CHALLENGES 4 WEBSITE ACTIVITIES

MODULE

SKILLS

1Communication Reading: Cows with regional accents

2 News

Reading & Listening: The News

3 Communities 4 Cash

Spelling: Sponsored Spelling Test Reading & Speaking: Proverbs

5 Water

Reading: The Loch Ness Monster 6 Save the Planet Speaking: Discussion of the Environment

7 Fashion

Writing: Fashion Show – Back In Time Reading: Sports Quiz Reading: The Open Window

8 Sport 9 Detective

10 Imagination

Reading: Discworld

GRAMMAR & VOCABULARY Vocabulary: Opposites: adjectives Grammar: Questionnaires Grammar: The Reason Why: past perfect tense Grammar: Verb Patterns Grammar: Answer Me! Vocabulary: Common expressions & idioms Grammar: Passive Grammar: Explain that! Grammar: ‘Guess Who’ game: future continuous Grammar: Questions Vocabulary: Fashion Crossword Grammar: My Grandfather’s youth Grammar: Who said that? Grammar: Alibi Grammar: Whispers & Answers: reported questions Grammar: Wishes

INTERNET Louis Braille

Headline History

The Scout Movement UK Currency

Water Quiz Freightliners City Farm

National Costumes

Sporting Greats Walking With Cavemen

Poetry

Module 1: Reading ‘COWS WITH REGIONAL ACCENTS’

Teacher’s Notes
Objective: To practise intensive reading skills. You can do the activity after Unit 1. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet (see below). Time: 15-20 minutes in class or you can set it for homework. Step 1: Ask students what they remember about animal communication from Unit 1 (Animal Talk) in the Student’s Book. Ask them if they think animals which make sounds could have regional accents – ask for a show of hands. Step 2: Give out the worksheets. Ask students to scan it quickly to find out: a) what theory is proposed in the article. b) who supports the theory and who doubts it. c) which two animals are mentioned. Answers a) Cows ‘moo’ in a regional accent. b) Lloyd Green and John Wells support it; Carl Padgett is doubtful. c) Cows and birds are mentioned. Step 3: Ask students to do the other task on the worksheet, in class or at home. Answers Sentence gaps: 1d, 2a, 3e, 4c, 5b.

Module 1: Reading Read the newspaper article and complete the gaps(1-5) with these sentences (a-e). a) b) c) d) e) They apparently sing in different accents depending on what part of the country they are from. However, not everyone was impressed by the theory. This could also be true of cows. There are even overtones of Estuary English around the South East. This is supposed to contribute towards the local cheddar cheese’s distinctive flavour.

Cows with regional accents?
They have one word in their vocabulary, and it’s a single syllable. But farmers claim cows say 'moo' in regional accents. Cows in the West Country have been heard ‘mooing’ with a distinctive Somerset accent. Birmingham accents have been noticed in the Midlands, while Geordie tones abound in the North East. (1) _______________. A similar phenomenon has previously been noticed among wild birds. (2) __________ _____ . The difference is that cows are believed to be picking up their owners’ accents and may even be passing the accent on to their young calves. The regional accent was first noticed by members of the West Country Farmhouse Cheesemakers group. Members spend hours with their cows playing them classical music. (3) _______________. One of the group, Lloyd Green, said: ‘I spend a lot of time with my Friesan cows, and they definitely moo with a Somerset drawl.’ The claims might have dismissed as complete nonsense, yesterday John Wells, Professor of Phonetics at University College London, said: ‘This phenomenon is well attested in birds. You find distinct chirping accents in the same species around the country. (4) _______________.’ (5) _______________. Carl Padgett, a top vet, said: ‘I'd have thought variations were more about breed than region. Cows also have a restricted ‘vocabulary’, while birds have complicated communication structures, so it is highly likely their accents would change in different parts of the country.’
(Adapted from The Daily Mail)

simple/complicated. extrovert panda!). difficult & complicated. delicious/disgusting.hard-working/lazy. sad/happy. horrible & disgusting. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: 15-20 minutes Step 1: Give out the worksheets and explain that the box contains forty-three adjectives . kind/mean. ugly/beautiful. cheap/expensive. extrovert/introvert. easy/difficult. extrovert & outgoing).amusing/serious. .twenty-one pairs of opposites and one extra word. careful/careless. common/rare. Point out any collocations offered by students that are not possible (e. There are some possible overlaps with synonyms (delicious & lovely. introvert & shy. quiet/loud. outgoing/shy. old/young The extra word is: dangerous Step 2: Check the answers.Module 1: Vocabulary OPPOSITES Teacher’s Notes Objective: To revise adjectives. Step 3: Elicit adjectives to describe the people and things in the final task. lovely/horrible. interesting/boring.g. useful/useless. Answers nervous/relaxed. easy & simple. Students have to match each pair of opposites and so find the adjective that is left over. well-known/unknown.

Module 1: Vocabulary OPPOSITES • Find pairs of opposites in the box. nervous quiet cheap careful ugly long useful delicious short easy sad hard-working lovely simple amusing young expensive unknown careless kind shy extrovert complicated loud common outgoing horrible lazy useless interesting boring introvert difficult old rare relaxed beautiful serious mean happy dangerous disgusting well-known • Which word is left over? _____________ • What is the opposite of this word? _______________ • Which adjectives could you use to describe … a) your best friend? d) a sunset g) fast food b) maths lessons? e) a sports car h) spiders c) pandas f) your mum or dad i) yourself .

Each of them prepares their own mini questionnaire. using the openers on the board. Write these three sentence openers on the board: How many times have you ……. Example: Most of the class have been abroad only once.. They could mak some generalisations. You can do this activity after finishing unit 1. They take notes. All the people have lived in this town all their lives. Materials: none Time: 10-15 minutes Step 1: Tell the students that they are going to do a mini survey in their class. Step 4: Each student presents the results of their survey. putting down numbers they hear from other students.Module 1: Grammar PRESENT PERFECT QUESTIONNAIRES Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practise the Present Perfect.? How long have you ……? Have you ever ……? Step 2: The students work individually. Only three people have travelled by plane. Example How many times have you been abroad? How long have you lived in this town? Have you ever travelled by plane? Step 3: The students walk around the class and ask other students their questions. They will be able to ask other students about anything that interests them. .

in 1809.html . (Answer: He invented the Braille system of raised dots which enables blind people to read and write).rnib. Answers 1 In Coupvray near Paris.org/braillebug/louis_braille_bio.Module 1: Internet Activity LOUIS BRAILLE Teacher’s Notes Objective: To scan for specific information using the Internet. They can do the activity at home or in class if you have the facilities. Step 3: After thirty minutes in class or at the beginning of the next lesson. elicit the answers.who2.hcsp http://www. Step 2: Give out the worksheets. 4 He injured his left eye with one of his father’s tools and then went blind in his other eye. Step 1: Ask students if they know who Louis Braille was. Here are some relevant ones: http://en.afb. It is then up to them to select the best-looking sites to find the information. 2 His father was a horse saddle maker. Tell them to begin by going to www. Music. Students have to use the Internet to answer as many questions as they can in twenty minutes. Step 4: Ask students which websites they used. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet. 6 He played the cello and organ.uk/xpedio/groups/public/documents/publicwebsite/public_braille. Its title was A Method of Writing Words.google. A soldier called Charles Barbier introduced Louis Braille to the system. Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school.com/ (making sure it’s in English) and typing in the words ‘Louis Braille’. for Use by the Blind and Arranged for Them.asp http://www. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. and Plain Songs by Means of Dots. France. 5 He went to the Royal Institute for Blind Youth (or the Royal Institute for Young Blind People or similar – it’s a translation from the French).org/wiki/Louis_braille http://www. 7 ‘Night Writing’ was a system of raised dots used by soldiers to share information on the battlefield without speaking. 3 He became blind aged three. 9 The first book in braille was published in 1827.org. 10 He died of tuberculosis in Paris in 1852. 8 Braille used six raised dots.com/louisbraille.wikipedia. Time: Thirty minutes at home or at school.

Module 1: Internet Activity LOUIS BRAILLE How much information can you find out about Louis Braille (the inventor of the braille system of reading for the blind) in 30 minutes? 1 When and where was he born? 2 What was his father’s job? 3 How old was he when he became blind? 4 How did he become blind? 5 What special school did he go to in Paris? 6 What musical instruments could he play? 7 What was ‘night writing’ and who showed it to Louis? 8 How many raised dots did Braille’s new system of writing use? 9 When was the first book in brailee published? 10 When and how did he die? What website(s) did you use to find the information? .

Step 3: Check the answers and write them on the board. Don’t repeat anything. Step 2: Read the news once as authentically as possible. Step 4: Ask students which news story was the most unusual. Students have to read the news items and make calculated guesses to fill in the gaps with numbers. Explain vocabulary as necessary. national or local) recently.Module 2: Reading & Listening THE NEWS Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice reading and listening for specific information. Explain the activity. One copy of the news for you to read (see below) Time: Thirty minutes Step 1: Give out the worksheets. . Ask if there have been any unusual stories in the news (international. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet.

Mr Hobhouse believes Britain is behind the rest of Europe as you can buy this sort of fuel in France. He also washed his beard. The whole operation took five hours. Read this aloud to the class when students have filled in all the gaps with numbers. His family helped and they had to use three packets of washing powder – shampoo had no effect. now runs on methane and is much cheaper. who lives in Somerset. An English farmer has converted his fast Jaguar car so it runs on rotting apple fumes. which is one and a half metres long.800-kilometre journey in Brisbane on Monday. David Cornthwaite completed his 5. Henry says it gains 10% in power does about 8 kilometres per litre. Yangtze and Mississippi rivers.433 km swim 70 days. Temperatures of 40º Celsius mean that he has gone through more than a dozen tubes of factor 30 suncream.Module 2: Reading & Listening THE NEWS For the teacher. A British man has become the first person to skateboard across Australia. An 80-year-old Chinese man has washed his hair for the first time in twenty-six years. The journey brought unique challenges. . The family are hoping to get into the Guinness Book of Records. He has worn out 13 pair of shoes and now has an over-developed right calf muscle. Germany and Italy. Henry Hobhouse. averaging about 77 km a day. which can reach a speed of 230 kph. Martin Strel already features in the Guinness Book of World Records for swimming the Danube. He has had to avoid huge snakes and once had a race with an emu. A Slovenian is in training to become the first person to swim the entire length of the Amazon. packs two underground tanks full of apples and collects the methane gas produced as they rot. His hair is nearly two metres long. He plans to finish his 5. And now some wacky news items. His car.

Wacky News An _____-year-old Chinese man has washed his hair for the first time in _____ years. An English farmer has converted his fast Jaguar car so it runs on rotting apple fumes. The family are hoping to get into the Guinness Book of Records. His family helped and they had to use _____ packets of washing powder – shampoo had no effect. which can reach a speed of _____ kph. He has had to avoid huge snakes and once had a race with an emu. who Lives in Somerset. Henry Hobhouse. His car. Mr Hobhouse believes Britain is behind the rest of Europe as you can buy this sort of fuel in France. He also washed his beard. Henry says it gains _____% in power does about _____ kilometres per litre. The whole operation took _____ hours. packs _____ underground tanks full of apples and collects the methane gas produced as they rot. Yangtze and Mississippi rivers. He plans to finish his _____-km swim in _____ days. Martin Strel already features in the Guinness Book of World Records for swimming the Danube. Temperatures of _____º Celsius mean that he has gone through more than _____ tubes of factor _____ suncream. A Slovenian is in training to become the first person to swim the entire length of the Amazon. which is _____ long. Germany and Italy. The journey brought unique challenges. David Cornthwaite completed his _____-kilometre journey in Brisbane on Monday. A British man has become the first person to skateboard across Australia. He has worn out _____ pair of shoes and now has an over-developed right calf muscle! • • Which do you think is the most unusual news story? Has there been any unusual stories in the news recently? . now runs on methane and is much cheaper. averaging about _____ km a day.Module 2: Reading & Listening THE NEWS • Read these news stories and guess what goes in the gaps – they are all numbers. His hair is nearly _____ metres long.

10 I was very excited because I had won the match. 8 I felt very ill because I had eaten two burgers. Students compare their sentences. Explain the activity via the example sentence.Module 2: Grammar THE REASON WHY Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice the past perfect tense Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet (one between two students) Time: Thirty minutes Step 1: Divide the class into pairs and give out the worksheets. 12 I hid behind the sofa because I thought I had seen a ghost. 13 I got a taxi home because I had found some money. . 3 I didn’t get the bus because I had got up late. 6 I bought a new computer because I had won the lottery. 15 I didn’t watch the film because I had seen it before. 4 I started crying because my goldfish had died. Possible sentence endings 1 I couldn’t read the instructions because I had forgotten my glasses. Step 3: Ask each group to read one or two of their best sentences to the class. Encourage students to make interesting or amusing sentence endings. 11 I had a shower because I had been all day in the sun. Step 2: After about fifteen minutes. 14 I didn’t eat my dinner because I had been to the dentist. 9 I felt really tired because I had been to a party. It doesn’t matter if they haven’t finished all the sentences. each pair forms a group with another pair. 7 I gave everyone a kiss because I had passed my driving test. 2 I didn’t answer the phone because I had fallen asleep. 5 I jumped up and down because our exams had finished.

Compare your sentences. . Invent endings for these sentences. Did you come up with any amusing sentences? Tell the class.Module 2: Grammar THE REASON WHY • • Work in pairs. Example I couldn’t read the instructions because I had forgotten my glasses. Use the past perfect tense. 1 I couldn’t read the instructions because __________________________________ 2 I didn’t answer the phone because ______________________________________ 3 I didn’t get the bus because ____________________________________________ 4 I started crying because _______________________________________________ 5 I jumped up and down because _________________________________________ 6 I bought a new computer because _______________________________________ 7 I gave everyone a kiss because __________________________________________ 8 I felt very ill because __________________________________________________ 9 I felt really tired because _______________________________________________ 10 I was very excited because _____________________________________________ 11 I had a shower because ________________________________________________ 12 I hid behind the sofa because ____________________________________________ 13 I got a taxi home because _______________________________________________ 14 I didn’t eat my dinner because ___________________________________________ 15 I didn’t watch the film because __________________________________________ • • Now form a group with another pair.

Module 2: Grammar VERB PATTERNS Teacher’s notes Objective: To practise verb patterns. e. . You can do this activity after finishing the Understanding Grammar in Module 2. He refused … I advised … She suggested … I tried … My parents let … I avoid … The teacher asked … My mum made … We started … My friends asked … She wants … I stopped … We enjoy … I agreed … She told … I gave up … I promised … My sister offered … My dad helped … I don't like … Step 1: Put the sentence openers in a bag or an envelope. They have to add an object if necessary. Divide the class into two groups and announce a competition. Time: 5-10 minutes Preparation: Copy and cut up the cues. Step 2: The students from the competing teams take turns to draw a sentence opener and complete the sentence with one of the phrases on the blackboard with the correct verb form. The teams score one point for each correct sentence. Materials: A set of sentence openers (alternatively. learn English / wear a school uniform / go out. The winner is the team that scores the most points. Write on the board three phrases that the students will have to use all the time while playing the game.g. Example She told … Student: She told me to wear a school uniform. You should have enough sentence openers for all the students in class. Make sure that all students have a chance to contribute. the cues can be given orally and then no materials are needed).

the Battle of Hastings. * Check the website (www. Tell them they should spend no longer than 40 minutes doing the task.uk) is still available.g. In a later lesson. e. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Forty minutes at home or at school Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school.co. they will be asked to tell the class (very briefly) about what they have found out. They need only say a couple of sentences.uk/history/british/) and choose a few events for students to select from. the Black Death. Step 3: In the next lesson. students have to go to a specified website* and find out some basic facts about an event in British history.co. the Battle of Waterloo. ask if they can add some more information. Basically. If it isn’t. ask students in turn to tell the class what event they chose and what they found out. Step 1: Give out the worksheets and explain the activity. Step 2: Students can do the activity at home or in school if you have the facilities. If any students have chosen the same event. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. you could go to the BBC’s history website (http://www. .bbc.Module 2: Internet Activity HEADLINE HISTORY Teacher’s Notes Objective: To use the Internet to find out some basic information about a British historical event.headlinehistory.

Follow the three steps: 1 Pick where you live – just click any area in the UK. …………………………………………………………………………… First. . Choose one and click on it to read the newspaper story. Tudor. At the bottom of the page you can see some “witnesses” of the event. Be prepared to tell the class about the event: • The historical era (period) the event happened.Module 2: Internet Activity HEADLINE HISTORY You are going to find out a few facts about an event in British history. go to this website: www. Click on any witness to ‘interview’ them. 2 Pick an era of British history – click Roman.co. Now you can see a list of ‘headlines’ for news stories. • The main character(s) involved. 3 Pick a skill level – click “Trainee Newshound”.uk Click on “Start Here”. • One or two basic pieces of information. Click “more” to read the full story. Victorian or World War 2.headlinehistory.

Module 3: Spelling SPONSORED SPELLING TEST Teacher’s Notes Objective: To learn some tricky spellings and to raise money for a charity. promise to donate a sum to the charity for each word spelt correctly. Time: Fifteen minutes. put the each student’s score on the sponsor sheet and sign it. As you correct the tests. Students have a list of tricky spellings to learn. i. Give out the list of words and the sponsor forms. If you agree to go ahead with the idea. Materials: Photocopies of the spelling list and sponsor sheet (see below). Step 1: Discuss the idea of raising money for a charity with your English teacher colleagues. Step 2: Explain the idea of a sponsored spelling test. or discuss the idea with your students and agree on a charity with them. They should then collect the money promised by sponsors and give it to you or the school secretary to pass on to the agreed charity. They have to ask their family and neighbours to sponsor them. either decide yourselves on a worthwhile charity. Collect the tests and completed sponsor sheets. Step 4: Return the sponsor sheets to the students. Step 3: Give the spelling test. . Give them a couple of days (or longer if you wish) to do this. Read out each word in a different order from the list.e. They keep a record of sponsors and amounts on the sponsor sheet.

Remember – LOOK. COVER.Module 3: Spelling SPONSORED SPELLING TEST Learn these words for your sponsored spelling test. WRITE. CHECK! aggressive apartment behaviour building chemical community disappear download facilities handicapped improvement magnificent peaceful permission programme receive straight tomorrow twelfth whistle .

Sponsor Sheet SPONSORED ENGLISH SPELLING TEST NAME AMOUNT PER WORD SPELT CORRECTLY AMOUNT OWED Number of words spelt correctly: Signed: ……………………………………………………………. (teacher) .

You may need to revise the difference between the Present Perfect Simple and Continuous and do one or two questions. paint all the walls blue ANSWERS a. A QUESTIONS 1. What is Jane writing about her new boyfriend? f. study for the exam c. Would you like something to eat? 6. eat scrambled eggs 3. have a big lunch 6. You can do this activity after finishing unit 7. cycle in the rain e. You've got mud all over your jacket! e. work on my history project 2. You're late! Step 1: Students work in pairs. . run six miles today d. Time: 10 minutes Preparation: Copy worksheet A and B for each pair of students. wash it b. Give out the worksheets. What does your new flat look like? ANSWERS B 1. Are you fit for the race? d. help an old lady to find our medical centre QUESTIONS a. similar to the ones in the activity. Is the new Jennifer Lopez film good? 4. not see it 4. sunbathe for too long 5. with the whole class to demonstrate how the activity should be done. You look tired! c.Module 3: Grammar ANSWER ME! Teacher’s notes Objective: To practice the Present Perfect and the Present Perfect Continuous. The students should not look at each others' worksheets. Why are there history books all over the table? 2. Materials: A worksheet (A or B) for each student. Your hair is wet! b. You've got egg on your T shirt! 3. not read her e-mail f. Why is your skin red? 5. In each pair student A gets worksheet A and student B gets worksheet B.

.Step 2: The students take turns to ask and answer questions. The questions are just read out from the worksheets. To give a correct answer. the students have to use the right cue (it has the same number as the corresponding question) and make a sentence either in the Present Simple or the Present Continuous.

000 7) Scouting for Boys 8) 2007 . Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school.Module 3: Internet Activity THE SCOUT MOVEMENT Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice scanning for specific information. Step 1: Give out the worksheets and ask students to guess the answers to the questions about the Scout Movement. Step 2: Explain that they now have to find the specified website (see worksheet). go to the correct section and check their guesses to the questions. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Ten minutes in class plus twenty minutes homework or on computers in school. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. Answers 1) 10% 2) 28 million 3) 6-25 4) Yes 5) Yes 6) 100.

Module 3: Internet Activity NAME: _________________________________________________ CLASS: ____ THE SCOUT MOVEMENT

• Guess the answers to these questions. 1 What percentage of scouts in the UK are girls/young women? a) 5% b) 10% c) 20% 2 How many scouts are there worldwide? a) 8 million b) 18 million c) 28 million 3 Between what ages can you join the Scouts? a) 6-12 b) 6-18 c) 6-25 4 Do you have to pay to be a member? a) Yes b) No 5 Can you do adventure sports such as canoeing and climbing? a) Yes b) No 6 How many people take part in scouting activities per day in the UK? a) 10,000 b) 50,000 c) 100,000 7 Whhat was the title of Robert Baden-Powell’s book? a) Let’s Go Scouting b) Scouting For Boys c) The Origins of Scouting 8 In which year did the Scout Movement celebrate its centenary? a) 2000 b) 2004 c) 2007

Now find this website: http://www.scouts.org.uk/

• Find ‘About Us’ at the top of the page. Hold the mouse over it. • Move down and click ‘Ten things you may not know about scouting’. • Check your guesses to the above questions. • How many did you guess correctly?

Module 4: Speaking PROVERBS

Teacher’s Notes
Objective: To discuss and interpret some proverbs from around the world. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet (one between two students will do). Time: Thirty minutes Step 1: Divide the class into pairs. Give out the worksheets and ask the students to read the proverbs and match them with what they mean. Step 2: Elicit the answers and explain any vocabulary as necessary. As you do so, discuss each proverb with the students and ask if they agree or disagree with them and if they can give any real people or situations that illustrate the proverbs. Answers 1c, 2e, 3a, 4g, 5b, 6h, 7f, 8d

Module 4: Reading & Speaking PROVERBS

• Read the proverbs (1-8) and match them with their meanings (a-h). • Do you agree with them?
1 Money is more eloquent than twelve members of parliament. 2 It is a wise man who lives with money in the bank; it is a fool who dies that way. 3 Money is a good servant but a bad master. 4 Money can build roads in the sea. a) We all need money, but we shouldn’t let it dominate our lives. b) All people, rich and poor, are equal when they die.

c) Money is more persuasive than a good argument. d) Good looks can be an advantage, but not as much as money. e) It’s a good idea to manage your money carefully, but there’s no point in saving it and not spending it. f) If you don’t have money, you have no power. g) Money can make the impossible happen. h) How rich or poor you are is only relative to other people’ wealth.

5 When death comes, the rich man has no money and the poor man no debt.

6 A penny is a lot of money – if you haven’t got a penny. 7 A man without money is like a wolf without teeth. 8 Beauty is potent, but money is omnipotent.

• Which is your favourite? • Do you know any other proverbs about money?

They can do the task in class or at home.Module 4: Vocabulary MONEY Teacher’s Notes Objective: To teach some common expressions and idioms with the theme of money. Answers 1d. Step 2: Go over the answers. Explain the task: students have to complete the sentences with the expressions. 6h 7g. 2b. 8c. 3e. 4i. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet. 9f . 5a. Time: Twenty minutes in class or at home. Step 1: Give out the worksheets.

7 The job paid well and was really easy. it was ____________________________. but if you really believe it. 3 They sold millions of that new gadget. 6 I don’t think you’ve got enough. _________________________ __________________________________________________________________! 5 “No. He must have ________________________________.Module 4: Vocabulary MONEY Complete the sentences (1-9) below with these expressions (a-i). _________________________________ __________________. you can’t have another ice cream. 4 I think you’re wrong. (a) money doesn’t grow on trees (c) get your money’s worth (e) moneyspinner (g) money for old rope (b) money to burn (d) money is no object (f) a tidy sum of money (h) the colour of your money (i) put your money where your mouth is 1 Go on. Let’s see ______________________________. Don’t worry about the price – ______________ _________________________________________________________________. you certainly _________________________________. It was a real ______________________. 2 He goes out every night. you know!” said his mum. choose what you want. 8 This is a great restaurant. 9 She started saving some of her pocket money every week from when she was five. Now she’s got ______________________________________________________. .

………………………………………………………………………………………. Write OK if the sentence sounds right. Three college students travelling around Asia saw him last in Kathmandu three weeks ago. My friend's brother repaired it. An English author wrote it. Barcelona scored three goals. I think someone stole it. 5. 8. ………………………………………………………………………………………. A couple of my best friends. They will organise the party at Windsor Castle. Some programmes should not appear before 22. Some of the second sentences would sound better in the passive.Module 4: Grammar Read the pairs of sentences. Our football team. The team will probably win Champions' League this year. decorated it. 3. ………………………………………………………………………………………. The TV is full of blood and aggression. The queen invited a lot of celebrities to her birthday party. My computer is working again. 2. . Fans and the media will meet the players. Rewrite them in the spaces provided. arrives in London tomorrow. 6. ………………………………………………………………………………………. 10. I love my room. ………………………………………………………………………………………. 7. 4. who are art students.00. ………………………………………………………………………………………. which has just won the World Cup. I can't find my fur coat. No one has used it. ………………………………………………………………………………………. I bought a great book. This CD player is brand new. ………………………………………………………………………………………. 9. ………………………………………………………………………………………. 1. A famous mountaineer disappeared in Nepal. ……………………………………………………………………………………….

I love my room. arrives in London tomorrow. A couple of my best friends. (long doer + we have to start with old information ) 9. This CD player is brand new. Our football team. ……It was repaired by my friend's brother. …The players will be met by fans and the media ……. decorated it. … He was last seen in Kathmandu three weeks ago by three college students travelling around Asia. The team will probably win Champions' League this year. in particular reasons for using passive voice. My friend's brother repaired it. (we have to start with old information + unimportant doer) 7. ………It hasn't been used. Three college students travelling around Asia saw him last in Kathmandu three weeks ago. Give each student a worksheet and tell them to rewrite the sentences in the passive if they feel it is necessary. They will organise the party in the Windsor Castle. The queen invited a lot of celebrities to her birthday party. I bought a great book. who are art students. who are art students. You can do this exercise after finishing module 10.00. ………OK………………………………………………………………………………. (unimportant/unknown doer) 6. (long noun phrase describing the doer) 4. ………OK………………………………………………………………………………. Elicit the reasons for changing the sentences into passive in each case. which has just won the World Cup. I can't find my fur coat. 5. (we have to start with old information) 8. Materials: A worksheet for each student (see above) Time:10 – 15 minutes Preparation: Copy the worksheets Step 1: The students work in pairs. My computer is working again. (we have to start with old information ) 10. Some programmes should not appear before 22. Step 2: Discuss the answers with the whole class. ………It was written by an English author. The TV is full of blood and aggression. ……It was decorated by a couple of my best friends. Answers: 1. No one has used it. ……I think it was stolen (unknown doer + new info should be at the end) 3. An English author wrote it. Barcelona scored three goals. ………The party will be organised at the Windsor Castle. Fans and the media will meet the players. A famous mountaineer disappeared in Nepal. .Module 4: Grammar Passive Teacher’s notes Objective: To practice the passive. I think someone stole it. (old information has to come first) 2.

Point out that there are one hundred pence in a pound. ‘hard’ and ‘super brain’. twenty pence or twenty p. you could play the game at a different level. Step 4: Find out which student has the most money left in their piggy bank. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Ten minutes in class. . How much change do you get? (Answer: 100p – 65p = 35p change). etc. Note: Depending on the age and ability of your students. Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. they write down the amount they have in their ‘piggy bank’. Step 2: Give students a calculation to practise.Module 4: Internet Activity MONEY2 Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice doing calculations with English money. After doing ten calculations. Step 1: Give out the worksheets. Step 3: At home or on computers in school. Example You buy something for sixty-five pence. The Levels are ‘easy’. You give the shopkeeper one pound.funbrain.com/cashreg/ and follow the instructions on the worksheet. ‘medium’. students go to this webpage: http://www. twenty minutes on computers in school or at home. Ask students to familiarise themselves with UK coins. Also point out how we say the coins – fifty pence or fifty p.

For each transaction you know the price and how much money you give. • Go to this website: http://www. If you are wrong. the money goes into your ‘piggy bank’. You have to calculate how much change you get.Module 4: Internet Activity MONEY Here are the coins they use in the UK. • Follow the instructions.com/cashreg/ • Choose the ‘medium’ level. • Click on the United Kingdom flag. Make ten transactions.funbrain. o How much is in your piggy bank after ten transactions? . the money goes out of your ‘piggy bank’. If you are correct.

Step 3: When they have finished. After they have read the text. Explain the activity.Module 5: Reading THE LOCH NESS MONSTER Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practise reading for specific information. Give Student A a copy of Worksheet A and Student B a copy of Worksheet B. and also answer their partner’s questions. to practise question forms. First the students read the text on their own worksheet. What is it? Where has it been seen? Have you seen photographs of it? Step 2: Divide the class into pairs (A and B). but it’s not important at this stage. What do they think the sightings might have been? . ask the students if they believe in the monster. they will notice that there are some gaps.g. e. they must ask their partner questions to find out the missing information. Time: Thirty minutes Step 1: Ask the class what they know about the ‘Loch Ness Monster’. Materials: Copies of Worksheet A for half the class and copies of Worksheet B for the other half.

however. Amazing underwater photographs were made public in the 1970s and generated new interest in the monster.6 km long. A doctor from London took a photograph which clearly showed _____ (What?) rising from the surface of the loch. He did. everything changed. The first recorded sighting of the monster was in the year _____ (When?) According to the story. did. however. The monster was seen on two different occasions. Read about the Loch Ness Monster. With the aid of cameras. the River Ness. force the monster back into the water! There were rumours of "strange events" in 1871 and 1930. Then ask your partner questions to complete the text. ‘Operation Deepscan’ covered the entire surface of the loch with twenty boats. once in the water and once on the road. it came out of the water and ate a local farmer. and maybe the noise forced the monster to come out again. In 1987. but couldn’t save the man. Later that year. A number remain unexplained to this day. the sonar scans don’t really prove anything. Public interest was tremendous. and is up to 225 metres deep. many people are convinced they have seen a large aquatic creature in the water. Example What does ‘loch’ mean? Loch means _____ (What?) . creating a sonar map from which nothing could hide. However. teams of volunteers monitored the surface of the loch every summer for _____ (How long?) – and they recorded an average of twenty sightings each year! In the late 1960s. _____ (Who?) saw the incident. scientists used _____ (What?) and sonar equipment. Nessie. In the 1960s. averaging _____ (How wide?) wide. however. the Loch Ness Investigation Bureau was formed. _____ (How many?) rivers flow into the loch._____ (What?) was found. Local newspapers called the monster "Nessie" and it was seen so often in the following months that in 1934 an official search was made . In this year they were building _____ (What?) near the loch. It is 36. and over the years every new photograph was studied and debated.Module 5: Reading: Worksheet A THE LOCH NESS MONSTER STUDENT A • Work in pairs. . and Loch Ness is the largest loch in Britain by volume of water. Although there is no scientific photographic evidence that either prove the existence of a monster in Loch Ness. but only one river flows out. but the monster really hit the headlines in 1933.

creating a sonar map from which nothing could hide. scientists used mini-submarines and sonar equipment.Module 5: Reading: Worksheet B THE LOCH NESS MONSTER STUDENT B • Work in pairs. The monster was seen on two different occasions. . Example How long is the loch? Loch means ‘lake’. A number remain unexplained to this day. but the monster really hit the headlines in _____ (When?). many people are convinced they have seen a large aquatic creature in the water. The first recorded sighting of the monster was in the year 565. but only one river flows out. ‘Operation Deepscan’ covered the entire Surface of the loch with _____ (How many?) boats. In this year they were building a new road near the loch. With the aid of cameras. averaging 1. Local newspapers called the monster "Nessie" and it was seen so often in the following months that in 1934 an official search was made . once in the water and once _____ (Where?). the sonar scans don’t really prove anything.nothing was found. and is up to _____ (How deep?) deep. However. According to the story. did. Nessie. Although there is no scientific photographic evidence that either prove the existence of a monster in Loch Ness. _____ (When?). and over the years every new photograph was studied and debated. everything changed. St Columba saw the incident. and Loch Ness is the largest loch in Britain by volume of water. teams of volunteers monitored the surface of the loch every summer for ten years – and they recorded an average of _____ (How many?) sightings each year! In the late 1960s. In 1987. however. however. Public interest was tremendous. the _____ (What?). however. He did. Later that year. Amazing underwater photographs were made public in the 1970s and generated new interest in the monster. force the monster back into the water! There were rumours of "strange events" in 1871 and 1930. the Loch Ness Investigation Bureau was formed.5 km wide. _____ (Who?) took a photograph which clearly showed a head and neck rising from the surface of the loch. Seven rivers flow into the loch. Then ask your partner questions to complete the text. It is _____ (How long?) long. but couldn’t save the man. it came out of the water and ate _____ (What?). Read about the Loch Ness Monster. and maybe the noise forced the monster to come out again.

You can use this activity after finishing unit 13. Why is this men wearing no shoes in winter? 6. Why is the Queen crying? 4. Why has the live programme on TV been cancelled? 5. Materials: A set of questions for each group of students (see below) Time: 10 minutes Preparation: Copy and cut up the question slips. . Why is the TV announcer wearing black? 3. Why is that woman wearing a coat on the beach in the summer? 14. Each group has the set of questions. You can use one question to give an example of how the game should be played. in the middle. Why is there a traffic jam? 9. face down. Why are they throwing away all these clothes? 8. Why is he sitting in the darkness? 10. Why were the people from the bank evacuated? 16. 1.Module 5: Grammar Explain that! Teacher’s notes Objective: To practice modal verbs in speculating about the past and the present. You should have one set for each group. Why is that car driving on the left? 15. Why did the police stop that car? Step 1: The students work in groups of four. Why did three students leave the class during the lesson? 13. Why did the teacher finish the lesson 10 minutes early? 11. Why are these people bathing in the sea in winter? 7. Why is the boy eating with his fingers? 12. Why is Ronaldinho running around the football pitch? 2.

. until the students run out of questions. They use modal verbs from unit 13 and appropriate infinitives.Step 2: The first student takes a question and reads it out. Student 3: They must have noticed something suspicious. Student 4: The car might be stolen. Example: Student 1: Why did the police stop that car? Student 2: It may have been going too fast. The other students offer speculations that could account for the situation presented in the questions. Step 3: The activity proceeds clockwise.

Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. and again deal with any questions about vocabulary. deal with any unknown vocabulary. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet. . Time: Fifteen minutes in class plus twenty minutes homework or on computers in school. Step 3: At home or on computers at school. students go to the specified website and find the answers to the questions. Step 1: Give out the worksheets and ask students to read the quiz questions. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. Explain any vocabulary as necessary. Step 4: Go over the answers. Again. Step 2: Ask students to guess the answers to the questions.Module 5: Internet Activity WATER QUIZ Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice reading for specific information.

useful words in your vocabulary book. WATER QUIZ 1 Where does our household water come from? 2 Where does it go when we have finished with it? 3 How much water does the average person use per day? 4 How is water supplied to our homes? 5 How is drinking water made safe? 6 Is it true that water coming out of sewage treatment plants is used for other things? 7 If you live up on a hill.water.html • How many answers did you guess correctly? Write new.usgs.gov/edu/qahome. .Module 5: Internet Activity WATER QUIZ Guess the answers to these questions. how does water get to your house? 8 How many baths could I have with water from a rainstorm? 9 Does a small leak in my house waste water? • Now go to this website to find the answers and check your guesses: http://ga.

students should try to agree on what they think is the most important and least important issue. Finally. . Ask the students to first read the newspaper extracts and help with vocabulary if necessary. They must take turns to give their opinions on why they are important. it doesn’t matter – as long as they discuss the issues fully. Step 2: Explain that students now have a discussion about all the environmental issues on the worksheet. Materials: Two copies of the worksheet per group. Time: Fifteen minutes Step 1: Divide the class into groups of four and give each group a couple of copies of the worksheet.Module 6: Speaking DISCUSSION Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice giving opinions and turn-taking. If they can’t agree. Step 3: Ask one student from each group to report the results of the discussion to the class. what problems they are causing now or will cause in the future.

Drought in Africa Yet again seasonal rain has failed to arrive in large parts of East Africa. Nigeria has lost more than half of its forests in the last five years. say why the issues are important. They are all important. MASSIVE DEFORESTATION According to the United Nations.Module 6: Speaking DISCUSSION • Work in groups. • Tell the class the results of your discussion. Read the newspaper extracts below. • Oil reserves running out Oil and petrol production will each a peak soon after 2010. . Hole in the Ozone Layer ‘growing’. think is the most important and the least important. As you give your opinions. according to new research carried out by a university in Sweden. say scientists Scientists say that satellite pictures show that the hole in the earth’s ozone layer is growing and that this will lead to an increase in cases of skin cancer. living in a big city and breathing in traffic pollution is like smoking up to a packet of cigarettes a day. as a group. Then discuss the environmental issues. making major drought a serious possibility. but try to agree which you. GLOBAL WARMING – IT’S A FACT An international committee of scientists said yesterday that the rise in the earth’s temperature is ninety-nine percent due to human activity. TRAFFIC FUMES ‘LIKE SMOKING’ According to a new study. DISAPPEARING SPECIES The World Conservation Union has published new figures that show the number of species disappearing from our planet – and the rate has increased significantly in the last one hundred years. This is much sooner than earlier predictions and will lead to massive price rises.

Just ask everyone to write one sentence on a small piece of rough paper. they mix up all the pieces of paper together and put them in a pile face down on the desk.Module 6: Grammar GUESS WHO Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice the future continuous tense. you can play the game with the whole class. Step 3: When all the students in the group have finished writing. Write an example of your own on the board if you wish (e. Alternative: If you don’t want to divide the class into groups. Each student should cut or tear a piece of rough paper into four pieces each piece big enough to write a sentence on. Step 2: Explain the game. They then take turns to pick up a piece of paper and read out the sentence. Materials: Students need some rough paper. Time: Twenty minutes Step 1: Divide the class into groups of four. They must not show their sentences to the others in the group. collect all the pieces of paper. The class has to guess who wrote the sentence. At six o’clock tonight I’ll be sitting on the bus). The others have to guess who wrote it. You can play this game after Unit 16. .g. Each student writes four sentences (one on each piece of paper) using a time and the future continuous tense. shuffle them and then read them out in turn.

(was able) A: Why did you try to do the whole project on your own? B: ……………………………………………………………………. (had to) A: You look horrible! Your hair is green! B:……………………………………………………………………. I had to pop into the post office to post some letters. You needn't have done. d. Did you spend all this money on cosmetics? 6. We travelled a lot. e. B:……………………………………………………………………. 2 Now use the modal verbs in brackets to write responses to the questions below. Why are you late? 3..Module 6: Grammar QUESTIONS 1 Match the questions with the responses. You should've put it away in the cupboard. I shouldn't have stopped the car so suddenly. 1. Where's my steak? a. (needn't have) A: Why are you broke? B:……………………………………………………………………. Mike. c. I was able to see penguins and whales b. I’ve ordered a pizza. (could have) . A: Did you do well in the competition? B: ……………………………………………………………………. I know it's awful. Yes. The cat has eaten all of it. Yes. I could've saved it for something more useful. (shouldn't have) A: This jacket doesn't look very nice. (should have) A: I did five practice tests before today's exam? B:……………………………………………………………………. Did you cause that accident? 5. f. where are you? I've brought some Indian take-away for dinner? 2. What did you do in Chile? 4.

2. Step 1: Students work in pairs or individually. It was a mistake. Step 2: The students work in pairs. 1. You needn't have studied so hard.Module 6: Grammar Teacher’s notes Objective: To practice modal verbs and expressions referring to the past. 1. 4 c. 6 e 2. 3. 4. Materials: A worksheet (see above) Time: 10-15 minutes Preparation: Copy a worksheet for each student. 5. I imported a virus that destroyed all his files. I know. I was able to score 135 points out of 150. 5 d. 6. Give out the worksheets and ask students to do the first task (matching the questions with responses). 1 f. Check the results with the whole class. using the modal verbs provided in brackets. You can do this exercise after finishing the Understanding Grammar in Module 6. I shouldn't have dyed it myself. 2 b. . I could have bought a nicer one but it was more expensive. 3 a. I should have asked someone for help. I had to pay for restoring my father's hard disc. Check the matching. The exam was very easy. They do task 2: they write their own responses to the questions.

Spring/Summer: 10am to 4. arts and crafts. animal food. Step 2: Give out the worksheets and explain that the students have to go to a website and answer as many questions as they can about a city farm in twenty minutes. goats. 7 Cakes. gardening. eggs. Step 1: Ask the class to guess what a ‘city farm’ is.Module 6: Internet Activity A CITY FARM Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice scanning for specific information Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Twenty minutes homework or on computers in school. Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. geese. jewellery. sheep.45pm 3 London 4 1973 5 45. turkeys. quail. bread making. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. (Answer: A farm in an urban area that keeps animals and sells farm produce. cooking. spinning & weaving. guinea fowl. composting.000 6 Wool. ducks. vegetables . clothes 8 10am – 3pm 9 chickens. pigeons & doves. Usually members of the public and schools can visit the farm). cows. rabbits and guinea pigs 10 Painted Wendy houses (a ‘Wendy house’ is a miniature house which children can play in) Chicken and rabbit cages. Step 3: Check the answers. pigs. Answers 1 Freighliners farm 2 Autumn/Winter: 10am to 4pm. arts and crafts. home-made cooking.

org. Would you like to visit the farm? What things would you do? ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ .freightlinersfarm.htm Home Page 1 What is the farm called? ___________________________________________ 2 What are the opening times? _______________________________________ About Us 3 Where is the farm? _______________________________________________ 4 When was it founded? ____________________________________________ 5 How many people visit the farm every year? ___________________________ Education 6 What can school students learn about when they visit the farm? ____________ ________________________________________________________________ Events 7 What do they sell at the Saturday Market? _____________________________ ________________________________________________________________ 8 What times is the market open? _____________________________________ Animals 9 What animals do they keep on the farm? ______________________________ ________________________________________________________________ Animal Shop 10 What do they sell? ______________________________________________ Galleries Look at the photos.Module 6: Internet Activity A CITY FARM NAME: ______________________________________________ CLASS: ____ Go to this website and find out about a farm in a city: www.uk/index.

If a display is not possible. A full-length photo is best. Step 2: Put up a display of the work with the heading ‘Fashion Show – Back in Time’. . Students also need to find a suitable old photo of a family member at home. the Key Expressions in Unit 21. because they then write a short description of the person’s appearance. Refer students to the Key Words on page 65. and the example text on the worksheet. Time: Ten minutes in class plus homework Step 1: Give out the worksheets. you can put the work in a folder to pass around the class. Explain the task. Students have to ask around at home to find an old photo of an older member of their family.Module 7: Writing FASHION SHOW – BACK IN TIME Teacher’s Notes Objective: To write a short description of a person’s clothes using words and expressions from Module 7 Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet showing an example of the writing. Ask students to put the photo with their writing on a piece of loose paper for display.

an aunt or uncle or a grandparent. • Useful vocabulary: the Key Words on page 65. My grandfather was sixteen then. He’s the tall boy on the right. • Write a description of how they look.I think they suit them. your mum or dad. they look at bit long. I think my great-grandfather is wearing a grey suit and a tie. This photo was taken in about 1961. Here is an example. All the brothers are wearing ties . sister or cousin). Their mother (my great-grandmother!) is wearing a checked jacket and a patterned dress. The youngest brother is wearing a short jacket with a zip with a pattern like a bed cover! The middle brother is also wearing a jacket with a zip and a round neck jumper. He is wearing baggy trousers. . the Key Expressions on page71. I don’t think it suits him.g. so he’s quite formally dressed. e.Module 7: Writing FASHION SHOW – BACK IN TIME • Find an old photo of someone in your family. It must be an older person (not a brother. they were trendy at the time! He’s with his two younger brothers. He’s wearing a casual jacket with a wide collar and and baggy trousers.

Solution .Module 7: Vocabulary FASHION CROSSWORD Teacher’s Notes Objective: To revise vocabulary from Module 7 (Fashion) Materials: Photocopies of the crossword Time: Fifteen minutes You can keep this crossword handy as a filler activity if students finish classwork early. or you could give it for homework.

Module 7: Vocabulary FASHION CROSSWORD Solve these clues and complete the crossword. Across 4 very loose (5 letters) 5 not wide (6) 8 having no taste (9) 10 a very short skirt (9) 11 untidily dressed (7) 13 a pullover or sweater (6) 14 fashionable (6) Down 1 informal (6) 2 trousers that are very wide at the bottom (5) 3 part of a coat that you pull over your head (4) 6 jeans material (5) 7 close-fitting (5) 9 labels such as Nike. Benetton. Tommy Hilfiger (8) 11 neat and attractive (5) 12 you wear it round your neck (3) .

. He goes to bed at 21. Time: 10 minutes. He spends the summer in his home in the city. They place the cues. Step 1: Tell the class that they are going to talk about your grandfather. in the middle of the group. He reads a lot. Materials: A set of cues for each group of students. He meets his friends once a month. He is a widower. Tell the students that when they hear the description of your grandfathers life now.00. You can start like this: My grandfather is 89. face down. their task will be to imagine his life fifty or sixty years ago. but he used to ride a horse and play tennis. You can do this activity after finishing unit 16.Module 7: Grammar My grandfather's youth Teacher’s notes Objective: To practise used to and would to talk about past habits. For example. He doesn't care about what he wears. He doesn't do any sport. He spends most of his time sitting in front of the TV. Step 2: The students work in groups of three. He doesn't drive. He doesn't go out a lot. He has a lot of free time. Preparation: Copy and cut up a set of cues for each group. He is retired. he isn't very fit now. He is an old man but he has had a very interesting life.

He would go to work even on Saturdays and Sundays. . Alternatively. you can tell the groups to look at all the cues at the same time and write a short text about the man's youth. Example: He is retired.Step 3: The students uncover the first cue and each of them makes a sentence describing the man's life when he was younger. He used to work 14 hours a day. He used to have his own business.

org/wiki/National_costume . Note: A useful website is Wikipedia: http://en. Students have to use the Internet to find out the information about the six national costumes. Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. Step 2: Give out the worksheets.Module 7: Internet Activity NATIONAL COSTUMES Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice scanning for specific information Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Thirty minutes homework or on computers in school. Explain the task.wikipedia. Give them a time limit (twenty-five minutes?) Step 3: See how much information the students found. Step 1: Ask students to describe their own national costume to you in English. you may need to reserve a time to use computers.

Module 7: Internet Activity NATIONAL COSTUMES Use your Internet skills to find out this information about the each national costume: • • • • What is it? Where is it from? When did it originate? Do people wear it on special occasions? If so. when? The Kilt The Kimono The Fez Lederhosen The Sari (or saree) The Bunad Which websites did you use? .

Answers 1c. 10b. 3b.Module 8: Reading SPORT QUIZ Teacher’s Notes Objective: To recycle sport vocabulary Materials: Photocopies of the quiz Time: 10-15 minutes You can keep this quiz handy as a filler activity if students finish classwork early. 4c. 6c. or you could give it for homework. 11b. 12c . 2a. 7a. 5b. 9b. 8b.

Module 8: Reading SPORTS QUIZ How much do you know about sport? Try this quiz. 1 Where is the St Andrew’s golf course? a) England b) Ireland c) Scotland 2 Where were the summer Olympic Games held in 2004? a) Athens b) Los Angeles c) Sydney 3 In which sport do you use a set of ‘clubs’? a) skiing b) golf c) tennis 4 What nationality is racing driver Fernando Alonso? a) Argentinian b) Portuguese c) Spanish 5 How many rings make up the symbol of the Olympics? a) three b) five c) seven 6 What sport would you be watching if you were at Twickenham? a) cricket b) football c) rugby 7 When was the first 100m run in under ten seconds? a) 1968 b) 1978 c) 1988 8 What is the Kentucky Derby? a) a baseball match b) a horse race c) an ice hockey stadium 9 How many players are in a volleyball team? a) five b) six c) seven 10 In what sport can you score a ‘birdie’? a) archery b) golf c) tennis 11 What is the highest number on a dartboard? a) 10 b) 20 c) 50 12 What colour shirt does the winner of the Tour de France cycling race wear? a) blue b) green c) yellow .

I seriously thought. Group 3 For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. but there is no cause for which I am prepared to kill. I'm not going to change the way I look or the way I feel to conform to anything. I don't mind living in a man's world as long as I can be a woman in it. I've always been a freak. Group 1 I am a little pencil in the hand of a writing God who is sending a love letter to the world. The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow. Step 1: Put these famous names on the board and make sure the students know who the people are or were: Mother Teresa Albert Einstein Mark Twain Woody Allen Marilyn Monroe Alfred Hitchcock John Lennon Muhammad Ali Sandra Bullock Thomas A. you know. So I've been a freak all my life and I have to live with that. At home I am a nice guy: but I don't want the world to know. don't get very far. I was a veteran. Group 2 I'm not against the police. You can do this activity after finishing unit 22 Materials : A number of quotes from famous people (see below) Time: 15 minutes Preparation: Copy a different quotations sheet for each group. Humble people. I'm never going to find anybody that will love me and just enjoy life. Edison Bill Gates Ernest Hemingway Michael Jackson Mahatma Gandhi Pele . Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can. I looked into the soul of the boy sitting next to me. A penalty is a cowardly way to score. I am proud of the fact that I never invented weapons to kill. before I was a teenager. I am prepared to die.it comes soon enough. I was thrown out of college for cheating on the metaphysics exam. I have never taken any exercise except sleeping and resting. I never think of the future .Module 8: Grammar Who said that? Teacher’s notes Objective: To practice reported statements. I've found. I'm just afraid of them.

I've always been a freak. Step 4: The groups in turn report their quotes.it comes soon enough. Answers and sources: I am a little pencil in the hand of a writing God who is sending a love letter to the world.com/) I'm not against the police. The game is over when you run out of names and quotes. give the other groups a chance to correct. They choose one quote at a time. don't get very far. Humble people. The group that provided the correct name or the correct sentence scores an extra point.quotations.Step 2: Announce a competition and draw a chart like this on the board: Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Step 3: Divide the class into three groups. Mother Teresa (www.quotationspage. Marilyn Monroe (http://www. They have to give the name of the author and use reported speech rules. The group can score two points for each quote: 1 point for guessing the author and 1 point for a correct report. The winner is the group that scored most points. give the other group a chance to guess the name. So I've been a freak all my life and I have to live with that. Mark Twain said that he had never taken any exercise except sleeping and resting. The students read the quotes and find their authors among the people on the board.about. Alfred Hitchcock I'm not going to change the way I look or the way I feel to conform to anything. Muhammad Ali I seriously thought. I'm never going to find anybody that will love me and just enjoy life. I've found. If the grammar was wrong. Mark Twain I was thrown out of college for cheating on the metaphysics exam. Woody Allen I don't mind living in a man's world as long as i can be a woman in it. If they get the author wrong.com) I never think of the future . you know. I looked into the soul of the boy sitting next to me. Albert Einstein I have never taken any exercise except sleeping and resting. Sandra Bullock . Cross out the names of people whose quotes have been correctly identified. without the names of their authors. Give each group five quotes. Example: I have never taken any exercise except sleeping and resting. John Lennon At home I am a nice guy: but I don't want the world to know. I'm just afraid of them.

Pele http://thinkexist. Ernest Hemingway I was a veteran. before I was a teenager.I am proud of the fact that I never invented weapons to kill. Bill Gates For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. Michael Jackson I am prepared to die.com/quotes/pele/ . Mahatma Gandhi (http://www. Edison The Internet is becoming the town square for the global village of tomorrow.com/) A penalty is a cowardly way to score. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.brainyquote. Thomas A. but there is no cause for which I am prepared to kill.

Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. in 1960. the Australian Open 3 times. Elicit a few suggestions. in 1956.C. Romania. Czech Republic. He was sentenced to five years in prison in 1967 for refusing to fight in the Vietnam war. Nadia Comaneci was born in Onesti.Module 8: Internet Activity SPORTING GREATS Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice browsing the Internet and scanning for specific information. His full name was James Cleveland Owen. A teacher once called him by his initials (J. She shot to fame at the 1976 Montreal Olympics when she was just fourteen. 1974. They can do the activity at home or on computers at school. Step 3: Check how much information students found out. The authorities also took away his heavyweight title. Step 2: Give out the worksheets and explain that students have to find out as much as the information as they can in twenty minutes. 4 x 100m and the long jump. in 1961. She moved to the USA in 1989 and is now an American citizen. Hitler refused to shake hands with him Diego Maradona was born in Villa Fiorito. Owen) and the nickname stuck. He won four gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin for 100m. and the US Open 4 times! Muhammad Ali won an Olympic Gold in Rome in 1960. He played in four World Cups(1982. He changed name from Cassius Clay to Muhammad Ali when he became a Muslim. 1990 and 1994) Martina Navratilova was born in Prague. 1986. She won five medals (three gold). Argentina. (answers below) Jesse Owen. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. He played for three European clubs – Barcelona. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Thirty minutes homework or on computers in school. 200m. the French Open twice. . and 1978. He won the world heavyweight title three times (a record) in 1964. Step 1: Ask your students who they consider to be the greatest sports stars of all time. Naples and Seville. She won Wimbledon 9 times.

How much information can you find in twenty minutes? Jesse Owen What was his full name? Why did people call him ‘Jesse’? At which Olympics did he become world famous? How many gold medals did he win there and in which events? Diego Maradona Where and when was he born? Name two European clubs he played for.Module 8: Internet Activity SPORTING GREATS Use your Internet skills to find out about these sporting champions. How many World Cups did he play in? When? Martina Navratilova When and where was she born? How many times did she win a) Wimbledon b) the Australian Open c) the French Open d) the US Open Muhammad Ali At which Olympics did he win a gold medal? Why did he change his name to Muhammad Ali? Why was he sentenced to prison? How many times did he win the world heavyweight title? Nadia Comaneci When and where was she born? At which Olympics did she become famous? How old was she and how many medals did she win? What website(s) did you use? .

Explain that not all is what it seems in the story.Module 9: Reading THE OPEN WINDOW Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice intensive reading for inference Materials: Photocopies of the three parts of the story Time: Twenty minutes homework and twenty minutes follow-up in class Step 1: Give out the first two parts of the story. He wrote under the pseudonym of ‘Saki’. • Vera tells of how Mrs Sappleton always keeps the French windows open. She is obviously a girl with a vivid imagination (or a compulsive liar!). 2) Vera says that Mr Nuttel had an uncontrolable fear of dogs. • When Mrs Sappleton comes into the room. Step 3: Give out Part 3 of the story and ask students to read it and answer the two questions. • Mr Nuttel goes to visit a friend of his sister (Mrs Sappleton) in the country to calm his nerves. • When he arrives. and in the next lesson thay should be prepared to summarise the story and offer an explanation of what will happen next. The Author Hector Hugh Munro was a novelist and short-story writer. He was born in Burma (now Myanmar). They never returned – they probably drowned in the marshes. Accept any offers. Vera. but was educated in Britain. Ask if the students can suggest what will happen next. Step 2: At the start of the next lesson. Elicit the main points from around the class. He was killed in the First World War in 1916. His novels and most of his short stories are about upper-class society in Britain in the early 1900s. 1) Framton ran out of the house because he thought he had seen ghosts of the men and dog in the shooting party. he is left alone with Mrs Sappleton’s niece. When she says “Here they are now”. ask students to summarise what has happened in the story so far. . hoping they will return. she mentions she is waiting for her husband and brothers to return. Mr Nuttel thinks she is perhaps mad. Elicit the answers. She tells him about how Mr Sappleton’s husband and her two brothers and dog went out shooting. Ask students to read them at home. He became a journalist and was a correspondent in the Balkans from 1902.

‘That was a year or so after your sister was here.’ she laughed. ‘I know what’ll happen. Framton Nuttel smiled nervously and tried to say something polite. Only her name and address.’ asked the niece politely after a few more moments of silence. His doctor had advised him to go down to the country for a few days to calm his nerves and get away from the stress of London life. I’m afraid you’ll have to put up with me.’ ‘So you haven’t heard about her tragedy? It happened three years ago. But his sister had insisted. He hadn’t been very keen on going round to see all his sister’s friends and acquaintances in the village. ‘Hardly anybody at all.’ Framton wondered if the girl’s aunt.’ said Framton.’ ‘Her tragedy?’ asked Framton. ‘You’ll just hide away down there and speak to nobody.’ ‘So you know nothing at all about my aunt?’ ‘Not really.’ said Framton. by H. I know lots of people down there who you can go and see. But my sister was here about four years ago and she got to know lots of people. My aunt’ll be down in a moment. ‘I suppose it’s quite warm for the time of year. ‘So.’ she pointed at a large French window that opened on out onto the lawn. Why do you think the window was open? ‘Come through to the living room. you know. ‘But what has the window got to do with a tragedy?’ .’ said the lively fifteen-year-old girl.’ she had told him. Mrs Sappleton. It’ll be worse for your nerves than London. was one of the nice people. Some of them are very nice people. ‘Well.Module 9: Reading THE OPEN WINDOW. you may wonder why we keep that window open on an October afternoon. ‘In the meantime. MUNRO (SAKI) Part 1 Read the first part of the story.’ said the girl. Mr Nuttel. do you know many people around here.H.

I get a strange feeling that they will all walk in through that window…’ She stopped speaking and at that moment her aunt appeared in the room. She thinks that they and the little brown spaniel that was lost with them will just walk in through the window as they did before. Framton tried to change the conversation to a less horrible topic. sometimes on quiet evenings like this.’ He continued talking about his health problems. She apologised for being late. ‘I hope Vera’s been amusing you?’ she said. That’s typical of you men. Was she mad? All the time.’ Here the girl’s voice became less confident. They’ll make a mess of the carpets. That is why the window is kept open every evening until it’s dark.’ ‘No?’ said Mrs Sappleton trying to stop yawning. you know. Mrs Sappleton was looking past him to the open window and the lawn beyond it.Part 2 Read the second part of the story. isn’t it?’ She carried on talking happily about shooting. And they don’t look as muddy as I thought. and places that were safe in other years just gave way without warning.’ said Framton. They’ve been shooting wild ducks in the marshes today so they’ll all have muddy boots.’ Framton smiled at the niece sympathetically. ‘No excitement or physical exercise. Then she suddenly brightened up. ‘My husband and brothers will be home soon from shooting. ‘I hope you don’t mind that open window. My aunt’s husband and her two brothers went out through that French window for a day’s shooting. ‘The doctors don’t agree about my diet though. but to Framton it was all horrible. ‘We’ve been having a very interesting chat.’ said Mrs Sappleton. That was the worst thing about it.’ Framton replied. They never came back. they all drowned in the marshes. Their bodies were never found. ‘Here they are at last!’ she cried. ‘And my poor aunt thinks that they will come back some day. What was the tragedy? Why was the aunt looking out of the open window? ‘Well. While they were out shooting wild ducks. It was a real pity that he had come on the anniversary of this terrible event. you know. It had been terribly wet that summer. ‘The doctors told me to have complete rest. And do you know. ‘Just in time for tea. it happened three years ago today. .

Framton noticed that the teenage girl. Vera. I suppose that’s enough to make anyone lose their nerves. He turned round and looked out across the lawn.’ said one of the men coming through the French window.’ said the niece calmly.Part 3 Read the last part of the story. out of the front gate and into the road. ‘He told me he has a terrible fear of dogs. Apparently he was in India once and he was chased by a group of wild street dogs. but most of it’s dry. ‘We’re quite muddy. darling. isn’t it?’ . down the drive.’ said Mrs Sappleton. ‘Here we are. He escaped from the dogs into a cemetery and spent the night in someone’s grave. He ran out of house. was looking out of the window too. They were all carrying guns and a tired brown spaniel was following them. but he could see three men walking across the lawn towards the window. It was getting dark. Who was that man who just ran away like that?’ ‘What a strange man Mr Nuttel is. It was like he had seen a ghost. ‘He spent the whole time talking about all his illnesses and just ran off when you arrived. She had a look of horror on her face. 1 Why did Framton act so strangely? 2 How did Vera explain his behaviour to the others? Suddenly. He picked up his jacket and rushed out of the room. Not a word of thanks or apology. These horrible wild dogs were barking just above him. A look of total panic appeared on Framton Nuttel’s face.’ ‘It was probably the spaniel. nearly hitting a cyclist.

so the verdict is … they are guilty! . Step 3: Send the two ‘suspects’ out of the class (they can stand or sit outside and quietly prepare their alibi. Explain the game: • • • • Imagine there was a crime between 7 o’clock and 8 o’clock on Friday evening. Ask the same questions. A lot depends on what answers the suspects give. Step 4: Call just one of the ‘suspects’ back into the room. Step 5: Ask the first suspect to sit in the corner facing away from the class. They must imagine they were together all the time. remind them. but some basic starter questions might be Where were you at 5 0’clock? What were you doing? What was your friend wearing? What was the weather like? Did anyone see you? What did you do next? etc. If they can’t. ask the rest of the class to think of some suitable questions to ask. The two suspects cannot possibly have prepared a watertight alibi.Module 9: Grammar ALIBI Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice a variety of past tense question forms Materials: None Time: 35 minutes Step 1: Write the word ‘alibi’ on the board and ask if students can remember what it means. (It’s important he/she cannot make eye contact or verbal contact with the second suspect. The rest of the class are detectives who will interview the suspects in turn and try to catch them out by finding discrepancies in their stories. etc. This should last about five minutes or so. what he did. The two students are suspects (this should get a laugh). (Alibi = proof that a person was could not have committed a crime because he/she was in another place. (It’s important that the other doesn’t hear the interview). so they should give plenty of contradictory answers.) Step 2: Choose two students who come to the front of the class. Ask the first suspect questions about where he was. While they are out of the room. Give them only five minutes. The two chosen students will go out of the room and work out their alibi for between 4 o’clock and 9 o’clock. who he was with. Step 6: Ask the second suspect to come into the room for an interview.

. Suspect: I’m not sure. jeans and a black top. Suspect: Yes. Some water.Example interview Q1: Where were you at five o’clock? Q2: What was he wearing? Q3: What did you do after that? Q4: Did anybody see you? Q5: What did you drink? Q6: And Wayne? Q7: Did you watch a DVD? Suspect: I was playing basketball with Wayne. Suspect: Er. Suspect: We went to my house for a drink. my mum. Suspect: A glass of milk. I think.

S3: She asked you what your shoe size is. S4: She asked you what percent you got in the maths exam. including yourself. The student asking the question can move around and ask anyone in the class.Module 9: Grammar WHISPERS AND ANSWERS Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice reported questions. S2: No. Now other students guess the question. S5: She asked you how old your mother is. Materials: None Time: Fifteen minutes Step 1: Explain the game. One student whispers a question (not a ‘yes/no’ question!) to another student. Example S1: (whispers to S2) How old is your mother? S2: (aloud to the class) Thirty-nine. S2: Yes! Step 2: Play the game as many times as you like. That student then says the answer aloud. S2: No. The rest of the class must then guess what the question was by reporting it. .

only information which relates to the statements) To save time. 7 AA. 2 HE. HE and HN. Step 1: Give out the worksheets and explain the activity. 6 HN. 4 GB. 9 AA. they can read about that type of hominid. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. There are ten statements about hominids. GB and PB. Step 2: Check the answers. they can should use the key at the bottom of the page for completing the boxes.e. 3 GB. 10 HN Step 3: Ask what other interesting information students found out while they were reading. When they click on a skull.bbc. 5 HE. Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: Thirty minutes homework or on computers in school Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. • • • • Students have to go to a specific website (www. Students should first read the statements so they know what kind of information they will be scanning for.co. They should then look at the information about each hominid and make relevant notes (i. They will see nine pictures of different skulls. 8 HH and HHe. .uk/sn/prehistoric_life/human/species/).Module 9: Internet Activity WALKING WITH CAVEMEN Teacher’s Notes Objective: To use a website to scan texts for specific information. Answers 1 GB.

had the biggest brain. Used stone tools. . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 appeared first on the earth. and lived in Asia. first walked on two legs. was the tallest. didn’t eat meat. had the smallest brain. and could speak. Now read about each type of hominid and make notes.Module 9: Internet Activity WALKING WITH CAVEMEN Find this website about ‘hominids’ – a family of primates which includes humans (‘homo sapiens’): www. Put these letters in the boxes above: AA = Australopithicus afarasis HE = Homo ergaster (or erectus) HHe = Homo heidelbergensis HR = Homo rudolfensis GB HH HN PB = Gigantopithicus blacki = Homo habilis = Homo neanderthalensis = Paranthropus boisei If you have time. and . was the first to leave Africa.bbc. Then answer the questions.co. click on ‘Caveman Challenge’ and play the game.uk/sn/prehistoric_life/human/species/ First read the statements below to see what kind of information you are looking for. .

luxurious. Step 3: Students now form pairs and use their notes to ask their partner questions. skeletal. education different. ask students to match the definitions in Exercise 5 with words from Exercise 4.arian . 2 ruler. department enormous. capital. Elicit a few answers.ous Example unusual.ent . Step 2: Give out the worksheets. designer careful. argument.ity . incompetent writer.al . Answers Suffix .ful . colourful majority. activity. Students will probably know others. mysterious. 3 incompetent. vegetarian creation. dangerous. capacity. 4 education. believer. They should try and answer without looking at the text. ruler.ment . normal. 6 luxurious . Narnia in The Lion. Step 4: Elicit some personal responses to the question in Exercise 3. Answers: 1 entertainment. university entertainment. ridiculous Step 6: Finally. character. and the parallel universes in Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy. you could ask them to look at the text and to call out words as they see them. special librarian.Module 10: Reading DISCWORLD Teacher’s Notes Objective: To practice intensive reading and to extend vocabulary Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: One class lesson Step 1: Ask students if they have read books or seen films that are set in a fantasy world. 5 vegetarian. The obvious examples are Middle Earth in The Lord of the Rings. imagination. Alternatively. You could write them on the board as they call them out. the Witch and the Wardrobe. Explain that first students should read the text carefully and at the same time make notes about the list of things in Exercise 1.ation . Step 5: Ask students to read the text again and complete the table.er .

1 Read about ‘Discworld’ and make notes about these things. THE PALACE Lord Vetinari’s luxurious home and entertainment centre. People don’t talk about it. It travels through space on the backs of four elephants that stand on a giant turtle. The Palace Gardens were built by an incompetent designer..5 centimetres wide . in fact). Education consists of eating and drinking. Never call him ‘monkey’. normal life doesn’t usually have librarians who are fully-grown orangutans and Death doesn’t ride a white horse called Binky. There’s also a ridiculous lake 150 metres long and 2.. She has a weird capacity to smell colours. A sergeant in Ankh-Morpork’s police. and ALWAYS SPEAKS IN CAPITAL LETTERS. The stories are about people who are just trying to get by. She’s a werewolf when there’s a full moon and a vegetarian the majority of the time. His main job is to stop people from reading books. He’s tall. the biggest city in Discworld. "Wow. . Never! And here are some places of special interest … THE SHADES Be careful. but Discworld is different from other fantasy worlds. well. He has written over thirty stories set in ‘Discworld’ and has sold over forty million books worldwide. THE LIBRARIAN. just as we don’t say. thin (skeletal. One Vote. in Discworld only one man votes . He’s a believer in the principle of One Man. but. It’s is a nasty place which nobody would want to end up in. The other main activity is having arguments between departments.him! DEATH. A 135 kg orangutan who you shouldn’t laugh at.perfect for fish on a diet. This is an enormous dark area of the city with dangerous streets and characters. · author · location of Discworld · biggest city · ruler’s name and home · strange characters · a dangerous place Discworld is the creation of Terry Pratchett. The ruler of Ankh-Morpork.Module 10: Reading DISCWORLD Background Terry Pratchett is an English fantasy writer. use your imagination! Here are some of Discworld’s colourful characters who you may run into . He shows up when you’re dead or when he thinks you should be dead. It’s full of mysterious creatures and unusual characters. Okay. we’re standing six thousand kilometres above a ball of hot iron in the centre of the earth!" Most of the action takes place in Ankh-Morpork. UNSEEN UNIVERSITY The wizards’ college. which of course would never happen in a real university. They contain a garden maze so tiny that visitors lose their way looking for it. LORD HAVELOCK VETINARI. Everything reminds you of real life. ANGUA.

cinema or music. Use your notes from Exercise 1 and don’t look at the text. Are they adjectives or nouns? Suffix .ous Example unusual (adj) librarian (n) Creation Different Writer Careful Majority Entertainment Enormous 5 Match words from Exercise 4 with these definitions.ent . 2 Someone like a king or queen.ment .ation . 3 Not able to do your job correctly. 1 Things like television.er .al . 5 Someone who doesn’t eat meat.ful .ity .arian . beautiful and expensive . 4 The process of teaching or learning.2 Work in pairs. 6 Very comfortable. 3 What do you think is the most unusual thing about Discworld? 4 Find words in the text with similar endings. Example: A: What is Ankh-Morpork? B: It’s the main city on Discworld. Ask and answer questions about the text.

The 'authors' confirm or ask for corrections. Example: I wish I had bought the bus ticket. My mum didn't wake me up in the morning. I wish I hadn't lost 50$. . They write the sentences down in their notebooks. I wish my mum had woken me up. Step 3: The slips are placed in a bag. the students address the authors of the slips and say what they did or what happened to them the day before. In each group. You can do this activity after finishing the Understanding Grammar in Module 10. Then. your mum didn't wake you up. you didn't buy a bus ticket. Each students thinks of three unfortunate things that happened to them yesterday or mistakes they made. Example: I didn't buy a bus ticket. Student 2: That's right. Each student in a group draws someone's slip and reads the sentences with wish silently. Materials: none Time: 5 minutes Step 1: Divide the class into groups of five. I lost 50$ Step 2: On separate pieces of paper the students now write about the same events but express their regrets about what happened. the students work individually. in turns.Module 10: Grammar Wishes Teacher’s notes Objective: To practice wish. you list 50$. They sign their slips. Example: Student 1: Adam.

The final creative writing activity can be started in class and finished at home. 3 He said he couldn’t be a writer because he hadn’t passed his exams. 6 b. and then answer the questions on it. Answers 1 It was knocked down and replaced with a supermarket. Step 1: Give out the worksheets. 7 Young children often live in a fantasy world without the everyday worries that grown-ups have. They have a different perception of reality. 4 (Students own choice) 5 He does cleaning jobs. Step 3: Ask students to offer some imaginative answers to the last three questions. you may need to reserve a time to use computers. . locate the website.Module 10: Internet Activity POETRY Teacher’s Notes Objective: To think about language and write some images for a poem Materials: Photocopies of the worksheet Time: 20-30 minutes on computers at school. plus homework. Preparation: If you want to do the activity at school. 2 He wanted to be a writer. Explain that students have to go on the Internet. Step 2: Go over the answers with the class. Write the best ones on the board if you like.

Now click on the title The Minister for Exams. Read the poet’s introduction before the poem. It tastes like __________________________________________________ 2 What colour is fear? Fear is the colour of ____________________________________________ 3 Why do leaves fall from the trees? They fall because _______________________________________________ .do • • • • Click on Poems at the top. 1 What happened to his old school? 2 What did he want to do after he left school? 3 What did the careers officer say? Now read the poem. Try to write imaginative answers to them! 1 Describe the taste of a mountain.poetryarchive. 4 Which of the writer’s answers to Questions 1-3 do you like most? 5 What sort of jobs does the writer do now? 6 Why did he say at the beginning that the exam was easy? a) The questions were easy b) Children have a good imagination c) He was very clever 7 In what ways do you think a child’s world differs from an adult’s? Here are three more questions. Click on View all themes on the right.Module 10: Internet Activity POETRY First go to this website: www. In the list of themes. find and click on imagination.org/poetryarchive/home.

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