serve upon plaintiff’s attorney, whose name and address is:
R. Cade Parian - Parian Injury Law, LLC
1201 West Peachtree Street, NW, Suite 2342
Atlanta, GA 30309
An answer to the complaint which is herewith served upon you, within 30 days after service of this
summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service; unless proof of service of this complaint is not filed
within five (5) business days of such service. Then time to answer shall not commence until such proof
of service has been filed. IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT WILL BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU
FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED IN THE COMPLAINT.
11/6/2018
This day of

Honorable Robipson
Clerk of.
By,
pLeputy-ClerU-

To defendant upon whom this petition is served:


This copy of complaint and summons was served upon you _____________________________ , 20

Deputy Shetriff

Instructions: Attach addendum sheet for additional parties if needed, make notation on this sheet if addendum is used
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 6 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***TV
Date: 11/6/2018 11:05 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY, GEORGIA


136 PRYOR STREET, ROOM C-103, ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
SUMMONS
John Doe
) Case 2018CV312687
) No.:________________________
)
)
Plaintiff, )
)
vs. )
Dr. Robert Peterson )
)
830 Westview Drive, SW, Wheeler Hall 213 )
)
Atlanta, GA 30314_____________________ )
Defendant )
)
)
)
)

TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S):

You are hereby summoned and required to tile electronically with the Clerk of said Court at
https://efilega.tvlerhost.net/ofsweb and serve upon plaintiffs attorney, whose name and address is:
R. Cade Parian - Parian Injury Law, LLC
1201 West Peachtree Street, NW, Suite 2342
Atlanta, GA 30309
An answer to the complaint which is herewith served upon you, within 30 days after service of this
summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service; unless proof of service of this complaint is not filed
within five (5) business days of such service. Then time to answer shall not commence until such proof
of service has been filed. IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT WILL BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU
FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED IN THE COMPLAINT.
11/6/2018
This day of _, 20.

Honorable Cathelene “Tina/ Robinson


Clerk of Superior Court//T
By. ~

To defendant upon whom this petition is served:


This copy of complaint and summons was served upon you _, 20_

Deputy Sherri ff

Instructions: Attach addendum sheet for additional parties if needed, make notation on this sheet if addendum is used
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 7 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***TV
Date: 11/6/2018 11:05 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY


STATE OF GEORGIA

JOHN DOE,

Plaintiff,

JURY TRIAL DEMANDED

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE, a domestic not-for-profit


Corporation,

Serve: c/o Dr. Alan D. Robertson, Sr.,


Morehouse College
830 Westview Drive SW
Atlanta, GA 30314

and

JOHN SILVANUS WILSON, JR., Individually and in his


capacity as former President of Morehouse College,

Serve: John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.


48B Linnaean Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

and

TERRAINE BAILEY, Individually and in her


capacity as Title IX Coordinator and Compliance
Specialist of Morehouse College,

Serve: Terraine Bailey


830 Westview Drive SW
Atlanta, GA 30314

DR. ROBERT PETERSON, Individually and in his


capacity as Assistant Professor at Morehouse College,

Serve: Dr. Robert Peterson


830 Westview Drive SW
Wheeler Hall 213
Atlanta, GA 30314

Defendants.
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 8 of 218

COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES AND DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL

COMES NOW the Plaintiff, John Doe, by counsel, and for his Complaint for Damages and

Demand for Jury Trial (hereinafter “Complaint”') against Defendants Morehouse College, John

Silvanus Wilson Jr., Terraine Bailey and Dr. Robert Peterson states herein as follows:

INTRODUCTION

1. This is an action involving claims under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,

20 U.S.C. §§ 1681-1688 (hereinafter “Title IX”) and various state law causes of action, arising out

of sexual harassment and assault.

PARTIES, JURISDICTION AND VENUE

2. Mr. John Doe (hereinafter “Plaintiff’) is a citizen of the State of Maryland, who currently

resides in Prince George’s County, Maryland.

3. Defendant Morehouse College, (hereinafter “Defendant Morehouse”) is a private

educational institution with its primary campus in Fulton County, Atlanta, Georgia. Upon

information and belief, Defendant Morehouse operates as a domestic not-for-profit corporation

whose principal office address and location of its registered agent. Dr. Alan D. Robertson, Sr.,

being 830 Westview Drive SW, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia 30314. Venue and jurisdiction

are proper as to Defendant Morehouse.

4. Defendant John Silvanus Wilson Jr. (hereinafter “Defendant Wilson, Jr.”) was employed

in Fulton County, Georgia and during all times relevant to this Complaint Defendant Wilson Jr.,

served as President of Morehouse. As President of Morehouse, Defendant Wilson Jr., had a legal

duty to ensure Morehouse’s compliance with the requirements of Title IX. Furthermore, it is

believed Defendant Wilson Jr., was the superior and supervisor of the co-Defendants Bailey and

Peterson when he was President of Morehouse. He is an individual who may be served at his place

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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 9 of 218

of residence being 48B Linnaean Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts 02138.

Venue and jurisdiction are proper as to Defendant Wilson, Jr.

5. Defendant Terraine Bailey (hereinafter “Defendant Bailey”) is employed in Fulton County,

Georgia and it is believed that during all times relevant to this Complaint Defendant Bailey served

as Title IX Coordinator and Compliance Specialist. Defendant Bailey has a legal duty to ensure

Morehouse’s compliance with the requirements of Title IX. She is an individual who may be

served at 830 Westview Drive SW, Fulton County, Georgia 30314. Venue and jurisdiction are

proper as to Defendant Bailey.

6. Defendant Robert Peterson (hereinafter “Defendant Peterson”) was employed in Fulton

County, Georgia and it is believed that during all times relevant to this Complaint. Defendant

Peterson served as an assistant professor in the sociology department at Morehouse. He is an

individual who may be served at 830 Westview Drive SW, Wheeler Hall 213, Atlanta, Fulton

County, Georgia 30314. Venue and jurisdiction are proper as to Defendant Peterson.

GENERAL ALLEGATIONS

A. Morehouse College

7. Defendant Morehouse is a fully-accredited, private liberal arts and sciences-based college

located in Atlanta, Georgia.

8. Per Defendant Morehouse, it is its policy to maintain a work and academic environment

that is free from sexual and gender-based harassment and misconduct, including but not limited

to: Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Nonconsensual Sexual

Contact, Nonconsensual Sexual Intercourse, Rape, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking and Retaliation.1

1 See Morehouse College’s Sexual Misconduct Policy, Section 1.1. Attached as Exhibit A.

-3 -
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 10 of 218

9. According to Defendant Morehouse, sexual harassment is not tolerated and is defined as

the following:

r) "Sexual Harassment": includes any of the following behaviors:


i. Hostile Environment - unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors,
and other visual, verbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when the
conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive to deny or limit the victim's ability to
participate in or benefit from Morehouse's educational programs or benefits by
creating an Intirridating or hostile environment.
ii. Quid Pro Quo - unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and
other visual, verbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when submission to
such conduct is made either explicitly or Implicitly a term or condition of an
individual's education, living environment, employment, or participation in a
college-related activity or program.
iii. Threats / Intimidation of a Sexual Nature - conduct of a sexual nature, which
reasonably would be expected to have the effect of threatening or intimidating
the person at whom such conduct is directed.

Source: http://www.morehouse.edu/titleix/poIicies.html. last accessed on 8/14/18.

10. One of the programs offered to undergraduate students at Defendant Morehouse is a study-

abroad program called MPAGE which stands for the Morehouse Pan-African Global Experience.

B. Plaintiff is accepted to and enrolls at Morehouse College.

11. Plaintiff is a young, male student who was admitted to Morehouse originally as an

undecided major but later declared Engineering as his primary major in the fall of 2014, despite a

very competitive admissions process.

C. Defendant Peterson sexually assaults Plaintiff.

12. In May of 2015, Plaintiff went on a study-abroad trip to Brazil with Morehouse’s MPAGE

program wherein Defendant Peterson was one of two chaperones as well as the Program Lead.

13. Asa chaperone, Defendant Peterson was responsible for supervising and guiding Plaintiff

in his study-abroad experience.

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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 11 of 218

14. While en route from Miami to Brazil, Defendant Peterson ordered alcohol for Plaintiff who

sat beside him on the airplane. Plaintiff was underage at the time.2 After ordering Plaintiff drinks,

Defendant Peterson began making unwanted sexual advances towards Plaintiff by placing his hand

on Plaintiffs inner thighs and groping him in his genital area. This occurred approximately four

different times during the airplane ride from Miami to Brazil. Plaintiff pushed Defendant

Peterson’s hand away each time.3

15. After arriving in Brazil, it is believed that the other chaperone present on the trip, who was

also a professor at Morehouse, Dr. Patricia De Souza, became aware of Defendant Peterson’s

inappropriate conduct in relation to Plaintiff.

16. While in Brazil, Defendant Peterson continued to sexually harass Plaintiff and other

Morehouse students that were on the trip. One instance occurred while at breakfast or lunch,

wherein Plaintiff and Defendant Peterson were sitting at a table and Defendant Peterson proceeded

to put his hand on Plaintiffs upper thigh under the table, in an apparently sexually suggestive

manner. Plaintiff again pushed Defendant Peterson’s hand away. This was witnessed by a friend

of Dr. Patricia De Souza, Dr. Nsenga Burton, who had joined her on the trip. This greatly disturbed

Dr. Burton and caused her concern, which she later reported.4

17. Additionally, throughout the course of the trip, Defendant Peterson sent sexually explicit

text messages to the various Morehouse students in attendance on the trip. It is unclear whether

any of these other students were minors at the time Defendant Peterson was sending these sexually

explicit text messages. For example, one of these messages that Defendant Peterson sent to the

students had a picture of a man’s penis and Defendant Peterson referred to the picture as a “shrimp

2 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, which was a report an independent investigator performed in
relation to the allegations, attached as Exhibit B, pg. 15. It is of importance to note that Plaintiff and other
student’s names have been redacted from this report for privacy reasons.
3 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 11.
4 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 14.

-5-
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 12 of 218

salad/dinner.” He also asked them repeatedly if they wanted a shrimp dinner taunting each of them

one by one saying, “XXX wants a shrimp dinner tonight, don’t you?” Defendant Peterson also

made frequent comments about sex. For example, during a visit to a museum with African cultural

sex symbols that depicted penises, it was reported by numerous students that Defendant Peterson

mimicked fellatio with the penises and after the museum trip, apparently would not stop talking

about penises. This made numerous students on the trip uncomfortable and created a sexually

hostile learning environment.

18. Another incident occurred wherein the Morehouse students were in a swimming pool and

it was reported that Defendant Peterson touched or sucked a student’s nipple while frolicking in

the pool with the students.5

19. What is also further disturbing is that while in Brazil, Defendant Peterson hosted a party

for the Morehouse students in his hotel room where he offered alcoholic beverages. Plaintiff was

underage, and it is believed other Morehouse students may have also been underage. Therefore,

Defendant Peterson was actively giving underage students alcohol. Defendant Peterson further

admitted to attending parties in hotel rooms of upperclassmen and drinking with them as well

during the trip. Obviously, this was not behavior appropriate for a trip chaperone/MPAGE

Program Lead.

SEXUAL ASSAULT AND MOREHOUSE’S FAILURE TO RESPOND REASONABLY

20. Immediately after returning to Morehouse from the Brazil trip, Dr. De Souza reported her

concerns about Defendant Patterson’s behavior to Professor Ida Mukenge and Michael Dillon,

Chair of the Department of Modern Foreign Languages at Morehouse. Dr. De Souza described

Defendant Peterson’s behavior as a “liability.”6 It is believed that both Professor Mukenge and

5 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 15.


6 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 15.

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Mr. Dillon were mandatory reporters per Morehouse’s Title DC Complaint process7. Per

Morehouse’s policy titled, “Responding to Title IX Complaints of Sexual Discrimination and

Harassment”:

Mandatory/Responsible Reporters must refer reports of misconduct under


these policies and guidelines to the Title IX Office, and information brought
to their attention is not confidential. All of the following employees are
trained on how to identify misconduct and on their duties to redress or report
it. Any dean, director, or department head or other similar administrator
who becomes aware of information indicating a significant likelihood of
sexual harassment must report such information to the Title DC Coordinator.
These administrators must respond not only when they received a specific
complaint or report alleging improper activity, but also when such matters
come to their attention informally. Unconfirmed or disputed allegations
should be clearly labeled as such and reports should indicate any steps
already taken to investigate or otherwise respond. Administrators and
faculty should consult with the Title DC Coordinator or the Director of
Student Services prior to responding to any situation involving alleged
harassment.8

Yet, they both failed to report Defendant Peterson’s behavior to Title IX so that a prompt

investigation could begin into his behavior. In fact, Defendant Peterson continued to be the

Program Lead and chaperone for the MPAGE Brazil study-abroad trip, as per Morehouse’s

website, he was listed as the primary contact and Program Lead for the trip as of May of 2017.9

Dr. Peterson invited student Rickie Banks to speak during one of his classes on behalf of the

MPAGE program in order to stir interest and promote the program. Rickie reported that while he

was speaking to the class about the trip to Brazil, Dr. Peterson continually embarrassed him by

inquiring him to tell the class how much sex he got while he was on the trip.

21. After the sexual assault awareness campaign in the fall of 2017, Mr. Dillon remembered

Dr. De Souza’s concerns about Defendant Peterson and decided to speak to the appropriate

7 See “Responding to Title IX Complaints of Sexual Discrimination and Harassment,” Exhibit C, pg. 9.
8 See “Responding to Title IX Complaints of Sexual Discrimination and Harassment,” Exhibit C, pg. 9.
9 See http://www.morehouse.edu/mnage/. last accessed 8/31/18.

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channels about those concerns.10 However, those concerns were never addressed by Defendant

Morehouse.

22. Upon information and belief, Interim Provost Michael Hodges told Defendant Morehouse

faculty and staff that Morehouse was aware of what happened with Defendant Peterson relating to

the Brazil trip, yet no apparent action was taken.

23. In December of 2017, after much struggle and increasing emotional issues relating to the

2015 Brazil trip and Defendant Peterson, Plaintiff filed a Title IX Complaint with Defendant

Morehouse. However, Defendant Morehouse claimed they did not receive his Complaint and no

action was taken, yet again.

24. On or about January 23, 2018, Plaintiff re-submitted his Complaint.

25. On or about January 26, 2018, Defendant Morehouse notified the Plaintiff that an

investigation had been initiated regarding his allegations. The notice advised the Plaintiff and

Defendant Peterson of their respective rights to provide a list of potential witnesses and

supplemental documentation to be reviewed by an external investigator, Nancy Castor Sprattlin,

an attorney in Atlanta. Thereafter, Defendant Morehouse placed Defendant Peterson on unpaid

leave.

26. Nancy Castor Sprattlin, the external investigator, completed her investigation on May 20,

2018 and submitted her report to the Plaintiff, Defendant Morehouse, and Defendant Peterson. Ms.

Sprattlin’s report found “...sufficient evidence here that Dr. Peterson engaged in conduct that may

be deemed to run afoul of Title IX, Morehouse Sexual Misconduct Policy, and/or Morehouse Code

of Conduct.”11 Based off those findings, Ms. Sprattlin recommended termination as the

disciplinary action.12

10 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 10.


11 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 15.
12 See Nancy Sprattlin’s Investigative Report, Exhibit B, pg. 15-16.

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27. It is now unclear as to whether Defendant Morehouse terminated Defendant Peterson, as

of the filing of this Complaint. Defendant Peterson remains listed as an active professor on

Morehouse’s website13 as well as the contact person of the MPAGE program.14

PLAINTIFF SUFFERS DAMAGES AND LOSS OF EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

28. After the 2015 Brazil trip and Defendant Peterson’s sexual assault and harassment of

Plaintiff, he began to suffer emotionally and academically as a result. As Plaintiff was previously

on the Dean’s List at one point during his tenure at Morehouse College but his grades began to

drop after the incident with Defendant Peterson.

29. Plaintiff had to leave Morehouse in the beginning of his Fall 2017 semester due to the fact

he was immensely struggling with completing his classes while coping with the aftermath of the

sexual assault and harassment of Defendant Peterson. He was also recovering from a very difficult

summer at home where he sought medical attention for symptoms relating to this event. He

attempted to go back to school but less than a month later, he called on his mother for help. His

mother immediately flew to Atlanta and went to campus in search for assistance for her son. She

was not able to do so as there was no one there to assist her and no one able to take appointments.

Phone calls were never returned, etc. Plaintiff and his mother were desperate for assistance with

removing him from classes but received no guidance from any administrators at Morehouse. After

exhausting all resources in Atlanta, they both returned to Maryland.

30. Upon arrival back to campus the following semester after hospitalization. Plaintiffs

mother became involved at one point as she once again returned to campus, pleading with

numerous Morehouse administrators such as David Wall Rice (Associate Provost), David Thomas

(President of Morehouse College), Sheryl Spivey (Director of Morehouse College Financial Aid),

13 See http://wvvw.morehouse.edii/academics/soc/facultv.html, last accessed 9/18/18.


14 See http:/7www.morehoi)se.edu/mpage/, last accessed 9/18/18.

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and Terrance Dixon (Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management) for help for her son.

However, she received no response from Morehouse and they failed to respond appropriately in

providing reasonable accommodations. Plaintiffs mother believes she sent over 30 emails and

made numerous phone calls and made two trips to campus on two separate occasions to ensure her

son’s safety as well as to ensure that the college knew of the Dr. Peterson’s being on campus and

potentially predatory behavior, yet never received reasonable responses from Morehouse

administrators. Per David Rice’s instruction, Plaintiffs mother was personally walked to the

President’s office, was introduced to the President’s acting Executive Assistant, was handed her

business card and was given instructions by Rice to email the President, copy him and the Assistant

and to specifically outline all that had been discussed in his office that day. David Rice comforted

Plaintiffs mother and informed her that all would be handled. Mr. Rice stated Morehouse had

found housing for Plaintiff and were in process of setting up his meal plan and parking on campus.

Plaintiff did receive a room; however he never received a meal plan or parking as promised.

Instead, he incurred a $10,000 bill for which no one was able to explain. Financial holds were

placed on his accounts and he once again was not able to retrieve his grades. To date, Plaintiff has

still not been able to see his grades nor register for classes or request transcripts in order to register

at another school. The following week upon return. Plaintiffs mother sent the email as directed

and is still awaiting a response/acknowledgement from the President’s office.

31. Additionally, Plaintiff was informed that his outstanding tuition would be forgiven by

Morehouse and he could re-enroll in classes for the fall 2018 semester, as he was eager to return

to school and graduate.

32. However, despite numerous requests to Morehouse administrators, Plaintiffs holds were

never removed from his account and he was not able to register for classes in accord with the fall

2018 deadline.

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33. Plaintiff therefore was desperate to transfer to another school, however could not due to

Defendant Morehouse essentially holding his official transcripts “hostage”. As of the date of filing

of this Complaint, despite repeated requests, Defendant Morehouse has still not provided Plaintiff

a copy of his transcript so that he may transfer to another school.

PRIOR ALLEGATIONS RELATING TO DEFENDANT PETERSON

34. On November 8, 2017, a campaign was launched at Defendant Morehouse and Spelman

College’s campuses relating to sexual assault awareness on both campuses which garnered

national media attention.

35. In conjunction with the sexual assault awareness campaign, a Twitter handle was launched

with the catchphrase of #WeKnowWhatYouDid where Defendant Morehouse and Spelman

students apparently called out their sexual attackers on social media. One particular tweet of

interest was posted by a user named Kevin Rush. The tweet reads: “# W eKnowWhatY ouD id Dr.

Robert Peterson.” The obvious implication of this message is that Defendant Peterson may have

sexually abused other students as well. The tweet has since been deleted but a screen shot of the

tweet is below:

'■:ii

com/rwey
YOUDid Dr.
:&u

36.
mmmmm
Additionally, it is believed other Morehouse faculty had addressed concerns at meetings in

the past about Defendant Peterson’s inappropriate interactions with students as well as the fact that

it was apparently an open secret that Defendant Peterson was known as a professor that exchanged

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good grades for sex. It is also believed there were at least two other complaints in the Title IX

office relating to Defendant Peterson.

37. One of the students on the Brazil trip in 2015, also expressed to Ms. Burton that Defendant

Peterson would bully students, stating he was in control of their grades and basically, they had to

do whatever he wanted in order to get good grades. This student stated he felt like Defendant

Peterson was threatening him and appeared to be a form of quid pro quo harassment with

Defendant Peterson and the students regarding Peterson’s controlling them through their grades.

38. What is additionally deeply concerning is other witnesses have come forward (who will

not be publicly named in this Complaint to protect privacy concerns) and expressed that they have

had similar experiences with Morehouse faculty and staff sexually harassing and assaulting

students; as apparently this was an ongoing problem that had been an issue for years. It is unclear

how much Defendant Morehouse was aware of this and what was being done to prevent it from

happening.

COUNTS AGAINST DEFENDANT MOREHOUSE

COUNT I:

Violation of Title IX-20 U.S.C. § 1681 (a)

(Clearly Unreasonable Response)

39. Plaintiff re-alleges and incorporates the allegations set forth above in paragraphs 1- 38 as

though fully set forth herein.

40. Defendant Morehouse had actual knowledge of Plaintiffs sexual harassment and

discrimination at the hands of his perpetrator, Defendant Peterson.

41. The sexual discrimination, consisting of Defendant Peterson’s sexual assault against

Plaintiff was so severe, pervasive and objectively offensive that it barred Plaintiffs access to equal

educational opportunities and benefits.

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42. Plaintiff was subjected to the discrimination because of Defendant Morehouse’s deliberate

indifference to known acts of harassment, sexual violence, discrimination and retaliation,

including, without limitation:

(a) Defendant Morehouse’s deliberate decision not to investigate Defendant Peterson

relating to his other inappropriately reported behavior relating to students;

(b) Defendant Morehouse’s deliberate decisions not to comply with its own policies on

sexual misconduct, Title IX and sexual harassment, as well as legal requirements

of Title IX as set forth in OCR Guidance;

(c) Defendant Morehouse’s failure to adequately hire, train and employ employees

who did not sexually harass students and create a sexually hostile environment;

43. Had Defendant Morehouse not been deliberately indifferent to Plaintiffs harassment and

discrimination, and instead complied with its own policies and federal law by promptly preventing

Defendant Peterson from further sexual harassment and providing reasonable accommodations for

Plaintiffs safety, Plaintiff would not have been deprived of equal educational opportunities. It is

also believed Defendant Morehouse was on notice of Defendant Peterson’s propensities regarding

other inappropriate interactions with students and should have performed an immediate

investigation and put safeguards in place to prevent other students, such as Plaintiff, from being

sexually harassed and assaulted by Defendant Peterson.

44. Because of Defendant Morehouse’s deliberate indifference, Plaintiff has suffered losses of

educational opportunities and benefits along with injuries, damages and losses, including, but not

limited to: further emotional distress, fear, anxiety and trauma, damage to and delays in pursuit of

higher education.

WHEREFORE, Plaintiff respectfully demands judgment against Defendant Morehouse

awarding:

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(a) Damages in amounts to be established at trial, including, without


limitation, reimbursement and prepayment for all of Plaintiff s tuition and
related expenses; payment of Plaintiff s expenses incurred as a consequence
of the sexual assault and harassment; damage for deprivation of equal access
to the educational benefits and opportunities provided by Defendant
Morehouse; and damages for past, present and future emotional pain and
suffering, ongoing and severe mental anguish, loss of past, present and
future enjoyment of life; and loss of future earning potential attributed to a
Morehouse degree;

(b) Pre- and post-judgment interest;

(c) Costs;

(d) Attorneys’ fees pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1988(b); and

(e) Such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper.

COUNT II:

Violation of Title IX-20 U.S.C. § 1681 (a)

(Hostile Educational Environment)

45. Plaintiff re-alleges and incorporates the allegations set forth above in paragraphs 1- 44 as

though fully set forth herein.

46. Plaintiff was subjected to physical sexual assault and sexual discrimination and

harassment, that was so severe, pervasive and objectively offensive that he was denied access to

educational opportunities and benefits.

47. For Plaintiff, Defendant Morehouse became a sexually hostile environment where his

perpetrator, Defendant Peterson, continued to remain on campus without any limitations or

restrictions after the 2015 Brazil trip. This was despite Professor De Souza’s reporting of

Defendant Peterson’s behavior during the Brazil trip upon her return to Atlanta. Only in January

of 2018 after counsel for Plaintiff became involved did Defendant Morehouse put restrictions in

place regarding Defendant Peterson and Plaintiff.

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48. Defendant Morehouse was deliberately indifferent to Plaintiffs known sexual harassment

and the sexually hostile educational environment in which he suffered as a result of its failure to

institute reasonable accommodations for the Plaintiffs safety as well as mental well-being,

including but not limited to: (i) excluding Defendant Peterson from campus after Professor De

Souza first reported the behavior in June of 2015; (ii) providing Plaintiff assistance in ensuring he

could continue his studies, (iii) preventing Defendant Peterson from sexually harassing Plaintiff

and creating a sexually hostile environment during the Brazil trip.

49. As a result of Defendant Morehouse’s deliberate indifference. Plaintiff was deprived of

equal educational opportunities at Morehouse.

50. Because of the ongoing sexually hostile environment that Defendant Morehouse

deliberately failed to address, Plaintiff suffered losses of educational opportunities and benefits,

along with injuries, damages and losses, including but not limited to: damage to and delays in

pursuit of higher education; and fear, anxiety, trauma and emotional distress.

WHEREFORE, Plaintiff respectfully demands judgment against Defendant Morehouse

awarding:

(a) Damages in amounts to be established at trial, including, without


limitation, reimbursement and prepayment for all of Plaintiffs tuition and
related expenses; payment of Plaintiff s expenses incurred as a consequence
of the sexual assault and sexual harassment; damage for deprivation of equal
access to the educational benefits and opportunities provided by Defendant
Morehouse; and damages for past, present and future emotional pain and
suffering, ongoing and severe mental anguish; loss of past, present and
future enjoyment of life and loss of future earning potential attributed to a
Morehouse degree;

(b) Pre- and post-judgment interest;

(c) Costs;

(d) Attorneys’ fees pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1988(b); and

(e) Such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper.

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COUNT III:

Breach of Contract

51. Plaintiff re-alleges and incorporates the allegations set forth above in Paragraphs 1-50 as

though fully set forth herein.

52. Based on the aforementioned facts and circumstances. Defendant Morehouse breached

express and/or implied agreement(s) with Plaintiff.

53. Defendant Morehouse’s acceptance of Plaintiff into a degree program at Defendant

Morehouse and his subsequent enrollment and payment of tuition fees created an express contract,

or alternatively, a contract implied in law or in fact between Defendant Morehouse and Plaintiff,

governed by, inter alia, the Sexual Misconduct Policy and the Morehouse Student Handbook.

(collectively, the “Regulations”) and the parties’ reasonable expectations.

54. The contract formed between Defendant Morehouse and Plaintiff contained the following

provisions, among others, that expressly prohibit sex-based discrimination:

Section 1
Introduction and Policy Language
1.1 It is the policy of the Morehouse College ("Morehouse" or "the College") to maintain a
work and acaderric environment that is free from sexual and gender-based harassment
and misconduct, including, but not limited to: Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence, Domestic
Violence, Dating Violence, Nonconsensual Sexual Contact, Nonconsensual Sexual
Intercourse, Rape, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking and Retaliation ("Prohibited Conduct").

Source: Morehouse Sexual Misconduct Policy, pg. 1, attached as Exhibit A.

55. Furthermore, the Morehouse College Student Handbook provides that the school does not

tolerate discriminatory behavior in its statement on harassment:

Harassment

Morehouse College prohibits and will not tolerate action and/or behavior of a harassing nature. This includes both
sexual and discriminatory harassment and related retaliation. Any member of the student body, found to be in
violation of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, which may include, but is not limited to, written
warning/reprimand, suspension or dismissal.

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Source: Morehouse College Student Handbook, pg. 53, attached as Exhibit D.

56. Plaintiff asserts that Defendant Morehouse, amongst other things, breached these

guarantees in employing a professor who sexually harassed and assaulted him on a school-

sponsored activity, creating a hostile environment, directly in contradiction to the school’s various

policies on discrimination and sexual harassment.

57. Defendant Morehouse failed to provide Plaintiff with an environment free from sex-based

harassment and discrimination when it failed to ensure he was protected from sexual harassment

and discrimination at the hands of a Morehouse staff member and received adequate assistance

thereafter.

58. As set forth above, Defendant Morehouse materially breached these guarantees of

providing an environment free from gender- based discrimination and other contractual provisions

as elucidated above.

59. As a result of Defendant Morehouse’s breach of contract with Plaintiff, Plaintiff suffered

damages in the result of the amount spent on attending Morehouse College and any incidental

damages related to his injuries as a result of the sex-based discrimination.

COUNTS AGAINST DEFENDANTS MOREHOUSE. WILSON JR.. BAILEY. AND

PETERSON

COUNT: IV

Negligence

60. Plaintiff re-alleges and incorporates the allegations set forth above in Paragraphs 1-59 as

though fully set forth herein.

61. Defendants knew of the wrongful conduct of Defendant Peterson and/or their propensities

to act in a dangerous, reckless, offensive and/or harmful manner. Upon learning of the sexual

harassment, Defendants should have immediately begun an investigation as well as put reasonable

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safeguards in place to protect Plaintiffs interests. Additionally, Defendants should have never

allowed a professor to sexually harass and assault a student on a school-sponsored field trip and

may have had prior knowledge and information that Defendant Peterson had a history of behaving

inappropriately with students. Defendants had a duty to employ qualified, competent employees

who did not sexually assault or harass students and failed to do so in their employment and

supervision of Defendant Peterson.

62. Defendants negligently failed to supervise, investigate and reprimand Defendant Peterson

and failed to take reasonable steps to ensure Plaintiff could safely continue his education at

Morehouse, free of sex discrimination.

63. Asa proximate result of said negligence, Plaintiff incurred the damages described herein.

COUNT V:

Negligent Hiring, Training, Retention and Supervision

64. Plaintiff re-alleges and incorporates the allegations set forth above in Paragraphs 1-63 as

though fully set forth herein.

65. Based on the aforementioned facts and circumstances, it is believed Defendants

Morehouse, Wilson Jr., and Bailey had supervisory authority over Defendant Peterson and other

Morehouse employees and/or agents.

66. Upon information and belief. Defendant Bailey did not have the requisite credentials and

training to perform the job of Title IX Coordinator and that her continued employment by

Defendant Morehouse as Title LX Coordinator, resulted in negligent hiring, training, supervision

and retention on its behalf.

67. Upon information and belief, Defendant Peterson did not have the requisite credentials and

training to perform the job of professor and that this was the result of Defendant Morehouse’s

negligent hiring, training, supervision and retention of Defendant Peterson.

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68. Based upon the aforementioned facts and circumstances, Defendants Wilson Jr., Bailey

and Peterson and other Morehouse employees and/or agents failed to comply with the policies and

procedures required of Title IX as well as Morehouse policies and procedures relating to sexual

misconduct, assault and harassment.

69. Furthermore, it is believed Defendant Morehouse and Defendant Wilson Jr., had

supervisory authority over Defendants Bailey and Peterson and negligently hired, trained,

supervised and retained them due to Defendants Bailey and Peterson’s failure to comply with the

requirements of Title IX and Morehouse policies and procedures relating to sexual misconduct,

assault and harassment.

70. As a proximate result of said negligence. Plaintiff incurred the damages described herein.

COUNTS AGAINST DEFENDANT PETERSON

COUNTS: VI. VII. VIII. IX

Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Assault, Providing


Alcohol to a Minor

71. Plaintiff re-alleges and incorporates the allegations set forth above in Paragraphs 1-70 as

though fully set forth herein.

72. Based on the information described above. Defendant Peterson’s touching of Plaintiffs

inner thigh on multiple occasions, as well as sexual comments resulted in his intentional infliction

of emotional distress and sexual harassment and assault against the Plaintiff.

73. Additionally, Defendant Peterson provided alcohol to Plaintiff, a minor, while on the Brazil

trip, in violation of state law.

74. As a result, Plaintiff suffered damages and will see compensation for his emotional distress

as a result of Defendant Peterson’s actions.

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COMPENSATORY DAMAGES

75. Plaintiff incorporates herein by reference each of the foregoing paragraphs as if fully

copied and set forth below and further states:

76. As a direct and proximate result of Defendants’ conduct as described above, Plaintiff has

incurred or may incur medical and/or counseling expenses, suffered severed, permanent emotional

distress, lost educational opportunities, lost future earning capacity attributable to a Morehouse

College degree and will continue to incur such expenses and emotional injuries in the future, all to

the damages of Plaintiff, which exceeds the jurisdictional minimum of this Court.

77. As a direct and proximate result of the conduct of the Defendants as set forth herein above,

the Plaintiff will incur future losses in the power to labor and earn based on the lost value of a

Morehouse degree as well as delays in his graduating college, has incurred and will continue to

incur expenses for psychological treatment and care, all to the damage of Plaintiff which exceeds

the jurisdictional minimum of this Court.

PUNITIVE DAMAGES

78. Plaintiff incorporates herein by reference each of the foregoing paragraphs as if fully

copied and set forth below and further states:

79. Defendants acted with oppression, fraud, malice, reckless, callous and/or flagrant

indifference in relation to the Plaintiff in their employing of an adult in an authority position (such

as a professor) who sexually harassed and assaulted Plaintiff. Additionally, it is believed

Defendants were aware of other disturbing behavior relating to Defendant Peterson yet failed to

act appropriately to prevent future sexual assault or harassment by Defendant Peterson against

students.

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80. By acting with oppression, fraud, malice, reckless, callous and/or flagrant indifference to

the Plaintiff, Defendants caused irreparable harm to the Plaintiff for which punitive damages are

appropriate (in relation to the above-referenced claims where punitive damages are possible).

REQUEST FOR RELIEF

WHEREFORE, Plaintiff seeks a judgment against all named Defendants, jointly and

severally, in an amount to be determined by a jury for:

A. A monetary judgment against Defendants in an amount that will fully compensate

Plaintiff for his injuries and damages;

B. A judgment of appropriate punitive damages against Defendants in an amount

sufficient to punish the Defendants for their willful, wanton, oppressive, fraudulent, malicious,

and/or grossly negligent conduct;

C. His costs herein expended including reasonable attorneys’ fees pursuant to CR 3.02,

CR 54.04 and 42 U.S.C. § 1988(b);

D. An award of post-judgment interest in the amount allowed by statute;

E. Trial by jury of all issues so triable;

F. His emotional distress, past, present and future;

G. His humiliation, past, present and future;

H. His embarrassment and mental anguish, past, present and future;

I. Lost wages and/or impairment of power to earn money;

J. Past, present and future medical expenses;

K. His pain and suffering; and

L. Any and all compensatory and incidental damages incurred in his attempts to

pursue his education at Morehouse.

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WHEREFORE, Plaintiff demands judgment against the Defendants, jointly and severally,

for compensatory and punitive damages, his costs expended herein, including attorneys’ fees, trial

by jury on all issues so triable; and any and all further legal and equitable relief to which he may

appear entitled.

This 5th day of November, 2018.

/s/R. Cade Parian_____


Parian Injury Law, LLC R. Cade Parian
1201 W. Peachtree St., NW Georgia Bar No. 331408
Suite 2342 Attorney for Plaintiff
Atlanta, GA 30309
Telephone: (404) 795-5035
Facsimile: (404) 953-7020
cade@westgalawver.com

/s/Lindsay Anne Cordes_________________


Thomas Law Offices Lindsay Anne Cordes (to be admitted pro hac
9418 North Commons Blvd. Ste. 200 vice)
Louisville, KY 40059 Tad Thomas (to be admitted pro hac vice)
Telephone: (877) 955-7001 Attorneys for Plaintiff
Facsimile: (502) 791-8352
Lindsav.cordes@thomaslawoffices.com
Tad@thomaslawoffices.com

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Sexual Misconduct Policy


Section 1
Introduction and Policy Language
1.1 It is the policy of the Morehouse College ("Morehouse" or "the College") to maintain a
work and academic environment that is free from sexual and gender-based harassment
and misconduct, including, but not limited to: Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence, Domestic
Violence, Dating Violence, Nonconsensual Sexual Contact, Nonconsensual Sexual
Intercourse, Rape, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking and Retaliation ("Prohibited Conduct").

1.2 In furtherance of the goal to make Morehouse College an institution free from sexual and
gender-based harassment and discriminatory actions, Morehouse College implements
this, its "Sexual Misconduct Policy" created in accordance with state and federal law.

1.3 Students who engage in Prohibited Conduct are subject to disciplinary action up to and
including permanent separation from the College (i.e. expulsion). Students are also
subject to disciplinary action for Aiding, Abetting, or Inciting any of these forms of
misconduct.

1.4 Bystanders. A Bystander is anyone who observes an emergency or any situation where
someone is in need of help. Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and
relationship violence. Morehouse College promotes a culture of community accountability
where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing
harm to themselves or others.

1.5 Further, any Retaliation against an individual who has complained about sexual
harassment or unlawful discrimination, or retaliation against individuals for cooperating
with an investigation of a complaint of sexual harassment or unlawful discrimination, is
similarly unlawful and will not be tolerated.

1.6 The Sexual Misconduct Policy and its procedures do not replace the criminal
justice system. In the event that an individual files a report with Campus Police, the
Morehouse College Police Department will report to the Atlanta Police Department certain
alleged crimes, including some forms of Sexual Harassment, Domestic Violence, Dating
Violence, or Stalking, which occur in Atlanta, Fulton County and constitute a felony under
Georgia law.

1.7 The Sexual Misconduct Procedures can be found in the Sexual Misconduct Procedures
document, which will continually be published on the College's intranet, as well as
external website.

EXHIBIT
Page 1 of 10 A
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 30 of 218

Section 2
Applicability, Jurisdiction & Title IX Coordinator Authority
2.1 The Sexual Misconduct Policy and its procedures will apply to all complaints by or against
students for Prohibited Conduct. The Policy and the accompanying procedures will also
apply to individuals reporting or participating in investigations of such conduct whether
made by students, faculty, staff, or third parties, and will take precedence over any other
Morehouse College policies and procedures with respect to such complaints. At this time,
this policy does not apply to complaints of harassment, discrimination or misconduct
between two non-student Morehouse community members. Such complaints should be
referred to the Office of Human Resources or Campus Police, as appropriate.

2.2 Morehouse designates the Title IX Coordinator (Title IX Coordinator") as the individual
charged with coordinating efforts to comply with Title IX. The Title IX Coordinator
addresses and oversees the investigation and resolution of all complaints related to
sexual and gender-based harassment involving students, faculty, staff, visitors, and
vendors, including Sexual Misconduct and Assault, Sexual Harassment, Dating Violence,
Domestic Violence, or Stalking.

2.3 The Title IX Coordinator is available to meet with any person to provide information about
resources, interim measures and options for investigation and resolution under this
Sexual Misconduct Policy:
Terraine L Bailey
Title IX Coordinator
Office of General Counsel and Compliance
830 Westview Drive, S.W., Gloster Hall, Room 109
Atlanta, GA 30314
(p) 470.639.0584
terraine. bailev(5) morehouse.edu

2.4 Inquiries or complaints concerning the application of Title IX may be referred to the Title
IX Coordinator and/or the United States Department of Education:
United States Department of Education
Office for Civil Rights
61 Forsyth Street, S.W., Suite 19T70
Atlanta, GA 30303-8927
Telephone: (404) 974-9406
Fax: (404) 974-9471
Email: OCR.Atlanta@ed.aov

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Section 3
Definitions
3.1 As used in this Policy:

a) "Aiding, Abetting, or Inciting": participating in, soliciting, directing, or assisting


in Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment, Domestic Violence, Dating, or Stalking.

b) "College Premises": refers to buildings or grounds owned, leased, operated,


controlled, or supervised by the College.

c) "College-sponsored activity": any activity hosted, performed, or conducted on


or off College premises that is specifically initiated or supervised by the College.

d) "Complainant": a person who alleges that another person or Student Organization


violated this Sexual Misconduct Policy,

e) "Consent": clear and unambiguous agreement, expressed in mutually


understandable words or actions, to engage in a particular sexual activity. Whether
valid consent has been given will be judged based upon what a reasonable person
would have understood from such words or actions.
i. Consent must be voluntarily given and is not valid: 1) if obtained by
physical force, coercion, or threat; 2) when a person is Incapacitated;3)
when an intellectual or other disability prevents a person from having the
capacity to give consent; or 4) if consent is given for a particular sexual
activity on a prior occasion (cannot be presumed to constitute consent to
engage in a different sexual activity or to engage again in a sexual activity).
ii. Consent can be withdrawn by either person at any point.

f) "Cyberbullying / Media-Based Misconduct": Photographing or taping someone


(via audio, video or otherwise) involved in sexual activity, or in a state of undress,
without his or her knowledge or consent. Even if a person consented to sexual
activity, photographing or taping someone without his or her knowledge and
agreement goes beyond the boundaries of that consent. Dissemination of
photographs or video/audio of someone involved in sexual activity, or in a state of
undress, without his or her knowledge or consent constitutes a separate and
additional act of sexual misconduct."

g) "Dating Violence": violence committed by a person:


i. who is or has been in a social relationship of a ronnantic or intimate nature with
the victim; and
ii. where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a
consideration of the following factors:
1. the length of the relationship;
2. the type of relationship; and
3. the frequency of the interaction between the persons involved in the
relationship.

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h) "Domestic Violence": Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed


by a current or former spouse of the victim by:
i. a person with whom the victim shares a child in common,
ii. a person who is cohabiting with or has cohabited with the victim as a spouse,
iii. person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family
violence laws of the jurisdiction where the crime occurred, or
iv. any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that
person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction
where the crime occurred.

i) "Force": The use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to


gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats), and
coercion that overcomes resistance or produces consent.
i. There is no requirement that a person has to resist the sexual advance or
request, but resistance is a clear demonstration of non-consent.
ii. Sexual activity that is forced is by definition non-consensual, but non-
consensual sexual activity is not by definition forced.

j) "Incapacitation": a person lacks the capacity to give Consent to sexual activity


because the person is: asleep, unconscious, mentally and/or physically helpless, or
otherwise unaware that sexual activity is occurring.
i. Incapacitation is not necessarily the same as legal intoxication. Where
alcohol or other drugs are involved, evaluating Incapacitation requires an
assessment of how the consumption of alcohol and/or drugs affects a person's:
1. decision-making ability; awareness of consequences;
2. ability to make informed, rational judgments;
3. capacity to appreciate the nature and quality of the act; or level of
consciousness.
ii. The assessment is based on objectively and reasonably apparent indications of
incapacitation when viewed from the perspective of a sober, reasonable
person.
iii. Intentional Incapacitation: providing alcohol or other drugs to a person
with the intent to render the person Incapacitated.

k) "Interim Measures": temporary accommodations or conditions placed upon a


Complainant or Responding Party by the Title IX Coordinator to address immediate
physical safety and emotional needs following any allegation of violation of the
Sexual Misconduct Policy.

l) "Notification of Outcome": a written notification issued to a Complainant and a


Respondent following the conclusion of a student judicial proceeding under this
Policy.

m) "Reporting Party": a person who is aware of, and reports a possible violation
under the Sexual Misconduct Policy on behalf of a victim, but who is not personally
the victim of the misconduct.

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n) "Respondent": a student or Student Organization accused of misconduct under


this Policy.

o) "Retaliation": engaging in conduct that may reasonably be perceived to adversely


affect a person's educational, living, or work environment because of their good
faith participation in the reporting, investigation, and/or resolution of report of a
violation of this Sexual Misconduct Policy; or Discourage a reasonable person from
making a report or participating in an investigation under this Sexual Misconduct
Policy.
i. Retaliation includes but is not limited to:
1. acts or words that constitute intimidation;
2. threats or coercion intended to pressure a person to drop or support a
complaint or to provide false/misleading information in connection with
an investigation; and
3. pressuring a person to participate or refrain from participating as a
witness in an investigation.
ii. Retaliation may constitute a violation of this Sexual Misconduct Policy even
when the underlying report made in good faith did not result in a finding of
responsibility.

p) "Sexual Assault": unwanted or unwelcome touching of a sexual nature, including:


fondling; penetration of the mouth, anus, or vagina, however slight, with a body
part or object; or other sexual activity that occurs without valid consent. This
definition includes, but is not limited to, rape and other physical sexual acts
perpetrated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent
(e.g., due to the student's age or use of drugs or alcohol, or because an intellectual
or other disability prevents the student from having the capacity to give consent).

q) "Sexual Contact": the deliberate touching of a person's intimate parts (including


genitalia, groin, breast, buttock, or clothing covering any of those areas), or using
Force or the threat of Force to cause a person to touch his or her own or another
person's intimate parts.

r) "Sexual Harassment": includes any of the following behaviors:


i. Hostile Environment - unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors,
and other visual, verbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when the
conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive to deny or limit the victim's ability to
participate in or benefit from Morehouse's educational programs or benefits by
creating an intimidating or hostile environment.
ii. Quid Pro Quo - unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and
other visual, verbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when submission to
such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an
individual's education, living environment, employment, or participation in a
college-related activity or program.
iii. Threats / Intimidation of a Sexual Nature - conduct of a sexual nature, which
reasonably would be expected to have the effect of threatening or intimidating
the person at whom such conduct is directed.

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s) "Sexual Misconduct": is a broad term that encompasses sexually motivated


misconduct, including conduct of an unwelcome and/or criminal nature. Thus, for
purposes of this Policy, Sexual Misconduct includes, but is not limited to:
i. Rape;
ii. Sexual Exploitation;
iii. Nonconsensual Sexual Contact;
iv. Nonconsensual Sexual Intercourse;
v. Sexual Assault;
vi. Sexual Violence;
vii. Domestic Violence; and
viii. Dating Violence.

t) "Stalking": occurs when a person engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly


commits acts toward another person, under circumstances that would place the
person in reasonable fear for safety, or of harm or bodily injury to self or others; or
reasonably cause substantial emotional distress to the person.
i. A course of conduct refers to a pattern of behavior of two or more acts over a
period of time that can be reasonably regarded as likely to alarm, harass, or
cause fear of harm or injury to that person or to a third party. The feared
harm or injury may be physical, emotional, or psychological, or related to the
personal safety, property, education, or employment of that individual.
ii. Stalking may involve individuals who are known to one another or have an
intimate or sexual relationship, or may involve individuals who do not know to
one another.

u) "Student Organization": a recognized Morehouse student organization, group, or


team including but not limited to those devoted to academic, athletic, cultural,
Greek life, leadership, pre-professional or other student activities.

v) "Title DC Coordinator": the designated College official with ultimate oversight


and responsibility for the College's compliance with Title IX of the Higher Education
Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. § 1681 et seq. ("Title IX"), implementing
regulations and relevant supplemental guidance.

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Section 4
Student and Student Organization Rights and Expectations
4.1 Confidentiality; Respect for Privacy.
a) Information regarding Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment, Domestic Violence,
Dating Violence, or Stalking reports, and any investigation or review or those
reports, including sanctioning determinations, will be shared among Morehouse
officials with a legitimate educational interest or with external individuals or entities
only on a need-to-know basis and only as permitted by Morehouse policy and
applicable law.

4.2 When a Complainant Requests Confidentiality and Elects Not to Proceed With an
Investigation
a) If the Complainant does not wish to proceed with an investigation and/or requests
to remain confidential, Title IX still requires the College to investigate and take
reasonable corrective action in response to the Complainant's information. In such
case. College's ability to respond may be limited.
b) The Title IX Coordinator will weigh the Complainant's request(s) for confidentiality
and/or wish not to proceed with an investigation against the College's obligation to
provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students.
c) Specifically, the Title IX Coordinator will consider the following factors:
i. The seriousness of the alleged misconduct;
ii. Whether there have been other complaints of Sexual Misconduct or Sex
Discrimination against the accused at the College or any other school or in
the nature of prior criminal charges;
ill. Whether the accused threatened further misconduct or violence against the
Complainant or others;
iv. Whether the Sexual Misconduct or Sex Discrimination was committed by
multiple persons;
v. Whether the Sexual Misconduct involved use of a Weapon;
vi. The age of the Complainant;
vii. Whether the University possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence of
the misconduct;
viii.Whether the Complaint reveals a pattern of conduct at a particular location
or by a particular individual and or student group or organization;
ix. The accused's right to receive information about the allegations if the
information is maintained by the College as an "education record" under the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ("FERPA"); and
x. Any other information that is relevant under the circumstances.

4.3 The Title IX Coordinator or designee will inform the Complainant if the College cannot
ensure confidentiality. In an instance where the College must disclose a Complainant's
identity, the Title IX Coordinator or designee will inform the Complainant prior to making
the disclosure.

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4.4 Mandatory Reporters.


a) Responsible employees are those who have the authority to address and remedy
sexual misconduct and gender-based discrimination or those who a student or
another employee would reasonably believe to have such authority or obligation. All
supervisors are responsible employees but not all responsible employees are
supervisors. Responsible employees must report known details of the incident as
well as the names of the Complainant and Respondent.
i. Examples of responsible employees are Directors, Faculty, Department
Heads, Deans, Vice Presidents, Managers, Supervisors, Police Officers,
Residential Deans, Coaches, Advisors, Office of General Counsel, Human
Resources, and Office of Student Conduct.

4.5Confidential Reporting.
a) Confidential employees are those individuals who have a confidentiality privilege
to protect the personal identification of a Complainant.
b) These confidential employees (i.e. health care professional, licensed
counselors, etc.) can fulfill their reporting requirements by making general reports
for statistical purposes and pattern tracking but do not divulge personally
identifiable information without client consent.
i. Employees who do not have a confidentiality privilege should not promise
confidentiality to the Complainant. An employee can tell the Complainant
that he/she will only tell the individuals that must know and will do his/her
best to protect the Complainant's identify but cannot promise confidentiality.
If the Complainant wants confidentiality, then he/she must be
referred to a confidential employee (i.e. health care provider or
licensed counselor).

4.6 Protection from Retaliation.


a) Morehouse will take appropriate steps to ensure that a person who in good faith
reports or participates in a Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment, Domestic Violence,
Dating Violence, or Stalking investigation will not be subjected to Retaliation by the
Responding Persons or others.
b) Anyone who believes that they are experiencing Retaliation is strongly encouraged
to report that concern using the procedure for the reporting of Sexual Assault,
Sexual Harassment, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking under this
Sexual Misconduct Policy.
4.7 Coordination with Concurrent Legal Proceedings. Students may report to law
enforcement in connection with the same behavior that forms the basis of Prohibited
Conduct under this Sexual Misconduct Policy.
a) Where a Complainant or another person with knowledge of possible Prohibited
Conduct has reported to law enforcement, Morehouse will fulfill its responsibility
under Title IX to take prompt and appropriate action to provide protection and
resources to the Complainant to the extent permitted by law or policy.

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b) A report to law enforcement will not change the College's obligation to potentially
investigate the matter but it may briefly delay the timing of the investigation if a law
enforcement agency requests that the College delay its process for a reasonable
amount of time to allow it to gather evidence of criminal conduct.

4.8 Advisor of Choice. Both Complainant and Respondent are entitled to have a single
advisor and/or observer of their choice accompany them at any meeting related to the
Title IX process. This advisor or observer may be an attorney. The advisor may not
interrupt or interfere with the proceedings and, to the extent they do, Morehouse retains
the right to stop the process and remove the advisor.

4.9 Conflict of Interest. Any persons exercising authority under this Sexual Misconduct
Policy who believe they may be unable to exercise that authority impartially in any case
shall excuse themselves from the matter and will be replaced with another person.
a) If the Complainant or Respondent believes a person exercising authority under this
Sexual Misconduct Policy has a personal, professional, or financial involvement with
the Complainant or Respondent that would prevent the person from exercising their
authority impartially, they may make a prompt objection to the Title IX Coordinator.
b) If the Title IX Coordinator determines that the objection is reasonable, the
challenged person will be replaced with another person.
c) Because Morehouse is a small community, knowledge of or acquaintance with the
student(s) and/or witness in a matter, awareness of a matter, participating as a
consequence of one's official role in events surrounding a matter, and/or
participation in the process prior to the formal disciplinary process, shall not
automatically be grounds for disqualification. The decision of the Title IX
Coordinator regarding a challenge is final.

Section 5
Additional Matters
5.1 Duty of Honesty. All Parties and witnesses are obligated to be completely honest
during the course of the entire process set forth in the Sexual Misconduct Policy. Any
person who knowingly makes a false statement - either explicitly or by omission - in
connection with any part of the process may be subject to separate College disciplinary
action.

5.2 Duty of Cooperation. All Parties and witnesses are obligated to cooperate with the
Title IX Coordinator and any persons charged with implementing the Sexual Misconduct
Policy. Any person who knowingly interferes with the actions taken to implement the
reporting, investigation, or resolution of matters under the Sexual Misconduct Policy may
be subject to separate College disciplinary action.

5.3 Recording the Proceedings. The Parties are not permitted to make video, audio, or
other electronic, photographic, or digital recordings of any meetings or proceedings held
under the Sexual Misconduct Policy. The Title IX Coordinator may make exceptions to
this prohibition in limited circumstances if he or she concludes, in his or her sole
discretion, that a recording is warranted, and upon written request of the Party seeking
the recording that explains the need for the recording.

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5.4 Follow-up with Complainant. Where the Title IX Coordinator deems appropriate, he
or she may contact the Complainant to provide an update on the process, the timing and
extent of which will be determined by the Title IX Coordinator and depend upon the
nature of the allegations and the situation.

5.5 Prohibition Against Retaliation. The College will not tolerate retaliation in any form
against any persons for their participation or involvement in the reporting, investigation,
and/or resolution of matters subject to the Sexual Misconduct Policy. The College will
take appropriate steps to prevent and/or address retaliatory conduct immediately. The
College includes retaliation in its definition of prohibited conduct under this Sexual
Misconduct Policy, as well as the College's general prohibition on retaliation.

5.6 Amnesty for Students Reporting Misconduct. The College encourages reporting
under the Sexual Misconduct Policy and seeks to remove barriers to reporting. The
College generally will not hold a student who reports conduct or is a witness during an
investigation under the Sexual Misconduct Policy accountable for disciplinary violations of
the College's Community Standards prohibiting use of drugs or alcohol. Under limited
circumstances, a person who reports conduct under the Sexual Misconduct Policy may be
held accountable for his or her own misconduct if, in the College's discretion, it is
determined that the behavior placed the health and safety of any person at risk, or if it
created a danger to the College community. The College retains the right to require
students to attend counseling or drug/alcohol related courses even in circumstances in
which disciplinary conduct will not be pursued under this part.

5.7 Special Situations. The College retains the right to determine, in its sole discretion, if
it will address a report of conduct that falls under the Sexual Misconduct Policy
administratively and outside of the process described herein when the safety of the
College community is at risk, if the material facts are undisputed, if there are
extenuating circumstances involving either of the Parties, or if the Title IX Coordinator,
in consultation with appropriate administrators, determines it is in the best interest of
the College and/or the community to do so.

5.8 Responsible Office. The Office of General Counsel & Compliance is the responsible
office for updating and maintaining this policy.

Revision History
Approved by the President; Compliance, Enterprise Risk & Policy Committee;
Title IX Committee. Effective Date August 1, 2016

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE TITLE IX INVESTIGATIVE REPORT


v. Dr. Peterson

SUMMARY OF INCIDENT

Morehouse College’s Office of General Counsel and Compliance (“OGCC”), which


oversees Title IX compliance, requested the described herein investigation as required by
Morehouse policy and federal law, after receiving a complaint by Morehouse student,
mmm *n January 2018 alleging inappropriate sexual conduct by Morehouse employee and
assistant professor. Dr. Robert Benjamin Peterson. All the information was reviewed by Terraine
Bailey, Morehouse Title IX Coordinator, and constituted a complaint under Morehouse policy and
Title IX. Specifically, Mr. ^g^g alleged that Dr. Peterson engaged in inappropriate conduct
during a study abroad trip to Brazil in 2015.

ONLINE WEB COMPLAINT

Day and Time of Report: January 23,2018


Reports taken by: Terraine Bailey, Morehouse Title IX Coordinator

On or about January 23, 2018, Ms. Terraine Bailey received a complaint from gg
alleging various instances of sexual misconduct by Dr. Peterson en route and during a
study abroad program trip to Brazil in 2015. Specifically, Mr. alleged that Dr. Peterson
touched his inner thighs several times in an attempt to seduce him on the flight to Brazil. Mr.
gggggalso alleged that Dr. Peterson engaged in other inappropriate conduct with him and other
students in Brazil. See Online Report Snapshot re gggg^gg| attached hereto as Exhibit
“A”.

EXHIBIT
P a g e 12
B
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IDENTIFICATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. PARTIES. AND WITNESSES

Title IX Coordinator: Terraine Bailey, Title IX Coordinator

Office of General Counsel Joy White, Interim General Counsel


And Compliance (as of April 2017

TitleIXExternal Investigator: Nancy Castor Sprattlin


Castor Sprattlin Law Group, LLC

Complainants:

Dr. Robert Peterson, Full-time Professor,


Faculty Respondent:
Sociology Department/Morehouse College

Witnesses:
Dr. Patricia de Souza (Former Faculty)
Dr. Michael Dillon (Faculty)
Dr. Ida Mukenge (Faculty)
Thomas Cox III (Former Sudent)
Dr. Nsenga Burton
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INTERIM MEASURES

On January 26, 2018, Morehouse notified the claimant via correspondence that an

investigation had been initiated in this matter. The notice advised the claimant of his right to

have a legal advisor present for all meetings and proceedings regarding this matter. See

Morehouse College "Notice of Investigation" to the respondent attached hereto as Exhibit

“B”. The notice also advised the claimant of his right to provide a list of potential witnesses

and supplemental documentation to be reviewed by the external investigator. See Exh. “B”.

Morehouse also notified the respondent via correspondence that an investigation had been

initiated in this matter. Thereafter, Morehouse placed Dr. Peterson on unpaid leave. See

Morehouse College "Notice of Investigation" to the respondent attached hereto as Exhibit

“C”. The notice advised the respondent of his right to have a legal advisor present for all

meetings and proceedings regarding this matter. The notice also advised the respondent of his

right to provide a list of potential witnesses and supplemental documentation to be reviewed

by the external investigator. See Exh. “C”

REPORTED FACTS BY THE COMPI.AINANT. RESPONDENT. WITNESSES

An investigation into the facts reveals the following:

interview and recollection of events


I met withBHHHHB on March 20, 2018. Mr. mm alleged that en route to
Brazil, Dr. Peterson sat next to him and ordered tequila, an alcoholic drink, for him. He took a sip
but did not finish the drink. According to Mr. Dr. Peterson started engaging him in
conversation and asked him questions about his relationship with his father. Then at some point, Dr.
Peterson tried to seduce him by touching his inner thighs on three to four separate occasions.
Specifically, Mr. gggg alleged that he got up to use the restroom and when he returned, Dr.
Peterson had taken his seat by the window. He allegedly asked Dr. Peterson to move but he refused
to return to his seat, so he decided to sit in Dr. Peterson’s seat because he was tired. According to

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Mr. Dr. Peterson thereafter proceeded to touch his inner thighs closer to his genitalia. He
pushed Dr. Peterson’s hand away, but Dr. Peterson allegedly touched Mr. at least three
more times despite being told by Mr. to stop. Mr. claimed that he was shocked
by Dr. Peterson and forced himself to stay awake. Mr. allegedly grew tired and sleepy, so
he got up again to use the restroom. However, when he returned to his seat. Dr. Peterson had
apparently moved and was then sitting next to someone else.
AccordingtoMr.^g^g|,hewasshockedbyDr.Peterson’sbehavior but decided to finally
sleep and “just put the whole thing on a shelf and forget about it.” Mr.^g^gg insisted, however,
that at some point in Brazil, he reported Dr. Peterson’s behavior to Dr. de Souza. According to
Mr. Dr. de Souza seemed really “mad” to hear about Dr. Peterson’s inappropriate
conduct and was later seen in the lobby of the hotel arguing with Dr. Peterson. He could not
hear what they were talking about but insisted that Dr. de Souza was “very angry.”
Mr. claimed that while in Brazil, Dr. Peterson was inappropriate on several
occasions. For example, he sent the students daily texts of a man “with his privates out next to a
bunch of shrimp” and “asked them if they wanted shrimp for dinner.” Mr. thought the
texts were “distasteful and bizarre.” Another time, Dr. Peterson removed his hat while he was sitting
at the pool and told him to “come get it” if he wanted to get his hat back. He allegedly went to Dr.
Peterson’s room later to retrieve his hat. When he got there, Dr. Peterson was apparently throwing
a party in his room. Other students were allegedly there playing games and drinking as there were
numerous liquor bottles around. Mr. gj^^gg claimed that he was looking for his hat in another
room when Dr. Peterson started pushing him around and slamming against the wall. He allegedly
pushed Dr. Peterson back and escaped his grip. He eventually found his hat in Dr. Peterson’s bag
and left his room.
Mr. gH^HI also recalled another incident at the pool involving Dr. Peterson and another
student (hereinafter referred to as Student X). While the students were coming out of the pool. Dr.
Peterson apparently went up to Student X and twisted/pinched his nipple. Mr. and the
other students who were present “laughed it off’ and thought the whole incident “was bizarre.”
According to Mr. ^gggg. Dr. Peterson “joked around a lot” and behaved more like one of them.
He did not remember the jokes being inappropriate but recalled Dr. de Souza having a problem with
Dr. Peterson acting so immaturely. Mr. ggjjj^^g also admitted that some of the students made fun
of Dr. Peterson and did not like Dr. Peterson “being gay”

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Dr. Peterson' s interviews and recollection of events


Dr. Peterson is a Morehouse alum and has been employed with Morehouse College since
2010. Prior to joining Morehouse full time, he taught at Morehouse as an adjunct professor. He is
the assistant professor of sociology and his focus is primarily on healthcare, health, gender-based
violence and sexual education. He also oversaw the study abroad program (MPAGE) to Brazil.
According to Dr. Peterson, the program offers a stipend to students majored in sociology who want
to experience life in Brazil. He handled the travel arrangements and communicates with the contacts
in Brazil for students’ lodging, events and activities. Sometimes, he accompanied the students in
Brazil but not always.
During our interviews. Dr. Peterson admitted using profanity sometimes when talking to students
but insisted he was trying to be more relatable. He claimed that as a sex education scholar, sometimes he had
to use such language to get the students’ attention. According to Dr. Peterson, his interaction with students
was not limited to only students with sociology majors. Dr. Peterson admitted that he is very active
in various organizations, especially those dealing with gender-based violence on campus. According
to Dr. Peterson, he stayed engaged and committed to those causes because he too was a victim of
sexual assault as a child.
In discussing Mr.g^^g’s specific allegations, Dr. Peterson vehemently denied them. Dr.
Peterson could not remember where everybody sat on the plane and whom he sat next to throughout
the entire trip to Brazil but remembered sitting next to Mr.^^ggj and some other students at some
point. According to Dr. Peterson, the students did not necessarily use or stay in their assigned seats.
He nonetheless recalled sitting next to Mr. on the flight from Atlanta to Miami. According
to Dr. Peterson, Mr. and he talked about everything. He was apparently familiar with Mr.
■■■’s aunt because she purchased Mr. ticket. He denied having any conversations
with Mr. regarding his father and/or his relationship with his father. He vehemently denied
ever touching Mr. in any way whatsoever during the flight. According to Dr. Peterson,
he could have touched Mr. “innocently” (i.e. more like a casual touching) while sitting
next to Mr. but never in a sexual manner. Mr. allegedly never told Dr. Peterson
that he felt uncomfortable around him. Dr. Peterson further admitted ordering alcohol for himself
on the flight from Miami to Brazil but denied ordering alcohol for any students.
Dr. Peterson claimed that, upon arriving in Brazil, everyone was excited because it was

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everyone's first time in Brazil. He admitted that he probably goofed around a little with the students
because it was his first time in Brazil. He denied socializing more with the freshmen and insisted
that he was trying to look out for them. Dr. Peterson claimed that he checked on the freshmen often
because they were young and vulnerable.1 Dr. Peterson also denied being more attentive to Mr.
dm and following him around in Brazil. He further denied ever removing Mr. IHHHT8 hat
and asking him “to come to his room to get it.” He also denied ever touching or attempting to seduce
Mr. in any way. He insisted that nothing happened between Mr. and him. He
reiterated that he neither followed Mr. |^j|^gj around in Brazil nor tried to seduce him in any way
as alleged.
Dr. Peterson admitted that he did engage in horseplay with the students in the pool sometimes
but denied ever “touching, caressing or sucking any student's nipple” as alleged. Dr. Peterson
admitted that he could have touched someone while playing in the pool, but not in a sexual way.
According to Dr. Peterson, he teased everybody and probably teased the student about his alleged
“hard nipples” but not in a sexual way. For example, he teased Mr. ggggg about his strange
haircut. Dr. Peterson further admitted inviting the students to his room to make caipirinhas (a
Brazilian alcoholic drink), and thereafter drinking with them in his room. He also admitted attending
parties that the upper classmen were having in their rooms.
Dr. Peterson recalled speaking with Dr. de Souza about some of the students’ concerns over
Dr. de Souza’s alleged preferential treatment of one of the students, hereinafter referred to as Student
Y. According to Dr. Peterson, Student Y did not want to do anything and was a constant pain, yet
Dr. de Souza “let him off easy.” The students allegedly thought that Dr. de Souza was favoring
Student Y and were questioning the nature of their relationship. According to Dr. Peterson, Dr. de
Souza, in response, was defensive and told him: “well Mr.gg|^gg said that you touched his leg.”
Dr. Peterson allegedly thought Dr. de Souza was just being defensive. Dr. Peterson also admitted
that he never addressed Mr. HHHs allegations as reported by Dr. de Souza directly with Mr.

In sum, Dr. Peterson thought the Brazil trip was great. He allegedly never knew that “anyone
felt a certain way about anything that had occurred in Brazil because no one ever expressed any
concerns to him.” Dr. Peterson claimed that he recently saw and greeted Mr. with a
handshake in September 2017 but that Mr. never said anything to him about any of his

1 According to Dr. Peterson, he needed to ensure their safety because one of the students was robbed at gun point.
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concerns alleged in his complaint here. Dr. Peterson is allegedly still in touch with some of the other
students who went to Brazil in 2015, including Mr. Thomas Cox III. Dr. Peterson appeared to be
heartbroken by the allegations and insisted that “the students were saying these things about him
because they didn't like the fact that he is gay.”

Dr. Ida Mukenpe ’s interview

I also spoke with Dr. Mukenge who is a sociology professor as well as the Director of
MPAGE-Bahia. She also serves as the liaison for MPAGE II. Dr. Mukenge has been with
Morehouse for more than 40 years, since 1971.
She explained that Dr. Peterson took a couple of her classes and was one of her mentees.
According to Dr. Mukenge, upon graduating from Morehouse, Dr. Peterson taught as a part-time
adjunct before joining Morehouse full time as a professor. Dr. Peterson was also involved with
MPAGE-Ghana.
Dr. Mukenge said that upon Dr. Peterson and Dr. de Souza ‘s return from Brazil, they
prepared and submitted a joint report. According to Dr. Mukenge, the report did not address any of
the allegations addressed in this investigation and was really a summary of the program: how the
program was run; what was good and what didn't work; and what needed improvement. Dr. Mukenge
also remembered Dr. de Souza sharing with her some concerns about Dr. Peterson but insisted that
Dr. de Souza’s concerns appeared to be more about Dr. Peterson’s immaturity, i.e. he didn't pull his
weight and was not responsible. She did not recall Dr. de Souza saying that “Dr. Peterson was a
liability” as alleged by Dr. de Souza.
Dr. Mukenge insisted she would have inquired a little bit more into Dr. de Souza’s concerns
if she had used a legal term such as “liability.” According to Dr. Mukenge, Dr. de Souza is very
organized and energetic, so she thought Dr. de Souza and Dr. Peterson had a personality conflict and
nothing more. She knew that their personalities were different and saw things from a sociological
perspective. Dr. Mukenge allegedly did not understand Dr. de Souza's concerns to be of a sexual
nature to the point where she would have pressed her for more information. She recalled talking to
Dr. Peterson about responsibility and pulling his weight. She didn't recall him saying anything. She
also admitted that she did not speak to the students who traveled to Brazil upon their return. Dr.
Mukenge further admitted that at that time, the study abroad committee was in progress and had not
been formalized. According to Dr. Mukenge, the program did not have a handbook or any formal
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protocol then and they are now working to finalize the handbook and protocol.
Dr. Mukenge claimed that she had not heard of any problems with Dr. Peterson until recently.
According to Dr. Mukenge, after the Twitter campaign, Dr. Dillon told her that Dr. de Souza had
shared some concerns about Dr. Peterson with him. Dr. de Souza allegedly had told him that she
would not travel with Dr. Peterson again because “she did not like his behavior” back in 2015 in
Brazil. According to Dr. Mukenge, up until then, no one had ever complained to her about
Dr. Peterson’s behavior with students or anybody else. Nor had any students' parents ever contacted
her about any concerns. She herself had never observed Dr. Peterson engage in any misconduct or
any behavior that she thought was inappropriate.
Dr. Mukenge stated that she didn't know Dr. Peterson socially but knew him as a committed
scholar and mentee. Dr. Mukenge was visibly disappointed and admitted that she was deeply hurt
by and truly heartbroken over the allegations. Dr. Mukenge said she “sincerely hoped the allegations
against Dr. Peterson were not true.” Dr. Mukenge insisted that Dr. Peterson is a serious Sociology
scholar who is committed to his discipline and who wants “to teach how sociology can be related to
the real world.”

Dr. Patricia De Souza’s interviews

I spoke to Dr. de Souza2, a former faculty member of the Department of Foreign Languages,
regarding Mr. claims- Dr de Souza explained that, during her employment with
Morehouse, Dr. Peterson and she took the students of the MPAGE program on a trip to Brazil in
May 2015. A couple weeks later, another faculty member from Clark Atlanta University (CAU),
Dr. Nsenga Burton, came to join them on the trip, but for the most part it was Dr. de Souza and Dr.
Peterson on the trip with the students.
According to Dr. de Souza, during the international flight to Brazil, Dr. Peterson started
drinking so much that he became a bit intoxicated. Upon arriving in Brazil, Dr. de Souza alleged
that Dr. Peterson was “acting more like a participant in the program”, rather than a faculty member.
He did not conduct himself as a faculty member would or should in her opinion. She also overheard
conversations of a sexual nature between Dr. Peterson and the students. According to Dr. de Souza,
there were rumors that Dr. Peterson was buying alcohol for the students and inviting, especially the

2 Dr. de Souza left Morehouse back in 2015/16 and is currently the Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies and
Director of International Education at Caflin University.

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freshmen, to his room to party and drink. According to Dr. de Souza, Dr. Peterson socialized more
with the freshmen, i.e. the "underclassmen". Dr. de Souza allegedly had concerns about Dr.
Peterson’s special attention to one of the students, Dr. de Souza claimed that Dr.
Peterson was following Mr. around and was very attentive to him. She didn't know what
was happening between them. Dr. de Souza denied that Mr.^gjj^g’s claims that he ever reported
Dr. Peterson’s alleged sexual misconduct towards him to her as reported in his complaint. Dr. de
Souza allegedly asked Mr. “if everything was okay” and told him to come talk to her if
Dr. Peterson was making him uncomfortable in any way. However, Mr. allegedly told
Dr. de Souza that “everything was okay”.
Dr. de Souza was also told by one of the students (she could not remember whom) that Dr.
Peterson was rough housing one day in the pool with them and allegedly “touched” or “sucked” on
a student’s nipple. According to Dr. de Souza, that student apparently had “hard nipples” that showed
through his shirt and as a result, he became the butt of Dr. Peterson’s jokes. Dr. Peterson allegedly
teased that student incessantly about his hard nipples.
According to Dr. de Souza, the upperclassmen eventually got tired of Dr. Peterson's immature
behavior and one of the students. Student Y, confronted Dr. Peterson at the dinner table and told him
that he needed to stop with all the sexual jokes. Dr. de Souza claimed that the freshmen, however,
felt pressured to tolerate his behavior because they feared retaliation and receiving failing grades
from Dr. Peterson. Dr. de Souza claimed that once Dr. Burton (CAU faculty member) joined them
during the last week of the trip. Dr. Peterson's behavior changed, and he began to behave more like
a faculty member. However, Dr. Burton reported to Dr. de Souza later that she had observed Dr.
Peterson's hand on Mr. knee under the table once at dinner. Although Dr. de Souza
admitted being very concerned about Dr. Peterson’s behavior toward Mr. she did not think
she had sufficient information to specifically address her concerns. Instead of confronting Dr.
Peterson, she allegedly started excluding him from certain day-to-day activities. According to Dr.
de Souza, Dr. Peterson started noticing her behavior change towards him and addressed it with her
one day in the hotel lobby. Dr. de Souza allegedly seized the opportunity during their conversation
in the lobby to address some of her own concerns, including Dr. Peterson’s inappropriate behavior
as reported by Dr. Burton and his drinking with the kids in his room, directly with Dr. Peterson, but
that Dr. Peterson allegedly became very defensive and angry.
Dr. de Souza admitted that she never reported Dr. Peterson’s alleged inappropriate conduct
to Morehouse upon returning to Georgia because “she did not know what to do and felt vulnerable”.
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Specifically, Dr. de Souza claimed that Dr. Peterson was senior to her and was well protected at
Morehouse. Dr. de Souza apparently didn't feel comfortable reporting Dr. Peterson to Dr. Mukenge,
a well-respected scholar who oversaw the MPAGE program and Dr. Peterson’s longtime mentor at
Morehouse. She feared reporting the details to Dr. Mukenge because Dr. Peterson was like “a
prodigy son” who had been pushed through the ranks from being a Morehouse alum to program
manager and now to a faculty position. Dr. de Souza further claimed that nothing would have been
done even if she had reported her concerns because Dr. Peterson and the Chair of the Sociology
Department, Dr. Bryan, are very good friends and travel together. Dr. de Souza even hesitated to
come forward to the investigator because she thought Dr. Peterson would know that she provided
information to the investigator about the Brazil trip.
According to Dr. de Souza, however, she made it clear to Dr. Mukenge that she did not want
to travel with Dr. Peterson ever again and that “Dr. Peterson was a liability.” Dr. de Souza admitted
that in light of this investigation, she regretted not having provided more details about her concerns
to Dr. Mukenge and management.

Dr. Michael Dillon ’.v interview


I met with Dr. Michael Fernando Dillon as well. He is an Associate Professor of Spanish
and has been with Morehouse since August 2013. He is also the Chair of the Department ofForeign
Languages and collaborates on MPAGE. Dr. de Souza allegedly told Dr. Dillon that Dr. Peterson
behaved inappropriately and conducted himself like “he was a student” during their trip to Brazil in
2015. She told Dr. Dillon that she did not want to travel with Dr. Peterson again because “Dr.
Peterson was a liability.” Dr. Dillon allegedly did not want to get involved so he urged Dr. de Souza
to talk to Human Resources or other appropriate authority to address her concerns. He was concerned
about Dr. de Souza's facial expression when she was talking about her general observations during
her trip. Dr. de Souza never told him whether she had later talked with HR because Dr. de Souza
left Morehouse shortly thereafter.
But when Dr. Peterson was named in the Twitter campaign, he allegedly remembered Dr. de
Souza's concerns, particularly Dr. de Souza’s facial expression so he decided to speak to the
appropriate channels about Dr. de Souza’s concerns. Dr. Dillon allegedly felt the need to report De
Souza’s concerns because Dr. Peterson was still taking students abroad and going on trips. He
apparently did not want to travel with Dr. Peterson and did not want that “kind of liability’.
However, Dr. Dillon admitted that he had never seen Dr. Peterson engage in any
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inappropriate behavior and that no student had ever reported any concerns to him about Dr. Peterson.
Other than Dr. de Souza, no other faculty member had ever expressed any concerns about
Dr. Peterson to him.

Dr. Nsenga Burton’s interview and recollection of events


I spoke with Dr. Nsenga Burton.3 Dr. Burton claimed that while on vacation in Brazil in
2015, she visited her friend. Dr. de Souza, in Bahia. While visiting Dr. de Souza, she.joined Dr. de
Souza, Dr. Peterson and the students on a couple of events. She also bumped into them at breakfast
and lunch because she stayed in the same hotel. She had the opportunity to observe Dr. Peterson’s
interaction with the students and found it “inappropriate and concerning.” She claimed that some
of the “students’ energy was very tense” whenever Dr. Peterson was around. Dr. Burton further
alleged that once at breakfast or lunch, she observed Dr. Peterson’s hand on a student’s knee
underneath the table. That student, believed to be allegedly pushed Dr. Peterson’s
hand away from his knee.
Dr. Burton allegedly shared her observations and concerns with Dr. de Souza and encouraged
her to report Dr. Peterson’s inappropriate behaviors to the appropriate channels. However, Dr. de
Souza never told Dr. Burton whether she had reported Dr. Peterson’s behavior to Morehouse upon
returning to Atlanta.

Thomas Cox Ill’s Interview

I also spoke with Thomas Cox III, one of the students who went to Brazil in 2015, on March
1, 2018. Mr. Cox graduated from Morehouse with a major in economics and minor in sociology.
The only course he took with Dr. Peterson was the course associated with the MPAGE program. He
had never taken any other course with Dr. Peterson. He recalled meeting the other MPAGE students
who went to Brazil that year for the first time at a barbecue at Dr. de Souza's house.
Mr. Cox recalled sitting next to one of the students on the flight to Brazil and did not see what
the other students including Mr. were doing. Mr. Cox stated that students could order
complimentary alcoholic beverages on the international flight to Brazil. He recalled having one or
two drinks. He insisted that he, and not Dr. Peterson, ordered his drinks. He believed that

3 Dr. Burton is currently the Chair and Professor of Film and New Media Production at Clark Atlanta University.
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sat next to Dr. Peterson but did not recall the exact arrangement. According to Mr. Cox,
the students were excited on the flight and were joking around but he did not recall the types ofjokes.
Mr. Cox insisted that Dr. Peterson's demeanor was consistent throughout the trip. According
to Mr. Cox, Dr. Peterson was “cool” but still commanded some level of respect from the students.
He recalled going to the museum but didn't think that Dr. Peterson acted differently. He recalled one
night going to Dr. Peterson's room to make a local alcoholic drink. Apparently, “the students were
going out either to get food or something”, but then went to Dr. Peterson's room to make the Brazilian
drink.
Mr. Cox also recalled one night some of the Freshmen going to a strip club. Apparently, Dr.
de Souza found out and went to the strip club to bring the freshmen back to the hotel. They were
concerned for their safety because one of the students had apparently been robbed at gun point during
the trip. However, Mr. Cox didn't recall any incident in the pool. He said that everybody was in the
pool almost every other day, if not every day. It was apparently quite a common occurrence for them
to be in the pool because breakfast was served by the pool daily.
After the Brazil trip, Mr. Cox apparently went to Dr. Peterson’s office several times to seek
his guidance and Dr. Peterson was allegedly instrumental in guiding him with his career. Mr. Cox
insisted that he had never witnessed any inappropriate behavior between Dr. Peterson and any
student. He said that Dr. Peterson also never made any sexual advances towards him and never acted
inappropriately with him. In sum, he called Dr. Peterson “a pretty cool” person.
Mr. Cox admitted that he remained in contact with Dr. Peterson, after the Brazil trip, but
denied being in regular communications with Dr. Peterson. Mr. Cox explained that Dr. Peterson had
reached out to him a few times after he graduated, maybe on a quarterly basis to find out how he was
doing. Mr. Cox also admitted that Dr. Peterson had recently called him to “get his permission to
disclose his contact information to the [investigator].” Mr. Cox expressed great respect for Dr.
Peterson and called him a mentor. According to Mr. Cox, Dr. Peterson had always been there for
him as a mentor and Dr. Peterson influenced him "with his educational career". He said that Dr.
Peterson is overall an honest individual and a great mentor.

MISCELLANEOUS MATERIALS

In conducting this investigation, the external investigator also reviewed materials including

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pictures received from Dr. Peterson. Dr. Peterson’s email statement is attached hereto as Exhibit

“D”. Pictures provided are attached as Exhibit “E”. The external investigator also reviewed

information received from Mr.g|gggs attorney, Lindsay A. Cordes from. Email and letter dated

April 4, 2018 from Ms. Cordes are attached hereto as Exhibit “F”.

ADDITIONAL INTERVIEWS

The External Investigator (El) made several attempts via email and phone to meet and talk

with other students who participated in the 2015 MPAGE-Bahia program and traveled to Brazil

with Dr. Peterson and Dr. de Souza but was not successful in communicating with most of them

about the initial claims and Mr. ggggs subsequent claims against Dr. Peterson. The list of the

student participants in 2015 MPAGE-Bahia is attached hereto as Exhibit “G”. Mr. Cox was the

only student who responded to the EEs meeting request and spoke with her.

STANDARD OF REVILW

Pursuant to Title IX guidelines and Morehouse College Policy, the preponderance of the

evidence standard is appropriate to issue an investigative conclusion in this matter.

It is the policy of the Morehouse College ("Morehouse" or "Morehouse College") to

maintain a work and academic environment that is free from sexual and gender-based harassment

and misconduct, including, but not limited to: Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence, Domestic

Violence, Dating Violence, Nonconsensual Sexual Contact, Nonconsensual Sexual Intercourse,

Rape, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking and Retaliation. See Morehouse College's Sexual Misconduct

Policy, Section 1.1. Sexual Assault is defined as the unwanted or unwelcome touching of a sexual

nature, including: fondling; penetration of the mouth, anus, or vagina, however slight, with a body

part or object; or other sexual activity that occurs without valid consent. This definition includes,

but is not limited to, rape and other physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person's will or

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where a person is incapable of giving consent (e.g., due to the student's age or use of drugs or

alcohol, or because an intellectual or other disability prevents the student from having the

capacity to give consent. Id., at Sections.1 (p).

RELEVANT ANALYSTS

The El finds the following facts relevant to whether there were violations of Title IX,
Morehouse Policy, and Morehouse Code of Conduct:
Violation of Title IX and Morehouse Sexual Misconduct Policy

1. While Dr. Peterson denied touching Mr. gggg| in anyway, Mr. gggggg was adamant
that Mr. Peterson touched his inner thighs near his genitalia three to four times on the plane
en route to Brazil. Mr. insisted that he never consented to such contact, told Dr.
Peterson to stop and pushed his hand away repeatedly, and was in complete shock that he
continued touching him.

2. Additionally, the CAU professor (Dr. Burton) who later joined Dr. de Souza and Dr.
Peterson in Brazil, allegedly observed Dr. Peterson putting his hand on Mr. HHIHs knee
once during breakfast/lunch and Mr. gggg pushing his hand away from his knee. Dr.
de Souza also alleged that Dr. Peterson was following Mr. gggggaround and being more
attentive to Mr. Dr. Peterson denied the allegations but did admit checking on
the freshmen as a group more often to allegedly “ensure their safety.”

3. Furthermore, while there is a different recollection of events between Dr. de Souza and
Mr. as t0 the conversation that transpired between them regarding Dr.
Peterson’s alleged inappropriate touching of Mr.gg^g, Mr.^g^^g’s recollection
and version of the facts seem to be supported in part by Dr. Peterson’s own concessions.
Specifically, Dr. de Souza claimed that she asked Mr. if “he was okay” and
that Mr. gggg never reported Dr. Peterson’s behavior to her. However, Mr.
gmm insisted that he reported Dr. Peterson’s behavior to De Souza. According to
Mr. mggj, after he reported Dr. Peterson’s inappropriate conduct. Dr. de Souza
seemed “very angry” and was seen in the lobby of the hotel arguing with Dr. Peterson.
Indeed, Dr. Peterson admitted that he confronted Dr. de Souza about her preferential
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treatment of a student (Student Y) and that she acted defensively in response.


According to Dr. Peterson, Dr. de Souza was defensive and told him” Well said
you touched him.” Dr. Peterson’s own statement seems to support Mr. g^^gg’s
claim that Dr. de Souza was made aware of Dr. Peterson’s inappropriate touching at
some point.

4. Additionally, Dr. de Souza also claimed that someone told her that Dr. Peterson allegedly
“touched or sucked” a student’s nipple while frolicking in the pool with the students. Dr.
Peterson denied sucking or touching any student’s nipple but admitted that he did play in
the pool with the students in the pool. Mr. ggggg, however, corroborated in part the
allegation reported to Dr. de Souza. Specifically, Mr. claimed that he observed
Dr. Peterson walking toward a student (Student X) as he was getting out of the pool and
“pinching or twisting” his nipple.

Violations of Morehouse Sexual Misconduct Policy and Code of Conduct


5. Dr. de Souza alleged that Dr. Peterson ordered alcohol for the students on the flight en route
to Brazil in 2015. While Dr. Peterson denied ordering alcohol for anyone, Mr. ^g|gg|
corroborated Dr. de Souza’s allegation. Specifically, Mr.^gg^ claimed that he sat next
to Dr. Peterson on the flight from Miami to Brazil and that Dr. Peterson ordered an alcoholic
beverage (i.e. Tequila) for him.
6. Dr. de Souza also alleged that Dr. Peterson acted immaturely and engaged in inappropriate
conduct (e.g. drinking in his room with students) that was not becoming of a faculty member
entrusted with the care of students. Indeed, Dr. Peterson admitted inviting the students to his
room to make caipirinhas, a traditional Brazilian alcoholic drink and thereafter drinking with
them in his room. He also admitted playing games in their rooms. See Exh. “D”, Dr.
Peterson’s email statement.

Accordingly, there seems to be sufficient evidence here that Dr. Peterson engaged in conduct that
may be deemed to run afoul of Title IX, Morehouse Sexual Misconduct Policy, and/or Morehouse
Code of Conduct.

RECOMMEND ATTONS

Based on the information obtained during the interviews conducted and other materials reviewed,

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including pictures and other materials received, we make the following recommendations:
• Disciplinary action, including and up to termination, because Dr. Peterson exercised
poor judgment in engaging in conduct with students that may be or perceived to be sexual
exploitation, unsolicited sexual contact, and/or sexual assault in violation of Title IX,
Morehouse Sexual Misconduct Policy, and/or Morehouse Code of Conduct as follows:

o ordering alcohol in 2015 on the flight to Brazil for Mr. | , who was
under the legal drinking age at the time, as alleged by Mr. |
o inappropriate touching of Mr.gg^g during flight to Brazil in 2015, as
alleged by Mr.
o inappropriate touching of Mr.g|gg| under a table during a meal as reported
by Dr. Burton;
o inviting students to his room to make alcoholic drinks, as admitted by Dr.
Peterson;
o inappropriate pinching/touching of a student’s nipple, as alleged by Mr.
Jg^ggj and Dr. de Souza;
o drinking with students in his room as alleged by Mr. gggg and Dr. de
Souza; and
o sending inappropriate texts to students as alleged by Mr. I
If termination is not selected, then written and final reprimand with comprehensive
counseling and training on proper conduct in interacting with students which would
include:

o Providing appropriate materials to Dr. Peterson on Title IX protections, sexual


harassment and sexual violence, which should include but not be limited to:
• What constitutes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation,
sexual misconduct or sexual violence;
• What constitutes inappropriate conduct;
• Proper protocol to engage in electronic communications with students;
• Proper conduct with students during activities sponsored by
Morehouse;
o Follow up meetings and training to ensure that Dr. Peterson has received and
understands all materials and information received.

This concludes the investigator's report.

Nancy Castor Sprattlin. Date: May 20, 2018


External Investigator on behalf of
Morehouse College
Castor Sprattlin Law Group, LLC
1820 The Exchange, Suite 150
Atlanta, Georgia 30339

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

Responding to Title IX Complaints of Sexual Discrimination and Harassment

Introduction

Applicability
This policy is applicable to all students, staff, faculty, temporary staff, student workers,
contractors, and visitors to Morehouse (including vendors, visiting athletes, alumni, parents and
guests ofstudents).

Policy Statement
Morehouse College (the “College”) institutes this policy as part of its commitment to a healthy,
safe campus community and to the prevention and reduction of the incidence and effects of
domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence, and stalking [hereinafter “violence”]. The
College recognizes that domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence, stalking and other
sex-based misconduct occurring in the campus community involves Title IX of the Higher
Education Amendments of 1972. Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in
education programs or activities and mandates certain responsibilities for the College.

Sexual assaults, sexual violence, stalking and other relationship violence affect our campus
community even if the incidents occur elsewhere. Incidents of domestic violence, sexual
violence, dating violence, and stalking crosses economic, educational, cultural, age, gender,
racial, and religious lines. They can occur in heterosexual and same sex intimate relationships,
including marital, cohabiting, or dating, as well as in non-intimate heterosexual or same sex
relationships, such as between coworkers or perpetrated by supervisors, and can occur between
strangers.

Definitions
1. Victim or Complainant: An individual who is currently subject to, or has in the past,
been subjected to domestic or sexual violence, dating violence, or stalking.

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EXHIBIT
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2. Respondent or Perpetrator: An individual who commits or threatens to commit an act


of domestic violence, sexual violence, dating violence, and stalking.

3. Domestic Violence: A pattern of coercive behavior, including acts or threatened acts,


that is used by a perpetrator to gain power and control over a current or former spouse,
family member, intimate partner, or person with whom the perpetrator shares a child in
common. It occurs in heterosexual and same sex relationships and impacts individuals
from all economic, educational, cultural, age, gender, racial, and religious demographics.
Domestic violence includes, but is not limited to, physical or sexual violence, emotional
and/or psychological intimidation, verbal abuse, stalking, economic control, harassment,
physical intimidation, or injury.

4. Sexual Violence: A range of behaviors, including but not limited to, sexual harassment,
a completed non-consensual sex act (i.e., rape), an attempted non-consensual sex act,
abusive sexual contact (i.e., unwanted touching), and non-contact sexual abuse (e.g.,
threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal harassment). These acts are also
addressed in the College’s Prohibited Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Misconduct
and Retaliation Policy. Sexual violence is any sexual act or behavior that is perpetrated
against someone’s will when someone does not or cannot give consent. Complainants of
sexual violence may know the perpetrator(s), such as a co-worker, classmate, supervisor,
and/or may be involved in a dating or marital relationship with the perpetrator, or the
perpetrator may be unknown to the Complainant. A person of any age or gender may be
a Complainant of sexual violence. Consent is not given when a perpetrator uses force,
harassment, threat of force, threat of adverse personnel action, coercion, or when the
Complainant is asleep, incapacitated, or unconscious.

5. Dating Violence: An act of violence threatened or committed by a person who is or has


been in a social relationship or a romantic or intimate nature with the Complainant. The
existence of a “romantic or intimate” relationship is determined based on the
Complainant’s perspective and in consideration of the following factors; the length of the
relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the
persons involved in the relationship.

6. Stalking: Refers to harassing, unwanted or threatening conduct that causes the


Complainant to fear for his or her safety or the safety of a family member, or would cause
a reasonable person in a similar situation to fear for his or her safety. Stalking conduct
includes, but is not limited to: following or spying on a person, appearing at a person's
home or work, showing up at a place where the perpetrator has no reason to be, waiting at
places in order to make unwanted contact with the Complainant, or to monitor the
Complainant, leaving unwanted items, presents, or flowers for the Complainant, and
posting information or spreading rumors about the Complainant on the internet, in a
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public place, or by word of mouth. Stalking may also occur through use of technology
including, but not limited to email, voice mail, text messaging, and the use of GPS and
social media networking sites.

7. Protection or Restraining Order: Protection orders, sometimes called restraining


orders or stay away orders, are a mechanism where a Complainant can petition the court
for protection from a perpetrator, as well as establish custody and visitation guidelines
and provide for other forms of economic security, like rent or mortgage payments, which
last for the duration of the order. Protection orders may also issue in criminal cases as a
condition of probation or condition of release particularly in a domestic violence, sexual
violence, dating violence, or stalking related crime.

8. Workplace and Campus Related Incidents: Workplace and campus related incidents of
domestic violence, includes sexual violence, dating violence, and stalking include acts,
attempted acts, or threatened acts by or against students, employees, and/or against
employees’ and/or students’ families or property, that occur in the workplace, on campus
or that occur outside the workplace or off campus but have an impact on the workplace
and the student’s education.

9. Campus and Workplace Safety Plan: A strategy which is developed in collaboration


with a Complainant to implement campus and workplace safety options, including but
not limited to: handling of court protection orders, procedures for alerting campus
security personnel, temporary or permanent adjustments to work schedules or academic
and class schedules, adjustments to student housing, change in parking locations, and
requests for escorts to and from classes or workplace facilities.

Morehouse’s Response to Violence


A. Non-Discrimination

Students, faculty, and staff have the right to be free from prohibited discrimination,
harassment, sexual misconduct, and retaliation within the College community. Title IX is
a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender in all
education programs and activities. Any form of discrimination on the basis of gender
includes sexual discrimination and harassment or sexual violence, such as rape, sexual
assault, sexual battery, sexual coercion, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking
is prohibited.

Additionally, the College prohibits discrimination, including harassment on the basis of


race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability,
veteran’s status, and genetic information in its educational programs and with regard to

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employment. The College also prohibits sexual misconduct offenses described in this
policy.

B. Non-Retaliation

The College prohibits retaliation against any individual who brings a good faith
complaint under this policy or is involved in the complaint process. Both Respondent
and Complainant are informed of this provision, and any retaliation should be reported
immediately to the Title IX Officer. Such conduct violates not only College policy and
expectations of personal integrity and respect for others, but may also violate state and
federal law. Students, faculty, and staff found to have violated this policy will be
disciplined appropriately, up to and including termination from employment or dismissal
from the College.

C. Supervisory Responsibility To Report Discrimination and Harassment

No individual who is in a position of authority over another, in either the employment or


educational context, has the authority to discriminate against or harass others by virtue of
his or her role. The College does not in any way, expressly or implicitly; condone
discrimination or harassment by a person in a position of authority over a student, staff
member or faculty.

Any administrator or supervisor who knows of, or receives a complaint of discrimination


or harassment must report the information or complaint to the Title IX Coordinator in a
reasonable and timely manner. Furthermore, a supervisor who does not appropriately
handle reports or incidents of discrimination and/or harassment, or who does not report
incidents about which he/she becomes aware of to the Title IX Coordinator may be
subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of their employment with
the College.

D. Reporting and Filing Discrimination and Harassment Complaints

Complaints and reports of discrimination and harassment should be reported as soon as


possible after the incident(s) to be most effectively investigated. No one should assume
that an official of the College knows about a particular situation. All reports and
complaints of discrimination and harassment will be promptly investigated and
appropriate action will be taken as expeditiously as possible. The College will make
reasonable efforts to protect the rights of both the individual and the Respondent. The
College will respect the privacy of the Complainant, the individual(s) against whom the
complaint is filed, and the witnesses in a manner consistent with the College’s legal
obligations to investigate, to take appropriate action, and to comply with any discovery or
disclosure obligations required by law.
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The Clery Act does not establish an obligation for Campus Police to conduct an
investigation of the reported crime, only to report the crime as a statistic following Clery
guidelines. They are also required to release a timely warning to the community about
any threat to the community.

The College reserves the right to investigate and resolve a complaint or report of
discrimination and/or harassment regardless of whether the Complainant ultimately
desires the College to pursue the complaint. In such cases, the parties will be informed of
the status of the investigation at reasonable times until the College’s final disposition of
the investigation. Pursuant to Title IX guidelines and College policy, all such
investigations will utilize the preponderance of the evidence standard to issue an
investigative conclusion in these matters involving violations of civil rights laws. The
College will maintain documentation of all proceedings, which may include written
findings of facts, transcripts, or audio recordings.

E. Confidentiality

The College recognizes and respects an employee’s right to privacy and the need for
confidentiality and autonomy. The Title IX Coordinator will keep private the information
gathered during the investigation to the extent permitted by state and federal law. The
Title IX Coordinator shall exercise care in sharing identifiable information about
students, staff, and faculty.

An informal complaint may be investigated without identifying the Complainant, if in the


judgment of the Title IX Coordinator, this would increase the likelihood of satisfactory
resolution of the complaint. A request for confidentiality, however, may limit the
College’s ability to respond to the complaint. The College will take reasonable steps to
investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the Complainant’s requests, as
long as doing so does not prevent the College from responding effectively to a hostile
environment and preventing hostile behavior that may be directed toward others.

The College will maintain the confidentiality of an employee’s disclosure regarding


violence to the extent permitted by law and unless to do so would result in physical harm
to any person and/or jeopardize safety within the workplace and campus community.
When information must be disclosed to protect the safety of individuals within the
workplace and campus community, the College will limit the breadth and content of such
disclosure to information reasonably necessary to protect the safety of the disclosing
student, employee and others and to comply with the law. The College will make every
effort to provide advance notice to the employee who disclosed information if the
disclosure must be shared with other parties in order to maintain safety on the College
campus and in the workplace even if the person providing the information chooses not to

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pursue a complaint. The College will also provide the student and employee with the
name and title of the person to whom the College intends to share their information and
explain the necessity and purpose of the disclosure.

F. Non-Confidential Reporting Options

If you are an employee, you are encouraged to speak to officials of the College to make
formal, non-confidential reports of incidents (the Title IX Coordinator, Deans, Vice
Presidents, or other Administrators with supervisory responsibilities, Campus Security,
and Human Resources). In addition, you may report such incidents to the College’s
Ethics Line. You have the right and can expect to have incidents of sexual misconduct
taken seriously by the College when formally reported, and to have those incidents
investigated and properly resolved through administrative procedures. Formal reporting
does not mean that your report will not be confidential, but it does mean that people who
need to know will be told and information will be shared as necessary with investigators,
witnesses, and the accused. The circle of people will be kept as tight as possible, to
preserve your rights and privacy.

G. Campus and Other Workplace Assistance

The College recognizes that Complainants of sexual violence, sexual assaults, domestic
violence, stalking and other forms of harassment and discrimination may need time off to
secure medical assistance, legal assistance, counseling, or to attend to other matters
related to the violence, such as court proceedings, relocation, or safety planning. The
College will make every reasonable effort to assist a student or employee in providing
protective measures while the case is pending. Such protective measures may include
changes to academic living, living, transportation, and working situations if such
accommodations are reasonable available. In addition, these steps may include directing a
Respondent to avoid contact with a Complainant, excluding a Respondent from parts of
campus, and/or providing a Complainant with an escort on campus.

Complainants who are employees will receive assistance in maintaining their


employment while they are experiencing or has experienced violence in the workplace,
outside the workplace, or who is assisting a family member who has experienced
domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence or stalking. The College will work in
collaboration with the employee to provide reasonable and flexible leave options when an
employee, or a child, spouse, or parent of an employee, is a Complainant of domestic
violence, sexual violence, dating violence, and stalking.

Any such adjustments will be designed to minimize any impact on the Complainant’s and
the Respondent’s educational program. If a Complainant chooses not to bring a

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complaint forward, the Title IX Coordinator can still assist with interim measures and
accommodations.

H. Filing a Title IX Complaint

Specific guidelines for students and employees who wish to file a Title IX complaint are
also contained in the Guidelines for Reporting and Responding to Complaints of
Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence Policy and the Prohibited Discrimination.
Harassment Sexual Misconduct and Retaliation Policy. Information is also
available for students on the College’s website located at
https://www.morehouse.edu/campus_life/student_conduct/index.html

The College has the authority to address these complaints in a non-criminal context. The
College process is completely separate from the police and courts. The College will not
attempt to resolve a discrimination or sexual harassment/sexual violence informally such
as through a conference with the parties or mediation. The Title IX Coordinator will:

• Oversee the investigation and resolution of all Title IX cases whether they occur on or
off campus. In cases where the Complainant or Respondent is an employee or
involves both an employee and a student, the case will be forwarded to the Office of
Human Resources and the two offices will work together to investigate and resolve
the case.
• Determine whether the complaint is one which should be processed through another
College dispute resolution procedure, such as a grievance hearing, available to the
Complainant; and if appropriate, the Title IX Coordinator shall refer the Complainant
to that procedure(s) as soon as possible;
• Inform the individual of the provisions of the discrimination/harassment complaint
procedures and provide a copy of the complaint procedure;
• Inform the person against whom the complaint is brought, of its existence;
• Obtain information and evidence, including the identity of any witnesses, from the
Complainant and the Respondent;
• Attempt to obtain information from the identified witnesses and police reports if
available;
• Maintain appropriate documentation; and
• Disclose appropriate information to others only on a need to know basis consistent
with state and federal law.
• Conduct all investigations in a prompt, thorough, and impartial manner.

The Complainant will be informed in writing of the importance of preserving evidence


for proof of criminal domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, or in
obtaining a protection order. In addition, the Complainant will be informed of:

• To whom the offense should be reported including options regarding reporting to law
enforcement and campus authorities;
• Giving the Complainant the right to decline to notify authorities;
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• Rights of Complainants and institutional responsibilities on orders of protection, no


contact orders, restraining orders, or similar lawful orders issued by criminal or civil
courts;
• Procedures for institutional disciplinary action in cases of domestic violence;
• Information about how the confidentiality of Complainants will be protected,
including how public available recordkeeping will be accomplished without including
identifying information about the Complainant, to the extent possible by law;
• Notification to Complainants about options for and available assistance in changing
academic, living, transportation, and working situations, if requested by the
Complainant and if reasonably available, regardless of whether the Complainant
chooses to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement;
• Notification of students and employees about existing counseling, health, mental
health, Complainant advocacy, legal assistance, and other services available for
Complainants both on campus and in the community.

During this process, the Title IX Coordinator will keep the Complainant and the
Respondent tor informed of the status of the investigation and will seek input from the
appropriate supervisor/administrator if an employee. All investigative and disciplinary
processes and proceedings are prompt, fair and impartial to the Complainant and to the
Respondent.

The amount of time needed to conduct an investigation will depend in part on the nature
of the allegation(s) and the evidence to be investigated (e.g., the number and availability
of witnesses involved). Usually within sixty (60) days of receipt of the complaint, the
Title IX Coordinator will provide notice of the outcome of the investigation or will advise
the parties of the additional estimated amount of time needed for the investigation. Upon
conclusion, the Title IX Coordinator will notify the Complainant and Respondent, in
writing, of the results of the investigation.

I. Protection and Restraining Orders

The College will take interim steps to protect a Complainant while the case is pending.
Depending on the case and the Complainant’s wishes, such protective measures may
include changes to academic, living, transportation, and working situation if such
accommodations are reasonably available. In addition, these steps may include directing
a Respondent to avoid contact with a Complainant (“No Contact Order”), excluding a
Respondent from certain parts of campus, and/or providing a Complainant with an escort
on campus, or an interim suspension of the Respondent needed to protect the
Complainant and/or the rest of the campus community. Any such adjustments will be
designed to minimize the impact on the Complainant’s and the Respondent’s educational
program or work environment.

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The Complainant may also seek an order of protection, or may receive a restraining
order, as part of his or her efforts to become safe and as part of his or her campus or
workplace safety plan. The College recognizes that the campus or workplace may or may
not be included on an order as a location from which a perpetrator must remain away. If
a student or employee chooses to disclose the existence of a protection or restraining
order to the Title IX Coordinator, Campus Police and Student Conduct Office, the
College will, wherever possible, assist the student or employee to enforce his or her
order. They will also assist the student or employee to gather documentation such as
emails or voice messages, that could support the student or employee’s efforts in the
justice system or otherwise to obtain or maintain safety from a perpetrator.

J. Mandatory/Responsible Reporters

As required by federal guidance, the College has identified certain groups of employees
as Mandatory/Responsible Reporters for purposes of complaints of sexual violence or
other sexual misconduct. These employees are the same as those identified as Campus
Security Authorities in the College’s Campus Security Report. As indicated below,
certain of these employees have the authority to redress complaints of sexual violence or
sexual misconduct. The others identified have a specifically designated duty to report
incidents of sexual violence or other student sexual misconduct or are individuals who
students could reasonable believe have the authority to redress or duty to report on
campus. Mandatory/Responsible Reporters must refer reports of misconduct under these
policies and guidelines to the Title IX Office, and information brought to their attention is
not confidential. All of the following employees are trained on how to identify
misconduct and on their duties to redress or report it.

Any dean, director or department head or other similar administrator who becomes aware
of information indicating a significant likelihood of sexual harassment must report such
information to the Title IX Coordinator. These administrators must respond not only
when they receive a specific complaint or report alleging improper activity, but also when
such matters come to their attention informally. Unconfirmed or disputed allegations
should be clearly labeled as such and reports should indicate any steps already taken to
investigate or otherwise respond. Administrators and faculty should consult with the
Title IX Coordinator or the Director of Student Services prior to responding to any
situation involving alleged harassment.

The following Mandatory/Responsible Reporters have the authority to redress complaints


of sexual violence or sexual misconduct:

• Director, Ethics & Compliance & Title IX Coordinator

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• Associate Vice President, Human Resources

• Director, Student Conduct

• Associate Vice President, Residential Housing

• Vice President, Student Enrollment

• Chief, Campus Police

• Deputy Chief, Campus Police

The following additional Mandatory/Responsible Reporters are specifically charged with


the duty to report complaints of sexual violence or student sexual misconduct to the Title
IX Coordinator.

• Resident Directors

• Residents Advisors

• Athletic Director

• Athletic Team Coaches, Assistant Coaches, and Athletic Trainers

• Faculty Department Chairs and Program Chairs

• Faculty

• Faculty accompanying students on off-campus trips or other College related trips,


within and outside the U. S.

• Provost

The College has confidential counseling and treatment resources available for students at
the Student Counseling Center and confidential resources for employees through the
Employee Assistance Program (EAP). We encourage students to contact the Student
Counseling Center and employees to contact the EAP to help process resolution options.
They can offer counseling and assistance in a supportive and confidential setting.

All employees, even those who are not specifically identified as Mandatory/Responsible
Reporters, including faculty, staff, and administrators, are expected to report incidents of
sexual violence and other sexual misconduct of which they are aware to the Title IX
Coordinator, or the Director of Student Conduct, and Campus Police.

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K. Student Conduct Process


Upon completion of the Title IX investigation by the Title IX Office, a copy of the final
investigative report will be forwarded to the Complainant, Respondent and Student
Conduct Officers. The Complainant and Respondent may comment, in writing, on the
Title IX final investigative report within five (5) business days of receipt. All comments
will be made a part of the investigative record and made available to the Student
Judiciary Committee and the Office of Student Conduct.

In cases involving charges of sexual violence and/or sexual misconduct, the parties will
have similar and timely access to witness statements and other documents gathered in
connection with the investigation of the complaint that the Student Judiciary Committee
intends to introduce at the hearing to the extent permitted by law.

The Director of Student Conduct will schedule a hearing date for the case and each party
will have an opportunity to present witnesses and evidence to the Committee. The
Complainant and the Respondent are entitled to the same opportunities to have an
advocate present during an institutional disciplinary proceeding, including the
opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by an advocate of
their choice.

Upon completion of the hearing, the Complainant and the Respondent are simultaneously
notified of the outcome of the disciplinary hearing in writing as well as notified of the
College’s appeal procedures, any change to the disciplinary sanction (s) before it
becomes final, and when the sanction (s) will become effective.

L. Notification of Outcomes For Students


The outcome of a campus disciplinary hearing is part of the educational record of the
accused student and may be released by the College under certain exceptions. However,
an institution of postsecondary education may disclose the final results of a disciplinary
proceeding, in writing without limitation, if it determines that: 1) the student is an alleged
Respondent of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense; 2). The students are the
Complainant and Respondent involved in non-consensual sexual contact/intercourse,
sexual harassment, stalking and relationship violence incident; 3) the accused student is
an alleged Respondent and has violated the College’s rules and policies of misconduct
with respect to the allegation made against him or her based on the final results of a
disciplinary proceeding involving a crime of violence or sexual offense; Students who
bring any sort of sexual misconduct complaint against faculty or staff must be informed
of the outcome and sanctions of any disciplinary proceeding

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This enables all students to be made aware when a fellow student has been found by the
school to have violated the disciplinary code. Therefore, even if a survivor of sexual
assault decides not to press criminal charges, the student body can still be warned that the
incident occurred and whether the perpetrator is still on campus.

M. Right To Appeal
Either party shall have the right to appeal the outcome of the Student Judiciary Hearing
Committee’s decision in the case. In exercising the right of appeal to the Office of
Student Conduct as provided by this procedure, a written appeal must be received by the
Director, Student Conduct within four (4) business days after the decision of the Judiciary
Committee. All appeals are limited to significant new information or evidence,
procedural errors in the case or if sanctions imposed are insufficient or excessive. All
appeals will be heard by the Collegiate Appellate Committee and a decision will be
rendered in the case and communicated to the student filing the appeal and the Student
Judiciary Committee.

N. Education and Training of Students and Employees


Students and employees are offered primary prevention and awareness programs that
promote awareness of rape, acquaintance, rape, domestic violence, dating violence,
sexual assault, and stalking. Training is also offered to administration officials who
conduct and participate in the investigation and disciplinary proceeding on how to
investigate and conduct hearings in a manner that protects the safety of the Complainant
and promotes accountability.

O. Campus Resources

• Doris Coleman
Office of the General Counsel
Director, Ethics and Compliance Officer/Title IX Coordinator
Gloster Hall, Room 109,
(404) 681-7589 Fax (404) 659-6106
Email: doris.coleman@morehouse.edu

• Chief Valerie Dalton


Campus Police
830 Westview Drive
Robert Hall, Southwest Annex
Phone: (404) 215-2666 (24 hours)
Alt. phone: (404) 427-7396 (in case of power outage)
valerie.dalton@morehouse.edu; www.campuspolice@morehouse.edu

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• Dr. Timothy Sams


Vice President, Student Development
Kilgore Hall, Room 200
Phone: (404) 653-7858
Email: tim.sams@morehouse.edu

• Michael Southern
Assistant Dean, Office of Student Conduct
Kilgore Hall, Room 200
Phone: (404)215-2681
Email: michael.southern@morehouse.edu

• Dr. Gary Wright (Confidential)


Director, Student Counseling Center
Sale Hall Annex
Atlanta GA, 30314
Phone: (404)215-2636
Hours: Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Email:
Email: www.morehouse.edu/campus_life/counseling

• Dr. Cynthia Trawick (Confidential)


Director, Student Health Center
Morehouse Student Health Center
James B. Ellison, Sr. Student Health Center
Brazeal Hall, Ground Floor (north end of campus
830 Westview Drive, S.W.
Atlanta, GA 30314-3773
Office: (404) 215-2637 Fax: (404) 215-2727 cynthia.trawick@morehouse.edu;
www.morehouse.edu/campus_life/studenthealth

Hours of Operation
Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. closed on weekends and College
recognized holidays.

Physician Hours
Monday, Tuesday, and Friday: 11 am to 1pm
Wednesday: 11 am to 7pm
Thursday: 1 lam to 5pm

• Amanda Bailey
Associate Vice President, Human Resources (Staff & Faculty)
Gloster, Room 100
(404) 653-7779 Fax: (404) 614-6047
Amanda.bailey@morehouse.edu

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Additional College & Web Resources:

> Morehouse Policy on Prohibited Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Misconduct and


Retaliation

> Employee Assistance Program


http://tigernet.morehouse.edu/emp/EmployeeAssistanceProgram.pdf

> Student Conduct, Grievances, Student Handbook,


http://www.morehouse.edu/campus_life/student_conduct/index.html

> Guidelines for Reporting and Responding to Complaints of Sexual Harassment and
Sexual Violence

> Brochures

• Stalking

• Cyber-Bullying, Cyber-Stalking, Cyber-Harassment

• What Every Morehouse Man Needs To Know

> www.atixa.org

> www.ncherm.org

> vvww.clergcenter.org

> http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/handbook.pdA

> http://safercampus.org

> http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-201104.html
ocr@ed.gov

> National Sexual Assault Hotline


1-800-656-HOPE (24 hours)

> National Domestic Violence Hotline


1-800-799-SAFE (24 hours)

> National Coalition against Domestic Violence


303-839-1852

> National Women's Alliance


202-515-3924
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> Carroll Rape Crisis center


770-834-7273 (24 hours)

> Clayton Rape Crisis Center


770-477-2177 (24 hours)

> Cobb Rape Crisis Center


770-427-3390 (24 hours)

> DeKalb Rape Crisis Center


404-377-1429 (24 hours)

> Fulton (Grady) Rape Crisis Center


404-616-4861 (24 hours)

> Gainesville Rape Crisis center


770-503-7273 (24 hours)

> Gwinnett Sexual Assault Center


770-476-7407 (24 hours)

> Men Can Stop Rape


202-265-6530

• External Reporting to Federal Agencies:

The Office for Civil Rights U. S. Department of Education


Atlanta Office Office for Civil Rights
U. S. Department of Education Lyndon Baines Johnson Department
61 Forsyth St., S. W„ Ste. 19T10 of Education Building
Atlanta, GA 30303 400 Maryland Avenue, S. W.
404-974-9406 - phone Washington, D. C. 2002
404-974-9471 - fax 800-421-3481 - phone
OCR.Atlanta@ed.gov 202-453-6012 -fax
OCR@ed.gov

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

STUDENT HANDBOOK
2017-2018

X^org^/'

Division of Student Services


Morehouse College
Suite 200, Kilgore Campus Center
830 Westview Drive, S.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30314

Morehouse College published the student handbook annually for the purpose of informing students about their rights, responsibilities
and privileges on campus. Morehouse College does not accept custodial responsibility for any enrolled student or campus visitor. The
College Student Handbook does not constitute a contract between the college and the student. While policies and programs are
presented accurately within this handbook, the college reserves the right to revise any section or part without notice or
obligation.

EXHIBIT
MOREHOUSE D
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Harold Martin, Jr.


Interim President of Morehouse College

I am Harold L. Martin, Jr., Interim President of Morehouse College. At Morehouse, our mission is and has always been clear—
to develop men with disciplined minds who will lead lives of leadership and service. We stand for excellence in all things that
we do. For 150 years, we have educated leaders who make noteworthy contributions to their families, their communities, their
professions, and to the world.

Harold L. Martin, Jr. ’02


Interim President of Morehouse College

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 72 of 218

Timothy Sams
Senior Vice President for Student Development

Greetings,

On behalf of the dedicated and experienced staff in the Division of Student Services and at the College, I
want to say thank you for choosing Morehouse for your higher education experience.

First andforemost, student well-being is our highest priority. During the course of this year and every year that
you are here with us, it is our intent to establish a partnership with you by working together to help you realize
your present andfuture goals and aspirations. Students are the reason we are here. We understand that, and we
askfor your patience, support, advice andfeedback as we continue to work to provide a quality educational
experience.

The Morehouse faculty, administration and staff are working very hard to improve the “quality of life” for our
students. We have committed faculty and staff, all of whom are here to team with you. Regardless of your
academic interest, there are strong programs that will challenge you and help prepare you for your chosen career
or graduate and professional study. We are here to provide the support to help you meet and exceed the
challenge. Students come to Morehouse because of the great college education, but also to experience the
“Morehouse Mystique.” The Morehouse Experience involves your classroom instruction, as well the numerous
co-curricular activities and initiatives that you will get involved in to help shape your mind, body and soul, and
enable you to serve on this campus and in the community.

The hallmarks of Morehouse College are leadership and service. However, there are a great number of
expectations that you must meet before you earn your degree and become a ‘Morehouse Man.’ This experience
that new students are about to undertake and that upperclassmen are undertaking is special indeed. It is our
expectation that you will continue to learn and grow, to challenge yourself and your classmates, and to strive for
excellence. We expect no less! We promise to give you our best and we expect your best, at all times, on and

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
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Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 73 of 218

off campus. We expect that you will represent Morehouse well and uphold its high ideals and legacy.

We will reinforce the importance of having a sense of moral and ethical values in your lives and in the way you
carry yourselves and interact with others. You will come to appreciate the importance of community service —
reaching out to help others less fortunate and making a real difference in people’s lives.
Gentlemen, your leadership and service are needed today as much as any previous time in the history of this
world. Claim your rightful place as the leaders that the good Lord placed you on this Earth to be. Don’t just live
the dream, Be the Dream! Stand and deliver my brothers, for God, for mother Morehouse, and for the world.

Your family and community are depending on you. Make us proud. Live up to the legacy of Morehouse
College!!!

Sincerely,

Himottuf Setmti, 'P6.."D.

Timothy Sams, Ph.D.


Senior Vice President for Student Development

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Calendar VI - VII
Introduction 8-9
History 10- 13
Traditions 15
Official College Hymns 16-17
General Administration 18-19
College Committees 20
Thomas Kilgore Jr. Campus Center 21
Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel 21-22
Student Services 28
Student Conduct & Student Life 29
Student Grievances 30-33
Student Rights & Responsibilities 34-35
Housing & Residential Life 79-87
Health Services 88
Disability Services and Counseling Services 89-90
Bonner Office of Community Services 96
Career Development & Engagement 98
International Student Services 98-99
Archer Hall Recreation & Fitness Center 99-100
Intercollegiate Athletics 100
Student Life Organizations 101-105
Guidelines for Student Travel 122-123
Student Safety/Security 123
Parking 124-127
College Resource Directory 128-132
Appendix - Most Frequently Asked Questions 133-138

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
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FIRST SEMESTER
COMMEMORATING THE 147,h ANNIVERSARY OF MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

2017
AUGUST

14-15 Official Registration


16 First Day of Classes
28 End Drop/Add
25 Last day to ADD/DROP courses
26 Withdrawal Period Begins

SEPTEMBER

4 Labor Day
14 Opening Convocation

OCTOBER

2-6 Mid-term Week


9-10 Fall Break-No Morehouse Classes
11 Classes resume
12 Mid-Semester Grades Due
27 Last Day to Withdraw
30-Nov 3 Academic Advising Week

NOVEMBER

6 Web Registration for J-mester and Spring 2018 begins


22-24 Thanksgiving Holiday Break
29 Last day of classes
30-Dec 1 Reading Period

DECEMBER

4-8 Final Examination


8 Semester Ends
14 All Final Grades due in Registrars’ Office by noon
22 College Closed

SECOND SEMESTER
COMMEMORATING THE 147,h ANNIVERSARY OF MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

2018
JANUARY

1 New Year’s Day


2 J-Mester Classes Begin
7 End One Week Courses; Two Week Courses Continue
13 J-MESTER CLASSES END
15 MLK Holiday
16 Last day of Registration
17 Classes begin
26 Last day to Drop/Add courses (After this date a student who withdraws from a course will receive
a grade of “W”

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FEBRUARY

15 FOUNDERS DAY CELEBRATION


29 - March 4 Mid-term Week

MARCH

5-9 Mid-Semester Examinations


12-16 Spring Break Week College Open-No Classes
19 Classes resume at 8 a.m.
20 Mid-Semester Grades due by 12pm
30 Good Friday- College Closed

APRIL

2-6 Academic Advising Week


9 Web Registration Begins for Fall 2018 Semester
22 Last Day to Withdraw
27 Last day of Classes
28-29 Reading Period/Senior Final Exams

MAY

2 Last Day of Class


3-4 Reading Period and Senior Final Examinations
7-11 Final Examinations
9 Senior Grades due by 5 P.M.
11 May Semester Ends
17 All Final Grades due by noon
19 Baccalaureate Services
20 Commencement Services

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INTRODUCTION
The Morehouse Mission
Morehouse College claims certain foundational principles upon which its entire existence stands. These include an appreciation for the
ideals ofjustice, equality, democracy, liberation, the humane treatment of all people, and the development of the spiritual self and
community. Although these standards defy most tools of quantitative measurement, they serve as prime motivators for most of what is
done at the College.

Guided by a commitment to excellence, Morehouse, a historically black liberal arts college for men, assumes a special responsibility
for teaching students about the history and culture of black people. The College seeks to develop men with disciplined minds,
emphasizing the continuing search for truth as a liberating force.

Morehouse prepares its students for leadership and service through instructional programs and extra-curricular activities that:

• develop skills in oral and written communications, analytical and critical thinking, and interpersonal relationships

• foster an understanding and appreciation of the elements and evolution of various cultures and the nature of the physical
universe

• foster understanding and appreciation of the specific knowledge and skills needed for the pursuit of professional careers and/or
graduate study

• cultivate the personal attributes of confidence, tolerance, morality, ethical behavior, humility, a global perspective and
commitment to social justice

Equal Opportunity
Morehouse College is a private institution......... race, color, national origin, gender, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age,
status as a disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam era in its programs and activities.

The person designated to handle inquiries regarding the College’s non-discrimination policies is the associate vice president for
Human Resources, 830 Westview Dr., S.W., Atlanta, GA 30314, and (470) 639-0358.

The College supports Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964... The College supports and complies with section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. The College also supports Title IV of the
Education Amendments of 1972 which prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender in education programs and activities.

The Vice President for Student Services is the College’s Section 504 Coordinator. The office is located in Suite 200, Kilgore Campus
Center, 830 Westview Drive, S.W., Atlanta, Georgia, 30314-3773. The telephone number is (470) 639-0979. Title IX of the Education
Amendments of 1972 Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 provides that no person on the basis of sex or gender shall be
excluded from participation in, be denied the benefit of, or be subjected to discrimination, including sexual harassment and violence,
in any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. The College’s coordinator for Title IX (relating to Atlanta
University Center students attending courses at Morehouse College) is the director of institution compliance. The office is located in
Gloster Hall, Room 109; telephone number is (470) 639-0584.

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990


No qualified individual with a disability shall be discriminated against or excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefits of
the services, programs or activities at Morehouse College. All student requests for accommodations and assistance should be directed
to the Office of the Vice President for Student Services. Students who feel they have been discriminated against because of their
disability should contact the Counseling Center, Sale Hall Annex, (470) 639-0901.john

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974


The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They
are:

(1) The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access.

Students should submit to the registrar, dean, academic department chair or other appropriate official written requests that identify the
record(s) they wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place
where records may be inspected. If the College official to whom the request was submitted does not maintain the records, that official
shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

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(2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that a student believes is inaccurate or misleading.

Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the College officials
responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

If the College decides not to amend the records as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and
advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding hearing
procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to
the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

One exception that permits disclosure without consent is to school officials with legitimate educational interest. A school official is a
person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic research or support staff position (including law
enforcement personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or
collection agent); a person serving on the Morehouse Board of Trustees; or a student serving on a official committee, such as a
disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her
professional responsibility.

Upon request, the College discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or
intends to enroll.

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the
requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office


U.S. Department of Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-4605

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THE HISTORY OF MOREHOUSE COLLEGE


(Updated May 2009)

Morehouse College: Then and Now

In 1867, two years after the end of the Civil War the Augusta Institute was established in the basement of
Springfield Baptist Church in Augusta, Ga. The school’s primary purpose was to prepare black men for ministry and
teaching. Today, Augusta Institute is Morehouse College, which is located on a 66-acre campus in Atlanta and enjoys an
international reputation for producing leaders who have influenced national and world history.

Augusta Institute was founded by the Rev. William Jefferson White, an Augusta Baptist minister,
cabinetmaker and journalist, with the encouragement of the Rev. Richard C. Coulter, a former slave from Augusta., and the
Rev. Edmund Turney, organizer of the National Theological Institute for educating freedmen in Washington, D.C. White
appointed the Rev. Dr. Joseph T. Robert, a minister and physician, as the Institute’s first president.

In 1879, the Institute was invited by the Rev. Frank Quarles to move to the basement of Atlanta’s
Friendship Baptist Church and changed its name to Atlanta Baptist Seminary. The Seminary later moved to a four-acre lot
in downtown Atlanta. Following Robert’s death in 1884, David Foster Estes, a professor at the Seminary, served as the
institution’s acting president.

When Dr. Samuel T. Graves was named the second president in 1885, the institution relocated to its current
site in Atlanta’s West End community. The campus’ new site was a gift from John D. Rockefeller and encompasses a Civil
War site, where Confederate soldiers staged a resistance to Union forces during William Tecumseh Sherman’s famous siege
of Atlanta in 1864. In 1897, the Atlanta Baptist Seminary became Atlanta Baptist College during the administration of Dr.
George Sale, a Canadian who served as the third and youngest president from 1890 to 1906.

A new era, characterized by expanded academic offerings and increased physical facilities, dawned with the
appointment of Dr. John Hope as the fourth president in 1906. A pioneer in the field of education and civil rights, Hope was
the College’s first African American president. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Brown University, Hope encouraged an
intellectual climate comparable to what he had known at his alma mater, and openly challenged Booker T. Washington’s
view that education for African Americans should emphasize vocational and agricultural skills.

Atlanta Baptist College, already a leader in preparing African Americans for teaching and the ministry,
expanded its curriculum and established a tradition of educating leaders for all areas of American life. In addition to
attracting talented faculty and administrators, Hope contributed much to the institution we know today. Upon White’s death
in 1913, Atlanta Baptist College was re-named Morehouse College in honor of Henry L. Morehouse, the corresponding
secretary of the Northern Baptist Home Mission Society.

Dr. Samuel H. Archer became the College’s fifth president in 1931 and headed the institution during the
Great Depression. He gave the school its colors, maroon and white, the same as those of his alma mater, Colgate University.
Archer retired for health reasons in 1937. Dr. Charles D. Hubert served as the second acting president until 1940, when Dr.
Benjamin Elijah Mays became the sixth president of the College.

A nationally respected educator and later a mentor to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., class of 1948, Mays
is recognized as the architect of Morehouse’s international reputation for excellence in scholarship, leadership and service.
During his tenure, the number of faculty members grew and the percentage holding doctoral degrees increased from two to
34 out of 65 teachers. The College earned global recognition as scholars from other countries joined the faculty, an
increasing number of international students enrolled, and the fellowships and scholarships for study abroad became
available. Morehouse received full accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in 1957. Mays,
himself a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Bates College, saw success in his 14-year effort to win a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa at
Morehouse in 1968.
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In 1967, Dr. Hugh Morris Gloster, class of 1931, became the first alumnus to serve as president of the
College. Under his leadership, Morehouse strengthened its board of trustees, conducted a successful $20-million fund­
raising campaign, expanded the endowment to more than $29 million and added 12 buildings to the campus, including the
Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel. Morehouse established a dual-degree program in engineering with the Georgia
Institute of Technology, the University of Michigan and Boston University. Gloster founded the Morehouse School of
Medicine and appointed Dr. Louis Wade Sullivan, class of 1954, its first dean. Sullivan later became the school’s first president
when the School became independent in 1981.

Dr. Leroy Keith Jr., class of 1961, was named eighth president in 1987. During the Keith administration,
the College’s endowment increased to more than $60 million, while faculty salaries and student scholarships significantly
increased. Construction of the Nabrit-Mapp-McBay science building was completed, the Thomas Kilgore Jr. Campus Center
and two dormitories were built, and Hope Hall was rebuilt. In 1994, Nima A. Warfield was named the College’s first
Rhodes Scholar. Under Dr. Keith’s leadership, the “A Candle in the Dark” Gala was founded in 1989 to raise scholarship
funds.

In 1994, Mr. Wiley Abron Perdue, class of 1957 and vice president for business affairs, was appointed the
College’s third acting president. Under his leadership, national memorials were erected to honor Dr. Benjamin E. Mays and
internationally renowned theologian Dr. Howard W. Thurman, class of 1923. Perdue launched an initiative to upgrade the
College’s academic and administrative computer information systems, finalized plans to build a new dormitory and oversaw
construction of a 5,700-seat gymnasium to provide a basketball venue for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Dr. Walter Eugene Massey, class of 1958, was named the Morehouse’s ninth president in 1995. A respected
physicist and college administrator, Massey called on the Morehouse community to renew its longstanding commitment to a
culture of excellence. Before joining the College, Massey held several notable positions, including director of the Argonne
National Laboratory and the National Science Foundation, and senior vice president and provost of the University of
California System.

Under Massey’s leadership, the College embraced his vision of becoming one of the nation’s finest liberal
arts colleges and accepted the challenge of providing students a quality 21st-century education. Morehouse expanded its
dual-degree program in natural sciences with the Georgia Institute of Technology; launched the Center for Excellence in
Science, Engineering and Mathematics with a $6.7-million U.S. Defense Department grant; established a new African
American studies program, and a Center for International Studies named for former United Nations Ambassador Andrew
Young.

The College’s Division of Business Administration and Economics was accredited by the America Association of
Schools and Colleges of Business, making Morehouse one of only a handful of liberal arts colleges in the nation with both AASCB
accreditation and a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

The physical infrastructure was also significantly enhanced. Construction was completed on Davidson
House Center for Excellence, which serves as the president’s official residence and houses a mini-conference center on its
lower level. In 2005, The Leadership Center was opened with a comprehensive conference space, the Executive Conference
Center. Other additions included the John H. Hopps Technology Tower, a 500-car parking deck and an expanded campus
bookstore. Renovations were made to several dormitories, classroom buildings. Archer Hall Recreation Center, Chivers-
Lane Dining Hall and the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel.

Under Massey, two more students became Rhodes Scholars: Chris Elders, class of 2002, and Oluwabusayo
“Tope” Folarin, class of 2004. By June 2006, the College successfully completed Morehouse’s most ambitious capital
campaign - raising a record $112 million, exceeding the Campaign’s goal of $105 million. The same year, Morehouse
became the permanent custodian of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King Jr. Collection, more than 13,000 hand­

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written notes, photos, sermons, letters, books and other artifacts belonging to its most noted alumnus, the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr., class of 1948.

On July 1,2007, the Rev. Dr. Robert Michael Franklin Jr., class of 1975, was appointed the College’s 10th
president. The former president of the Interdenominational Theological Center had previously served as Presidential
Distinguished Professor of Social Ethics at the Candler School of Theology and senior fellow at the Center for the Study of
Law and Religion, both at Emory University. He was a program officer in the Human Rights and Social Justice Program at
the Ford Foundation and served as Theologian-in-Residence for The Chautauqua Institution, both in New York.

During his tenure, Franklin led the institution forward with his vision of the “Morehouse Renaissance,”
further elevating public confidence in the College’s continuing stature as a premier institution providing quality education
along with enhancing the intellectual and moral dimension at Morehouse.. In part, he accomplished this by establishing the .
concept of the “Five Wells,” an ideal to cultivate men of Morehouse as “Renaissance men with social conscience and global
perspective” who are well-read, well-spoken, well-traveled, well-dressed and well-balanced.”

Under Franklin’s leadership, the College reaffirmed its commitment to academic vigor, and was
reaccredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The Quality Enhancement Plan focused on enhancing the
global awareness and competence of Morehouse students.

In a $20-million project initiated by Massey, Franklin oversaw the completion of the Ray Charles
Performing Arts Center and Music Academic Building, a 75,000-square-foot facility named after the late legendary
musician.

Franklin led and supported cultivation efforts - such as establishing the Renaissance Commission, a blue-
ribbon group of 150 influential volunteer stakeholders - that increased the total number of new donors by 4,500. The
College generated more than $68 million in institutional funds ($33 million during the silent phase of the comprehensive
capital campaign) and $60 million in restricted funds from federal sources, including congressional appropriations and
competitive federal grants.

Dr. Willis Sheftall, class of 1964, served as Interim President until January 2013. A respected business
educator and administrator, helped make the Morehouse Economic Department become one of the most respected programs
in the nation. The former chair of the Economics Department and dean of the School of Business at Hampton University,
Sheftall also served as Morehouse’s provost three times during his administrative career before becoming Interim President.

Dr. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., class of 1979, an accomplished university administrator, professor and former
executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, was named the College
College’s 11th president in January 2013. Under his leadership, the College improved student achievement across a wide range
of metrics. He and his team were champions for STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) initiatives for
students and significantly increased the College’s private gifts, grants and contracts. During his tenure, computer science major
Prince Abudu became the College’s first International Rhodes Scholar, making him the College’s fourth Rhodes Scholar.

Wilson played a pivotal role in bringing President Barack Obama to Morehouse as the commencement speaker in
2013, and, in hosting Vice President Joseph Biden in 2015.

Mr. William James Taggart, a graduate of Howard and Harvard universities, assumed the role of interim
president of the College in 2017. He had been the chief operating officer of Morehouse since 2015.

With more than 30 years of experience with Fortune 500 companies, higher education, boutique firms and
federal government agencies, Taggart distinguished himself as a result-driven leader in both public and private sectors. Prior
to serving as CEO of the Atlanta Life Financial Group, he was chief operating officer of the U.S. Office of Federal Student

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Aid.

Tragically, just two months after Taggart was appointed as the Interim President of Morehouse College, he
became ill and passed away suddenly on June 8,2017. A memorial fund, the William J. Taggart Scholarship Fund, was
established in his honor.

Following Taggart’s passing, the Morehouse College Board of Trustees chose Mr. Harold Martin
Jr. ’02 as Interim President in June 2017. Martin is a business leader with extensive experience in advising
senior executives at institutions of higher education and at Fortune 500 companies. Martin, a former Morehouse
Board secretary who is the youngest administrator to lead the College since 1913, will head the College until a
permanent president is chosen by the Board.

Martin holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and a juris doctor from Yale Law School.
He graduated Summa Cum Laude from Morehouse and was the class valedictorian, earning a B.A. in Business
Administration and membership into the Phi Beta Kappa honor society.

Martin was an Associate Partner at McKinsey & Company, one of the world’s leading management
consulting firms where he helped academic institutions solve complex strategic, financial, and organizational
challenges. Martin also was a leader in the firm’s Higher Education Practice, which studied trends transforming
higher education and best practices exemplified by leading colleges and universities. Since leaving McKinsey &
Company in 2014, Martin has built a successful independent consulting practice and private investment firm in
Atlanta.

Martin is building on the momentum started by Taggart by working with Morehouse’s Board, students,
parents, faculty, staff, alumni, and donors to solidify the College’s position as an academic leader and to expand
giving at Morehouse. His leadership allows Morehouse College to continue its long and unique history of
developing men with disciplined minds who lead lives of leadership and service to students now representing 35
states and 17 countries.

From Augusta to Atlanta, Morehouse College’s more than 150-year history embodies a mission that
shines rays of educational excellence for men trained to become leaders and lead to serve.

“Morehouse will develop ‘Renaissance men’—leaders with a social conscience


—who will champion the causes of equality, justice and peace in their communities and throughout the globe.”
-President Robert Franklin Jr. ’75

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PRESIDENTS OF MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

Dr. Joseph Robert 1871-1884


Dr. Samuel Graves 1885-1890
Dr. George Sale 1890-1906
Dr. John Hope 1906-1930
Dr. Samuel Archer 1931-1938
Dr. Charles D. Hubert 1938-1940 (Acting)
Dr. Benjamin E. Mays 1940-1967
Dr. Hugh M. Gloster 1967-1987
Dr. Leroy Keith, Jr. 1987-1994
Dr. Wiley A. Perdue 1994-1995 (Acting)
Dr. Walter Massey 1995- 2007
Dr. Robert M. Franklin 2007-2013
Dr. John Silvanus Wilson, Jr. 2013-2017
Harold Martin, Jr. 2017-Present (Acting)

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TRADITIONS

Steeped in history, Morehouse College celebrates its rich heritage by observing important traditions, a number of which are described
below:

Morehouse Mystique
A difficult concept to define, the Morehouse mystique is perhaps best described as the spirit of brotherhood that inspires nurtures and
sustains successful Morehouse Men in their pursuit of excellence and their commitment to service.

Spiritual Life
Spiritual growth and development are integral to life at Morehouse College. Students receive spiritual nurturing through Sunday
worship services, service as chapel assistants and participation in the annual Science and Spiritual Awareness Week.

Crown Forum
Crown Forum is a college-wide assembly observed eight times during the academic year. It provides opportunities for Morehouse
students to expand their spiritual and intellectual horizons. The primary goal of the Crown Forum is best summarized in the words of
distinguished Morehouse alumnus and internationally noted theologian Howard Thurman: “As Morehouse students, a crown is placed
over our heads that for the rest of our lives we are trying to grow tall enough to wear.”

Homecoming
Homecoming is a week of activities that commemorates the annual return of Morehouse alumni to the campus. Homecoming
typically features the coronation of Miss Maroon and White, a fashion show, parade, concert, and a host of alumni activities. The
highlight of Homecoming is a football game, which features the Maroon Tigers versus a Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
opponent and the famous half-time “Battle of the Bands.”

Founder’s Day Observance


Founder’s Day Observance, held annually in February, honors the man who established Morehouse College. Traditionally, the
celebration includes a formal convocation featuring a nationally-acclaimed speaker. Parents’ Weekend, and the “A Candle in the
Dark” gala fund-raiser.

“A Candle in the Dark”


Established in 1989 and conducted in conjunction with the Founder’s Day Observance, “A Candle in the Dark” gala is a major fund­
raiser for the College’s Endowed Scholarship Fund and serves as a forum for recognizing outstanding contributions to society by
African American men. The Bennie Award, named in honor of former Morehouse President Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays, is presented
to alumni in three categories: service, achievement and trailblazing. The Candle Award, given for personal and professional
achievement, is presented in a variety of professional fields.

Family Weekend
Family Weekend, held in conjunction with Founders’ Day and “A Candle in the Dark” gala, is an opportunity for parents to spend
time with their sons and become acquainted with members of the faculty and staff. The weekend features a series of seminars and
workshops designed to stimulate dialogue about the academic and social experience at Morehouse.

Reunion: “A Gathering of Men”


The College hosts alumni by classes each May during Commencement weekend. Numerous activities are planned for returning
alumni, including The Reunion Golf Classic, a National Alumni Association meeting and luncheon, class meetings, parties and
picnics. One of the highlights of the weekend is the annual Reunion Banquet, where classes in reunion present their collective class
gifts to the College to benefit the Annual Fund.

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OFFICIAL COLLEGE HYMNS

DEAR OLD MOREHOUSE

Dear Old Morehouse, Dear Old Morehouse


We have pledged our lives to thee;
And we’ll ever, yea forever
Give ourselves in loyalty.

True forever, True forever


To Old Morehouse may we be
So to bind each son the other,
Into ties more brotherly.

Holy Spirit, Holy Spirit


Make us steadfast, honest true
To Old Morehouse and her ideals
And in all things that we do.

J.O.B. Moseley '29

FIGHT ON MOREHOUSE

Fight on, Morehouse, fight for victory and fame


Raise your banner to the sky, and we’ll honor your
great name, RAH, RAH, RAH!
Fight on Morehouse, ever loyal let us be
We’ll ever be true, and we’ll always honor you,
So FIGHT, FIGHT, FIGHT!
Men of Morehouse, never stop this battle long
We will fight for what is right, with our ideals clear
and strong, RAH, RAH, RAH.

Marching onward, onward, upward, to the light,


With Morehouse in view, with our courage firm and
true, we’ll FIGHT, FIGHT, FIGHT!

Wendell P. Whalum ’52

MOREHOUSE VICTORY MARCH

Morehouse — Tigers with a roar like thunder —


Morehouse — We will rip the foe asunder —
Raise the Maroon and the White —
Fight, fellows, fight, fight, fight for
Morehouse — College that we must mount high for —
Morehouse — Great old school we’ll do and die for
On, on, on to Victory for Morehouse, our Alma Mater!

Words and time by Hugh M. Gloster ’31


Music by Wendell P. Whalum ’52

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

Morehouse College, Morehouse College,


Morehouse College, bless her name —
Whether in defeat or victory.
We are loyal just the same.

And we’ll cheer for Morehouse College


‘Tis for her we’ll fight for fame;
And we’ll sing her praises loud in every land,
Morehouse College, bless her name.

Words by Moredecai W. Johnson ’ll

BLACK NATIONAL ANTHEM

LIFT EV’RY VOICE AND SING

Words by James Weldon Johnson


Music by J. Rosamond Johnson

Lift every voice and sing,


Till earth and heaven ring,
Ring with the harmonies of liberty;
Let our rejoicing rise
High as the list’ning skies,
Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us;
Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;
Facing the rising sun
Of our new day begun.
Let us march on till victory is won.
Stony the road we trod.
Bitter the chast’ning rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat,
Have not our weary feet
Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over a way that with tears has been watered;
We have come, treading our path thru the blood of the slaughtered
Out from the gloomy past,
Till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.

God of our weary years,


God of our silent tears,
Thou who has brought us thus far on the way;
Thou who has by thy might
Led us into the light.
Keep us forever in the path, we pray.
Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee;
Lest our hearts, drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee;
Shadowed beneath Thy hand,
May we forever stand,
True to our God, true to our native land.

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GENERAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE COLLEGE

President of the College


The president is the chief executive officer of the College and the official adviser and executive agent to the Morehouse College Board
of Trustees. As such, he has responsibility for the overall management and supervision of the activities of the institution, and the
power to perform all acts and execute all documents required to implement the actions of the Board or its executive committee.

The president also serves as liaison between the Board and the College, and renders such reports to the chairman of the board and to
board members and committees as needed in their work or as required by the bylaws. In addition, he is a member of the faculty,
chairman of the faculty and the administrative council, and an ex-officio member of standing committees of the faculty.

The president’s ultimate charge is to provide and maintain an environment that is conducive to teaching, learning, research,
employment and public service.

Senior Vice President and Provost for Academic Affairs


The senior vice president and provost for Academic Affairs is the principal academic officer of the College and are responsible for
implementing faculty actions approved by the president and Board of Trustees. She/he is accountable to the president for all academic
matters, including faculty, personnel, educational policies and procedures, the curriculum, and instructional programs. As a member
of the faculty, the senior vice president and provost for Academic Affairs works with department chairs in recruiting and evaluating
faculty members and in preparing recommendations to the president for faculty appointments, promotions and salaries.

Vice President for Business Affairs/Chief Financial Officer


The vice president for Business Affairs serves at the leisure of the president and is responsible for the fiscal operation of the College.
She/he provides the president and Board of Trustees with information pertinent to the fiscal management of the College, prepares the
College’s annual budget for Board approval, implements budgetary controls, and maintains the financial records and reports of the
College’s financial activities.

General Counsel
The Office of General Counsel’s (“OGC”) mission and goal is to provide legal services to the College so as to facilitate the College’s
operation while minimizing legal exposure. The OGC seeks to recognize areas of high legal risk and to make recommendations for
resolving those issues that are consistent with the law and the College’s business objectives. The OGC provides a wide range of legal
services, including but not limited to, the following:

• Providing advice,
• Creating, reviewing, and negotiating contracts and memoranda of understanding and agreement,
• Responding to internal and external requests for documents, including subpoena,
• Acting as the College’s official agent for service of process,
• Managing outside counsel,
• Handling litigation and other matters,
• Defending charges filed with administrative agencies,
• Investigating employee matters in limited circumstances, and
• Facilitating supervisory and faculty training.

The OGC is comprised of the General Counsel, an Associate General Counsel, a Senior Paralegal, and an Executive Assistant. The
General Counsel reports to the President of the College.

Interim Director of Campus Operations


The Interim Director of Campus Operations serves at the leisure of the president and is responsible for providing an attractive, safe
and well-maintained environment that is conducive for attaining excellence in teaching, learning, working and living. The primary
focus of the office is functional support: to provide and maintain efficient systems for the campus community. She/he is responsible
facilities planning and capital improvement projects.

Vice President for Institutional Advancement

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The vice president for Institutional Advancement serves at the leisure of the president and is responsible for developing and
implementing policies to facilitate raising funds from various sources, including foundations, corporations, governmental offices,
alumni and friends. She/he coordinates fundraising activities and schedule of the president, proposals submitted by members of the
college community, solicits small and large gifts, and implements a centralized gift processing system. In addition, the vice president
for Institutional Advancement is involved in short- and long-range planning fund-raising efforts for the College and coordination of
the president’s capital campaign.

Senior Vice President for Student Development


The Vice President for Student Development serves at the leisure of the president and is responsible for students and their learning
experiences outside the classroom. He/she has administrative oversight and accountability for wellness of students, conduct and
discipline, housing and residential education, campus life, health services, recreation and intramural sports and intercollegiate
athletics. With the assistance of his managerial staff, the Vice President for Student Development helps students establish productive
relationships within the college community. He/she also exercises general supervision and oversight of student concerns and welfare,
and student organizations, as well as maintains student personnel records. He/she is also a member of the College faculty.

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COLLEGE COMMITTEES

Committee on the Academic Program


The Committee on the Academic Program is composed of the vice president for Academic Affairs (who serves as chairman), the
registrar, director of Admissions, chairpersons of academic departments, four members of the faculty elected for staggered terms of
two years each and representing different academic divisions of the College, and four students appointed for one-year terms by the
president of the Student Government Association. The committee continually studies the academic program with a view toward
making improvements in the curriculum. It also advises the faculty on curricular changes based on proposals and recommendations
the Committee receives from departments, individual faculty members and students.

Committee on Academic Standing


The Committee on Academic Standing is composed of the director of Admissions, who serves as chairman, the vice president and
provost for Academic Affairs, the registrar, the director of Financial Aid, three members of the faculty elected for staggered terms of
three years each, and three students appointed for one-year terms by the president of the Student Government Association.
The committee is responsible for determining academic standing, including honors, probation, suspension and dismissal.

Committee on Athletics
The Committee on Athletics is composed of 11 members: The director of Athletics, who serves as chairman, the vice president for
Business Affairs, Senior Vice President for Student Development, vice president for Institutional Advancement, registrar, director of
Admissions, three members of the faculty elected for staggered terms of three years each, and three students appointed for one-year
terms by the President of the Student Government Association. The committee advises the athletics staff concerning policies and
procedures for the College’s intercollegiate athletic program, including scheduled athletic contests and special student s such as
Homecoming and programs honoring athletes.

Committee on Social and Cultural Affairs


The Committee on Social and Cultural Affairs is composed of 13 members: the Senior Vice President for Student Development, who
serves as chairman, vice president for Business Affairs, dean of the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel, chairman of the
Department of Health and Physical Education, superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, two members of the faculty elected for
staggered terms of two years each, and eight students appointed for one-year terms by the president of the Student Government
Association. The committee advises the faculty on establishing policies concerning public programs at Morehouse and approves the
calendar of all student affairs.

Committee on Student Organizations


The Committee on Student Organizations is composed of 13 members: the Senior Vice President for Student Development, who
serves as chairman, the vice president and provost for Academic Affairs, vice president for Business Affairs, chairman of the
Committee on Fraternities, three members of the faculty elected for staggered terms of two years each, and five students appointed
for one-year terms by the president of the Student Government Association. The committee formulates policies and procedures
for the operation of student organizations at Morehouse College. The Committee recommends new organizations for formal
recognition by the faculty, monitors the programs of student organizations, and assesses their financial ability to support and
underwrite those programs. The Committee of Student Organizations, through the Committee on Fraternities, oversees fraternity life
on campus. The Committee on Fraternities makes recommendations to the Committee on Student Organizations concerning rules and
regulations that govern the chapters of the six national Greek-letter fraternities recognized by Morehouse College. The Committee on
Student organizations reviews these recommendations and adds its own before sending them to the faculty for final approval.

Committee on Student Welfare


The committee on Student Welfare is composed of 18 members: the Senior Vice President for Student Development, who serves as
chairman, the president (ex-officio), vice president and provost for Academic Affairs, vice president for Business Affairs, the registrar,
director of Admissions, four members of the faculty elected for staggered terms of four years each, and seven students appointed for
one-year terms by the president of the Student Government Association. The committee reviews general policies, procedures and
programs that are judged to be in the best interest of the students of Morehouse College, and recommends appropriate action by the
administration, faculty or Student Government Association.

Membership Committee
The membership committee nominates members and officers for the Board of Trustees. In addition, it advises the board on
procedures for selecting honorary degree recipients and oversees this process. The committee must have at least five, but not more
than 13, members.

Physical Plant Committee


The physical plant committee advises the Board on the maintenance of buildings and grounds, and on the construction of physical
facilities. It also develops recommendations on policies regarding buildings and grounds.

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THOMAS KILGORE JR. CAMPUS CENTER

Chick-Fil-A.
Monday - Friday: 7 a.m. to Midnight
Saturday: 7:00 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Sunday: Closed

The Thomas Kilgore Jr. Campus Center is a multi-purpose community center that hosts various personal development, entertainment
and social activities for Morehouse students, faculty and staff, as well as the general public. The first floor of the Kilgore Center
features a snack bar area (seating capacity 150), faculty lounge, Mazique Dining Hall (seating capacity 60) and courtyard. The second
floor houses administrative offices, sleeping quarters (two suites and two single rooms) and three seminar rooms (combined seating
capacity of 75).

Special Function Facilities


Morehouse College believes that constructive, extracurricular activities supplement and complement the academic process in
developing a broadly educated individual. The College is not obligated to tolerate events that interfere with any lawful mission,
process or function of the institution. However, it must be shown that operation of the College will not be interfered with materially
and substantially.

• The Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel is a multi-purpose facility that seats 2,501 persons. It is named in honor of the
College’s most distinguished alumnus, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. ’48. The Chapel’s ecumenical programs and
services are indicative of the College’s ideological tradition of building future leaders. The Chapel dean coordinates all religious
activities.

• The Samuel Howard Archer Hall is a multi-purpose fitness and recreation center. The facility provides arenas for intramural and
recreational sports. Special events such as dances, Greek step shows and student fundraising events also can be scheduled at this
facility.

The Forbes Arena is a sports center that seats 7,000. Named in 1999 in honor of legendary Morehouse coach and administrator,
Franklin Lafayette Forbes, Forbes Arena is the $8-million, 6,000-seat facility, which was part of the $51 million-plus investment
in the Atlanta University Center by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and was dedicated on April 3, 1996.
The facility is, without question, one of the finest places to watch basketball in Atlanta... Highly accessible, it has excellent
sightlines and lighting, and the fans are right in the mix of all the action. Morehouse Madness is an interesting experience. With
the famed Morehouse student body out in force and venting in full voice, Forbes Arena is an extension of old Archer Hall,
longtime home of Maroon Tiger basketball teams and becomes the setting for a truly incredible adventure.

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. INTERNATIONAL CHAPEL

Chapel Hours:
Monday through Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
King Chapel
(470) 639-0323

Campus Ministries
The Morehouse College Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel — the world’s most prominent religious memorial to Dr. King-
was dedicated in 1978 under the presidency of Dr. Hugh Morris Gloster. As a building, the Chapel is a multi-purpose campus facility
that serves alternately as a worship space, academic classroom, and venue for cultural and community events. As a program, the
Chapel is the hub for educational and spiritual activities centered on promoting Dr. King’s ideal of the Beloved World Community.
This includes training in the principles of virtue-ethics, nonviolence, service and harmony, as well as programming that develops
awareness and skills in vocational discernment, love and forgiveness, and peace and nonviolence.

The Chapel is the sponsor of the College of Ministers and Laity: a member of the International Council of Community Churches of
Christ; and is affiliated with the Christian Council of Metropolitan Atlanta, cooperating with the Association of Global New Thought,
the Fellowship for Reconciliation, and the Foundation for Community Encouragement Science and Spirit magazine.

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Special attention is given to the spiritual needs of Morehouse students. In the life and discipline of the school, constant effort is made
to inculcate Christian principles. For students who live on campus, Sunday morning worship services are held in the Martin Luther
King Jr. International Chapel. The College also has two Christian organizations: the King International Chapel Ministry and the
M.L.K. Chapel Assistants.

Students may obtain additional information about campus ministries from the Office of the Dean of the Chapel, which is located in the
Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel.

OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


Gloster Hall, Room 305
(470) 639-0545

The Office of Institutional Advancement (OIA), a division of the Office of the President, is responsible for advancing the College
through various fundraising and public relations efforts. The Vice President for Institutional Advancement serves as the chief
spokesperson for the College and works closely with the president and members of the faculty, staff and student body to effectively
tell the Morehouse story to the College’s many local, national and international audiences. The vice president for Institutional
Advancement supervises the directors of public relations, alumni relations and corporate and foundation relations and special events,
publications.

Office of Strategic Communications


This department initiates media coverage of College events, programs, and student, faculty and staff achievements. The department
also promotes special events such as Founder’s Week, Commencement/Reunion, and “A Candle in the Dark” gala, the College’s
annual fund-raising event. Communications is divided into three separate parts — publications, web services and media relations.
Publications publish and distribute Morehouse Magazine, a twice yearly alumni magazine, and Inside Morehouse, a monthly
newsletter for faculty, staff and students of the College. Publications also provide writing, editing and publishing support on major
College projects. Media relations serve as the College’s liaison with local, national and international media.

WHAT ABOUT ALUMNI RELATIONS, CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION RELATIONS and GOVERNMENT
RELATIONS???
Alumni Relations
The Office of Alumni Relations, Annual Giving Programs, and Special Events serve the College in three distinct areas. Our office
manages the relationship between our alumni and the College, leads alumni and annual fund fundraising efforts, and manage all large
scale special events.

Corporation and Foundation and Government Relations


The Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations’ mission is to work with high-level donors and supporters to advance the College.
Corporate and Foundation Relations works to gather the necessary resources from the corporate and foundation communities to allow
Morehouse to remain competitive with other world-class institutions. To raise funds for the College, the unit’s goals include
increasing support for Morehouse’s key funding initiatives, boosting corporate presence on the campus, developing opportunities for
interaction, and identifying and successfully linking institutional priorities with appropriate funding sources.

Media Relations and Special Events


This department initiates media coverage of College events, programs, and student, faculty and staff achievements. The department
also coordinates and promotes special events such as Founder’s Week, Reunion Weekend, Commencement, and “A Candle in the
Dark” gala, the College’s annual fund-raising event.

Publications
This department publishes and distributes Alumnus, a quarterly alumni magazine, and Inside Morehouse, a monthly newsletter for
faculty, staff, students, parents and friends of the College. The department also provides writing, editing and publishing support on
major College publication projects.

Printing Services
Printing Services provides a wide range of design and printing services for the College community. Printing Services works in
conjunction with the department of Communications to ensure that all college communications both print and electronic—are
representative of the standards of the college and present a consistent image.

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE PRINT SHOP


Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday, 9am-3pm
(hours are subject to change)
Morehouse Parking Deck/Lower Level
(470) 639-0743 or ext. 0743 (470) 639-0155
printing@morehouse.edu
Services Provided:
Typesetting and Design

Some of the design projects done by Printing Services include the college catalog, the student handbook, programs for Crown Forum,
convocation, baccalaureate, Commencement, the Benjamin E. Mays Lecture Series and cultural events.

Quick Copying, Duplicating, and Print Services


> Announcements > Index cards
> Annual reports > Journals
> Booklets > Newsletters
> Bookmarks > Note cards
> Brochures > Note pads
> Bulletins > Pamphlets
> Business cards > Posters (ll"x 17")
> Calendars > Programs
> Carbonless forms > Reports
> Certificates > Tickets
> Envelopes > Flyers
Business Cards and Stationery

Printing Services adheres to formatting guidelines provided by the Office of Communications. A style guide is available on the
Morehouse College website or in the Office of Communications to clarify standards set on all stationery, business cards and other
media - related products.

Clients will receive a PDF proof of all stationery to ensure that the information is accurate. Client must approve a final proof before
job will be printed. All stationery will be available for pickup within five to 10 days of client’s approval. Any changes made to
stationery after approving the final proof may result in additional charges. Please note that all requests for press work (i.e. non-
digital printing), will be vended and will be submitted in order of approval date and may require additional processing time..

Finishing Services
Printing Services provides a variety of binding and finishing services, some of which are listed below. Contact us regarding any
special bindery services you may need.

> Folding
> Stapling
> Collating
> Custom tabs
> 3-hole punch
> Saddle-stitch binding
> Cutting
> Fastback binding
> GBC binding
> Coil Binding
> Padding
> Insertion into brochures, booklets, etc.

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A completed print shop requisition is required for all jobs handled by Printing Services. The following information
is required:
> Your name, the name of the publication you’re working on, your phone number, email address,
division/office/department name and the accounting information
> Signature and the date the job is needed. "ASAP" is not considered a valid date.
> Whether the document is single side or double-sided
> Number of copies
> Ink color(s)
> Type(s) of paper

The Printing Services staff can help you answer these questions. Ifyou have any questions about printing a
publication, document, report, flyer, announcement, etc., contact us via phone, email or in person. Printing Services
is ready to assist you in creating and producing a product that meets your requirements and achieves your vision.

Turn-around Time

> Every effort is made to complete jobs within 24 hours of being submitted.
> Turn-around time may be effected by volume, time of year, complexity ofjob, etc.
> Every effort is made to give an accurate estimate ofjob completion according to stages of completion
required and to meet the date and/or time of completion
y Jobs submitted after-hours are considered to be received the following business day.

CD/DVD Duplication and Scanning Services

Compact disc (CD) and digital video disc (DVD) duplication is available through the Printing Services. There will
be a charge of $3.00 per CD and $10 per DVD. Hard copy may be scanned to create PDF files or a master disc may
be supplied. There is a charge of $1.50 per page to scan hard copy to files in addition to the duplication charge. In
all cases, copyright laws are observed. For CD/DVD duplication pricing, please visit the Printing Services
department to find a comprehensive list under “Electronic Services.”

Fax Service

Fax services are available for a fee for both inbound and outbound faxing. Contact Printing Services for rates.

Automatic Bank Teller

Automatic bank teller machines are located in the Office of the Morehouse College Campus Police at the rear of
Robert Hall. This service operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Atlanta University Center Shuttle Service

The Atlanta University Center provides free daily shuttle service to students for their convenience and safety.
Students are encouraged to use the shuttle service for transportation within the Atlanta University Center Complex,
to the Robert Woodruff Library, West End MARTA station, and West End Mall. Copies of the shuttle bus schedule
are available in the Office of Campus Police.
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Automobile Policy

College policy prohibits freshmen from having vehicles on campus. Campus parking permits will not be issued to
any student who is classified as a freshman regardless of his age or the number of semesters he has been registered
at the College. It is a violation of school policy for upperclassmen to obtain parking permits for freshman students.

Local Banks

All students are encouraged to open personal checking and/or savings accounts at one of the many banks near
Morehouse. Following are five banks in the area. Morehouse does not endorse or recommend a particular bank or
financial institution.

> Capitol City Bank and Trust - Lee Street, West End
> Citizens Trust Bank - M.L. King Jr. Drive
> Wells Fargo — Lowery Street, West End
> Bank of America - Lee Street, West End
> Wells Fargo - Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard, West End Post Office

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE MAILROOM


Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. to Noon
Location: Robert Hall, First Floor
Telephone: (470) 639-0803 or ext. 0803

The College, in cooperation with the United States Postal Service (USPS), operates a post office station on campus.
The post office is a full-service facility that processes inbound and outbound mail and packages, domestic and
international. The post office sells stamps, envelopes and some shipping supplies for your convenience.

Student Mail

Mailbox numbers and keys are assigned by the post office staff. If you have a problem with your box or key, please
see a member of the post office staff.

Mail is picked up daily from the area substation by 9 a.m. It is sorted and distributed to the appropriate mailboxes
Monday through Saturday by 11 a.m. U.S. mail packages that will fit will be placed into mailboxes.

All oversized packages will be held at window 1 or 2, depending on the size. A notice will be placed in your
mailbox indicating which window to claim your package(s). Mailboxes are only for the individual to which they are
assigned. They cannot be shared with anyone. They cannot be used for political, commercial or entrepreneurial
purposes.

Please make sure that correspondents are given your correct mailbox unit number. Mail with an incorrect or
incomplete address is placed into a holding area and post office staff will attempt to locate the address when time
permits.

Unclaimed Mail

Unclaimed mail and parcels represent significant risk to the Morehouse campus, including fire, safety and other
legitimate business concerns. In addition to regularly checking the post office box, students are responsible for
promptly notifying the post office of any prolonged absences or events that will prevent them from picking up their
mail and parcels. Unclaimed mail is mail or packages that have neither been collected, nor forwarding instructions
received by the post office for any predetermined periods of time. This mail may be returned to the sender or
forwarded to the student’s address of record at cost to the student after 14 days.

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Miscoded Mail - If mail for another person is placed in your box, please return that mail to Window 1 immediately.
Mail tampering or theft is a federal offense, and perpetrators will be prosecuted. Please do not sign for mail or
parcels that do not belong to you.

Special Service Mail - Sensitive Mail with plane tickets, checks, money orders, valuables, etc., enclosed should be
sent certified, insured, delivery confirmation and/or by express mail. Special service mail, as well as UPS, is held at
Window 1. A notification will be placed in your mailbox. Please bring notification along with your Morehouse
identification to claim your special service mail or package(s).

Large or Oversized Shipments — Student anticipating receiving or sending oversized mail (large items or over 100
lbs collectively) should contact the post office staff as far in advance as possible to assist with the proper receipt,
forwarding, storage and or other benefits, i.e., discounts where available through Morehouse's preferred shipping.
For more information, please contact the Post Office Staff.

Mail Addressing — Proper format for sending mail and packages to and from your Morehouse address:

(Name)

Morehouse College

830 Westview Drive, SW

Unit # Enter your unit number and C/O Department or program, i.e., PSP, etc.

Atlanta, GA 30314-3773

To better ensure that your mail is delivered to your box, give this format to anyone who may send you mail. Put this
address in the upper left-hand corner when sending mail or a package.

Students are required to obtain a post office box during registration and to retain it for the duration of their
continuous enrollment at the College. Students are responsible for checking their boxes periodically for important
College information that is sent regularly from various College offices.

Inter-Campus Mail Service

Students may use this service free of charge for correspondence with College departments, personnel or students.
The sender’s return address must be on the outside of the envelope. This service does not handle U.S. mail (other
than redirected), books, cartons or packages. The facilities of the Morehouse College Post Office and the Intra-
Campus Mail Service may not be used for any commercial or political purposes. Please ensure that all
packages/envelopes are clearly marked "Inter-Campus Mail".

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE BOOKSTORE


Hours
Monday — Thursday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saturday: 11 a.m. to 3p.m.
(hours are subject to change)

Located: Parking Deck, Lower level, Westview Drive


(470) 639-0802
bookstore@morehouse.edu
www.morehouse.bkstr.com

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The Morehouse College Bookstore, located on the lower level of the parking deck on Westview Drive, sells new and
used textbooks, course-related reference material, general reading books on a variety of topics and interests,
periodicals, clothing, memorabilia, gift items, teaching supplies, computers, computer products, electronic games,
office supplies to the community, guest, and visitors. The store is uniquely designed to serve the needs of
Morehouse College and carries a wide range of Morehouse -themed merchandise, along with general merchandise
to cater to various interests and needs.

The average student’s book expense is $650 per semester. We know that going to college costs more than ever
before, and books are big ticket items. To help ease the burden, we now offer you the ability to rent your textbooks.
In addition to saving you money, our Rent-A-Text program offers convenience and flexibility. On average, you’ll
save more than half the price of a new book. The bookstore also offers students access to a world of interactive
digital content though a product called CafeScribe. By allowing students to read, highlight, take notes and share
their information digitally, we now provide hundreds of students and professors unprecedented levels of interaction.

At the end of each semester, the bookstore has a buyback program that allows students to sell their books back to the
bookstore. The value of the used book depends upon many things: whether a professor still requires the book, how
old the book is, how many the bookstore already has, and the book’s condition. The bookstore also offers
Guaranteed Buyback, which means that if a book is sold to the bookstore, the seller is guaranteed to get at least 50
percent of the purchase price.

For added convenience and with the popularity of student and alumni shopping the Internet, all merchandise sold in
the bookstore can be ordered through the website, www.morehouse.bkst.com or efollett.com, and shipped via
FedEx. Special orders are another means that the bookstore uses to meet the needs of its customers. By using
electronic networks, customers may rapidly receive books from both foreign and domestic publishers. Educational
software is also available through the bookstore’s website. Qualified customers - students, faculty, or staff- will
find great educational discounts on everything they need with savings up to 85 percent off commercial software list.

The bookstore accepts cash, gift cards, personal checks, certified checks, cashier’s checks, money orders, AMEX,
VISA, MasterCard, and Discover credit cards for all purchases. Students may also pay using their student voucher
accounts provided they have the funds available and proper authorization. Students who have credit balances on
their accounts may use this balance at any time to purchase any merchandise.

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OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES


Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Suite 200, Kilgore Campus Center
(470)639-0355

MISSION STATEMENT

In support of Morehouse College’s mission, the mission of the Office of Student Services is to intentionally
encourage and promote the development of ethically engaged students as contributing citizens of a global
society. The office actively facilitates learning through the discovery, synthesis, preservation, and
dissemination of knowledge while fostering an inclusive and culturally diverse environment.

Goals:

1. We will embrace a student-centered philosophy in all our direct services to students. We encourage,
challenge and support students to become self-actualized leaders who realize their full potential through
education, training, student development, applied research and a wide-range of student experiences.

2. We will encourage and promote the development of appropriate values, attitudes and conduct for a
communal academic community.

3. We will facilitate and encourage cultural, spiritual and intellectual co-curricular enrichment opportunities
within the Morehouse community.

4. We will continue to provide opportunities for faculty, student and staff interaction that will enhance
community development and brotherhood.

5. We will provide living and learning environments, as well as recreational and social opportunities, to
promote a well-balanced, healthy lifestyle.

As the official liaison between the College and the student body, the Office of Student Services will accomplish our
goals by being committed to Morehouse College institutional values: Accountability, Civility, Community,
Compassion, Honesty, Integrity, Respect, Spirituality and Trust. Additionally, we will embrace core values of
excellence, innovation, leadership and social justice that will inform and direct our decisions, services and
program initiatives.

The Senior Vice President for Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services
has overall responsibility for student conduct and for maintaining the quality of student life. The quality of the
undergraduate experience at Morehouse depends on a wide range of co-curricular programming and services
provided by the departments that operate under the auspices of the Office of Student Services. They are: Housing
and Residential Life, Student Health Services, Counseling Center, Student Leadership, Student Development,
Student Life and Planning, Off-Campus Student Services, Greek Life, Recreation, Intramurals and Fitness, Career
Planning and Placement, International Student Services, Athletics, Student Conduct and Campus Life, and
Morehouse Student Publications.

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OFFICE OF STUDENT CONDUCT

Monday- Friday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Suite 200, Kilgore Campus Center
(470) 639-0421
STUDENT GRIEVANCE POLICY
Policy Statement

Morehouse College seeks to cultivate an academic village that encourages tolerant, respectful, and non-
discriminatory behavior from all of its inhabitants. An environment that promotes communication, fairness and
deference among students, faculty, staff and administration is of the highest priority to the College. To ensure that
these behaviors are appropriately facilitated, Morehouse College has instituted such policies that provide a medium
for resolving discrepancies of any nature. The following policy and procedure pertain to the process by which a
student may have grievance with any occurrence involving any member of the College community.

Grievances

A “grievance” shall be defined as an actual or supposed circumstance that is regarded as just cause for complaint.

The “griever” shall be the complainant.


The “respondent” shall be the defendant.

• The expression of a grievance may be verbal or written using an approved format issued by the Office of
Student Services.
• The process of execution of a grievance may be of a formal resolution procedure or an informal resolution
procedure with a contingency of transposition.
• A grievance may also be co-authored if there is a circumstance that affects more than one student.

General Grievance
A grievance issued by a student against any member of the College Community that violates the
statues expressed in the Grievance Policy Statement.

Grade Discrepancy
A grievance issued by a student whose intention is to dispute a grade given in any course that he
believes was given in an arbitrary or capricious manner by a professor.

Sexual Harassment
Issued by a student, a grievance’s nature is explicitly sexual. The foundation of this grievance is
infringement (in any manner) of the College’s Sexual Assault/ Harassment Policy outlined in the
Student Handbook against Students.

Discrimination
A grievance issued by a student who has experienced treatment or consideration based on class or
category rather than individual merit; partiality or prejudice founded in that of ethnicity, gender,
age, religion, sexual orientation or disability.

Informal Resolution Procedure

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The Informal Resolution Procedure invites all parties (the grieved and the respondent), utilizing effective
communication, to discuss the grieved circumstance and deduce a viable solution that is agreed upon by all parties
involved. Students should take proactive measures to resolve their grievance with the respondent and make
notations of such measures. Students are also encouraged to employ the use of a third-party mediator who is agreed
to by all parties, in the event that effective communication warrants such an intermediary.

If a student finds his issue unsatisfactorily resolved, the respondent uncooperative, or evasive, then he may appeal to
the respondent’s superior to obtain a desirable resolution.

Formal Resolution Procedure

The Formal Resolution Procedure may be used if, and only if, the Informal Resolution Procedure has failed to yield
a satisfactory result for the student, based on irreconcilable differences. The Formal Resolution Procedure begins
with the filing of a written grievance (using a format published by the Office of Student Services) with the Office of
Student Services.
• Written grievances must be filed within thirty (30) days of occurrence. Grievances filed after the 30-day
deadline will be considered at the discretion of the College Judiciary Committee or the Honor and Conduct
Review Board.
• Grievances filed using the Formal Resolution Procedure that are discovered to have been filed under false
pretenses will be dismissed immediately, and the filer may be subject to corrective action.
• Formal grievances must not conflict with any other policy expressly stated by the College.
• All formal grievances will be kept confidential except for the privilege of those parties’ involved and authorized
members of the College. This Confidentiality Agreement may be voided with the consent of all parties involved
in the grievance.
• The Formal Resolution Procedure may not be used as a medium for retaliation, intimidation or coercion. Such
cases shall be expelled indefinitely.

The Process:

1. File formal grievance


Formal grievance is filed with the Office of Student Services through the Attorney General (appointed by
the Student Government Association president)
a. Copy of grievance sent to the designated superiors
{Designated superior who has the authority to enforce resolution ruled by the College Student conduct
Committee or Honor and Conduct Review Board. Should the superior find the resolution
unenforceable, he may offer an alternate solution within three (3) business days. The grieved and the
student conduct administrator must approve alternate resolution.)
2. Preliminary mediation hearing
The appointed student conduct administrator will determine the grievability of all cases. Cases found to be
incredulously based and/or in violation of the statues of the Formal Resolution Procedure will be dismissed.
Dismissed cases are incontestable and may not be appealed.
a. A written notice will be issued by the Office of Student Services to all parties involved (griever
and respondent) informing them of the date, time and location of the hearing. Hearings of both
parties will be held separately, and the grieveability will be determined thereafter.
b. The student conduct administrator, after discussing the position of both parties and a possible
resolution, will submit a written recommendation to the College Judiciary Committee or the
Honor and Conduct Review Board.
c. The student conduct administrator will refer cases to either the College Judiciary Committee or the
Honor and Conduct Review Board at his/her discretion.
3. College Judiciary Committee Hearing/ Honor and Conduct Review Board
The CJC/ HCRB will hear the case with all parties present and deliver an equitable and unbiased resolution.
a. The attorney general may represent the student griever.
b. The CJC/ HCRB have 24 hours to make a ruling. In extenuating circumstances that require longer
deliberation, the CJC/ HCRB must inform all parties of the extension.
4. Resolution

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Resolutions given by the CJC/ HCRB are forwarded to the Respondents superior to execute, and a copy of
the grievance will be retained in the employee’s file with the Office of Human Resources. In the cases of
students, the superior shall be the Office of Student Conduct, who will execute the decision of the CJC/
HCRB.
5. Appeals
Appeals must be filed within seven (7) days of receiving decision from CJC/ HCRB. Appeals may only be
filed if there is any new evidence/information that could sway the CJC/ HCRB to overturn their decision.

1. File appeal with the Office of Student Services and the appointed student conduct
administrator through the attorney general. The Assistant Dean of the College for Student
Conduct will deny or grant the appeal and decide a viable resolution to the case.
2. If the student conduct administrator does not find substantial basis for appeal, the case is
thereby closed.

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Student Grievance Procedure

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE

Grievance Statement Form


Morehouse College
830 Westview Drive, Atlanta, GA 30314
TEL: 470-639-0421
Email: studentconduct@morehouse.edu
This form should be used for the following:
General Grievance, Grade Discrepancy,
Sexual Harassment and Discrimination

Personal information to be completed by the student (please print or type).

Name: Last) First):___________________________________________ Date:______ MOD#:__

Mailing address (Street) (City) (State) (Zip)

State the date of incident, party against whom the grievance is being made, and the dates of attempted
resolution. Attach additional sheets if necessary.

State the policy or procedure that has been violated. Attach additional sheets if necessary.

State your rationale to support your allegation. Attach additional sheets if necessary.

State your suggested resolution. Attach additional sheets if necessary.

Signature
Date

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Morehouse College’s Student Rights and Responsibilities

All students at Morehouse College are considered to be responsible adults. Therefore, each student shall be held
accountable for his own personal behavior. The College expects all students to learn and obey local, state, and
federal laws. In addition, students are expected to observe and adhere to the code of conduct.

Morehouse College students are responsible for reading, knowing, and observing all policies and procedures
related to their in-class behavior and their on- and off-campus conduct. Information regarding these policies and
procedures can be found in the Morehouse College Student Handbook and Online Tigemet. A student’s lack of
awareness of any Morehouse College policy or procedure shall not constitute grounds to be absolved from
violations of those policies.

Student rights are as follows:

• Morehouse College is a private institution committed to equal opportunity and basic human rights for all
students. Morehouse College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex,
disability, or age in its programs and activities.

• Every student has the right to view educational records as required according to Federal Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974.

• The right to request the amendment of the student’s education record that a student believes is inaccurate
or misleading.

• The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s
education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

• The right to file a complaint with the Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the college
to comply with requirements of FERPA.

STUDENT RIGHTS

Academic Rights
Morehouse College supports the right to academic freedom for every student in pursuit of his education. This
includes the freedom to learn, freedom to teach, and the freedom to speak the truth, all which should be done in an
atmosphere of mutual respect.

Freedom of Speech
Morehouse College fully supports the right of a student to assemble peacefully and to express himself in a manner in
which order is maintained.

Freedom to Learn
Morehouse College has determined that “all students shall be responsible for conducting themselves in a manner
that helps to enhance an environment of learning in which the rights, dignity, worth, and freedom of each member of
the academic community is respected.

Right of Confidentiality
No information or documentation referring to a student’s academic or personal life is released to any party outside
the college without the written permission of the student. Any request from a current student or former student, to
release information to a third party, must be made in writing and include the student’s signature. Students have the
right to inspect and review their own official records, except letters of recommendation.

Participation in Institutional Governance


Morehouse College encourages students to involve themselves in activities associated with the governance of the
College by serving on the various committees, councils, and task forces that are charged with making decisions
regarding Morehouse College.

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Student Grievances
Students who encounter disputes with faculty or staff members of Morehouse College should first report any such
grievance to the program/department head. This step should be followed by conferences with persons at
progressively higher levels, including deans and the appropriate vice president.
Student Conduct
Students who attend Morehouse College are expected to conduct themselves in a manner consistent with life at an
academic institution. The Code of Conduct, intended to reinforce this policy, is published in the Student Handbook
and Online Tigernet

• Student Conduct will provide a fair hearing for all parties involved in an incident that may result in a
violation of the student conduct code.
• Any students subject to student conduct process will have their violation(s) reviewed by the following:

(a) Honor & Conduct Review Board


(b) College Judiciary Committee
(c) Administrator as deemed appropriate
• All students shall be presented their alleged violation in written form. A time shall be set for a hearing, not
less than five, nor more than fifteen, calendar days after the student has been notified. Maximum time
limits for scheduling of hearings may be extended at the discretion of the Assistant Dean of the College for
Student Conduct or Designee.
• Students subject to suspension or dismissal may submit an appeal, in writing, to the Assistant Dean of the
College for Student Conduct within four (4) business days after they are notified of the decision and
sanction imposed.
• Generally, the College jurisdiction and discipline shall apply to conduct which occurs on/off College
premises or which adversely affects the College Community and/or the pursuit of its objectives. Students
and Student organizations will be considered for disciplinary action whenever violations are committed on
or at College sponsored event. Whenever conduct violates both the law and guidelines found in this
document, disciplinary action may be taken by the College irrespective of and separate from action taken
by civil authorities.
Right to Be Heard
Students who are in alleged violations of the Code of Conduct of the Morehouse College Student Handbook are
entitled to the right to be heard, the right to conference, and the right to a hearing to refute alleged violations against
them. A student who has been found responsible for violating the Code of Conduct will be subject to disciplinary
action recommend either by their peers of the Honor and Conduct Review Board (HCRB) or with faculty, staff, and
students of the College Judiciary Committee (CJC) and/or Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct. The
Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct may choose one of the methods in which the hearing is being
conducted.

Student responsibilities are as follows:

• Morehouse is an academic community. All members of the community are expected to abide by ethical
standards both in their conduct and in their exercise of responsibilities toward other members of the
community. The Morehouse College Policy on Academic Integrity establishes the basis for academic
standards at the College and the procedures for handling violations. The policy is based on an
understanding that actions in this regard should serve both an educational and disciplinary function.
• The College expects students to understand and adhere to basic standards of honesty and academic
integrity.
• The College has expectations that each Morehouse student will exhibit the qualities of integrity, leadership,
tolerance, respect for persons and property, and compliance with all rules and regulations.

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• Comply with all local, state, and federal laws.

• Refrain from abusive and sexual misconduct.

THE MOREHOUSE COLLEGE


STUDENT CREED

The community of scholars at Morehouse College is dedicated to personal and academic excellence.

Choosing to live in the community obligates each member to code of civilized behavior.

Allegiance to these ideals requires each Morehouse student to refrain from and discourage behaviors, which threaten
the freedom and respect every individual deserves.

As a Morehouse Student,

I will practice personal and academic integrity.

I will respect the rights and property of others.

I will discourage bigotry, while striving to learn from differences in people, ideas and opinions.

I will demonstrate concern for others, their feelings, and their needs for conditions that support their work and
development.

Man of Morehouse College

CLASS EXCUSE POLICY

Each Morehouse student is expected to attend scheduled classes on a routine basis and be punctual. However, class
excuses may be granted for the following reasons with valid written documentation:

• Illness
• Physician’s appointment
• Court appearances
• Funeral
• Military obligation
• Family emergency
• Conference with dean/faculty/staff
• Official school business

Unexcused absences include the following:

• Public transportation problems


• Oversleeping
• Automobile breakdowns

The Senior Vice President or Associate Vice President/dean of college for Student Services or his designee may
provide verification of all official class excuses. Valid written documentation must be submitted to justify class
absences within five (5) calendar days of the class absence.

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For students from other institutions attending Morehouse classes, the same policies and procedures apply, except
that excuses should come from the equivalent officials of the institutions involved.

Class excuses are not issued during the summer sessions.

PHILOSOPHY OF CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE SYSTEM

The conduct and discipline system affects and applies to all currently enrolled students at the College. Its major
purpose is to maintain the integrity of the College and members of the College community, to promote and preserve
an orderly environment, to exercise proper control over disciplinary matters, and to implement established student
conduct procedures in matters affecting all students accused of violating College policies, rules and regulations.

This system is also a developmental tool with two main objectives. While its primary objective is to provide a safe,
secure and hospitable environment for all students and visitors, a secondary goal is to assist students in developing a
high degree of integrity and moral character by encouraging acceptance of personal responsibility for behavior.
Similarly, the conduct and discipline system attempts to modify those behaviors deemed unacceptable by the
College, including, but not limited to, lewd, rude, slanderous or hostile behavior toward anyone by any Morehouse
student.

JURISDICTION OF THE COLLEGE The Student Code of Conduct and the processes for its administration and
enforcement exist for the protection and advancement of the Morehouse College community. Generally, College
jurisdiction and discipline shall apply to conduct that occurs on College premises and at College-sponsored events
and to off-campus conduct that adversely affects the College community and/or the pursuit of its objectives. Each
student shall be responsible for his conduct from the time of application for admission through the actual awarding
of a degree, including times before classes begin, after classes end, and between terms of actual enrollment. The
Student Code of Conduct shall apply to a student’s conduct even if the student withdraws from school while a
disciplinary matter is pending. The Student Code of Conduct applies to individual students and college-affiliated
students organizations. In many instances, a violation of federal, state and local law may also be treated as violation
of College regulations. The Senior Vice President for Student Development and/or Associate Vice President/Dean of
College for Student Services shall decide on a case-by-case basis whether the Student Code of Conduct shall be
applied to conduct occurring off campus.

STUDENT CONDUCT REVIEW PROCESS

The informal student conduct and discipline system is to provide a fair hearing for all parties involved in an incident
that may have resulted in a violation of the student conduct code. Another goal seeks to help college students
develop a high degree of integrity and moral character by encouraging acceptance of personal responsibility for their
behavior. The informal hearing is designed with this in mind. The informal hearing is a private conference that is
held to make sure that all parties fully understand the allegations of misconduct and the College student conduct
process. The informal hearing is scheduled when the “notification of violation” is prepared and sent to the referred
student(s) via mail, hand delivery and/or electronic. Students who choose to assume individual responsibility for
their behavior through this process are not required to have a formal hearing.

Acceptance of responsibility: A student who accepts responsibility shall be advised:

1. That he has the right, but is not required, to provide additional information regarding the allegations.
2. The Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or a designee shall make the determination of
sanctions unless the offense is a major violation for which suspension or expulsion may be imposed.
3. That the student waives his right to have the matter heard in the formal process by a student conduct body.
4. That any sanctions imposed may not be appealed to the College Appellate Committee.
5. That the student’s acceptance of responsibility must be in writing on a form provide by the Assistant Dean
of the College for Student Conduct or a designee, which must be signed and dated by the student and is
maintained in the student’s file within the Office of Student Conduct.

Student who choose not to assume individual responsibility for their behavior through this process are required to
have a formal hearing.

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Denial of responsibility: A student who denies responsibility or prefers to have the violation heard by a student
conduct body shall be advised:

1. That he need not provide any additional information regarding the alleged violation to the Assistant Dean
of the College for Student Conduct or a designee during the formal hearing.
2. The date, time and location of a hearing before the student conduct body which shall be given notice at
least five (5) business days prior to such hearing, if one had not been scheduled. No hearing will be held
unless the student has been given at least five (5) business days’ notice.
3. That the student must provide an address, electronic or otherwise to receive notice of proceedings.
4. That the student has a right to an advisor of the student’s choice as set out and that student is advised to
have an advisor, but is required to have an advisor in all suspension and expulsion cases.
5. Student’s denial of responsibility shall be writing on a form provided by the Assistant Dean of the College
for Student Conduct or designee, which must be signed and dated by the student and is maintained in the
student’s file within the Office of Student Conduct.

The formal hearing is designed to afford students “fundamental fairness” by peer or faculty/staff review. All
students subjected to student conduct action must have their violations reviewed by the following: a) the Honor and
Conduct Review Board (HCRB); b) the College Judiciary Committee (CJC); or c) the College Appellate Committee
(CAC) or d) an appropriate College administrator.

Honor and Conduct Review Board (HCRB)

Students are referred to the HCRB by the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct for minor violations of
the code of conduct so that their cases may be reviewed by their peers. In this type of hearing, there are (5) five
student justices who will review the violation using the same procedures applicable to College Judiciary Committee
hearings. The chief justice of the HCRB, who is appointed by the SGA president, will serve as the chairperson for
this HCRB. The student justices who comprise the HCRB serve for approximately one (1) academic year and are
elected by their class during the annual SGA student elections. If a student justice seat is vacant after an election, the
SGA president will appoint a designee. The HCRB can only make recommendations to their adviser. The Assistant
Dean of the College for Student Conduct or designee is responsible for administrating the conduct and discipline
system and serves as the adviser and will notify student(s) of the final decision.

College Judiciary Committee (CJC)

Students may be appointed to serve on the CJC by the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct. The
committee consists of a group of (5) five members of faculty, staff and students.

The exact membership of a committee may vary. Staff members on the CJC serve a minimum two-year
term. Students who serve on the CJC are allowed to a serve a maximum term limit of two years. Faculty
representatives on the CJC are appointed by the senior Vice President/Provost for Academic Affairs and serve a
minimum two-year term. In the event that a CJC member seat is vacant or absent, Vice President for Student
Development or designee shall select and appoint from an approve group of faculty, staff, and students to serve on
the CJC as alternates.

College Appellate Committee (CAC)

Students may be appointed to serve on the CAC by the Vice President for Student Development or designee. The
committee consists of a group of (5) five members of faculty, staff and students.

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The exact membership of a committee may vary. Staff members on the CAC serve a minimum two-year
term. Students who serve on the CAC are allowed to a serve a maximum term limit of two years. Faculty
representatives on the CAC are appointed by the senior Vice President/Provost for Academic Affairs and serve a
minimum two-year term. In the event that a CAC member seat is vacant or absent, Vice President for Student
Development or designee shall select and appoint from an approve group of faculty, staff, and students to serve on
the CAC as alternates.

The Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct will automatically refer cases involving recommendation for
suspension or expulsion to the CAC. The student may file a written appeal with the CAC within (4) business days*
after he is notified of the recommendation of the HCRB or CJC by the Assistant Dean of the College for Student
Conduct. Appeals are limited to questions of improper procedure, excessive sanction, or the availability of new
information that was unavailable to the student at the time of his formal review.

Following the review, the CAC shall deliberate privately and vote on whether to uphold the recommendation of the
HCRB or CJC. The CAC may deny the appeal, reduce the sanction, or in the instance of improper procedure or new
information, remand the matter to the appropriate party for a new hearing. The judgment of the CAC shall be
determined by a majority vote and shall be considered the final judgment of the College on the matter.

Standards of Proof
The core issue in every student disciplinary violation is “conduct.” College procedures need not be bound by the
same standards of proof as a court of law. Recommendation by the Student Conduct Hearing Panel shall be based on
a “preponderance of the evidence”. Preponderance of evidence means that is more likely than not that the alleged
violations occurred and that the accused student was responsible for the violation. The burden of proof in student
conduct hearings will be on the side of the complainant. It is the responsibility of the accused student to present
information that could clear him of the offenses which he has been allegedly accused of violating. Naturally, the
more serious the incident, the more strict scrutiny will increase.

Student Disciplinary Records

All records concerning Code violation hearing under this procedure shall be held in the Office of Student Conduct.
Disciplinary records are confidential and will not be released outside the College without the student’s written
permission or by order of a court of law. Exceptions are noted below. A copy of disciplinary case materials will stay
in a student’s file until approximately seven years after graduation, at which time it will be purged and/or destroyed.
Student disciplinary records are maintained in the Office of Student Conduct. All student records shall be protected
according to the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

Notification of student conduct action is made on a “need to know” basis and may include notification to the
Athletic Department in cases involving student athletes; the Music Department in cases involving Glee Club, jazz
and marching band members; the Housing and Residential Education Department in cases involving residence hall
students; and victims of violent crimes involving student perpetrators. Copies of all student conduct sanction letters
are sent to the Vice President for Student Development.

In the case of a suspension or dismissal, notification is sent to the senior Vice President/Provost for Academic
Affairs, Senior Vice President for Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student
Services, Associate Dean of Admissions and Assistant Dean of Records and Registrar, Chief of Campus Police,
Director of Housing and Residential Education, and the Student.

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Provisions for Process

If a student is charged with an off-campus violation of federal, state or local laws that demonstrates flagrant
disregard for the College community, the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or designee may
conduct an investigation to determine if the violation has merit and/or if it can be disposed of administratively by
mutual consent of the parties involved on a basis acceptable to the Senior Vice President for Student Development,
Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services. Such disposition shall be final and there shall be no
subsequent proceedings. If the violation cannot be disposed of by mutual consent, the Assistant Dean of the College
for Student Conduct or designee may later serve in the same matter as the HCRB, CJC or a member thereof.

All violations shall be presented to the accused student in written form. A time shall be set for a hearing, not less
than five no more than 15 calendar days after the student has been notified. The scheduling of hearings may be
extended at the discretion of the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or designee.

The HCRB and CJC will conduct hearings according to the following guidelines:

1. Hearings normally will be conducted in private, with the admission of others subject to the discretion of the
chief justices and /or chairperson. With the written consent of the students involved and the Assistant Dean of
the College for Student Conduct, a representative of the student press may be admitted but shall not have the
privilege of participating in the hearing.
2. Hearings shall be conducted by the College Judiciary Committee, Honor Conduct Review Board or the
Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct.
3. All student conduct violations shall be presented to the accused student in written form via certified mail, hand
delivery, or electronic notification by the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct.
4. If a student fails to obey the summons of a College official, the student shall forfeit his opportunity to bring
forth information and/or testimony.
5. There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all hearings before a HCRB and/or CJC.
The record shall be the property of the College.
6. In hearings involving more than one accused student, the chairperson of the CJC or Chief Justice, at his or her
discretion, may permit the hearings to be conducted separately.
7. The complainant and the accused student have the right to be assisted by an advisor of their choice; however,
the advisor must be a member of the College community and cannot be an attorney or parent. The complainant
and the accused student are responsible for presenting their own information and, therefore, advisors are not
permitted to speak or to participate directly in any hearing before a HCRB and CJC. A student should select as
an advisor a person whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the student conduct
hearing because delays will not normally be allowed due to the scheduling conflicts of an advisor.
8. The complainant, the accused student and the HCRB and CJC may arrange for witnesses who are identified by
the complainant and/or accused student at least two business days prior to the hearing. Witnesses will provide
information and answer questions from the HCRB and CJC. The complainant and the accused student may
indirectly pose questions to each other and to witnesses; more specifically, they will address their questions to
the chairperson or chief justice rather than to the witnesses or each other. This method is used to preserve the
educational tone of the hearing and to avoid the creation of an adversarial environment. Decisions about
whether or not potential information will be received by the HCRB and CJC shall be made by the chairperson
or chiefjustice HCRB and CJC.
9. Pertinent records, exhibits and written statements may be accepted as information for consideration by the CJC
or HCRB at the discretion of the chairperson or chiefjustice.
10. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the chairperson or chief justice of the CJC or
HCRB.
11. Formal rules of process, procedure, and/or technical rules of information, such as those applied to criminal or
civil courts are not used in student conduct code proceedings.
12. After the hearing, the HCRB and/or CJC shall determine whether the student has violated the conduct code.

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ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY

Morehouse is an academic community. All members of the community are expected to abide by ethical standards
both in their conduct and in their exercise of responsibilities toward other members of the community. The
Morehouse College Policy on Academic Integrity establishes the basis for academic standards at the College and the
procedures for handling violations of them. The policy is based on an understanding that disciplinary actions for
academic dishonesty should serve both an educational and disciplinary function.

The College expects students to understand and adhere to basic standards of honesty and academic integrity.
Actions that are dishonest or that lack integrity includes, but is not limited, to:

• Plagiarism

The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use by paraphrase or direct quotation,
from the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment.
It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency
engaged in the selling of term papers and other academic materials

In projects and assignments prepared independently, students must never represent the ideas or the
language of others as their own.

• Destruction of Resources or the Work of Others

Students must not destroy or alter either the work of other students or the educational resources
and materials of the College.

• Use of Work in One Course from Another

Students must not take unfair advantage of fellow students by representing work completed for
one course as original work for another or by deliberately disregarding course rules and
regulations.

• Cheating

Students must not engage in cheating in completing course work. Unless directed by the faculty
member, students should neither give nor receive assistance on assignments or examinations.

The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to:


1) the use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests or examinations;
2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers,
preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments;
3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member
of the College faculty or staff.

• Incorrect Reporting of Data

In laboratory research projects involving the collection of data, students must accurately report
data observed and not alter or falsify data for any reason.

Review Process for Alleged Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy

Phase I: Faculty Action and Mediation

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As used in this policy, the term “days” shall mean calendar days or work days in which the College is in
session, including reading and examination periods, but excluding weekends and the days after the last
examination in the semester and the first day of class in another. Faculty members who suspect a violation of
academic integrity should adhere to the following procedures:

• If the faculty member believes that the violation resulted from an error in judgment and was unintentional,
he or she may, at his or her discretion, elect to handle the matter preliminarily. If the instance can be used
to educate the student about appropriate academic standards, the faculty member shall inform the student of
the charge, meet to discuss the matter, and then take action within the context of the course. The permitted
actions of a faculty member in such an instance shall include requiring the student to repeat the assignment
or examination or to complete an alternate assignment or examination; or issuing a failing grade for the
assignment, examination or course. The faculty member shall notify the student of his or her decision and
the manner in which it was resolved.

• In the case of a course failure, a notice must be given in writing to the student and the Dean of Records and
Registration. A student who receives a failing grade in the course in this manner may appeal the decision to
the Divisional Dean.

• If a faculty member elects to address the violation in an academic manner, he or she shall send written
notification of the charge and action taken to the dean for the division in which the student has declared his
major. (Note: the faculty chair in the student’s declared major is responsible for reporting/monitoring
multiple violations of this policy).

• If possible, this situation may be disposed of administratively by mutual consent or through a process of
mediation between the student and the faculty person. If a resolution is reached, the Student Conduct
Administrator may impose sanctions, up to and including dismissal from College.

Phase II: Formal Review

At the time that an HCRB is impaneled, the coordinator shall, by mail or hand delivery, furnish the student
with a written notice of the violation and the date, time and place for the hearing, which shall be held at least
five calendar days, but not more than 10 days,* after the board is impaneled.

The HCRB shall conduct a formal review of all violations and information. At the proceeding, the student will
be afforded the opportunity to respond. The faculty member also shall be available to make a report to the
board.

After reviewing the information, including the statements of all witnesses, the HCRB shall meet in closed
session to determine whether a violation of the academic integrity code has occurred. If a majority of the
members of the HCRB determine that the violation is supported by a preponderance of the information, then the
HCRB shall determine the appropriate penalties. Alternatively, the HCRB may make a recommendation to the
Student Conduct Administrator, who may accept, reject, or modify the HCRB recommendation but may not
impose any penalty greater than the one imposed by the HCRB.

If the student fails to appear at the time and place appointed for the hearing, the HCRB may proceed without
him. Legal counsel or parents will not be permitted to participate in the formal review of HCRB proceedings.

The penalties that may be imposed by the HCRB shall include:

1. The student must repeat the assignment or exam or completean alternative assignment.
2. The student receives an F on the assignment or exam.
3. The student receives an F in the class.
4. The student receives an F in the class, and a notation is made on the student’s record.
5. The student receives an F in the class, with or without a notation to the student’s record, and the
student is placed on academic probation.

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6. The student receives an F in the class, a notation is made on the student’s record, and the student is
suspended for one [or more] terms from the College.
7. The student receives an F in the class, a notation is made on the student’s record, and the student is
dismissed from the College.

When the offense is sufficiently serious to merit failure in the course, immediately after such determination, if
no appeal is taken or a final decision on appeal affirms the failing grade, the student will be administratively
withdrawn from the course and will not be permitted to remain in class, to attend classes, or take any
examinations in the course. A student may not withdraw from a class in which an allegation of an academic
violation is pending unless and until the matter is resolved favorably for the student. A student who receives a
failing grade and is administratively withdrawn from a course following faculty action, mediation, or a hearing
shall not be entitled to any refund or credit of tuition for that course.

Receiving an F in the class with academic probation, notation on the internal academic folder, or violation of
the “Crown Standards” should be considered the “default” penalty. Mitigating or aggravating circumstances
may suggest alternate penalties. Mitigating circumstances include factors such as the student’s class status
(freshman, sophomore, junior or senior). Aggravating circumstances include factors such as a repeat offense
and severity of the violation. Sanctions 1 and 2 above may only be imposed by the AJO or HCRB with the
faculty member’s concurrence.

Records of a student’s violation of academic standards shall be retained for a period of two years from the date
of the student’s graduation from the College, or five years from the date of the student’s last attendance at the
College if the student ceases to matriculate prior to graduation. Notations made to the student’s permanent
record shall remain indefinitely. All such records shall be maintained in a confidential manner. Students have a
right to inspect their records relating to academic integrity violations in accordance with College policies.

* As used in this policy, the term “days" shall mean calendar days or work days in which the College is in session,

including reading and examination periods, but excluding weekends and the days after the last examination in one
semester and thefirst day of class in another.

Phase HI: The Appeals Process

In all matters pending before them, the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or the HCRB, as
appropriate, shall notify the student in writing of the findings and the penalty imposed. The student will be
informed of his right to appeal to the College Appellate Committee (CAC). The Assistant Dean of the College
for Student Conduct will automatically refer cases involving decisions for suspension or expulsion to the CAC.
The student may file a written appeal with the CAC within four business days* after he is notified of the
decision of the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or HCRB. Appeals are limited to questions
of improper procedure, excessive sanction, or the availability of new evidence that was unavailable to the
student at the time of his informal review or the original HCRB meeting.

Following review, the CAC shall deliberate privately and vote on whether to uphold the decision of the
Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or HCRB. The CAC may deny the appeal, reduce the
sanction, or, in the instance of improper procedure or new evidence, remand the matter to the appropriate party
for a new hearing. The judgment of the CAC shall be determined by a majority vote and shall be considered the
final judgment of the College on the matter.

COLLEGE GENERAL STATEMENT ON CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES AND ALCOHOL

The unlawful use, possession, distribution, sale or manufacture of controlled substances or alcoholic beverages,
including the improper use of prescription medicines by Morehouse students, is strictly prohibited. Any student
found in violation of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action.

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Alcoholic Beverage Policy

The College does not condone the misuse or abuse of alcoholic beverages. Members of the College community are
held accountable for their decisions regarding their use of alcohol, as well as behavior that occurs as a result of
alcohol use. For students who violate this policy, specific sanctions include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Automatic disciplinary probation for first-time violators of the policy (includes possession or
consumption).
2. Suspension from the College for second-time violators of the policy (includes possession or
consumption).
3. Permanent expulsion from the College for third-time violators of the policy (includes possession or
consumption).

Controlled Substances* Policy

Morehouse College does not condone the misuse or abuse of controlled substances. Although the Assistant Dean of
the College for Student Conduct or the HCRB and/or CJC will determine on a case-by-case basis the nature of the
sanctions against students who violate this policy, specific sanctions include, but are not limited to:

1. Like Alcohol
2. Automatic suspension from the College for first-time violators of the policy on possession,
distribution, sale or manufacture of illegal drugs.
3. Permanent expulsion from the College for second-time violators of the policy on possession,
distribution, sale or manufacture of illegal drugs.

*The term “controlled substances” is used in this handbook instead of the term “drugs "for two reasons. First, the term “drugs "
refers to any chemical substances that, when taken into the body, changes the chemistry and functioning of the body. These
changes may be positive or negative. Drugs that have a therapeutic effect are generally called “medicine. ” Those with negative
effects have usually been called “drugs. ” For a great many persons in society, the term “drug” carries a negative connotation,
but it is not always accurately used. Secondly, “controlled substances " is a term that refers to any chemical substances whose
distribution and/or use is controlled or prohibited by some law or statute, or whose distribution and/or use is permitted by a
prescription issued by a licensed practitioner. This term is useful in that it also distinguishes so-called “over the counter” drugs
from prescription and illegal drugs that in essence comprise the “controlled substances. ” Moreover, controlled substances are
classified under the Drug Enforcement Act into schedules that indicate their relative medicinal use and probability of abuse and
dependence (addiction).

ABUSIVE CONDUCT POLICY

Abusive Conduct in General

The College does not condone abusive conduct in any form. Abusive conduct includes the following behaviors:

1. Physical abuse
2. Verbal abuse
3. Threats
4. Intimidation
5. Harassment, including sexual and discriminatory harassment
6. Coercion and/or other conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person
Morehouse College is committed to fostering an open and supportive community that promotes learning, teaching
and discovery. This commitment includes maintaining a safe and healthy educational and work environment free
from sexual and gender-based harassment, and discrimination. Any form of sexual or gender-based harassment,
discrimination or sexual violence subverts the mission of the College and offends the integrity of the campus
community. This includes acts or threats of violence and/or misconduct via email, text, and all social media
platforms.

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TITLE IX

Morehouse College is committed to fostering an open and supportive community that promotes learning, teaching
and discovery. This commitment includes maintaining a safe and healthy educational and work environment that is
free from sexual and gender-based harassment and discrimination. Any form of sexual or gender-based harassment,
discrimination or sexual violence subverts the mission of the College and offends the integrity of the campus
community. This includes acts or threats of violence and/or misconduct via email, text, and all social media
platforms.

The College’s Sexual Misconduct Policy is designed to ensure a safe and non-discriminatory educational and work
environment that meets the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Sexual misconduct, as
defined by the College’s policy, can be committed by both men and women and can occur between same or different
sexes. All students, faculty, staff and third parties are expected not only to treat one another with mutual respect but
also to conduct themselves in a manner that does not infringe upon the rights of others.

All acts of sexual misconduct are prohibited by the College, including, but not limited to:

■ Sexual Assault Domestic Violence Dating Violence


• Non-consensual Sexual Non-consensual Sexual Rape
Contact Intercourse
■ Stalking Intimidation Sexual Exploitations
■ Cyberbullying Retaliation Quid Pro Quo

The College will provide educational and training programs regarding sexual and gender-based harassment while
also promoting sexual violence and harassment prevention awareness. In addition, it will provide support to
members of the campus community who experience, encounter, and/or witness behavior that violates the Sexual
Misconduct Policy and the College’s Code of Conduct. The Title IX Coordinator is designated by the College to
coordinate all compliance efforts with federal and state laws and oversee the investigation and resolution of
complaints relating to sexual and gender-based harassment involving students.

A. Who and What is Covered Under Title IX

Applicability: This policy applies to all sexual and gender-based harassment and misconduct (as defined in the
Morehouse College Sexual Misconduct Policy) committed or experienced by students that occurs in connection with
all academic, educational, extracurricular, athletic, and other Morehouse College programs, whether the programs
take place in College facilities, at a program sponsored by the College at another location, or elsewhere.

Freedom of Expression: The College is committed to the principles of free inquiry and free expression. Vigorous
discussion and debate are fundamental to the College. Title IX is neither intended to stifle teaching methods or
freedom of expression generally nor will it be permitted to do so. However, sexual harassment is neither a legally
protected expression nor the proper exercise of academic freedom. It compromises the integrity of the College, its
tradition of intellectual freedom and the trust placed in its members.

Prohibited Conduct: The College prohibits all acts of sexual misconduct, as they are defined in Section
3.1 of the Morehouse College Sexual Misconduct Policy. More broadly, sexual misconduct is defined as
sexual contact without consent and includes: intentional touching, either of the complainant or when
the complainant is forced to touch (directly or through clothing) another person's genitals, breasts,
thighs, anus or buttocks; rape (sexual intercourse without consent, whether by an acquaintance or a
stranger); attempted rape; sodomy (oral sex or anal intercourse) without consent; attempted forcible
sodomy without consent; or penetration with an object without consent. To constitute lack of consent,
the acts must be committed either by force, intimidation, or exploitation of the victim's mental
incapacity or physical helplessness.

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Sexual Harassment: Sexual Harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, unwelcome requests for sexual
favors, and other unwelcome verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when a person’s submission to
such conduct is implicitly or explicitly made the basis for employment decisions, academic evaluation, grades or
advancement, or other decisions affecting participation in a College program or activity; or such conduct that is
sufficiently severe or pervasive that it unreasonably denies, adversely limits, or interferes with a person’s
participation in or benefit from the education, employment or other programs and services of the College and creates
an environment that a reasonable person would find to be intimidating or offensive.

Reporting: Reports of sexual misconduct are taken seriously and will be dealt with promptly. The specific action
taken in any case depends on the nature and gravity of the conduct reported and may include implementing interim
measures, investigation, and the initiation of grievance and disciplinary processes. If sexual harassment and/or
misconduct has occurred, whether on or off campus, the College will act to stop the harassment, prevent its
recurrence, and discipline and/or take appropriate action against those responsible. The College will not attempt to
resolve a sexual harassment complaint informally such as through a conference with the parties or mediation.

Once the complaint is received, the Title IX Coordinator is required to provide: (1) a written explanation of your
rights and options including your right to notify law enforcement and to be assisted by campus authorities in doing
so, (2) an explanation of your rights to obtain no contact orders or to enforce an order already in existence, and (3)
contact information for campus and local advocacy, counseling, health, mental health and legal assistance services.
You will also be provided with written detailed procedures that you should follow if a sex offense occurs, including
who to contact and information about the importance of preserving physical evidence.

All allegations of sexual harassment and/sexual misconduct will be resolved by the Title IX Coordinator pursuant to
the College’s Sexual Misconduct Procedure.

Questions or complaints about sexual misconduct should be directed to the Title IX Coordinator:

Terraine Bailey
Title IX Coordinator and Compliance Specialist
Gloster Hall, Room 109
470-639-0584 (Direct)
terraine.bailey@morehouse.edu

Sexual Harassment and/or Sexual Misconduct by Third Parties: The College prohibits sexual harassment by
third parties towards members of the College community when the third party has been brought into contact with the
student through a College program or activity. Although individuals who are not students or employees of the
College are not subject to discipline under the College’s internal processes, the College will take prompt, corrective
action to eliminate sexual harassment and prevent its recurrence in those circumstances. If a student believes that
they have been subject to sexual misconduct in a College program or activity by an individual who is not a College
student or employee, the individual should report the alleged harassment or misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator
and the Administrator/Title IX Office responsible for that program or activity.

Complaints Involving Faculty and Staff: Morehouse College students will be graded, supervised and selected for
various academic and extra-curricular opportunities by employees of the College during their educational
experiences. If a student is subject to sexual harassment or sexual misconduct by a faculty or staff member, the
student should report the alleged harassment and/misconduct to Title IX Coordinator. The College will take prompt
action to resolve the situation and make reasonable efforts to prevent any continued harassment.

Retaliation: The College prohibits retaliation against persons who complain about alleged sexual harassment and
sexual violence and/or cooperate, testify, or participate in any manner in an investigation or proceeding of reported
harassment. Retaliation includes intimidating, threatening, coercing, or in any way discriminating against the
individual because of the individual’s complaint or participation in an investigation. Retaliation and/or reprisals
against an individual who, in good faith, reports or provides information about behavior that may violate this policy
are against the law and will not be tolerated.

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Sanctions: Individuals who violate this policy are subject to discipline up to and including expulsion, suspension
and/or other appropriate sanctions or actions.

False Reporting: Intentionally making a false report or providing false information is grounds for sanctions and
discipline.

B. Consent Policy

Consent is Key: Morehouse College encourages all students to engage in healthy relationships built upon open
dialog and mutual respect. Safe and healthy relationships are not left to assumptions or based on prior
interactions. Affirmative consent from both parties is required prior to engaging in all sexual activities.
Consent can be withdrawn by either person at any time.

Consent: Affirmative consent is defined as clear unambiguous agreement, expressed in mutually understandable
words or actions, to engage in a particular sexual activity. Whether valid consent has been given will be judged
based upon what a reasonable person would have understood from such words or actions. Consent must be
voluntarily given and is not valid if: obtained by physical force, coercion, or threat; when a person is
incapacitated; when an intellectual or other disability prevents a person from having the capacity to give
consent; or if consent is given for a particular sexual activity on a prior occasion (it cannot be presumed to
constitute consent to engage in a different sexual activity or to engage again in the same sexual activity).

C. Sharing of Information

Confidentiality: The College recognizes the importance of confidentiality. Information shared by an individual
with designated campus or community professionals cannot be revealed to any other individual without express
permission of the individual. Those campus and community professionals include: medical providers, mental health
providers, ordained clergy, and rape crisis counselors, all of whom have legally protected confidentiality. These
individuals are prohibited from breaking confidentiality unless there is an imminent threat of harm to self or others.

Privacy: The College is committed to protecting the privacy of all individuals relating to any complaint of sexual
misconduct. Information related to a report of misconduct will only be shared with a limited circle of individuals.
The use of this information is restricted to those College employees who “need to know” to assist in the active
review, investigation, or resolution of the report. While not bound by confidentiality, these individuals will be
discreet and respect the privacy of all individuals involved in the process.

Responsible Employee: A Responsible Employee is someone who has the authority or who a student responsibly
believes has the authority/duty to act to redress sexual harassment and/or misconduct, and is mandated to report
incidents of sexual harassment and/misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator, regardless of how slight the incident
may seem. All faculty members, administrators, and staff at Morehouse College are Responsible Employees.
D. Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Training
Training, Education and Prevention: All students are required to participate in on-going campus sexual assault
awareness and prevention trainings including online surveys and courses and small group sessions and assignments.

a. Student Leaders: All Student Leaders (e.g. SGA, RA, Orientation Leaders, etc.) are required to
complete the online AlcoholEdu and Haven Sexual Assault Prevention courses at the beginning of
each school year.

b. New and Incoming Students: Sexual assault awareness and prevention training is conducted as a part
of New Student Orientation at the beginning of each academic year. Incoming students are required to
complete the online AlcoholEdu and Haven Sexual Assault Prevention courses prior to their arrival for
New Student Orientation.

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E. Resources

For health emergencies or if emergency assistance is needed after school hours, call 404-215-2666 (Campus
Police) or call 911. Campus Police will respond and call an ambulance, if necessary. You should also go to the
nearest emergency room to ensure that any physical evidence is preserved.

• Morehouse Campus Police


830 Westview Drive
Robert Hall, Southwest Annex
Phone: (404) 215-2666 (24 hours)
Alt. phone: (404) 427-7396 (in case of power outage)
www.campuspolice@morehouse.edu

• Morehouse Student Counseling Center


830 Westview Drive
Sale Hall Annex
Atlanta GA, 30314
Phone: 470-639-0231
Hours: Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
www.morehouse.edu/campus life/counseling

Professional counseling services help students resolve personal difficulties and acquire the skills, attitudes and
knowledge that will enable them to take full advantage of their experiences at Morehouse College. Counseling
services are free, confidential and available to currently enrolled students. Services include but are not limited
to issues such as emotional crisis, relationships, academic/educational, career and other personal issues.

• Morehouse Student Health Center


James B. Ellison, Sr. Student Health Center
Brazeal Hall, Ground Floor (north end of campus
830 Westview Drive, S.W.
Atlanta, GA 30314-3773
Office: (470)639-0603 Fax: (470)639-0973
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(Closed on weekends and College recognized holidays).
www.morehouse.edu/campus life/studenthealth

Physician Hours
Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday: 1:00PM to 4:00PM
Tuesday: 12:30PM to 3:30PM
Friday: 12:30PM to 4:30PM
E. External Reporting: In addition to the internal resources described above, students may pursue complaints
directly with the government agencies that deal with unlawful harassment and discrimination claims. A violation of
this policy may exist even where the conduct in question does not violate the law. You may contact the following
agencies:

The Office for Civil Rights U. S. Department of Education


Atlanta Office Office for Civil Rights
U. S. Department of Education Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building
61 Forsyth St., S. W., Ste. 19T10 400 Maryland Avenue, S. W.
Atlanta, GA 30303 Washington, D. C. 20202
404-974-9406 Fax: 404-974-9471 800-421-3481 Fax: 202-453-6012
Email: OCR.Atlanta@ed.gov Email: OCR@ed.gov

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F. Direct Communication: An individual may act on concerns about sexual harassment directly, by addressing the
other party in person, or writing a letter describing the unwelcome behavior and its effect and stating that the
behavior must stop. The Title IX Office can help the individual plan what to say or write, and likewise can counsel
persons who receive such communications.

G. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence Harassment by Third Parties

The College prohibits sexual harassment by third parties towards members of the College community when the third
party has been brought into contact with the student or employee through a College program or activity. Although
individuals who are not students or employees of the College are not subject to discipline under the College’s
internal processes, the College will take prompt, corrective action to eliminate sexual harassment and prevent its
recurrence in those circumstances.

If a student or an employee believes that they have been sexually harassed in a College program or activity by an
individual who is not a College student or employee, the individual should report the alleged harassment or violence
to the Title IX Office and the Administrator responsible for that program or activity.

I. Filing a Formal Complaint

• The applicable procedure depends on the circumstances and the status of the person bringing the
charge and the person against whom the charge is brought. Generally the Complainant should provide
a written statement of the incident underlying the complaint as soon as possible after the alleged sexual
harassment occurs. The College can only take corrective action when it becomes aware of problems.
Therefore, students and employees, who believe that they have experienced sexual harassment or
sexual violence, are encouraged to come forward with their complaint and seek assistance within the
College. Likewise, students and employees who believe that they have witnessed sexual harassment
are encouraged to report the alleged harassment or violence promptly.

• The Complainant may also provide pertinent records and documentation. Information that is helpful to
an inquiry and resolution of the complaint includes:
• Date, Time, Name, E-mail, Address and Phone Number of the Complainant
• Complainant’s title or program /year of study (student)
• Complainant’s department, division or business unit (employee)
• Complainant’s role in the incident, e.g., target of alleged sexual harassment/violence, witness,
friend
• Name of the alleged harasser (“Respondent”)
• Respondent’s title or program/year of study (student)
• Respondent’s department, division or business unit (employee)
• Relationship between the Respondent and the Complainant
• Address where the alleged sexual harassment/sexual violence occurred
• Date and time when the alleged sexual harassment/sexual violence occurred
• A description of the alleged sexual harassment/sexual violence conduct, e.g., sexually degrading
comments or gestures, inappropriate touching; sexual contact without consent, including sexual
intercourse
• Other circumstances which contributed to the incident, e.g., physical disability, alcohol
• Other incidents of hostile conduct by the Respondent, if any
• Other(s) involved in the incident as possible Complainant(s), witness (es) or additional
Respondent (s)
• What action by the College does the Complainant seek in response to the harassing conduct?

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• Has the Complainant made a report to others, e.g., local or Campus Police, faculty, students,
others?
• Has the Complainant requested partial or complete confidentiality?

• The College must make a prompt, thorough and impartial inquiry, regardless of whether the
Complainant makes a formal report, desires an inquiry or requests that no inquiry be made.

• A request for confidentiality may limit the College’s ability to respond to the complaint. The College will
take reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the Complainant’s
requests, as long as doing so does not prevent the College from responding effectively to a hostile
environment and preventing hostile behavior that may be directed toward others.

J. Grievances and Appeals

The applicable procedure depends on the circumstances and the status of the person bringing the charge
and the person against whom the charge is brought. A grievance or appeal should be initiated following the
completion of the investigation by the Title IX Office, a decision in the case, and any appeals. Proceedings
are conducted by officials trained on sexual assault and other intimate partner violence issues, and will use
the preponderance of the evidence standard (which is “more likely than not” and the standard used by civil
courts in the U. S.). In addition, both Complainant and Respondent will be informed in writing of the final
results within one business day of such outcome being reached.

K. Procedural Matters

1. Investigations: All complaints of alleged sexual harassment are investigated under the oversight
of the Title IX Coordinator. The College will process all formal complaints it receives, regardless of where
the conduct occurred, which is the basis for the complaint. The Title IX Coordinator may also determine
that an investigation is warranted without a formal complaint if the College has sufficient notice that sexual
harassment may have occurred.
An investigator will be appointed, as expeditiously as possible but within 5 calendar days, to investigate the
complaint. The investigation will be conducted in such a way that respects the privacy of all persons
involved to the reasonable extent possible, bearing in mind the safety of the campus community. External
Title IX professional investigators may be asked to conduct or to assist in the investigation. The results of
the investigation may be used in the third party intervention process or in a grievance or disciplinary action.

Title IX investigations will not wait until the criminal justice system has run its course or for the
conclusion of a criminal investigation. In fact, to do so is in violation of Title IX ‘s “promptness”
mandate if the College declines to act because it is awaiting either the completion of a criminal
investigation or prosecutorial decision as to whether charges will be filed and/or a final judgment by
a judge or jury.

Pursuant to federal regulations, Title IX complaints, unlike criminal investigations, have no limits on how
long it may take to conduct an investigation. Although there is no fixed period of time on how long an
institution can take to conduct an investigation and finally resolve it, the College will resolve all complaints
and issue a final resolution within a 60-day timeframe. More complex cases, such as those involving
multiple incidents, may take longer. In short, “promptness” means prompt as to the final resolution,
including all grievance proceedings (if any) and post decision appeals, rehearing’s and requests for
reconsideration.

The College will take any interim action such as a no-contact order or interim suspension of the accused
needed to protect the alleged victim and the rest of the campus community.

Allegations falling under other policies and procedures, such as those relevant to student employment
complaints will be referred to the appropriate administrator for resolution.

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In all circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator will conduct a Preliminary Review of the complaint and
either proceed with the investigation or conclude the complaint process due to (a) insufficient information
to support a finding of sexual harassment or sexual violence by a preponderance of the evidence or (b)
finding that the complaint involves matters which are beyond the scope of applicable College sexual
harassment policies.

At any time, the Title IX Coordinator may implement, or recommend to appropriate College administrators,
measures to prevent a sexually discriminatory environment and prevent sexual harassment that may be
directed toward others.

Upon completion of the final investigative report, the Complainant, Respondent and other persons whose
actions or actions are the subject of the complaint will be informed, in writing, of the outcome of any
disciplinary proceeding that arises from an allegation or complaint of sexual harassment, including
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking. They will also be informed of any change in
the results before they become final as well as when the results become final. The Complainant and
Respondent may comment, in writing, on the report as required under Title IX regulations. Such
comments will be made a part of the investigative record.

2. Recordkeeping: The Title IX Office will maintain and track all reports of sexual harassment and
report, at least annually, concerning their number, nature and disposition to the President and
administration. The Title IX Office will keep confidential records of reports of sexual harassment and the
actions taken in response to those reports, and use them for potential legal purposes and to identify
individuals or departments likely to benefit from training so that training priorities can be established. All
records regarding sexual harassment complaint investigations will be maintained for at least three years.

3. Retaliation: The College does not tolerate or condone any form of retaliation against any
Complainant or against any other person who participates in an inquiry or investigation of a complaint
under this procedure.

L. Exceptions

This policy does not supersede policies and procedures addressing issues specifically governed by other College
policies, such as grade appeals and school dismissal appeals, disability and reasonable accommodation complaints.

Students and employees are expected to present such complaints in accordance with the applicable College policy
and procedure.

M. Complaints Involving Faculty and Staff

Many College students will be supervised by employees of the College during their educational experiences. If a
student is aggrieved by sexual harassment or sexual violence in such a setting, the College will attempt to resolve
the situation and take reasonable steps to prevent harassment that may be directed toward others. The College
CYBER-BULLYING, CYBER-HARASSMENT & CYBER-STALKING

Colleges and universities have developed policies that prohibit electronic forms of communication that are a form of
stalking and/or harassment. Below are some commonly used definitions for electronic communication of behaviors
that are considered to be disruptive to the Morehouse College community.

Cyber-Harassment
■ Cyber-Harassment differs from Cyber-Stalking in that it does not generally involve a credible threat.
Cyber-Harassment usually refers to threatening or harassing via email messages, instant messages, blogs, or
other electronic communications technologies that are designed to torment another person.

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■ Cyber-Bullying and Cyber-Harassment are used interchangeably. Cyber-Bullying refers to the use of
electronic technologies to facilitate deliberate and repeated harassment or threats to an individual or group.
■ Cyber-Stalking is the use of the internet, email or the electronic communication to stalk another person. It
involves a pattern of threatening or malicious behaviors.
Cyber-Stalking is considered the most dangerous form of harassment, stalking, and/or Cyber-Bullying.
Federal Violations
Cyber-Stalking, Cyber-Bullying, and Cyber-Harassment are violations of federal and state laws such as Title IV of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendment Act of 1972.

Examples of Cyber-Bullying
• Any type of harassment or behavior intended to disturb or upset another person that is intentional, done
repeatedly, and found to be threatening or disturbing.
• Teasing
• Telling lies
• Making fun of someone
• Mean and/or rude comments
• Spreading rumors
• Making threatening/aggressive comments
• Asking someone inappropriate or insulting questions having to do with their sex life which makes the
person feel uncomfortable or emotionally violated
• Hazing another person
• Verbal speculation about one’s sexual preference

What are the tools?


• Blogs
• Chat Rooms
• Cell Phones
• Email
• Facebook
• Instant Messaging
• Text Messages
• Tumbler
• Twitter
• Websites

Victim Experiences
Students who are victims of online behaviors experience anxiety and a variety of emotions, below are examples of
the behaviors victims are likely to experience:
• Anxiety
• Alcohol and/or drug abuse
• Depression
• Poor or declining academic performance
• Poor relationships with roommate, peers, family members and others
• Self-esteem challenges
• Social life challenges
• Stress
• Withdrawing from the community

CYBER BULLING LEGAL ISSUES

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Criminal Law Limits

The following kinds of speech can lead to arrest and prosecution:


• Making threats of violence to people or their property
• Engaging in coercion
• Making obscene or harassing phone calls
• Harassment or stalking
• Hate or bias crime
• Creating or sending sexually explicit images of teens
• Sexual exploitation
• Taking a photo of someone in place where privacy expected

Reporting Your Concerns


If you are a victim of online harassment, bullying and/or other inappropriate behaviors, please report incidents to
any of the following:

Division of Student Services


(470) 639-0355

Office of Student Conduct


(470) 639-0421

Title IX Coordinator
(470) 639-0584

Counseling & Disability Services


(470) 639-0901

Campus Police
(404)214-2666

Harassment

Morehouse College prohibits and will not tolerate action and/or behavior of a harassing nature. This includes both
sexual and discriminatory harassment and related retaliation. Any member of the student body, found to be in
violation of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, which may include, but is not limited to, written
warning/reprimand, suspension or dismissal.

Discriminatory Harassment

Discriminatory harassment is defined as verbal or physical conduct directed toward an individual solely
because of his or her gender, race, nationality, religion, creed, age, disability, citizenship and/or presumed or
actual sexual orientation that (a) stigmatizes the individual as known by the speaker to invoke strong visceral
contempt of other human beings, and is likely to invoke violence or imminent harm, or (b) is of a continual
nature such that it creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working, academic or campus environment or
unreasonable interference with an individual’s work or academic performance.

Sexual Harassment

The College adopts the definition of sexual harassment as set forth by the Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission guidelines, modified, in part, to meet the needs of the academic setting. Sexual harassment is
defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a
sexual nature when:

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1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an


individual’s employment or participation in an academic program or activity;

2. Submission to rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or
academic decisions affecting that individual; or

3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or
academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working, academic or campus
environment.

Harassment may:
a) occur as a result of a power relationship, as in supervisor/supervised or faculty/student relationship; or
b) arises from the creation of a hostile environment by another person, including one’s peers or
subordinates.

The following are examples of behaviors that constitute or may constitute sexual harassment:

1. Lewd remarks or whistles


2. Unwanted physical contact (including touching, hugging, brushing against)
3. Persistent, unwanted sexual/romantic attention (including asking for dates)
4. Sexually suggestive visual displays in offices (e.g., photographs, calendars)
5. Jokes, humor or insults of a sexual nature
6. Obscene messages (in notes, voice mail or computer)
7. Taking sexual advantage of a person intoxicated or on drugs
8. Repeated, unwanted discussion of sexual matters
9. Discussion and rating of sexual attributes and attractiveness
10. Asking or commenting about someone’s sexuality or sex life
11. Unwelcome, sexually suggestive gestures, body language or sounds
12. Sexual misuse or abuse of power or hierarchical authority
13. Subtle or overt pressure for sexual favors
14. Deliberate, repeatedgender-based humiliation/intimidation
15. Stalking
16. Sexual assault

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE ANTI-HAZING POLICY

Morehouse College strictly prohibits any individual student or students, groups of students, or any student
organization(s) affiliated with or otherwise associated with Morehouse College (each of the aforementioned groups,
a “Morehouse College Student Organization”) from hazing any student or engaging in any hazing activity in any
way.

For purposes of this Policy, “hazing” is defined to include, but is not limited to: 1) any conduct involving
pressuring or coercing a student into violating federal, state, and/or local law(s) or the Morehouse College Student
Code of Conduct; 2) any conduct involving brutality of a physical nature, including, but not limited to, paddling,
whipping, beating, pushing, shoving, tackling, branding, prolonged exposure to the elements, forced calisthenics,
forced consumption of food, liquor, drugs, or any other substance (whether legal or illegal), or other forced physical
activities that may adversely affect the physical and mental health or safety of the student; and 3) any conduct that
may adversely affect a student’s mental health or dignity, including, but not limited to, sleep deprivation, forced
exclusion from social contact with other individuals, servitude of any kind, and any forced conduct that would be
considered demeaning, degrading, or result in extreme embarrassment.

For purposes of this Policy, a person “engages in” in hazing if he or she: 1) perpetrates hazing by aiding
and abetting hazing activities; 2) is the object of or consents to hazing activities; or 3) observes or has knowledge of
hazing activities and fails to report such hazing activities within twenty-four (24) hours of their occurrence as
required by this Policy.

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For the purposes of this Policy, any activity described herein or any other activity that recklessly or
intentionally endangers the physical or mental health of a Morehouse College student for purposes of initiation,
admission into, continued membership, or affiliation with a Morehouse College Student Organization will be
presumed automatically to constitute prohibited “hazing” and a forced activity, the willingness of the Morehouse
College student to participate notwithstanding.

It will not be a defense to any student disciplinary process or procedure or other action brought pursuant to
this Policy that: 1) the consent of the student was obtained; 2) the conduct or activity resulted in no injury to the
student; 3) the conduct or activity was not an official Morehouse College event or was not otherwise sanctioned or
approved by Morehouse College; or 4) the conduct or activity was not a requirement of or condition precedent to
membership in a Morehouse College Student Organization.

Any individual or Morehouse College Student Organization found in violation of this Policy as a result of
conduct occurring on-campus or off-campus will be, at a minimum, subject to appropriate sanctions imposed by
Morehouse College. Morehouse College Student Organizations may also be sanctioned for any conduct or activity
in violation of the Policy by any individual(s) or group(s) affiliated with any such organization, including an
organization’s members, membership intake participants, and alumni.

Any penalty imposed by Morehouse College pursuant to this Policy or otherwise does not absolve the
student(s), group(s) of students, or other student organization(s) affiliated with Morehouse College from any penalty
imposed for violation(s) of the criminal laws of the State of Georgia, including, but not limited, to the penalty
prescribed at O.C.G.A. § 16-5-61, which provides that hazing is a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature.
Furthermore, any penalty imposed by Morehouse College does not absolve the student(s), group(s) of students, or
other student organization(s) affiliated with Morehouse College from penalties imposed in any civil proceedings or
otherwise or for any violation of any other Morehouse College policies to which the violator(s) may be subject as a
result of engaging in conduct in violation of this Policy.

Every Morehouse College Student Organization is required to include in its bylaws an anti-hazing section
fully incorporating this Policy. A copy of such bylaws will be submitted to the Department of Student Life at the
beginning of each academic year. Every Morehouse College Student Organization shall have its members sign an
acknowledgement of this Policy at the beginning of each fall and spring semester. All membership intake
participants shall be required to sign an acknowledgement of this Policy prior to the commencement of each
membership intake period. Every Morehouse College Student Organization will also submit a Hazing Compliance
Agreement to the Department of Student Life within thirty (30) days of the election of any new organizational
officers certifying their personal acknowledgement of this Policy.

Any person, including Morehouse College trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, and students, having
knowledge of or receiving information regarding any activity that may constitute hazing or a violation of this Policy
shall contact the Morehouse College Department of Campus Safety at (404) 215-2666 and the Office of Student
Services at (404) 653-7858 or (404) 215-2681, or complete a Morehouse College Hazing Incident Report Form (a
copy of which is attached to this Policy) within twenty-four (24) hours of obtaining such knowledge or receiving
such information. Additional Hazing Incident Report Forms are available at the Office Student Services, the Office
of Student Conduct, and the Office of the General Counsel. Any student(s), group(s) of students, or student
organization(s) who fails to report hazing or any activity that may constitute a violation of this Policy may be subject
to sanctions consistent with this Policy and/or the Morehouse College Student Code of Conduct.

INDIVIDUAL STUDENT VIOLATIONS

Alleged violations of this Policy by an individual student or group of students shall be filed in the Office of
the Vice President for Student Services using the Hazing Incident Report Form and investigated by the Office of
Student Conduct in accordance with the procedures set forth in the Morehouse College Student Handbook.

Any Morehouse College student found to be in violation of this Policy shall be subject to sanctions, which
may include the following:

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Warning - A written warning notice to the student that he is in violation of or has violated institutional
regulations.

Probation - A written reprimand of probation for a violation of institutional regulations. Probation is for a
definite period of time and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student violates any
other institutional regulation during the probationary period. Morehouse College reserves the right to prohibit
students on probation from:

(a) Representing the College or their respective classes (e.g., the Freshmen Class);

(b) Participating in extracurricular activities or as a representative of the College community;

(c) Participating in membership intake activities for any student organization;

(d) Occupying a position in a club or student organization or serving on a College committee or


board;

(e) Attending or participating in any social club or organization affairs, functions or activities; or

(f) Participating in any College program abroad.

Mandatory Activity - The student may be required to perform community service projects, participate in
counseling or other education programs, or complete other assignments and activities as retribution for his violation
of institutional regulations.

Restitution — The student may be required to provide compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may
take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement.

Withholding of Grades - Morehouse College may withhold grade(s), transcripts, and diplomas pending
payment of fines or compliance with sanctions and the Morehouse College Student Code of Conduct.

Suspension - The student may be suspended from the College for a definite period of time, after which the
student may be eligible to return. Students who are suspended must leave the campus not later than forty-eight (48)
hours from the date of suspension.

Expulsion - The student may be permanently separated from the College with no recourse for return.

For the avoidance of doubt, the terms in this Policy will be construed in accordance with the definitions
provided in the Morehouse College Student Code of Conduct.

ORGANIZATIONAL VIOLATIONS

Alleged violations of this Policy by a Morehouse College Student Organization shall be filed in the Office
of the Vice President for Student Services using the Flazing Incident Report Form and investigated by the
Department of Student Life. In all cases of alleged violations of this Policy by a student organization or student(s)
affiliated with a Morehouse College Student Organization, the advisor and regional or national governing offices of
such organization(s) will be notified, if applicable. During the period of investigation or adjudication of the alleged
violations of this Policy, all membership intake activities and organization activities may be suspended in the sole
discretion of the College.

Any Morehouse College Student Organization found to be in violation of this Policy shall be subject to
sanctions, which may include the following:

Warning - A written warning to the organization that it is in violation of or has violated institutional
regulations.

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Probation - A written reprimand of probation for a violation of institutional regulations. Probation is for a
definite period of time and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the organization or its
members are found in violation of any institutional regulation during the probationary period. Morehouse College
reserves the right to prohibit student organizations on probation from:

(a) Representing the College or their organization;

(b) Participating in extracurricular activities;

(c) Participating in membership intake activities;

(d) Wearing organizational paraphernalia on-campus or at any College-related functions;

(e) Having its members occupy a position in a club or organization or serve on any College
committee or board.

Mandatory Activity - The student organization or its members may be required to perform community
service projects, participate in education programs, or complete other assignments and activities as retribution for
their infractions.

Restitution - The organization may be required to provide compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This
may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement.

Organization Suspension - The student organization may be suspended from the College for a definite
period of time, after which the organization may be eligible for reinstatement as a student organization. During the
period of suspension, the student organization may be prohibited from conducting any organization activities on-
campus or off-campus; using College facilities, office space, or property; wearing organizational paraphernalia on-
campus; or receiving any other benefits made available to Morehouse College Student Organizations. National Pan-
Hellenic Council organizations suspended pursuant to this Policy must submit all charter materials to the Office of
Greek Life within forty-eight (48) hours of the suspension. Other student organizations suspended must submit all
charter materials to the Department of Student Life within forty-eight (48) hours of the suspension. Notification of
organization suspension will be forwarded to the regional or national governing offices of the organization, if
applicable.

Organization Expulsion - The organization may be permanently separated from the College with no
recourse for return. Expelled student organizations may not conduct any organization activities on-campus or off-
campus. Student members of expelled organizations will be prohibited from wearing organizational paraphernalia
on-campus or otherwise representing their organization on-campus. National Pan-Hellenic Council organizations
expelled must submit all charter materials to the Office of Greek Life within forty-eight (48) hours of expulsion.
Other student organizations expelled must submit all charter materials to the Department of Student Life within
forty-eight hours (48) of expulsion. Notification of organization expulsion will be forwarded to the regional or
national governing offices of the organization, if applicable.

For the avoidance of doubt, the terms in this Policy will be construed in accordance with the definitions
provided in the Morehouse College Student Code of Conduct.

RETALIATION PROHIBITED

Morehouse College strictly prohibits any person or Morehouse Student Organization, including, but not
limited to, its trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, and students from retaliating against any student who is a victim
of hazing, reported hazing, refused to participate in hazing, assisted in the investigation of hazing, or participated in
the prosecution of any alleged hazing. Any person who experiences retaliation for reporting any activity that may
constitute hazing or a violation of this Policy may file a retaliation complaint in the Office of the Vice President for
Student Services using the Hazing Incident Reporting Form (a copy of which is attached to this Policy).

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Please direct all questions regarding this policy to the Office of Student Services, Kilgore Center, Suite 200,
Phone-(470)0639-0421.

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
HAZING INCIDENT REPORT FORM

Date of Incident:.

Time of Day:

On Campus or Off Campus (Please Include Location/Address):

Accused (Organization and/or individual student(s)):

Complainant(s):

Has a Police Report Been Filed? If YES, Case #:

Statement of Incident (Please use additional sheets if necessary):

I understand that if I intentionally provide any false or misleading information on this form, I may be subject
to sanctions under the Morehouse College Student Code of Conduct.
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Signature of Person Making Statement Date

Print Name of Person Making Statement


VIOLATION OF LAWS

ATLANTA CITY CODE

DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUSES POLICY

INTRODUCTION
It is the policy of Morehouse College (“the College”) to comply with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses
Regulations of 1990. The regulations require schools, colleges, and universities to implement and enforce
firm drug and alcohol prevention programs and policies as a condition of eligibility to receive federal financial
assistance.

Compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses regulations requires an institution of higher education
(IHE) to provide written certification that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the unlawful
possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol abuse by students, faculty and staff. A separate
Drug-free Workplace Policy has been issued to faculty and staff.

In keeping with the College’s efforts to maintain a healthy work environment, it is expected of all employees
and students to demonstrate behavior which enhances a positive work environment including a drug-free
campus. Alcohol abuse or the use of illegal drugs is incompatible with the educational mission of Morehouse.
The illegal use or abuse of drugs and/or alcohol has a clear and adverse effect on the educational environment.

DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE AND CAMPUS POLICY


The College has adopted and implemented a drug and alcohol prevention program that includes the following
components:

The annual distribution, in writing, to each student who is taking one or more classes for any type of academic
credit except for continuing education units, regardless of the length of the student’s program of study, of:
• Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit, at a minimum, the unlawful possession, use or distribution of
illegal drugs and alcohol by students on College property or as a part of any of its activities.
• A description of the applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful
possession or distribution of illegal drugs and alcohol.
• A description of the health risks associated with the use of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol.
• A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs that
are available to students.
• A clear statement that the College will impose disciplinary sanctions on students (consistent with local,
state, and federal law); and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion, or
termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of the standards of conduct. A
disciplinary sanction may include the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program.

The College policy prohibits the following:


• The use, possession, manufacture, distribution or sale of illegal drugs, controlled substances, or drug
paraphernalia on College premises, in College supplied vehicles, or at any official function or College
activity.
• The use, possession, manufacture, distribution or sale of alcoholic beverages on College premises, in
College supplied vehicles, or at any official function or College activity.
• Being under the influence of an authorized controlled substance, illegal drug or alcohol on College
premises, in College supplied vehicles, or at any official function or College activity.

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• The use of alcoholic beverages or drugs that adversely affects a student’s academic performance, that is
a threat to individual safety on the part of students, that adversely affects the College’s reputation in the
public arena on the part of students.

SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY


A College student who violates the College’s drug and alcohol policy will be subject to the sanctions set forth
in the Student Code of Conduct. All violations are handled on an individual basis.

The College does not tolerate the misuse or abuse of illegal drugs or alcohol. The Student Conduct
Administrator or designee and/or the College Judicial Committee will determine the nature of the sanctions
against students who violate this policy. Disciplinary action includes, but is not limited to, warnings,
probation, suspensions and expulsions or referral for prosecution and/or for the completion of a substance
abuse assistance or rehabilitation program specified by Morehouse at the expense of the student. Specific
sanctions include but are not limited to:

• Automatic suspension from the College for first time violators of the policy on possession,
distribution, sale or manufacture of illegal drugs;
• Automatic disciplinary probation for first time violators of the policy on the possession and/or
consumption of alcohol;
• Permanent expulsion from the College for second time violators of the policy on possession,
distribution, sale or manufacture of illegal drug;
• Suspension from the College for second time violators of the policy on the possession and/or
consumption of alcohol;
• Permanent expulsion from the College for third-time violators of the policy on the possession and/or
consumption of alcohol.

Students who are expelled or suspended (for any length of time) should be aware that this action may impact
the following:
• Tuition, Residence Hall costs and fees (suspension does not forgive financial obligations)
• Student Financial Aid including Hope Scholarship
• Athletic participation and eligibility
• Health insurance (contact your personal health care provider)
• College housing
• Meal Plan
• Use of College resources and access to College facilities
• Immigration status for international students
• Veterans and dependents of veterans
• Internships, assistantships, and study abroad

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS/ATHLETES
Student organizations in violation of the College’s policy on drugs and alcohol will be subject to disciplinary
action up to and including educational sanctions, suspension and/or revocation of its registration and/or
referral to the appropriate federal, state, or local authorities for prosecution in the courts.

When there is an alcohol or drug infraction, in addition to any criminal prosecution or College judicial code
sanction, a student who is a member of any of the College’s athletic teams may face additional sanctions
based on rules established by the team and/or the NCAA Compliance Officer.

SUMMARY OF LEGAL SANCTIONS COVERING ALCOHOL AND DRUGS


Local, state, and federal laws make illegal use of drugs and alcohol serious crimes. Convictions can lead to
imprisonment, fines, and assigned community service. Courts do not reduce prison sentences in order for
convicted persons to attend school or continue their jobs. A felony conviction for such an offense can prevent
an individual from entering many fields of employment or professions.

Federal law penalizes the manufacture, distribution, possession with intent to manufacture or distribute, and
simple possession of drugs (“controlled substances”).

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ATLANTA CITY CODE


Local laws regarding the use of alcohol and drugs include, but are not limited to the following:

A. DRUG OFFENSES
Section 178001: Sale of model glue to persons other than bona fide retail dealers prohibited. Punishable by a
fine not to exceed $1,000, or 60 days in jail, or 60 days of public work, or any or all of these.

Section 178003: Unlawful possession of one ounce or less of marijuana within corporate limits of the city is
prohibited. This is punishable by a fine not to exceed $1,000, or 60 days in jail, or 60 days of public work, or
any or all of these.

Section 178005: Unlawful for any person to intentionally inhale or inhale spray paint containing halogenated
hydrocarbons for the purpose of intoxication. This is punishable by a fine not to exceed $250 or
imprisonment for not more than 25 days.

B. ALCOHOL OFFENSES
Section 1711010(h): Any person convicted of violating any prohibition related to the “furnishing to,
purchasing of, or possession by persons under 21 years of age “alcoholic beverages” shall be punished by a
fine not to exceed $1,000 or imprisonment in the city jail or stockade for not more than six months or both.
Any person who is under 21 years of age and convicted of purchasing or knowingly possessing any alcohol
beverages shall be punished by not more than 30 days imprisonment or a fine of not more than $300 or both.

Any person charged with a second or subsequent offense shall be punished as for a misdemeanor of a high and
aggravated nature in the court having general misdemeanor jurisdiction in the county in which the alleged
offense occurred.

STATE OF GEORGIA CRIMINAL LIABILITY - ALCOHOL


The following alcohol related offenses are misdemeanors under Georgia law and are punishable by up to one
year in jail and a fine of $1,000 [O.C.G.A. Section 3-3-9(b)].

Offenses

• Giving an alcoholic drink to a person who is in a state of noticeable intoxication [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-
21].
• Selling, giving or furnishing alcoholic drinks to a person under 21 years of age [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-23(a)
(1)].
• Possession of an alcoholic beverage by a person under 21 years of age [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-23(a) (1)].
• Misrepresentation by a person under age 21 of his or her age for the purpose of obtaining an
alcoholic beverage illegally [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-23(a) (3)].

Penalties
Penalties for supplying alcoholic beverages to persons under 21 years of age or the unlawful purchase and
possession of alcoholic beverages by any person under 21 years of age [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-23.1],

First Conviction: A misdemeanor punishable by not more than six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up
to $300 [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-23.1(b)],
Second Conviction: A misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature punishable by a fine of up to $5,000
and/or up to one year in a county jail [O.C.G.A. § 3-3-23.1 and 17-10-4],

STATE OF GEORGIA CRIMINAL LIABILITY - DRUGS


The following drug-related offenses are felonies under Georgia law [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(c)].

Offenses
Purchase, possess, or have under his or her control any controlled substance [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(a)].
2. Manufacture, deliver, distribute, dispense, administer, sell or possess a controlled substance [O.C.G.A. §
16-13-30(b)].
3. Manufacture, deliver, distribute, dispense, administer, purchase, sell or possess with the intent to distribute
marijuana [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(j) (1)].
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4. Hire, solicit, engage, or use an individual under the age of 17 years for the purpose of manufacturing,
distributing, dispensing, on behalf of a solicitor, any controlled substance [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(k)].

Penalties
• First conviction for violation of Offense 1: A felony and imprisonment for not less than two years
and not more than 15 years [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(c)].
• Second and subsequent convictions for violation of Offense 1: A felony and imprisonment for at least
five years and not more than 30 years [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30 (c)].
• First conviction for violation of Offense 2: A felony and imprisonment for at least five years and not
more than 30 years [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30 (d)].
• Second and subsequent convictions for violation of Offense 2: A felony and imprisonment for at least
10 years and not more than 40 years or life imprisonment [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30 (d)].
• Any conviction for violation of Offense 3: A felony and imprisonment for at least one year and not
more than 10 years [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(j) (2)].
• Any conviction for violation of Offense 4: A felony and imprisonment for at least five years and not
more than 20 years, or by fine not to exceed $20,000 or both [O.C.G.A. § 16-13-30(k)].

FEDERAL PENALTIES AND SANCTIONS FOR ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF A CONTROLLED


SUBSTANCE
[21 U.S.C. 844(a)]
• First conviction: Up to one year imprisonment or a fine of at least $1,000 or both. After one prior
drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed two years, or a fine of at least $2,500 or
both. After two or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed three years
and a fine of at least $5,000. Special sentencing provision for possession of crack cocaine: At least
five years in prison is mandatory, not to exceed 20 years and a fine of at least $1,000, if:
• It is a first conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds five grams.
• It is the second crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds three grams.
• It is the third or subsequent crack conviction and the amount of crack possessed exceeds one gram.

21 U.S.C. 862 (b)-862(d) and 881 (a) (7)


Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or facilitate possess of a controlled substance if that
offense is punishable by more than one year of imprisonment. (See special sentencing provisions regarding
crack.)

21 U.S.C. 881 (a) (4)


Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft or any other conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled
substance.

21 U.S.C. 862
Denial of federal benefits, such as student loans, grants, contracts and professional and commercial licenses,
up to one year for the first offense, up to five years for the second and subsequent offenses.

18 U.S. C. 922(g)
Ineligible to receive or purchase a firearm.

MISCELLANEOUS
Revocation of certain federal licenses and benefits, such as pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are
vested within the authorities of individual federal agencies.

DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PROGRAMS


The College has an established substance abuse educational program that includes educational counseling
through its Counseling Resource Center. The College may require, as part of disciplinary action, that the
student receive treatment by a designated professional and they may be referred to an appropriate organization
for further assistance. Failure to comply with Morehouse’s requirements is justification for immediate
dismissal from the College and/or lesser sanctions.

HEALTH RISKS AND THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL

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Alcohol consumption causes a number of marked changes in behavior. Even low doses of it significantly
impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely, increasing the likelihood that the driver
will be involved in an accident. Low to moderate doses of alcohol also increases the incidence of a variety of
aggressive acts, including spouse and child abuse. Moderate to high doses of alcohol cause marked
impairment in higher mental functions, severely altering a person’s ability to learn and remember information.
Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death. If combined with other depressants of the central
nervous system, much lower doses of alcohol will produce the effects just described. Repeated use of alcohol
can lead to dependence. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms,
including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening.
Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol, particularly when combined with poor nutrition, can
also lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and liver.

Mothers who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with fetal alcohol syndrome. These
infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation. In addition, research indicates that
children of alcoholic parents are at greater risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

LOCAL ALCOHOL AND DRUG RESOURCES


The College recognizes that alcohol and drug abuse and addiction are treatable illnesses. We also recognize
that early intervention and support improves the success of rehabilitation. We encourage students to seek
professional help for their drug or alcohol problems. Listed below are referral resources.

Anchor Hospital
5454 Yorktowne Drive
Atlanta, GA 30349
770- 991-6044 ext. #3370

Grady Hospital
80 Jesse Hill Jr., Dr. S.E.
Atlanta, GA 30303
404-616-4307

St. Jude’s Recovery Center


139 Renaissance Parkway NE
Atlanta, GA 30308
404-874-2224

Ridgeview Institute
3995 South Cobb Drive
Smyrna, GA 30080
770-434-4567

ANNUAL DISTRIBUTION OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY TO STUDENTS


The Drug-Free Campus and Workplace Policy is distributed annually to each student by the Vice President
Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services. The Vice President for
Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services is to ensure that the
appropriate section of the Student Handbook references the annual distribution and related College policies
and indicate where copies of the annual distribution may be obtained.

BIENNIAL REVIEW OF THE PROGRAM


The Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations require that every two years (on even numbered years) the
College conducts an audit of the effectiveness of their Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Program by October
1.

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The Vice President for Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services
is responsible for implementing this policy and for conducting the biennial reviews in accordance with the
requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses regulations. The Vice President for Student
Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services is also responsible for
monitoring and enforcing the provisions of this policy.

RECORDS MANAGEMENT
The Vice President for Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services
is responsible for the record retention and access requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses
regulations. Copies of the annual distributions, the results of biennial reviews, and the detailed procedures for
the distributions and the reviews are to be maintained by the Student Services office for three years after the
fiscal year in which the record was created as well as other required records reasonably related to the
College’s compliance with the drug prevention certificate.

LIAISON WITH DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION REVIEWERS


The Vice President for Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services
will provide the U. S. Department of Education access to personnel, records, documents, and any other
necessary information that is requested by the Department to review the College’s adoption and
implementation of its drug prevention program.

Upon request, the College will make the following records and information concerning its drug prevention
program available to the Secretary of Education and the public:

• A copy of each component of the annual distribution The results of biennial reviews

• Furthermore, the College will retain the following records for three (3) years after the fiscal
year in which the record was created:

• A copy of each component of the annual distribution and the results of biennial reviews. Any
records reasonably related to the College’s compliance with the drug prevention program
certification.

As required by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses regulations, the Secretary of Education will annually
review a representative sample of IF1E drug prevention programs. If the College is selected for review, the
College will provide the Secretary access to personnel, records, documents, and any other necessary
information requested by the Secretary to review the College’s adoption and implementation of its drug
prevention program.

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE

ARTICLE 1: DEFINITIONS

1. The term “College” means Morehouse College.

2. The term “student” includes all persons taking courses at Morehouse College, both full-time
and part-time, and those who attend post-secondary educational institutions other than the
College and who reside in the College residence halls. Persons who have withdrawn after
allegedly violating the Student Code, who have not officially enrolled for a particular term but
who have a continuing relationship with the College or also have been notified of their
acceptance for admission are considered “students,” as are persons who are living in the College
residence halls, although not enrolled in the institution.

3. Non-Student refers to any person who is not enrolled part-time or full-time or auditing classes
at Morehouse College.

4. Group refers to a number of persons who are associated with each other but who have not
complied with college requirements for registration as an organization.

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5. Guest refers to individuals or visitors on campus including, but not limited to, the host student's
residence hall.

6. The term “faculty member” means any person hired by Morehouse College to conduct
classroom or teaching activities or who is otherwise considered by the College to be a member
of the faculty.

7. Staff or administrative staff refers to all full-time and part-time non-teaching employees.

8. The term “College official” includes any person employed by the College, performs assigned
administrative or professional responsibilities.

9. Member of the Morehouse College community includes any person who is a student, faculty
member, college official or any other person employed by the college. Any question concerning
a person’s status in a particular situation shall be determined by the Senior Vice President of
Student Development.

10. The term “College premises” includes all land, buildings, facilities and other property in the
possession of or owned, used or controlled by the College (including adjacent streets and
sidewalks).

11. College Sponsored Activity refers to any activity on or off college premises that is directly
initiated or supervised by the college.

12. The term “organization” means any number of persons who have complied with the formal
requirements for College recognition.

13. Peer Hearing Board is comprised of students who hear cases with a minimum of three (3) to
five (5) students to hear a case.

14. The term “Honor And Conduct Review Board, HCRB or College Judiciary Committee,
CJC” means any person or persons authorized by the Vice President for Student Development
and/or Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct to determine whether a student has
violated the Student Code of Conduct and to recommend imposition of sanctions.

15. Vice President for Student Development the Vice President for Student Development serves at
the leisure of the president and is responsible for students and their learning experiences outside
the classroom. He/she has administrative oversight and accountability for wellness of students,
conduct and discipline, housing and residential life, campus life health services, recreation and
intramural sports and intercollegiate athletics. With the assistance of his managerial staff, the
Vice President for Student Development helps students establish productive relationships within
the college community. He/she also exercises general supervision and oversight of student
concerns and welfare, and student organizations, as well as maintains student personnel records.
He/she is also a member of the College faculty.

16. Associate Vice President/Dean of the College he/she has the administrative insight to work
within the broader Division of Student Development model that improves the colleges’ rates of
retention, satisfaction, graduation and ultimately services. Dean of the college. Career services,
International students, residential life. Student Life, and Recreational rate of alumni
participation. He/she is also responsible for managing Student Intramural and Fitness.

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17. The term Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct means person designated by
the Vice President for Student Development and/or Associate Vice President/Dean of College
for Student Services to be responsible for the daily administration of the non-academic student
discipline program in including interpreting the Code of Student Conduct for students, faculty
and staff. The Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct is authorized on a case-by­
case basis to impose sanctions upon students found to have violated the code of Student
Conduct violations. He/she also works with students, parents, academic colleges, staff in
various offices and any other affected internal and external constituencies. The Vice
President for Student Development or Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student
Services may authorize a designee to serve simultaneously as Assistant Dean of the College
for Student Conduct and the sole member or one of the members of a HCRB or CJC.

18. The term Title IX Coordinator and Compliance Specialist means Title IX of the Education
Amendments of 1972 provides that no person on the basis of sex or gender shall be excluded
from participation in, be denied the benefit of, or be subjected to discrimination,
including sexual harassment and violence, in any education program or activity receiving
Federal financial assistance. Terraine L. Bailey, (470)639.0584.

19. Complainant refers to any person who submits a report alleging that a student violated the
Student Code of Conduct.

^ The term “accused student” means any student accused of violating the Student Code of
Conduct.

^ Respondent refers to any person who is alleged to have violated the Student Code of Conduct.

^ Conduct Conference is a informal/formal meeting to determine whether violations of the


Student Code of Conduct have occurred.

^ Adviser- the term “adviser,” refers to a faculty or staff member, administrator, or student from
the college, who may be present during a conduct hearing, assist in the preparation of a hearing,
and consult with the student during a hearing.

^ Violation refers to a formal allegation to a student of violation of the Student Code of Conduct.
Violations are described in a letter sent to a student whose conduct is in question.

^ The “Appellate Board” means any person or persons authorized by the Vice President for
Student Development or Associate Vice President/Dean of College for Student Services to
consider an appeal from the HCRB and CJC’s determination as to whether a student has violated
the Student Code or from the sanctions imposed by the Assistant Dean of the College for Student
Conduct.

^ The term “designee” means a College official authorized on a case-by-case basis designated by
the Vice President for Student Development, Associate Vice President/Dean of College for
Student Services and/or Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct to impose sanction
upon student found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct.

^ Sanction refers to official college responses to violations of the Student Code of Conduct.
Sanctions are intended to educate students and redirect inappropriate behavior toward more
acceptable pattern consistent with community standards and values.

^ Policy is defined as the written regulations of the college as found in, but not limited to, the
Student Code of Conduct, other policies in the Morehouse College Student Handbook, the
Undergraduate Catalog, the college web page or computer use policy.

^ The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to:


(1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests or examinations;
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(2) use of sources beyond those authorized by the faculty in writing papers, preparing
reports, solving problems or carrying out other assignments;
(3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a
member of the College faculty or staff;
(4) engaging in any behavior specifically prohibited by a faculty member in the course
syllabus or class discussion

^ The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation,
of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment.
It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency
engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.

INHERENT AUTHORITY— The College reserves the right to take necessary and appropriate action to
protect the safety and well-being of persons, property or the campus community. Such action may include
taking disciplinary action against those student whose behavior on or off campus premises indicates that they
pose a substantial danger to others. When the Vice President of Student Development, Associate Vice
President/Dean of College for Student Services and Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct believe
this to be the case, students or student groups will be issued an interim suspension until circumstances warrant
that it is okay for said individual(s) to return safely to campus.

INTERIM SUSPENSION— The Vice President for Student Services, Associate Vice President/Dean of
College for Student Services, Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct and/or designee may
suspend a student from the College for any interim period pending disciplinary or criminal proceedings, or
medical evaluation. The interim suspension shall become immediately effective without prior notice whenever
there is information that the continued presence of the student at the College poses a substantial and
immediate threat to himself or herself, or to others.

A student suspended on an interim basis shall be given a prompt opportunity to appear personally before the
Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or a designee in order to discuss the following issues only:
a) The reliability of the information concerning the student’s conduct, including the matter of his or
her identity; and
b) Whether the conduct and surrounding circumstances reasonably indicate that the continued
presence of the student on College premises poses a substantial and immediate threat to himself
or herself, or to others.

RECIPROCITY WITH AUC

As a member of the Atlanta University Center, the College has a reciprocal agreement with the other member
institutions regarding student behavior and discipline. When a Morehouse College student is accused of an
incident on the campus of another AUC institution it is as if the matter occurred at the College. Likewise,
incidents involving students from other AUC institutions who engage in misconduct on the College campus
will be addressed on their respective campuses.

A. Conduct — Rules and Regulations

Any student found to have committed or attempting to commit the following misconduct is subject to
disciplinary sanctions:

1. Acts of dishonesty, include but not limited to, the following:


a. cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty
b. furnishing false information to any College official, faculty member or office
c. forgery, alteration, or misuse of any College document, record or instrument of
identification
d. tampering with the election of any College-recognized student organization

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2. Disorderly Conduct: Disruption or obstruction of teaching, research, administration,


disciplinary proceedings, other College activities, including its public-service functions on or off
campus, or other authorized non-College activities when the act occurs on College premises.

3. Abusive Conduct: includes the following conduct:


a. physical abuse
b. verbal abuse
c. threats
d. intimidation
e. harassment
f. coercion and/or other conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any
person.

4. Theft. Theft of and/or damage to property of the College or property of a member of the College
community or other personal or public property.

5. Hazing, Any act that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student, or that
destroys or removes public or private property for the purpose of initiation, admission into,
affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. The
express or implied consent of the victim will not be a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the
presence of hazing is not a neutral act; it is in violation of this rule.

6. Failure to comply. Includes failure to comply with directions of College officials or law
enforcement officers acting in performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to
these persons when requested to do so.

7. Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys to any College premises or unauthorized


entry to or use of College premises.

8. Violation of published College policies, rules or regulations, whether available in hard copy or
electronically.

9. Violation of federal, state or local law.

10. Use, possession, manufacturing or distribution of marijuana, narcotic or other controlled


substances except as expressly permitted by law.

11. Use, possession, manufacturing or distribution of alcoholic beverages or public intoxication


except as expressly permitted by the law and College regulations. Alcoholic beverages may not,
in any circumstance, be used by, possessed by or distributed to any person under twenty-one
(21) years of age.

12. Possession (including legal, illegal or unauthorized) of firearms, explosives, other weapons or
dangerous chemicals on College premises, or use of any such item, even if legally possessed, in
a manner that harms, threatens or causes fear of others individuals who may legally carry a
firearm in public areas must check those firearms immediately with the Campus Police
Department upon entry onto the campus.

13. Disruptive Campus Demonstration: Participation in a campus demonstration that disrupts the
normal operations of the college and infringes on the rights of other members of the College
community; leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/or normal activities within any
campus building or area; intentional obstruction that unreasonably interferes with freedom of
movement, either pedestrian or vehicular, on campus.

14. Obstructing traffic. Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College
premises or at College-sponsored or supervised functions.

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15. Disorderly, lewd or indecent conduct. Conduct that is disorderly, lewd, or indecent; or
constitutes a breach of peace; or aiding, abetting or procuring another person to breach the peace
on College premises or at functions sponsored by, or participated in by, the College. Disorderly
conduct includes, but is not limited to: any unauthorized use of electronic or other devices to
make an audio or video record of any person while on the College premises without his/her prior
knowledge, or without his/her effective consent when such a recording is likely to cause injury
or distress. This includes, but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person
in a gym, locker room or restroom.

16. Abuse/misuse of computer facilities and resources. This includes but is not limited to:

a. unauthorized entry into a file to use, read or change the contents, or for any other
purpose
b. unauthorized transfer of a file
c. unauthorized use of another individual’s identification and password
d. use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty
member or College official use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive
messages
e. use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the College computing
system
f. use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws
g. any violation of the college’s computer use policy

17. Abuse of the Student Conduct System, including but not limited to:

a. failure to obey the summons of a HCRB and CJC or College official to appear for a
meeting or hearing as part of the Student Conduct System
b. falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a HCRB and CJC
c. disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a Student Conduct hearing
d. institution of a Student Conduct proceeding in bad faith
e. attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the student
conduct system
f. attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a HCRB and CJC prior to,
and/or during the course of, the student conduct proceeding
g. harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a member of a HCRB and CJC
prior to, during, and/or after a student conduct proceeding
h. failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the Student Code
i. influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the student
conduct system

18. Unregistered motor vehicle


19. Gambling - playing and betting for money or other things of value at any game played with
cards, dice, or balls
20. Tampering with fire detection equipment
21. Disregard fire alarm signal
22. Throwing objects out of window
23. Visitation
24. Unauthorized entry
25. College student identification cards
26. Actions leading to conviction of criminal offense
27. Unauthorized burning
28. Tampering with college equipment

If someone threatens to harm or kill you, please contact Campus Police immediately as it is very difficult to
determine an individual’s intent to follow-through on a threat. Also, maintain evidence of harassing,
threatening and intimidating behaviors, and if possible, be able to identify and/or name the student(s) you
believe to be responsible for the inappropriate behaviors.

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It is important that you also establish a timeline of when the behavior began up to the point you file an
incident report. Take a minute to document the behaviors. Be specific as to when the behaviors started and
document all occurrences no matter how minor you think they might be.

Student Conduct Violations Online


The Office of Student of Conduct will work with Housing and Residential Education, Morehouse Technology
Group (MTG) and Campus Police to conduct a thorough review of all alleged incidents of harassment,
bullying, threatening and intimidating behaviors online. A conduct hearing may be held in cases that
demonstrate a violation of Community Standards and/or our Code of Conduct. The possible consequences for
an online violation of our Community Standards and Code of Conduct may include suspension and/or
expulsion from Morehouse College. A person may also be subject to criminal penalties as well.

ADDITIONAL STUDENT CONDUCT VIOLATIONS AND DEFINITIONS

1. Complicity- Helping, procuring, encouraging, and/or cooperating with another person in the
commission of a violation of the Student Code of Conduct.

2. Destroying, damaging or littering of any property- intentionally or recklessly destroying,


damaging, or littering personal or college property.

3. Disorderly and Disruptive Behavior/Activities

a. Disorderly Conduct- An offense involving disturbance of the public peace, lewd and
indecent behaviors. This includes belligerent behavior toward students, faculty and/or staff
in the performance of their duties. Belligerent behaviors include aggressive, argumentative,
quarrelsome, loud-mouthed, confrontational, threatening remarks or gestures, foul and/or
abusive language.
b. Disruptive activity- Participation in an activity that interferes with teaching, research,
administration, student conduct proceedings, other university functions including public-
service functions and off-campus activities. Representative actions include:

a. Leading or inciting others to disrupt scheduled and/or normal activities on college


premises.
b. Classroom behavior that seriously interferes with either the instructor’s ability to
conduct the class or the ability of other students to profit from the instructional
program.
c. Any behavior in class or out of class, which for any reason materially disrupts the
academic work of others, involves substantial disorder, invades the rights of others,
or otherwise disrupts the regular and essential operation of the college.

4. Electronic Copyright Infringement- Using intellectual property without authorization from the
owner. Downloading, uploading or sharing copyrighted material without permission is illegal.

5. Host Responsibility - Students and student organizations are responsible for their guest/visitor’s
behavior and compliance with college policies and procedures in academic and non-academic
buildings, on university owned property, and at university sponsored events. Any student’s
failure to fulfill his/her responsibilities will be subject to fines/charges for any damage and
possible disciplinary action. Non-members of the Morehouse community whose behavior is
detrimental to the college may have his/her visiting privileges revoked and/or be subject to
charges of trespassing on Morehouse College property.

6. Pets—Pets and other animals are prohibited in all college buildings, with the exception of those
approved by the college.

7. Publicity/Posting Policy- All flyers or other media used for marketing or event purposes that
are not approved or aligned with individual building and college publicity and posting policies.

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8. Safety and Equipment - the following are representative actions that threaten the health, safety,
and welfare of members of our community:
a. Tampering with fire safety equipment such as fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, alarm
pull stations or emergency exits.
b. Failure to comply with Fire Safety Procedures
c. Unapproved use of fire within college facilities, particularly within residential units.
d. Use of all candles and incense in student rooms is prohibited.
e. Open fires, including bonfires, camp fires, etc., are prohibited without university approval.
f. Grilling and other outdoor cooking outside of designated areas.

9. Sales and Solicitation— Solicitation is defined as requesting money, seeking agreement to pay,
taking subscriptions, selling merchandise or tickets or offering any other comparable event
admission, materials and privileges.
a. Promoting sales in person or by handbills, through e-mail and/or internet, or by posters or
similar materials must be approved by the Building Coordinator and/or Residence
Education and Housing staff.
b. Soliciting and selling for private or commercial gain is not permitted on Morehouse
College’s campus.
c. Door-to-door solicitation is not permitted in any residential facility at any time, and the
commercial stuffing of student mailboxes is strictly prohibited.

B. Violation of Law and College Discipline

If a student is charged only with an off-campus violation of federal, state or local laws, but not with any
other violation of this Code, disciplinary action may be taken and sanctions imposed for conduct that
has an adverse impact on the College community. The College’s disciplinary proceedings may be
instituted against a student charged with conduct that potentially violates both criminal law and the Student
Code (that is both possible violations resulting from the same factual situation) without regard to the
pendency of civil or criminal litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Proceedings under this
Student Code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with or following civil or criminal proceedings
off campus at the discretion of the Senior Vice President for Student Development and Associate Vice
President for Student Services and Dean of the College. Determinations made or sanctions imposed under
the Student Code shall not be subject to change because criminal charges arising out of the same facts that
gave to violation of College rules were dismissed, reduced or resolved in favor of or against the criminal
law defendant.

STUDENT CONDUCT POLICIES

A. Violations and Hearings

1) . Any member of the College community may file a student conduct violation against any student for
violations of the Student Code. Allegations of Student Code violations shall be prepared in writing and
directed to the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or designee responsible for the
administration of the College system. Any violation should be submitted as soon as possible after the
event takes place, and shall provide factual information supporting the alleged violation of the student
code preferably within five (5) days.
2) The Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct or designee may conduct an investigation to
determine if the (violation) charges have merit and/or if they can be disposed of administratively by
mutual consent of the parties involved on a basis acceptable to Assistant Dean of the College for Student
Conduct. Such disposition shall be final and there shall be no subsequent proceedings. If the student
conduct (violation) are not admitted to and/or cannot be disposed of by mutual consent, the Assistant
Dean of the College for Student Conduct may later serve in the same matter as the HCRB and CJCs or a
member thereof. If the student admits violating institutional rules, but sanctions are not agreed to,
subsequent process, including a hearing if necessary, shall be limited to determining the appropriate
sanctions.

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3) Hearings normally will be conducted in private and the admission of others is subject to the discretion of
the chairperson. With the written consent of the students involved and the Assistant Dean of the College
for Student Conduct a representative of the student press may be admitted, but shall not have the privilege
of participating in the hearing.
4) Hearing shall be conducted by the College Judiciary Committee, Honor Conduct Review Board or the
Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct. The HCRB and CJC determination shall be based on
whether it is preponderance of information that the accused student violated the Student Code.
5) All student conduct violations shall be presented to the accused student in written form hand deliver,
mailed and/or electronic notification from the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct.
6) In hearings involving more than one accused student, the chairperson of the CJC or Chief Justice, in his
or her discretion, may permit the hearings to be conducted separately.
7) The complainant and the accused student have the right to be assisted by an advisor they choose,
however, the advisor must be a member of the College community and can not be an attorney or
parent. The complainant and/or the accused student are responsible for presenting his or her own
information and, therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in any
hearing before a HCRB and CJC. A student should select as an advisor a person whose schedule allows
attendance at the scheduled date and time for the Student Conduct hearing because delays will not
normally be allowed due to scheduling conflicts of an advisor.
8) The complainant, the accused student and the HCRB and/or CJC may arrange for witnesses who are
identified by the complainant and/or accused student at least two weekdays prior to the hearing.
Witnesses will provide information and answer questions from the HCRB and CJC. Questions may be
asked by the accused student and/or complainant to be answered by each other and by other witnesses.
This will be conducted by the HCRB and/or CJC with such questions directed to the chairperson, rather
than directly to the witness. This method is used to preserve the educational tone of the hearing and to
avoid creations of an adversarial environment. Questions of whether potential information will be
received shall be resolved in the discretion of the chairperson of the HCRB and/or CJC.
9) Pertinent records, exhibits and written statements may be accepted as information for consideration by the
HCRB and/or CJC at the discretion of the chairperson or Chief Justice.
10) All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the chairperson of the CJC or HCRB.
11) Formal rules of process, procedure and/or technical rules of information, such as applied to criminal or
civil courts, are not used in Student Code proceedings.
12) After the hearing, the HCRB and/or CJC shall determine whether the student has violated the conduct
code.

There shall be a single verbatim record, such as a tape recording, of all hearings before a HCRB and/or CJC.
The record shall be the property of the College. If a student fails to obey the summons of a College official,
the student shall forfeit his opportunity to bring forth information and/or testimony.

B. Alternate Dispute Resolution

Upon mutual request of the accused student and the accuser, and with the consent of the Assistant Dean of the
College for Student Conduct, alternative dispute resolution including negotiated settlements between the
parties, mediation or similar forums may be scheduled in lieu of formal conduct hearings.

C. Sanctions

The primary purpose of sanctions in this code is to protect the College community from behavior that is
disruptive, threatening or dangerous to others; or that is lewd, indecent, and obscene; or that impairs the
primary function of the College to educate students. Sanctions under the Student Code of Conduct may be
tailored to suit the circumstances of each offense. In cases where alcohol and/or drug usage are known or
where the accused student exhibits extreme violent or abusive behavior, sanction imposed may be suspended
pending drug and alcohol abuse assessment and counseling, or participation in anger management classes.
The sanctions that may be imposed as a result of disciplinary proceedings include, but are not limited to,
warnings, disciplinary probation, suspension and dismissal.

1. The following sanctions may be imposed upon any student found to have violated the
Student Code:

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a. WARNING — A notice in writing to the student that he is violating or has


violated institutional regulations.
b. PROBATION — A written reprimand for violation of specified regulations.
Probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more
severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any institutional
regulation(s) during the probationary period. Students on disciplinary probation
are not allowed to:

1. Represent the College or their classes

2. Take part in extracurricular activities involving events before or as a


representative of the College community

3. Participate in a selection/induction program of a fraternity or participate in


any fraternity activities

4. Occupy any position in a club or organization or serve on a College


committee or board

5. Attend or participate in any social club or organization affairs, functions


or activities

6. Participate in any College program abroad

c. DISCRETIONARY SANCTIONS — Students may be required to perform mandatory service


(a specific number of hours within a specific time period) to an on-campus department, division,
and faculty or staff member. This sanction may be imposed in conjunction with other sanctions.
d. RESTITUTION — Student may be required to provide compensation for loss, damage or
injury. This may take the form of appropriate service and/or monetary or material replacement.
e. REFERRAL TO COUNSELING — In cases where students being disciplined manifest
behaviors and/or attitudes that inhibit their ability to function effectively as members of the
College community, they may be referred to counseling services available at the College.
f. RESIDENCE HALL SUSPENSION — Separation of the student from the residence halls for a
definite period of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Conditions for re-admission
may be specified.
g. RESIDENCE HALL EXPULSION — Permanent separation of the student from the residence
halls.
h. INTERIM SUSPENSION- Temporary separation of a student from the campus when the Vice
President for Student Development and /or Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct
believes such separation is necessary, or from a classroom when requested by a faculty member.
i. COLLEGE SUSPENSION — Separation of the student from the College for a definite period
of time, after which the student is eligible to return. Students who are suspended must leave the
campus within 48 hours of suspension. Conditions for re-admission may be specified at the
discretion of the Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct.
j. COLLEGE EXPULSION — Permanent separation of the student from the College. Dismissal
constitutes a student’s involuntary separation from the College with no recourse to return.
Dismissal generally is used for very serious infractions, which include, but are not limited to,
violations of College policy on drugs which include illegal manufacture, sale, delivery, or
possession with the intent to manufacture, sell or deliver any controlled substance and alcohol;
physical altercations or abuse; theft; fraud; forgery; possession of a firearm or any weapon of
mass destruction violations of other criminal laws. As result of this sanction, the Campus Police
will pursue a criminal trespass warrant against you which will prevent you from coming on the
college campus.
k. REVOCATION OF ADMISSION OR DEGREE- Admission to or a degree awarded from the
College may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation or other violations of College standards in
obtaining the degree, or for other serious violations committed by the student prior to graduation.

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1. WITHHOLDING DEGREE—The College may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned


until completion of the process as set forth in the Student Conduct Code of Conduct, including
the completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.

1. More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single violation.

2. Other than College expulsion, or revocation or withholding of a degree, disciplinary


sanctions shall not be made part of the student’s permanent academic record, but shall
become part of the Student’s disciplinary record. Upon graduation, the student’s
disciplinary record may be expunged of disciplinary actions. College suspension or
College expulsion, or revocation or withholding of a degree, upon application to the
Assistant Dean of the College for Student Conduct. Otherwise, cases involving the
imposition of sanctions College suspension. College expulsion or revocation or
withholding of a degree shall be expunged from the student’s disciplinary record seven
years after final disposition of the case.

Weapons

O.C.G.A. § 16-11-127.1
Carrying weapons within school safety zones, at school functions, or on school property

(a) As used in this Code section, the term:


(1) "School safety zone" means in, on, or within 1,000 feet of any real property owned by or leased to any
public or private elementary school, secondary school, or school board and used for elementary or secondary
education and in, on, or within 1,000 feet of the campus of any public or private technical school, vocational
school, college, university, or institution of postsecondary education.

(2) "Weapon" means and includes any pistol, revolver, or any weapon designed or intended to propel a
missile of any kind, or any dirk, bowie knife, switchblade knife, ballistic knife, any other knife having a blade
of two or more inches, straight-edge razor, razor blade, spring stick, knuckles whether made from metal,
thermoplastic, wood, or other similar material, blackjack, any bat, club, or other bludgeon-type weapon, or
any flailing instrument consisting of two or more rigid parts connected in such a manner as to allow them to
swing freely, which may be known as a nun chahka, nun chuck, nun chaku, shuriken, or fighting chain, or
any disc, of whatever configuration, having at least two points or pointed blades which is designed to be
thrown or propelled and which may be known as a throwing star or oriental dart, or any weapon of like kind,
and any stun gun or taser as defined in subsection (a) of Code Section 16-11-106. This paragraph excludes
any of these instruments used for classroom work authorized by the teacher.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (c) of this Code section, it shall be unlawful for any person to
carry to or to possess or have under such person's control while within a school safety zone or at a school
building, school function, or school property or on a bus or other transportation furnished by the school any
weapon or explosive compound, other than fireworks the possession of which is regulated by Chapter 10 of
Title 25. Any person who violates this subsection shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction thereof, be
punished by a fine of not more than $10,000.00, by imprisonment for not less than two nor more than ten
years, or both; provided, however, that upon conviction of a violation of this subsection involving a firearm as
defined in paragraph (2) of subsection (a) of Code Section 16-11-131, or a dangerous weapon or machine gun
as defined in Code Section 16-11-121, such person shall be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000.00 or
by imprisonment for a period of not less than five nor more than ten years, or both. A child who violates this
subsection shall be subject to the provisions of Code Section 15-11-63.

(c) The provisions of this Code section shall not apply to:

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(1) Baseball bats, hockey sticks, or other sports equipment possessed by competitors for legitimate athletic
purposes;

(2) Participants in organized sport shooting events or firearm training courses;

(3) Persons participating in military training programs conducted by or on behalf of the armed forces of the
United States or the Georgia Department of Defense;

(4) Persons participating in law enforcement training conducted by a police academy certified by the Georgia
Peace Officer Standards and Training Council or by a law enforcement agency of the state or the United
States or any political subdivision thereof;

(5) The following persons, when acting in the performance of their official duties or when en route to or from
their official duties:

(A) A peace officer as defined by Code Section 35-8-2;

(B) A law enforcement officer of the United States government;

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(C) A prosecuting attorney of this state or of the United States;

(D) An employee of the Georgia Department of Corrections or a correctional facility operated by a political
subdivision of this state or the United States who is authorized by the head of such correctional agency or
facility to carry a firearm;

(E) A person employed as a campus police officer or school security officer who is authorized to carry a
weapon in accordance with Chapter 8 of Title 20 ; and

(F) Medical examiners, coroners, and their investigators who are employed by the state or any political
subdivision thereof;

(6) A person who has been authorized in writing by a duly authorized official of the school to have in such
person's possession or use as part of any activity being conducted at a school building, school property, or
school function a weapon which would otherwise be prohibited by this Code section. Such authorization shall
specify the weapon or weapons which have been authorized and the time period during which the
authorization is valid;

(7) A person who is licensed in accordance with Code Section 16-11-129 or issued a permit pursuant to Code
Section 43-38-10, when such person carries or picks up a student at a school building, school function, or
school property or on a bus or other transportation furnished by the school or any weapon legally kept within a
vehicle in transit through a designated school zone by any person other than a student;

(8) A weapon which is in a locked compartment of a motor vehicle or one which is in a locked container in or
a locked firearms rack which is on a motor vehicle which is being used by an adult over 21 years of age to
bring to or pick up a student at a school building, school function, or school property or on a bus or other
transportation furnished by the school, or when such vehicle is used to transport someone to an activity being
conducted on school property which has been authorized by a duly authorized official of the school; provided,
however, that this exception shall not apply to a student attending such school;

(9) Persons employed in fulfilling defense contracts with the government of the United States or agencies
thereof when possession of the weapon is necessary for manufacture, transport, installation, and testing under
the requirements of such contract;

(10) Those employees of the State Board of Pardons and Paroles when specifically designated and authorized
in writing by the members of the State Board of Pardons and Paroles to carry a weapon;

(11) The Attorney General and those members of his or her staff whom he or she specifically authorizes in
writing to carry a weapon;

(12) Probation supervisors employed by and under the authority of the Department of Corrections pursuant to
Article 2 of Chapter 8 of Title 42, known as the "State-wide Probation Act," when specifically designated and
authorized in writing by the director of the Division of Probation;

(13) Public safety directors of municipal corporations;

(14) State and federal trial and appellate judges;

(15) United States attorneys and assistant United States attorneys;

(16) Clerks of the superior courts; or

(17) Teachers and other school personnel who are otherwise authorized to possess or carry weapons, provided
that any such weapon is in a locked compartment of a motor vehicle or one which is in a locked container in
or a locked firearms rack which is on a motor vehicle; or

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(18) Constables of any county of this state.

18) (d)(1) This Code section shall not prohibit any person who resides or works in a business or is in the
ordinary course transacting lawful business or any person who is a visitor of such resident located within a
school safety zone from carrying, possessing, or having under such person's control a weapon within a school
safety zone; provided, however, it shall be unlawful for any such person to carry, possess, or have under such
person's control while at a school building or school function or on school property, a school bus, or other
transportation furnished by the school any weapon or explosive compound, other than fireworks the
possession of which is regulated by Chapter 10 of Title 25.

(2) Any person who violates this subsection shall be subject to the penalties specified in subsection (b) of
this Code section.

(3) This subsection shall not be construed to waive or alter any legal requirement for possession of
weapons or firearms otherwise required by law.

(e) It shall be no defense to a prosecution for a violation of this Code section that:

(1) School was or was not in session at the time of the offense;

(2) The real property was being used for other purposes besides school purposes at the time of the
offense; or

(3) The offense took place on a school vehicle.

(f) In a prosecution under this Code section, a map produced or reproduced by any municipal or county
agency or department for the purpose of depicting the location and boundaries of the area on or within
1,000 feet of the real property of a school board or a private or public elementary or secondary school that
is used for school purposes or within 1,000 feet of any campus of any public or private technical school,
vocational school, college, university, or institution of postsecondary education, or a true copy of the
map, shall, if certified as a true copy by the custodian of the record, be admissible and shall constitute
prima-facie evidence of the location and boundaries of the area, if the governing body of the municipality
or county has approved the map as an official record of the location and boundaries of the area. A map
approved under this Code section may be revised from time to time by the governing body of the
municipality or county. The original of every map approved or revised under this subsection or a true
copy of such original map shall be filed with the municipality or county and shall be maintained as an
official record of the municipality or county. This subsection shall not preclude the prosecution from
introducing or relying upon any other evidence or testimony to establish any element of this offense. This
subsection shall not preclude the use or admissibility of a map or diagram other than the one which has
been approved by the municipality or county.

(g) A county school board may adopt regulations requiring the posting of signs designating the areas
within 1,000 feet of school boards and private or public elementary and secondary schools as "Weapon-
free and Violence-free School Safety Zones."

FAQ’S ON THE COLLEGE’S DISCIPLINARY SYSTEM AND HEARING PROCEDURES

What is the relationship among the AUC institutions regarding disciplinary rules?

As a member of the Atlanta University Center, the College has a reciprocal agreement with other AUC
schools regarding student behavior and discipline. If a Morehouse student is accused of misconduct on one of
the other AUC campuses, the College reserves the right to handle the case as if it occurred at the College.'
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Will I have a fair hearing, and will I be given an opportunity to present information on my behalf?

Students will have a fair opportunity to explain their position and present information and witnesses on their
behalf. Parents and lawyers are not permitted to attend the hearing or address the Assistant Dean of the
College for Student Conduct, College Judiciary Committee or HCRB, or question witnesses while the hearing
is in session.

Office of Housing and Residential Education (OHRE)

Hours: Monday - Friday, 9 am to 5 pm


Location: Kilgore Residential Commons
Telephone: (404)215-2634
Email: Tigerden@morehouse.edu

Vision
To become a premier housing and residential education program.

Mission
The Office of Housing and Residential Education is committed to developing a safe and inclusive
residential community that assists in fostering development of Morehouse men. Programming, services, and
policies are intentionally designed to facilitate intellectual and personal growth, cultural awareness and
appreciation, social responsibility, ethical leadership and academic excellence. It is our responsibility to
create a challenging yet supportive residential community that promotes and cultivates conscientious men to
lead in a global society.

Guiding Principles
The mission of Housing and Residential Education will be accomplished by embracing the Morehouse
College core values (Accountability, Civility, Community, Compassion, Honesty, Respect, Spirituality, and
Trust) and committing to the College and Division of Student Services goals. Additionally, the Office of
Housing and Residential Education will:

Focus on Intellectual and Personal Growth

Focus Focus on Character Development

Focus on Sei~vant Leadership

Focus on Quality Service

Residential Houses
There are twelve (12) residential houses at Morehouse College that vary in capacity from 40 to 360
residents. Generally, the residential houses are categorized as freshmen and upperclassmen. There are also
special themes associated with each residences halls. Each residential house is managed by an Associate
Dean of Residential Education (House Dean) and student staff consisting or Lead Residential Advisors
(Leads) Residential Advisors (RAs) and Residential Academic Mentors (RAMs).

Residential Life Staff


The staff of each residential house consists of the following:
• Associate Dean ofResidential Education (House Dean), who is live-in professionals that supervise
the student staff and support students through programming and intervention services.
• Lead Residential Advisor (Lead) - an upper-class student that leads the residential staff in the
house in house programmatic and operational efforts.
• Residential Advisor (RA) - an upper-class student that serves as a peer mentor and assists students
with their concerns.
• Residential Academic Mentor (RAM) — an upper-class student that provides peer academic
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coaching and tutorial services.


The residential house staff works to create and promote an environment that supports respect, integrity,
civility, accountability, and compassion among all residents. They also work with the day-to-day
administrative duties, provide leadership in the residential houses and conduct educational, cultural, social,
personal and career development programs for the residents.

HOUSING ACCOMMODATIONS

3-year Live-on Requirement


The three-year live-on requirement is a commitment between the men of Morehouse and the Office of
Housing & Residential Education to enhance the students' experience and success. This commitment requires
students to live on campus and have a meal plan for three years (depending on the residential house and
student classification).

Morehouse College believes that students who live on-campus are more likely to stay enrolled, graduate on
time, and feel connected to the campus community. In support of this commitment, the Division of Student
Development will focus time and energy into campus resources to ensure student success. Research shows
that living on campus has several positive outcomes that help students developmentally. Empirical research
reveals six areas in which residence halls have a significant impact on students (Blimling, 2003):
• Retention - They have greater expectations for academic achievement and are more likely to remain
in college.
• Co-curricular Involvement - More involved in campus activities. Students learn to work with others,
manage budgets, express their ideas in meetings, negotiate with others, and follow through with
projects.
• Personal Growth and Development - Students meet more challenges, mature more quickly and learn
to become interdependent.
• Interpersonal Relationships - Students build strong friendships and share more experiences. They
interact more, develop more tolerance, and experience more cultural diversity.
• Faculty Interaction - Students have more contacts with faculty both in the residence halls and due to
close proximity to faculty offices.
• Positive Feelings about Campus Experiences - Students feel that the campus is more comfortable,
more educationally purposeful, supportive, and more enjoyable yielding higher overall satisfaction
with their college experience.

The three-year live-on requirement is fulfilled by the following criteria:


If the student has completed three full years of attendance at Morehouse College or another accredited post­
secondary institution before the residential houses open for fall semester. For example, a transfer student who
has attended another accredited institution for at least three years and lived on campus is exempt from the
live-on requirement. Experience must be at an institution of higher education and does not include high school
or boarding school experience. If the student is legally married or in a legal civil union, we require a notarized
copy of your official marriage or civil union documentation.

Students may petition to be released from the three-year live-on requirement and the housing contract based
on the following criteria:
• Live at home with parents or legal guardians whose permanent home address is within 25miles
driving distance of campus.
• Medical Accommodation.
• Financial Duress.

To apply, the student must complete the exemption form located on the housing website.

Incoming Freshmen

All freshmen are required to live in a residential house on the Morehouse College campus
unless they are granted a waiver from the Associate Dean of the College for Residential Education &
Director of Housing to live off campus due to extenuating circumstances. New students accepted to the
College will apply online via TigerDen - the web-based housing application portal - after confirmation
of the college’s acceptance fee. Students are responsible for adhering to the application and financial
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deadlines outlined by the Office of Admissions. Residential house and roommate requests are honored
as space permits. Assignments for the fall semester are made on a “first paid” basis and made available
in the housing portal throughout the summer. Please note that incoming freshmen will be able to rank
their preferences but it is not guaranteed. You can visit the housing website to view the housing
options for incoming freshmen. Continuing Residential Students Housing Application Process
Due to the limited number of housing units available for returning students who wish to live on campus, the
Office of Housing and Residential Education implements a housing selection process each spring semester.
The process is designed to provide continuing students with an equitable system for obtaining on-campus
housing assignments during the following academic year.

In order to participate in the housing selection process, students must complete and submit a housing
application to the Office of Housing and Residential Education along with payment verification of the
housing reservation fee (if applicable). Continuing students’ housing applications become available in mid to
late spring.

Students living off campus who wish to request on-campus housing for the next academic year must
participate in the housing selection process listed above. No student can be considered for campus housing
without submitting a housing application and remit the housing reservation fee (if applicable).

In order to complete the housing selection process and secure their room assignment, students must assure
the financing of tuition for the fall and spring semester. The Office of Business and Finance determines if
payments are necessary and the amount of these payments. Note these payments are separate from the
housing reservation fee, and payments must be made in order to continue through the housing selection
process.
Students’ room assignments are for the fall and spring semesters. Students will only be released from this
obligation if they are no longer enrolled at Morehouse College and have completed the contract release
form. Any additional exception must be granted by the Associate Dean of the College for Residential
Education & Director of Housing prior to the end of the semester.

As space permits, residential house and roommate preferences will be granted to students who are selected
into campus housing. Students with concerns about room assignments should contact the Office of Housing
and Residential Education. Students with roommate problems should contact their respective RA and/or RD.

ON-CAMPUS HOUSING APPLICATION CHECKLIST:

1. Complete and submit Housing Application via TigerDen - the web-based housing application
portal.

2. Register for classes.

3. Remit Housing Reservation Fee (if applicable)

4. Remit Initial Tuition, Room and Board, Fees Payment.

5. Remit Final Tuition, Room and Board, Fees Payment.

6. Check TigerDen Housing Portal website for room assignment.

7. Check-in: Be sure to bring approved items only.

8. Check-out: Be sure to clean up and return keys on time.

Summer Term Housing


Students must apply separately for summer term housing. Summer applications are available via TigerDen -
the web-based housing application portal. Applications must be submitted by April 30 . Students employed
by the Summer Academy must apply through their designated program coordinator.

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Withdrawal from the Residential Community


Any student who wishes to move out of campus housing for any reason (i.e. moving to off-campus housing
or withdrawing from the College) must do the following:

• Complete and submit a Housing Contract Release Request Form to the Office of Housing and
Residential Education.
• Remove all belongings from his assigned room upon approval of Housing Contract Release.
• Return the room key to the Residential House staff.
Any assignment will be canceled and financial reimbursement made if appropriate. Students who fail to
vacate in accordance with this policy will be responsible for all applicable charges.

COMMUNITY STANDARDS

Quiet Hours
Noise should be maintained at a reasonable level at all times within the residential houses. All students are
expected to be considerate of others who are studying or sleeping. During designated quiet hours, noise
levels should not be loud enough to be heard outside students’ rooms. Regular quiet hours are:

Sunday - Thursday 10pm-Sam


Friday and Saturday Midnight - 10am

All residents must observe quiet hours 24 hours per day during the
Reading Period thru the end ofFinals Week

Endangering Behavior
Students who participate in endangering behavior may be removed from their residential houses, fined, and
be subject to disciplinary action and/or criminal charges.

Endangering behavior includes, but is not limited to the following:


• tampering with fire equipment
• blocking a fire escape
• failing to evacuate a building during a fire alarm
• defacing or tampering with safety signs or equipment
• using or possessing firearms, explosives, firecrackers, and other highly flammablematerials
• removing windows or screens
• throwing objects out of windows
• using open flame devices such as candles, oil lanterns, propane torches, etc.
• careless use of appliances and/or use of appliances that are prohibited
• tampering with wiring
• installation of partitions, paneling, or lofts
• careless use of any other material that may result in danger to the College community
• entering or exiting designated emergency exits

Fire Safety
Making false fire reports tampering with fire-fighting equipment (including removing fire extinguishers
from their proper stations or discharging them other than to put out fires) and interfering with fire fighters
are all criminal offenses. Fire doors that close should never be propped open, blocked or otherwise tampered
with, nor should fire escapes be accessed for any purposes other than emergency evacuation. Repair and/or
replacement costs will be assessed to students responsible for such acts or prorated among the occupants of a
residential house. In addition, all responsible parties may be subject to disciplinary action, fines, and/or
criminal charges.

Smoking Policy
Smoking is prohibited in the residential houses or within 15 feet of a hall. This policy is strictly
enforced. Violators may be required to move off campus immediately and may be denied on-campus
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privileges in the future. Also included in this policy is a strict prohibition of the following combustible
items:
• Incense
• Candles
• Cigars
• F ireworks

Appliances
Television sets (if outside antenna or other exterior reception devices are not used), electric flat irons, small
compact refrigerators, hair dryers and fans are permitted in residential houses. Microwave ovens, electric
skillets, hot plates, coffee pots and all forms of cooking equipment are not allowed in individual student
rooms.

Occupants of rooms where prohibited appliances are found may be subject to disciplinary action and/or a
fine. Students with certain medical conditions may apply to the Director of Housing permission to use
special appliances in their rooms.

Maintenance
Any item in need of repair and or replacement should be brought to the attention of a Residential House Staff
person. The process/procedures for notifying an RA about repairs/replacement of residential house items will
be disseminated during the first hall/floor meeting during the fall semester.

THE COLLEGE WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR THE LOSS OF MONEY OR VALUABLES OR
FOR DAMAGE TO THE PROPERTY OF ANY STUDENT WHO RESIDES IN
CAMPUS HOUSING.

Any incidents that result in the loss or damage to property should be reported to the Campus Police and the
House Dean. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain renter’s insurance on their personal property or
extend their parents’ homeowner’s coverage to include their property away from home.

Each student also shares responsibility for the overall condition of his room, residential house, and its
furniture. Students will be held responsible and charged if any damages are made to the room,
residential house, and/or its furniture beyond normal wear and tear.

The residential house staff makes monthly room checks to ascertain the condition of rooms. If at the end of a
term a room is left in such condition that it requires more than routine cleaning, a fine will be assessed to
each resident of the room.

Entry into Your Room


The College may permit authorized personnel to enter a student’s room under the following circumstances:
• for routine health and safety room inspections
• when repairs or maintenance are needed
• when there is reason to believe the room is being used for illegal purposes
• when there is reason to believe the occupant’s life or health is in danger
• when necessary to ensure that the College’s policies and procedures are followed

Custodial Services
Custodial services are provided to every residential house to keep the common living areas clean and keep
buildings up to College standards. Residents are responsible for the general cleaning of their rooms and
removing excessive trash from the common areas. Students are expected to keep their rooms reasonably
clean and orderly so as not to endanger the health and safety of themselves or others. If, after appropriate
warning, a student does not maintain his room in reasonable order, he may be required to vacate the room
without a refund.

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Damages
During check-in, students are required to complete a Room Condition Report (RCR) outlining any existing
damages in their room. Residents are liable for any damage and/or loss to their room, or its furniture not
reported on the RCR. Repair or replacement costs will be assessed to the individual or individuals
responsible. In common areas or when this is not possible, costs can be prorated among the residents of a
building, floor or wing. Students are encouraged to report any information regarding specific acts of
vandalism to the Office of Housing and Residential Education.

Room Keys
Room keys are issued to each student assigned to a residential house room. During check-in, students will
receive room keys from the residential house staff and must return keys to the residential house staff when
the room is permanently vacated at the end of each semester. Students moving out before check-out must get
approval from the house staff. Students who fail to return keys immediately in accordance with established
procedure will be charged a late departure fee. Students are responsible for locking their rooms whenever
they are not present (i.e. going to the shower, laundry, or visiting another resident). Students should
ALWAYS lock their room doors at night. New or additional locks may not be affixed to doors, and keys
may not be duplicated. Lost keys should be reported immediately to the RA who will take appropriate
actions to have the locks changed and new keys issued at the student’sexpense.

Lockout Policy and Procedure


Residents are expected to maintain control of their residential house room key at all times. Students are not
to give their room key to anyone and should have their key in their possession whenever they leave their
room.

RESIDENTS MUST KEEP THEIR KEY WITH THEM AT ALL TIMES.

The Office of Housing and Residential Education cannot stress enough the importance of adhering to this
policy. Lost room keys and lockouts are the most common issues faced by our residents. It is imperative that
residents exercise responsibility for their personal property, fellow residents’ safety, and their college home.

House Deans have office hours from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. There is an “Administrator on Duty” during
after-hours to assist with emergencies. Should a student become locked out of his room, he should follow the
procedure below:

• During standard business hours (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.), students are to contact their RA for assistance. If the
RA is unavailable, students are to contact their Lead.
• During after-hours (5 p.m. to 3 a.m.), the student should contact the RA on-duty. If the RA on-duty is
not available then the student can call Campus Police, who will contact the Administrator on Duty.
• The RA on Duty assists with lockouts during the following scheduled times ONLY: 7 p.m., 9 p.m., 11
p.m., 1 a.m., and 3 a.m. Any residents locked out between these times must wait for the next scheduled
lockout assistance time. Weekends hours (Sat.- Sun) are 9:00 AM, 1:00PM, 5:00 PM, 7:00 PM, 11:00
PM, 1:00 AM and 3:00 AM.
• Lost keys must be replaced by the end of the next business day.
• Note: There will be no lockout assistance from 3 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Lockout Fees
Due to the significant costs and safety hazards lost room keys cause the entire Morehouse College community,
the Office of Housing and Residential Education strongly urges residents to make a conscious effort to secure
their keys. Lack of responsibility with room keys will result in a fine as follows:

1. First incident - Lockout Standard Fee of $25.


2. Second incident - Lockout Standard Fee of $50.
3. Third incident - Lockout Standard Fee of $75.

More than three (3) lockouts in any academic year will result in a hearing before the House Dean. Action
may include additional fines, restrictions on co-curricular activity participation, and/or serious disciplinary
action.

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Laundry Service
Laundering facilities are located in the lower level of Archer, Graves and Perdue halls. Card-operated
machines and folding tables are available.

Pets
Pets and animals may not be kept in residential houses; however, arrangements will be made to
accommodate dogs that assist students with disabilities, e.g., guide dogs for students who are blind and
companion dogs for students who are hearing or mobility impaired. Students who need an animal to assist
them because of a disability must contact the Counseling & Disability Resource Center who will provide
documentation to housing. Students who keep pets or animals inside or outside any residential house will be
fined for each offense and may be held responsible for the extermination or other costs associated with the
pets or animals.

Solicitation and Selling


Neither students nor non-students may solicit or sell any products or services or post any advertisements in
the residential houses. Unauthorized advertisements that are posted will immediately be removed by the
residential house staff.

Decorations
Although individuality and creativity is encouraged, students are not to decorate in a manner that
permanently alters their room. Materials may not be used if they cause damage to the paint, walls, ceilings,
or floors. To hang items on walls, please use map tacks, thumbtacks, or blue painter’s tape.

Flyers
All notices and signs posted by organizations in residential houses must show the approval stamp by
the Office of Student Life on the document and must be approved by the House Dean of the respective
residential house. Flyers should clearly state the name of the responsible organization and should be posted
only on designated bulletin boards. No notices or signs may be placed on the interior or exterior walls,
windows or doors. Signs and notices that are posted improperly will be removed, and the responsible
organization may be fined and charged the cost of any repairs. Please contact the Office of Housing and
Residential Education for further clarification.

Storage
Storage is not available in the residential houses. Students who need to store items must make their own
arrangements with a commercial storage company.

GUESTS AND VISITATION

Guest Policy
A guest is defined as any person, other than authorized College officials, who does not live in a specific
residential house. Students will be held responsible for their own conduct, as well as that of their guests.
Students who invite guests to campus and the residential houses are expected to inform them of all rules and
regulations. All guests must present a picture I.D. upon request by the residential house staff.

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Community Information Desk (CID)


The Community Information Desk is the check point for guest entry to any residential
house. The primary purpose of the CID is to monitor and facilitate guest visitation. The
management of the CID is coordinated by the House Dean.

All visitors must provide a student I D. or other picture I.D. when requested by the
residential house staff. If confiscated, the I.D. card will be given to the House Dean.

Overnight Guests
Students are prohibited from having overnight guests in their rooms. While the College
is fully aware and sensitive to the fact that students participate in late-night study and
discussion sessions from time to time, all students are encouraged to return to their own
rooms and/or dwellings to sleep.

Visitation
Guest visitation in residential houses is a privilege, not a right, and therefore may be suspended by the
Associate Vice President for Student Services & Dean of the College, the Associate Dean of the College for
Residential Education & Director of Housing, or the House Dean. Residents must have their roommates’
consent before inviting female visitors to their rooms, and female visitors must not interfere with the
academic pursuits of residents or their roommates.

FRESHMEN VISITATION POLICY

There is no visitation for individuals not affiliated with the college in the freshmen residential houses
for the first semester until the weekend following homecoming. In addition, visitation ends the last day of
finals. In the second semester, visitation for those not affiliated with Morehouse begins at the discretion of
the house dean and ends the last day of finals.

Freshmen hours for female visitation, beginning the Friday after


homecoming are:
Sunday - Thursday 6 pm — 11pm
Friday 6 pm - Midnight
Saturday 6 pm - Midnight

UPPERCLASSMEN - VISITATION POLICY


Visitation for the first and second semesters begins the discretion of the House Dean
ends the last day of finals. The hours for visitation for those not affiliated with
Morehouse are as follows:

Sunday - Thursday 6pm - Midnight


Friday 6pm - Midnight
Saturday 6pm - Midnight

Otis Moss Jr. Residential Suites


The Otis Moss Residential Suites is an upperclassman residential house comprised of an East and West
building capable of housing up to 360 students. The apartment-style living quarters allow students to accept
greater responsibility for their daily activities within the guidelines of the College and the Office of Housing
and Residential Education. Students have the option of staying on a meal plan or utilizing the kitchens to
prepare meals. Otis Moss Residential Suites residents are allowed 24-hour visitation privileges on weekends
beginning Friday at lam ending on Sunday at 11:59pm.

DINING SERVICES

Meal Plans
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Meal plans may be required depending on the classification and residential house.

In traditional houses, students will select their meal plan during the housing application
process:
• All residential freshmen are required to have the unlimited meal plan.
• Sophomore students can choose between unlimited and 14-meal plan.
• Juniors can choose between unlimited, 14, and 10-meal plan.
• Seniors can choose from any option available.

In the Otis Moss Suites, students can choose any meal plan option or choose not to
purchase a meal plan. Students select their meal plan on the dining services web page
and must have a credit on their student account for the amount of the selected meal plan.

The meal contract is offered for the academic year. Exceptions: Only two (2) meals
served per day on the following holidays: Thanksgiving, Dr. King’s birthday, Spring
Break, and Good Friday.

Each student who resides on campus is issued an I.D./meal card, which must be
presented for entrance into the dining hall. The meal plan is also available for purchase
by students who live off campus.
I.D. cards are not transferable — the right to use them may not be given or sold to
another person. All I.D. cards are the property of the College and must, therefore, be
returned upon request. Lost cards should be reported to the I.D. Card Office —Access
Control, which will charge students a fee for a replacement card. The meal plan for the
semester ends with dinner on the last day of finals.

Cash Meals
Residential students are admitted to the dining hall when they present their meal cards.
Guests and visitors accompanied by residential students must pay cash for their meals
when they enter the dining hall. Because of space limitations, only those who are
receiving meals are admitted to the dining hall during meal hours.

Off-Campus Meal Plans


Students living off campus may purchase an off-campus meal plan that fits their needs.
Students should consult the schedule of fees to obtain information on the various off-
campus meal plans. Meal plans are purchased through the Student Accounts
department in the Business and Finance Office.

Special Diets
Requests for special diets will be honored by the dining hall within its capabilities.
Students cannot be released from their residential house contract, which includes room
and board, because of their requests for special meals.

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HEALTH SERVICES

Brazeal Hall, Ground Floor (north end of campus)


Telephone: (470) 639-2637

Clinic Hours: Sam to 5pm Monday, Tuesday, and Friday


8:00am to 7:00 pm Wednesday and Thursday

Doctors’ Hours: 11:00am to 1:00 pm Monday, Tuesday and Friday


11:00am to 6:00 pm Wednesday and Thursday
After hours and weekends report to Campus Police

The staff of Morehouse College Health Services provides health care for all students registered for four or
more credit hours. (A pre-entrance medical examination and immunization form is required of all new and
transfer students upon entering the College). In case of illness, students are urged to use College Health
Services. Parents or guardians will be notified of any serious illness, accident or injury.

Costs
Medical treatment in the Student Health Center is free to all eligible Morehouse College students. A portion of
student fees is designated to defray the cost of campus health services. Students are not required to pay for
diagnosis, treatment and medications dispensed from the drug formulary.

Primary Health Service/Medical Referrals


Physicians and registered nurses provide primary medical care. Physicians order appropriate medications,
usually free of charge to students. Any detailed medical work-ups will be referred to the appropriate local
Medical Center or Health Care Provider. A Health Services physician external to the College may treat a
student who must be hospitalized for surgery or medical care. The student and/or his parents, not the
College, assume responsibility for all medical fees not covered by insurance.

Medical Excuses
College Health Center does not issue excuses. If a class is missed due to a clinic visit, an e-mail will be sent to
the professor confirming the date and time of the student’s visit. Only College physicians can excuse a
student from physical education. Special classes may be assigned in physical education to meet this
requirement. Registration for each semester of physical education is required with or without exemption.

Support Services
College Health Center provides a range of support services for students, including counseling, instruction on
caring for acute and chronic diseases, and using preventive medical techniques. College Health Center also
serves as advisor and liaison for the Counseling Center works in partnership with the Counseling Center and
provides advice and counseling on sexually transmitted diseases, drug and alcohol abuse, and all other health-
related matters.

Medical Emergencies
In case of any emergency during hours when the Student Health Center is closed, security should be contacted
and ambulance services summoned as needed and appropriate. Fees resulting from the use of ambulance
services are the student’s responsibility. The College realizes that each and every emergency situation is
unique and that a student or a person on the student’s behalf may contact an ambulance directly. The College
encourages students to use discretion, prudence, and caution when contacting emergency medical services.
These services can be costly. If at all possible, the Student Health Center should be consulted during normal
clinic hours prior to contacting outside medical service providers. If a student thinks he requires emergency
service and is unable to come to the Student Health Center, he should contact a Resident Assistant or Resident
Director. Campus Police will arrange for transportation to the appropriate medical facility.

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STUDENT COUNSELING & DISABILITY CENTER

Sale Hall Annex


Monday—Friday, 9 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
470-639-0231
Fax: 470-639-177
http://niorehouse.edu/campus life/counseling serv/
Facebook: MorehouseCRC

Appointments may be made by calling the Student Counseling & Disability Center (returning clients), or by
coming into the office in person. Appointments will be scheduled as soon after the initial request as possible,
depending on the urgency of the situation and staff availability.

Services

The Student Counseling & Disability Center offers a broad array of services designed to meet the demands of
students, faculty and staff at the College. The Center facilitates institutional goals by working closely with
faculty, administrators and staff to provide a supportive campus climate.

The Center provides individual and group counseling, crisis intervention, workshops, seminars, and disability
services and also provides referral services for students in need of psychiatry and counseling in the
community.

The Center also provides professional development and is available to campus organizations, academic
departments, administrators and staff on topics including, but not limited to, “Identifying Signs of
Psychological Distress”, “Recognizing Symptoms of Depression”, and “Addressing Substance Abuse”. Our
counseling programs provide support for students in need of individual assistance as well as staff who could
benefit from psycho-education on health and wellness-related topics.

• Individual Counseling is available to help students develop and expand coping strategies that will
enable them to more effectively handle situations they may encounter during their college years. The
Counseling Center offers students a safe place to explore, develop and learn more about themselves
and their relationships with others. All students are encouraged to use the Center’s confidential and
free services.

• Group Counseling is for students seeking peer support on topics of social and academic adjustment,
identity, love and sexuality, men’s issues, addiction, and relationships. All topics are explored in a
supportive and confidential environment.

• Workshops and Seminars are available throughout the semester to provide psycho- educational
programs and skill development in time management, career decision-making, stress management,
study methods, interpersonal relations and drug and alcohol awareness.

• Disability Services are provided to assist the College in fulfilling its commitment to educate and
serve students with disabilities. This service is committed to making the College an accessible
academic, social and physical environment for students with physical and learning challenges.

• Crisis Intervention Our Center has an on-call counselor after hours during the work week and
during weekends to respond to urgent matters. If you need emergency assistance, call Campus Police
and they will dispatch to the counselor on call, who will immediately return the call.

Confidentiality

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Confidentiality obliges staff at the Student Counseling & Disability Center not to discuss information about a
client with anyone. The purpose of confidentiality in psychological counseling, psychotherapy and disability
services is to enable you to discuss problems you are experiencing honestly and privately in a trusting
environment.

Safeguarding information shared by you in the context of the counselor/therapist-patient relationship is an


ethical and legal responsibility. The Student Counseling & Disability Center strictly protects the
confidentiality of shared information during sessions.

Limits of Confidentiality

There are exceptions to confidentiality of therapist-patient information set by the state of Georgia.

Examples include:

• Issues of child abuse if under the age of 18 years old.


• Imminence of danger to self or others.
• If you tell your therapist that you actually intend to cause imminent, life-threatening harm to
yourself, the therapist is legally obligated to take whatever actions seem necessary to protect you
from harm.
• If you tell your therapist that you actually intend to do imminent bodily harm to another person(s), by
law your therapist will inform the authorities of the intent and take additional action if necessary.
• If a court of law orders a counselor or therapist to release information, that person is bound by law to
comply with such an order.
Release of Information

With the exceptions noted above, information about you, including your use of counseling and disability
services, cannot be released to anyone outside the Student Counseling & Disability Center without your
written permission. If you ask the Center to release information, you will be asked to sign a form authorizing
its release. You may revoke your permission at any time by giving us written notice.

Content of Disclosure
If you decide that you want to authorize the Student Counseling & Disability Center to disclose information
contained in your record, you determine what information is disclosed. You can:

• Designate to whom the disclosure is to be made


• Specify the purpose or need
• Expressly limit what information you authorize to be released
• Revoke the authorization at any time
• Indicate when the authorization expires

DISABILITY SERVICES
Location: Sale Hall Annex, Suite 100
Telephone: 470-639-0231
Fax: 470-639-0177

Disability Services functions to insure that all students with disabilities have equal access to educational
opportunities at Morehouse College. A wide range of services and accommodations is offered for students
with disabilities. These services are based on the specific needs of each student as identified by the
Coordinator for Disability Services.

The Disability Services provides support for students with disabilities of all kinds, including mobility, visual,
or hearing impairments; speech impairments; chronic illnesses such as AIDS, diabetes, and lupus; seizure
disorders; head injuries; painful conditions such as back injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome; psychological
disabilities such as bipolar disorder and severe anxiety or depression; attention deficit disorder; learning
disabilities.
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Qualified disabilities as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), involves a physical or mental
impairment, which substantially limits one or more major life activities (walking, seeing, hearing, speaking,
breathing, learning or working). Students must meet the academic requirements for admissions to Morehouse
College and have such disabilities as, but are not limited to, the following:

• Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder


• Autoimmune Disorders (lupus, HIV/AIDS)
• Blindness or Visual Impairment
• Blood Disorders (sickle cell anemia)
• Cerebral Palsy
• Communication
• Hypertension
• Learning Disorders
• Multiple Sclerosis
• Orthopedic Impairment
• Psychiatric Disabilities
• Spinal Cord or Traumatic Brain Injury

Obtaining Accommodations

• Self-identification of disability
• Submit required documentation (psychological assessment or physician’s statement)
• Schedule appointment with Disability Services Coordinator
• Complete Disability Services Intake Packet
• Request accommodations

Academic Accommodations

The disability services coordinator determines which accommodations are appropriate given a student's
particular disability or disabilities. Following are some of the more commonly prescribed
accommodations:

• Handouts in large print


• Course material in electronic format
• Extended time on exams
• Alternate format for testing (oral, multiple choice)
• Testing in distraction-reduced environment
• Reader or scribe for exams
• Text books on tapes
• Program modification
• Use of assistive devices
• Taped recorded lectures
• Note-takers
• Preferential seating
• A student is permitted to make audio-recordings of class lectures.
• A student is given extended time on examinations.
• A student is given frequent breaks for rest, medication, food, or exercise during exams.
• A student is furnished with copies of examinations in large-print format.
• A student is allowed to use a basic four-function calculator during examinations.
• A student is allowed to use a laptop computer during examinations.
A student is not penalized for mechanical errors (spelling, punctuation, capitalization,
handwriting, and proofing) on in-class writing assignments and examinations.

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• The instructor uses alternative testing formats for the student's exams: For example,
oral rather than written, short-answer rather than multiple-choice (or vice versa), or
essay rather than multiple-choice.

Program Modification

• Foreign Language or math substitutions


• Part-time of reduced course load

Support Services

• Special housing arrangement


• Self-advocacy training
• Counseling/disability management
• Study skills, time management, and organizational strategies enhancement

The disability services coordinator may recommend a reduced course load (for a single semester or for a
student’s entire academic career) when the student's disability makes it necessary to work more slowly and
spend more time on each course. The disability services coordinator can assist students in securing approval
from the deans of their colleges for reduced course loads. The coordinator also works with the Financial Aid
Office to protect the student's award from being impacted by taking a reduced course load.

Occasionally a student's disability necessitates an adjustment in required courses. The disability services
coordinator determines whether learning disabilities will prevent the student's mastery of course material in
mathematics or foreign languages. If so, the coordinator advises the student about the procedures to be
followed in seeking adjustments. Both the disability services coordinator and the student must write to the
dean of the student's college explaining the special requests.

Mandatory Medical Leave of Absence

The College Physician, the Director of Counseling Services, Medical Director or the Academic Deans, may
recommend or require that a student be withdrawn from the College or placed on a mandatory medical leave
of absence when the student’s health or medical condition deteriorates to the point of becoming life
threatening, impedes his academic progress, is disruptive to the normal life of the College Community, or
endangers the health and safety of the College Community.

Medical Leave of Absence

A student whose health prevents him from making academic progress may request a leave of absence by
consulting with his academic dean. If he elects to take a leave, he must complete the appropriate paperwork.

Resuming Studies after a Medical Leave of Absence

A student who is placed on a leave of absence must go through the Counseling or Health Center to be
reinstated to the College. He must provide official documentation that the medical or health problems which
resulted in a leave of absence must be submitted to the Vice President of Enrollment Management and Student
Services, the Director of the Health Center and the Director of the Counseling Center by November 1 for a
student who wishes to resume his studies during the Spring Semester and March 1 for the Fall
Semester. The College Physician or the Director of the Counseling Center has the authority to determine
whether it is appropriate for a student to be permitted to resume his studies after a Medical Leave of Absence.

Auxiliary Services

The disability services coordinator determines which Auxiliary Services are appropriate given a student's
particular disability or disabilities.

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Assistive Technology

Several types of technology are made available to students by disability services to help offset the effects of
their disabilities. Computer-based technology is located in the Learning Resource Center.

Students with documented disabilities that affect their ability to read print may be eligible for textbooks and
other class materials on CD. The disability services coordinator helps students order these recordings of
textbooks on CD through Recordings for the Blind and Dyslexic (RFB&D).

Disability groups for students

The disability services coordinator informs students about staff- and student-run disability groups, as well as
local, state and national organizations. Students are encouraged to become informed and active in decisions
regarding disability law and services.

Financial Advising
The Office of Financial Aid administers loans, grants, and scholarships for which students with disabilities
may be eligible. The Director of Financial Aid can assist students in understanding the relationship between
Morehouse College’s Financial Aid and other sources of assistance (such as the Department of Rehabilitation
and the Social Security Administration). The disability services coordinator assists students in informing the
Financial Aid Office about any special disability circumstances that may affect their eligibility for financial
aid. These circumstances include the course loads and disability-related extra expenses.

Housing Assistance

The Department of Housing at the College allots a certain number of spaces within the residence halls that can
be used to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities. In order to use one of the allotted spaces, a
student must provide disability services with documentation of a disability-related need for special housing.

Designated Coordinator Level

If an individual desires to file a formal written grievance, the individual should promptly submit the grievance
to the Coordinator of Disability Services.

The grievance must be submitted in writing on the Grievance Form prescribed for that purpose. The
Grievance Form must be completed in full in order to receive proper consideration by the Director. Upon
request, the Director or representative shall provide assistance in completing the Grievance Form.

A college official, appointed by the respective vice president, will investigate the grievance and make
reasonable efforts to resolve it. A written response will be provided to the complainant within 10 school days
after receipt of the fully completed Grievance Form.

Final Review Level

If the complaint is not satisfied, or if a reply has not been received with in the specified time, the complaint
may then appeal, in writing, within ten (10) school days, to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, (if it is
an academic matter) or to the Vice President for Student Services, (if it is a student services matter). A
written response will be given to the individual within ten (10) school days.

If the individual is still not satisfied, he may appeal in writing, within ten (10) school days from receipt of the
final response, to the College President
Grievance Records

Grievance records will be maintained for at least one year by the Coordinator of Disability Services.

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THE BONNER OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SERVICE (BOCS)


Leadership Center, 4th Floor, Room 425
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(470) 639-0594; (404) 507-8600 fax

Morehouse College is committed to developing leaders who will make significant and encouraging images on
society. The Bonner Office of Community Service (BOCS) seeks to utilize its resources to develop and
encourage volunteerism. It is our wish to perpetuate a culture of service on our campus that will strengthen
our resolve to be accountable as leaders, with the desire to be stewards of positive social change.

Students and others of the Morehouse College family know that the path they walk in service extends beyond
the classrooms and/or offices of the Atlanta University Center. BOCS supports and facilitates the
involvement of Morehouse students, faculty, staff and administration in community service work through a
variety of programs and opportunities, both on and off campus, which require commitments ranging from just
a few hours each semester to several hours each week.

Through the efforts of the Bonner office Morehouse College better fulfills her mission of "developing men
with disciplined minds who will lead lives of leadership and service.”

Although a majority of students engage in community service on a volunteer basis, BOCS offers a limited
number of scholarships and/or stipends for eligible students.

The Bonner Office of Community Service currently sponsors or co-sponsors the Bonner Scholarship
Program, the Emma and Joe Adams Scholarship Program, and the Federal Work Study Community
Service Program.

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Career Development and Engagement.

Mays Commons
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. or by appointment
(470J-639-0723

Career Counseling and Placement for Non Business Majors

The mission of the Office of Career Development and Engagement is to fulfill the mission of Morehouse College by
fostering understanding and appreciation of specific knowledge and skills needed for the pursuit of professional
careers and/or graduate study.

Services
• Career Counseling
• On-Campus Interviews
• Recruitment Information SessionsO
• Resume Preparation, Development and Critique
• Interview Preparation and Feedback
• Mock Interviews'
• Resume Referral
• Job Postings
• Career Development Workshops
• Job Search Strategies
• Internship Search Assistance
• Career Assessment
• Graduate/Professional School Search Assistance

Post-Baccalaureate Services

The primary goal of this office is to increase the number of students going to graduate and/or professional school.
Students are able to gain knowledge of the application process. In addition, emphasis is on increasing the
performance levels of admission tests score, such as GRE, LSAT, and the GMAT.

Services

• Assist in research development of graduates and professional schools


• Prepare for admissions test, such as GRE, LSAT, and GMAT
• Provide technical assistance with appointments with graduate schools and companies
• Provide career assessment
• Obtain a clearinghouse of information for graduate and professional schools and companies, including
internships
• Disseminate information pertaining to graduate and professional school and companies.

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Morehouse College
Office of Career Services
Division of Business Administration and Economics

Mission and Vision Statement

The Morehouse College Office of Career Services (Division of Business Administration and Economics) serves
as the primary conduit in support and assisting Morehouse College students and graduates in their efforts to
become proficient in the following areas:

• developing self-knowledge related to career choice and work performance by identifying,


assessing and understanding their competencies, interests, values, and personal characteristics;

• obtaining educational and occupational information to aid career and educational planning and to
develop an understanding of the world of work;

• selecting personally suitable academic programs and experiential opportunities that optimize
future educational and employment options;

• taking responsibility for developing career decisions, graduate/professional school plans,


employment plans, and/or job-search competencies;

• preparing to seek out suitable employment by developing job-search skills, effective candidate
presentation skills, and an understanding of the fit between their competencies and both
occupational and job requirements;

• gaining experience through student activities, community service, student employment, research
projects, cooperative education, internships, international exposure and other opportunities;

• linking with alumni, employers, professional organizations, and others who will provide
opportunities to develop professional interests and competencies, integrate academic learning
with work, and explore future career possibilities;

• seeking a desired employment opportunity or entry into an appropriate educational, graduate, or


professional program; and

• Helping students to prepare to manage their careers after graduation

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES


Kilgore Center, Suite 200
9 a.m. till 5p.m.
(470) 639-0331 or
Email: harry.wright@morehouse.edu
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Morehouse College invites men from other countries to join the Morehouse community as regular full-time students or as exchange
students. Special services are offered to address their needs or concerns.

International Student Services (OISS) serves as the central resource and liaison for the international student community of Morehouse
College. The mission of OISS is to facilitate programming and delivery of immigration services. The services offered are
Immigration counseling, pre-arrival and orientation, transfer of schools, 1-20 issuance, employment, change of status/ reinstatement of
status, cross cultural activities and communications, and tax information.

More specifically, the international student advisor provides programming efforts to provide activities and services related to pre­
arrival communications, orientation, general advising and counseling, cultural education, community outreach, and assisting the
international student organization. The immigration focus is with the implementation of and compliance to SEVIS (the Student
Exchange and Visitor Information System), all matters related to maintaining immigration status, as well as the issuance of the 1-20
and employment authorization.

The international student services office is located in The Kilgore Center, Suite 200. You may contact the advisor at (470) 639-0331
or by email at harry.wright@morehouse.edu.

DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION, INTRAMURALS & FITNESS (RIF)


Samuel H. Archer Recreation Center

Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m.- 11 p.m.


Friday, 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m. — 11 p.m.
Sunday, 1 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(Hours of operation are subject to change during the summer months and for special events.)

Telephone: (470) 639-0651

Pool Hours: Monday - Friday, 2:00 p.m. — 7:00 p.m.


Saturday, 10:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m.
Sunday, Closed
Weight Room Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.
*Opening time may vary Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Sunday, 1:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Philosophy

Morehouse College has long recognized that a quality education includes both the classroom and co-curricular opportunities.
The College has endorsed the concept of a healthy mind in a healthy body through the funding of the Samuel H. Archer Recreation
Center. Archer Recreation Center is a 53,808-square-foot facility that houses a swimming pool, television lounge, game room, locker
rooms, gymnasium, and meeting rooms. Here, fitness, wellness, intramurals as well as recreational programs and activities are
provided for the students, alumni, faculty, staff, their spouses and children. The facility provides a unique environment for students to
interact with other members of the larger Morehouse College community. It also houses the Offices of the Student Government
Association, Maroon Tiger Student Newspaper, The Torch College Yearbook, Student Life, Access Control, and the Academic
Success Center.

Entrance and Usage Policy

Students must have a valid Morehouse College photo ID card with a decal reflecting the current academic term to enter
Archer Recreation Center. Students are required to have their I.D. cards in their possession at all times, and should present them when
requested by a member of the RIF Staff as a means of identification. Students who fail to present their I.D. cards upon request will be
asked to leave the facility and may be subject to disciplinary action.

Prior to using the facilities users are required to complete a liability waiver form, which are available in the main office #203.
Morehouse students are permitted to have a maximum of two (2) guests. Students must remain with his guest (s) throughout their visit.
Guests must present a photo ID card and sign the guest registry.

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Facility Reservations

The RIF Department offers Morehouse College approved registered student organizations, departments, and Morehouse
College community organizations the opportunity to reserve the Archer Recreation Center for tournaments and special events.
Experienced facility staff will help groups plan their event by assisting with such details as room layout, completing the necessary
work orders, understanding parking options, and complying with university rules and regulations. Approval of request is based on
space accommodations, function purpose and availability.

Lockers

Locker rooms for students, faculty, staff and guests are open during the hours the Archer Recreation Center is open. Users
are responsible for their own combination locks and may choose any available locker in the dressing area. Locks must be removed
daily or they will be cut off.

Equipment

A wide assortment of equipment is available for use by Morehouse students, faculty and staff in the weight room and cardio
rooms on the first and third floors respectively.
Basketball

The Archer Recreation Center has one full-size varsity court/floor and two side courts. Availability depends on the
scheduling of Physical Education classes, Intercollegiate Sports, Intramural programs and other student activities.

Swimming

The James E. Haynes swimming pool is located in the Archer Recreation Center and is used for instruction in the Physical
Education classes and for recreational swimming. Recreational swimming programs hours vary but generally are Monday-Friday,
from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. Summer hours will be determined by the Recreation Coordinator/Aquatics. For more specific schedules, contact
the RIF Office at (404) 614-8543.

Tennis Courts

There are six outdoor lighted tennis courts on the Morehouse campus. Availability depends on the scheduling of physical
education and athletic programs. Courts generally are available to students before 11:00 p.m. except during classes and special events.

Bodybuilding

Nautilus and free weight equipment is available on the first floor of Archer Recreation Center, which generally is open for
use during regular schedule hours.

INTRAMURAL SPORTS PROGRAM

Location: Archer Recreation Center, Room 203


Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Friday, 8 a.m. - 11p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Sunday, 1 p.m. - 9 p.m.
(Hours of operation are subject to change during the summer months and special events)
Telephone: (470) 639-0651

The Intramural Sports Program is a vital component of the Department of Recreation, Intramurals & Fitness within the
Division of Student Services at Morehouse College. The goal of the Intramural Sports Program, which makes physical and
recreational activities available to all members of the Morehouse community, is to provide an opportunity for each student to
participate in a competitive sports activity as frequently as his interest, ability and time permit.

While certain sports form the core of the Intramural Sports Program at Morehouse and thus are promoted each school year,
the program is designed to change as student needs and interests change. Schedules are available in the Intramural Office in Archer
Recreation Center (#204 Archer Hall) and in each Residence Hall Director’s office.

Organization of Intramural Teams


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Participation in the Intramural Sports Program is open to all Morehouse students, faculty, staff, and administration.
Interested parties should contact the Intramural Sports Program Office.

Each team participating in Intramural Sports must have a team captain who serves as the primary liaison between the
Intramural Office and the team. Other duties of the team captain are outlined in the Intramural Calendar brochure, which is available
in the Intramural Office (#204 Archer Hall).

Any and all campus organizations may enter teams in Intramural competition. Separate tournaments are organized for
residence halls, independent groups and fraternity organizations.

Eligibility

The eligibility rules for competing in Intramural sports are found in the Intramural Calendar Brochure. Copies are available
in the Intramural Office.

Student Staff Work-Study Program

The Department of Recreation, Intramurals, & Fitness is looking for enthusiastic, dedicated, and hard-working students who
enjoy interacting in a positive way with our guest. Our department wishes to provide a safe and exciting arena for recreation.
Our guest use the recreation facilities to have fun, stay fit, enjoy friendly competition, and relieve stress in a clean, healthy
environment. Our student staff plays a valuable role in meeting the needs of our guest by providing excellent customer service.
Working in the Department of Recreation provides valuable work experience, certifications, measurable achievements, competitive
wages, life-long learning opportunities, and lasting friendships.

Federal Work Study positions are available in a wide variety of areas and with a wide variety of responsibilities. The
following student positions are offered throughout the year: Facility Attendant, Marketing Assistant, Intramural Coordinator,
Lifeguard, and Office Assistant. For more detailed job descriptions and current openings, please consult the main office.

Student Officials

Student officials are hired by the Office of Intramural Sports, or recruited from the work-study program. Student officials
should have a good working knowledge of the rules of play, be determined and willing to improve their officiating skills, and be
responsible for all intramural equipment used during the activity. Meetings are held to inform all officials of important rules
interpretations, departmental policies and first-aid procedures.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Morehouse students compete on the intercollegiate level in the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC), the National
Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II, and in national championship tournament meets, both individually and as a
qualifying team. Teams compete on the intercollegiate level in tennis, track and field, cross-country, baseball, golf, basketball and
football. Eligibility on a varsity team is governed by athletic association regulations and administered by the Athletic Department.
For more information, contact the Director of Athletics.

Sports Information

The Office of Sports Information disseminates information about varsity intercollegiate athletic teams, the NCAA, SIAC, and other
athletic conferences and professional organizations to newspaper, radio and television outlets throughout the country. The Office also
prepares hometown news releases on student athletes, publishes programs and literature related to the Athletic Department, and
maintains individual and team records. The Sports Information Office is a ready source of information on team and individual
performance during each season, as well as background information on coaches and administrators involved in the athletic program.

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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The Office of Student Life


Kilgore Center, Suite 200
Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
(470) 639- 0309 fax (404) 222-2597
www.morehouse.edu/campus_life/studentlife/

Annual Registration of Students Organizations

Recognized student organizations must register each year with the Office of Student Life. Organization registrations are due in the
Office of Student Life on or before close of business on the second Friday in April. Registration form can be found on the Student Life
website. Once approved, organization registration is valid from September - May.

Applications for new organizations are only accepted once a year and must be submitted before the close of business on the second
Friday in April. To become recognized by the College, each student organization is expected to file the following items with the
Office of Student Life & Planning:

1. New Student Organization charter application found on the Student Life website
2. Membership Roster Form {Greek Letter Organizations) 8c Officer’s List
3. Advisor Responsibility Agreement Form (2)
4. Constitution and By-Laws
5. Tentative activity calendar for upcoming academic year
Student Organizations Requirements & Consequences
• The president or an executive officer of the organization is expected to attend all of the Presidents Council meetings for the
Fall and Spring Semester. The president and/or executive officer may miss 1 meeting each semester without penalty. In the
event of a presidents inability to attend a Presidents Council meeting he may send a representative in his place.
• The organization must host at least three events/programs; social, raising academic awareness and community service based.
• The organization must submit an electronic review journal at the last official Presidents Council Meeting of the school year.
• The journal should include pictures, program evaluations, flyers and/or other artifacts that verify the activities of the
organization.
• Failure to complete the journal will place the organization on probation for the Fall Semester.
• Failure to meet the Fall Semester requirements will result in the organization & leaders losing their charter and the
opportunity to re-charter for two years.
• The organization must register and provide new updates concerning executive officers, advisors and any other changes that
have been made by the 2nd Friday in April.
• All organizations are required to have a logo that is deemed accepted by the office of Student Life.
• An organization that wishes to end its charter must submit a written statement. The executive officers of that organization
will not be able to re-charter another organization for two semesters.

Probation
• The probation limit for an organization is subject to change based upon the offense in question.
• Initial probation does not restrict organizations from hosting (remove “events or” from here) meetings. It can however, result
in the organization losing its charter for two years.
• Organizations on probation are not able to host events.
• If an organization is placed on initial probation, it will hold its position for two semesters before the organization’s charter is
revoked.
• A two-year suspension can and will result from repeated offenses including but not limited to; failure to meet the specified
requirements listed above.

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An organization that remains inactive for two years will have its charter revoked. The organization must reinstate its charter by
filing a request for renewal. A student organization may have its registration suspended or its charter revoked if it is found guilty of
any or all of the following:

1. Submitting falsified information;

2. Violating policies and regulations of Morehouse College and;

3. Failing to discharge its financial obligations to the College

All officers of any chartered student organization must have at least a 2.7 grade point average for active participation. Some
organizations may require higher standards. Upon approval, an organization will be listed in one of the following categories:

Academic / Pre-Professional

Academic/Pre-professional organizations foster the appreciation of a particular academic field or discipline among the student body or
serve as a governing body within a particular college division. Academic/Pre-Professional organizations provide an opportunity for
individuals to discuss and share information related to a specific academic field, topic or interest. Additionally, these organizations aid
in developing professional standards among members and in a particular field or related career path.

Athletic
Athletic organizations encourage participation in sport activities. They also aid in the development of skills, knowledge and
support of a particular sport or leisure activity.

Cultural
Cultural organizations encourage appreciation for cultural diversity among its members and the campus community.

Religious / Spiritual
Religious/Spiritual organizations assist in the spiritual development, instruction and fellowship of students. These
organizations foster interdenominational, denominational or specific spiritual and/or religious tenets.

Residential Life Government


Residential Life Government organizations serve as a liaison between the Morehouse College community and the members
of the various residence halls, with the overall goal of enhancing student life and residential living.

Service
Service organizations focus on outreach efforts for the campus as well as community projects. Service organizations are an
excellent way to give back to the community and gain experience in your field. These organizations provide philanthropic
and/or altruistic service to the campus and/or community.

Social/Political Action
Social/Political Action organizations address social, political and governmental concerns and promote interest in these areas
at the campus, local, state and national levels.

Special Interest
Special Interest organizations encourage students to discuss and share information regarding a particular area of interest
and/or awareness of a topic not necessarily related to other specified categories.

State / International Club


State/International organizations help students maintain contact with their home state or international country by
strengthening friendships among students from the same state or country. These groups hold social activities, establish travel
connections among students, and perform social service projects for the College and the community.

An updated list of student organizations is available each year from the Office of Student Life and Planning.

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ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS

Debate
The English Department sponsors the Forensics program in association with the College Speech program. The Forensics
program provides curricular and extracurricular learning and experience in forensics, including tournament competition in
debate, public speaking and oral interpretation of literature.

Band
The Music Department sponsors the concert, jazz and marching bands. For more information, contact the Music Department.

Glee Club
The Glee Club is the official singing organization of Morehouse College and is on duty to serve the President at all times
throughout the year. Along with local concerts, there is an annual spring tour, which averages ten to fifteen cities in two to
three weeks. The members do not receive academic credit. Auditions are held at the beginning of each semester and all
majors may participate.

FRATERNAL & SOCIAL FELLOWSHIP ORGANIZATIONS

Fraternities and social fellowship organizations are extracurricular organizations chartered by the College. The College encourages
fraternities to contribute to the fulfillment of its mission by promoting academic excellence, exercising collegial spirit, celebrating
diversity, recognizing the interdependence of campus organizations, and respecting the dignity of the entire College community. The
College does not recognize fraternities and social fellowship organizations as secret societies because secrecy is incompatible with the
College’s mission to maintain an open exchange of ideas and information.

To be classified as a fraternity or social fellowship organization and operate on campus, organizations must be nationally affiliated and
adhere to various rules and regulations established by the College. Compliance with College policies, procedures and regulations
always supersedes any oaths of secrecy fraternity members may take. The College recognizes the following fraternal and social
fellowship organizations:

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.


Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.
Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Music Fraternity, Inc.
Groove Phi Groove Social Fellowship

Coordination of Greek Life on Campus

The Office of Student Life/Greek Life Committee governs Greek-letter fraternities and social fellowship organizations. The Office is
charged with such activities as policy making, policy enforcement, training, conduct monitoring and coordinating College activities
and policies with the local, state, regional and national representatives of each fraternity and social fellowship organization. The
Greek Life Committee conducts a mandatory in-service training seminar at the beginning of each school year for Chapter Advisors,
Chapter Officers and other organizational representatives.

The Office of Student Life also will conduct a RUSH for students interested in membership intake at the beginning of each
semester.

*SEE HAZING POLICY PAGE 52 - 56

Rush

Students interested in membership intake must attend the Rush. Students will be provided with general information about each
organization (e.g. academic requirements, monetary requirements, community service requirements, etc.). Students will be permitted
to meet with the organization(s) of their choice (remove “at the end of the general session”).

Rush will take place over three days. Students interested in an organization are encouraged to attend all sessions. Each organization is
responsible for selecting students for its membership intake program. No more than twenty-five (25) students may be selected for any
membership intake program per semester.

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Advisors to Greek Letter and Social Fellowship Organizations

All Greek Letter and social fellowship organizations must have a minimum of two (2) advisors who work closely with the
organization and serve as its liaison with the Office of Student Life.
The Campus Advisor must be a member of the faculty or professional staff whose primary duty is to counsel the organization. The
Off-Campus Advisor must be a graduate of an undergraduate institution and have completed undergraduate study for at least four (4)
years prior to becoming an Advisor. The Advisor should be a member in good financial standing of the Greek-letter organization.
Advisors are subject to approval by the Office of Student Life’s/Greek Life Committee

In brief, duties of a Chapter Advisor include:


1. Ensuring that all activities are in keeping with College regulations

2. Ensuring that all activities are in keeping with the objectives of the national organization

3. Meeting with the chapter at all meetings where possible or have a representative present

4. Serving as an Advisor and consultant on all fraternity matters

5. Serving as a liaison between the chapter and the College, local graduate chapter and all levels of the organization

6. Ensuring that students in the chapter are familiar with Georgia law on hazing

7. Giving supervision to record keeping, financial transactions, and intake activities in accordance with College and
fraternity policies

Advisors or their designee(s) must attend all major functions of the organization (e.g. parties, fund raisers, etc.). If an advisor
cannot attend an event, he must notify the Office of Student Life at least four (4) business days in advance of the activity. The
advisor must designate another member of the faculty or staff to attend. An advisor must notify the Office of Student Life and
Planning immediately, in writing, if he cannot continue to serve as advisor to an organization.

Fraternal organizations play an important role on the college campus. Each chapter is expected to be responsible, productive, and a
cooperative member of the college community.

Much care should be given in choosing an advisor. The constant guidance and assistance that must be provided to fraternal
organizations requires maturity and wisdom usually found in more experienced members, especially in the operations of the particular
chapters.

Advisors are expected to help members of the undergraduate chapter develop into the kind of men of whom their organization can be
proud and to who the organization can look for assistance in carrying out its programs on the national, regional, state and local levels.

Membership Selection

Because the College recognizes fraternal and social fellowship groups as private organizations, these groups may select student
members according to their criteria. These criteria must not discriminate against students in an arbitrary and capricious manner, and
must be functionally related to the explicit goals of the organization and the mission of the College. Prospective members of a
fraternal organization have the right to learn about the organization, its rules, responsibilities, and benefits of membership in an
environment that poses no risk or threat to them.

Fraternal and social fellowship organizations must comply with the College’s Certification Procedures, which require that the
candidates selected for the intake meet the following criteria. (Remove “These”) Organizations may induct into their membership any
student in good standing who has a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average and has earned at least 30 hours of college credit
at Morehouse. Transfer students must have a minimum 3.0 grade point average and have earned at least IS hours of college credit
at Morehouse. No student may be selected for membership unless he has achieved sophomore status. The Office of Student Conduct
must verify that candidates selected for membership do not have any disciplinary sanctions. Students must be in good financial status
with the College. Morehouse College does not honor any legacy clause each student will have equal opportunity based on the
approved selections criteria.

College Certification Procedures


(REMOVE “Students selected for membership intake must complete a Membership Intake Student Data form. These forms
may be obtained from the Office of Student Life and must be returned to that office.”) The Office of Student Life will verify
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with the Office of the Registrar that each student has the minimum 3.0 grade point average and the earned hours required for
membership intake. In addition, the Office of Student Life will confirm with the Office of Student Conduct that those applying for
membership intake do not have any disciplinary sanctions. Moreover, The Office of Student Life will make sure that the student is
financially cleared through the Office of Financial-Aid. The Office of Student Life will notify the respective organizations concerning
the eligibility or ineligibility of students invited for membership intake. The membership intake program may not begin until the
Office of Student Life sends official approval to the Organization. Violation(s) of this process may be grounds for disciplinary action.

Organizations requiring copies of academic transcripts should request them directly from the Office of the Registrar and are
responsible for insuring that students complete the required transcript request forms and pay any associated fees.

Membership Intake

Membership intake is the process by which students become members of a fraternal organization. Chapters wishing to participate in
membership intake must meet with the Assistant Director of Student life in order to gain permission. The intake chairperson and
chapter president must be present at this meeting. (REMOVE “The application can be obtained from the office and must be submitted
at least fourteen (14) days prior to the start of any membership intake activities.”) Membership-Intake is usually conducted by regional
teams comprised of members of the fraternity selected by the national or regional representatives. It does not involve any pledging
activities. Most Greek letter fraternities no longer permit pledging.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA)

The Morehouse College SGA is the official medium for addressing student concerns and the chief avenue for promoting campus
livelihood and involvement. It offers students an opportunity to develop sound judgment, maturity and leadership skills by taking an
active role in issues that govern student life at Morehouse College.

The SGA is composed of the Executive Board, the Student Senate, and the Honor and Conduct Review Board. It also incorporates
Class Council and Student Trustee concepts of student governance. Elections for SGA office take place during the Fall Semester for
new students and during the Spring Semester for upperclassmen. Student candidates desiring to campaign for office must be in good
standing and have a minimum 2.7 cumulative grade point average.

Campus Alliance for Student Activities (CASA)

Morehouse College CASA is responsible for the development of activities and programs for the student body. The programs and
activities developed enrich the social, physical, intellectual, cultural, educational, and spiritual lives of students. In addition, CASA
encourages students to be active members of the campus community through developing character, transferable skills, camaraderie,
and scholarship amongst the student body at Morehouse College, as well as the Atlanta University Center. Student candidates desiring
to serve on CASA must be in good standing, complete the application and interview process and have a minimum 2.7 cumulative
grade point average.

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The Constitution
of the

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Morehouse Student Body

Table of Contents

Title Page

Table of Contents 99

Preamble 100

Article I — Name and Purpose 100

Article II - Membership 100

Article III - Governance Structure 100

Article IV — Mission Statement 100

Article V - Executive Branch: SGA Executive Board 100-102

Article VI - Legislative Branch: Student Senate 102- 103

Article VII - Judicial Branch: Honor & Conduct Review Board 103 - 104

Article VIII - Class Officers 104

Article IX — Student Elections 105

Article X - Qualifications for Candidates 105 - 106

Article XI — Removal from Office 106

Article XII. Succession 107

Article XIII. Ratification and Amendments 107-108

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History:
Last revised by the 74th Senate; ratified by order of the 76th Senate; enacted into law by President Dewey Fowler August 2006.

The Constitution of the Morehouse Student Body

Preamble
We, the students ofMorehouse College, in an effort to govern ourselves by just laws, to maintain a medium for the expression of
equality andjustice, to promote widespread interest in student affairs, to provide a means by which to avoid and settle disputes, and to
enrich our college lives, do hereby adopt and promulgate this constitution as the governing document of the Student Government
Association ofMorehouse College.

Article I. NAME AND PURPOSE


The name of this association shall be deemed the Student Government Association (S.G.A.) of Morehouse College. The Student
Government Association is the official entity in the College’s governance structure that represents all enrolled students at Morehouse
College.

Article II. MEMBERSHIP


All students enrolled at Morehouse College shall be members of the Student Government Association.

Article HI. GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE


The structure of the Student Government Association shall consist of the following:
a. The Executive Branch (SGA Executive Board)
b. The Legislative Branch (Student Senate)
c. The Judicial Branch (Honor & Conduct Review Board)

Article IV. MISSION STATEMENT


The Student Government Association is to provide a medium through which student concerns may be constructively addressed. To
provide Morehouse students with the opportunity to govern themselves. To ensure equality of all students regardless of nationality,
race, religion, sexual orientation, or socioeconomic status; and to control and direct student activity in concordance with the best
interests of the students of Morehouse
College.

Article V. EXECUTIVE BRANCH: SGA EXECUTIVE BOARD


Section 1. The officers of the Student Government Association shall be those of the Executive Board; they shall be:
a. President
b. Vice President
c. Treasurer
d. Executive Secretary
e. Executive Director
f. Senior Board of Trustee (SBT) - Ex Officio
g. Junior Board of Trustee (JBT) - Ex Officio
h. Attorney General

Section 2. The duties of the SGA President are:


a. To preside over all meetings of the executive board and student body meetings;
b. To make appointments and recommendations for dismissal of Executive Positions;
c. To appoint the Chief Justice of the Honor and Conduct Review Board;
d. To nominate, and with the concurrence of the student senate, appoint an
Attorney General as an Ex-Officio and Non-Voting member of the Student Government Association;
e. To receive legislation and appropriation to be approved or vetoes upon one week if receipt from the senate
f. Establish committees, whether standing or temporary in nature;
g. and should he see fit, shall appoint a staff to aid him with the management of the Executive Board and to carry the duties of the
Office of the President and said staff
are subject to confirmation by the senate;

Section 3. The duties of the Vice President are:


a. to act in the full capacity of the SGA President in case of his absence, resignation or dismissal;
b. to attend all meetings of the Executive Board and student body;
c. to preside over all regularly scheduled meetings of the Student Senate;
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d. to uphold the name of Morehouse College, enforce this constitution and to initiate, coordinate, and implement programs, in
conjunction with the SGA President, for the benefit the student body;
e. and to perform all other reasonable tasks delegated by the SGA President.

Section 4. The duties of the Treasurer are:


a. to consistently maintain accurate records of all financial expenditures and revenues handled by the Executive Board during his
tenure;
b. to process financial requisitions in a timely manner upon request from the SGA President or Student Senate according to the defined
budget guidelines;
c. to submit an accurate, written report of all financial transactions to the Business Office and the Student Senate upon request;
d. to serve as a liaison to the vice president of Business and Finance and to carry out all requisite duties that accompany this role as
defined by the SGA President or by legislation;
e. to attend all meetings of the Executive Board and student body;
f. to uphold the name of Morehouse College, enforce this constitution, and to initiate, coordinate, and implement programs, in
conjunction with other executive staff to benefit the student body;
g. and to perform all other reasonable tasks delegated by the SGA President.

Section 5. The duties of the Executive Secretary are:


a. to accurately type and prepare all minutes from Executive Board meetings;
b. to type and prepare all outgoing correspondence material;
c. to attend all meetings of the Executive Officers and the student body;
d. to uphold the name of Morehouse College, enforce this constitution, and
to initiate, coordinate, and to implement programs, in conjunction with the President, to benefit the student body;
e. and to perform all other reasonable tasks delegated by the President.

Section 6. The duties of the Executive Director are:


a. to attend all meetings of the SGA Executive Board, Senate, CASA, and Student Organization Presidents Council;
b. shall keep accessible records and proceedings of all SGA Executive Board, Senate, CASA, and Student Organization Presidents
Council Meetings;
c. maintain a working calendar of the SGA Executive Board, Senate, CASA, and Student Organization Presidents Council events;
d. shall be responsible for all SGA Executive Board and CASA correspondence; e. and solicit ideas from the student body regarding
social programming initiatives for consideration by CASA.

Section 7. The duties of the Senior and Junior Board of Trustees are:
a. to attend all Student Welfare Committee meetings associated with the Board of Trustees (BOT);
b. to conduct a meeting open to all students, for the purpose of addressing student concerns to be brought to the attention of the BOT
(this meeting must be held at least two weeks prior to each meeting of the BOT);
c. to attend all meetings of the Executive Board and the student body;
d. to compile a written report of their findings of student concerns and this should be published for the student body after each BOT
meeting;
e. to uphold the name of Morehouse College, enforce this constitution, and to initiate, coordinate, and implement programs, in
conjunction with the SGA President, to benefit the student body;
f. and to perform all other reasonable tasks delegated by the SGA President.
Section 8. The Advisory Board shall be a committee not be identified as members of the Executive Board whose duties are:
a. Secretary of Academic Affairs
b. Secretary of Student Services
c. Secretary of Campus Operations
d. Secretary of Institutional Advancement
e. Secretary of information Technology
f. Treasurer, Executive Board
The duties of the board shall include:
a. Attending all meetings of the Executive Board, Senate Student welfare and Concerns Committee, and the Student Body;
b. to work in conjunction with the Student Senate Student Welfare and Concerns Committee;
c. to uphold the name of Morehouse College, enforce this constitution, and to initiate, coordinate, and implement programs for the
benefit of the student body according to their position;
d. non-voting members who provide counsel and advice to the SGA when pertaining to their specialized position, and to carry out all
tasks as delegated by the SGA Executive, Legislative, & Judicial branches
e. The treasurer will correspond with the Vice-President of Business and Finance and, in addition to his regular duties, will act in the
same manner as the Advisory Board.
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Section 9. The Attorney General shall serve as an official on the Executive Board, whose duties are:
a. File formal grievances with the Office of Student Services;
b. present impeachment cases to the Senate. In the event the Attorney general is under Impeachment charges, a representative from the
judicial board will present the case to the senate.
c. Prepare and represent student griever in the result that there is a hearing with the CJC/HCRB;
d. to provide advisement on constitutional and conduct matters;
e. to provide for the reprimand of appointed officers, for bad behavior, conduct, or actions opposite to the agenda and direction of the
SGA.

Section 10. There shall be at a maximum of three (3) faculty advisors to the Executive Board without vote. The advisors shall be
chosen by simple majority vote of the Executive Officers.

Section 11. Executive Officers are prohibited from serving as officers in any other campus organizations when a conflict of interest
occurs; which is to be determined by judiciary hearing. Officers must maintain a cumulative 2.70 grade point average during their
tenure in office.

Article VI. LEGISLATIVE BRANCH: STUDENT SENATE

Section 1. Representation in the Student Senate shall consist of twenty-six senators elected to serve one-academic year terms.
Article VI was amended during the Spring 2004 General Election.

Section 2. The Senate shall be composed of no more than twenty-six (26) senators according to the following breakdown:
a. Five (5) senators shall be elected from each class (freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior).
b. Six senators shall be elected from the student body at-large. Three at-large senators shall be elected during the general elections of
the Spring semester, and three at-large senators shall be elected during the Fall semester in the September General Election.
c. In the event that a class senate seat becomes vacant, it shall be filled by appointment of the president of that class and is not subject
to the confirmation of The Senate. In the event that an at-large senate seat becomes vacant, that seat shall be filled by appointment by
the President of the Senate and is subject to confirmation by the Senate.
d. In the event that a Senate seat is not filled after certification of the elections results, it shall be deemed vacant and filled by the
procedure prescribed in part c of this section.
e. Prior to submitting petition for candidacy, potential candidates will choose to seek election to Class Senate seats or at-large Senate
seats. Freshmen seeking class senate seats will be randomly and evenly distributed until all eligible candidates have been placed to run
for a senate seat. The same procedure shall be used if all seats are vacant for sophomore, junior, senior, and at-large seats. Incumbents
shall not be paired against incumbents in elections. Candidates wishing to seek senate seats during the Spring General Election or
September General Election for at-large seats will have the option of selecting to run against any incumbents of class (spring) or at-
large incumbent (spring or fall), or becoming eligible to seek a vacant seat (if available). Candidates wishing to seek vacant seats
shall be evenly distributed between/among the vacant seats until all candidates have been placed.
f. Incumbents for at-large Senate seats (if applicable) will not be paired with incumbents for at-large seats (if applicable).
g. Presidents of the chartered organizations of The College shall be non-voting members of the Senate.
h. The Dean of the Delegation shall be selected by the senators of their respective classes (i.e. all senators who are juniors will meet to
decide which senator among them will be the Delegation Dean of the Junior Class.) At-large senators are eligible to be the delegation
dean of the class of which he is a member. The Dean of the Delegation shall be the only senator to also be a member of his class’s
respective class council.

Section 3. The Executive Officers of the Senate shall be the following:


a. President of the Senate
b. President Pro Tempore of the Senate

Section 4. The Vice President of the Student Government Association shall be the President of the Senate and the presiding officer of
the Student Senate.

Section 5. The President of the Senate shall have the power to:
a. Preside over all meetings of the Senate, except for meetings in which the Senate is debating and acting upon recommendation that
the President of the Student Government Association or the Vice President of the Student Government Association be removed from
office.
b. Cast the tie-breaking vote in Senate proceedings.

Section 6. The Senate Staff shall consist of the following:


a. Secretary of the Senate
b. Clerk of the Senate
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c. Reading Clerk of the Senate


d. Parliamentarian of the Senate
e. Sergeant-At-Arms of the Senate

1. The Secretary of the Senate shall be the head of the Senate Staff:
a. Have charge of all records and documents of The Senate.
b. Prepare and maintain all records and documents of The Senate.
c. Take the minutes of every Senate assembly and provide copies, upon request to all senators.
d. Take the minutes of all committee meetings, if so desired by The Senate, and provide copies, upon request, to all senators.
e. Take and maintain attendance records of every charted organization of the Senate.
f. Determine if a quorum is present at each meeting.
g. Record the votes during the business of The Senate.
h. Handle all correspondence of The Senate.

2. The Clerk of the Senate shall:


a. Handle and prepare all amendments, bills, and resolutions produced by The Senate.
b. Refer amendments, bill, and resolution to the appropriate committees as provided by the Bylaws of the Senate.
c. Handle day-to-day operations of vacant senate seats.
d. Assist the Secretary of The Senate.

3. The Reading Clerk shall:


a. Perform the vocal duties of the Senate (i.e. reading of the Senate membership roll during roll call and roll call votes, reading of
legislation, and other reading at the request of the President of the Senate, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, or a majority of
the Senate).

4. The Parliamentarian shall:


a. Help to maintain order and decorum in all meetings of The Senate pursuant to The Constitution, the Bylaws of The Senate, and
Robert’s Rules of Order - The Modem Edition, or the most recent edition.
b. Advise the President of The Senate, other officers, and senators on proper parliamentarian procedure.

Section 7. Each Senator is required to attend all regularly scheduled meetings of the Student Senate.

Section 8. The Student Senate shall have the authority to:


a. Approve or deny any budget proposal initiated by the Executive Branch, Judicial Branch, and recognized student organizations
that request funds from the Student Senate.
b. Approve or deny appointments to the following: Chief Justice, Chairman of the Elections Committee, Advisory Board members,
& Executive Board Vacancies.
c. Initiate Senate Appropriations Budget to be sent to the SGA President for approval. The SGA President reserves the right line
item veto (LIV) any budget proposal.
d. Refer to the Judiciary Branch any violations of the Morehouse Student Body Constitution.
e. Initiate any Senate investigation pertaining to matters involving the SGA.
f. Override a veto of the SGA President with a 2/3-majority vote.
g. Initiate any legislation that coincides with Morehouse Student Handbook and other official college publications.

Article VII. JUDICIAL BRANCH: HONOR & CONDUCT REVIEW BOARD


Section 1. The officers of the Honor & Conduct Review Board shall be defined as student justices; they shall be:
a. Chief Justice
b. Senior Class Justice
c. Junior Class Justice
d. Sophomore Class Justice
e. Freshman Class Justice
Section 2. There shall be a Student Court consisting of five justices. Each class shall elect one (1) justice to the HCRB, and the SGA
President with a simple majority vote of the Student Senate shall appoint the Chief Justice. Each Justice must maintain a 2.6 grade
point average during their tenure of office.

Section 3. The duties of the Student Court shall be to:


a. Decide any constitutional questions concerning the interpretation of this constitution or concerning the provisions found within,

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b. Recommend to the office of the Dean of Students Services and/or the College Judiciary Committee, punishment for those whom
it finds guilty of any offense or 2 The GPA requirement for Justices was raised to 2.7 (Article VII Section 4) during the Spring
2004 General Elections conduct violation,
c. Hear and adjudicate the complete case of persons accused of any conduct violation,
d. Recommend to the Office of Student Conduct & Campus Life to suspend the charter of any class and/or organization upon
recommendation of the Executive Office and/or Student Senate,
e. Hear the complete case of alleged election irregularities [If such case is justifiable, a new election shall be held. A new Elections
Committee shall be appointed by the Student Court, and they shall conduct new elections within
two weeks of the decision. All such cases must be presented to the tribunal, in writing, within five days after the election results
are announced], and
f. Consider recommendations received from the Executive Office and/or Student Senate.

Section 4. Each member must maintain a 2.7 grade point average during their tenure of office.

Article VIII. CLASS OFFICERS


Section 1: The officers of the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Classes shall consist of the following:
a. President
b. Vice President
c. Treasurer
d. Secretary
e. Student Senator
f. Student Justice

Section 2. The presidents of the classes shall direct all of their class activities and preside over their respective classes and class
officers meetings. The class officers, in conjunction with the Class President, shall initiate, coordinate and implement activities to raise
money for their respective classes, and to positively promote the name of Morehouse College.

Section 3. Class meetings will be called by the President of that class or by petition of 1/3 of the members of that class.

Section 4. Each class must present proposals for all fund-raising activities to the Student Senate for approval.

Section 5. The money that each class raises may only be used to benefit that class or to benefit a worthy charity. The Senate Ethics
Committee and/or Student Court will take up any suspended misuse of funds. The Treasurer of each class is to be held accountable for
all money handled by his class during his tenure. The Student Senator is the “Dean of Delegation” referred to in Article VI Section 2
Line item h.

Section 6. All money left in the treasuries of the Freshman Class Council, Sophomore, and Junior classes after the first day of final
exams of the Spring semester will be turned over to the Treasurer-elect of the same class for the next year. A written report of this
transaction must be submitted to the Executive Office of the Student Government Association before the last day of final exams of the
Spring semester.

Section 7. All money left in the treasury of the Senior Class after the first day of final exams of the Spring semester will be turned
over to the Office of Alumni Affairs for future events in conjunction with that graduating class. The Senior Class President shall
remain President throughout his lifetime and will be responsible for organizing reunions and other events in conjunction with the
Alumni Relations Office.

Section 8. Each class shall have at least one Faculty Advisor. The officers of the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior classes shall chose
their Faculty Advisor(s). The Freshman Class Council advisor shall be the Freshman Class Dean. A student advisor for the Freshman
Class Council will be chosen by simple majority vote of the Executive Board of the Student Government Association and shall be
designated an ex-officio member of the council.

Section 9. The Freshman Class Council shall be comprised of the Class President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, Senator4, and
Student Justice and the elected Presidents of the Freshman Residence Halls. The purpose of the Freshman Class Council is to initiate,
coordinate, and implement activities for first-time, first-year, enrolled students.

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Article IX. STUDENT ELECTIONS

Section 1. Each Spring semester, the campaign season for Elective Offices shall be conducted. A calendar of events schedule will be
published according to the rules & regulations adopted each academic year by the SGA Elections Committee.

Section 2. All members of the student body of Morehouse College are eligible to vote only once on Election Day.

Section 3. The student body shall elect persons to the following positions:
a. The Executive Offices of the Student Government Association
b. The Editor-in-Chief of The Maroon Tiger
c. The Editor of The Torch

Section 4. Each class shall elect their respective class officers.

Section 5. In order to have his name on the official ballot, a candidate must submit an official petition to the Election Committee on
the established date & time set forth by The Senator is the “Dean of Delegation” referred to in Article VI Section 2 Line item h the
committee. The Petition requirements are as follows:
a. Candidates seeking the positions of the Executive Board must submit petitions to the Elections Committee with the signatures of
100 enrolled students of Morehouse College on them.
b. Candidates seeking the positions of Class Officers must submit to the Elections Committee petitions with the signatures of 50
enrolled students of their Morehouse College graduating class on them.
c. Candidates seeking the positions of Editor-in-Chief of The Maroon Tiger and Editor of The Torch must submit to the Elections
Committee, petitions with the signatures of 100 enrolled students of Morehouse College on them.

Section 6. No persons shall be allowed to run for more than one Student Government Association Office during any given Election.

Section 7. The SGA President shall appoint a chairman to the Elections Committee, subject to confirmation by the Senate.

Section 8. The Executive Board of the Student Government Association and the Residential Life Office shall conduct the elections for
the Freshman Class Officers in the Fall of every year.

Section 9. The following procedures will take place on Election Day and Run-Off Day:
a. The polling places will be designated by the Elections Committee.
b. The polls will be open and adequately manned by the Elections Committee & Office of Student Services, on the said calendar
date of the Student Elections.
c. Each candidate for each Executive Office will be allowed one poll watcher to ensure that the ballot procedures are followed. The
poll watcher cannot be a candidate for any office.
d. After the polls close, the Elections Committee Chairman, accompanied by one or more Faculty/Staff Advisors and a campus
police officer, will transport the ballots from the polling place to a counting site designated by the Elections Committee.
e. The ballots shall be counted immediately upon their arrival in the designated counting site. The only people allowed in the room
during tabulation will be the members of the Elections Committee, one poll watcher, who is not a candidate for any Student
Government Office, for each candidate for Executive Office, Faculty Advisors, and a campus police officer. No progress
reports or information will be disclosed until all the ballots have been counted and the official results are announced.
f. The official results shall be announced by the Elections Chairman at noon the following day.
g. In order for a candidate to win election to an office, he must receive 50 percent plus one, affirmative votes cast for that office.
h. For an office for which no candidate receives more than 50 percent plus one, affirmative votes cast for that office, a run-off
election will be held between the two candidates who received the most votes.
i. The Elections Committee shall set forth the rules and regulations of elections, except where said rules & regulations conflict with
the provisions of this constitution. However, the said rules & regulations must be approved by the
Student Senate and Office of Student Services.

Article X. QUALIFICATIONS FOR CANDIDATES

Section 1. A candidate for the office of SGA President and Vice President must be a member of the Junior or Senior Class when he
takes office and must have a cumulative grade-point average not lower than 2.70 when he submits his petition for candidacy.

Section 2. Candidates for the office of SGA Treasurer, Recording Secretary and Corresponding Secretary must have cumulative
grade-point averages not lower than 2.70 when they submit their petitions for candidacy.

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Section 3. Applicants for staff positions in the offices of Student Government must have a grade point average not lower than 2.50
when submitting their resume to the designated Chief of Staff.

Section 4. The qualifications for the Junior Board of Trustee Representative and Senior Board of Trustee Representative will be
congruent to the College Board of Trustees Bylaws and will be as follows:
a. The Senior Board of Trustees Representative will not be elected.
b. The Junior Board of Trustees will be elected to a two-year position beginning in his sophomore year. During the first year of his
term, he will be known as the Junior Board of Trustees Representative, and during the second year of his term, he will move up
to the position of Senior Board of Trustees Representative.
c. There shall be three student representatives on the Board of Trustees; these shall be the Senior Board of Trustees Representative,
the Junior Board of Trustees Representative, and the Ex-officio Board of Trustees Representative, who shall be the President of
the Student Government Association.
d. The term of the Ex-officio Board of Trustees Representative will be one academic year.

Section 5. Candidates for any of the Class Offices must be members of the class for which they are seeking office. Except for the
Freshman Class, candidates for office must have cumulative grade-point averages not lower than 2.70 when they submit their petitions
for candidacy.

Section 6. Candidates for the offices of Editor-in-Chief of The Maroon Tiger and Editor of The Torch must be members of the Junior
or Senior Class when they take office, must have at least one year of prior experience on the respective staffs to which they seek to be
elected, and must not have grade-point averages lower than 2.70 when they submit their petitions for candidacy.

Article XI. REMOVAL FROM OFFICE

Section 1. Any officer of the Executive Board may be removed from office only through any of the following conditions:
a. By conviction of the Honor & Conduct Review Board for a constitutional ethics violation. (Majority vote)
b. By imposed disciplinary sanction of the College Judiciary Board or Honor & Conduct Review Board for student misconduct.
(Majority vote)
c. By student body petition of more than 50 percent of the enrolled students of Morehouse College calling for removal from office
presented to the Honor & Conduct Review Board for impeachment.
d. By imposed disciplinary sanction by the Dean of Students for academic or student misconduct.
e. By resignation or voluntary/involuntary removal from school.

Section 2. Class officers may be removed from office only through any of the following conditions:
a. By conviction of the Honor & Conduct Review Board for a constitutional ethics violation. (Majority vote)
b. By imposed disciplinary sanction of the College Judiciary Board or Honor & Conduct Review Board for student misconduct.
(Majority vote)
c. By petition of more than 50 percent of the members of the graduating class involved presented to the Honor & Conduct Review
Board for impeachment.
d. By imposed disciplinary sanction by the Dean of Students for academic or student misconduct.
e. By resignation or voluntary/involuntary withdrawal from school.

Section 3. Student Senators may be removed from office only through any of the following conditions:
a. By imposed disciplinary sanction of the College Judiciary Board or Honor & Conduct Review Board for student misconduct.
(Majority vote)
b. By majority vote of the organization/class the senator represents.
c. By 2/3 majority vote of the Student Senate.
d. By imposed disciplinary sanction by the Dean of Students for academic or student misconduct.
e. By resignation or voluntary/involuntary withdrawal from school.

Section 4. Student Justices may be removed from office only through any of the following conditions:
a. By imposed disciplinary sanction by the Dean of Students for academic or student misconduct.
b. By vote of the College Judiciary Board for student misconduct. (Majority vote)
c. By resignation or voluntary/involuntary withdrawal from school.

The amending and passage of Article VI during the Spring 2004 General Election deleted the office of organization senators.

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Section 5. The Editor-in-Chief of The Maroon Tiger may be removed from office only through any of the following conditions:
a. If The Maroon Tiger is not issued on a regular basis.
b. By imposed disciplinary sanction of the College Judiciary Board, Honor & Conduct Review Board for misconduct. (Majority
vote)
c. By imposed disciplinary sanction by the Dean of Students for academic or student misconduct.
d. By resignation or voluntary/involuntary withdrawal from school.

Section 6. The Editor of The Torch may be removed from office only through any of the following conditions:
a. If funds allocated to The Torch are misused or if sufficient monthly progress is not made on the compilation of the yearbook as
determined by the Honor & Conduct Review Board.
b. By imposed disciplinary sanction of the College Judiciary Board or Honor & Conduct Review Board.
c. By imposed disciplinary sanction by the Dean of Students for academic or student misconduct.
d. By resignation or voluntary/involuntary withdrawal from school.

Section 7. All persons elected in Student Government Association Elections must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.60
or above. Failure to do so will result in immediate removal from office as enforced by the Executive Board.

Article XII. SUCCESSION

Section 1. In the event the Student Government Association President is separated from office, the Vice President shall become the
President; and he shall appoint a Vice President subject to confirmation by the Student Senate.

Section 2. If any Executive Board officer is removed, the President will appoint someone to fill the vacancy subject to confirmation
by the Student Senate.

Section 3. In the event a Student Justice is separated from office, the President of the Student Government Association shall appoint a
new justice with confirmation by the Student Senate.

Section 5. In the event the Editor-in-Chief of The Maroon Tiger or the Editor of The Torch is separated from office, the top Assistant
Editor of the publication involved will fill the vacancy by confirmation of the Executive Board.

Section 6. The line of succession to the Student Government Association Presidency shall be as follows:
The Executive Branch and the Judicial Branch must maintain a grade point average of 2.7 (Article V Section 9 and Article VII
Section 4 respectively).
a. Vice President
b. Treasurer
c. Executive Secretary
d. Executive Director
e. Senior Board of Trustees Representative
f. Junior Board of Trustees Representative
g. Attorney General

Section 7. When a vacancy occurs in a Class Office, the Class President shall appoint someone to fill that position, except where the
appointment conflicts with this constitution.
Section 8. In the event that a Class President is separated from office, the Class Vice President shall become the Class President; and
he shall appoint a Class Vice President.

Article XIII. RATIFICATION AND AMENDMENTS


Section 1. This Constitution shall become effective only after the following conditions are met:
a. The designated Faculty Advisors are provided the opportunity to review this document prior to its ratification and adoption.
b. The Constitution is approved by a simple majority of votes cast by the students of Morehouse College, in the annual Student
Elections.
Section 2. Amendments to this Constitution may be adopted only by the following procedure.
a. Proposed amendments shall be typed and given to the Executive Board and Student Senate for review.
b. If approved by the Student Senate, all proposed amendments shall be presented to the Office of Student Services for review.
c. Faculty Advisors will have the opportunity to review the proposed amendment prior to its adoption.
d. The proposed amendments shall become part of this Constitution upon adoption by the students of Morehouse College in the
annual student elections or in a special referendum.
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e. This Constitution shall become effective immediately upon ratification.

Section 3. Notice of a proposal to amend the Constitution of the Morehouse Student Body shall be given in the agenda and considered
at no fewer than two meetings of Student Senate prior to voting. A copy of the proposed amendment shall be made available to each
voting member of the senate. A simple majority vote of all members of the Student Senate is required.

Section 4. Proposed amendments to the Constitution which have been approved by the SGA President or overridden presidential veto
by the Student Senate shall be submitted to a referendum vote by the Morehouse Student Body. Notice of the referendum shall be
given and copies of the proposed amendment shall be made available to the general undergraduate student population at least two
weeks in advance of voting.

Section 5. Amendments to the Constitution of the Morehouse Student Body become effective upon approval by the Student Senate,
Office of Student Services, and at least 50 percent plus one, majority affirmative votes of the student body cast in the general student
election or in a special referendum vote in which at least 1/3 of the student body
votes.

Section 6. Amendments to the Bylaws of the Student Senate become effective upon simple majority vote of the membership. A
referendum need not be held.

Section 7. In the case of a change in the Bylaws of the Board of Trustees, which necessitates an amendment to the Constitution of the
Morehouse Student Body, the necessary changes will be made with approval from the Office of Student Affairs. A referendum need
not be held.

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MOREHOUSE COLLEGE EVENT POLICY

Social events that are expected to draw over 500 participants are generally held in Archer Hall Gymnasium, Martin Luther King Jr.
International Chapel or Forbes Arena.

1. Posters and/or announcements for events on Campus property should be placed on the bulletin boards located at designated
locations.

2. Requests to use the all events should be made to the Office of Campus Operations’ Event Support Services Department at
least fourteen working days prior to the event. Under no circumstances will an organization be granted permission to
use the Center without at least 48-hours’ notice unless approved by Student Life. The student who schedules an event
must be an officer of the sponsoring organization and must attend the function.

3. All events must end by 1:00 a.m. At 12:30 a.m., campus police will notify participants to leave by turning on the hours
lights.

4. Campus Police officers are required to monitor the facility, and two faculty/staff/student advisors are required to monitor
participants and the cleaning of the exterior and interior areas after the function, (consult with office to find out number of
officers needed)

5. Functions will be canceled immediately if alcoholic beverages are brought inside or outside the facility, and/or if fights occur
inside or outside the facility. The areas accessible to students will be identified on the facility request form.

6. If the privileges of a student organization are suspended for any reason, the organization may appeal to the Dean of Student
Services in writing, within seven days of receiving the suspension notice. The Dean of Student Services may render a
decision based on that appeal, or on a hearing. The Dean’s decision will be final and binding.

Any additional questions about the use of the faculty should be directed to the coordinator of the facility.

SCHEDULING EVENTS

Requests for College Facilities and Services

All chartered student organizations may use College facilities and services and participate in Homecoming activities. Students should
submit facility request forms for all facilities and to the Facilities Committee and get approval before announcing a particular facility
as the meeting place for a program or events:

• Kilgore Center - submit facility request forms to the Campus Operations’ Support Services Department in the Triplex,
Building #9.
• All Chapels - (M.L. King, Sale, and Danforth) - submit facility request forms to the Campus Operations’ Support Services
Department in the Triplex, Building #9.

(Available in the Office of Campus Operations) Student activities for which a facility is requested cannot conflict with previously
scheduled events or interfere with ongoing facility requirements.

Guidelines for Outdoor Events

Student groups planning outdoor events should inform the Office of Student Activities and Campus Operations’ Support Services
Department in the Triplex, Building #9. Residence halls or student organizations planning outdoor events should also inform the
Office of Residential Life. Activities using Morehouse College property or public roads or sidewalks within the campus must be
approved by the College. Student groups should not sign service contracts until all approvals are given, including approval by
the Student Activities Office and/or the Office of Business Affairs. Any questions regarding event planning and procedures
should be directed to the Student Activities Office.

Use of Campus Quad, College Green and Campus Grounds

The campus grounds are reserved primarily for informal use, including rallies and other assemblies, by students, faculty, staff and
guests of the College. All events and activities other than informal use may be permitted with approval by the Office of Campus
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Operations. The office will book approved events or activities on the College calendar, coordinate them with the Superintendent of the
Physical Plant, and provide set-up assistance and guidance, if required.

Students, faculty, and staff who want to use the campus quad must submit a facility request form, get approval from the Office of
Campus Operations, and adhere to the following rules:

1. No holes may be dug and no permanent damage may be done to turf or crosswalks.

2. No vehicles are permitted.

3. No stakes may be driven into the ground without approval from the Physical Plant (so as not to damage underground
utilities).

4. Tents may be allowed with approval from the Superintendent of the Physical Plant.

5. Sponsoring organizations or departments will be responsible for the cost of set-up and clean up.

Individuals or organizations that violate this policy may be subject to disciplinary action, including suspension of the organization’s
charter.

Scheduling Activities

All student activities should be scheduled on the Semester Calendar of Student Activities maintained in the Office of Student
Activities. Student organizations should submit a list of their major activities by the end of the third week in September for the fall
semester, and by the end of the third week in January for the spring semester. Activities not included on the Semester Calendar of
Student Activities should be scheduled as follows:

1. Student organizations that want to sponsor activities involving the entire student body should clear the date, time and
location with the Office of Student Activities at least three weeks in advance so that it may be added to the Student
Activities Calendar.

2. Other student meetings, rehearsals, etc, should be scheduled monthly with the Office of Student Activities.

Students should adhere to the following guidelines when planning and scheduling activities:

1. Secure a date and time on the Calendar of Student Life & Planning.

2. Secure a Facility Request Form from the Office of Campus Operations, for the following areas: Kilgore Campus Center,
M.L. King, Jr. International Chapel, and all other miscellaneous buildings.

3. Submit the form to the Vice President of Student Services.

4. If the activity is a fund-raiser, secure authorization from the Office of Business Affairs.

5. Secure the proper faculty or staff hosts and/or hostesses and arrange for required security.

Guidelines for Guest Speakers at Morehouse College

Morehouse College is intent on promoting and protecting the intrinsic right to human dignity-the belief that as a person, one is
inherently worthy and honorable, regardless of status, station or stage of life. Our aim is to challenge and overturn the view that it is
permissible to treat certain people badly-because one has access to a “bully pulpit” and can get away with it.

Respect for the humanity of all persons is our goal. All messages ought to enhance human dignity rather than degrade it. We prefer
that our audiences be helped to understand the dignity of difference.

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Therefore, we recommend the following:


• Employ inclusive language that is affirmative and appreciative of diversity.
• Avoid bigoted comments and language that needlessly blames other racial or ethnic groups.
• Avoid sexist offensive comments as well as homophobic references and xenophobic language.
• Please avoid gratuitous use of profanity and other slang references inappropriate for a worship context.
• Please observe and strictly follow the allotted time for your message.
• Offer people hope and a reason to live faithfully and joyfully.

Our student body, faculty and staff are international, interfaith, interracial and interdenominational. Christians make up the majority.
Hence, references to Jesus as the Christ are acceptable, but not at the expense of other faith traditions.

The Sunday worship hour at the College is strictly Christian in the protestant tradition. It is often called “the Jesus hour.” The College
was founded by Baptist Christians in 1867 in Augusta, Georgia, by the Reverend William Jefferson White at the Silver Bluff
Springfield Baptist Church Founded in 1787.

Sponsored Visits by Political Candidates

Morehouse College does not support political parties or individual candidates for political office. Consequently, visits by political
candidates at the invitation of College departments, programs, or recognized organizations are subject to rules established by the
College to ensure that such visits are consistent with its mission and applicable legal restrictions.

College departments, programs, and recognized organizations that want to sponsor appearances by political candidates must follow
these guidelines.

1. In most instances where national candidates are involved, protocol mandates that the official College invitation be extended
by the President of the College. For more information, contact the Office of College Relations.

2. The purpose of any appearance by a candidate on campus should be to bring together the candidate and Morehouse College
students, faculty, administrators, and other employees. Departments, programs, and recognized organizations may not
sponsor or promote public campaign appearances on the Morehouse campus by candidates for political office.

3. Publicity should be limited to the Morehouse College community and handled by the Office of College Relations. Posters
may appear only on campus.

4. At no time should any aspect of the meeting or its format be dictated by or put under the control of the candidate, his or her
representatives, or any outside organization.

5. No fund raising for the candidate may take place in connection with the speaking event.

6. No College funds, including funds raised by an organization, should go to a candidate personally or to support his or her
campaign. College funds may be used for items such as posters.

7. The selection and use of rooms for such meetings will be governed by existing College rules and procedures.

8. Any College department, program or recognized organization that sponsors an appearance by a political candidate is
responsible for ensuring that the candidate and his or her organization are furnished with a copy of these rules and that they
abide by them. If a candidate or organization is unwilling to abide by these rules, they should not be brought to campus.

9. No College department, program or recognized organization may lend its or the College’s name or support to any off-campus
political campaign activity. This is not intended to prevent individual students, faculty members or employees from engaging
in political campaign activities off-campus, but to prevent the College’s name from being used in connection with political
campaign activities.

Organizations that fail to abide by the rules not only may jeopardize their organization’s privilege to sponsor future appearances, but
possibly their own good standing or charter as well.

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FUND-RAISING ACTIVITIES

The basic purpose of fund-raising activities is to enable organizations to raise money for programs that will contribute to the campus
community. Therefore, all fund-raising activities should be sponsored to support an approved project.
Before an individual fund-raising activity will be approved, the following criteria must be followed:

1. A fund-raising proposal, outlining the program for which the funds will be used, should be submitted to the Office of
Student Activities. This proposal should include the nature of the program, its purpose, the activities that will be funded,
an estimate of the amount of money needed to run the program, and an estimate of the number of fund-raising events
needed.

2. Once the fund-raising proposal has been approved, the sponsoring organization should follow the established procedures
for planning and scheduling the fund-raising event.

3. Fund-raising proposals should be submitted at least three weeks before the fund-raising activity. Fund-raising activities
should be scheduled at least seven days in advance.

4. A new program proposal is necessary for each fund-raising event.

5. The Office of Business Affairs will deposit all funds with the College cashier as soon as the cashier’s office is open.

6. All revenues generated through a fund-raising activity, minus expenses involved in conducting the activity, must be used
for the approved program or project.

7. Within 48 hours following a fund-raising activity, a financial report must be filed with the Vice President for Business
Affairs.

8. Fund-raisers for personal gain or to finance private activities of an organization and its members are strictly
prohibited.

Funds for Student Organizations


The financial transactions of student organizations are subject to the fiscal policies of the College.

1. Student organizations are required to handle financial receipts and disbursements through the Office of Business Affairs.

2. The funds of all student organizations must be deposited with the Office of Business Affairs in an “agency account” in
the name of that organization. Funds may be withdrawn with a requisition signed by the person designated to make such
withdrawals. An organization will not need to justify its withdrawals from the agency account; however, each
organization should establish its own procedures for expenditures and the accounting of its funds.

3. The Office of Business Affairs will be responsible for collecting, reporting and disbursing any and all funds at each fund­
raising event.

4. Organizations that are incorporated or affiliated with national or regional bodies that are incorporated are exempt from
this policy.

5. All organizations (whether incorporated or not) should submit their financial records to an annual audit, a copy of which
should be filed with the Office of Student Activities.

Off-Campus Activities for Student Organizations


Student organizations or groups that sponsor off-campus activities must adhere to the following guidelines:

1. Students who use an organization’s name or represent themselves as members of an organization of Morehouse College
should file information in advance with the Office of Student Activities.

2. That information should include the date, time and location of the event. If the activity involves financial transactions,
that information should be reviewed with the Office of Student Activities before any financial commitments are made.

3. Student organizations or their representatives must get approval from the Vice President for Student Services and Vice
President for Business Affairs before making any transaction that will incur a financial obligation for the organization.
Student organizations operating with funds allocated through the College may not make any such transactions without an
approved requisition and purchase order issued by the Office of Business Affairs. Students who make transactions on

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behalf of their organizations and fail to comply with this regulation will be held personally responsible for any
obligations incurred.

How to process purchase requisitions


Centralized purchasing by fixing responsibility for buying in one department makes possible an audit control over institutional
expenditures for materials, supplies, equipment and services which is impossible when purchasing is decentralized. Therefore, the
College’s procurement program requires a request to the Vice President for Business Affairs of the requirements of items to be
charged to the respective unit budget allocations.
The following steps must be followed:
■ Requisitions require approval by the Vice President for Student Development
■ Approval by Vice President for Business Affairs
■ Issuance of vendor of a Purchase Order by the Accounts Payable Department
■ Delivery of goods and/or services
■ Verification of receipt of goods and/or services by initiator of requisition
■ Payment to vendor by the Accounts Payable Department (upon receipt of invoices).
Note: In the absence of adherence to any of these procedures, the College will not assume responsibility for payment of debts
incurred.
Content: Use the requisition form for all requests for materials, supplies, equipment, and services. Whenever possible, include on a
single requisition only items that can be ordered from one vendor.
Specifications: See that complete and accurate specifications are given for every item requested and that the unit through which the
request is being made is identified. When appropriate, the date, time, place, etc., should also be included.

Estimated Cost: So far as possible, an estimated cost of each item should be shown. The purchasing agent, upon request, will assist
an organization in securing prices.

Timing: A period of five working days should be allowed for requisitions to be fully processed.

GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT TRAVEL

1. Only classes conducted by academic departments, athletic teams or representatives of recognized student organizations may
represent the College on field trips, or at games, tournaments, competitions or other student related events held at off-campus
locations.

2. Each travel group must be accompanied by one or more full-time members of the faculty or staff. Parents or guardians may
also be invited to serve as a chaperon for large groups.

3. Requests for student travel must be reviewed and approved by the appropriate division head at least one week prior to the
scheduled departure. The business office generally needs 10 business days to process such requests. Allowing 10 business
days affords the business office personnel (Budget Analyst, Travel Accountant and Accounts Payable) enough time to
review the request for completeness and accuracy. It also gives us time to communicate and receive any missing information
or documentation that may prevent us from moving forward with the approval process.

4. If a cash advance is desired, the faculty/staff advisor or sponsor must submit an Authorization for Travel to the Office of
Business Affairs. Cash advances are only distributed to Morehouse Faculty and Staff and should be accompanied with
detailed support documentation. Please also note that the maximum amount that can be requested as Miscellaneous is $50.00.

5. A Notice of Student Travel form should be completed by the faculty/staff advisor or sponsor, and submitted to the Director of
Student Life and Planning at least twenty-four (24) hours prior to the scheduled date of departure. Information to be
provided includes:

a. Name of group

b. Faculty/staff advisor or sponsor

c. Title of activity

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d. Purpose of activity

e. Destination(s)

f. Date(s) of travel

g. Roster of participants

h. Emergency contact person(s) and telephone number(s)

i. Roster of chaperons

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STUDENT SAFETY/SECURITY

CAMPUS POLICE
Monday - Sunday, 24 hours a day
Robert Hall, Southwest Annex
(404)215-2666

The Department of Campus Police is responsible for the general security of the College. The Department responds to all College
emergencies, enforces College regulations, and applicable federal, state and local laws. The Campus Police Department also provides
security for special on-campus events and approved off-campus activities.

Students must surrender their I.D. cards whenever requested by Campus Police or other college officers. Failure to do so may result in
disciplinary action.

Campus Police are not responsible for unlocking dormitory rooms, except in cases of extreme emergency. Students should notify their
Resident Directors or Resident Assistants if they are locked out of their rooms.

Emergency Transportation
All emergency medical and emergency transportation services are handled through the Department of Campus Police.

Lost and Found


A lost and found service operated through the Department of Campus Police is open Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 5p.m.

Crime Prevention Program


Students may use the engraving tools available in the Department of Campus Police to mark their possessions.

Police Escorts
In cases of emergency or under extenuating circumstances, Campus Police will escort students to and from the Robert W. Woodruff
Library, Vine City and West End MARTA stations, Mall West End and within the Atlanta University Center complex.

Personal Property
While it is the College’s intent to keep the personal property of all students safe and secure, Morehouse assumes no responsibility for
lost, stolen or damaged property. Students are encouraged to distinguish their personal belongings with their name or other unique
insignia and purchase personal property insurance or obtain a rider on their parts homeowner’s policy.

Criminal Background Checks


This service is provided free of charge to all Morehouse College students. An authorizing consent form must be completed before the
background check can be conducted.

Copies of Police Reports


Copies of reports can be requested in person by coming to the Campus Safety Department located in the Robert Hall Annex or simply
clicking on the link, fill out the Report Request Form provide your email address and a copy of your report will be emailed to you.
Please allow five (5) business days for processing.
Some incident reports may not be suitable for electronic submission, due to the sensitive nature of its contents.

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PARKING
Introduction
The Morehouse College parking policies govern parking on campus and other Morehouse-owned properties, so that our staff, faculty,
students and guests may have maximum benefit from parking facilities. Adhering to these policies promotes driver and pedestrian
safety and access to campus facilities by emergency vehicles at all times.

The Morehouse College Parking Office, under the supervision of the Vice President for Business Affairs, is responsible for
administering and enforcing College parking rules and regulations. Students and others, who violate these regulations risk being
ticketed, booted, having their College driving privileges revoked or vehicles impounded. For more information about registration and
parking, contact the Parking Management office.

A motor vehicle parked, operated or driven on campus is the sole responsibility of its owner or operator. The College is not liable nor
does it maintain insurance for damages caused to or by any vehicle, its operator, occupants or any others, unless the damage is the
result of a College employee acting in the course of and within the scope of his or her employment with the College.

During emergencies and special situations, it may become necessary to suspend or otherwise modify the parking regulations. The
College reserves the right to change parking regulations at any time. Temporary regulations and restrictions will be enforced
accordingly.

General Policy
The Morehouse Parking Policy requires all faculty, staff and students to obtain the proper parking permit to park on campus lots or
other Morehouse property, including during nights, weekends and holidays and break periods. All others are required to park in the
parking deck until a proper permit has been obtained. The Campus Parking Office will register vehicles and issue permits. Only one
permit will be issued to an employee, student or service contractor (vendor) per year. Parking permits and access control materials are
not transferable without prior written authorization from the parking office.
• The use of the campus lot(s) is only for registered vehicles with valid permits displayed.
• Freshmen are allowed to purchase parking permits, but the parking office will assign freshmen to park in the parking deck
only. Parking lots on the interior of campus will be assigned to sophomores, juniors, seniors, staff, and faculty.
• All permitted vehicles are required to display permits at all times on campus and park in spaces dictated by the type of permit
granted for said vehicle.
• It is the responsibility of all vehicle operators to have knowledge of these policies and any updates of these policies.
• All guests and visitors are required to park in the parking deck.
• The parking policies are subject to change during the academic year. Any changes will be posted on the Morehouse College
website.
• The speed limit is 5 mph for all Morehouse College lots, properties and the deck.
• Excessive misuse or violations of policies may result in revocation of parking privileges.
A. Permits/ Access Control Material
• Permits will be color-coded to reflect the vehicle owner's classification and authorized parking location(s).
• Permits for faculty and staff are valid as long as they are employed with the College.
• Contractors (vendors) permits are typically valid for one year (July 1- June 30).
• Student permits can be purchased monthly, for the semester or for the entire academic school year.
• Morehouse students attending summer school and students or individuals involved in a summer program are required to
purchase a summer parking permit, (see www.morehouse.edu/student_life/campusinfo/parking.html).
• Daily parkers are issued temporary permits only and are required to park in the parking deck.
• Parkers on payroll deduction must surrender access materials and permits before deductions will stop.

Applicants will need the following to complete vehicle registration:

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• Employment identification or verification, or current student identification


• Driver's license and proof of insurance
Anti-Passback System
The access-control system uses a passback control feature that requires access-control material to be used at an entrance reader before
it can be used at an exit reader and vice versa. If a passback situation has been determined, the individual is expected to pay the lost
ticket rate or the appropriate fine.
Repeated violation of the passback control system could result in revocation of parking privileges for the permit owner. Allowing
someone to use your access card or permit to enter or exit will prevent you from gaining access into or out of the parking deck.

Reserved Parking
Anyone parking in a reserved parking space (including spaces marked “Reserved for Deans” and/or “Department Chairs”) must have a
reserved parking permit. A reserved permit is required even if permission from a reserved permit holder to park in their reserved space
in their absence has been granted. Individuals with reserved parking must park in their designated space only.

Motorcycle Parking
Motorcycles must be registered with a motorcycle permit, and must be parked in area (s) designated motorcycle parking only.
Individuals purchasing a vehicle parking permit may not be required to purchase a separate motorcycle permit. There is no motorcycle
parking in the deck.

Lost, Stolen or Damaged Permits and/or Access Material


Lost or stolen permits and/or access materials must immediately be reported to the parking office. A police report must be filed with
Campus Police. The replacement fee for lost, stolen or damaged permits, and/or access material is $20. Permits and access cards will
be replaced at no cost only if the damage is a result of normal wear and tear.

B. Payment Methods

• Permits and/or access cards may be paid for in the following manners
■ Students cash, student account, major credit card, debit card or check.
■ Faculty/Staff - payroll deduction, major credit card, debit card, cash or check.
* Parking fines can only be paid using cash, major credit card, or debit
cards with MASTERCARD or VISA logo. Fines or boot fees paid after hours are payable only in cash with
receipt for payment provided.

Issuing of a bad check for payment is against the law and is subject to prosecution.

Refunds
Refunds can be obtained only on prepaid parking. Refunds will be prorated based on the remaining weeks or months in the semester.
The discontinuation of payroll deduction is allowed if all parking access material is returned. Individuals terminating employment
without returning parking access material(s) will receive a deduction from their final check equivalent to three months of parking fees.

C. Parking Violations and Fees


The Morehouse College Campus Police Department and Campus Parking Office will have the responsibility to regulate and enforce
all parking. All fines are the responsibility of the vehicle registrant and/or permit registrant.

Fees for Violations


1. $ 50 - Unauthorized parking in reserved parking spaces
2. $100 - Unauthorized parking in handicapped spaces
3. $ 50 - Blocking other vehicles or loading docks
4. $ 50 - Double parking
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5. $ 50 - Parking on yellow or white curbs or designated “NO PARKING” areas


6. $150 - Possession of lost, fraudulent/stolen parking materials
7. $ 25 - Parking in lot not designated by permit
8. $ 25 - No permit or permit not displayed
9. $ 50 - Parking in restricted areas
10. $100 - Parking in or blocking handicap access ramps or curbs
11. $ 25 - Motorcycle parked in car space or space not designated for motorcycle
12. $ 50 - Occupying two spaces
13. $ 50 - Tampering with parking gates
14. $ 200- plus the cost of repair (including trip fee) - Breaking and/or damaging the gate arm
15. $25 - Failure to pay parking fees using access card (per occurrence)

16. $75 - Failure to pay parking fees by tailgating

17. $200 - Failure to pay parking fees by lifting gate arm

18. $10 - Unauthorized parking in a visitor space

19. $75 - Parking in a EV charging space

20. $25 — Unauthorized use of parking materials

Vehicles found in violation are subject to any or all of the following sanctions:
1. Warning stickers affixed to vehicle window.
2. Parking boot. Boot removal without authorization will result in prosecution or sanctions equaling the cost to repair or replace
a boot, (fines may be paid with cash, major credit card or debit cards with MASTERCARD or VISA logo.)
3. Vehicles will be towed if:
a. boot left on vehicles for more than 24 hours.
b. vehicle blocks a driveway, loading dock, handicap-access area or parking space, or creates a hazard.
4. Fraudulent reproduction of a permit is a violation of the law and prohibited by College policy. Violators are subject to loss of
parking privileges, fines and/or prosecution.
5. Boots not paid for by 5:30 pm will be removed the following business day unless the vehicle owner chooses to pay a $25
trip charge, in addition to the violation fee.
6. An additional $10 will be added to the violation fee for each 24 hour period the vehicle remains booted.
Appeal Process
In cases where a vehicle is ticketed, booted or towed, the owner may elect to appeal the action after the fee is paid. An appeal form
must be completed and submitted to the parking office within seven (7) days from the date of the action (appeal forms are available in
the Parking Office in the deck). All appeals will be handled by the Parking Manager and/or his designee at 10 a.m. on the Thursday
following submission of the appeal form. No appeals will be heard on Thursdays falling on Thanksgiving Day or authorized holidays
and school closings.
None of the following are considered acceptable grounds for appeal:
1) Lack of knowledge of parking policies.
2) Inability to locate an appropriate space at desired location.
3) Instruction to park by a Morehouse employee or any other individual other than a parking employee.
4) Not seeing posted signs governing the area or violation.
5) Vehicle was loaned to another individual.
All appeal decisions are final,

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After Hours and Weekend Parking


During normal business hours (8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.) all permitted parkers are expected to park in their designated parking area to
help ensure adequate parking in all areas. Off-campus students are allowed to park only in the deck during normal business hours.
After hours and weekend parking are allowed in areas where permit holders may not be assigned to-with the exception of Kilgore lot,
G lot (behind Perdue Hall) and all reserved spaces.

Storage of Vehicles on Campus


Storing vehicles on campus is not permitted. All vehicles with permits must be operable and moved with notification. Malfunctioning
or inoperable vehicles must be moved within seven (7) days to a location off campus of owner’s choice and responsibility. Vehicles
not moved within seven (7) days after notification and/or warning will be towed off campus. The College is not responsible for loss,
damage, recovery cost or reclamation of said vehicle. Information concerning the location of towed vehicles can be obtained from
Campus Police.

Overnight Parking
Overnight parking is permitted for students and employees traveling on college-related business or activities. Individuals requesting
overnight parking accommodations must inform the parking management office in advance and provide specific dates of travel.

Special-Event Parking
During special events, parking rates and availability may change. Most special event parking will be restricted to the parking deck.
The rate for special event parking will be determined on a per-event basis. The range is $2 to $5, depending on the nature of the
event. Typically, a $2 per-car flat rate will apply for an event that is primarily a Morehouse College student event. The flat per-car
rate for an event geared toward the general public is $5.

PARKING OFFICE INFORMATION


Location: Parking Deck, 1st floor
Office Hours: Monday -Friday
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Telephone: (470) 639-0749
Fax: (404) 222-2570
Electronic Mail: parking@morehouse.edu

Postal Address: Attn: Parking Office


Morehouse College
Unit No. 140077
830 Westview Drive
Atlanta, Georgia 30314-3773

Morehouse College and/or parking management company are not responsible for any loss, theft, vandalism or damage incurred
while parked on Morehouse College property.

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COLLEGE RESOURCES DIRECTORY

This listing is intended to serve as a quick reference for identifying resources to assist you with addressing any questions or concerns
you may have. If you are not sure where to go for assistance, please contact the Operator. The telephone number is (470) 639-0999.

NOTE: If you are calling from an off-campus location, you must precede the four-digit extensions below with the (470) 639-
prefix.

Academic Counseling
Class Deans (see listing)

Academic Grievances
(Faculty Member or Department Chair who is involved)

Vice President for Academic Affairs 0801


Class Deans (see listing)

Academic Standing
Registrar’s Office 2641
Class Deans (see listing)

Advanced Placement Credits


Office of Admissions 2632

Advanced Standing
Office of the Registrar 2641
Office of Admissions 0818

Alcohol and Other Drugs


Class Deans (see listing)
Director of Campus Life 7893
Office of Residential Life 2634

Alumni Affairs 0821

Audio-Visual Services
Media Center (404) 653-7803

Automobile Regulations/Registration
Campus Police 2666

Health Services 2637


Bookstore 8685

Calendar of Events
Publications and Special Events (404) 681-2800 option 6
Campus Life 0309.
Career Development and Engagement 0723
Counseling Resource Center 2636

Catering
Aramark (404)215-2667

Chaplains
Martin Luther King International Chapel 0209
Class Deans (see listing)

Freshmen/Sophomore Dean (404) 653-3206


Junior/Senior Dean 2748

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Class Rank
Office of the Registrar 2641

Commencement
Office of the Registrar 2641

Course Election Changes


Office of the Registrar 2641

Dining Services
Aramark (470) 639-0496

Discipline
Associate Dean of Student Conduct (470) 639-0421
Class Deans (see listing)

Drugs
(See “Alcohol and Other Drugs” listing)

Elections, Student
Office of Student Life 0309

Emergencies
General Campus Police (404)215-2666
Injury Health Services (Infirmary) (470) 639-2637
Fire-Dial 911 (9-911 within College)

Emotional Concerns
Counseling Center 0231
Class Deans (see listing)
Employment
Career Counseling and Placement (404)653-7882
Office of Financial Aid (844)512-6672

Event Scheduling
Office of Student Life 0309

Facilities Repair
Residence halls during business hours:
Office of Housing and Residential Education 2672
All buildings during all hours:
Physical Plant (470) 639-0800

Facilities Reservations
Support Services ((404)215-2671

Graduation Requirements
Office of the Registrar (844)512-6672
Class Deans (see listing)

Health Education
Office of Health Professions 2670

Health Insurance
Student Health Services (470) 639-0603
Honors Program 2679

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Housing
Office of Housing and Residential Education 2672
Off-Campus - Director of Off-Campus Life 2730

I.D. Cards
Sale Hall Annex 0276

Illness/Injury Emergencies
Campus Police 2666
Ambulance (911/call 9-911 within College)
Health Services (Infirmary) (404)215-2637

Intercollegiate Sports
Athletic Director (470) 639-0650

International Student Advisor 2728

Internships
Career Development and Engagement 2703

Intramural Sports
Director of Intramurals (404) 614-8543

Language Requirement
Office of the Registrar 2641
Department of Modern Foreign Languages 0807

Leadership Programs
Dean of Student Life 0231

Learning Disabilities
Counseling Center 2636

Library Information
Robert Woodruff Library (404) 522-8980

Loans
Office of Financial Aid (844)512-6672

Mail Service
Post Office 0803

Majors
Academic Departments
Office of the Registrar 2641
Class Deans (see listing)

Medical Consultation
Student Health Services (470) 639-0603

Noise Complaints
Campus Police 2666
Residential Deans 2672

Nutrition Information Aramark (470) 639-0496

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Off-Campus Activities
Office of Student Life 0309
Office of Off-Student Life 0309

Parking
Parking (470) 639-0496

Personal Concerns
Class Deans (see listing)
Counseling Center 2672
Office of Housing and Residential Education

Pets Policy
Office of Student Services 2730

Photocopying
Print Shop 0743

Police
Campus Police (404)215-2666

Reading/Skills Improvement
Department of English 0805

Readmission
Office of Admissions 0818

Recreational Facilities
Athletics 0651
Office of Student Life 0309

Repairs (Room/Residence Hall) Emergencies


Office of Housing and Residential Education 2672
Physical Plant 0800

Residence Hall Programs


Office of Housing and Residential Education 2672
Residence Deans
Class Deans (see listing)

ROTC
Army ROTC (404)413-6486
Navy ROTC (470)-639-0258
Air Force ROTC 2867

Scholarships
Office of Financial Aid (844) 512-6672
Career Development and Engagement 2644

Sexual Assault
Campus Police (404)215-2666
Health Services (Infirmary) (470) 639-0603
Office of Title IX Director (470) 639-0584
Counseling Center 0231
Class Deans (see listing)

Social Programming
Office of Student Life 7893

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Stress Management
Counseling Center 0231

Student Accounts
Office of Business Affairs 2654

Student Conduct
Office of Student Conduct 0421

Student Exchange Programs


Class Deans (see listing)

Student Organizations
Office of Campus Life 7893

Student Religious Organizations


Dean of the Chapel (470) 639-0323

Study Abroad Programs


Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership (470) 639-0323

Telephones
Polycom 0804

Tickets
Office of Business Affairs (470) 639-0815

Title IX Coordinator
Office of Ethics & Compliance (470) 639-0584
Transcripts
Office of the Registrar 2641

Tutoring
Fredrick Douglas Commons 0470

Volunteer Service Opportunities


Bonner Office of Community Service (470) 639-0594

Withdrawal from College


Office of Academic Affairs 0801
Office of Student Services 0379

Work-Study
Office of Financial Aid (844)512-6672

Writing Skills Improvement


Fredrick Douglas Commons 0470

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APPENDIX A

MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

1. If a student has an out-of-town guest, can he or she stay with the student in the Residence House?
No, Students are not allowed to have overnight guests.

2. How can I become a Resident Assistant?


Generally, students must have lived on campus at least two semesters before they can serve as Resident Assistants. The
process includes completing an application during the Fall semester and attending a series of training classes, including a
brief internship with a current Resident Assistant, during the Spring semester. A student may begin the process during his
first semester at Morehouse.

3. When and where can a student get an official excused absence to present to his professors?
Official excuses may be obtained from the Office of Student Services during normal business hours. Students are required to
submit written documentation to substantiate the reasons they missed class.

4. If a student cannot go home during the Winter Break, can he remain on campus in the residence house?
The residence halls are closed during the Winter Break and are not available for student occupancy.

5. Are there bathroom facilities in each residence house for female guests during visitations?
Not all residence house are equipped with designated bathroom facilities for female guests. Residents of residence halls
without such facilities are responsible for establishing acceptable procedures and accommodations for their female guests.

6 If a student suspects and/or alleges that his roommate is stealing his personal items from their room, what procedure
is available to have the allegations addressed?
Students should report this and all other problems to the Residential Deans, who will conduct the initial investigation and
make appropriate referrals.

7 If a student has a good voice, can he automatically be a member of the Glee Club?
No. Tryouts for the Glee Club are held at the beginning of each semester.

8 Where can “older” or otherwise “non-traditional” students go for support?


Older or non-traditional students may go to the Office of Student Life and Planning or Off-Campus Programs to receive
support. A student organization called Seasoned Mystique also serves the needs of these students.

9. Can a student satisfy the language requirement through a Study-Abroad Program? Where can a student sign-up for
Study-Abroad?
Yes. Andrew Young Center for Global Leadership, 408 Walter E. Massey Bldg (470) 639-0323

10. What GPA does a student need to have to become a member of Phi Beta Kappa?
To be eligible for membership in Phi Beta Kappa, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.75 by their junior year and 3.50
by their senior year, with no grade lower than a “C”. However, since no more than 10 percent of the graduating class may be
members, the standards may vary from year to year.

11. Why does the College require students to remove their hats in buildings?
Removing one’s hat indoors is an act of both courtesy and deference. Historically, hats were an essential part of men’s attire.
They functioned primarily as a place to conceal weapons. Within this context, men removed their hats when entering a
building to demonstrate that they entered in friendship, peace and harmony. This custom developed into a contemporary
behavior that is considered good manners.
Men remove their hats when they want to show deference, high regard and respect for women, elders, or people of superior
status such as judges, generals, presidents, and professors. Men also remove their hats to show deference when national
anthems or sacred hymns are played or sung.
As an institution committed to developing leaders who have internalized good manners and rules of social behavior,
Morehouse expects and requires students to remove their hats when entering buildings and classrooms and to observe other
rules of good social behavior.

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Morehouse is a diverse community with a student population representing a variety of religions and religious practices.
While the College recognizes and appreciates this diversity, it requires that all students, regardless of their religious customs,
adhere to established College practices.

12. Where can a student register for GRE, GMAT, LSAT, and MCAT courses?
Students can obtain information about the GRE, GMAT, LSAT, and MCAT in the Counseling Center. Director of
Career Development & Engagement, (470) 639-2703 will assist with any services pertaining to testing.

GRE: Graduate Record Examinations


Educational Testing Services
P. O. Box 6000
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6000

GMAT: Graduate Management Admissions Test


Educational Testing Service
P. O. Box 6103
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6103

LSAT: Law Services


Test Administrations
Box 2000-T
661 Penn Street
Newtown, Pennsylvania 18940-0995

MCAT: MCAT Program Office


P. O. Box 4056
Iowa City, Iowa 52243

13. Is there a treatment program on campus for students with alcohol, drug or chemical dependence problems?
Morehouse does not have alcohol, drug or chemical dependence treatment programs. However, the College refers students to
a broad range of treatment programs in the Atlanta metropolitan area. For more information, students should contact the
Counseling Center, Sale Hall Annex.

14. Where can students go for sleep disorder problems?


Too much or too little sleep can indicate more serious problems. Students who are experiencing any type of sleep
disturbance should contact the Counseling Center in Sale Hall Annex for evaluation.

15. Where can a student go for help to improve his memory for examinations?
The ability to retain large amounts of academic material for examinations can make the difference in a successful academic
experience. Students can learn concentration skills that will improve their overall retention rate. Contact the Counseling
Center or Office of Disability Services.

16. If a student is having problems in a relationship, will the Morehouse student and his significant other be able to
receive help?
Yes. The Counseling Center sees couples on a regular basis. Many relationship issues are best resolved when both parties
are involved in the discussion.

17. If a student is a diabetic, is there someone at Morehouse who can help monitor his blood sugar levels?
Yes. Students who are diabetic have access to a device in the Infirmary that can help monitor blood glucose levels.

18. Where can a student go to find a part-time job?


Job boards are located outside Room 105 in Gloster Hall and in the AUC Placement Center, 440 Westview Drive (the
Science Research Building).

19. How and where can a student find summer internships?


Students interested in internships must see the Director of Career Development & Engagement.

20. Where can a student go for emergency dental service?

133
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 203 of 218

Dental clinics listed in the yellow pages may give discounted services to students who don’t have dental insurance, but most
of these clinics close by 5 p.m. In an emergency, students may need to go to an emergency room for care until they can see a
dentist.

21. Where can a student go for help in developing a professional resume?


Students can pick up sample resume forms from the Director of Career Development & Engagement, Monday through Friday
from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

22. If a student is arrested for violating a federal, state or local law, will the College provide bail money and legal
assistance?
No. The College is not responsible for providing bail money and/or legal assistance to a student arrested for violating a
federal, state or city law.

23. If a student cannot find the library materials he needs for a term paper at Woodruff Library, can he use his
Morehouse identification card to check out books at other libraries?
No. However, students may secure materials through an inter-library loan. Ask the librarian at Robert Woodruff Library for
more details.

24. Who does a student see if he feels a faculty or staff member is sexually harassing him?
Students should report incidents of sexual harassment to their class dean, the Counseling Center, Senior Vice President for
Student Services or Senior, Vice President and Provost for Academic Affairs and Title IX..

25. Can a student fail a class that he is otherwise successfully passing simply because he has three unexcused absences?
Yes.

26. Who can approve an overload for a student to register for more than 18 hours, and under what circumstances will an
overload be approved?
The class dean/department chair can approve overloads for students who have a cumulative 3.0 GPA.

27. Can a student cross-register for courses in his major?


Yes, with the permission of his department chairperson.

28. Can a student repeat a course he has failed at a school other than Morehouse?
No. Students cannot impact the GPA outside Morehouse.

29. What restrictions are imposed on students who are placed on academic probation?
They are limited to 13 hours of credit per semester and cannot participate in extracurricular activities.

30. Does Morehouse have an exchange program with other colleges and universities?
Yes. See the Freshman Dean for details. However, this service is not limited to freshman.

31. How can a student become a Georgia resident?


A dependent student of another state cannot become a Georgia resident unless his parents move to Georgia. An independent
student must reside in Georgia for 12 months as an independent student and claim Georgia as his legal state of residency.

32. Are parking spaces available for commuter students?


A few spaces are reserved for students who sign up for the car-pooling program. Students are required to register vehicles
and riders with the Morehouse Parking.

33. How are off campus students informed of campus events and other essential information?
In addition to the traditional College communication networks, off-campus students can look to a bulletin board located at
Kilgore Center and the Office of Student Life.

34. Can parents, employers, or other interested people gain access to students’ transcripts, financial aid records, etc.
FERPA laws protect student’s rights. Student must sign an authorization form before we can discuss your student records.

35. Are students’ addresses and telephone numbers given out to anyone who asks for them? Are students’ files kept
confidential in ALL college offices?

134
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 204 of 218

The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, is a federal law that requires educational institutions to
establish a written policy about the privacy rights of students and to make that policy available. The law provides that the
institution will maintain the confidentiality of student’s education records.

Student records include the records, files, documents and other materials that contain information directly related to students,
and which are maintained by the institution or by a person acting on behalf of the institution.

Students have the right to inspect and review the contents of their records, to obtain copies of those records, and to receive an
explanation or interpretation of these records. Students also have the right to a hearing if they wish to correct or amend their
records.

Records may be inspected only at the office responsible for maintaining them. Each office is responsible for establishing its
own access procedures; this may include a written request from students.

Students do not have access to the following:

1. Financial records of parents and any information contained in them.

2. Confidential letters or recommendations written prior to Jan. 1,1975.

3. Personal medical and psychiatric records prepared and used solely in connection with the treatment of students.
Such records will be made available to other physicians at the students’ request.

4. Personal notes kept by faculty members, deans or counselors in their personal files for use in their individual
capacities.

No information about students, other than directory information, will be released without their written request, except to:

1. Members of the faculty and administration who have a legitimate interest in the information;

2. Officials of others schools or school systems in which the student wishes to enroll;

3. Officials in connection with student applications for or receipt of financial aid;

4. State and local officials if required by law adopted before Nov. 17, 1974;

5. Organizations conducting studies for or on behalf of educational agencies, provided such studies will not permit
identification of students and their parents;

6. Accrediting agencies to carry out their accrediting functions;

7. Parents of dependent students; and

8. Officials in compliance with a student conduct order or lawfully issued subpoena, with the condition that students
will be notified before compliance with the order or subpoena.

When consent is required, it must be in writing, signed and dated by the person given consent, and must include:

1. Specification of record to be released;

2. Reason for release and;

3. Names of the parties to whom the record should be released.

A record will be kept of the parties who have received access to students’ records, except for the exceptions noted above.
Students have access to this record. Information furnished to other individuals and organizations will be limited to the items
listed below, unless accompanied by a release signed by the student:

1. Enrollment status;
135
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 205 of 218

2. Dates of enrollment;

3. Classification;

4. Degree earned (if any)and dates;

5. Major;

6. Honors received; and

7. Local and home addresses and telephone numbers.

If students do not wish to have any of the above information released, they should notify all of the offices concerned.

36. Can a student get a copy of his transcript each semester to make certain his grades are being reported accurately?
Students are mailed a copy of their grades at the end of each semester, provided they have no balance outstanding in the
Business Office. The first transcript is free; additional copies are $3.00.

37. How can students get discounts at various off-campus cultural and entertainment facilities, e.g., the Fox Theater, High
Museum of Art, Alliance Theater, 14th Street Playhouse, etc?
Most entertainment facilities offer discounts for certain events and performances to students with college IDs. Call in
advance for specific information.

38. Intellectual Property


Every member of the Morehouse College community has rights and responsibilities with respect to copyright and intellectual
property. All Morehouse faculty, staff, and students have the responsibility to properly use copyrighted material and protect
intellectual property rights.

Consistent with academic tradition, students shall own the copyright in the academic works they create, unless otherwise
provided in a written agreement between the student creator)s) and the College. Morehouse also does not claim ownership of
intellectual property that is produced by faculty, staff, or students on their own time and outside the scope of their
employment. The College shall own the copyright in the following works created by students, acting individually or jointly
with others'.
1. works created by students as College employees, either as a work study or regular employee, acting within the scope
of their employment, except for academic works created and owned by faculty under this policy;
2. directed works, i.e., works agreed upon between the College and the student creator)s), the creation of which is based
on a specific request by the College and which is supported by substantial College resources;
3. works created in connection with the administration of the College; and,
4. works created pursuant to a contract with an outside sponsor that provides for College ownership of the copyright in
the works.

39. Works Created by Independent Contractors. Consistent with the applicable law, the contract between the parties, and/or a
sponsored agreement, work produced for the College by independent contractors shall be considered work-for-hire and shall
be owned by the College.

40. The College’s full IP policy is set forth in the Morehouse College Policies and Procedures Manual.

136
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 206 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***LW
Date: 11/19/2018 11:55 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY


STATE OF GEORGIA

JOHN DOE,

Plaintiff,

v.

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE, a domestic not-for-profit


Corporation, JOHN SILVANUS WILSON, JR., CIVIL ACTION FILE
Individually and in his NO.: 2018CV312687
capacity as former President of Morehouse College,
TERRAINE BAILEY, Individually and in her
capacity as Title IX Coordinator and Compliance
Specialist of Morehouse College, and DR. ROBERT
PETERSON, Individually and in his
capacity as Assistant Professor at Morehouse College,

Defendants.

AFFIDAVIT OF SERVICE

PERSONALLY appeared before me, an officer duly qualified to administer oaths, ERIC

D. ECHOLS, a permanent process server who after being duly sworn, states the following:

1.

Affiant states that he is over 18 years of age, a citizen of the United States, and not related

to the parties herein. The statements made in the affidavit are true and correct and are based upon

my personal knowledge. Affiant states that service was conducted as a permanent process server

with the SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY and a copy of the Order authorizing me to

service process is attached hereto (see Exhibit “A”).

2.

I personally served HASKELL B. RUFF, CPA Associate Vice President / Controller for

Business & Finance and designated person to accept service for registered agent DR. ALAN D.

ROBERTSON, SR on behalf of Defendant MOREHOUSE COLLEGE on Tuesday, November


Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 207 of 218

13, 2018, at 1:40 p.m. HASKELL B. RUFF, CPA accept service for former registered agent DR.

ALAN D. ROBERTSON, SR who was still listed on the Georgia Secretary of State website (see

Exhibit “B”) and no longer employed with Morehouse College and served a copy of the following

document(s) as provided by the court:

1. SUMMONS; and

2. COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES AND DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL with Exhibits A
to D attached.

I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct.

This the / & day of November 2018.

Eric D. Echols
Permanent Process Server
TFP Company, LLC
P.O. Box 6069
Marietta, GA 30065
(770)579-0188

Sworn to and subscribed before


me this \i y day of . 2018.

My Commission Expires: "S X

CHANDLER ARDIS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Cobb County
State of Georgia
My Comm. Expires Apr. 03,2021
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 208 of 218
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 209 of 218
$

Smith, Ronald Stinyard, Kelvin Underwood, Robert Wolfe, Lisa


Smith, Virginia Stone, Rodney Velasquez, Julius Wright, Christopher
Smith Jr., Bruce Swindle, Frank Walkear, Rcgmaid Yeste, John
Snellingg, Sharon TamaroS, Paul Washington, Sabrina Zayas, Roberto
Spears, Joye Tassaw, Bcriiane Webber, Melina
Stanton, (ZSinstopitor Thoir^json, Vanessa Weeks, Frances
Starks, Marc Thrash, Nancy West, Eric
Steidl, David TorUHany Wiliiams, Lawn
Stevetaon,Nosiba Tremble, GarfMd Wlngo, Michael
Stewart, Emmie Tucker, Paul Wlnklonan, Nan

beappomfed and authorized to serve as a Peratanait Process Server in the Fnhon County Su$Miior Court, for
the Calendar Year 2018, without the neceraty of an order for appointment in each individual case.

BY ORDER OF THE Court this g? dav ofJanuary. 2018.

IS. Tusan, Chief Jud^


Fulton County Superior Court
Atlanta itidtcial Cmaiit

2 of 2
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 210 of 218
11/14/2018 GEORGIA

GEORGIA GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE

CORPORATIONS DIVISION ROBYN A. CRITTENDEN

HOME (/)
BUSINESS SEARCH

BUSINESS INFORMATION

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE
Business Name: Control Number: 0D01104
(INC.)

Domestic Nonprofit
Business Type: Business Status: Active/Compliance
Corporation

Business Purpose: NONE


830 WESTVIEW DR SW,
Date of Formation/ s/28/1g13
Principal Office Address: ATLANTA, GA, 30314-
Registration Date:
3773. USA

Last Annual Registration


State of Formation: Georgia 2018
Year

REGISTERED AGENT INFORMATION

Registered Agent Name: Dr. Alan D. Robertson, Sr.

Physical Address: 830 Westview Drive SW, Atlanta, GA, 30314, USA

County: Fulton

OFHCER INFORMATION

Name Title Business Address


Alan D. Robertson, Sr.. CFO 830 WESTVIEW DR SW, ATLANTA, GA, 30314, USA

AVERY MUNNINGS Secretary 830 WESTVIEW DR, ATLANTA, GA, 30314, USA

David A Thomas CEO 830 WESTVIEW DR, ATLANTA, GA, 30314, USA

Filing History Name History


Back
Return to Business Search

EXHIBIT B

Office of the Georgia Secretary of State Attn: 2 MLK, Jr. Dr. Suite 313, Floyd West Tower Atlanta, GA 30334-1530,
Phone: (404) 656-2817 Toll-free: (844) 753-7825, WEBSITE: http://www.sos.ga.gov/
© 2015 PCC Technology Group. All Rights Reserved. Version 4.7.1 Report a Problem?

https://ecorp.sos.ga.gov/BusinessS earch/Businesslnformation?businessld=445664&businessType=Domestic%20Nonprofit%20Corporation 1/1


Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 211 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EFILED***LW
Date: 11/19/2018 11:55 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY


STATE OF GEORGIA

JOHN DOE,

Plaintiff,

v.

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE, a domestic not-for-profit


Corporation, JOHN SILVANUS WILSON, JR., CIVIL ACTION FILE
Individually and in his NO.: 2018CV312687
capacity as former President of Morehouse College,
TERRAINS BAILEY, Individually and in her
capacity as Title IX Coordinator and Compliance
Specialist of Morehouse College, and DR. ROBERT
PETERSON, Individually and in his
capacity as Assistant Professor at Morehouse College,

Defendants.

AFFIDAVIT OF SERVICE

PERSONALLY appeared before me, an officer duly qualified to administer oaths, ERIC

D. ECHOLS, a permanent process server who after being duly sworn, states the following:

1.

Affiant states that he is over 18 years of age, a citizen of the United States, and not related

to the parties herein. The statements made in the affidavit are true and correct and are based upon

my personal knowledge. Affiant states that service was conducted as a permanent process server

with the SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY and a copy of the Order authorizing me to

service process is attached hereto (see Exhibit “A”).

2.

I personally served HASKELL B. RUFF, CPA Associate Vice President / Controller for

Business & Finance on behalf of Defendant DR. ROBERT PETERSON in his capacity as

Assistant Professor at Morehouse College on Tuesday, November 13, 2018, at 1:40 p.m.
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 212 of 218

HASKELL B. RUFF, CPA accepted service due to Defendant DR. ROBERT PETERSON in his

capacity as Assistant Professor at Morehouse College was no longer employed with Defendant

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE and served a copy of the following document(s) as provided by the

court:

1. SUMMONS; and

2. COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES AND DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL with Exhibits A
to D attached.

I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct.

This the ( ($ day of November 2018

eAc D.Echols
Permanent Process Server
TFP Company, LLC
P.O. Box 6069
Marietta, GA 30065
(770)579-0188

Sworn to and subscribed before


me this 1 U> day of . 2018.

NotaryPu blie-Sfgnature

My Commission Expires: Av 1Z-H 15 •Z^z.1


| CHANDLER ARDIS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Cobb County
State of Georgia
\ My Comm. Expires Apr. 03,2021
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 213 of 218

>tq:;

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY


iMi ost
STATE OF GEORGIA
I
i!V. t
Administrative Order No. eJd/2£)C &G80&3
&
^ORPER FOR APPOINTMENT FOR PROCESS SERV1CE

Having «ssdand omsidered the petitims and cariminai recxards, and it appearing to the Cotut that sufficient
grounds exist that each petitioner meets the requirements for appointment by tile Court, it is hereby

ORDERED and ADJUDGED that the following:

Adams Jr., John Dreeman, Douglas Hudson, Hakimah Nichols, Lathm


ADen, Lafctita Ducton, Deborah Hudson, Kyle Nolen, Miitm
Anderson, William Echols, Eric Humphrey, Joviera Nowik, Dennis
Andrews, Gene Echols, Patricia Janes, Fmik O'Brien, Qaistopher
Armstaratg, CtniatnpW Edwards, Donnie Jcdmsroa, Christina O'Leary, Omstme
Batiey, Anna Elliott, Maurice Jdhastm^Bari Owens in, Michaed
Baker, Wanda Evans, Alonzo Jones, AJicia Perldbas,Kar«a
Banks, Randy Faulkner, Dana Kahsai,$Mle Pondnie, Richard
Barney, Steven Fexrero, Amy Kemredy, Richard PyKRtAet
Bany,I*aBl Fisher, Dawn Kidd, Elizabeth Rauser, Jayne
Basham, James Fitzgerald, Floretta Kim, Leonard Redneila, Kevin
Bass, Susan FdMb,CMieriQ& King, Amos Reddick, Derek
Benito, Richard Folds, George Kotiar, Michael Reid,Cletis
Benito, Robert Ford, Ronnie Lair, Aaron Rhodes, Kathryn
Benson, fames Fox,Miato I-ane, Madeline Rice, Robert
Bolting, Katherine FtanMin, Anthony t M^ha Richardson, Leroy
Freese, Jessies Lots, William Rivers,
Briley, Eksnnie Fuller, Utomas Lewis, Kevin KooensMi^ j$raa
Brown, Ranald Gallo, Elizabeth Lobin, Jerome Robertson, Mariam
Bunch, Kim Gayle, Earl Lutwack, William Rttinnson, Jeroy
Byers, Edmond George, Randal Maggard Jr., Andrew Ruddock, Leopold
Carithers, Gregory QjMmffl.tlWHaas__ __ MaggardJOLL Andrew.... RaddockrMiBmKet-
Cafn^r^Srian Greenway, Kkfocrly Maggard, J. Daniel Sadler Jr, John
Grimshaw, Sharm Mallas, Nicholas Saxon, Jasmine
Oad^Badl' Gruhn,Tammie McClellan, Rodney Saxtm,Rasl3ad
Clemmots, Joyce Handley, Wiley McGahee, Larry Saxon, Robin
QiB^’&snHa Harris, Constance 3 MitiMl, Kevin Saxon, Virgmia
Cros, Charles Harris, Parks Morgan, Todd Seklecki, Christian
Cunnii^hani, Sally Hassan,MuhsmS. Morrison, Zori SelLAbagail
Daniels, Alysa Heimerich, Richard Mott, Cynthia SelfCorvin
Daniels, Sonia Highsmith, Amos Murphy Jr., Gregory Sexton, Tmici
Daverport, Alterick Hightower, Anthonio Murphy, Heebest Shadix,fimmy
Davidscm, Danny Hill, Hollis Murrieta, Francisco Shepherd, Elizabeth
Day, Duane Hindsman, Cherrod Nailer, Jonathan Stbbald, John
DeVau^m, Caii Horton, Christopher Nealey, Cedric Singleton, Wesley
Dolbier, Jeffrey Howard, Ricky Nichols, Jean Smith, Ddade

10f2

EXHIBIT A
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 214 of 218

Smith, Ronald Stinyard, Kelvin Underwood, Robert Wolfe, Usa


South, Virginia Stone, Rjixiney Velasquez, Julius Wright, Christopher
Smith Jr., Bruce Swindle, Frazik Walker, Reginald Yeste, Joha
Sharon Tamarofij Paul Washington, Sabrina Zayas,Rt*erto
Spears, Joye Tassaw, Bcdmne Webber, Melina
Stanton, CZhristopher HMHnpsoa, Vanessa Weeks, Frances
Storks, Marc Thrash, Nancy West, Eric
SteidI, David T<st,l$Bmy Williams, Lavem
Stevenson, Nos3ml Tnnnble, Garfield Wingo, Michael
Stewart, Ronnie Tucker, Paul WinHemao, Nan

be a$^x)mted and authorized to serve as a Permanent Process Server in die Fulton County Supedor Court, for
the Calendar Year 2018, without the necessity of an order for appointment in each individual case.

BY ORDER OF THE Court Hus _«s*^day of January,

2 of 2
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 215 of 218
Fulton County Superior Court
***EF1LED***LW
Date: 11/19/2018 11:55 AM
Cathelene Robinson, Clerk

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY


STATE OF GEORGIA

JOHN DOE,

Plaintiff,

v.

MOREHOUSE COLLEGE, a domestic not-for-profit


Corporation, JOHN SILVANUS WILSON, JR., CIVIL ACTION FILE
Individually and in his NO.: 2018CV312687
capacity as former President of Morehouse College,
TERRAINE BAILEY, Individually and in her
capacity as Title IX Coordinator and Compliance
Specialist of Morehouse College, and DR. ROBERT
PETERSON, Individually and in his
capacity as Assistant Professor at Morehouse College,

Defendants.

AFFIDAVIT OF SERVICE

PERSONALLY appeared before me, an officer duly qualified to administer oaths, ERIC

D. ECHOLS, a permanent process server who after being duly sworn, states the following:

1.

Affiant states that he is over 18 years of age, a citizen of the United States, and not related

to the parties herein. The statements made in the affidavit are true and correct and are based upon

my personal knowledge. Affiant states that service was conducted as a permanent process server

with the SUPERIOR COURT OF FULTON COUNTY and a copy of the Order authorizing me to

service process is attached hereto (see Exhibit “A”).

2.

I personally served HASKELL B. RUFF, CPA Associate Vice President / Controller for

Business & Finance on behalf of Defendant TERRAINE BAILEY in her capacity as Title IX

Coordinator and Compliance Specialist of Morehouse College on Tuesday, November 13, 2018,
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 216 of 218

at 1:40 p.m. HASKELL B. RUFF, CPA accepted service due to Defendant TERRAINE BAILEY

in her capacity as Title IX Coordinator and Compliance Specialist of Morehouse College was no

longer employed with Defendant MOREHOUSE COLLEGE and served a copy of the following

document(s) as provided by the court:

1. SUMMONS; and

2. COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES AND DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL with Exhibits A
to D attached.

I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct.
This the /4 day of November 2018.

TFP Company, LLC


P.O. Box 6069
Marietta, GA 30065
(770) 579-0188

Sworn to and subscribed before


me this 11? day of . 2018.

Notai^Public'Signature

My Commission Expires: 3
CHANDLER ARD1S
NOTARY PUBLIC
Cobb County
State of Georgia
My Comm. Expires Apr. 03.2021
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 217 of 218

E X H IB IT A
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-1 Filed 12/13/18 Page 218 of 218

Smith, Ronald Stinyard, Kelvin Underwood, Robert Wolfe, Lisa


Smith, V&pma Stone, Rodney Velasquez, Julius Wright, CMstopber
Smitli Jr., Bruce Swindle, Frank Walker, Reginald Yeste, John
Snellinga, Stotsa Tamaro^Paui Warfm^sten, Ssfamia Zayas,Bdbcrto
Speszs^Joye Tassaw, Bcrbzme Webber, Melina
Stanton, C3itistopher Thompson, Varscssa Weeks, Frances
Starks, Marc Thrash, Nancy West, Brie
SteidLDtevid Tort,Heary Williams, Lavero
Stevenson, Nosiba Trmble, Garfield Wmgo, Michad
Stewart, Roonie Tucker, Paul WinMeman, Nan

te appointed airi aiStoiisred to serve as a Permanent Proem Server in the Fulton County Superior Court, for
file Calendar Year 2018, without the necessity of an order for appointment in each individuai case.

Atlanta Judicial Circuit

2 of 2
JS44 (Rev. 6/2017 NDGA)Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document
CIVIL COVER1-2 Filed 12/13/18 Page 1 of 2
SHEET
The JS44 civil cover sheet and the information contained herein neither replace nor supplement the filing and service of pleadings or other papers as required by law, except as provided by
local rules of court. This form is required for the use of the Clerk of Court for the purpose of initiating the civil docket record. (SEE INSTRUCTIONS ATTACHED)

I. (a) PLAINTIFF(S) DEFENDANT(S)


John Doe Morehouse College, John Silvanus Wilson, Jr., individually
and in his capacity as former President of Morehouse
College, Terraine Bailey, individually and in her capacity as
Title IX Coordinator and Compliance Specialist of
Morehouse College, and Dr. Robert Peterson, individually
and in his capacity as Assistant Professor at Morehouse
College
(b) COUNTY OF RESIDENCE OF FIRST LISTED COUNTY OF RESIDENCE OF FIRST LISTED
PLAINTIFF DEFENDANT Fulton County
(EXCEPT IN U.S. PLAINTIFF CASES) (IN U.S. PLAINTIFF CASES ONLY)

NOTE: IN LAND CONDEMNATION CASES, USE THE LOCATION OF THE TRACT OF LAND
INVOLVED

(c) ATTORNEYS (FIRM NAME, ADDRESS, TELEPHONE NUMBER, AND ATTORNEYS (IF KNOWN)
E-MAIL ADDRESS)

R. Cade Parian, Esq., Parian Injury Law, LLC Joshua I. Bosin, Esq., Juliana O. Nwafor, Esq.
One Atlantic Center, Suite 2342 Holland & Knight LLP
1201 West Peachtree Street, Atlanta, GA 30309 1180 West Peachtree Street, Suite 1800, Atlanta, GA 30309
Telephone: (404) 795-5035 Telephone: (404) 817-8500
E-Mail: cade@westgalawyer.com E-Mail: joshua.bosin@hklaw.com

II. BASIS OF JURISDICTION III. CITIZENSHIP OF PRINCIPAL PARTIES


(PLACE AN “X” IN ONE BOX ONLY) (PLACE AN “X” IN ONE BOX FOR PLAINTIFF AND ONE BOX FOR DEFENDANT)
(FOR DIVERSITY CASES ONLY)

PLF DEF PLF DEF

1 U.S. GOVERNMENT ✔ 3 FEDERAL QUESTION 1 1 CITIZEN OF THIS STATE 4 4 INCORPORATED OR PRINCIPAL


PLAINTIFF (U.S. GOVERNMENT NOT A PARTY) PLACE OF BUSINESS IN THIS STATE

2 U.S. GOVERNMENT 4 DIVERSITY 2 2 CITIZEN OF ANOTHER STATE 5 5 INCORPORATED AND PRINCIPAL


DEFENDANT (INDICATE CITIZENSHIP OF PARTIES PLACE OF BUSINESS IN ANOTHER STATE
IN ITEM III)
3 3 CITIZEN OR SUBJECT OF A 6 6 FOREIGN NATION
FOREIGN COUNTRY

IV. ORIGIN (PLACE AN “X “IN ONE BOX ONLY)


TRANSFERRED FROM MULTIDISTRICT APPEAL TO DISTRICT JUDGE
1 ORIGINAL ✔ 2 REMOVED FROM 3 REMANDED FROM 4 REINSTATED OR 5 ANOTHER DISTRICT 6 LITIGATION - 7 FROM MAGISTRATE JUDGE
PROCEEDING STATE COURT APPELLATE COURT REOPENED (Specify District) TRANSFER JUDGMENT

MULTIDISTRICT
8 LITIGATION -
DIRECT FILE

V. CAUSE OF ACTIONJURISDICTIONAL
(CITE THE U.S. CIVIL STATUTE UNDER WHICH YOU ARE FILING AND WRITE A BRIEF STATEMENT OF CAUSE - DO NOT CITE
STATUTES UNLESS DIVERSITY)

Plaintiff’s Complaint alleges federal sexual harassment, discrimination, and hostile educational environment claims
against Morehouse brought pursuant to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. §§ 1681 et seq, and
state law breach of contract claim, negligence claim, negligent hiring, training, retention, and supervision claims. Plaintiff
also asserts the same state law negligence claims against the Individual Defendants.
(IF COMPLEX, CHECK REASON BELOW)

1. Unusually large number of parties. 6. Problems locating or preserving evidence


2. Unusually large number of claims or defenses. 7. Pending parallel investigations or actions by government.
3. Factual issues are exceptionally complex 8. Multiple use of experts.
4. Greater than normal volume of evidence. 9. Need for discovery outside United States boundaries.
5. Extended discovery period is needed. 10. Existence of highly technical issues and proof.

CONTINUED ON REVERSE
FOR OFFICE USE ONLY

RECEIPT # AMOUNT $ APPLYING IFP MAG. JUDGE (IFP) ______________________

JUDGE MAG. JUDGE NATURE OF SUIT CAUSE OF ACTION______________________


(Referral)
Case 1:18-cv-05714-WMR Document 1-2 Filed 12/13/18 Page 2 of 2
VI. NATURE OF SUIT (PLACE AN “X” IN ONE BOX ONLY)
CONTRACT - "0" MONTHS DISCOVERY TRACK CIVIL RIGHTS - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY TRACK SOCIAL SECURITY - "0" MONTHS DISCOVERY
150 RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENT & 440 OTHER CIVIL RIGHTS TRACK
ENFORCEMENT OF JUDGMENT 441 VOTING 861 HIA (1395ff)
152 RECOVERY OF DEFAULTED STUDENT 442 EMPLOYMENT 862 BLACK LUNG (923)
LOANS (Excl. Veterans) 443 HOUSING/ ACCOMMODATIONS 863 DIWC (405(g))
153 RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENT OF 445 AMERICANS with DISABILITIES - Employment 863 DIWW (405(g))
VETERAN'S BENEFITS 446 AMERICANS with DISABILITIES - Other 864 SSID TITLE XVI
✔ 448 EDUCATION 865 RSI (405(g))
CONTRACT - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY TRACK
110 INSURANCE FEDERAL TAX SUITS - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY
120 MARINE IMMIGRATION - "0" MONTHS DISCOVERY TRACK TRACK
130 MILLER ACT 462 NATURALIZATION APPLICATION 870 TAXES (U.S. Plaintiff or Defendant)
140 NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENT 465 OTHER IMMIGRATION ACTIONS 871 IRS - THIRD PARTY 26 USC 7609
151 MEDICARE ACT
160 STOCKHOLDERS' SUITS PRISONER PETITIONS - "0" MONTHS DISCOVERY OTHER STATUTES - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY
190 OTHER CONTRACT TRACK TRACK
195 CONTRACT PRODUCT LIABILITY 463 HABEAS CORPUS- Alien Detainee 375 FALSE CLAIMS ACT
196 FRANCHISE 510 MOTIONS TO VACATE SENTENCE 376 Qui Tam 31 USC 3729(a)
530 HABEAS CORPUS 400 STATE REAPPORTIONMENT
REAL PROPERTY - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY 535 HABEAS CORPUS DEATH PENALTY 430 BANKS AND BANKING
TRACK 540 MANDAMUS & OTHER 450 COMMERCE/ICC RATES/ETC.
210 LAND CONDEMNATION 550 CIVIL RIGHTS - Filed Pro se 460 DEPORTATION
220 FORECLOSURE 555 PRISON CONDITION(S) - Filed Pro se 470 RACKETEER INFLUENCED AND CORRUPT
230 RENT LEASE & EJECTMENT 560 CIVIL DETAINEE: CONDITIONS OF ORGANIZATIONS
240 TORTS TO LAND CONFINEMENT 480 CONSUMER CREDIT
245 TORT PRODUCT LIABILITY 490 CABLE/SATELLITE TV
290 ALL OTHER REAL PROPERTY PRISONER PETITIONS - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY 890 OTHER STATUTORY ACTIONS
TRACK 891 AGRICULTURAL ACTS
TORTS - PERSONAL INJURY - "4" MONTHS 550 CIVIL RIGHTS - Filed by Counsel 893 ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS
DISCOVERY TRACK 555 PRISON CONDITION(S) - Filed by Counsel 895 FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT
310 AIRPLANE 899 ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT /
315 AIRPLANE PRODUCT LIABILITY FORFEITURE/PENALTY - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY REVIEW OR APPEAL OF AGENCY DECISION
320 ASSAULT, LIBEL & SLANDER TRACK 950 CONSTITUTIONALITY OF STATE STATUTES
330 FEDERAL EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY 625 DRUG RELATED SEIZURE OF PROPERTY
340 MARINE 21 USC 881 OTHER STATUTES - "8" MONTHS DISCOVERY
345 MARINE PRODUCT LIABILITY 690 OTHER TRACK
350 MOTOR VEHICLE 410 ANTITRUST
355 MOTOR VEHICLE PRODUCT LIABILITY LABOR - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY TRACK 850 SECURITIES / COMMODITIES / EXCHANGE
360 OTHER PERSONAL INJURY 710 FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT
362 PERSONAL INJURY - MEDICAL 720 LABOR/MGMT. RELATIONS OTHER STATUTES - “0" MONTHS DISCOVERY
MALPRACTICE 740 RAILWAY LABOR ACT TRACK
365 PERSONAL INJURY - PRODUCT LIABILITY 751 FAMILY and MEDICAL LEAVE ACT 896 ARBITRATION
367 PERSONAL INJURY - HEALTH CARE/ 790 OTHER LABOR LITIGATION (Confirm / Vacate / Order / Modify)
PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCT LIABILITY 791 EMPL. RET. INC. SECURITY ACT
368 ASBESTOS PERSONAL INJURY PRODUCT
LIABILITY PROPERTY RIGHTS - "4" MONTHS DISCOVERY

TORTS - PERSONAL PROPERTY - "4" MONTHS


TRACK
820 COPYRIGHTS
* PLEASE NOTE DISCOVERY
DISCOVERY TRACK 840 TRADEMARK TRACK FOR EACH CASE TYPE.
370 OTHER FRAUD SEE LOCAL RULE 26.3
371 TRUTH IN LENDING PROPERTY RIGHTS - "8" MONTHS DISCOVERY
380 OTHER PERSONAL PROPERTY DAMAGE TRACK
385 PROPERTY DAMAGE PRODUCT LIABILITY 830 PATENT
835 PATENT-ABBREVIATED NEW DRUG
BANKRUPTCY - "0" MONTHS DISCOVERY TRACK APPLICATIONS (ANDA) - a/k/a
422 APPEAL 28 USC 158 Hatch-Waxman cases
423 WITHDRAWAL 28 USC 157

VII. REQUESTED IN COMPLAINT:


CHECK IF CLASS ACTION UNDER F.R.Civ.P. 23 DEMAND $_____________________________
JURY DEMAND ✔ YES NO (CHECK YES ONLY IF DEMANDED IN COMPLAINT)

VIII. RELATED/REFILED CASE(S) IF ANY


JUDGE_______________________________ DOCKET NO._______________________
CIVIL CASES ARE DEEMED RELATED IF THE PENDING CASE INVOLVES: (CHECK APPROPRIATE BOX)
1. PROPERTY INCLUDED IN AN EARLIER NUMBERED PENDING SUIT.
2. SAME ISSUE OF FACT OR ARISES OUT OF THE SAME EVENT OR TRANSACTION INCLUDED IN AN EARLIER NUMBERED PENDING SUIT.
3. VALIDITY OR INFRINGEMENT OF THE SAME PATENT, COPYRIGHT OR TRADEMARK INCLUDED IN AN EARLIER NUMBERED PENDING SUIT.
4. APPEALS ARISING OUT OF THE SAME BANKRUPTCY CASE AND ANY CASE RELATED THERETO WHICH HAVE BEEN DECIDED BY THE SAME
BANKRUPTCY JUDGE.
5. REPETITIVE CASES FILED BY PRO SE LITIGANTS.
6. COMPANION OR RELATED CASE TO CASE(S) BEING SIMULTANEOUSLY FILED (INCLUDE ABBREVIATED STYLE OF OTHER CASE(S)):

7. EITHER SAME OR ALL OF THE PARTIES AND ISSUES IN THIS CASE WERE PREVIOUSLY INVOLVED IN CASE NO. , WHICH WAS
DISMISSED. This case IS IS NOT (check one box) SUBSTANTIALLY THE SAME CASE.

s/ Joshua I. Bosin December 13, 2018


SIGNATURE OF ATTORNEY OF RECORD DATE