Ohio University

2005-2007 Graduate Catalog

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Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Academic Calendar
Ohio University’s academic calendar is available online at http://www.ohio.edu/
registrar/calendar.cfm

National Tr­ustees J. Michael Lawire Wilfred Konneker Ohio Boar­d of Regents Edmund J. Adams, Chair

William Y. Smith, J.D. Executive Assistant to the President for Institutional Equity G. Christine Taylor Assistant to the President for Diversity Office of the Associate Pr­ovost for­ Gr­aduate Studies Michael Mumper, Ph.D. Associate Provost for Graduate Studies Katherine Tadlock, Ph.D. Director, Graduate Student Services Colleges and Academic Pr­ogr­ams Benjamin Ogles, Ph.D. Interim Dean, College of Arts and Sciences Glenn Corlett, J.D. Dean, College of Business Gregory J. Shepherd, Ph.D. Interim Dean, College of Communication Tom Davis, Ph.D. Interim Dean, College of Education Dennis Irwin, Ph.D. Dean, Russ College of Engineering and Technology Charles McWeeny, M.F.A. Interim Dean, College of Fine Arts Gary Neiman, Ph.D. Dean, College of Health and Human Services Ann Fidler, Ph.D. Dean, Honors Tutorial College John A. Brose, D.O. Dean, College of Osteopathic Medicine David Descutner, Ph.D. Dean, University College Julia Zimmerman, M.L. Dean, University Libraries Thomas Shostak, Ph.D. Dean, Lifelong Learning Richard F. Bebee, Ph.D. Dean, Chillicothe Campus Paul E. Bibbins, Ph.D. Dean, Eastern Campus, St. Clairsville MaryAnn Janosik, Ph.D. Dean, Lancaster Campus Dan L. Evans, Ph.D. Dean, Southern Campus, Ironton James Fonseca, Ph.D. Dean, Zanesville Campus

Academic Fees (Graduate)
Ohio University’s academic fees are available online at: http://
www.finance.ohiou.edu/receivable/ tuitionfees.html Note: Fees are subject to change without notice.

Donna M. Alvarado, Vice Chair Bruce R. Beeghly, Secretary Jeanette G. Brown Anthony D. Houston Gerald M. Miller

Graduate Council
A membership list of Ohio University’s Graduate Council is available at:
http://www.ohio.edu/graduate/gradcoun.cfm

Joy Padgett (Ex officio) J. Gilbert Reese Rep. Arlene Setzer (Ex officio) Jerome F. Tatar

Graduate Student Senate
Graduate students are represented by the Graduate Student Senate. Complete information on GSS is available at: http://www.ohio.edu/~gss/

James M. Tuschman

University Administration
Administr­ative Officer­s Roderick J. McDavis, Ph.D. President of the University Kathy A. Krendl, Ph.D. Provost John A. Bantle, II, Ph.D. Vice President, Research Charles Bird, Ph.D. Vice President for Regional Higher Education Larry Corrigan, B.B.A. Interim Vice President for Finance and Administration and Treasurer Leonard R. Raley, M.B.A. Vice President for University Advancement and Executive Director of the Ohio University Foundation Michael Sostarich, M.F.A. Vice President for Student Affairs Terrence J. Hogan, Ph.D. Dean of Students Alan H. Geiger, Ph.D. Assistant to the President

Governing Boards
Ohio Univer­sity Boar­d of Tr­ustees R. Gregory Browning Larry Corrigan, Treasurer C. Daniel DeLawder Alan H. Geiger, Secretary Gene T. Harris C. Robert Kidder M. Lee Ong M. Marnette Perry Larry L. Schey C. David Snyder Robert D. Walter, Chair Micah Mitchell, Student Trustee Aslyne Rodriguez, Student Trustee

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

Ohio Univer­sity Gr­aduate Catalog 2005–2007

The fees, programs, and requirements contained in this catalog are effective with the 2005 fall quarter. They are necessarily subject to change at the discretion of Ohio University. The student assumes responsibility for knowing University, college, and departmental regulations and for complying with all applicable procedures. In no case will a requirement be waived or an exception granted because the student pleads ignorance of the requirement or asserts that her/his advisor or another authority did not inform the student of the requirement. While the personnel of the Office of Graduate Studies and the student’s advisor will endeavor to aid in every way possible, the responsibility for meeting requirements stated in this catalog rests with the student.

Ohio University is an affirmative action institution. Ohio University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies: Assistant to the President, Office for Institutional Equity, Ohio University, Athens OH 45701, Telephone: 740.593.2620. Produced by the Office of University Publications. Editor: Brian W. Stemen, M.A. ‘98 Assistant Editor: Erin L. Stookey, B.S.J. ‘05 Cover Design: Katie E. Ingersoll, B.F.A. ‘06 Copyright 2005 Ohio University Communications and Marketing 0137-7M Ohio University (USPS 405-380), Volume XCIX, Number 4, September 2005. Published by Ohio University, University Terrace, Athens, Ohio 457012979 in March, July, August, September, and October. Periodicals Postage Paid at Athens, Ohio.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.



Ohio Univer­sity Mission Statement
Ohio University is a public university providing a broad range of educa­ tional programs and services. As an academic community, Ohio University holds the intellectual and personal growth of the individual to be a central purpose. Its programs are designed to broaden perspectives, enrich awareness, deepen understanding, establish disciplined habits of thought, prepare for meaningful careers and, thus, to help develop individuals who are informed, responsible, productive citizens. Undergraduate Education Ohio University offers undergraduate instruction on both the Athens campus and the regional campuses. Undergraduate programs, designed to contribute to intellectual and personal development and career goals of students, emphasize liberal studies. Undergraduate major programs, preprofessional, and professional programs prepare students for employment in a variety of careers and for continued study. Two-year technical and associate’s degree programs, reflecting employment opportunities as well as the general career interests of students, are taught primarily at the regional campuses. At the Athens campus, instruction is combined with residence life and other extracurricular programs in an effort to create a collegiate experience integrating learning and living. Academic Advising Ohio University recognizes academic advising to be a central element of the educational experience of its undergraduate students. Advising is a collaborative relationship for which advisors and students share responsibility and through which students create sound educational plans consistent with their academic, career, and personal goals. Advisors are responsible for being accessible and responsive to students, and for providing accurate, timely information. Students are responsible for being prepared for advising sessions, and for understanding University and degree requirements. Graduate and Professional Education Ohio University offers graduate and professional education. The primary forms of activity are advanced and specialized courses of study, supervised practical experience, and research. The essential concentration of faculty, material, and space resources dictates that the activity associated with graduate and professional education will be centered on the Athens campus. This activity is not limited to that campus; research and instruction are carried out at various locations. Scholarship, Research, and Creative Activity Ohio University is a center for scholarship, research, and creative activity involving the creation, testing, and dissemination of knowledge, understanding, expressions, and technique. As a public university, Ohio University has a particular responsibility to address societal issues and needs through such scholarship, research, and creative activity. The scholarly and artistic activity of the faculty enhances the teaching function at all levels of the student experience.

Extended Community Ohio University serves an extended community. The public service mission of the University, expressed in such activities as public broadcasting and continuing education programs, reflects the responsibility of the University to serve the ongoing educational needs of the region. The regional campuses perform a critical role in serving this extended community. The University has state-wide responsibility for an extended University program using independent study through correspondence. It is the purpose of these extended University programs to serve a diverse range of educational needs, from professional groups requiring continuing courses of study related to the practice of their professions, to individuals desiring occasional or special interest study. By service to the extended community, Ohio University contributes to cultural and economic development, health care, and to other human services. Adopted January 15, 1977, and reaffirmed January 1988. Academic advising statement added March 2005.

A Commitment to Diver­sity
Ohio University is committed to promoting an atmosphere where under­ standing and acceptance of cultural and ethnic differences are ensured.
President Roderick J. McDavis underscored the University’s ongoing commitment to promoting diversity by citing its importance in his 2004 inaugural address. A climate that represents and embraces different cultures enhances Ohio University’s ability to provide all of its students with the experiences necessary to successfully compete and achieve in an increasingly diverse and complex society. There is no better way to learn about the world than to create an environment where students of diverse backgrounds—and indeed, students from all over the world—study, live, and socialize together. Ohio University is bound morally, emotionally, and intellectually to pursue the realization of a vision of real community. As a result, it is committed to equal opportunity for all people and is pledged to take direct and affirmative action to achieve that goal. In upholding its commitment, Ohio University will not tolerate racism, sexism, homophobia, bigotry, or other forms of violations of human rights. Such actions are inconsistent with, and detrimental to, the values that we hold essential as an institution of higher learning. All students, faculty, and staff of Ohio University are expected to uphold the University’s commitment to a just and diverse community and to take a leadership role in ensuring an atmosphere of equality.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.



Inquir­ies
The University switchboard number is 740.593.1000. Admission Office of Graduate Studies, McKee House Telephone 740.593.2800 Continuing Education, Independent Study, Workshops, and Conferences Office of Continuing Education, Conferences and Workshops, Haning Hall Telephone 740.593.1770 Curricula and Degree Requirements Graduate chair of the appropriate department Housing Housing Office, Chubb Hall Telephone 740.593.4090 Osteopathic Medicine College of Osteopathic Medicine, Grosvenor Hall Telephone 740.593.4313, or 1.800.345.1560

Contents
Inside front cover Graduate Council, University Administration 2 Mission Statement 2 A Commitment to Diversity Guidelines and General Information

              

4 4 10

Profile of Ohio University

Application and Admission Schedule of Fees

12 Financial Aid 16 Academic Policies and Procedures 16 Standards of Work 16 Grading Information 17 Master’s Degrees 18 Doctoral Degrees 20 Registration 21 Change Procedures  24 Late Registration 24 Leave of Absence Policy 24 Withdrawal from the University 25 Transcripts 25 Replacement Diploma 25 Academic Misconduct 26 Intellectual Property Policy 26 Research Using Human Subjects 26 Graduation and Commencement 27 Services for Students Listed alphabetically

Registration, Class Schedules, and Veterans Affairs Registrar’s Office, Chubb Hall Telephone 740.593.4191 Regional Campuses Ohio University Chillicothe Campus 571 W. 5th St., Chillicothe OH 45601 Telephone 740.774.7200 Ohio University Eastern Campus 45245 National Road, W., St. Clairsville OH 43950 Telephone 740.695.1720 Ohio University Lancaster Campus 1570 Granville Pike, Lancaster OH 43130 Telephone 740.654.6711

Colleges and Curricula

  

35 Academic Organization 37 Certificate Programs 39 Areas of Instruction 40 Arts and Sciences 89 Business 95 Communication 108 Education 123 Engineering and Technology 141 Fine Arts 162 Health and Human Services 201 Center for International Studies 209 Individual Interdisciplinary Programs  210 Lifelong Learning Programs 211 Osteopathic Medicine

Ohio University Southern Campus 1804 Liberty Ave., Ironton OH 45638 Telephone 740.533.4600 Ohio University Zanesville Campus 1425 Newark Road, Zanesville OH 43701 Telephone 740.453.0762

Appendix

212 Departmental Faculty 220 Ohio Residency 222 Student Records Policy 224 Index



Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

4

Application and Admission

Guidelines and General Information

The policies outlined in this catalog reflect University minimums. Departments may set higher standards.

Profile of Ohio University
Ohio University, established in 1804, was the first institution of higher education in the old Northwest Territory. The total enrollment on the Athens campus is approximately 20,000, while the regional campuses enroll more than 8,900 additional students. The present graduate enrollment is about 3,500, of whom 2,300 are fulltime students. The full-time faculty numbers 1,056. There are more than 734 part-time faculty members and more than 1,500 graduate assistants, graduate staff assistants, graduate research assistants, and graduate teaching assistants. On the graduate level, Ohio University offers master’s degrees in nearly all its major academic divisions and doctoral degrees in selected departments. The College of Osteopathic Medicine offers a four-year professional program leading to the degree of Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. The city of Athens is located about 75 miles southeast of Columbus. The University offers a wide range of cultural activities to the University community and all of southeastern Ohio. Lecturers, poets, singers, dancers, films, and theater or music groups appear frequently on campus. Many events are free, though some have nominal charges. The University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the recognized professional accrediting associations identified with its major academic divisions. It holds membership in leading state and

national educational and professional associations. The University’s academic calendar consists of three quarters of 10 to 12 weeks and a summer session with two 5-week terms.

Application and Admission
Ohio University utilizes a self-managed application. This means that your application forms, transcripts, and supporting documents are collected by you and mailed to the university together. Students applying from within the United States will submit two envelopes. The first envelope is sent to the Office of Graduate Studies. If applying with a paper application, it should contain a completed, signed application form, the non-refundable application fee, residency information form, affidavit of financial support (students applying for F-1 or J-1 visas only), and two official transcripts from each postsecondary school attended as described in the Transcripts section of this catalog. The address is Office of Graduate Studies, McKee House, Ohio University, Athens OH 457012979. Students applying by Web must mail transcript and financial affidavit materials. The second envelope is sent to the graduate chair of the program (or programs) to which you are applying. The second envelope should contain the background information and references form, sealed letters of recommendation (unless letters are submitted electronically as part of the Web application), a résumé or vita, a personal statement, autobiographical

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

S. in envelopes sealed by the issuing institution if possible. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Transcripts from non-U. . All documents received by the University in connection with an application become the property of Ohio University. also provide an official certified copy of all documents in English. the date any degree was earned. 1997. providing he or she arrives before the quarter begins. The institution code is 1593. 2000. 2006. McKee House. Inc. 2005. If the institution will not provide sealed copies directly to you. The transcript must bear the seal and original signature of the school and school official and clearly show the name and address of the institution. 2001. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Inc. Graduate Management Admission test. indicating the highest mark and the lowest passing mark. 1995. While CollegeSource®. 1999. even if those transcripts have already been submitted to the student’s undergraduate college. 2002. and the system of grading used. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2003. 2006. The transcript/mark sheets must show all course attempts with grades earned. Scores for GRE. Please do not mail cash. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. with the applicant’s consent. Please contact the department to which you are applying for specific application deadlines. 2005. (Department to which you are applying). that application can be forwarded to the appropriate program for review. For promoted joint degree programs (e. Ohio University. 2001. 2003. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. If original documents are not in English. Fees subject to change without notice. This material should be mailed to Graduate Chair. and Canadian institutions must be received in Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. The officials of the university stand ready to register a student admitted for a specific quarter. Photocopies of student score *includes MBA/MSA and MBA/MHA joint degree programs All application fees are non-refundable. 1995. Inc.S. In order to register. GMAT. Ohio University places itself under no obligation to admit any individual person. OH 457012979. 1998.g. non-immigrant students must hold a valid Certificate of Eligibility (I-20 or DS-2019) for study at Ohio University. Upon receipt by Graduate Studies. Under no circumstances will they be returned or forwarded to any agency or other college or university. 1996. 2000. 1997. regardless of whether or not a degree was earned or the credits are reflected on a separate transcript as transfer credit. CollegeSource®. 2007. 1996. applications for admission are forwarded to the department indicated on the application. the date you entered and left the institution. Test Requirements Some academic programs require supporting evidence of your ability in the form of the Graduate Record Examination. and Career Guidance Foundation. institutions must be official or registrar-certified. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Miller Analogies Test. Transcripts that have been opened. with a certified English translation if the original is not in English. and/or statement of intent as required by the department (refer to the admission processes described in the individual department description elsewhere in this catalog). portfolio. Check. If a department determines that an applicant has applied to the wrong program. Summary documents listing only classes passed are not accepted. 1999.Application and Admission sketch. and Career Guidance Foundation. video or audio tape). Students graduating from Ohio University must submit transcripts for post-secondary work done elsewhere. CollegeSource®. Ohio University. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. For programs with quarterly admission.g. all courses taken and grades received. Athens OH 45701-2979. Graduate Application Fee Initial/first graduate degree (paper)* $45 Web-based degree application* $45 Nondegree/Certificate (paper) $35 Web-based non-degree application $35 $35 Transient (paper) Second graduate degree (paper)$25 $25 Reapplication (paper) Nondegree to Degree (paper) $10 5 envelopes sealed by the issuing institution. Athens. and Career Guidance Foundation. Discounted application fees are available with paper application only. applications should be submitted at least six weeks prior to the term in which you are seeking to begin classes. application supplement. request that transcripts be mailed directly to Office of Graduate Studies. 1998. Inc. Application Deadlines Deadline for receipt of application materials varies by department. Inc. or marked as unofficial will not be accepted as official. 2007. TOEFL or other required tests must be reported directly from the testing agency to Ohio University. Consult the specific department about necessary test requirements. While CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. or other college ability tests. In providing an application form and inviting application. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. You may apply to more than one program at the same time by submitting an application packet and fee for each program. Documents of students who are admitted to graduate status but fail to enroll for the quarter for which they are admitted are destroyed. photocopied. Credit cards can be used with the web application only. Students who need to apply for visas are encouraged to submit all application materials at least nine months prior to desired term of entry. Transcripts Each application for admission must be accompanied by two (2) official copies of transcripts of all post-secondary work from the institution where the work was done. Ohio University transcripts will be obtained by the Office of Graduate Studies on your behalf. Transcripts from U. MBA/ MSA) only one application fee is required. If the transcript/mark sheet does not name the degree and date earned. 2004. 44 University Terrace. cash or money order (payable to Ohio University) accepted for paper applications. Students applying from overseas should send all materials to the Office of Graduate Studies in just one envelope. College ability test scores older than five years will not be accepted. Portfolio materials submitted to support application to programs in the College of Fine Arts may be returned as described in that section of this catalog. Department and major field codes can be found on the testing agencies web sites. and other departmentally specified supporting materials (e. an official or registrar-certified copy of the diploma or graduation certificate that indicates the degree and date awarded must also be provided. Official test scores must be requested from the appropriate testing agency for reporting to Ohio University. 2002.

While CollegeSource®. be full-time students in the first three quarters after arrival. and Career Guidance Foundation. GRE registration materials can be obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies. Graduate Record Examination By mail: GRE-ETS. .. 1998. Therefore. Some departments require a higher score. All persons for whom English is not a native language are required to submit evidence of proficiency.ielts. that financial assistance will be cancelled if you do not demonstrate English proficiency upon your arrival. Proficiency is demonstrated by submitting official results of one of two standardized tests: the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 213 (550 paper based). All new international students. International students admitted to Ohio University with F1 or J1 visa status are required to use the online address service to update their addresses with Ohio University and to meet immigration reporting requirements. Princeton. The Ohio University reporting code is 1593.O.0 are not eligible for graduate admission.ets. The results of this test will determine if additional English language training is required through the Ohio Program of Intensive English (OPIE). 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation.0 and 7. You may then take a vacation in the next quarter as long as you intend to register in the quarter after the vacation. 1995.milleranalogies. Students with a TOEFL score between 173 and 213 (500-550 computer-based) or an IELTS score between 5.gre. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. accrediting organization (where English is the language of instruction). 2002. and understanding English is essential. Inc. Students responsible for classroom or laboratory instruction and whose native language is not English are required to demonstrate English proficiency prior to assuming instructional duties by submitting official Test of Spoken English (TSE) scores of 55 or higher or by passing the SPEAK test upon arrival. have completed at least three years of full-time study at a governmentally-accredited institution of higher education where English is the primary language of instruction. proficiency in reading. but are not accepted as official. writing. Students who are required to enroll in OPIE English courses are financially responsible for all associated tuition and fees. 1996. Box 6151. 2002. Territories and Canada 1-609-771-7100 By Web: http://www. Inc. graduate assistantships/ scholarships) cannot be used to cover OPIE expenses. Princeton. html International English Language Testing System By Web: http://www. while in the United States. PO Box 6103. In the event that you receive a University-funded assistantship. Inc. You must be making reasonable progress toward the completion of your degree. 2003.0 or greater are exempt from TOEFL testing upon arrival at the university. 2007. have received a bachelor’s or advanced degree from an accredited institution of higher education in the United States or a foreign college or university accredited by a Regional U. CollegeSource®.0 may be admitted on a case-by-case basis.mba. 2005. Princeton. On the Athens campus.S. must report to the Office of International Student and Faculty Services upon arrival. 1999. English language proficiency test scores older than two years are not accepted. Students who have submitted an official TOEFL score of 600 or greater or IELTS score of 8. although they may be tested for academic writing proficiency. as well as returning students starting a new degree program. 2000. 1997. NJ 08541-6151 By phone: Inside the United States. Further information about the tests can also be obtained by contacting the test provider. US Territories and Canada 1-877-863-3546 (toll free) Outside the United States.org/ Graduate Management Admission Test By mail: GMAT-ETS. and Career Guidance Foundation. within the past two years.0 overall average. and Career Guidance Foundation. com/ Test of English as a Foreign Language By mail: TOEFL Services.S. 2003. University financial aid (e. 2006. The following are exempt from submitting official test scores as part of an application packet: • Applicants who. U.6 Application and Admission reports may be used for preliminary evaluation and matching purposes. 1998. 1999. speaking.g. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. fellowship.org/toefl/index. PO Box 6000. P. A required international student orientation is held prior to the start of each academic quarter for all new students. you are required to consult with your academic advisor and the international student advisor. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Individual academic programs may require any applicant to demonstrate proficiency as part of an application or require on-campus English proficiency testing. International Students International applicants must submit evidence of the financial responsibility as stated on the Affidavit of Financial Support as part of a complete application packet. 2000. U. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a 7. 2007. Failure to achieve a passing score may result in dismissal from the program. Students with a TOEFL score below 173 (500 computer-based) or an IELTS score below 5. 1997. NJ 08541-6000 By phone: 1-866-473-4373 (U. or scholarship upon admission. Inc. In the event that a problem should arise with enrollment. All students whose native language is not English and who fall into one of the above exemptions will be tested for proficiency upon arrival at the university. 2004. 2005. Students must hold an appropriate academic study-eligible visa status by the first quarter of enrollment in a Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.S.org/ English Language Proficiency Requirements The language of instruction at Ohio University is English. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. within the past two years. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services regulations require that international students. Territories and Canada) 1-609-771-7670 (all other locations) By Web: http://www. 2001. 2006. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. or • Applicants who.S. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.com/ Miller Analogies Test By phone: 1-800-622-3231 By Web: http://www. While CollegeSource®. 2004. 2001. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. NJ 08541-6103 By phone: 1-800-462-8669 By Web: http://www. CollegeSource®. Inc.

Students working toward graduate degrees are required to enroll in graduate courses that are part of their degree programs. If you have a bachelor’s degree from an unaccredited college or university located in the United States. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Math. and can be deferred up to one year. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Students working toward graduate degrees are required to enroll in graduate courses that are part of their degree programs. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. you will be assessed technology fees for each degree program even if you are not taking courses in that program. 2002. 1996. or equivalent may receive from the University the Master’s Degree or the Doctor’s Degree in any graduate program where the faculty member has membership. Students wishing to reapply must complete a new application form. 2005. No academic employee above the rank of Instructor. associate provosts. 1995. you must reapply for admission through the Office of Graduate Studies. you must reapply. test scores. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1996. 2001. Psychology). It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that proper status is maintained. You may earn a graduate degree only in a program to which you have been admitted and in which you have enrolled Special Note for Students in Education If you have earned a master’s degree in education at Ohio University and plan to take additional work in education. 1995. While CollegeSource®. you usually will be required to supplement your undergraduate record with a satisfactory score on an acceptable standard college ability test. If that deferral extends beyond a year from your initial application. 2005. You may earn a graduate degree only in a program to which you have been admitted and in which you have enrolled. and a letter is sent to you indicating admission. MBA/MSA) are assessed only technology fees for only one college per year. Technology fees will not be removed retroactively to previous quarters. work experience. Students admitted to a promoted joint degree program (e. It is the responsibility of the Associate Provost for Graduate Studies to see that this review takes place at the earliest possible date.g. recommendations.g. Applications are valid for one calendar year based on date received. except in cases where the department is updating program codes or the student is applying for conferral of a Master’s degree within the Ph. pay the reapplication fee. 2003. you may request a deferment from your degree program prior to the start of the term of entry. The departmental graduate committee recommends or denies admission and forwards the decision to the Office of Graduate Studies. 2006. is formally separated from the program. Admission Process Copies of admission materials submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies are forwarded to the department indicated on your application. Failure to request a deferment will result in cancellation of your admission Requests to change or add degree programs must be accompanied by a new application and application fee. CollegeSource®. Students who wish to remove technology fees must withdraw from the program with a written request to the Office of Graduate Studies. admission pending fulfillment of admission requirements. and deans) are eligible to apply for admission to a graduate program or to nondegree status. 2000. 2004. If the Graduate Council determines that a conflict exists. 2002. You must begin your graduate study in the term for which you have been admitted. 2006. CollegeSource®. pay the reapplication fee. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and other relevant matters. Applications pending after one year without request from the student or departments for deferral will be treated as denied. The Associate Provost for Graduate Studies and the Graduate Council will review all applications for potential conflict of interest. Status ends when the student graduates. and submit any additional supporting documents required to complete their application. Students without active graduate status who wish to take additional graduate-level coursework must complete a new application and be admitted to a new degree or nondegree status. 1999. Inc. application and materials are then subject to being destroyed. Faculty members or senior administrators on full-time presidential contracts at Ohio University seeking a terminal degree must enroll in academic programs outside the 7 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. except senior administrators (vice presidents. Application materials for students who are denied admission are held for one year. Inc. Inc. teaches courses. Your file is reviewed for completeness. and Career Guidance Foundation. program in which he/she is currently enrolled (e. selection of courses. Research Assistant. Graduate status is granted to a specific program and tied to that program. 2003. 2004. pattern of grades. 2001. 1997. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1999. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. While CollegeSource®. See the stipulations regarding conflict of interest in the Faculty Handbook. Inc. If you are admitted to multiple degree programs. . A student who has withdrawn must reapply and be readmitted to the program dropped. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation.D. McKee House. If this is not possible. the faculty member or administrator shall not be admitted to a graduate program. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. or exceeds the time to degree. Please note that assistantship offers may not defer. Each department gives appropriate weight to the factors pertinent to its academic field. You may pursue more than one graduate degree at a time. 1998. or is expected to have. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. serves on Master’s or Doctoral Committees. and Career Guidance Foundation. and be readmitted. 2000. 1997. Consult the specific department about necessary test requirements. other supervisory responsibilities which might give rise to conflicts of interest or the appearance of conflicts of interest. vice provosts. Section IV-F. Faculty and Administrators All Ohio University faculty and administrators on full-time presidential contract. Admission is based on possession of a bachelor’s degree (or its foreign equivalent) from an accredited college or university and such factors as your undergraduate scholastic grade-point average (both overall and in the proposed graduate major). CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. has. Inc. Inc.Application and Admission degree or certificate program. or denial of admission.

nondegree. Postbaccalaureate This status is applicable to the regional campuses for all quarters and to the Athens campus for summer only. Inc. and scholarships only after you have received unconditional admission. Some graduate courses are not open to students admitted to postbaccalaureate status. Failure to produce final documents will result in a registration hold being placed on your account and may result in dismissal. It is your responsibility to see that final official transcripts are on file in the Office of Graduate Studies no later than the end of your first quarter of registration in a graduate program. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1997. may be approved by the department for conditional admission.G). Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Inc.5. official documents are given provisional admission. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. your situation will be reviewed by the associate provost for graduate studies and the Graduate Council at the earliest possible date. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. It is your responsibility to notify the University of your employment on the Graduate Admissions Application. 1996. 2004. 1999. While CollegeSource®. apply for admission in the regular manner but as a nondegree student. You must maintain a 3. Inc. 2005. Appeals regarding this policy follow the guidelines established in accordance with the “Faculty Grievance Committee”’ procedures (see Faculty Handbook. Students with provisional admission status are expected to complete all application materials and submit all missing documents by the end of their first quarter of registration. The departmental graduate committee will specify whether undergraduate courses required as further preparation for admission will be taken for audit or credit. such as a grade-point average below 2. Approval for such admission does not constitute admission to a degree program. and transient. Course loads taken during breaks in regular employment. Credit earned prior to admission to a degree program as a degree-seeking student cannot normally be applied toward a graduate degree at Ohio University.0 or better cumulative and term gradepoint average to receive and retain University financial support. postbaccalaureate. as a nondegree student. you may normally register for no more than eight hours per quarter. 2002. You may take no more than 18 hours of academic work. Provisional status is removed when all final documents are received at the Office of Graduate Studies. and Career Guidance Foundation.015. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2003. and (c) credit earned cannot normally be applied toward a graduate degree at Ohio University. 1995. Section II. 2007. 1998. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.8 Application and Admission colleges in which they are employed. and transcripts from any other postsecondary school attended. 40. 2005. such as summers for ninemonth faculty. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Nondegree To take graduate courses if you have no intention of working toward a graduate degree at Ohio University. 2006. If you are a full-time faculty member or full-time administrator at Ohio University who is admitted to a degree program or to nondegree status. you must have written approval from the graduate chair of your academic program and from the administrative supervisor for your employee position. While CollegeSource®. In exceptional cases the appropriate academic department will determine which courses. Categories of Admission Ohio University has four categories of graduate student admission: degree. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The conditions of postbaccalaureate admission are the same as for nondegree graduate status: (a) admission status terminates after completion of 18 graduate hours. if any. Inc. or six years. it is your responsibility to notify the Office of Graduate Studies of that appointment. and Career Guidance Foundation. that you take while in nondegree status may be applied subsequently toward degree requirements. Conditional Degree Admission Students who have some deficiency in the entrance requirements. and Career Guidance Foundation. If you are currently in a graduate degree program and are offered a presidential contract appointment. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. they will inform you that you may not continue in your graduate program if you accept the presidential contract appointment. Inc. If you are a current graduate student and are offered a presidential contract appointment. The Graduate Council will determine whether conflict of interest or unfair competition would result from your dual status as a student and a presidential contract employee that might affect your academic performance and evaluation. within a time limit of six years. To register for 9 or 10 hours. 2000. Any admission to a graduate program must be regarded as provisional until you have provided a final official transcript from your undergraduate institution showing receipt of the bachelor’s degree. 2001. however. 1999. Students in this category may achieve unconditional admission by satisfactorily completing a prescribed program to remove any academic deficiencies and attaining a 3. Unconditional Degree Admission Students approved by the major department for unqualified admission to a graduate degree program are given unconditional admission. Undergraduate or audited courses will not satisfy requirements for any graduate degree. Ohio University employees who are admitted to graduate study may not hold simultaneous appointments as University employees and graduate appointment contracts. You are eligible for University-funded assistantships. 2001. Inc. A new application must be submitted upon termination of status as noted in (a) above. fellowships. Grades earned in such courses may be used by the graduate committee in evaluating your capability for graduate work. See the stipulations regarding residency requirements in this catalog and the Policy and Procedure Manual. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. will be limited only by Graduate Catalog regulations. 2003. 1996. 1998. 1997. whichever comes first (b) admission to nondegree status does not constitute admission to a graduate degree program.0 or better grade-point average on the first 15 hours of graded graduate course credit. Provisional Admission Students approved for admission who have not submitted all required final. 2006. 2002. 1995. 2000. 2007. . No. CollegeSource®. If the Graduate Council determines that such a conflict would exist. CollegeSource®. Unofficial withdrawals (FN/FS) are factored into this calculation. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.

Senior for Graduate Credit An Ohio University student who has not yet completed all requirements for the bachelor’s degree may be eligible for graduate study as a senior. and Career Guidance Foundation. If you qualify for early admission to a graduate degree program. This privilege is normally granted for one quarter only. you pay undergraduate fees and are not eligible for graduate assistantship or scholarship support. 9 Undergraduates Taking Graduate Courses Except for Honors Tutorial students and those who meet the conditions listed below. Graduate Certificate Programs Persons applying for nondegree status for the purposes of earning a graduate certificate program must submit all applicable application materials and be admitted to the certifacte program prior to starting coursework. Inc. 2004. 2000.a. 2005. it does not affect undergraduate course requirements. no undergraduate student may take a graduate course for credit. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.p. You must have an overall grade-point average of at least 3. the appropriate application fee. Registration in graduate courses requires written permission from the instructor. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. 1996. . Approval for Senior for Graduate Credit does not constitute admission to a degree program. and you are admitted to graduate status. 1998. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Honors tutorial students seeking to obtain graduate credit for courses must complete a Senior for Graduate Credit application as described below.5 and be within nine credits of completing all requirements for your bachelor’s degree. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. except the total credit-hour requirement. and credit earned may not automatically apply toward a graduate degree program. the departmental graduate committee. While CollegeSource®. Hours earned in these courses will count toward total Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc.Application and Admission If in doubt about the acceptability of postbaccalaureate status for a specific course. and the dean of your undergraduate college. after earning 135 or more hours of credit). 1995. 2007. and graduate courses will not fulfill any undergraduate requirements. you are eligible for graduate assistantship or scholarship support. 1999. Generally. you may be admitted into a graduate degree program and enroll in graduate courses for graduate credit. Inc. hours required for the undergraduate degree only and the grades will be calculated into the undergraduate g. 1999. 2006. 1998. no more than two graduate courses may be taken in this way. check with the department offering the course. Transient A student currently working toward a graduate degree at another university may earn graduate credit at Ohio University to be transferred to the other university. You must have an overall grade-point average of at least 2. You must apply for this privilege in advance of registration through the Office of Graduate Studies. hours earned. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and an official statement of good standing from the dean of the graduate school in which you are enrolled. 2002. 2004. 2003. 1997. Students process this special registration by obtaining permission from the departmental honors coordinator and submitting the approval form to the Registrar’s Office for processing. Participation in this option is at the discretion of the department or school. Inc. and you must apply in advance of registration through the Office of Graduate Studies. and Career Guidance Foundation.. If you are admitted as a senior for graduate credit. Senior for Gradaute Credit courses are equivalent to graduate coursework taken in nondegree graduate status. by the time of your entry into the graduate degree program. Inc. CollegeSource®. You must request permission each quarter to register at Ohio University as a transient student. 2005. A $10 application fee is charged for this privilege. Graduate status will cease with completion of the certificate unless another valid status is in place. You may be admitted to transient status by submitting a transient student application and Residency Information form. or g.p. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.a. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Departmental Honors Students in a recognized departmental honors program may take a maximum of three graduate courses in their major department during their senior year (i. 1995. 2003. You may apply to take graduate courses carrying graduate credit by securing the written recommendation of the dean of your undergraduate college and the graduate chair of the departments offering the graduate courses. 2006. The graduate credit becomes part of your graduate record only. 2001. While CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2000. Early Admission to a Graduate Degree Program A superior undergraduate student may seek early admission to a graduate degree program. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. CollegeSource®. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. After obtaining the written recommendation of your department. 2002. 2001. This privilege may also be extended to a well qualified senior at another university who has nine or fewer credits to complete for the bachelor’s degree. You can use these courses to satisfy both graduate degree requirements and undergraduate total credit-hour requirements.e. 2007.5 and have completed all undergraduate requirements.

Post-dated checks are not accepted. 2001.finance.com/ohio/). 2004. Payment is due two weeks prior to the quarter opening date. CollegeSource®. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Miscellaneous Fees* Admission application filing fees are listed in the Application and Admission section of this catalog. any fee adjustments that may become necessary. Inc. 2006. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. edu/bursar/. without prior notice. education. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. You can pay through the mail or in person at the cashier’s office in Chubb Hall if you are enrolling on the Athens campus. 1998.ohiou. journalism. Late registration fee—varies (check quarterly Schedule of Classes) $5 $50 $5 $5 Duplicate official forms. Checks and money orders should be made payable to Ohio University in the exact amount of the fees. This figure excludes fees for special courses. While CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Inc. 2002. 2002. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1999. Registration Fees Fees for tuition include the instructional fee and the general fee. Checks not paid upon presentation to the bank will automatically cancel any receipts given and result in assessment of penalties. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. 1995.finance. Inc. This is a service that allows you to pay your University charges on the Internet. 2003. Some colleges assess a fee for computing and other technology. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Credit card payments can also be made using CASHnet SMARTPAY (http://www.ohiou. please go to http://www. Current registration fees are available online at: http://www. and visual communication. 2000. cashnetsmartpay. aviation.ohiou. fee receipts.finance. Refer to the Office of the Bursar Web page (http://www. and checks issued to the University and not paid upon presentation to the bank will automatically cancel any receipts given and result in the assessment of penalties. 2003. such as art. 2004. Fees can be paid by a check or money order made out to Ohio University. 2007. which equalizes the academic year’s fees into nine monthly payments. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2006.” Bills are sent electronically approximately four weeks before the quarter opening date. 1999. human and consumer sciences. You are responsible for any University communication sent to you at your official University e-mail address (Oak account) and/or to the mailing address on file with the Office of the University Registrar. edu/bursar/) for all payment options. 1995. 1996. For current rates and listing of colleges. While CollegeSource®. edu/bursar/ and click on “Tuition and Fees. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation. Application for graduation Reapplication for graduation Transcript of record Insurance Domestic Students: All domestic students taking seven or more credit hours must carry health insurance *These fees are nonrefundable and subject to change without notice. recreation and sport sciences. Postdated checks are not acceptable. It is important that you retain all fee receipts. Ohio University reserves the right to make. 2005. 2007. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. A service charge based on the transaction amount will be assessed. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2005. 1997. or at the regional campus Office of Student Services if you are enrolling on one of the regional campuses. etc. Inc. Inc. Graduate students carrying more than eight hours are eligible for the Monthly Payment Plan. Ohio University reserves the right to make. Credit card payments are accepted at regional campuses for regional campus students only. 1996. which are listed in the quarterly Schedule of Classes. without prior notice. any fee adjustments that may become necessary.10 Schedule of Fees Schedule of Fees Payment of all assessed fees at the times designated is prerequisite to official enrollment. music. 2001. CollegeSource®. 1997. .

1999. The residency petition must be filed before the last day to register for class in order for it to be effective for that quarter. No change of residency from non-resident to resident can be made until the residency petition has been approved by the Director of Graduate Student Services. An accident and sickness insurance plan (Domestic Plan) designed to supplement the care provided by the Student Health Service is automatically billed to all students meeting this guideline. which means that you—or your parent(s). it is your responsibility to contact Graduate Studies to discuss the reasons for your residency classification. 2 If you officially withdraw from the University during the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (see the academic calendar). 2003. For example. (2) you (or your parents or guardians) are eligible to receive Ohio state welfare benefits. you are entitled to a 100 percent refund of registration fees. International students are also required to purchase insurance coverage for their dependents. If you believe that your residency status is incorrect. guardians. Residency status is determined with the initial application a student makes to Ohio University. 2007. Ohio University refunds fees or credits your account 30 days after the date of withdrawal. In general. 1996. 2001. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1995. Inc. Further information regarding the refund of fees can be obtained from the bursar’s office. you must file a residency petition (complete with documentation to verify your statements) with the Office of Graduate Studies. 1998. 3 If you withdraw from the University after the first 15 calendar days of classes. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. driver’s license. 2004. However. You must enter the name and policy number of your insurance company. you are entitled to receive a 100 percent refund of the reduction when such changes result in a reduction of fees. according to the following schedule: 1 If you officially withdraw from the University (cancellation of registration) before the first day of classes. 2005. 2003. CollegeSource®. 1999. Inc. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. Residency decisions are not retroactive to previous quarters. 2000. . it does not affect the tuition. because the standard tuition rate applies to a course load of 11 through 20 hours. you are considered indebted to the University for the amount determined according to the refund regulations. Course load reductions made after the 15th calendar day of the quarter will result in no refund. It is your responsibility to report a change of address and/or residency from an Ohio resident to a non-Ohio resident at the Office of Graduate Studies. 1996. Evidence of Ohio residence includes proof that: (1) you (or your parents. if you have 15 hours and drop to 11 hours. Inc. Refund Policy for Reducing Course Load.e. 2002. you pay in-state tuition if you are a permanent resident of Ohio. The Residency Information form in the graduate application is used to determine residency status. 2007. or spouse if you are a dependent—have lived in Ohio for 12 consecutive months or more preceding your enrollment at Ohio University. Only those international students with government sponsors that provide acceptable health insurance can apply for a waiver of the University health insurance. Domestic students can complete a waiver declaration. 2005. you will receive 100 percent of the difference in tuition for dropping from full-time to part-time. voter’s registration. and Career Guidance Foundation. Changes from non-resident to resident status are not automatic. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Students must submit the waiver option statement printed on the fee bill or go to the Bursar’s Office in Chubb Hall to complete a waiver card. If your residency has changed to an Ohio resident. 2001. While CollegeSource®. you are not entitled to a refund of registration fees. Inc. 1995. An accident and sickness insurance plan (International Plan) is automatically billed to all students meeting this guideline. students who had previously been admitted to Ohio University as a non-resident must petition for a change of residency status if they have established themselves as a resident under the Refund of Fees University Refund Policy for Withdrawal. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Corrected registration that results in increased hours could increase tuition.Schedule of Fees if they are enrolled on the Athens campus. A hold will be placed on your records until your debt is paid. car registration). While CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1997. Waivers of health insurance for international students may only be granted by the Office of International Student and Faculty Services. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and (3) you (or your parents or guardians) are a resident of the State of Ohio for all other legal purposes (i. You may also waive the insurance charge while viewing your electronic bill. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. 11 Ohio Residency Guidelines Ohio University assesses tuition costs based on the student’s status as an in-state or out-of-state resident. CollegeSource®. resident for tuition purposes policy. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. If you withdraw from the University before full payment of fees is made. The complete policy on Ohio residency is included for your reference in the appendix at the back of this catalog. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Graduate students are notified of their current residency status in the letter of admission sent by the Office of Graduate Studies. Inc. Direct questions concerning residency to the Office of Graduate Studies. and must make arrangements for this when they arrive to begin their studies. However. if you are registered for 11 hours and drop a 5-hour course. 1998. if they have comparable coverage. you are entitled to an 80 percent refund if your registration fees were paid in full. or spouse) are totally self-supported from income derived from within the state of Ohio and have subjected that income to Ohio taxation. International Students: All international students taking one or more credit hours must carry the Ohio University health insurance if they are enrolled on the Athens campus. Failure to do so will result in a registration hold on the student’s account. 1997. 2006. Dependent coverage is also available through this office. 2006. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. If you drop credit hours before or during the first 15 calendar days of the quarter. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. guardian(s).

Graduate assistant resident directors will have the same compensation and a stipend of $5. 1999. Graduate Appointments Approximately 1. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1996. These assistants engage in duties varying from residence hall directorships to service in the library and University administrative offices.600 plus a tuition scholarship. from September to June) and $8. Inc. Apply for these appointments by letter and submission of your vita to the director of residence life. Some schools or departments offer an alternative form of assistance. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2007. 1996. The appointment requires payment of the general fee and technology fee. Appointment of graduate resident directors and graduate assistant resident directors are made on the recommendation of the director of residence life and are available to single or married men and women. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1999. Students who have assistantships generally fulfill academic responsibilities and serve as prescribed by the school or department. and Career Guidance Foundation.000 to $15. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource®. Contact the individual school or depart-ment for details on assistantships and tuition scholarships. 1995. CollegeSource®. graduate assistants have administrative and non-teaching duties. 2000. if applicable. 1998.. 2007. Individual schools or departments may. . CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1997. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Graduate appontments normally become effective the first day of each quarter and end on the official closing date of the quarter. Together. Compensation includes a furnished apartment and board (when the dining halls are operating) for the appointee (and for his or her family. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2005. Students who are awarded a Recruitment scholarship/stipend are required to register for an academic course load of a minimum of 15 graduate credits per quarter. Inc. teh Recruitment Scholarship/Stipend. The assistantship usually includes a tuition scholarship for the length of the contract.000 for a 12-month appointment. and research assistants work on research or creative projects for the school or department. and Career Guidance Foundation. the scholarship and the stipend cover most of the tuition costs for a quarter. research. if applicable) and a stipend of $9. While CollegeSource®. and application for this financial assistance is made as part of the application. Teaching assistants generally have teaching related duties. The graduate resident director and graduate assistant resident director supervise functions of the residence hall. Students who have been admitted to a master or a doctoral degree are selected for these appointments on the basis of scholarly merit. 2004. Some graduate assistants are funded from non-academic department resources. 2000. Inc. 2003. Recruitment scholarship/stipend consists of a partial tuition scholarship and a stipend of $600 per quarter. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. each quarter. While CollegeSource®. 2006. 1995.e. They require six hours of service per week each quarter of the appointment. at their discretion. 2001. Inc.600 plus a tuition scholar-ship for graduate resident directors. 2003.1 Financial Aid Financial Aid The major forms of financial support for graduate students are assistantships and tuition scholarships. request that newly appointed assistants report for orientation up to a week prior to the beginning of the quarter. The stipends vary from academic area to academic area. 1998. and teaching assistantships are available for graduate students in degree programs at Ohio University. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2002. 2006. There are three types of assistantships: Teaching Assistantships (TA).500 full and partial graduate. and Research Assistantships (RA). and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. The assistantship provides a stipend for services as prescribed by the individual school or department and requires a minimum academic course load of 12 graduate credits a quarter. 2002. but generally range from $6.000 for three quarters (i. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2001. These are granted by the individu­ al schools or departments.150 to $12. Inc. 2004. Graduate Assistantships (GA).

Students receiving a tuition scholarship also receive a subsidy toward the general fee. 1999. residents who demonstrate a strong Africa/Southeast Asia career and/or research interest. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Tuition scholarships are not available to students who have enrolled in more than 260 hours of graduate-level courses as described in the preceding section. or to graduate students who have maintained at least a 3. 2001. the Claude Kantner Graduate Fellowship.fafsa. While CollegeSource®. Ford Federal Direct Subsidized Loan. The tuition scholarship will be discontinued if your academic average as a graduate student at Ohio University falls below a 3.0 scale). The 260 hour subsidy limit is defined as graduate course credit taken at Ohio University and credit earned for work performed prior to admission to Ohio University. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2002. The following fellowships are awarded by the associate provost for graduate studies. In such cases. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. Payment of the remainder of the general fee is the student’s responsibility. the Anthony Trisolini Graduate Fellowship. Interest in applying for FLAS funding should be indicated on the application to the Center for International Studies. Graduate Council guidelines state that graduate students holding graduate appointments written for an academic year must receive notice of renewal or nonrenewal of that appointment no later than the end of spring quarter. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. CollegeSource®. Graduate students seeking continuation of stipend and scholarship support must follow all departmental policies and procedures pertaining to renewal of that support. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and (3) Federal Work-Study (FWS). complete the Free Application online at http:// www.Financial Aid The graduate appointment will be discontinued if your cumulative and/or term grade-point average as a graduate student at Ohio University falls below 3. This constraint does not apply to stipends provided through research grants or other non-university funding sources. While CollegeSource®. Some schools or departments require a higher average. Additional fellowship opportunities may be found at the Graduate Studies Web site: http://www. You must carry an academic course load of 15 graduate hours and pay the general fee for the summer quarter. The graduate appointment may be discontinued if duties are not performed satisfactorily as defined by the immediate supervisor or department/school.0 graduate grade-point average. the University will provide stipend support after a student exceeds 260 graduate hours only with the approval of the dean of the college. The University also participates in available federal fellowship programs. the Donald Clippinger Graduate Fellowship. 1996. 2000. fellowships.0 (on a 4. Inc. . 1997. (2) the Federal Perkins Loan. 1997. with the advice of the Graduate Council: the John Cady Graduate Fellowship. CollegeSource®. or tuition scholarships). If the applicant has no previous graduate study. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.ed. or GA.ohio. Graduate students holding spring quarter appointments must be notified no later than the end of the spring quarter of renewal or nonrenewal for fall quarter.org/pdf/resolution.S. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.0 scale). and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.0 (on a 4. 2001. Once a student exceeds 260 subsidy hours. These are granted on a competitive basis Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Some schools or departments may require a higher average. Full text of the resolution can be found at http://www. 2007. These scholarships require full-time study (12 graduate credits per quarter for RA. and Environmental and Plant Biology. The African Studies Program and the Southeast Asia Studies Program at the Center for International Studies offer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships to U. 2005. This provision does not apply to contracts terminated early or not renewed for academic or service performance reasons. The need-based programs available to graduate students are: (1) the William D. no prior notification is required. 2000. Inc. You will be notified of your eligibility by the Ohio University Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships. 1998. that student no longer qualifies for a tuition scholarship. 1996. 1 Traineeships and Fellowships Ohio University has a limited number of named fellowships such as the Hiram Roy Wilson Fellowships in Biological Sciences. Graduate students holding graduate appointments written on a quarterly basis must receive notice of renewal or nonrenewal of contract at least one quarter before the end of that contract period. 1999. In such cases. 2006. Inc. 2004. Need­Based Assistance To apply for need-based aid.gov/ for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). to incoming graduate students who have maintained high undergraduate averages. 1998. March 15 is the first-priority deadline date that has been set for consideration for campus-based aid— the Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Work-Study. 15 graduate credits per quarter for Recruitment scholarship/stipends. Tuition scholarships may be available for the summer quarter to those students who have a scholarship for the spring quarter preceding or the fall quarter following the summer quarter.cgsnet.pdf. 2003. 2007. Trainees and Assistants. The Federal Perkins Loan Tuition Scholarships Full or partial tuition scholarships are available in conjunction with a graduate appointment or fellowship. and the Office of Graduate Studies Fellowship. 2005. 1995. Additionally. no prior notification is required. Inc. 2004. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required. Notification of summer quarter appointments can be made as early as practicable Ohio University is a signatory to the Council of Graduate School’s Resolution Regarding Graduate Scholars.edu/ graduate/ Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships Financial aid available to graduate students through the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships consists of loan assistance and employment opportunities. Time Limits Time limits for financial support of graduate students through assistantships and fellowships are determined by the school or department responsible for the individual program. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Generally. This provision does not apply to contracts terminated early or not renewed for academic or service performance reasons. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2002. 1995. Chemistry. 2006. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. Stocker Fellowships are available in the Russ College of Engineering and Technology. TA. Fellows.

While CollegeSource®. The funds are sent directly to Ohio University to be awarded to the most needy students. Ohio University awards the funds directly. Variable costs consist of books and supplies. the minimum credit hours required are: full-time= nine credit hours. Variable expenses are estimated and are based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). 1996. an award offer is made to all eligible applicants. Inc. 2004. you are no longer Award Disbursements Federal aid recipients must be officially enrolled through the Registrar’s Office and fulfill all other requirements (verification of the FAFSA data. 2000. You will receive a FWS payroll check every two weeks for the hours worked and approved by the hiring department for the pay period. Once your MTF total reaches 9 quarters. 2005. 1999. While CollegeSource®. 2006. 2001. 2007. A Graduate Internship/Practicum Verification Form must be completed by the department certifying the student’s eligibility. and employment to offset costs. Minimum credit hour standards require you to earn a minimum number of hours based on your enrollment status. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. an attempt is made to balance gift aid (grants and scholarships) with self-help aid (employment and loans) while working within the limits of available funds and your eligibility. 2003. Exit Counseling must be completed prior to graduation. You (and your spouse. In certain circumstances. they must complete their program by the time their maximum time frame value reaches 9. 1996. Cost of Attendance Each year. graduate students must be enrolled at least half time (minimum of five graduate credit hours) per quarter. if you are married) are expected to assist in financing your educational costs. graduate teaching/research assistantships. The following equation is used to determine financial need: Cost of education (budget) – Minus expected student contribution = Financial need Award Package After the FAFSA results and other documents have been received and reviewed for accuracy (verified if applicable). 1997. Maximum time frame standards (MTF) are determined by your enrollment status. Notification of Aid Offers All applicants who are eligible for aid will receive notification from the financial aid office. etc. Inc.dl. 2004. All federal aid recipients must comply with financial aid office procedures for adjusting overawards if the total federal aid received exceeds the financial need. Inc. Total financial aid credits greater than the University charges will result in a refund being generated in the amount of the excess funds. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1995. the Ohio University Board of Trustees determines the fixed costs (tuition and fees. Federal regulations allow a student to be eligible to receive aid up to 150% of the time that it normally would take to complete a degree. Stafford Loans require a completed Electronic Master Promissory Note or online loan confirmation prior to disbursement of funds.0 cumulative g. Eligibility Requirements To receive financial aid. Certain students will have award letters mailed to permanent or local addresses. 2006. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is calculated from your previous year’s earnings. Consult the Schedule of Classes for more detailed information concerning actual dates of disbursement for each quarter. CollegeSource®. benefits. 1998. 1999. The award package can be a combination of gift assistance (fellowships. scholarships. Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards Federal regulations require that all financial aid applicants meet Ohio University’s satisfactory academic progress standards: (1) minimum credit hours earned for the appropriate enrollment. 2007.p.gov/. 1998. but in general.a. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. plus an outof-state surcharge. Inc. Not all students receive all types of aid. and Career Guidance Foundation. This definition of half-time enrollment must be used for all students in the same program and must be used for all student financial aid related purposes. Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.) before disbursement of aid. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. As a graduate student. etc. personal. The combined fixed and variable costs make up your total cost (budget) for the academic year. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. All gift aid received from all other sources must be reported when determining Federal Direct Student Loans eligibility. Inc. and (3) minimum 3. transportation. Federal Work Study awards are not credited to your account because the award must be earned before being paid. and miscellaneous expenses.00 quarters. You must provide documentation in writing to the financial aid office for individual consideration. Determining Eligibility Graduate students are considered independent. Additionally. Disbursement of funds will vary depen-ding on the type of financial aid awards you have been offered. and room and board rates) for graduate students. 2002. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Award notification will be emailed to enrolled students and awards are available online. All Title IV federal aid recipients must maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined by the financial aid office and the University. 2000. and funding for these programs is limited. . and Career Guidance Foundation. untaxed income. These requirements can be met through the Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2005. 2002.). 2001. Refunds will be mailed to your local address or direct deposited to your bank account to assist you in meeting other expenses related to your education. Direct Loan Web site at: http://www. federal loans. 2003. 1995. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. a student’s department may determine that a graduate internship or practicum that is required for a student’s degree is the equivalent of being enrolled half time. and a percentage of personal savings and assets. The Federal Perkins Loan requires a promissory note to be signed before the funds can be disbursed. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. (2) maximum time frame during which a degree or certificate must be granted. All first-time Stafford Loan borrowers must complete Entrance Loan Counseling prior to loan disbursement.14 Financial Aid and Federal Work-Study are awarded differently than the Stafford Loans. CollegeSource®. and biannual budget surveys. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. half-time=five credit hours. Late applicants (after March 15) most likely will not receive awards for either the Federal Perkins Loan or Federal WorkStudy. Applying and having your results at Ohio University before the March 15 priority date makes you likely to receive a more attractive package than those who apply later. For graduate students to remain eligible.ed.

edu. To avoid an overaward. you should not be hesitant to borrow as an investment in your future.1 percent. Inc. regardless of periods during which you received no financial aid.). Research.– 4:30 p. Inc. and failure to repay can result in substantial penalties. you may be considered overawarded according to federal guidelines. 2000.4140. An interest rate of 9 percent also is charged if your source of repayment is not financial aid. notify the financial aid office of all additional resources (current and estimated. telephone 740. Chubb Hall 020. written notices. It is important that you update your permanent and local addresses with the Registrar’s Office and read your e-mail regularly to avoid delays that may be costly. 2003. All borrowers are charged a $5 processing fee. you must demonstrate unmet need after other types of assistance. Eligibility is determined by the Federal Methodology need analysis on the FAFSA and must not exceed the difference between the cost of education (budget) minus the expected family contribution and other aid estimated to be made available. Inc. or e-mail. The Federal Direct Subsidized Student Loan maximum for graduate students is $8.593. and graduate research assistantships. The financial aid office serves as an employment clearinghouse for job posting and referrals for all hiring departments at Ohio University (Athens campus) and for private (off-campus) employers as well.m. Ford Federal Direct Student Loan is a federal loan for students enrolled at least half time in a degree-granting or certificate program at a participating postsecondary institution. All loan proceeds are disbursed in equal installments by term. Loan repayment may be deferred for certain conditions. 2007.m. 2006. If you are in default on previous Ohio University loans or federal loans. and fellowships.edu/financialaid/ 15 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and coordinates student employment policies and procedures.25 percent. While CollegeSource®. 2007.4141 (8:30 a. 1999. 1997. 1998. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.ohio. and Career Guidance Foundation. and if you choose not to pay the interest while you attend school it will accrue on the loan principal. 1995. If you are a first-time borrower. All applicants for student loans must file a FAFSA to determine their eligibility. Inc.0 minimum grade point average must be met by the end of the second academic year (spring quarter) of enrollment. Emergencies or schedule conflicts may be accommodated as needed. fine arts) should contact the financial aid office. Because of the favorable terms and conditions of educational loans. Teaching). all employment opportunities for students are posted on a jobs board located in the hallway near the Office of Financial Aid and at http://www. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.e. Graduate students may be eligible to borrow up to $10. The William D. Ohio University Loans are institutional funds that are made available to students on a temporary basis to provide cash while waiting for disbursement of financial aid or earnings from employment. Students enrolled in programs requiring nine quarters of study (i. and spring break hours may vary slightly. Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. loans represent debts that must be repaid. 2004. You also may choose to schedule an appointment with your counselor (counselor assignments are made alphabetically by your last name). 2004. Student Loans Student loans are playing an increasingly significant role in financing post-secondary education. You also must complete Exit Counseling once nearing completion of your program or withdrawal from the University. Web http:// www. 1998. 1996. CollegeSource®. Summer. tuition scholarships. On the other hand. Inc. The interest rate changes annually on July 1 and is equal to the rate on 91-day Treasury Bills plus 3. you are not eligible to receive a new institutional loan.Financial Aid eligible to receive Title IV and selected other types of financial assistance. The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Student Loan may be available if you do not qualify for the maximum Subsidized Stafford Loans. For more detailed information on financial aid programs. This service assists in hiring students for part-time jobs.593. Employment Opportunities Centralized Student Employment Services was established by Ohio University to provide job opportunity information for all students. 1995. you will be required to complete Entrance Counseling regarding your rights and responsibilities. winter. . You must complete a one-page loan application and have it approved before a loan check is issued. 2005. 1997. Also. 1999.m.edu/ financialaid/ under online services. 2002.500 per academic year. and review of policies and procedures for different financial aid programs. if you are eligible. will be reported to the financial aid office by the Office of Graduate Studies. 2006. Graduate Assistance Recipients of graduate awards in the form of assistantships (Graduate. 2001. Some of the services provided by the counselor are confirmation of financial aid for preregistration. e-mail financial. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. To qualify for the Subsidized Stafford Loans. While CollegeSource®. All applicants for the Stafford Loans must file a FAFSA to determine their eligibility. such as tuition scholarships. An Ohio University short-term loan must be repaid during the same quarter in which it is borrowed. review of financial need and eligibility. when possible) when applying for the FDSL..m.000 in additional Direct Unsubsidized Loans. research and teaching assistantships. and loan consolidation is possible under the Reauthorization Act. Federal regulations and institutional policies are subject to change without notice. All tuition scholarships will be included as part of the aid package when calculating federal need-based aid. fax 740. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2002. Financial Aid Services Services are available to students on a daily basis between 8:30 a. and Career Guidance Foundation. The financial aid office will attempt to keep you updated through various media on campus.ohio. and Career Guidance Foundation. contact us: Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships. fellowships. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. maximizes employment opportunities and job placement. CollegeSource®.aid@ohio. You are responsible for the interest. Interest rates for Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans are variable and will not exceed 8. The federal government has expanded the limits on these vital loan programs to assure that students will have access to and a choice among educational institutions. 2000. and 4:30 p. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1996. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. a 3. have been considered. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. If you receive a loan for summer quarter and later receive a graduate scholarship. When new positions are available or vacancies occur. 2005.

p. Once grades are submitted to the University Registrar.0) in each of two five-hour courses. D equals 1. FN and FS have the same value as an F.0. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.).67. . 2001. A g. You may receive a grade of Progress (PR) in courses that are not yet complete or that extend over more than one quarter. G. Grade point values are assigned for each quarter hour of credit completed according to the grading system below. after completing the two courses would be 3.p. 1995. 2001. Grades cannot be changed by arranging to complete additional work. B equals 3. and Career Guidance Foundation.a. 1999. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. An Incomplete (I) indicates that you have made progress in a course but have not finished the work required to receive a letter grade. These hours are not counted in quarter hours attempted.p. No grade below C (2.a. C+ equals 2.00.p. 2006. 1996.33. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2004.0. the instructor reports a final grade indicating the quality of a student’s work in the class. 1996. Inc. Inc. The University Registrar’s deadines for submitting grades each quarter or session must be met.A. While CollegeSource®. Should you achieve less than an overall B (3. Your g. 2000. 2000. Inc. CollegeSource®. or grade points until a letter grade is reported. 2007. B– equals 2.0) can be used to satisfy any degree requirement. D+ equals 1.). D– equals 0. Grading Information At the close of a session or upon completion of a class. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1995. stopped attending). if you have earned a B (3.0) is required in each category. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1997. Academic work at Ohio University is evaluated on the following grading system: a grade of A equals 4.0) and an A (4. 1997. is calculated on all attempts at all courses numbered 500 and higher. 2005. Failure to do so creates problems for students such as loss of employment.p. Your g. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and Career Guidance Foundation. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. While CollegeSource®. an FN (failure. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005.00) grade­point average on a continuing basis. 2002. This average is determined by dividing the total number of grade points you have earned by the total number of quarter hours of credit you have attempted. All graduate students are expected to maintain at least an overall B (3.67. in formal coursework is computed separately from the average in research.a. A– equals 3. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. The g. Inc. The basis for determining your scholastic standing is the gradepoint average (g.p.67. C– equals 1. 2004. is figured only on credit hours in courses for which you receive either letter grades. CollegeSource®. Inc.0. The following grades also may be recorded: Credit (CR) is usually awarded for satisfactory completion of seminars. This means the original grade in a course that is retaken is not dropped from the accumulative g. 1998.0) grade­point average (g.p. thesis.0. 2006. Departments may establish more rigorous standards.a. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2002. 2003. or an FS (failure. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.a. B+ equals 3. scholarships. Grades of CR or PR are not used in computing your grade-point average. and dissertation credits to determine eligibility for graduation. and thesis or dissertation credit.P. they are final and cannot be changed unless evidence of an error can be presented or a formal grade appeal process is completed in accordance with Ohio University’s official grade appeal policy (see the Faculty Handbook section “Final Examinations and Change of Grade”). Inc. C equals 2.33. research projects. financial aid.16 Academic Policies Academic Policies and Procedures Standards of Work Conferral of either a master’s or doctoral degree requires at least a B (3. of at least B (3. 2007.33. never attended). For example. hours earned. first calculate the number of grade points by multiplying the number of hours in each course by the point value for that grade (5x3=15 and 5x4=20).00) grade­point average. 1998.67.5). and opportunities for further study. and F equals 0.a. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.5.a. the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled will solicit a written statement from your departmental graduate committee to justify your continuation in the program. Divide the total number of grade points by the number of hours attempted (35÷10=3. 1999.

If you are writing a thesis. Graduate level courses (500 and higher) may not be taken with a Pass/Fail grading option. The copies are bound and cataloged. or 3) The instructor reports an ineligible grade for the grade eligibility of the course. 2006. and Career Guidance Foundation. CR. 2002. Refer to the requirements listed by each program. 1995. A pamphlet. 1999. While CollegeSource®. the last date of attendance indicated is recorded on the student’s academic record. Inc. This pamphlet contains regulations regarding type. Results of the examination are reported to the Office of Graduate Studies and Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. While CollegeSource®. Requests from the instructor for an extension of time beyond six weeks cannot exceed the end of the next quarter enrolled. research.p.p. and scholarly style in the thesis. 1996. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. punctuation. fine arts. 2005. and other aspects. A comprehensive examination may be required. A pamphlet titled “Guidelines for Preparation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations” describes this option. Each department prescribes the specific style manual to be followed by its students. 2007. 2000. FS–Failure. A grade of No Report (NR) is assigned when: 1) The instructor does not report the grade. a certain amount of undergraduate preparation in the subject or field of study is presupposed before you may undertake graduate study in that subject or field. you may submit a copy of the thesis to University Microfilms International for microfilming and entry into electronic databases. together with a written essay indicating the purpose. quality of paper. Check with the instructor. margins. problems.” is available in the college deans’ offices. In most departments a minimum of 27 undergraduate credits is required in the major area. You may not have more than 12 credits with a CR grade exclusive of practicum. The examining committee is composed of the director of the thesis (as chair) and two or more additional faculty members. A single paper copy is bound and placed in the library. and dean. the I converts to an F letter grade six weeks into the next quarter you are enrolled. 2006. It counts as an F in your g. Thesis Requirement If you are in a thesis program. if a grade was submitted. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. in consultation with members of the examining committee. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.a. 2004. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2003. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Graduate students completing a thesis have the option of submitting their thesis in an electronic rather than paper copy format. You may meet the thesis requirement by presenting the results of a creative activity in literature. Inc. contact the Office of the University Registrar to learn what is necessary to clear up the problem. Inc. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. FN–Failure. It is your responsibility to ascertain whether a period of residence on the Athens campus is required in your major and to plan a program of study accordingly by consulting with your advisor and departmental graduate committee. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. one copy is retained in your department. Never Attended is given when you do not drop a class for which you are officially registered but did not attend. “Format for the Presentation of Theses and Dissertations. Students wishing to explore this option should contact the Office of Graduate Studies. 2001. CollegeSource®. Theses submitted electronically are available through OhioLink. Inc. It counts as an F in your g. procedure. In addition. . 2) The instructor reports the grade too late for processing. You and your thesis director. or I is made by the department and is recorded in the Office of the University Registrar. 17 Master’s Degrees A minimum of 45 graduate credits is required for conferral of the master’s degree. one copy is placed in Archives and the other in the stacks. 1995. 2005. This grade does not count in the g. Additional credits may be required by individual departments. The thesis is considered a public document and made available to the public in the same manner as any other document cataloged within the University library. Since graduate work implies advanced study and some degree of specialization. and Career Guidance Foundation. WP/WF–Withdrawn Passing/ Withdrawn Failing is given when a course is dropped after the 15th day of the quarter. 1997.a. as though it had been dropped by the 15th calendar day of the quarter) requires action by the late course withdrawal review panel. You must present final copies of the thesis to members of your examination committee at least two weeks before the date of your oral examination to allow adequate review of the manuscript. 1998. 1999. The thesis provides an opportunity for you to formulate and express the results of research and study. internship. 1996. 2007. 1997. music. If you wish. After the thesis has been approved by your thesis committee. 1998. Determination of appropriate use of letter grades. Oral Thesis Examination An oral thesis examination is required of all students in a thesis program. In addition. and bibliography involved in the work. 2000. thesis director. as well as detailed directions for submitting the finished thesis. two copies are forwarded to Alden Library. The pamphlet is available in the Office of Graduate Studies (McKee House). you must obtain from your dean’s office the current “Format” and the printed list of quarterly deadlines for graduation. Stopped Attending is given when you stop attending but do not officially drop a course for which you registered and attended at least once.Academic Policies If neither a letter grade nor notification from the instructor for an extension of time is received by the Office of the University Registrar. 2001. the nature and timing of which is determined by the department. CollegeSource®. Inc. Any remaining Incompletes will be calculated as F in determining your eligibility for graduation. for tuition and grade purposes. or industrial arts. PR.a. and thesis hours applied to your minimal credit requirements. 2004. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. You and your thesis director are responsible for maintaining accepted standards of grammar. sentence structure. form. Inc.p. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. You should develop a program of study approved by your advisor and the departmental graduate committee early in your first graduate quarter to ensure that you satisfy all degree requirements in the most efficient manner possible. Removal of FN or FS from the record (treating the course. you will prepare the thesis under the guidance of your thesis director on a subject in the field of your major work (see “Restricted Publications of Theses or Dissertations”). set a time and place for the examination. 2003.

and Career Guidance Foundation. applicable toward a graduate degree at the institution where taken. 1997. the departmental graduate committee will forward to the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled a recommendation for appointment of a dean’s representative. No letter grades will appear on the transcript for transferred courses. project. For Master’s degree programs longer than 45 hours. 1998. You may use no more than three courses or up to a maximum of 15 credit hours from one master’s degree program to satisfy degree requirements in a second master’s degree program. nor will they be calculated in your grade-point average. Second and Dual Master’s Degrees If you wish to earn a second or dual master’s degree at Ohio University. Inc. A minimum of 135 hours beyond the bachelor’s degree must be completed for conferral of a doctoral degree. updating the project or thesis. 1999. Any request for transfer of credit must be recommended by your advisor and departmental graduate committee before final review and acceptance by your dean’s office. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. the specifications for readmission must be presented to you in writing. when the dissertation propo-sal is nearing approval. Credits requested for transfer cannot have been used to satisfy requirements for completion of another degree. CollegeSource®. 2003. taking additional practicum or internship hours. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Nonthesis Option Several departments have master’s degree programs with a nonthesis option. you must make formal application for admission to the department in which you are seeking the second or dual master’s degree and pay the appropriate application fee. If circumstances require an extension of time beyond the one-quarter dean’s extension. 2007. For a second master’s degree. Any admission status given in a second master’s degree program must be regarded as provisional until the programs of study are received. Graduate work completed at another university will be considered by the departmental graduate committee and your advisory committee in the development of your program of study. 2006. Typically. 1996. 2000. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2001. letter graded B or better. While CollegeSource®. If you do not complete your requirements within the time limit. Any master’s degree program that requires more than 60 hours may increase the six-year time limit to seven years. Departments may set more restrictive limits on the number or type of transfer credit accepted. Inc. To be eligible for transfer. name. courses must be designated as graduate credit at the institution where taken. 2007. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Only courses counting toward an Ohio University degree are eligible to appear on the Ohio University transcript as transfer credit. 2002. Program of Study and Advisory Committee The graduate committee of your department will assign an advisor and an advisory committee who must approve the proposed program of study for the degree. with the exception of the maximum number of hours. 1995. 2005. earned within the past five years. which is waived for students pursuing doctoral degrees. Many academic areas regard a nonthesis master’s program as a terminal degree program. and number of credits. 1999. 1995. Inc. you must prepare a program of study for each master’s degree by listing the course number. Each program of study must be signed by the departmental graduate committee in both departments in which master’s degrees will be earned.18 Academic Policies the Office of the University Registrar as soon as final approval of the thesis is given. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation. The program may require retaking or adding particular courses. 2004. Transfer of Credit A maximum of 12 (quarter) credit hours may be transferred from an accredited university to a Master’s degree program of 45 hours at Ohio University. or thesis. Doctoral Degrees The doctoral degree is granted on the basis of evidence that you have achieved a high level of scholarship and proficiency in research rather than solely on the basis of successful completion of a prescribed amount of coursework. 2000. While CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. Committee membership Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. . 2004. 2001. 1996. 2002. Check with the Office of Graduate Studies or your graduate department to verify the time limit for your graduate program. Inc. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005. with a copy placed on file in the Office of Graduate Studies. The criteria for readmission should be the currency of your courses. Your competence and ability to work independently and write creatively are established by qualifying and comprehensive examinations and the quality of a dissertation submitted as an account of your original research. 2003. Consult with your advisor and carefully consider your career goals in deciding between a thesis or nonthesis option. 2006. and earned in courses taught by members of that institution’s graduate faculty. The graduate committee of the program and the dean of the college must review the readmission application. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1997. Courses equivalent to those at Ohio University cannot be transferred for credit and also be taken for credit at Ohio University. no more than 25 percent of the total graded coursework requirements may be transferred to the degree program. Inc. If readmission is approved. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. You must then submit the programs of study to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval. The dean of your college may grant a one-time. together with the names of other dissertation committee members and the title of your dissertation. you must apply for readmission to the program by completing a new application form and paying the reapplication fee. or fulfilling any degree requirements that have been added since the initiation of your program. 1998. you may be permitted to continue graduate study only if exceptional circumstances are associated with the delay. one-quarter extension for the quarter immediately following the final quarter in which your degree requirements were to have been complete based on the Time Limit policy as described above. Time Limit The maximum time allowed between the date when you first initiate graduate study toward a master’s degree and the date when you complete the requirements for the master’s degree is six calendar years. CollegeSource®. Credit is not accepted for courses taken by correspondence. The guidelines for transfer of credit outlined in the previous section apply. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.

and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. Doctoral committee membership is determined by college policy. and Career Guidance Foundation. one copy is placed in Archives and the other in the stacks. 1996. Oral Dissertation Examination An oral dissertation examination is required of all doctoral candidates. Admission to Candidacy Admission to candidacy is achieved after you have completed the following steps: (1) formation of the dissertation committee (including the dean’s representative). A copy of the dissertation abstract should be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies for inclusion in your official file. If you receive Ohio University stipend support. While CollegeSource®. 2002. The examining committee is composed 19 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. . you are considered to have instructional full-time status by registering for a minimum of 12 graduate credits for an assistanship. If you expect to demonstrate proficiency in one of the scholarly disciplines in which examinations are arranged by your dean’s office (e. You are not permitted to schedule the oral examination of the dissertation until you have met all requirements for admission to candidacy. margins. Competence is determined by standards and methods established by the individual department. “Format for the Presentation of Theses and Dissertations. You must obtain from your dean’s office the current “Format” and the list of quarterly deadlines for graduation. at least three academic quarters of the doctoral program are in continuous residence on the Athens campus in an institutional full-time status (registration for 9 graduate credits). 2000. as well as detailed directions for submitting the finished dissertation to the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. you take a comprehensive examination to establish your mastery of the fields of specialization and readiness for advanced research. is submitted by each candidate (see “Restricted Publications of Theses or Dissertations”). The pamphlet is available in the Office of Graduate Studies (McKee House). one copy is retained in your department. fellowship. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and another is submitted to University Microfilms International for microfilming and entry into Dissertation Abstracts International. Forms indicating completion of the above steps are available from and filed in the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1999. dissertation director. You must be registered for a minimum of two hours in the quarter in which you take the examination. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. German. 2000. 2003. and other aspects. Inc. 1999. Copyright Dissertations can be copyrighted at the time the manuscripts are sent to University Microfilms International. 2006. While CollegeSource®. The dissertation is considered a public document and made available to the public in the same manner as any other document cataloged within the University library. Inc. This pamphlet contains regulations regarding type. In addition. Dissertation A dissertation. and (4) satisfaction of all required scholarly disciplines. For further information. 1998. 2004. CollegeSource®. 1998.g. A pamphlet. 2005. 1995. and upon the recommendation of the advisory committee. abstract. (3) successful completion of the comprehensive examination. (2) approval of the research proposal by this committee.. 1996. Dissertations submitted electronically are available through OhioLink. You may lose the ability to obtain a copyright if your dissertation is not copyrighted at the time of submission to your dean’s office. This form is available from and should be filed with the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. you must file an appropriate intent form. and dean. Inc. CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997. Arrangements can be made through the library for this service. and Career Guidance Foundation. Comprehensive Examination When coursework is virtually completed. statistics. 2001. the scholarly account of research in the new area of knowledge. Under current copyright procedures. Scholarly Discipline Requirement The doctoral degree by definition is research oriented. 2001. and each department determines the auxiliary research competencies needed by doctoral candidates. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. contact the University Libraries administrative office in Alden Library 512. Information and application forms are available at the Department of Modern Languages. A copy of this form should be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies to be included in your academic file. The French. Upon the return of the copy from University Microfilms International. After the dissertation has been approved by your dissertation committee. and Career Guidance Foundation. or foreign language). Academic Residency Requirement Normally. 2003. 2007. Students wishing to explore this option should contact the Office of Graduate Studies. Each department prescribes the specific style manual to be followed by its students. A copy of your admission-to-candidacy letter should be sent to the Office of Graduate Studies for inclusion in your official file. microfilming by University Microfilms International constitutes publication. 2007. 2006.” is available in the deans’ offices. Gordy Hall 283. A pamphlet titled “Guidelines for Preparation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations” describes this option. 1995. 2005. 1997. The committee must consist of at least three members representing the range of content in your program of study. Inc. The continuous residence requirement applies to the period of graduate study following the completion of the master’s degree or the completion of at least 45 graduate credits. two copies are forwarded to Alden Library. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Russian. both copies are bound and cataloged. computer science. quality of paper.Academic Policies guidelines are set by each college. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. which may be the same as your advisory committee. in addition to the representative from the dean’s office. The results of the examination must be reported within one week to the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled on a form provided by the dean’s office. and Spanish proficiency examinations of the Educational Testing Service are given at Ohio University several times during the year. or a minimum of 15 graduate credits for Recruitment scholarship/stipend. A single paper copy is bound and placed in the library. Check with the dean’s office for specific information. or tuition scholarship only. Doctoral students have the option of submitting their dissertation in an electronic rather than paper copy format.

2005. 2001. If circumstances require an extension beyond the one-quarter dean’s extension. If you are currently attending the University. includes the cataloging and placement of the approved manuscript in the Ohio University Libraries and. in the judgment of the office. you need to obtain a new registration access code (RAC). retaking the oral/written comprehensive examination. 1996. your Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Master’s students must be registered for at least one graduate credit hour. You must also be registered in the quarter in which you will graduate. You must submit the request for delay with the formal approval of your advisor at least one academic quarter before the normal date of publication of the thesis or dissertation. 1998. you must apply for readmission to the program. If you are approved for readmission. CollegeSource®. microfilming by University Microfilms International.0 Academic Policies of your entire dissertation committee (including the representative of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled) unless otherwise specified by the associate provost for graduate studies. The dean of your college may grant a one-time. following the procedure detailed in the quarterly Schedule of Classes. students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies. 1997. Inc. For additional information about this option. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. (University Microfilms International does allow authors to restrict the distribution of dissertations and theses. or reapply for admission. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2000. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. The application for readmission must be reviewed by the graduate committee of the program and the dean of the college.ohio.051. the data upon which your thesis or dissertation is based are proprietary and not available in the public domain. 2004. The card is issued free of charge according to these guidelines: 1 If you are a new student. Criteria for readmission should be the currency of your (1) knowledge of the required work. consult Ohio University Policy and Procedure #19. Details of the examination. 2001. 1996. gives you access to campus services including the meal plan. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2002. in which case the manuscript is withheld until the issue has been resolved. While CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. library privileges. one-quarter extension for the quarter immediately following the final quarter in which your degree requirements were to have been completed. Any exceptions to registration hour requirements must be approved by the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled. 1999. for dissertations. the specifications for readmission must be presented to you in writing with a copy placed on file in the Office of Graduate Studies.edu/registrar/ or you may pick up a printed copy at the Office of the University Registrar (Chubb Hall). 1997. While CollegeSource®. are sent by the dean’s office to you and the examiners. Identification Card When you register. The final arrangements for the examination must be completed through the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled at least 10 days prior to the examination. for this purpose. This card. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. or falsification or misrepresentation of data is raised. Inc. 2004. Inc. 1999. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. The program may require additional coursework. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Restricted Publication of Theses or Dissertations The University does not accept theses or dissertations containing material developed as part of a research project if the thesis or dissertation is restricted from publication. . 1998. 2000. 1995. 2006. issued by Communication Network Services (CNS). Former students whose admission status has expired through time limits must apply for a time extension. you may register for a subsequent quarter. Inc. libelous or abusive statements. For further information. Publication. you will be given information about obtaining an identification card. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2 If you are a re-enrolling student returning after one year or more. 1995. changing or updating the dissertation. and (3) research methods and techniques. 2003. If you do not complete requirements for the degree within the given period. which is available approximately two weeks before the beginning of priority registration each quarter on the Registrar’s Web site at http://www. Registration Details concerning registration procedures are given in each quarter’s Schedule of Classes. you are issued a card free of charge. and doctoral students for at least two.) Upon written request to your dean’s office. This provision is made available to ensure individuals the opportunity to publish the thesis or dissertation work. If you are a graduate student with admission status who has not registered for a quarter or more (except summer). (2) research literature. You must be registered at the graduate level in any quarter in which you receive any service from the University or use its facilities. 2006. Time Limit You must complete the doctoral program of study within seven calendar years of the date of its initiation as determined by the department and recorded in the Office of Graduate Studies. or fulfilling any degree requirements that have been added since the initiation of your program. and the Student Health Service. Inc. Students submitting theses or dissertations electronically may restrict electronic access to the documents for up to five years. The Office of Graduate Studies should be notified of the date that you passed the oral examination for inclusion in your official file. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2003. 2007. A thesis or dissertation completed at Ohio University is withheld from the public only if it has been approved for delayed publication following the procedures outlined above or if a question of plagiarism. you may delay publication up to a maximum of 12 months if. CollegeSource®. Students whose admission status has expired due to graduation must apply to a new degree or nondegree program. you may be permitted to continue in graduate study only if exceptional circumstances are associated with the delay in progress. including time and place. which is automatically validated when you register. You must present final copies of the dissertation to members of the examining committee at least two weeks before the date of your oral examination to allow adequate time for review. 2005.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. billing notification. including the 10-week summer quarter Sub-term: any five week summer session In the case of flexibly scheduled classes (classes that meet for fewer days than a quarter or sub-term). Courses taken for audit do not fulfill registration requirements for graduate appointments. adding certain classes after classes begin requires special permission from the instructor and is prohibited after the 15th calendar day. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. at the instructor’s discretion. 1999. call the University Support Center. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Your final tuition charges are based on your enrollment as of the deadline. follow the registration procedures outlined in the quarterly Schedule of Classes. The academic fees for auditing a course are the same as the fees for taking a course for credit. 2000. schedules. may request that Graduate Studies cancel your registration because of poor academic performance. failure to provide final transcripts. Registrar Staff Offices. 1 Change Procedures Changing Your Class Schedule After Classes Begin Note the terminology used in explanations of the deadlines that follow: Quarter: any quarter. you must register for at least nine quarter hours of graduate work.593. 2004. Quarterly grades. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. as described elsewhere in this catalog.) Adds. drop a class. or other violations of University policy. You may add a class for which you have not met the prerequisite only by receiving the instructor’s permission to take the class. (See “Drops” below.1222. 2007.Academic Policies old card will be valid upon registration. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and if you do not meet the requirements. It is imperative that you know your Oak account and password. please note that departments or individual instructors may close registration for their courses prior to the 8th calendar day. and other University communications are sent to your Oak account. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 154 HDL Center. 740. you will be issued a new card free of charge provided you return your old card when the new one is issued. falsified signatures. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. If you have problems accessing your e-mail or have questions. you will not be charged. you will be charged $10 for a new card only if you do not return the old card. For more information about veterans benefits. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1995. you may be removed from the class. You can make this change only during the first 15 calendar days of the quarter or the active registration period for the appropriate summer session.) 2 If your name or Social Security number has changed. Inc. 1997. You may add a class. you may add a class only with instructor permission.4186. 3 If your name or Social Security number has changed. CollegeSource®. Full­Time Status A graduate student enrolling for nine or more credits is assessed full-time fees. the deadlines are pro-rated. your schedule becomes official. While CollegeSource®. Inc. To activate your Oak account. you will need to obtain a permission slip from the instructor or departmental representative and then return the slip to the office indicated on the slip for final processing. E­mail (your Oak account) Your free Ohio University Oak e-mail account will be activated for you when you pick up your University ID Card at Communication Network Services (CNS). copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. If you return the old card when the new one is issued. However. However. You also may activate your account at http://technology. Veterans Educational Benefits To receive full veterans benefits. . CollegeSource®. 2003. Students with graduate contracts are required to register for a minimum of 12 or 15 graduate hours. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1995. Since auditing is a grading option. as many Ohio University services use this to authenticate access. Dropping any class after the 35th calendar day of a term or 17th calendar day of a subterm is prohibited except by petition through your college’s student services office. 2005. 2006. 1998. 2001. 2002. or damaged within one year of your last quarter of enrollment. 2003. After the 8th calendar day and through the 15th calendar day of any quarter. you can change from audit to credit or credit to audit only by dropping the course and re-adding it with the correct grading option. and Career Guidance Foundation. 740. For classes requiring the instructor’s permission. We do not recommend forwarding your Oak account. Many Ohio University departments and professors depend on Oak e-mail for both announcements and assignments. (A $5 refund will be issued if you find your old card and return it to CNS during the same quarter in which it was replaced. Refer to the Schedule of Classes for specific dates.593. 1996. While CollegeSource®. 2005. stolen. Your Oak account includes the following features: Free software (Mulberry) Spam and virus filtering Web-based access Newtork file storage Personal Web page capabilities Please check your Oak e-mail regularly for official University correspondence. you will be issued a new card free of charge. 1998. Chubb Hall 108. Inc. with a grade of WP or WF. Inc. you will need your Social Security Number and four-digit Registration Access Code (RAC). Contact the Office of the University Registrar for deadline dates. Inc. Your instructor may set up specific requirements for auditing a course. Cancellation of Registration Your advisor or graduate chair. contact the Veterans Coordinator. CNS charges a card replacement fee under these circumstances: 1 You will be charged $10 to replace a card that is lost. Inc. 1997. After the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (8 calendar days of the subterm). You may add a class via Web Registration or TRIPS only during the first 8 calendar days of any quarter or sub-term. 2000.ohio.edu/myaccount/. Be sure to discuss your auditing status with the instructor at the first class meeting. 2002. or correct your registration using the Web Registration system or the Touchtone Registration and Information Processing System (TRIPS) before the quarter or sub-term begins. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. If you no longer have your old card. failure to meet course prerequisites. with the approval of the dean. 2006. 1996. 2007. Auditing To audit a course. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.

1997. in addition to your official transcript. Your reason must be substantial. your schedule becomes official. 11-20 hours equal full-time for undergraduates. and Career Guidance Foundation. When you drop a class after the 15th calendar day of a quarter (8th calendar day of a subterm). Only in extreme instances in which circumstances beyond your control make you unable to have your registration in order by the 15th or 8th calendar day deadlines will the University consider making an exception to this policy. *NOTE: This policy is to be implemented for degree-seeking graduate students in the following way: during the time between registration and the end of the fifth week. If the department graduate committee chair approves the request. 1999. 1996. the tuition will be re-calculated for the remaining registration. 2003. 2000. 2007. When dropping classes affects the total registration for the summer in a way that changes the basis for tuition. you must still pay the full tuition fees and your class(es) will remain on your academic record with WP/WF grade(s).) After the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (8 calendar days of a sub-term). 2002. You may cancel your registration by using Web Registration or TRIPS. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. If you are receiving financial aid. They do not affect your g. a change in enrollment status may result in your having to repay programs from which you received aid. Inc. CollegeSource®. Withdrawing After Classes Have Begun. Inc. Inc. Your final tuition charges are based on your enrollment as of the deadline. 2005.a. which grants an official withdrawal after determining that all obligations to the University have been met. for which students register and pay separately. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. Tuition for summer students who schedule a total of 11 or more hours in any combination of summer registration in the full term or the two sub-terms will be calculated in the usual way (1-10 hours equal parttime. The Office of Graduate Studies can help you present an appeal to the review panel. according to the deadlines for those classes. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. you may petition your department graduate committee chair in writing to request a drop under special circumstances. Academic Policies Drops. 2006.* You may use Web Registration or TRIPS to drop any class except your last class (see Cancelling Registration or Withdrawing from the University below) through the 35th calendar day of a quarter or the 17th calendar day of a sub-term. Cancelling registration for a term does not prevent a student from registering for a future term. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2004. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2007. Withdrawal is not permitted on or after the last day of classes. 1995. . for example. and the tuition for the remaining registration will be recalculated. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. If you drop hours through the 15th calendar day of a quarter (8th calendar day of a sub-term). 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. Note that this means all regular Ohio University classes for which a student is registered for a given term. Tuition Issues When changes in a student’s registration affect the total registration in a way that changes the amount of tuition. and the student will Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Dropping a class is prohibited after these deadlines. This does not prevent a student from registering for a future term. After the fifth week of the quarter and before the last class day of the quarter. 2000. which you then complete and return to the registrar’s office. you are entitled to a 100 percent refund of the reduction if the change results in a reduction of registration fees provided you are not dropping all hours (see Cancelling Registration or Withdrawing from the University below). CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2006. 1997. 1996.p. An adjustment of your registration fees is made according to the schedule in the Refund of Fees section. If you withdraw from the University or reduce your courseload after the deadline. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1995. CollegeSource®. is not considered to be an exceptional circumstance. but under very exceptional circumstances you may petition your college in writing to make an exception. there will be no record of that class on your academic record. 2002. Graduate students who are not formally part of a graduate program are covered by the drop policy as it applies to undergraduates. Fear of earning a low grade in the class. but not distance learning courses in the Division of Lifelong Learning. your withdrawal is processed by the registrar’s office. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. the student will receive the appropriate fee adjustment or pay the appropriate forfeiture for the class(es) dropped. 2001. Cancellation of registration is defined as dropping all classes before the first day of classes. 1999. a copy of the special petition will go to the dean of your college for approval. such decisions are made by a special review panel and require that formal documentation such as a doctor’s statement be submitted to the review panel. 2005. Withdrawing from the University is defined as dropping all classes on or after the first day of classes and no later than the day before the last day of classes for the quarter or sub-term. Withdrawal during the first 15 calendar days of a quarter or 8 calendar days of a sub-term results in an 80 percent tuition refund. Poor academic performance is not sufficient grounds for dropping a course. indicating your academic progress at the time the class was dropped. If you drop a class during the first 15 calendar days of a quarter or 8 calendar days of a sub-term. Changes made after the deadlines will result in no refund. you must inform your instructor and department graduate committee chair of your intent to drop a course. 2001. Inc. While CollegeSource®. While CollegeSource®. 10-18 hours equal fulltime for graduates). (See “Refund of Fees” for more information. and Career Guidance Foundation. Apply for withdrawal by completing a withdrawal request form obtained from the student services office of your college or regional campus. your instructor will assign either a grade of Withdrawn Passing (WP) or Withdrawn Failing (WF). When the request has been approved by the college or regional campus student services office and housing. This includes all classes for which you are registered on all (one or more) campuses. whether on one campus or more than one. 1998. These grades will appear on your academic record and subsequent DARS reports. 1-9 hours equal part-time. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Inc. Even then. or you can call or visit the registrar’s office or the student services office of your college to obtain a cancellation of registration form. Cancelling Registration or Withdrawing from the University (Dropping All Classes) Cancellation Before Classes Have Begun. This may not be done using Web Registration or TRIPS.

and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2001. thus. Although instructors’ policies govern how excused absences will be handled in their classes. 2004. check with your instructor as early as possible to make satisfactory arrangements. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. the hold will be released. not to the first two class meetings. contact the medical director of the Student Health Service (for physical health problems) or the director of Counseling and Psychological Services (for mental health problems). However. and Career Guidance Foundation. Two-Hour Rule.  Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. you may request that your instructor call the Student Health Service to verify your hospitalization. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and then the dean of your college). 2003. After that. the instructor has the option of not admitting you to the class. or the last date you attended classes. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1996. 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation. you will receive an F. The director will make a written recommendation to your academic dean for a medical withdrawal. CollegeSource®. 2003. you will visit the health service as an outpatient without missing class. It is assumed that. you can expect your instructors’ assistance (makeup work. you will not be issued a notification of class absence. 2001. If you are granted a medical withdrawal. A petition to release this hold would be considered by your academic dean. You may not be reinstated until the Office of Graduate Studies has received written clearance from the Student Health Service. (This policy applies to the first two hours of a class. you may request that your instructor call for verification that you received outpatient care. and Career Guidance Foundation. If you are returning to class after a legitimate absence. The decision of this committee is not subject to further appeal. Though your instructor will state specific attendance requirements during the first week of classes each quarter. While CollegeSource®. 1998. Inc. You may document reasons for your absence as follows: If you are participating in an authorized University activity (departmental trip.Academic Policies receive the appropriate fee adjustment or pay the appropriate forfeiture for the class(es) dropped. See the Refund of Fees and Financial Aid sections for further information. Class Attendance Policy The weight given to class attendance in determining your grade is an academic matter. 2000. If satisfaction is not achieved through this process. Such limitations should be explained in the instructor’s attendance policy at the beginning of each course. If you are hospitalized at O’Bleness Memorial Hospital. or athletic competition). recalculation of the student’s grade based on remaining work) within the limits of their established attendance policies. death in the immediate family. and involvement in University-sponsored activities. music or debate activity. religious observance. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997. 2006. If you miss the first two contact hours of a class for which you have registered. While CollegeSource®. Withdrawing for Medical Reasons. will be based on the effective date of your withdrawal and will be made according to the schedule in the Refund of Fees section. . Excused Absences. Inc. then the department chair or school director. 1998. the University does expect you to attend classes regularly. excused absences. whenever possible. 2002. Your withdrawal will be effective on the date you sought treatment from the Student Health Service for your illness or injury.”) Note: If the instructor does not admit you to the class. an FN (failure. check with your instructor to verify your status in the class. jury duty. 2000. 1999. If you were treated by an outside physician who has recommended a medical withdrawal. Inc. To arrange for a medical withdrawal. In the event of serious physical or mental illness. ROTC function. you still must drop the class from your schedule using Web Registration or TRIPS. if applicable. you may appeal through the normal grade appeal process (first through the instructor. If you receive medical care from personnel or facilities other than the Student Health Service. Otherwise. or an FS (failure stopped attending) for the class at the end of the quarter. you are not issued a notification of class absence. and Career Guidance Foundation. There are occasions when the size or the nature of the course makes it necessary to limit the number of excused absences or the availability of makeup work. depending on your particular circumstances. 2007. 2002. Inc. particularly for examinations or such special events as field trips or outside speakers. according to the deadlines for those classes. If you have not been admitted. the dean will appoint a faculty committee of five members. and to re-enroll you will have to request a medical clearance from the appropriate director. 2005. It is possible to withdraw for medical reasons through the day before the last day of classes for the quarter or the summer subterm. the appropriate director and the dean of your college must agree on the withdrawal. 2004. you will receive notification in the mail from the medical director. 2006. 2007. However. Inc. all instructors are responsible for their own attendance policies. that recommendation must be sent to the medical director of the Student Health Service. 1995. A fee adjustment. 1997. including the chair or director of the department or school in question. A medical hold will be placed on your records. If you receive outpatient care at the Student Health Service. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1999. (See “Change of Course Schedule. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. you are required to provide verification of the dates you received care. 2005. Two or more consecutive withdrawals can be cause for placement of a registration hold on your record by the registrar or your academic dean. 1996. to consider your case and render a decision. if you give written permission for the information to be released. you may arrange for a medical withdrawal from the University. you will need to drop the class through Web Registration or TRIPS. CollegeSource®. If you are involved in University activities that may conflict with your class schedule.) If you miss the first two contact hours. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. When the clearance is approved. never attended). Your change in enrollment status may result in your having to repay programs from which you have received financial aid. you can obtain notification from the sponsoring office. If your grade has been affected by a legitimate absence or absences that your instructor does not excuse. certain absences are considered legitimate by the University. Multiple Consecutive Withdrawals. These include illness. Inc.

Leave of Absence Policy Students enrolled in a degree program who do not expect to make progress toward their degree for a period of time due to personal. CollegeSource®. Prior to the completion of the leave of absence. A student who does not return and register in the degree program at the conclusion of an approved leave of absence is considered dropped from the program. the student must notify the departmental graduate chair or director of graduate studies so that the reentry process can be initiated. 2007. 2002. your regional campus student services office. you must either (a) meet the requirements set forth in the Graduate Catalog at the time of your initial registration in a graduate degree program. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.4 Academic Policies Change in Program Requirements As a degree candidate. This information is considered by the graduate committee and the dean of the college as part of the approval process. 2003. 1998. Address. Each program or department will establish a process for reviewing and approving leaves of absence requests. Chubb Hall. CollegeSource®. To be eligible for a leave of absence. To request a leave of absence. 1997. . All foreseeable leaves of absence must be requested prior to leaving the campus. a plan to address any incompletes at the time leave is undertaken. 1997. and emergency contact information may be updated online at http://www. and any outstanding debt to the University prior to a leave of absence. 2005. Departments should also have in place Withdrawal from the University Apply for withdrawal on a withdrawal form obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies. Approved leaves will be documented for the student in writing. Requests for changes in name. 1996. 2002. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. or professional reasons may request a leave of absence from a degree program. 2003. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Students on an approved leave of absence may not make significant use of university resources and sevices or engage in significant consultation with the faculty. departments are expected to make appropriate adjustments to allow you to fulfill the requirements of the initial program of study. Inc. International students in F-1 or J-1 nonimmigrant status must also obtain authorization from International Student and Faculty Services prior to the initiation of a leave of absence and before retruning to campus to ensure compliance with current SEVIS regulations and visa restrictions. In the event of program changes. completing a change of address form and depositing the form in an address deposit box located on the First Floor of Chubb Hall. 2007. social security number. 2004. Inc.ohio. Chubb Hall). or stopping by the Registrar Services Windows (FIrst Floor. telephone number. medical. address. 2006. you may also update this information by e-mailing address@ohio. seven calendar years for master’s degrees of 60 or more hours and doctoral degrees). A leave of absence will not extend the time limit for completion of a degree (six calendar years for master’s degrees of less than 60 hours. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. You are responsible for any University communication sent to you at your official University e-mail address (Oak account) and/or mailing address on file with the Office of the University Registrar. 1999. Note: International students in F-1 or J-1 status are required to use the online address service to update their addresses with Ohio University and to meet immigration reporting requirements. you are generally expected to meet all requirements of the program at the time of the extension request. If an extension of time beyond one quarter is granted. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation. with a copy forwarded to the college office and the Office of Graduate Studies for recording in the student’s file. 2004. edu/registrar/ by selecting “Update My Address” (Oak ID and password are required to use this service). While CollegeSource®. 2006.) Change of Personal Information You must report any changes in your personal data to the Office of the University Registrar. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Requesting a leave of absence will ensure that your academic program is aware of your plans. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. (This paragraph does not apply to students in the College of Osteopathic Medicine. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. telephone number. a graduate student must not have received an extension of the time limit for the degree. federal financial aid. The fees are listed in the quarterly Schedule of Classes. In cases where late registration is necessary. It also provides confirmation for third parties of your status as a student on an approved leave. Late Registration Registration is not permitted after the first 15 calendar days of the quarter (in the case of some individual classes. These requests should be sent to Registrar Services Windows. or birthdate must be accompanied by documentation verifying the correct information as required by the registrar’s office. edu (be sure to include your Person Identification [PID] number and full name). and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. While CollegeSource®. or (b) should you choose to follow the requirements of a later catalog. 2005. This includes changes in name. a student shall submit to the departmental graduate chair or director of graduate studies a written request stating the reason for the leave and expected duration of the leave. Requests for such extensions must incorporate a detailed explanation of the means employed to meet modifications in requirements enacted since your entry. and Career Guidance Foundation. First Floor. you will be charged a retroactive registration correction fee beginning with the third calendar week of each quarter unless late changes are the result of University delays as judged by the registrar. Inc. 2001. When the request for withdrawal has been approved by the associate provost for graduate studies. Inc. 1999. All registration procedures should be completed by the 15th calendar day of the quarter. 2001. 1998. meet those requirements in their entirety. or your college student services office. 1995. 1996. 1995. birthdate. 2000. and will assist in ensuring that loose ends which could pose future problems are taken care of. after the first day). In addition. It is the responsibility of the student to resolve all issues pertaining to financial support. or emergency contact information. 2000. social security number. Inc.

2004. Obtaining Transcripts Students may order official transcripts in one of the these types: 1. 5 Student Records Information Student Records Policy Consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. to consider your case and render a decision. telephone 740. permitting another student to plagiarize or cheat from your work. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Medical transcript only There is a $5. and delivery options available and to obtain a transcript request form. 740.edu/registrar/ transcri. Inc. and the University Appeal Board have the authority to take formal action that includes. The decision of this committee is not subject to further appeal.4206. visit the Registrar Services Windows in Chubb Hall. using unauthorized material during an exam. or verification of a name change. then the department chair or school director. Inc. If you withdraw after the 15th calendar day of any quarter. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. The director of judiciaries. 2001.00 per transcript fee for regular processing (generally 2–3 business days). 2000. 2003. 2002. 1996. you also must return the original diploma. The fee for diploma replacement is $15. but is not limited to. If you fail to complete the work of a course and do not complete an authorized withdrawal. While CollegeSource®. 2001. or knowingly furnishing false information to the University by forgery. Suite D. suspension or expulsion from the University. The specific policy is detailed in the Appendix of this catalog. including suspension or expulsion by the Office of University Judiciaries—will be taken against you. A refund of registration fees is made according to regulations. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. maintenance. 2007. 1996. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. you can take the matter to the University Appeal Board. and Career Guidance Foundation. Undergraduate transcript only 3. or Academic Misconduct All forms of academic misconduct are prohibited by the Student Code of Conduct.593. the University Hearing Board. review.cfm. or identification. Online orders may be “automatically authorized” without the student’s signature. and then the dean of your college. in person at the Registrar Services Windows.Academic Policies the order is referred to the Office of the University Registrar. The student is required to provide his/her signature authorizing release of his/her transcript. CollegeSource®. Inc. Inc. 2005. by mail with a signed letter of request including payment by check or credit card. Further information on academic misconduct is available from the Office of University Judiciaries. or send e-mail to transcripts@ohio. .593. Transcripts may be ordered online. Academic misconduct includes. the dean will appoint a faculty committee of five members. serious action—which may include failure of work undertaken.D.edu/registrar/grd. In cases of academic misconduct. and formal disciplinary action. If you wish to appeal an action of University Judiciaries or the University Hearing Board. Graduate (master’s and Ph. 2005. CollegeSource®.2629. 2003. If satisfaction is not achieved through this process. The replacement diploma will be the same size as the current diploma. or submitting a forged grade change slip. acquiring improper knowledge of the contents of an exam. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. all of Ohio University’s policies and practices governing the collection. carry current titles and signatures of University officers and the notation “official replacement. submitting the same paper in two different courses without the knowledge and consent of your professors. submitting an academic exercise (written work. 1999. you may not be reinstated until the Office of Graduate Studies has received a written clearance from the Student Health Service. you will have an F reported for the course. alteration. showing all coursework at Ohio University 2. 2006. 1999. Inc. ohio. and Career Guidance Foundation.) transcript only 4. you may appeal this grade first through the instructor. computer program) that has been prepared totally or in part by another. 1997. sculpture.cfm for more details. If you have withdrawn from the University for medical reasons.edu. and the University Appeal Board have no authority to modify a grade given by a faculty member. presenting the ideas or the writing of someone else as your own (plagiarism). and Career Guidance Foundation. Beckley Building. 1995. 1998. you will receive a WP/WF grade in each course. which grants an official withdrawal after it has been determined that all obliga-tions to the University have been met. Refer to the current Schedule of Classes for timelines and a full description of the Refund of Registration Fee Policy. While CollegeSource®. such as suspension or expulsion. provide a notarized affidavit attesting that the original diploma has been lost or destroyed. There is a $10. but is not limited to. a faculty member has the authority to grant a failing grade. Details of appeal procedures are included in the Student Handbook. printing. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. go to the registrar’s Web site at http://www. Academic misconduct refers to dishonesty in assignments or examinations (cheating). Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Comprehensive transcript. If you have committed any act of academic misconduct as determined by the judgment of a faculty member or by the procedures of the Office of University Judiciaries. In the case of a name change. including the chair or director of the department or school. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. Visit http://www. 1998. phone the Registrar’s Office. or misuse of University documents. and release of student records will be based upon the principles of confidentiality and your individual right to privacy. To find out more about the various processing. application. by signed FAX with payment by credit card. 2002. the University Hearing Board. Inc. Replacement of Diploma To obtain a replacement diploma. The faculty member also has the discretion to refer your case to the director of judiciaries.ohio. 2000. failure in the course. the director of judiciaries. 2006. 2007. Instructions for verifying a name change are available from the registrar’s office. However. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. to the registrar’s office along with a request for a new diploma.” Allow four to six weeks for delivery. 2004. records. If your course grade is lowered by an instructor who has accused you of plagiarism.00 fee for each transcript processed on the same day requested. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.

2003. see the Ohio University Policy and Procedures Manual or contact the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.edu/registrar/.44. fall. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1995. 2004.6 Academic Policies mation concerning procedures.593. Computer software and databases are the property of the University if created as part of University-assigned duties. 2006. Questions about applying for graduation may be sent to graduation@ohio.593. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation. staff. Intellectual Property Policy The University intellectual property policy is defined by Ohio University Policy and Procedure 17. 2007. 2000. . Notices on these topics are provided via e-mail to all registered students as of the dealine for registration in each academic quarter. 2005. Ohio Revised Code). 2004. Suite 190. and University levels. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2006. CollegeSource®.052. While CollegeSource®. and colleges. ohio. Inc. 1998. or students at or under the auspices of Ohio University. Further. 1997. Doctoral candidates must be approved for graduation by their college dean before they may participate. 2001.edu/policy/17-001. 202 Baker University Center. While CollegeSource®. patentable inventions created by Ohio University faculty. 93-348) and the regulations on public welfare set forth in Part 46 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations (45 CFR 46). deanstu@ohio. 1997. Inc. • Student Code of Conduct • University Regulations Regarding Concealed Gun Law • Consequences for Involvement in Civil Disturbance • Graduation/Transfer-Out Rates (Student Right to Know Act of 1990) • Crime Awareness and Campus Security (Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act) • Drugs and Alcohol (Drug-Free School and Community Act of 1989) • Convictions for Certain Riot-related and Sexual Assault Offenses (Ohio House Bill 95) • Campus Disruption (Ohio House Bill 1219) • Voter Registration (Voter Registration Provision in Higher Education Amendments of 1998) • Student Privacy (The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 or FERPA) • Copyright Infringement and the Internet • Emergency Closing of the University • Statement on Hate-Motivated Behavior • Statement on Sexual Assault Questions regarding notifications can be addressed to the Office of the Dean of Students. For details concerning the scope and purpose of this policy and for infor- Official Notifications for Students Various state and federal laws require Ohio University to provide information and notice to students on a variety of topics. and students are the property of the University if the work was supported by University funds or performed in Universitycontrolled facilities. Graduation and Annual Commencement Exercise You must apply for graduation through the Registrar’s Office and pay the graduation fee by the date indicated in the University calendar. 2002. 2003. college. and observation. These notices are routinely available at the University’s Web site at: http://www. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation.html —or contact the Technology Transfer Office. The policy provides for a generous sharing of any royalties among the inventors and the relevant University units. 2000. and summer quarters are invited to attend. ohio. Inc. and to protect the interests of Ohio University. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2002.L. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. In accordance with state law (Section 3345. Ohio University occasionally develops statements or policies on important matters and distributes them to all students.1818. you must reapply for graduation and pay the graduation reapplication fee by the date indicated in the University calendar for the quarter in which you will meet graduation requirements. 1996. All students are subject to the rules of behavior as outlined in the Student Code of Conduct.edu/notifications/. Inc. it is a student’s responsibility to know and follow current requirements and procedures at the departmental. along with spring quarter candidates. Additional deadlines to be met by students writing theses or dissertations are available in the office of the dean of the college in which you are enrolled.1800. Below is a listing of official notifications that Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. this policy applies to research investigations involving human subjects conducted by faculty. are currently provided to students. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2001.edu. 1995. Guide for Residential Living. 1998. Academic attire with appropriate hoods is worn by candidates at the commencement exercises. ohio. to assure a favorable climate for the conduct of scientific inquiry. 20 E. CollegeSource®. Circle Drive. Master’s and doctoral degree recipients from the preceding winter. staff. In summary. Research Using Human Subjects The investigator in any research involving human subjects at Ohio University is expected to conduct any and all such experiments in compliance with Ohio University Policy and Procedure 19. You may apply online at http://www. and Career Guidance Foundation. You must submit all work to be applied toward meeting degree requirements no later than the last day of classes of the quarter in which you expect to graduate. and University Policy and Procedures. including those described in the University’s Undergraduate Catalog. The annual commencement is held at the close of spring quarter in June. Ohio University’s policy on research involving human subjects is in compliance with the requirements set forth in the National Research Act (P. 2005. Make arrangements for purchasing academic attire through the Office of University Events. Students are encouraged to read the complete policy and procedures on the Web—at http://www. In addition. departments. interviews. Graduate Catalog. 1996.001. 1999.edu. telephone 740. The purpose of the policy is to protect the rights and personal privacy of individuals. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 740. Inc. Studies that require review include everything from clinical trials to surveys. If you fail to meet graduation requirements in that quarter. E-mail is sent to each student’s official University e-mail address (Oak account). copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.

and is a source of information on matters affecting graduate students.ohio. 2003. 1996. Hours for the computer labs are posted there on a quarterly basis. 2002. The Career Services Web site— http://www. and oncampus interviewing. and Career Guidance Foundation. résumé preparation.ohio. Services include: Individual advising on career decisionmaking and job search strategies. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Approximately 50 labs are available on campus—some labs are open to all majors. 2005. For specific software located in the computer labs visit. Inc. Many departments also operate computing labs for their own students. 2001. employer directories.2909. All official graduate files are kept in this office. interview techniques. 1999. 1995. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. . A Career Resource Center containing a wealth of career information: career guides.and submitting required materials. Computer Services Computer Services provides stateof-the-art computing resources and facilities to Ohio University students. 2004. Inc. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. telephone 740. Inc. which are free to all students. Lindley Hall 185. Career fairs that bring a wide variety of employers to campus to discuss career and job opportunities. for assistance in all career-related matters. and TOEFL. In addition. Inc. 2006. 2004. admissions test bulletins. 2000. http:// technology. 2002. 2000. You are encouraged to contact Career Services. exploring career options. registration. and other important information. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Brown Hall. Bobcat Job postings. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1997. Boyd Hall. Personnel in this office are available for consultation and assistance on matters of interest to graduate students. summer job and internship listings. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. 2007. graduate school guides. In addition to the above services.edu/. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Lab locations include Computer Services Center. Inc. employer literature. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.Ser­vices for­ Students 7 Services for Students Office of Graduate Studies The Office of Graduate Studies assists students with the University processes of admission. Available tests include the GMAT. GRE. Inc. A Mock Interview Program that allows you to practice and improve your interview performance. 2007. While CollegeSource®. and professional job vacancies. and electronic theses and dissertations. and other career-related topics. 2005. All labs contain laser printers for high–quality output.edu/etc/for a complete listing of tests.593. While CollegeSource®. 1996. 2003. and conducting effective job searches. 1999. 1997. Seminars on career decision making. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.ohio. This program consists of three special services: computerized résumé referrals. and Career Guidance Foundation. some labs are restricted to people within a certain major. a combinedLibrary/Computer Services’ “Learning Commons” computer lab is available on the second floor of Alden Library. The main offices for Computer Services are in the Computer Service Center. 2001. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Computer Labs Lab computers can be used to access the Internet and various software programs. CollegeSource®. hours of operation. Career Services The Office of Career Services offers assistance in making career decisions. 2006. 1995. Visit http://www. Educational Testing Center The Educational Testing Center is a computer based testing facility that offers numerous testing sessions per week. you must register with the office by attending a registration orientation session that explains services and procedures. 1998. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. the office also offers the Online Job Search Program for students who will graduate in the current academic year. Praxis I. and graduate appointment contracts. To be eligible for this program. paying a nominal fee.edu/careers/—can provide general career information and connect you with a range of other jobhunting resources on the Internet.

performance. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. are displayed in the Seigfred Hall and Trisolini Galleries. Other recommendations by the council go through the provost to the president for final approval. 2002. Frontiers in Science Lecture Series. psychologists. 2000. are frequently offered.edu/ equity/disabilityservices/ Counseling and Psychological Services Counseling and Psychological services are available to graduate and undergraduate students on an individual and group basis for educational. learning and study services including liaison with Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic. marital. Cultural Events and Entertainment University students have the opportunity to see theatrical productions produced by the Ohio University School of Theater during the academic year. information to faculty regarding academic accommodations. you can obtain assistance in appraising your abilities. CollegeSource®. If you are facing personal problems of any kind (emotional. and Student Lectures. The School of Music offers recitals and concerts by students. and noon or 1 p. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. the Ohio Valley Summer Theater stages two productions during the summer. and serves as an advocate for graduate education at Ohio University. provide entertaining and educational programming for the University and community. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. faculty. Visit http://www. and recommends University-wide policy and new directions for graduate education. Additional exhibitions. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1998.m. a record of such impairment. Inc. WOUB-AM and -FM. Music. Pop concerts by contemporary entertainers are sponsored by student organizations on campus. 2003. or being regarded as having such an impairment.593. experimental movies. and trainees. recitalists. reviews. including work by the School of Art faculty and students. 1997. are subject to established academic requirements. 1999. 1995. Inc. 2000.ohio.8 Ser­vices for­ Students Software Ohio University has several software site licenses that provide software to students. Confidential consultations are provided by a staff of counselors. and Dance. 2002. 2007. and personal adjustment concerns. contact the Office for Institutional Equity located in Crewson House to discuss your individual needs. The Office for Institutional Equity has the primary responsibility for identifying and coordinating services to meet the particular needs of the person with a disability. The council initiates. edu/software/ for more information. and public television station. foreign films. dance. you can receive help in understanding and resolving your concerns so that you can improve your performance. contact the receptionist on the third floor of Hudson Health Center or call 740. All students. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1998. and 5 p. and reviews and nominates graduate students for selected regional and national competitions. 1996. implementation. The office provides guidelines for required documentation of a disability. you can consult with a mental health professional about your worries. If you have a disability. and ethnic programs. and visiting artists. Graduate Council selects the annual finalists for the Named Graduate Fellowships. A variety of art exhibitions are available in the University’s Kennedy Museum of American Art. or learning. 2006. 2003. transportation assistance. All information concerning disabilities is confidential. and elimination of graduate programs and degrees at Ohio University. you can receive help in understanding and resolving those difficulties. 1999. Monday through Friday.m. seeing. If you are having academic difficulties. 1995. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. The Graduate Council recommends to the University Curriculum Council the initiation. The University invites distinguished speakers and artists to appear in recital or to lecture informally on campus through the Schools of Theater. Inc. 2001. Broadway theater. . 2005. The Performing Arts Series comprises 10 to 14 national and international programs that include symphony orchestras. 2004. Ohio University recognizes the need for reasonable accommodations to promote program accessibility. hearing. 1996. To make an appointment. social. WOUB-TV. career. Workshops on a variety of topics. 2005. regardless of disability. Inc. The council has both advisory and policy-recommending responsibilities for graduate education. and personal growth of students. Persons requiring reasonable accom-modations for disabilities must provide documentation and register with the Office for Institutional Equity.1616 between 8 a. CollegeSource®. 2001. choral. performing manual tasks. Inc. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation. Disability Services The Office for Institutional Equity is committed to assuring equality of opportunity and full participation at Ohio University for persons with disabilities. Inc. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines disability as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities such as walking. In addition. designed to support the educational. and the School of Music Opera Workshop produces an annual opera. Graduate Council The Graduate Council reviews. library assistance.ohio. If you are uncertain about your educational or career objectives. tutoring and study skills assistance through the Academic Advancement Center. First-run movies. the Kennedy Lecture Series. While CollegeSource®.m. substance abuse. The University’s public radio stations. 2004. so you can identify more appropriate and satisfying directions. etc. stress. and how to obtain the software. coordinates. If you are concerned about a friend or family member.. The composition of the Graduate Council represents both departments that grant doctoral degrees and those offering only master’s degrees. social. cost. 1997. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. interests. and classic films are shown throughout the year. Visit our Web site at http://www.). including eligibility. While CollegeSource®. etc. and Career Guidance Foundation. and work-place and housing accommodations. 2006. General services include priority scheduling.

1000. the Outstanding Graduate Student Award. The senate also awards the Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award. you may purchase the University accident and sickness plan for your spouse and dependent children. or completing a master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation. For more information or a copy of the Graduate Student Senate constitution. CollegeSource®. For University personnel and student telephone numbers during the day. color. status as a disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam era. or while traveling anywhere in the world. programs. While CollegeSource®.593. and the Graduate Student Senate John Houk Memorial Research Grants for graduate student research. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. national origin. As an enrolled student. 1995. 2005. The plan. when information is not immediately available. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The Graduate Student Senate meets on a regular basis. For more information regarding student insurance. 2007. the Campus Directory. x-ray facilities. The staff includes physicians. at school. sexual orientation. and facilities. The Web address is http:// www. and Career Guidance Foundation. While CollegeSource®.1899. you have access to medical care in the ambulatory care clinic on a walk-in basis Monday through Friday.593. Ohio University. Check the current Schedule of Classes for time and place. Inc. If you are married or a single parent. osteopathic medicine. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2000. 2006. 2007.Ser­vices for­ Students Graduate Student Senate The Graduate Student Senate is composed of student representatives from each graduate academic department. 9 Institutional Equity It is the policy of Ohio University that there shall be no discrimination against any individual in educational or employment opportunities because of race. religion. 2002.4000. CollegeSource®. Special opportunities for minority and/or female students have been created through grant funds in several areas. 1996. contract staff. Inc. contact the president of Graduate Student Senate. 1998. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation. the University conducts a vigorous affirmative action program in order to promote equal employment opportunities and to ensure nondiscrimination in all educational programs and activities. including telecommunications. and researches questions Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2001. 2005. 1999. there shall be no discrimination because of age except in compliance with age requirements of retirement plans or state and federal laws and guidelines. Health Service The Student Health Service is located in Hudson Health Center on the North Green. Serving you in the outpatient clinic are a pharmacy. 2006. 1999. Other Graduate Student Senate activities include workshops on such topics as grant writing and library resource system identification and use. pharmacists. gender. provides protection against major medical and surgical expenses for the insured student at home. classified staff. and yearly research activities on the quality of graduate life and education. staff.ohio. Your eligibility for services does not depend on purchasing student health insurance. may also be eligible. and is therefore responsible for recommending graduate students for positions on University standing committees. specific efforts are being made by individual academic departments to recruit minority graduate students. A medical record is maintained. campus events. the policy includes repatriation. 2001. physical therapists. 1998. subject to the benefits and exclusions of the policy. Harassment Policy Harassment of students. Athens OH 45701-2979. If you are an international student. electrical engineering. Many forms of harassment are discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and thereby Health Insurance Ohio University requires students to maintain a health insurance plan. For more information about special opportunities. Inc. academic and social calendars. registered nurses. call 740. Inc. and students may harass any other member of the community. 2000. or disability. telephone 740. . Domestic students taking seven or more hours and international students taking one or more hours will automatically be billed for insurance. or faculty is not acceptable behavior at Ohio University. and accidental death benefits. All meetings are announced and open to the public. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Furthermore. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. psychology. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. For information. Inc. 2004. call the switchboard 740. you must have a tuberculosis skin test upon first arriving in Athens or returning to the campus after an absence of two or more years.1816. It is a goal of Ohio University to increase the representation of underrepresented students in all of its graduate programs. The Graduate Student Senate is recognized by the University as the representative graduate student organization.593. medical evacuation. The major medical plan offered by the University is designed to supplement the care provided by the Student Health Service. and registered Information Center A complete information service in the lobby of Baker University Center answers questions regarding University services. 1997. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1996. and to that end. No male or female member of the Ohio University community including faculty. 2002. In addition. This test is given free of charge. 2003. a medical laboratory. you can call the Student Health Service at 740. contact the graduate chair in the specific department or the dean’s office in the appropriate college. 1995. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.597. 2004. Graduate students participating in an internship or coop program. and Career Guidance Foundation. and a physical therapy department. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. It represents the graduate student body in the University community and provides a forum in which graduate students can discuss issues related to their concerns about both academic and nonacademic aspects of the community. In addition to accident and sickness benefits. it provides check cashing services. The Information Center has Ohio University brochures. and health careers.edu/~gss/ laboratory and x-ray technicians. 1997. Also.

family International Students Information on graduate admission is available from the Office of Graduate Student Services. jokes. the following individuals. as well as returning students starting a new degree program. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1998. religious. and Career Guidance Foundation. and developmental interests of more than 100 countries. 2000. national origin. 2007. such as cross-cultural awareness workshops. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. on a modest scale. those already enrolled at Ohio University may apply for the same awards. The Office of International Student and Faculty Services also works with other departments and organizations on campus such as Residence Life.) The Office of International Student and Faculty Services The Office of International Student and Faculty Services offers consultation about any concern. and. sexual harassment includes unwanted advances. 2) Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for decisions affecting the individual. International Studies. or intimidating environment claim. Contact the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships. 2003. Phi Beta Delta. or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: 1) Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment or of a student’s status in a course. The International and Community Women’s Program brings together wives of foreign students on campus and interested wives of faculty and community people. 3) Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with the individual’s work. . or veteran status. Upon arrival. representing national. shall be authorized to receive and investigate inquiries and complaints: representatives from the Office for Institutional Equity. or work environment. In addition. ISU members come from all corners of the world. International Family Program Support services are provided to international families through the Office of International Student and Faculty Services. living. Entering international students are eligible to apply for awards based on academic promise. Inc. conducted in cooperation with the City of Athens and the International Student Union. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. offensive. Gender-based conduct can take the form of abusive written or graphic material. CollegeSource®. religion. Athens Friends of International Students (AFIS) AFIS runs a hospitality program and an International and Community Women’s Program. Legal Affairs. Ohio Program of Intensive English (OPIE) The OPIE administers English proficiency examinations to new international students and provides intensive language instruction for those needing it. Ombuds. An orientation program will be conducted for a few days before the opening of each quarter to introduce new students to the campus. but sometimes long friendships develop from this brief opportunity to gain insight into American home life. or hostile acts. All new students. Harassment includes conduct relating to race. Harassment is any conduct that has the intent or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s or group’s educational. which create a supportive climate for international students. Inc. they must consult with the Office for Institutional Equity. or threatening. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2002. and social interests. (See descriptions of courses and programs elsewhere in this catalog. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. gender. Student Life. or offensive environment for work or learning. and Career Guidance Foundation. Associations More than 20 internationally oriented student organizations exist at Ohio University. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1998. or educational experience or creating an intimidating. The International Student Union (ISU) ISU functions at Ohio University as the umbrella organization for more than 20 international student organizations and serves as the programming body for the international community on campus. University Judiciaries. CollegeSource®. including immigration. cultural. program. color. 2003. 2005. study. 1995. Any individual who is not authorized but is approached about concerns or complaints regarding harassment must direct the complainant to an authorized employee. 1997. regional. Inc. Nonsexual verbal or physical conduct that denigrates or shows hostility toward another because of the person’s gender can be the basis for a hostile. must report to this office upon arrival. Inc. Harassment may lead to sanctions up to and including termination of employment or student status. It serves as a forum for ideas and information and offers a productive and easy way to participate in University life. representing the collective educational. 2002. 2001.0 Ser­vices for­ Students illegal under law as well as a violation of Ohio University policy. sexist slurs. 1997. and Human Resources. matches international students with local American families. 2006. All University supervisory personnel have an affirmative responsibility to discourage and eliminate conduct inconsistent with this policy. and personal problems. 2000. When authorized employees are contacted with a complaint. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Programming reaches a high point in spring during International Week and the International Street Fair. and in addition. intimidating. 2006. 1995. While CollegeSource®. 2001. 1999. 2007. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. All Ohio University employees and students are responsible for compliance with this policy. Students should contact departments directly. While CollegeSource®. requests for sexual favors. 2004. Inc. Visits may be only for a dinner or an afternoon excursion. or activity. Financial Aid Assistantships are available from academic departments. epithets. performance. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. They join together for special programs throughout the year. 1996. McKee House. age. financial. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1996. Ohio University is committed to maintaining an environment in which every individual can work. may request special aid in cases of demonstrated need. Complaints can be received and investigated only by employees who have been authorized by the institution. or their designees. sexual orientation. negative stereotyping. and the Fulbright Alumni Association to promote programs. hostile. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. disability. 2005. Because of their positions or the nature of their work. and live without being harassed. 1999.

and Career Guidance Foundation. group study. Motorcycle parking is restricted to specifically designated areas.1917. 2006. Before students can drive or park on Ohio University property. and other national and global agreements. 2000. as well. Hours are extended at the end of each quarter. CATCAB is available 7:45 a. 1999. 1999. community services. and Career Guidance Foundation. For those who use the library for reading and study. 1997. microforms. 2004. 1997. Users of this service are asked to pre-schedule for transports to classes and other campus functions. Schedules and other information regarding the use of CATCAB can be obtained by calling 740.library.000 e-books. Graphic production services. Failure to register a motor vehicle or parking illegally makes the violator subject to penalties as printed on the violation/citation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.edu/parking/ or by stopping by Parking Services located at 100 Factory Street.1909. CollegeSource®. Alden Library is open 139 hours per week. Inc. Parking maps are also available free of charge at Parking Services. The Music/Dance Library. for group projects. an international network. which delivers requested material to Alden Library twice daily. While CollegeSource®. 1995. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1995. CDs. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. Qualified and friendly library staff offer reference assistance and research consultation. Parking services also handles distribution of garage permit sales. Each of the Ohio University regional campuses also has a library. photographs. provides students with a technology-enriched learning environment.Ser­vices for­ Students members are given information about health care and insurance. 1998. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Through OCLC. Instructional Media and Technology Services (IMTS). 1996. are available upon faculty request. and social activities. and access to a variety of software applications. the Learning Commons Sunday through Thursday. 2003. 2007. Inc. materials in more distant research collections are readily available to University students and faculty for research and study. Inc.000 journals and magazines. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Monday through Friday.500 seats and. 2005. The Library also houses Archives and Special Collections. located on the College Green.facilities. teaching. a collaborative endeavor with Computer Services and University College. While CollegeSource®. the online network of 84 academic libraries in Ohio. CollegeSource®. and serving as an information resource center for students and faculty. and integral component of University Libraries. Librarians utilize two computer labs in Alden Library for a variety of orientation and instructional programs to help students understand the variety of information resources available from the Libraries. the Learning Commons offers an appealing atmosphere conducive to individual research. IMTS lends more than 14. Audiovisual equipment such as projectors and recorders can be rented by registered campus student organizations. With the exception of finals week and intersession. before and during final exams. Fine Arts Library. Located on the 2nd floor with seating for approximately 300. The state-of-the-art facility houses 100 computer workstations. they must register their vehicle with Parking Services. provides convenient requesting and quick delivery of library materials statewide. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. The Vernon Roger Alden Library. There is no charge to register vehicles. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Government Documents. Alden Library Learning Commons. is housed in Glidden Hall (The School of Music and a periodical reading room for the Department of Mathematics is maintained in Morton Hall. The Libraries’ collections include more than 2 million printed volumes. International advisors are also available for consultation on immigration and employment questions. Lesserused library material is stored off-site at the Southeast Ohio Regional Library Depository (Alden Library Annex). The Alden Library staff consists of 102 trained and experienced individuals. including research poster displays. In addition. Inc. networked printers. . 1998. 1996. and provides 24 hour access to Motor Vehicles/Registration Parking information can be obtained at the Parking Services Web site: http:// www. including 6. and Career Guidance Foundation. and subscriptions to about 28. 2003. videos.597. In addition. is the central library facility on the Athens campus. the collections of maps. or collaborative course projects.593. 2000.ohiou. providing print and electronic collections. located on the second floor of the library. faculty. and learning at Ohio University. CATCAB is a free service designed to transport students. and Computer Services assistants help users with hardware and software. IMTS.000 in electronic format. Staff. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. to 7:30 p. the Learning Commons is open 24 hours Sunday through Thursday and until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. For more information about the Ohio University libraries. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. or by calling 740. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2004. Health Sciences Library. 2005. and the Media Library. there are about 2. 2002. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. over 12.ohiou. visit our World Wide Web site: http://www. a number of group study rooms.m. and staff with permanent or temporary mobility limitations. Services. Center for International Collections.000 instructional video and DVD titles.edu/ 1 Libraries The University Libraries support research. Writing Center advisors provide consultations on writing projects. 2001. the Learning Commons “desktop” is applied to the more than 200 public workstations located throughout the building to provide a common interface to library resources for all users. The Libraries’ participation in OhioLINK. Collections. 2002. 2007. Document delivery and current awareness services are also available to assist in study and research. multimedia stations. 2006.m. most of whom are assigned to providing assistance and consultation to library users in person and online. English language classes. digital AV and Web materials. provides audiovisual equipment and services to the entire University community. and other non-print items number nearly 3 million. 2001. Inc.

593. Charles J. 2003. Spacious aerobics and combative arts rooms are also available. and a team approach to problem solving. 2000. Intramural broomball. dance floor. Inc. Inc. Inc. 1995. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. continuous customer service. Further duties include assisting individuals in accomplishing the expeditious settlement of their problems: intervening in the bureaucratic process on behalf of individuals when that process unnecessarily or unfairly impinges upon them. and foosball. The center offers a 36-foot high double-sided climbing wall. There are programs in club sports. Bird Ice Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. located immediately next to the Ping Center. Hours of operation are 7 p. The service is available every night of the week during the academic quarters. 2005. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. Ser­vices for­ Students University Ombuds The Ombuds serves as an advocate for fairness while assisting students and other members of the University community in resolving problems. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. the Ombuds reports valid complaints directly to the president when no remedy has been found elsewhere in the University. These areas complement one another in providing students with facilities and programs to meet their recreational interests and also fulfill University goals by encouraging physical. staff. education. and a viewing/ party lounge.m. Complaints and grievances brought to the office are handled with confidentiality. Students and others are encouraged to identify areas on campus they feel are not sufficiently lighted. driving range. and serves as a resource on University policies and procedures. If you need assistance outside the normal hours of operation. and a combative arts room. 2007. eight racquetball courts (two convert to squash courts and four convert to wallyball courts). 2005. Issues with safe and secure lighting are also monitored by the Ohio University Police Department. is committed to the health and wellness of the Ohio University community. Emergency “Blue Light” telephones have been installed on the main entrance of every residence hall as well as various Campus Recreation The Division of Campus Recreation. The University Ombuds Office is located at Crewson House 200. and outdoor pursuits. 2001. to 2 a. The arena is equipped with skate rentals. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and a sun deck. five basketball/volleyball courts. 2006. and visitors. The fitness area and free weight room provides users with a variety of cardiovascular and resistance training equipment. The lounge is furnished with sofas.593. staff. CollegeSource®. Ohio University Police Officers patrol on foot.1911.2627. 1998. SAFE-T Patrol’s mission and focus is to provide Safe Arrival For Everyone concerned about their safety on campus. an underwater observation area for viewing swimming and diving techniques. 1997. and visitors at Ohio University. every night during the academic quarter. faculty. A commitment is made to improve the quality of life by providing quality facilities and programs and ensuring customer satisfaction. 2002. 1996.m. The department is involved in many functions that assist with safety and security of the Ohio University campus and its students. recreational hockey. While CollegeSource®. Department members provide and participate in educational programs designed to help educate University community members about their own safety and the safety of others. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Arena. with uniformed police officer patrolling throughout the campus community 24-hours a day. chest tables. Having a full-time law enforcement agency operating on campus allows uninterrupted safety and security. table tennis.faculty. Inc. While on duty. . The Golf and Tennis Center. air hockey. a big screen television. and Career Guidance Foundation. in marked cruisers. locations throughout the University campus. please contact the OUPD at 593. 2001. Service can be provided during hours of operation by calling 740. Outdoor Pursuits Rental Center and the Challenge Course. and electronic mail stations. Ping Student Recreation Center. disc golf. 2000. The Aquatic Center features a long course indoor swimming pool that has two three-meter and two onemeter diving boards. emotional. The department’s mission is to enhance the quality of life for our community through law enforcement. Other activities include recreational skating. and social growth. 1996. 1998. and on bicycle. 2007. Bird Ice Arena is an indoor arena that features an illuminated 190-by-85 foot ice surface with fiberglass dasher boards. Recreation and Sport Science classes. concession stand. learnto-skate programs. Golf and Tennis Center. skate sharpening. figure skating. 1997. University Police The Ohio University Police Department (OUPD) is a full-service professional law enforcement agency. and using broad investigatory powers through direct and ready access to all University officials of instruction and administration. an elevated fourlane running track.4040 or by simply stopping a SAFE-T Patrol team on duty and requesting their assistance for a safe walk to your destination. The division is composed of these facilities: Aquatic Center. all teams are under the supervision of a police lieutenant and in constant radio contact with the Ohio University Police Department. telephone 740. 1999. The Ping Center is one of the largest campus recreational facilities in the country. Finally. chairs. 2004. A small games area offers billard tables. Bird Arena serves as home ice for the Ohio University Ice Hockey Club Team and Synchronized Ice Skating Team. 1999. 365 days a year. and late night skate sessions. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2002. fitness. The Ombuds works as a change agent when issues or concerns repeatedly emerge. and immediate response to emergency situations. The SAFE­T (Safe Arrival For Everyone–Tonight) Patrol Division provides a free walking escort to all students. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. intramural sports. pro shop. 2004. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. A SAFE-T Patrol team will be glad to meet you and escort you safely to your destination within the campus community and limited areas adjacent to campus. 2006. We do not operate on recognized holidays. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. under the administration of the College of Health and Human Services. 1995. While CollegeSource®. two multipurpose gymnasiums. including equipment for physically challenged individuals.

Team activities include elements and team-building activities. sand volleyball. The Outdoor Pursuits Rental and Sales Center offers for rent or sale backpacking. the course takes participants to new broomball. Inc. phone. and scuba diving equipment. an outdoor climbing tower. racquet restringing. 2003. 2004. private rental basis to groups of 10-15. The Fitness Program offers diverse program opportunities. staff. and six outdoor tennis courts. and Career Guidance Foundation. Aquatic Center. The mission is to provide these services in an efficient manner that allows students and other members of the academic community to use the services with minimum difficulty and maximum satisfaction. table tennis. first floor lobby. 1998. their physical and mental strengths and wallyball. to 5 p. 1998. is a fun and exciting program offers individual. 1999. 2006. This is done always within the spirit of the University’s policies and standards. 1996. The division administers more than 30 recognized club sports on campus. alumni. The clubhouse offers golf and tennis equipment rentals. horseshoes. Faculty may obtain class lists and advisee lists and use these tools to communicate with their students. the nine-hole disc golf course is played similar to traditional golf except that players attempt to land a Frisbee-type disc into an elevated metal basket that serves as a catcher. Inc. gear rental and sales. flag football. grade reports. camping. address update. 2001. 1996. billiards. foosball.593. 2002. are scheduled in leagues. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. A registered dietician is on staff to provide nutritional services.4191. A guiding principle is always to respond to legitimate requests for information or services as quickly and accurately as possible. While CollegeSource®. indoor soccer. a low and high challenge course. women.) Visit the Registrar Services Windows. 2007. outdoor clinics. community are welcome. and Career Guidance Foundation. Team sports activities to reach individual and group goals. helping those we serve get what they have a right to expect and understand what they do not have a right to expect. Individual and year round. the community. Personal fitness training and fitness assessments also are available. The a ropes course. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Composed of a low course hockey. dual activities may be scheduled events faculty.edu. 2005. Two licensed massage therapists offer 30. climbing. Monday–Friday. Many services are available online at http://www. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.ohio. and the community. 2004.597.m. The indoor tennis courts are covered by a 40-foot tent structure. 2000. and a schedule to meet the needs of its members. (Summer and winter break hours vary according to University policy. the Ping Center is available to the community on special weekend events and as guests of students. faculty. cross country. badminton. The Ping Center. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. leadership.  University Registrar The Office of the University Registrar provides a wide range of services to the academic community. The Outdoor Pursuits Program is housed in the Ping Center. CollegeSource®. faculty. dodgeball. Chubb Hall. Located at the Golf and Tennis Center. bowling. The office is open 8 a. degree and enrollment verification. 2006. re-enrollment processing. Use of these fields is by reservation only. transcripts. The Outdoor Pursuits Program provides opportunities for outdoor adventure sports and activities. While CollegeSource®. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Other services provided by the Office of the University Registrar include classroom scheduling. concessions. four indoor tennis courts. private lessons. squash. call 740. The Golf or are scheduled to fit the availability and Tennis Center is also available to of the participants. Individual discs or sets may be purchased at the center. 2000.edu/registrar/. and an indoor climbing wall.CREC or visit our Web site at http://www. the Stimson Avenue club sports fields. Through a variety of coed teams.ohio. and resale items. name. faculty. and wrestling. and alumni. alumni. 2003. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. darts. disc golf. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. including fitness sessions ranging from traditional Step and Hi/Lo to Cardio Kick. and alumni. Individual and dual activities are Students. golf cart rental. and racquetball. Mind/ Body sessions offer exciting activities such as Yoga and Pilates®. 2002. For more information on facilities and programs. 1997. The Aquatic Center is open to the community during lap and recreational swim times. staff. The division also offers recreational special events throughout the year. open tennis. participants utilize outdoor soccer. and staff. and the offered for air hockey. volleyball. allowing players to compete in stateof-the-art playing conditions. faculty/ staff member learn how to get the help they need. New clubs can be organized if they meet the needs of the University community. It offers outdoor trips. floor heights. softball. and the West State Street club sports fields. The rental center is located outside the east wing of the Ping Center next to the The Intramural Sports Program offers loading dock. 2001. Each club is run by students and establishes an organizational framework. Inc. and way to work towards various goals team sports for men.Ser­vices for­ Students consists of a nine-hole Par 35 golf course. schedule of classes.and 60-minute massages. a diverse set of structured activities The Challenge Course. also known as for students.edu/ recreation/. basketball. putting greens. and maintenance of student personal information (address. and graduation application. 2005. When the requested information or service is not the responsibility of the office. veterans educational benefits. staff. and with a group. or e-mail registrar@ohio. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. The illuminated 300-yard driving range is located on West State Street and can accommodate approximately 30 drivers. 1999. Bird Arena and driving range operations are seasonal and open to students. etc. .). 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.m. bench press. Inc. canoeing. 1995. and a high course. are available to students. call 740. class schedules. the Golf and Tennis Center. Many of the outdoor club sport activities take place on the South Green club sports fields. then the principle is to help the student. dual. CollegeSource®. faculty/ staff. Services for students include registration. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. which play The Challenge Course is available on a during the afternoons and evenings.

winter. unless you graduate or otherwise leave the University. 2007.and 20-meal plans. and other projects. 2004. Most residence hall space designated for graduate students is on South Green. and single graduate students. 1997. convenience. You should plan to have sufficient funds to cover living expenses for this period. Furnishings in the apartments do not include linens. 2006. You do not have to live on campus to participate in one of the meal plans. bedding. Inc. and 4 efficiencies. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The Super 20 is for those who want 20 meals a week and don’t want to forfeit the value of a meal that they may miss or skip. All human subjects research must receive approval or a signed letter of exemption prior to initiation of work. Air conditioners are permitted with an additional installation and electricity surcharge fee providing that there is sufficient electrical capacity. preparing proposals. University Apartments Ohio University apartments are rented primarily to married students. 1995. All guidelines established by the University regarding air conditioner usage must be followed. Athens OH 45701. 2002. it is preferred by those who eat almost exclusively on campus. telephone 740. when residence halls are closed. Wolfe Street apartments are furnished.4090. and Career Guidance Foundation. air conditioned facilities. The office provides training opportunities on research compliance topics. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource®. Graduate students may be appointed to externally-supported faculty-directed projects as Graduate Research Assistants and when eligible receive a stipend and tuition scholarship. dissertations.edu http://www. 2003. Access is available to all members of the University community. 1998. contact Residence Service. Residence hall housing is secured by returning the housing acceptance agreement to Ohio University Residence Services. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. staff and students in interpreting guidelines. theses. All use of live. The 14meal plan allows you to select any 14 meals during a seven–day period and is a good choice if you tend to spend your weekends away from campus or prefer two meals a day. athletes. This plan may be shared with another student. A telephone outlet is provided in each unit. Once the academic year begins. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. are a few triples and quads. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. those received earlier are assigned first. ORSP can facilitate electronic proposal submission. and a fenced playground are located in the complex. Interim Housing The University tries to provide graduate students with housing at a nominal cost during the breaks between the fall and winter quarters and the winter and spring quarters. . vertebrate animals in research and teaching must receive approval from the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) prior to initiation of work. 1999. The 20–meal plan allows you to eat all meals served during a seven-day period. The Wolfe Street Apartments are located on the southeast corner of the main campus. e-mail housing@ohio. Both the Super 20 and Super 14 allow you to use missed meal credits. and obtaining awards for external support of research. 2002. scholarship. near the Ping Recreation Center. Inc. For the 10-. ORSP provides online subscriptions to funding source databases. students with children. Dining Service is not available on campus during this time. Inc.edu/housing/ Research and Sponsored Programs The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) assists faculty. or walk-up window. 1995. Outdoor parking facilities. weekly missed meals are forfeited. dishes. it is highly unlikely that a continuing student will be released from the contractual obligation that is assumed when the agreement is returned. Residence Services Residence Hall Residence Services Many graduate students find oncampus living to be a convenient and comfortable option. Fifty units are available in a two-story brick building: 38 one-bedroom units. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. CollegeSource®. 8 bedroom/ nurseries. Predominant room styles include doubles and singles. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2005. If you have questions about the residence halls or want information concerning University apartments. the plans are not transferable. and miniblinds. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2001. For a period of about 40 days—from Thanksgiving through New Year’s Day—Ohio University is not in session. Inc. lamps. 2001. While CollegeSource®. Dining Services Five basic meal plans are offered to help meet a variety of needs. Off-campus students may purchase a quarterly meal plan contract. 1998. 2000. 2006. Research Compliance is the central point of contact for researchers seeking assistance with research regulation issues. coin-operated laundries. While CollegeSource®. Priority for residence hall assignments is established by the date the agreement is returned. or rugs. including monthly television cable service and ethernet access. 2005. and hearty eaters.4 Ser­vices for­ Students Research Compliance The office helps faculty. Tenants are responsible for paying for phone service. 1999. 1997. fellowships. either by taking a friend to the dining hall or by getting items from one of the snack bars. 2000.593. 2004. Assignments are made in the order the agreements are received. All utilities are included in the monthly rent. 14. The Residence Services agreement is binding for the entire academic year (fall. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. creative activities. Inc. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) approves human subjects research.ohio. staff. 2007. The most economical of the meal plans. negotiating terms and conditions. The 10-meal plan is the least expensive and is for light eaters or those who anticipate eating most of their meals off campus. and spring quarters). refrigerator. but may purchase any of the plans as an off-campus student. 1996. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and students conduct responsible research in today’s regulatory environment. and there Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2003. Chubb Hall 60. and Career Guidance Foundation. and facilities with in-room computers and printers. All apartments are equipped with an electric range. All University food service contracts are binding for the entire academic year for on-campus students. Residence hall options for graduate students include buildings designated for graduate students and students over 21 years of age. Interim housing will likely involve a temporary change of residence. Inc.

Inc. 1999. M.) Physics and Astronomy (M. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.) English (M. 1998.P.B. M. Education.Ed.A.. Indonesian/Malaysian.D.A. Ph. cell biology. magazine journalism. Business. Inc.D. Ph.S.S. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.D.S. multimedia Mass Communication (Ph. public relations. mathematics for secondary school teachers.B.) College of Business Business (M.A. 2000. computational mathematics.) Geological Sciences (M. public administration (M. and Career Guidance Foundation. public broadcasting Visual Communication (M. environmental geochemistry.C.A.) Political science (M.A.S. Russian. biochemistry.S.D. 2002. master’s. Ph. 2007. Inc.) Sociology (M. Inc.). and Career Guidance Foundation.. applied mathematics (Ph. microbiology.A. French...S.A.Ed. plant systematics Environmental Studies (M. ecology. and doctoral levels. executive M. paleobotany. and Career Guidance Foundation. and colleges within the University hold individual accreditation..) Biochemistry. geophysics History (M.). media management and policy.S. Business/Sports Administration.A.) Geology. Psychology (M. While CollegeSource®. analysis. 2001.) Broadcast journalism.D. 2006. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Graduate programs are also offered through the Center for International Studies and the College of Osteopathic Medicine. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Swahili. evolution. Professional Program M. 2003. Greek. Inc.D. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1996.) Rhetoric and public culture. health communication. and Career Guidance Foundation. College of Arts and Sciences African American Studies* Anthropology* Biological Sciences (M. numerous departments. ecology and evolutionary biology. and environmental archaeology Foreign Languages and Literatures French.A.B. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.D.A. physical and earth sciences.) Political Science (M.) Cell biology and physiology.) College Student Personnel (M. Inc.S. Additional information is available from the office of each college’s dean.) Applied mathematics.S.D. molecular biology.) Clinical. multimedia.) Photo communications (including documentary photography). 1995.A. Japanese. exercise physiology and muscle biology.B. topology.T.) Computer Education and Technology (M. Ph. pure mathematics (M.).A. environmental monitoring.) Women’s Studies (certificate) College of Communication Communication Systems Management (M. 2004.) New technology and culture. 2002. relating and organizing Communication and Development Studies (M. CollegeSource®.A.A. Program.) Journalism (M. Spanish (M. Ph. 1996.A. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1998. Teaching English as a second or foreign language Mathematics (M. Ph.A. schools. Engineering and Technology.. Ph. Spanish.A. experimental Social Sciences (M. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. CollegeSource®. 2007. In addition. and Health and Human Services. M.) Executive M.P.) Linguistics. newsroom graphics management. 1999.) Applied economics (M. neurobiology Chemistry and Biochemistry (M.) Analytical.S. newswriting/editing. 2003..) Environmental and Plant Biology (M.) Counselor Education (M.P.A.W. Telecommunications Telecommunications (M. Southeast Asian Literature in translation Geography (M. 1997./M.) Communication Studies (Ph. phycology.A. Ph.. commercial photography (including illustrative photography). organic.) Life sciences.Ed. Ph. hydrogeology.A..D.A.) Linguistics (M.A. While CollegeSource®. Italian. environmental policy and planning. Ohio University is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools at the bachelor’s. 2000..S.A. 2001. 1997. and physical chemistry Classics and World Religions* Conservation Biology (certificate) Economics (M..D.A. interactive multimedia.).) Ohio Program of Intensive English* Philosophy (M.) Social Work (M. 2004.D.) Journalism. Latin. College of Education Adolescent to Young Adult Education (M. Fine Arts.P. environmental geology. plant morphology. 2005. financial economics (M.. . Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Communication.. 1995.Ed.Colleges and Curricula 35 Colleges and Curricula Academic Organization Ohio University offers graduate degree programs through the Colleges of Arts and Sciences. German.D.) Courses in Chinese.S. Ph.D.S. inorganic. plant physiology. 2006. algebra. 2005. The Office of Graduate Studies coordinates graduate study at Ohio University and administers the Individual Interdisciplinary Studies Program.S.) Molecular and Cellular Biology (M.S. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. publication design.

electronic circuits.A. biomedical. .Ed.H. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Business/ Health Administration (M.A. solid-state electronics. complexity theory. geoenvironmental.D. biomechanics.D. online privacy.) Curriculum and Instruction (Ph.).) Special Education (M. VLSI design.F. 2007. cryptographic protocols. Ph.D.. Individual Interdisciplinary Program Individual master’s and doctoral programs Lifelong Learning Executive./M. middle level education.). family studies.. Southeast Asian Studies. and Career Guidance Foundation.) Nurse administrator. Ph. environmental.36 Colleges and Curricula Cultural Studies in Education (M. Art (M. acting. nurse educator.) Curriculum and Instruction (M.H. 2003. medical image processing.).S.) Studio: Ceramics. Ph. case-based reasoning.S.F. computer vision. corrosion and flow in multiphase systems. biomedical information processing Chemical Engineering (M. exercise physiology-clinical (M. Ph. power systems.S. M. information theory.D. performance/pedagogy.S. coaching education.A.A.D. 2004.) Recreation and Sport Sciences (M. applied and theoretical computer science.Ed.D. playwriting.) Educational Research and Evaluation (M. M.B.) Reading Education (M...). math education. Inc. music education. software and systems engineering. 2007. audiology (Au.F.) Music (M.D. professional. Public Health (M.) African Studies.A. approximate algorithms. air quality and atmospheric chemistry Civil Engineering (M. computer graphics. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. performance.F. batteries and fuel cells. real-time systems. 1996.. reading and language arts. controls.) Mathematics Teaching at the Adolescent to Young Adult Level (M. 2006.S. Ph.) Cellular and molecular engineering. 2000.. instructional technology.) Higher Education (M.P. Ph. data communications. and Career Guidance Foundation. printmaking.A.B. manufacturing. manufacturing.D.) (Emphases: curriculum and instruction. Communication and Development Studies. Ed.S. energy and pollution control.. Inc.N.. communications.) Early childhood education.Ed. Ph.) Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. computational biology.S. scientific visualization. Latin American Studies. theory Theater (M. industrial engineering.M. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.. electronic and advanced carbon materials. 1999.S. CAD/CAM.) Manufacturing systems.. 2001. energy conversion.H.A. Ph. 2003. family nurse practitioner Physical Therapy (D. electronic commerce.A.) Civil engineering.Ed.P. water resources.). solid mechanics.D. signal processing. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.) Theater history and criticism (M..) Health administration (M./M. optoelectronics Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (M. While CollegeSource®. technology management Hearing. 2000. transportation Computer Science (M.A.S. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. International Development Studies. Inc.A.A.. 2004.) Athletic training education. and Career Guidance Foundation.A. While CollegeSource®.S. electromagnetics.. College of Health and Human Services Health Sciences (M.Ed. 1997. power electronics.) Biochemical and biomedical engineering. photography. history and literature. artificial intelligence.H. M. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.).A.). performance/composition.A.) Geotechnical. painting. 2005.H. exercise physiology-research.F.) 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and skills needed to function more effectively in a variety of administrative and managerial roles throughout health services organizations. and the Ph. or social work. medicine. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. psychology. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1997. Contemporary History The Contemporary History Institute offers a certificate in contemporary history that serves as an adjunct to the M. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. W. 1998. hearing and speech sciences. theory. political science. and training to use GIS as a tool to answer research questions relevant to their disciplines. nutrition.html Health Care Services Administration The health care services administration certificate program is intended for health and health-related professionals who want the basic administrative and managerial knowledge that this program can provide. but it also draws faculty and students from the Departments of Economics and Political Science. 1999. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and Political Science. 2003. 2006. he gerontology certificate. Health Policy The multidisciplinary graduate certificate in health policy addresses the educational needs of graduate students and professionals in health care and related industries who have already earned a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Geographic Information Science Maps remain a fundamental means of geographic communication. CollegeSource®. 1995. Econo-mics. For additional information on admission and requirements. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. government. see the program description in the College of Health and Human Services section. . in journalism.as. 2003. 2005. health policy certificate. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. health sciences. as well as nondegree students. While CollegeSource®. or visit the web site at http://www. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. The institute is centered in the Department of History. themes. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral program at Ohio University are eligible to apply for the certificate. 2002. as well as nondegree students. broaden your career possibilities. For additional information on admission and requirements. 1996. Inc. CollegeSource®. the E. 2000.D. nursing.A. 2001. For additional information on admission and requirements. 2005. Inc. degrees in economics and political science. or allow you to study an area of interest from a variety of perspectives. and Career Guidance Foundation. Geography. Inc. Inc. Students receive the certificate after satisfactorily completing a sequence of interdisciplinary seminars and tutorials focusing on methodologies. as well as nondegree students. The GIS certificate offers nongeography majors an opportunity to gain the knowledge. as well as nondegree students. degrees in history. The program applies a multifaceted understanding of the factors affecting the conservation of biological diversity. are eligible to apply for the certificate. While CollegeSource®.S. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Scripps School of Journalism.A. and issues in contemporary history. Inc. and writing a thesis or dissertation on a topic in contemporary history. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. To meet this expanding role. 1995. 1998. 2002. 1996. 2004. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. see the program description in the College of Arts and Sciences section.phy. 2007. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral program at Ohio University. 2001. The GIS is open to all graduate students who meet and maintain their minimum college requirements. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral program at Ohio University. 2006. 2000. and Ph. Certificate holders will be prepared to work collaboratively with professionals from a variety of disciplines to gain insights into rural and urban program administration and services in order to be able to work with both underserved and other population groups. the M. and the performance certificate are open to nondegree students.edu/Departments/ Geography/GIScertificate. and the undergraduate Honors Tutorial College. in mass communication (journalism sequence). regardless of college or field. the M. 1997. Inc. For additional information on admission and requirements. It is designed particularly for those who work or plan to work in business. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral program. see the program description in the College of Arts and Sciences section. You will be awarded the certificate and receive official recognition on your transcript when you graduate.Certificate Programs 37 Certificate Programs Most of the certificate programs listed on this page are open to all students pursuing a graduate program at the University. These interdisciplinary pro­ grams can complement your primary area of interest. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. are eligible to apply for the certificate.D. physical therapy. For additional information on admission and requirements. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. For additional information on admission and requirements. The certificate program exposes the student to the competencies. It is centered in the Department of Biological Sciences but includes faculty members from the Departments of Environmental and Plant Biology. The program is designed for students who want to gain knowledge and skills for a career that involves working with the elderly. and Career Guidance Foundation. and the expanding role of the map and related digital information places a premium on the ability to interpret and analyze mapped information. see the program description in the College of Health and Human Services section. Gerontology The College of Health and Human Services and the College of Arts and Sciences jointly sponsor the multidisciplinary graduate gerontology certificate program. Conservation Biology The Program in Conservation Biology offers an interdisciplinary graduate certificate in conservation biology.ohiou. the advancement of Geographic Information Science (GIS) is seen as the important synthesis of traditional mapping with the more advanced tools of data modeling and analysis. see the program description in the College of Health and Human Services section. 2004. The health care services administration certificate. see the program description in the College of Arts and Sciences Geology section. knowledge. at Ohio University are eligible to apply for the certificate.

Inc. law. and wherever analysis of gender and sex is applicable. 2003. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. personnel. 1997. 1998. Women’s Studies The interdisciplinary graduate certificate in women’s studies can complement any degree program. see the program description in the College of Arts and Sciences section. Inc. it may be particularly helpful to those who plan to work in such areas as journalism. Inc. . Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2000. 2004. health. 2002. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2003. 2001. Inc. 2004. labor relations. Students pursue the performance certificate in a nondegree status and may not simultaneously pursue a Master of Music. For additional information on admission and requirements. 1999. Applicants must have an earned bachelor’s degree or the equivalent. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2007. 1999. management. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral program at Ohio University are eligible to apply for the certificate. or visit http://www. see the program description in the College of Fine Arts section.38 Certificate Programs Performance The School of Music offers a performance certificate that provides an intensive program of study for students whose career goals are directed towards performance. counseling. For additional information on admission and requirements. and Career Guidance Foundation. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1996. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2001. 2006. 1998. While CollegeSource®. CollegeSource®. edu/womenstudies/. 2000. While CollegeSource®. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.ohio. 2006. 2007. 1997. 1996. education. social work. Inc. The 30-hour program is designed to be completed in one to two years of full-time study. 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2005. 2005. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1995. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.

While CollegeSource®.cfm Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. All programs and requirements are subject to change without notice at the discretion of Ohio University. 2004. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource®. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. (1–4. and Career Guidance Foundation. Courses described in this catalog are for graduate credit only. Su for summer). 1998. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and the last year in which the course was offered. . 1999. 2002. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. the credit may be expressed as a range and a maximum—for example. Guide to Course Listings Course listings for each area follow the program requirements. describe areas of graduate instruction at Ohio University and the requirements for admission to and completion of graduate degree and certificate programs. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2005. The italicized information following some course descriptions gives the following information: faculty name. For a course carrying variable credit. 2003. Once you have completed an advanced course. You may enroll for a course with variable credit any number of times and for any number of credits within the quarter limit. Course Number The course number indicates the student classification for which the course is intended. 2001. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Prerequisites Course prerequisites are indicated at the beginning of course descriptions following the abbreviation “Prereq. No graduate credit is awarded for any work taken below the 500 level. 2004. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2007. 1996. CollegeSource®. Sp for spring. D for on demand). 1997. 2000. frequency with which the course is offered (A for alternate years. Inc. 1996.Areas of Instruction 39 Areas of Instruction The following sections. you may add a course by obtaining the instructor’s permission. Departments may limit the number of hours counted in satisfying degree requirements. quarter offered (F for fall. 2007. Class Schedule Each quarter’s Schedule of Classes is available from the Registrar’s Office and other locations around campus. Y for yearly. arranged by college. 1998. W for winter. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. graduate standing is a prerequisite for enrollment. Inc. you may not subsequently enroll in a prerequisite course for credit. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1997. as well as on the Web at http://www. max 8)—indicating that one credit is the minimum and four credits the maximum allowed for the course in one quarter. While CollegeSource®. 2006. 2003. provided the total registration for the course does not exceed the maximum. courses numbered 700–899 are for post-master’s or doctoral-level students. Inc.ohio. 1995. 2002. Courses numbered 500–699 are for master’slevel students. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. Credit Hours Credit for a course is indicated by the number or numbers in parentheses following the course title. For more information. 2005. 2001. see “Undergraduates Taking Graduate Courses” in the Application for Admission section. 1995.” Even if you have not met the prerequisites. Inc. 2006. edu/registrar/schedcls.

D.ohiou. English.) Environmental Studies (M. Ph.F.) Social Work (M.S. please visit our Web site (http://www. Ph.000 sp­ecimens. a vertebrate collection with more than 10. 2002..) Social Sciences (M. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and psychology.S.) Geograp­hy (M.) Environmental and Plant Biology (M.) Geological Sciences (M.edu/ Facilities Among the college’s graduate facilities and equip­ment are a Tandem van de Graaff nuclear accelerator. physics and astronomy.000 p­lant sp­ecies..A. Ph. Ph..) Linguistics (M.) Public Administration (M. 2004. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.) Mathematics (M. and a p­aleoinvertebrate collection with at least 350.A.A. 1996. 2000. Ohio Dep­artment of Wildlife areas. environmental studies.A.A.) Molecular and Cellular Biology (M.) History (M. While CollegeSource®. and any other information that prospective students might need.S. collections include an herbarium with more than 5.E.S. Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in biological sciences.S.) Graduate Certificate Programs Conservation Biology Contemp­orary History Geograp­hic Information Science Women’s Studies Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.A. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. the Keck Thin-film Analysis Facility.D. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.. an entomological collection with more than 100.. 2006. College Green The College of Arts and Sciences offers the Master of Arts or Master of Science degree through 16 departments.D.edu/). Ohio University is a member of the Association of Systematic Collections. several electron microscop­es.cas. Sp­ecialized laboratory facilities include a morp­hometrics laboratory. and the Exp­erimental Psychology Research Laboratory and a modern clinical facility serve as resources for training in p­sychology. Benjamin Ogles Interim Dean Howard Dewald Associate Dean Maureen Weissenrieder Associate Dean http://www. several modern nuclear magnetic resonance sp­ectrometers.) Philosop­hy (M.) Sociology (M.) Political Science (M.) Economics (M. 2004.000 sp­ecimens.. and molecular and cellular biology.P.D. Ph. history.cas. CollegeSource®. and a hybridoma laboratory.D. More than one area of emphasis is available at both degree levels in several of these departments. 1997. . 1999.A.S. several chemical sp­ectrometers. and Career Guidance Foundation.S.D. Inc. 2002. Inc. specialized graduate facilities.000 sp­ecies.A.S. 2001. 1998. a nitride MOCVD facility. and Career Guidance Foundation. Ph. Inc.W. public administration. Graduate Degree Programs Biological Sciences (M. 1996. Wayne National Forest. a p­hotomicroscop­y laboratory. 1995. 1995. chemistry and biochemistry. a scanning confocal microscop­y facility.S.D. Sp­anish (M. a p­aleobotanical collection with more than 100. 2005. and Career Guidance Foundation. Ph. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.A.S.. and a mammalian recombinant genetics laboratory.S. M. and a 180-acre land laboratory adjacent to the camp­us are all available as resources for teaching and research. 1998. 1999.ohiou.S. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc.. and Career Guidance Foundation. Ph.) Modern Languages: French.40 College of Arts and Sciences College of Arts and Sciences Wilson Hall. 2003.) Chemistry and Biochemistry (M. M.) English (M... 1997. environmental and plant biology. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2007. 2000. Multidepartmental and special discipline master’s degrees are offered in social work. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. For more information. 2005. A large p­reserve of remnant p­rimary forest. mathematics. 2006. an exercise p­hysiology laboratory.A.D. While CollegeSource®. Each department will provide upon request a brochure describing specific degree requirements. 2003. Dep­artments in the social sciences maintain up­-to-date comp­uter laboratories.) Physics and Astronomy (M. Ph. 2007.D.000 insect sp­ecimens.. 2001. social sciences.) Psychology (M. a scanning tunneling microscop­e with molecular beam exp­itaxy growth chamber. Inc.A.

2005. Materials are drawn from a variety of areas—literature. and visual arts. Critique of diverse definitions of ethnic group­s. and Western and Eastern Europ­e. Ethnograp­hic fieldwork materials are exp­lored in light of current gender theories. Taking the view that gender is a cultural construction. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 561 North American Prehistory (5) Analysis and interp­retation of the cultural evolution of indigenous North American Indian cultures. and method are directed toward reconstruction of extinct sociocultural systems rather than toward time-sp­ace distribution of archaeological materials. health sciences. 548 Blood. or p­hilosop­hy will find a minor emp­hasis in the African world exp­erience to be useful. The use of film as a medium for recording cultural information. 2000. 546 Introduction to Human Osteology (5) This course focuses on the identification. 555 Medical Anthropology (5) Non-western medical systems and theories of health and disease causation. The recovery and analysis of remains unrecognizable by conventional methods is covered. economics. It does. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource®. 545 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (5) A cross-cultural comp­arative inquiry into the way different non-Western cultures define femininity and masculinity. sociology. imp­rovident. 2002. Anthropology http://www. clerical nationalism. food and nutrition. systematic connections between health or illness and both way of life and environmental situation. symbolism of health and illness. human evolution. and p­olitical science. or Mesoamerica with emp­hasis on ap­p­lication of anthrop­ological method and theory to understanding of p­articular sociocultural systems. Inc. comp­arative arts. 556 Seminar in Methodology and Field Research (5) A graduate seminar in anthrop­ological field methods. p­hilosop­hy. and the arts and humanities. analysis.edu/socanth/ No graduate degree in anthrop­ology is offered. and as a means for p­resenting information about cultures. and Career Guidance Foundation. designed to p­resent the basic methodology literature and p­rep­are students to conduct anthrop­ological field research. 551 Political Anthropology (5) Cross-cultural survey of p­olitical arrangements with emp­hasis on ap­p­lication of anthrop­ological method and theory to p­olitical p­roblems. Questions of ethno-nationalism. curing rituals. 2007. but some graduate courses are offered each quarter. Inc. 563 Gender in Prehistory (5) Examines the ap­p­lication of gender studies as an analytic tool for archaeological reconstructions. Childs.—with a view to showing how they relate to slavery and the subsequent exclusion of blacks from the mainstream of American life. 2001. ecology. While CollegeSource®. study and analysis of trauma and how it affects the human skeleton. 1999. p­olitical science. sciences. however. 2001. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. urbanization as social p­rocess.S. human adap­tation. 2005. Childs. social change in kinship­ systems. and strategies. 550 Economic Anthropology (5) Survey of economic arrangements found in various typ­es of cultural systems with emp­hasis on ap­p­lication of anthrop­ological theory and method for understanding p­articular systems. social basis for diagnosis and cure. 1997.cas. environmental studies. 532 Third World National Movements (5) Comp­arative study of varieties of national op­p­ression. Involves survey. strengths. If you enroll in an up­p­erdivision undergraduate course under this course number. and Career Guidance Foundation. These contribute p­articularly to degree p­rograms in Asian studies. education. Usually a sequel to p­revious subject-matter course. Bones and Violence (5) The identification. Comp­arative analysis of p­roblems of social develop­ment undertaken typ­ologically. 1995. 2007. among others. Attention to p­roblems of agrarian reforms. 2004. 2006. p­hysical anthrop­ology). 557 Anthropology of Religion (5) Survey of various asp­ects of religion in their cultural setting with emp­hasis on the use of anthrop­ological theories for an objective understanding of religion. 2002. Due attention to various notions of Pan Africanism and Black Nationalism in the U. and required assignments. 540 The Black Child (5) In-dep­th study of black child—imp­act and effects of growing up­ in America. Analysis begins with the earliest occup­ation of the region and ends with the establishment of various state systems. Inc. linguistics. Graduate students p­ursuing a degree in communication. Several courses contribute to degree p­rograms in African and Latin American studies. . and other forms of resp­onse to op­p­ression reviewed. offer several graduate courses that enable students to earn a minor concentration in African World Studies.edu/aas/ The Dep­artment of African American studies does not offer an academic p­rogram leading to a graduate degree. and Latin America. Anthropology Courses (ANTH) 501 Anthropology and Film (5) Prereq: 101. African studies. 1998.College of Arts and Sciences 41 Curricula and Courses African American Studies http://www. as well as lectures on anthrop­ological archaeology as it p­ertains to Ohio. Also examines alternative images. Attention to p­roblem of ethnicity in international arena. deals with effects and role of school and family in creative adjustment of black child in p­redominantly white society. When taught by a cultural anthrop­ologist. 2000. 566 Cultures of the Americas (5) Survey of cultural diversity p­resent in South. coons. 691 Professional Seminar (1–15) Class involving contact hours. archaeology. 547 Forensic Anthropology (5) Forensic anthrop­ology deals with the identification of human remains in situations which generally result in litigation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Latin American studies. media. African American Studies Courses (AAS) 501A Images of Blacks (4) Examines the sources and the effects of the dominant negative images of blacks that have p­ervaded American culture—bucks. theory. etc. Cross-national comp­arisons made of ethnic p­rocesses in develop­ing countries vis-à-vis ethnic p­rocesses in the U. While CollegeSource®. communication. 2006. dance. creative writing. The courses p­rovide a broad interdiscip­linary ap­p­roach to the black exp­erience and include the social sciences. kinship­ terminology. 2003. Students will learn the micro-anatomy and macroanatomy of human bone and how skeletal remains are analyzed. excavation. international studies. the course examines the relationship­s between gender ideas and such features of social systems as kinship­ and p­olitical hierarchy. and laboratory analysis of materials. education. and interp­retation of cultural information. devoted Christians. Rhodes. p­seudosciences. 1995. Inc. Inc. discussion. and anthrop­ological research itself. 552 Archaeological Anthropology (5) Introduction to contemp­orary archaeology in which goals. North. film. Considers evolving gender roles within a wide range of p­ast cultural settings. non-western family systems. as well as other p­rograms such as communication. Emp­hasis on cultures from Ohio and the Midwest. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. study and analysis of the human skeleton. 560 Kinship (5) Theoretical framework and ethnograp­hic work on kinship­ systems of various world cultures. Ecological factors in health and nonhealth. 565 Field School in Ohio Archaeology (5–10) Prereq: p­erm. Rhodes. the methodological literature and techniques p­resented vary by instructor’s sp­ecialty. 1998. 582 The Black Family (5) Black family in America and its imp­ortant role in develop­ment of ethnic differences. 1996. children. and sociology. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. as a technique for observation. education. Sp­ecifically. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource®. the focus will often be on ethnograp­hic methods. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Actual archaeological investigation of p­rehistoric Indian sites in Ohio. Since anthrop­ology has subfields (cultural anthrop­ology. 531 Third World Ethnic Politics (5) Review of various theories of race. Rose. and Career Guidance Foundation.S.ohiou.ohiou. 1996. and regional disp­arities within framework of single nation state. p­sychology. 697 Independent Research (1–15) For students desiring to p­ursue indep­endent research p­rojects under sup­ervision of a faculty member and resulting in term p­ap­er or equivalent. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1999. 564 Near East Prehistory (5) Scrutiny of the archaeological data and consequent reconstruction of the evolutionary p­rocess affecting cultures in the Near East. 1997. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2003. 530 Social Theories of Underdevelopment (5) Systematic review of p­roblems of social change in develop­ing areas from multidiscip­linary p­oint of view. Rhodes. you are required to comp­lete assignments beyond those required of undergraduates and to write p­ap­ers to p­resent to class for discussion. buffoons. Africa. history. geograp­hy. 2004..

edu/ Admission to graduate study in biological sciences requires a bachelor’s degree with a strong background in the biological and p­hysical sciences. The develop­mental group­ studies how multicellualr comp­lexity is established and mainatined over time. metabolism. control of movement. Areas of Emphasis Graduate education in the Dep­artment of Biological Sciences is conducted in three broad p­rogrammatic areas: cell. GRE scores. The GRE advanced subject test in biology or a p­hysical science is recommended but not required. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and interp­retation of the p­rocess of cultural evolution as exp­ressed by the ancient societies of Mexico and Central America (Mesoamerica). and interp­retation of the p­rocess of cultural evolution as exp­ressed by the ancient societies of South America. and mechanisms. and healing.42 College of Arts and Sciences 567 South American Prehistory (5) Reconstruction. The integrative biology p­rogram includes research group­s in muscle and exercise p­hysiology. The ecology and evolutionary biology p­rogram integrates research in functional morp­hology. Faculty use lab and field based research on model organisms and natural p­op­ulations to study ecological and evolutionary p­atterns. and career goals. Emp­hasis on southeast Asia. 2005. 585 Cultures of Southeast Asia (5) Survey of cultural systems of island and mainland Southeast Asia. ecosystems and biotic communities in which human p­op­ulations are included. developmental and microbiology p­rogram emp­loys molecular and cellular ap­p­roaches to study biological function. analytical. 2006. 2007. neuroendocrine control of develop­ment. 1997. 1997. The cell group­ examines intracellular and intercellular interactions amongst a wide variety of cells. p­rocesses. a short essay concerning p­rior training. While CollegeSource®. 2004. transcrip­ts. 2002. max 8) Sup­ervised readings in all areas of anthrop­ology. The microbiology group­ addresses questions concerning the role of microorganisms in environmental p­rocesses and in disease and immune resp­onses. integrative biology. The muscle and exercise p­hysiology group­ focuses on the effects of exercise. p­olitics. 1998. and aging on human p­erformance. 2007. and ecology and evolutionary biology. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. musculoskeletal mechanics. and two quarters are required of doctoral students. injury. A nonthesis master’s p­rogram is available for secondary school and junior college teachers. neuronal cytoskeleton and axonal transp­ort. Inc. you must score in at least the 50th p­ercentile to ap­p­ly. genetics. Latin America. and quantitative tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required of all ap­p­licants. 2001. 1995. sp­eciation. 572 History of Anthropological Thought (5) In-dep­th examination of schools of anthrop­ology as they have develop­ed within various subfields at different times and p­laces. At least one quarterof sup­ervised teaching within the dep­artment is required of all master’s students. Black Studies See African American Studies. evolution of crucial anatomical areas. economics. analysis. and community ecology to understand the causes and consequences of biological diversity. and Career Guidance Foundation. and p­hysics. and Micronesia. Master’s students must comp­lete 45 quarter hours. Inc. 1999. and three letters of recommendation should be received by January 15 for you to be considered for financial sup­p­ort during the following academic year. and Career Guidance Foundation. research interest. visual. Biological Sciences http://www. Inc. muscle biology. 599 Readings in Anthropology (1–3. Make individual arrangements with p­articular faculty member in advance. While CollegeSource®. renal transp­lantation and diabetic cardiovascular and kidney disease. p­rocess. auditory. 2004. 581 Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa (5) Survey of cultural diversity in sub-Saharan Africa with emp­hasis on ap­p­lication of anthrop­ological theory and method to understanding of p­articular sociocultural systems. exercise and female rep­roduction. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2006. CollegeSource®. ideology. and Career Guidance Foundation. . CollegeSource®. 2003. adap­tational p­hysiology and biochemistry. 1999. 1998. organic chemistry. 2000. Results of verbal. cellular metabolism and ion transp­ort. 575 Culture and Personality (5) Interrelations between p­ersonality systems and cultural systems. the ap­p­lication. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and vestibular neurobiology. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 571 Ethnology (5) Cross-cultural analysis of structure. with at least 30 hours in formal courses and seminars. The neuroscience group­ addresses areas of research including comp­utational biology. emp­hasizing trop­hic interactions in the develop­ment of sensory systems. Ap­p­licants whose native language is not English also must submit the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or its equivalent. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. p­hylogeny. 594 Seminar in Anthropology (4–6) Selected top­ics. as well as skeletal muscle histology. Africa. The metabolic and comp­arative p­hysiology group­ is actively conducting research in the following areas: insect p­hysiology. and neural and neuroendocrine control of the autonomic nervous system. including calculus. 578 Human Ecology (5) Analysis of mutual and recip­rocal relations between sociocultural systems and other systems in their environment. 577 Peasant Communities (5) Focuses up­on folk comp­onent of state societies. Inc. interp­retation of fossil record.biosci. a score of at least 620 is required for admission. nutrition. 1996.ohiou. includes kinship­. 570 Mexican/Central American Prehistory (5) Reconstruction. p­hysiology. and adap­tation in various cultural systems. develop­mental and microbiology. 1996. 586 Problems in Southeast Asia Anthropology (5) Selected top­ics of current theoretical concern relating to southeast Asia. Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and neuroscience. 576 Culture Contact and Change (5) Imp­acts of cultures up­on one another: immediate and subsequent cultural adap­tations. 591 Primate Social Organization (5) Introduction to p­rimate ethnology. and fit between p­aleontological and immunological ap­p­roaches to evolution. 2003. 2000. 587 Pacific Island Cultures (5) Anthrop­ological survey of Melanesia. with reference to develop­ment of human cultural behavior. and Career Guidance Foundation. Top­ics include fossil record for hominoid and hominid forms. Bacteriology See Biological Sciences. 2002. a list of faculty members with whom you are interested in working. analysis. gender. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. develop­mental neurobiology. Doctoral students must comp­lete 135 quarter hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. with at least 45 quarter hours in formal courses and seminars. 592 Human Evolution (5) In-dep­th examination of evidence for biological macroevolution of humans. Inc. Polynesia. central p­attern generation. 1995. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. The cell. 2001. p­op­ulation. and environmental relationship­s. 2005. heavy metals and neurodegeneration. metabolic and comp­arative p­hysiology.

541B Parasitology Laboratory (2) Laboratory survey of p­rotozoan and helminth p­arasites with emp­hasis on life cycles and identification. 4 lec. Peterson. Tanda. and dynamics of marine p­lants and animals. 1996. excitable p­rop­erties of neurons. 4 lec. anaerobic methods. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 507 Developmental Biology (4) Mechanisms of animal develop­ment at tissue. Y. A major goal of the course is to train students in critical analysis of p­rimary journal articles. Peterson. A. Romoser. (See “Molecular and Cellular Biology. 3 lec.S. Peterson. consciousness. 525 Evolutionary Genetics (4) Basic concep­ts of p­op­ulation genetics (mutation. Cunningham. Y. Johnson. Students will be assessed by means of a lab p­ractical and two written exams. A. emotion. and Career Guidance Foundation. emp­hasis on environmental variables affecting distribution. Lecture: insect morp­hology. 2 lec. sensation. Rall’s model. Colvin. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. F. Y. and Ph. field trip­. modeling of action p­otentials. and p­rocesses of molecular evolution at the p­op­ulation and sp­ecies level. Assessment is based on two essay exams. In each class. A. 1997. and training and environmental adap­tations. Y. and management of trop­ical diseases on our p­lanet and take a holistic ap­p­roach in the examination of trop­ical diseases as systems. Y. F. 3 lab. Sp. Su. Y. Y. Inc. analyze. Dual listed with GEOG 516. W. introduction to available software for simulating neurons and networks of neurons. structure. Sp. and p­revention. 4 lec. 4 lab. 43 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Structure. F. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and p­roductivity of communities. 530 Invertebrate Biology (6) The marjor taxa of marine and freshwater invertebrates: structure. F.”) Biological Sciences Courses (BIOS) 503 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (6) Comp­arative study of the anatomy of vertebrates. 521 General Microbiology (5) Prop­erties of microorganisms and their imp­ortance in our environment. 4 lab. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. F.) and to basic behaviors (locomotion. behavior. abundance. smell. with emp­hasis on the analysis of data. 3 lec. Top­ics to be covered include cell morp­hology. 4 lab. 2001. W. F. 520 Comparative Vertebrate Biomechanics (4) Describes basic mechanical. 1998. 2006. DiCaprio. and temp­erature relations. Assessment is based on two essay exams. 3 lec. function. While CollegeSource®. offered in conjunction with the Dep­artments of Economics. 522 Microbiological Techniques (5) Prereq: 521. Inc. A major goal of the course is to train students in effective p­resentation of research literature and leadership­ of group­ discussions. Cunningham. mutations and mutagenesis. La Pierre. function. W. 3 lec. Sp. imp­act. Extensive lab work covers each of the major classes of vertebrates. distribution. synap­tic conductances. 518 Methods in Computational Neuroscience (4) Prereq: 514 recommended. energy exp­enditure. W. Sp. Y. and genomics-based analysis of gene exp­ression. Rowe. and ecology. CollegeSource®. 6 lab. genetic drift). W. Lab: emp­hasis on insect collection and identification. Y. 2005. W. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Currie. 2007. Lecture. fluid balance. Gilders. 2000. systematics. mitochondrial genetics and p­rions. Holzschu. (Same as PESS 514). p­rotein and DNA isolation and quantitation. 3 lec. Reilly. comp­artmental models. and develop­ment of the nervous system. 516 Biogeography (4) Examination of historical. CollegeSource®. and yeast. p­ercep­tion. 5 lec. Inc.. discussion. levers) is recommended. behavior. cellular. and comp­uter lab. gas exchange. F. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2 lab. 2000.D. diagnosis. In each class. Geograp­hy. Y. eukaryotic tissue culture. abundance. 542 Principles of Physiology I (3) Function of animal cells and organs emp­hasizing the p­hysical and chemical p­rincip­les underlying p­hysiological p­rocesses. 514 Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience (5) Introduction to the molecular and cellular basis of the functioning of the nervous system. 529 Marine Biology (5) Biological p­rocesses in marine and estuarine habitats. W. 4 lec. 2 lab. and adap­tations for life at sea. Y. Sp. Sp. 1999. genetics of selected bacteria. 515 Neural Basis of Sensation and Movement (4) Prereq: 514 or p­erm. . mechanisms of gene transfer and recombination. Environmental and Plant Biology. chemical messengers and regulators. 3 lec. 2001. Sp. 2002. Students are encouraged to understand cognitive p­rocesses by integrating research results from multip­le levels. Y. While CollegeSource®. Inc. 541A Parasitology (3) Etiology of human p­arasites. La Pierre. 3 lec. W. develop­ment. p­hysiology. Hassett. V 524A irology (3) Emp­hasis on the study of those events following virus-cell interaction which are critical to viral rep­lication and p­athology. 4 lab. W. 1995. comp­lements lecture material in 523A. Disease manifestations. A. molecular biology of ion channels. A. 535 Entomology (6) Overview of insect biology. White. and Career Guidance Foundation. and dynamics of p­lant and animal p­op­ulations. 517 Cognitive Neuroscience (4) Prereq: 515 or p­erm. neurop­harmacology and signal transduction control of gene ep­ression. synap­tic modification rules. students discuss original journal articles and recent scholarly reviews of top­ics in cognitive neuroscience. natural selection. F. Rates. 2004. hearing. Cunningham. Rowe. F. chemical. Y. Sp. with emp­hasis on acid mine p­ollution. Currie. Y. 2003. Inc. diagnostic and control methods. 1998. Rowland. regulation of gene exp­ression and recombinant DNA. Y. Biknevicius. evolution. quantal analysis. media p­rep­aration. 523A athogenic Bacteriology (3) P Microorganisms in relation to disease. generation and utility of transgenic animals. Modern methods of isolation and identification of viruses will also be studied. etc. 3 lec. Semi-indep­endent course gives extensive exp­erience in use of bacteriological techniques and equip­ment. Students are exp­ected to comp­lete simulation p­roject using one of the available software p­ackages. organization. 545 Physiology of Exercise (4) Fundamental concep­ts and ap­p­lication of organ systems’ resp­onses to exercise: sp­ecial reference to skeletal muscle metabolism. F. learning and memory. and molecular levels. 1996. attention. Y. Inc. p­rograms offered in conjunction with the Dep­artments of Chemistry and Environmental and Plant Biology. Y. Rowland. 2003. 2006. gene flow. 3 lec. 6 lab. Sensory system function and the neural control of movement in vertebrates: how molecules. 544 Tropical Disease Biology (4) This team-taught lecture/seminar course is designed to p­rovide an overview of the nature. 2004. Rowe. students hear a lecture and discuss assigned articles from the research literature. neural networks. 5 lec. A. 4 lec. behavioral. (See “Conservation Biology. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. A. Neural basis of higher-order p­rocesses in vertebrates: learning and memory. cardioresp­iratory regulation. 523B Pathogenic Bacteriology Laboratory (2) Pathogenic and clinical diagnostic bacteriological techniques. and molecular levels of organization. cells and circuits of nervous systems give rise to sensation (vision. 3 lec.). Introduction to mathematical and comp­utational techniques for modeling single neurons and networks of neurons. cellular. 3 lec. synap­tic function. 4 lec. Focus on membrane p­rop­erties of excitable and nonexcitable cells. Y. Hebbian synap­ses. F. and Career Guidance Foundation. and p­resent data. Hagerman. 6 lab. 531 Limnology (5) Physical. 4 lec. Cunningham. touch. with emp­hasis on exp­erimental ap­p­roaches. their transmission. orientation of head and eyes toward sensory stimuli. p­osture. Students will do a comp­lete brain dissection. Some background in anatomy and basic p­hysics (vectors. 2002. mathematical modeling.”) Molecular and cellular biology— M. 2007. aberrant transcrip­tion and disease. Includes five-day field trip­ (estimated cost $100 p­er student) to temp­erate marine environment late in quarter. Top­ics are considered at behavioral. limited to 20 students. 526 Molecular Genetics (3) Top­ics will emp­hasize the interaction of microbial genetics with molecular biology. etc. W. Lab covers both standing and running freshwater habitats.College of Arts and Sciences The dep­artment also offers interdiscip­linary studies in two areas: Conservation biology—a p­lan of study leading to a graduate certificate in conservation biology. Sp. technical demonstrations. circulation. Holmes. 1999. 1995. and ecological asp­ects of animal locomotion and feeding. and Political Science. and biotic influences that shap­e sp­atial p­atterns of p­lant and animal distributions and community structure in the contemp­orary landscap­e. and nutrient balance. and by using the techniques to collect. some asp­ects of immunity. 1997. and voltage-dep­endent conductances. bacterial identification p­rocedures. their bacteriop­hage. Hodkin-Huxley equations. and evolution of the vertebrate body forms and organ systems are comp­ared. Lab training in common microbiological methods. W. 4 lab. and biological p­rocesses in lakes (analogous to those of oceanograp­hy). La Pierre. p­atterns. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Top­ics also include gene regulation during differntation and develop­ment. Dyer. Reilly. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation. Carr. 505 Quantitative Approaches in Comparative Biology (6) Quantitative methodologies and analytical techniques used in modern comp­arative biology are exp­lored through lectures. W. evolutionary relationship­s and ecological adap­tations. 513 Human Neuroscience (4) Study of human brain anatomy with functional and clinical considerations. Y. Sp. 543 Principles of Physiology II (3) Physiological p­rocesses underlying locomotion. environmental. all with ap­p­lied emp­hasis. 2005. 527 Mechanisms of Gene Regulation (3) An in-dep­th discussion of the molecular events that regulate eukaryotic gene exp­ression. Cable theory. A. Geological Sciences.

Endocrine control of mammalian homeostasis and metabolism. Cunningham. 575 Sociobiology (3) Current understanding of how and why animal social behavior evolved. 2005. 6 lab. thermal. 1997. A. Emp­hasis on local fauna. and organization of communities. F. motion transduction. 683 olloquium in Ecology. W. ecology. W. and Career Guidance Foundation. and control of cardiovascular function. including discussions on anatomy. resp­iratory. diagnosis. 580 Biological Research Methods (2–4) F. Sugiyama. analysis of variance. 4 lec. 555 Principles of Physiology II Laboratory (2) Prereq: 543 or concurrent. and therap­y. lip­ids. W. crustacean. biogeograp­hy. 4 lec. W. and human p­erformance assessment and training. 543. Field p­roject required. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Emp­hasis on theoretical. not directly ap­p­licable to thesis. 2 lec. 1996. Y. 653 Current Topics in Biological Transport (3) Advanced lecture-seminar. 557 Animal Systematics (4) Princip­les and methods of systematic zoology. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Numerical methods and hyp­otheticodeductive reasoning ap­p­lied to study of organismic diversity (taxonomy) and geograp­hic distribution (biogeograp­hy). W. p­hysiological. including sp­acing. Provides a theoretical and emp­irical examination of the descrip­tion. conservation biology. behavior. 656 Advanced Physiology of Exercise (4) Prereq: 545 or PESS 514. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. function. the effects of human-induced habitat degradation on loss of sp­ecies diversity. Annual p­articip­ation is required of all graduate students enrolled in the Neuroscience section. Behavior. Y. including interactions with p­lants. 2000. and Evolution. 3 lec. 4 lec. Lab exp­eriences designed to comp­lement 545. tuataras. and Career Guidance Foundation. 4 lec. 3 lec. 554 Principles of Physiology I Laboratory (2) Prereq: 542 or concurrent. F. Inc. and evolution. behavior. . water. lizards. including p­redation and comp­etition. using the “classic” invertebrate p­rep­arations (crab leg. 2001. A. W. Hooper. literature reviews. Y. and p­aleobiology in the study of diversity. Instruction in microscop­e op­eration and maintenance and darkroom techniques.. p­ertinent lab work illustrating fundamental p­rincip­les and various exp­erimental techniques. 1 lec. 2006. chemical/p­hysical and functional p­rop­erties of biological membranes. The function and design of enzymes. F. Y. Identification of Ohio sp­ecies and north American genera and families. Svendsen. p­op­ulation interactions. 555 or p­erm. and soil. temp­erature and other conditions will be covered. 2002. 710 Advances in Signal Transduction (5) Prereq: CHEM 592. Moody. 3 lec. and metabolic p­athways in animals adap­ted to live in different and often extreme environments. Miles. Biochemical strategies emp­loyed to maintain an organism’s structure and function during environmental changes in oxygen. 4 lec. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 4 lab. crocodilians. evolution. Field trip­s are an integral p­art of this course. 565 Ichthyology (6) Top­ics include morp­hology. other microorganisms. Cuddington. CollegeSource®. normal p­hysiology of heart and vascular system. 2004. distributions. Sp. While CollegeSource®. Inc. and genetics of rep­tiles (turtles. and biochemical resp­onses to environmental factors. cardiovascular and muscle p­hysiology. systematics. salinity. 1998. White. stomatogastric system. Sp. Use of comp­uter stressed. W. behavior. Su. 562 Animal Physiological Ecology (4) Examines how organismal p­hysiology is affected by the p­hysical environment. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 563 Cell Chemistry (4) Structure/function of p­roteins. Lectures. W. Discussion of extinction as a p­rocess. Svendsen. ecology and systematics. 4 lab. agents of change. F. 5 lec. linear regression.. 712 Seminar in Neuroscience (1) Forum for p­resentation of original research. Inc. Comp­arative ap­p­roaches exp­lore the behavioral. Field techniques of safe cap­ture and monitoring for p­op­ulation p­resence and abundance.44 College of Arts and Sciences 546 Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (3) Prereq: required for those enrolled in 545. 1999. Aplysia feeding system). and toads. taxonomy and classification. While CollegeSource®. 2005. 2000. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. reading. 4 lab. 2004. p­hysiology. Sp. and p­arental behavior of solitary as well as social animals. Research p­ap­er required. Svendsen. D. 4 lab. Field trip­s are an integral p­art of this course. Sp. 2 lab. 581 Animal Conservation Biology (4) The roles of p­op­ulation genetics. and analysis of frequencies. Critical study of literature and research methods p­ertaining to p­hysiology of biological transp­ort. 781 Techniques in Electron Microscopy (6) Princip­les and methods for p­rep­aration of biological sp­ecimens for ultrastructural analysis and research. and genetics of amp­hibians (caecilians. and carbohydrates. Lab p­roject and p­ap­er required. Additional top­ics include waste treatment. Chamberlin. 4 lec and arr. salamanders. 3 lab. and biodegradation/bioremediation. p­hysiology. and discussions of contemp­orary issues in neuroscience. Crockett. Behavior. and some associated techniques. p­hysiology. and metabolic p­hysiology. Goodrum. A. comp­uterized data acquisition and analysis. W. natural selection and adap­tation. anatomy. 3 lab. and discussions of contemp­orary issues in ecology. and Career Guidance Foundation. 558 Biology of Amphibians (3) Evolutionary origin. Presentation and discussion. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the exp­erimental basis of p­rincip­les covered in 542. ecology. and macroevolution. Loucks. 685 Research in Zoology (1–15) Unsp­ecified research. Y. Hikida. Y. F. CollegeSource®. hyp­othesis testing. Annual p­articip­ation is required of all graduate students enrolled in the section of Ecology. Coschigano. geograp­hical distribution. Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the exp­erimental basis of p­rincip­les covered in 543. and rep­orts. Moody. Biochemistry of energy metabolism and mechanisms of metabolic regulation. neuromodulation. leech. Emp­hasis on mathematical models that describe the biotic p­rocesses that mold community structure. Lecture and discussion of current research in p­hysiology. Sp. F. Advanced concep­ts and methodologies for research in the endocrinology of exercise. Morris. 2007. and role of ornithology in current ecological and evolutionary theory. 4 lec. membranes. 666 Adaptational Biochemistry (3) Prereq: CHEM 591 or p­erm. A. Johnson. 695 Master’s Thesis (1–15) Research directly ap­p­licable to thesis. 3 lec. water. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. 4 lec. Y. cardiovascular. biogeochemical cycling. 1997. 1995. 571 Ornithology (6) Bird biology. Sp. 6 lab. 1998. F. sensory map­p­ing. W. Y. F. F. Sp. Y. ecology. Y. 559 Biology of Reptiles (3) Evolutionary origin. W. 2007. W. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. field. 573 Animal Behavior (5) Ecological. 2002. Sp. The lab comp­onent will entail research p­rojects designed and conducted by the student under the sup­ervision of the instructor. Chamberlin.and intracellular signal transduction. 586B Immunology Laboratory (2) Prereq: 586A or concurrent. W. 711 Neuroscience Methods (4) Prereq: 514 or p­erm. and develop­mental asp­ects of animal behavior. Y. Miles. 670 Biostatistics I (5) Ap­p­lication of univariate statistics to biology. I 586A mmunology (3) Prereq: p­erm. correlation. F. taxonomy. 550 Principles of Endocrinology (4) Prereq: 542 and 543 or 560 or 548 recommended. Y. A. Research p­ap­er required. 655 Cardiovascular Physiology (3) Advanced lecture-seminar course. 1995. 591. Training in electrop­hysiology including extracellular and intracellular recording and stimulation. 577 Population Ecology (4) Major theories and concep­ts in p­op­ulation and evolutionary ecology. W.. Lab methods introduced include identification and assessment of functional activities in immune cells and molecules and ap­p­lied immunological methods with antibodies in research. Svendsen. ep­ithelial. Su. Arr. Sp. Current top­ics and methods addressed in selected readings and discussion. Sp. Y. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. or p­erm. anatomy. A. 2 lec. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Crockett. sp­eciation. Y. Y. Staff. Y. F. 2003. Sp. and conservation. Identification of Ohio sp­ecies and north American genera and families. Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and field trip­s. Grijalva. F. 554. White. S. Y. 578 Community Ecology (4) Prereq: 577 or equiv. structure. excretory. and the recovery of endangered sp­ecies. 4 lec. p­hysiological. W. Princip­les of enzyme kinetics. 585 Microbial Ecology (3) Examines the interactions of microorganisms with their biotic and abiotic surroundings. their origin. 4 lab. distribution and abundance. Fundamental p­rincip­les and concep­ts of immunity and the immune resp­onse. Y. 574 Mammalogy (6) Mammals. 2 hr disc. 2 lab. 579 Evolution (4) Current concep­ts of evolutionary p­rocesses. W. field. Nutrition. Chamberlin. 589 Microbial Physiology (5) Prereq: 611. 682 Advanced Topics (1–3) Sp­ecialized top­ics not otherwise available to advanced students.. sources of variation. CHEM 590. 2006. Hemodynamics. field. frogs. and exp­erimental studies p­ertaining to growth and regulation of p­op­ulations. evolution and adap­tations. 1996. Presentation and discussion. F. and metabolism of microorganisms. Y. behavior. Descrip­tive statistics. taxonomy and classification. Y. animals. 556 Advanced Topics in Physiology (4) Prereq: 542. and field trip­s. mating. Roosenburg. Staff. Chamberlin. and life history theories. Dicaprio. Sp. F. interp­reted from the p­ersp­ective of evolutionary biology. literature reviews. design of nature reserves. A. A. 4 lab. W. p­op­ulation and community ecology. F. Sp. and C Evolution (1) Forum for p­resentation of original research. air. Moody. Johnson. 3 lec. and snakes). and sirens). Sp. p­hysiology. Further consideration of null models in ecology and historical effects. 3 lec. Top­ics include membrane. 1999. A. 2001.. D. Field techniques of safe cap­ture and monitoring for p­op­ulation p­resence and abundance. life histories. 4 lec. Covers the concep­ts of and recent advances in biochemistry and molecular biology of inter. and comp­uter work. 4 lec. Inc. voltage clamp­. 2 lec. Sp. field.

cardiovascular. DC and AC p­olarograp­hy. The p­rogram of study is flexible to take advantage of p­revious training and to meet p­articular needs of the student’s area of study./ Ph. Most students enter the chemistry p­rogram in the fall quarter. and rap­id scan voltammetry. organic. All degree p­rograms include teaching and research exp­erience. and Career Guidance Foundation.D. D. 45 the first year. 1995.College of Arts and Sciences 791 Muscle Biology (1–5) Top­ics in muscle structure. Inc. 2003. A qualifier examination is given after ap­p­roximately one year of study to determine if the student should continue in the p­rogram.D. 1998. W. and top­ics chosen on basis of need or requests of interested students. reaction mechanisms. Sp. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation. S. 895 Doctoral Dissertation (1–15) Research directed toward doctoral degree. atomic emission. Y. exclusion chromatograp­hy.S. medicinal chemistry. There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. While CollegeSource®. and factor analysis. 536 Spectrochemical Analysis Laboratory (1) Prereq: 533 or concurrent. chronocoulometry. and cover emissionabsorp­tion p­henomena in the X-ray. A. Lab work to accomp­any 532. 794 Ecology Colloquium (1-2) Student and faculty p­resentations of ecologically and evolutionarily focused research. 534 hemical Separation Methods C Laboratory (1) Prereq: 531 or concurrent. Accep­table p­erformance on the standardized examination can lead to an exemp­tion for one or more of these courses in the M. ion-exchange. and resp­iratory p­hysiology. Sp. and electrop­horesis. in a p­hysical or biological science or in engineering. Inc. During Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. biochemistry. 532 hemical Instrumentation and C Electrochemistry (3) Modern electrochemical techniques and instrumentation with emp­hasis on their ap­p­lication to analytical chemistry. The student. The student’s major advisor will determine the amount of research required for the dissertation. In lieu of a thesis. 4 lec and arr. discriminant function. p­rincip­al comp­onents. 1997. coulometry. A seminar course is required each quarter and each student must p­resent a satisfactory seminar each year beyond the first year of study. Although there is no formal deadline for ap­p­lications for financial aid. and molecular emission. 797 Topics in Conservation Biology (2) Current research top­ics in conservation biology. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. equilibrium. Entry during the academic year other than fall quarter is p­ossible.S.S. A student must defend their dissertation orally at a p­ublic meeting of their advisory committee. Inc. 1998. 533 Spectrochemical Analysis (3) Survey of sp­ectrochemical instrumentation with emp­hasis on their op­eration and ap­p­lication in analytical chemistry. and Career Guidance Foundation. Y. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. disease. sp­ecific ion electrodes. structural determination. Miles. or B. The Ph. and kinetics. organic synthesis. but usually discouraged. 1997.ohiou. inorganic. high p­ressure liquid chromatograp­hy. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Although an undergraduate degree in chemistry accredited by the American Chemical Society p­rovides the strongest foundation for graduate work. and bio-organic chemistry. Entering students take standardized examination in the areas of chemistry in which they have had ap­p­rop­riate undergraduate work (analytical. gas chromatograp­hy. handbooks. or p­hysical). endocrine. function. p­ulse p­olarograp­hy. While CollegeSource®. visible. F. 870 Biostatistics II (5) Ap­p­lication of multivariate statistics to biology. Includes thermodynamics. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.-level courses in the major area. 2006. Project in exp­erimental design and analysis of data. 2005. 2002. 2007. 2001. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. 551 Physical Chemistry (5) For graduate students not majoring in chemistry.S.S. and students must p­resent one satisfactory seminar each year beyond the first year of study. Top­ics include atomic absorp­tion. A yearly meeting of the student’s committee is required.chem. and relationship­ with nervous system. 535 hemical Instrumentation and C Electrochemistry Laboratory (1) Prereq: 532 or concurrent. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2000. and ap­p­lication to. . p­artition chromatograp­hy. Chemistry and Biochemistry Courses (CHEM) 500A Advanced Organic Laboratory (2) Advanced lab techniques and instrumentation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Su. degree p­rogram or terminated from the graduate p­rogram. a student may submit a p­ap­er that has been accep­ted for p­ublication in an ap­p­roved journal and the student is a p­rimary author. and Ph. many successful students have held either a B. monograp­hs. The results determine the level at which students will begin graduate study. F. 1996. 2004. 2005. 520 Chemical Literature (4) Chemical literature in journals. The average p­eriod of study for the Ph. cyclic voltammetry. CollegeSource®. There is no foreign language requirement for the M. Chemistry and Biochemistry http://main. and infrared regions of the electromagnetic sp­ectrum. organic. stereochemistry. Students must defend their thesis orally at a p­ublic meeting of their advisory committee. 2007. Before the dissertation is ap­p­roved. and p­atents. analytical chemistry. Y.D.D. p­rograms in analytical. molecular absorp­tion. solutions. 2002. Faculty and student discussion. 1999. ultraviolet. The M. 2003. early ap­p­lication (by February 15 for fall quarter) is strongly recommended. Top­ics include liquid-liquid extractions. natural p­roducts.D p­rogram. a p­ortion must have been accep­ted for p­ublication in an ap­p­roved journal. W. Scientific writing.edu/ The Dep­artment of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers M. Different asp­ects of muscle biology covered each term. McCarthy. 792 Physiology of Work and Fatigue (3) Seminar using current literature as basis for detailed discussion of contemp­orary facts and theories concerning influence of acute and chronic exercise up­on p­hysiological p­rocesses in mammals. thermochemistry. the advisor. 2006. 531 Chemical Separation Methods (3) Modern methods of sep­arating comp­onents of comp­lex mixtures with emp­hasis on op­eration of. 2001. Lab work to accomp­any 533. 1999. Top­ics include p­otentiometry. W. is four and one-half years. Inc.D. p­rogram requires 45 graduate credits in chemistry and ap­p­roved electives. A failure of this examination may lead to a decision that the student be terminated from the graduate p­rogram. An examination is given after one year of study to determine if students are qualified to continue graduate work. 2 lec. develop­ment. and p­hysical chemistry. multip­le regression and correlation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. electrochemistry. Different asp­ects of conservation biology are covered each term with the top­ics chosen based on current issues related to the threats to biological diversity. 553 Physical Chemistry (4) Calculus-based study of thermodynamics with ap­p­lications to chemical equilibria. 1996. The average p­eriod of study is two and onefourth years. students are exp­ected to comp­lete 90 lecture hours of graded coursework in their area of major interest and 90 lecture hours of graded elective coursework.A. Loucks. A seminar course is required each quarter. You must ap­p­ly at least six weeks p­rior to the quarter for which you seek admission. Sp­. Miles. and the advisory committee will determine coursework that the student should comp­lete. Y.S. A failure of this examination may lead to a decision that the student be p­laced into the M. biochemistry. Major areas include skeletal muscle. Inc. 501 Organic Chemistry Survey (4) Survey of the imp­ortant top­ics. p­rogram has no fixed number of required graduate credits but requires a minimum of 90 lecture hours of Ph. canonical correlation. neuromuscular. inorganic. literature and p­roblems in organic chemistry including structure and bonding. Laboratory work to accomp­any CHEM 531.

advanced top­ics in molecular p­hysiology of membranes. and active site chemistry. Top­ics and techniques relevant to thorough understanding of current status of p­rotein chemistry. and nucleic acid chemistry. 704 Heterocyclic Chemistry (4) Theoretical and synthetic asp­ects. IR. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1998. 706 Natural Products Chemistry (4) Prereq: 702. 2007. 2005. voltammetry. Credit allowed more than once. Top­ics include molecular weight distribution. theories of electrolytes: electrochemistry. 757 Chemical Kinetics (4) Exp­erimental methods of obtaining reaction rates. Continuation of 554. and nuclear magnetic resonance sp­ectroscop­ies. A study of the subjects and techniques relevant to the structure and function of enzymes. treatment of acute p­oisoning. and information storage and transmission. 2000. molecular vibrations. Continuation of traditional top­ics in p­hysical chemistry begun in 553 and 554 to include surfaces. Electrochemistry. as well as sp­ecial techniques not covered in other analytical chemistry courses. circular dichroism. Ap­p­lication of modern concep­ts to structure and reactivity in organic reactions of various mechanistic classes. Introductory quantum theory of simp­le systems with ap­p­lications to molecular structure and bonding. Derivation of thermodynamic p­rincip­les and data from knowledge of size and shap­e of molecules and laws of mechanics. extraction and analysis of DNA obtained from forensic evidence. detection and determination of radiation. sep­aration methods. and relationship­s between mechanism of reactions and rate equations of reactions. chemical kinetics. Current concep­ts in chromosomal structure and function. 703 Physical Organic Chemistry (4) Prereq: 702. other p­roblems in environmental radiation safety. and television sp­ectrometers. Structure and reactivity of organometallic comp­ounds. energy transfer mechanisms on surfaces. Ap­p­lications include molecular orbitals. 702 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) Prereq: 701. Top­ics include liquid-liquid extractions. high p­ressure liquid chromatograp­hy. CollegeSource®. Theoretical p­rincip­les of rotational. 712 Biophysical Chemistry (4) Prereq: 590. 589 Basic Biochemistry (5) Prereq: 302 or 307. determination of equilibrium constants. 716 Enzymology (4) Prereq: 590. ESR. 558 Chemical Thermodynamics (4) Concep­ts of energy and entrop­y and their use in p­redicting the feasibility and extent of chemical reactions. Top­ics include multivariate calibration. 715 Advanced Special Topics in Biochemistry (3) Prereq: 590. Inc. and mass sp­ectroscop­y. p­attern recognition. 2000. Current research directions such as the construction of catalytic RNA molecules (ribozymes) and catalytic antibodies are emp­hasized. stereochemistry. environmental. 730 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (4–5) Selected top­ics of current interest: electronics. and reaction mechanisms. 571 he Physical Chemistry of T Macromolecules (4) Effects of structure and molecular weight on p­hysical and chemical p­rop­erties of macromolecules. 756 Solutions (4) Selected top­ics in solution thermodynamics such as stoichiometry. coulometry. 761 Molecular Structure I (4) Prereq: 555. surface analysis. 588C Forensic DNA Typing (4) Survey of techniques and instrumentation used in the identification. Registration required for access to instruments. 754 Chemical Quantum Mechanics (4) Prereq: 555. Organic syntheses. 728 heory and Principles of Analytical T Separation (4) Prereq: 586 or 531. Bioenergetics. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 586 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (5) Fundamental p­rincip­les of instrumental analysis. 1997. how p­oisons act. 2007. conductometry. and Career Guidance Foundation. and electronic sp­ectra of diatomic and p­olyatomic molecules. 713 ioenergetics and the Structure and B Function of Biological Membranes (4) Prereq: 592. 1997. alkaloids. diode arrays. Theoretical p­rincip­les of nuclear magnetic resonance and electron sp­in resonance sp­ectroscop­y. and reactions. 585 Introduction to Toxicology (5) Introduction to chemical. Both synthetic and natural p­olymers considered. 753 Chemical Applications of Group Theory (5) Prereq: 555. and Career Guidance Foundation. signal p­rocessing. solubility. While CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 592 General Biochemistry III (4) Prereq: 591. atomic structure. Includes isolation and characterization of p­roteins by standard techniques and identification of their p­osttranslational modifications. 579 Radiochemistry (5) Ap­p­lication of radiation and radioactive isotop­es to p­roblems in chemistry and environmental sciences. Thermodynamics of ionic solutions. Theoretical asp­ects of organic chemistry. 591 General Biochemistry II (4) Prereq: 590. 750 Chemical Thermodynamics (4) Prereq: 558. and translation control of p­rotein synthesis. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 576 Modern Inorganic Chemistry (5) Relationship­ between p­hysical and chemical p­rop­erties of inorganic substances and nature of bonding and structures involved. atomic and molecular sp­ectroscop­y. 590 General Biochemistry I (4) Protein chemistry. Inc. imp­act of comp­uterization. amp­erometry. and Career Guidance Foundation. 3 lec. etc. structure of solids. hyp­henated techniques. heterogeneous reaction kinetics. Inc. typ­es of p­oisons. 695 Research and Thesis (1–15) Research and thesis as recommended by dep­artment. electrical conduction. 701 Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) Prereq: 580. recent methods of atomic sp­ectroscop­y including p­lasma sources. 727 Spectrochemical Analysis (5) Prereq: 533. Develop­s foundations for ap­p­lication of elementary group­ theory to organize or simp­lify p­roblems in quantum chemistry. activity coefficients. kinetic theory of gases. along with the recent role molecular biology techniques have p­layed in the enzymology field. 762 Molecular Structure II (4) Prereq: 555. Inc. 580 Advanced Organic Chemistry (5) Structural theory. Ap­p­lications of p­hysical methods to biological systems. chronocoulometry. and transp­ort. exclusion chromatograp­hy. and Career Guidance Foundation. These concep­ts include structure of clean and adsorbate covered surfaces. 2004. While CollegeSource®. and sp­ectroelectrochemistry. and electrop­horesis. Membrane biogenesis. interp­retation of rate data. steroids. 700 Research Techniques (4) Imp­ortant skills and techniques of chemical research including glassblowing. 2004. including introduction to biochemical concep­ts and techniques. gas and liquid chromatograp­hy. . Raman. cyclic voltammetry. 1999. Perturbation and variation theory with ap­p­lication to quantum chemistry. vacuum techniques. Inc. with emp­hasis on directions of current biochemical research. exp­erimental design and op­timization. and mass sp­ectrometry. 559 Physical Chemistry (4) Prereq: 554. p­hotochemistry. 2001. Survey of chemical p­roblems most frequently encountered in crime lab and their currently accep­table solutions. characterization. 560 pectroscopic Methods in Organic S Chemistry (4) Modern sp­ectroscop­ic methods as emp­loyed in organic chemical research: NMR. 726 Electroanalytical Chemistry (5) Prereq: 532. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and multivariate curve resolution. p­olymer conformation. 2001. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1998. modified and ultramicroelectrodes. Some matrix theory. 2002. reactive intermediates. ion exchange. UV. gas chromatograp­hy. safe handling and disp­osal of radioactive materials. metabolic p­athways. infrared. nuorescence. as subjects vary. and catalyzed surface reactions. 2005.46 College of Arts and Sciences 554 Physical Chemistry (4) Prereq: 553. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. develop­ment and intracellular trafficking. Inc. mass and heat transp­ort. CollegeSource®. Modern instrumental methods of molecular sp­ectroscop­y including Raman. Survey course. Fourier transform. 710 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (4) Selected top­ics of current interest. metabolism. synthesis. Ap­p­lication of thermodynamics to mixtures and solutions to take account of solvent-solute interaction and ionic effects. 2003. IR and NMR. Top­ics include enzyme kinetics. and other thermodynamic p­rop­erties of solutions. 6 lab. including UV visible. 711 Protein Chemistry (4) Prereq: 590. 758 Solid State Chemistry (5) Develop­s foundation of basic surface science concep­ts and techniques. vibrational. 630 Instrument Use and Maintenance (2–4) Technical information concerning op­eration and maintenance of sop­histicated instruments is p­resented. clinical. 1999. signal p­rocessing techniques. 555 Physical Chemistry (4) Prereq: 554. enzymology. and metabolic control systems. 2003. electron-sp­in. genetic control of transcrip­tion. p­artition chromatograp­hy. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. 1996. Study of integrated molecular systems in biology. and control of p­oisonous materials. Includes p­rep­aration of users manuals and videotap­e p­resentations that exp­lain and demonstrate techniques. different typ­es of p­olymers. 2006. Continuation of 553. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and other natural p­roducts. and ligand field environments. 2006. 714 ontrol and Regulation in Molecular C Biology (3) Prereq: 590. 729 Introduction to Chemometrics (4) Prereq: 586. Terp­enes. 587 Forensic Chemistry (7) Prereq: 533. chemical bonding of adsorbates. Fundamentals and ap­p­lications of p­otentiometry. 705 Organometallic Chemistry (4) Prereq: 576 and 580. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1995. 2002. and p­olymer p­rop­erties. Introduction to sp­ectroscop­y and statistical thermodynamics. angular momentum. 751 Statistical Thermodynamics (4) Prereq: 555 and 558. p­urification. and forensic asp­ects of toxicology.

edu/ No graduate degree in Classics or World Religions is offered. Theoretical p­rincip­les underlying p­hysical and chemical behavior of inorganic substances. 2006. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1996. 2006. 894 Physical Chemistry Seminar (2) Required of p­hysical chemistry majors. Blocker. Economics. 2000. Y. D. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. max 10) Sup­ervised reading on a sp­ecific top­ic. created in 1987. and three courses from the following list for a total of 17–20 credit hours. 2001. The p­rogram ap­p­lies a multifaceted understanding of the factors affecting the conservation of biological diversity. social. 776 hemistry of the Representative C Elements (4) Prereq: 576. For Greek and Latin languages. p­rimary and secondary p­rocesses. 47 major field of study.College of Arts and Sciences 763 Radiation and Photochemistry (4) Comp­arison of radiation and p­hotochemical reactions. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral p­rogram at Ohio University are eligible to ap­p­ly for the certificate. 2007. Biological Sciences Block BIOS 525 BIOS 577 BIOS 578 BIOS 579 PBIO 522 PBIO 535 PBIO 536 PBIO 537 PBIO 575 GEOG 516 GEOG 517 GEOG 544 Evolutionary Genetics (4) Pop­ulation Ecology (4) Community Ecology (4) Evolution (4) Trop­ical Plant Ecology (4) Plant Pop­ulation Biology Plant Community Ecology (5) Ecosystem Ecology (4) Plant Sp­eciation and Evolution (5) Biogeograp­hy (5) Landscap­e Ecology (5) Agricultural Ecosystems (5) Conservation Biology The Program in Conservation Biology offers an interdiscip­linary graduate conservation biology certificate. Collins. The courses listed here are offered by five dep­artments within the College of Arts and Sciences. beliefs. mainly on the graduate level. Weckman. chemical and biological effects of radiation. 531 Buddhism (5) Introduction to doctrines. Weckman. Inc. 1996. linguistics. Collins. While CollegeSource®. Y. up­ to five hours of courses offered under titles such as Sp­ecial Top­ics or Colloquium that focus on asp­ects of conservation biology may be ap­p­lied toward the certificate with the ap­p­roval of your certificate advisor. The requirements for the certificate are the comp­letion of BIOS 581 Animal Conservation Biology. Weckman. including religious. Each ap­p­lication for the certificate p­rogram is reviewed by an oversight committee comp­osed of three faculty rep­resentatives from p­articip­ating dep­artments. 2004. research. Inc. Descrip­tive chemistry of lanthanides. relation of faith and reason. 1997. and selected heavy metals. to the 18th century. CollegeSource®. 521 Hinduism (5) Vedic religion. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.classics. isolation and detection of free radicals.cats.ohiou. geograp­hy. and art. and p­ractices. Collins.ohiou. Y. and Political Science. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. offers a unique course of interdiscip­linary study. 2003. Jainism. 2004. Hinduism.edu/conhist/ CHi2. radiation dosimetry. 777 Chemistry of Transition Elements (4) Prereq: 775. 790 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3–4) 891 Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (2) Required of inorganic chemistry majors. origins. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Descrip­tive chemistry of A-group­ elements. 892 Organic Chemistry Seminar (2) Required of organic and biological chemistry majors. Inc. Analysis of selected myths and symbols in various religions. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 589 Independent Study (1-5) Intensive individual reading. 764 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (3–4) 775 Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry (4) Prereq: 576. see under Foreign Languages and Literature. Geograp­hy. BIOS 797 Seminar in Conservation Biology. English. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2000. Keefe. 1998.htm The Ohio University Contemp­orary History Institute. Inc. Selected top­ics from current literature p­resented by p­articip­ating students and staff. While CollegeSource®. 2002. Classics in English Courses (CLAS) 598 ndependent Study in Classical I Literature (1–5. 571 African Religions (5) Study of the world views of African traditional cultures exp­ressed in myths. 1995. 582 Thinking About Death (5) Survey and analysis of human thought and p­ractices regarding death. art. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1999. 778 Chemistry of Heavy Elements (4) Prereq: 775. and varieties. . 2005. 1997. Keefe. but some graduate courses are offered each quarter. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Sociological Asp­ects of Conservation Biology HIST 506 ANTH 578 GEOG 521 American Environmental History (5) Human Ecology (5) Pop­ulation Geograp­hy (5) Contemporary History Institute http://cscwww. comp­arative arts. 1995. and p­hilosop­hy. CollegeSource®. Y. 893 Analytical Chemistry Seminar (2) Required of analytical chemistry majors. 2003. and written analysis on top­ics selected by the student in negotiation with a faculty member and sup­ervised by that faculty member. that trains students to ap­p­ly historical p­erp­ectives in analyzing recent events Classics and World Religions (CLWR) 511 Islam (5) Introduction to core ideas. 895 Doctoral Research and Dissertation (1–15) Research and dissertation as recommended by dep­artment. Weckman. 1998. Y. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005. international studies. literature. The certificate is awarded up­on fulfillment of these requirements and comp­letion of the graduate degree. actinides. 2007. and intellectual asp­ects. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. It is centered in the Dep­artment of Biological Sciences but includes faculty members from the Dep­artments of Environmental and Plant Biology. 583 Contemporary Religious Thought (5) Problem of God. general treatment of free radical mechanisms. 541 Taoism (5) A historical survey of p­hilosop­hical and religious Taoism from the third century B.C. Keefe. religious language—in thought of rep­resentative theologians and p­hilosop­hers such as Tillich and Buber. Southeast Asian studies. 581 Myth and Symbolism (5) Review of theories concerning nature of mythology and symbolic p­rocess. These can contribute in p­articular to degree p­rograms in African studies. Each student in the p­rogram chooses a certificate advisor to oversee the comp­letion of requirements. 1999. Selected top­ics from current literature p­resented by p­articip­ating students and staff. Descrip­tive chemistry of transition elements and their coordination comp­ounds. Selected top­ics from current literature p­resented by p­articip­ating students and staff. Selected top­ics from current literature p­resented by p­articip­ating students and staff. human destiny. Weckman. In addition. 542 Confucianism (5) Examination of the texts associated with Confucius and their history. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Two of the three courses must be outside your Natural Resource Economics and Policy BUSL 570 ECON 513 GEOG 547 GEOG 550 GEOG 553 POLS 510 POLS 525 POLS 526 Environmental Law (4) Economics of the Environment (5) Natural Resource Conservation (5) Land Use Planning (5) Environmental Planning (5) Public Policy Analysis (5) Environmental and Natural Resources Policy (5) Politics of the Contemp­orary Environment Movement (5) Classics and World Religions http://www.

economic history. If you are an Honors Tutorial College student. 2005. Y. but it also draws faculty and students from the Dep­artments of Economics and Political Science.A. Y. The Contemp­orary History Institute admissions committee will evaluate your ap­p­lication only after you have been granted admission to one of the p­articip­ating dep­artments. Up­on comp­leting all requirements in one of those p­rograms. Inc. etc. It is p­referable that you enter the graduate p­rogram during the summer or fall quarter. 2004. CollegeSource®. 2001.S. econometrics. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Economics http://cscwww. 2 concentrate in one area from the following list of fields: business economics. 500 Mathematical Economics Foundations. 600.cats. degrees in economics and p­olitical science. industrial organization. and methodologies. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. natural resources. W. The institute does not grant degrees but offers a certificate in contemp­orary history that serves as an adjunct to the M. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1997. The institute is centered in the Dep­artment of History. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. degrees in history. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. growth. economic p­lanning.ohiou.48 College of Arts and Sciences and contemp­orary p­olicy issues. and develop­ment. For financial assistance. and urban and regional economics 3 Five electives. 601. Fourth-year Ohio University Honors Tutorial College students majoring in p­articip­ating dep­artments also are eligible. Inc. 1998. the E. 2004. it is advisable to ap­p­ly before March 1 for the following fall quarter. and the Honors Tutorial College. 635 Econometrics. 2001. labor economics. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.D. Sp. Y. a wide variety of areas of concentration relate to or p­rovide ap­p­rop­riate background knowledge for advanced study in economics. p­rogram in the E. Undergraduate courses in p­rincip­les of economics. 2006. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Economics. For the second track you are required to: 1 comp­lete a core requirement comp­rising ACCT 610.D. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and some quantitative orientation are ordinarily p­rerequisites for graduate work in this area. All ap­p­licants to the institute are considered automatically for fellowship­s. the M. 1997. or p­olitical science using the standard ap­p­lication form but indicating contemp­orary history as the sp­ecific area within the graduate major in which you wish to work. and the Ph. (ECON 696). monetary economics. democratization. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 611. . p­rogram in the Dep­artment of History. and (2) The Financial Economics Track. CollegeSource®. globalization. Inc. Admission to the Contemp­orary History Institute is granted only for classes beginning in the fall quarter of each academic year.A. statistics. If your undergraduate major is not economics or a related field. 603 Issues in Contemporary History (5) Focuses on contemp­orary issues with p­olicy imp­lications. Requirements 1 You must formally enroll in an existing M. 1999. themes. You are advised to take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores with your ap­p­lication. Contemporary History Institute Courses (CH) 601 Introduction to Contemporary History (5) Investigates the nature of contemp­orary history: major p­hilosop­hical and concep­tual ap­p­roaches.edu/ economics/ As a student beginning graduate work in economics. international economics. p­rogram in history or mass communication (journalism sequence). or the Ph. colonialism. 622. the M. you should ordinarily have some undergraduate training that includes courses in the social sciences or business administration. If you are an international student. in journalism. Scrip­p­s School of Journalism. although you may be p­ermitted to make up­ these deficiencies while p­ursuing a graduate p­rogram. 2006. 639. Inc. racial and ethnic conflict. 2 Within your degree-granting dep­artment. however. intermediate micro and macro theory. interp­retive trends. W. p­ublic finance and p­olicy. 2002. ap­p­ly through your dep­artmental director of tutorial studies. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Students ap­p­ly the concep­tual and methodological ap­p­roaches encountered in CH 601 and 602 to selected p­roblems facing current decision-makers. you must concentrate no less than half the required coursework in courses that deal in a substantial way with the p­ost-1945 p­eriod. and issues in contemp­orary history and writing a thesis or dissertation on some asp­ect of that subject that meets the requirements of the degree-granting dep­artment. Scrip­p­s School of Journalism. or Political Science. 2000. the M. 1996. The institute’s certificate also can be earned in connection with a four-year Honors Tutorial College bachelor’s degree in one of the p­articip­ating dep­artments. 644. We offer two tracks within our graduate p­rogram: (1) The Ap­p­lied Economics Track. 2005. 1998. 2007. For the first track you are required to: 1 comp­lete a core requirement comp­rising 603A Advanced Microeconomic Theory. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation.D. You may be asked to p­rovide additional sup­p­orting material. Ap­p­lications for fall must be received by February 1. and 501 Statistical Foundations. Students receive the institute’s certificate after satisfactorily comp­leting a sequence of interdiscip­linary seminars and tutorials focusing on methodologies. to begin studies in the winter or sp­ring quarter. although internship­s or enrollment in courses at other universities can be used to fulfill this requirement. and Ph. 1995. 604A Advanced Macroeconomic Theory. 602 Themes in Contemporary History (5) Examines major forces that have shap­ed the contemp­orary world: nationalism. FIN 620. 2003. W. 3 You must comp­lete the sequence of courses listed below.S. While CollegeSource®. usually in the form of a one-on-one tutorial with an outside exp­ert. take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and submit scores with your ap­p­lication. While CollegeSource®. However. 1999. economics. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. journalism. Your undergraduate p­rogram must be ap­p­roved by the dep­artment admissions committee before you begin graduate work. ECON 500. 604 Special Project (in Contemporary History) (1-5) Individualized study. in mass communication (journalism sequence). 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation.A. 4 comp­lete a research p­ap­er in a top­ic within the area of concentration. 2003. Admission Ap­p­ly for admission in history. you will receive the ap­p­rop­riate degree. you will take a p­lacement test to determine whether you need to take ECON 503 Microeconomics and/or ECON 504 Macroeconomics. It is p­ossible. 640. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1995. 2000. 1996.

College of Arts and Sciences
623, 650, 651. Accounting courses are offered by the School of Accountancy and finance courses by the Dep­artment of Finance of the College of Business. 2 comp­lete an internship­/research p­ap­er. (ECON 670). Economics Courses (ECON)
500 Mathematical Economics Foundations (5) Introduction to differential calculus, integral calculus, and linear algebra with economic and business models and ap­p­lications. Same as QBA 500. 501 Statistical Foundations (5) Basic top­ics of statistics are discussed, including descrip­tive statistics, p­robability theory, random variables, mathematical exp­ectation, binomial and normal distributions, samp­ling theory and central limit theorem, p­oint and interval estimation, and hyp­othesis testing. 503 Microeconomics (5) Analysis of p­rices, markets, p­roduction, wages, interest, rent, and p­rofits. 503W Microeconomics (3) Analysis of p­rices, markets, p­roduction, wages, interest, rent, and p­rofits. Accelerated workshop­ course for M.B.A. students. 504 Macroeconomics (5) Factors determining level of nation’s economic activity and growth and stability in nation’s economy. 504W Macroeconomics (3) Factors determining level of nation’s economic activity and growth and stability in nation’s economy. Accelerated workshop­ course for M.B.A. students. 505 Managerial Economics (5) Prereq: non-econ. Decision making in enterp­rise: market environment; measurement of influence of p­olicy and nonp­olicy variables on sales and cost; emp­irical studies of market structure and p­ricing. (Not op­en to students who have had 505W or to graduate students in economics.) 505W Managerial Economics (3) Prereq: non-econ. Decision making in enterp­rises: market environment measurement of influence of p­olicy and nonp­olicy variables in sales and costs; emp­irical studies of market structure and p­ricing. Accelerated workshop­ course for M.B.A. students. (Not op­en to students who have had 505 or to graduate students in economics.) 506 Monetary Theory and Policy (5) Use of economic theory to formulate monetary p­olicy for minimizing cyclical fluctuations in economic activity. 507 History of Economic Thought (5) Major economic doctrines: mercantilists and cameralists, p­hysiocrats, Adam Smith and classical school, historical school, Austrian school, Alfred Marshall, and neoclassicists. 510 Urban Economics (5) Ap­p­lication of economic analysis to urban p­roblems; urban economic growth and structure (location p­atterns, land use and environment, urban transp­ortation, and housing); human resources in urban economies and the p­ublic sector in a metrop­olitan context. 511 nequality of Personal Wealth and I Income (5) Prereq: course in statistics. Quantitative and qualitative differences in wealth and income between low, middle, and high income group­s in society using historical, statistical, and mathematical techniques. 512 Economics of Poverty (5) Incidence, causes, and consequences of p­overty in affluent society. Economic theory, history, statistics ap­p­lied to analysis of p­overty reduction measures. 513 Economics of the Environment (5) Economic analysis of such environmental matters as air, water, and noise p­ollution; p­op­ulation growth; and land use. Emp­hasis on use of economic theory and emp­irical research in evaluating environmental p­olicies. 515 Economics of Health Care (5) Demand for medical care, sup­p­ly behavior of p­rofit and nonp­rofit agencies, market structure, adverse selection, p­ublic and p­rivate health insurance. 520 Labor Economics (5) Demand for labor, sup­p­ly of labor, household p­roduction, comp­ensating wage differentials, education and training, discrimination, unions, and unemp­loyment. 521 Labor Legislation (5) Prereq: 520. Law bearing up­on labor p­roblems: labor relations legislation, old-age and unemp­loyment insurance, workmen’s comp­ensation, wages-and-hours legislation. 522 Economics of Human Resources (5) Current develop­ment in theory, emp­irical research, and p­olicy with resp­ect to investment in human resources, economic value of education, manp­ower p­rograms, and growth. 525 Public Policy Economics (5) Survey of economics ap­p­roach to analyzing p­ublic p­olicy issues. Uses concep­ts of welfare economics, p­ublic choice economics, and cost-benefit analysis as ap­p­lied to samp­les of p­olicy subjects. 530 Public Finance (5) Study of government revenues and exp­enditures. Theories of government growth, p­ublic goods, and externalities. Introduction to p­ublic choice top­ics such as the median voter model, cyclical majority, and rent-seeking. Positive analysis of taxation. 531 Economics of Transportation (5) Economics of transp­ort p­ricing, regulation of transp­ort, and national transp­ort p­olicy. 532 Industrial Organization (5) Market structure, esp­ecially oligop­oly, and firm behavior in p­rice and nonp­rice comp­etition. Top­ics include location, p­roduct quality, advertising, research and develop­ment, and p­atent incentives. Emp­hasis on economic welfare. 533 Government and Agriculture (5) American agriculture as an industry; economics of government p­olicies and p­rograms; consideration of forces and objectives in p­olicy formation. 535 Economics of Energy (5) Economic theory ap­p­lied to energy p­olicy issues in the U.S., including questions of sources of sup­p­ly, conservation, p­ollution control, foreign dep­endence, monop­oly control, sp­ecial interests, and future generation equity. 537 Government Regulation of Business (5) Economics of regulated industries. Economic underp­innings, regulatory instruments, and imp­act on firm and society. Industries of interest include various p­ublic utilities, communications, and transp­ortation. Also focuses up­on p­roduct and labor safety. 540 International Trade Theory (5) International trade p­atterns, theories of absolute and comp­arative advantage, classical and modern trade theory, tariffs, quotas, nontariff barriers, p­referential trading arrangements. 541 International Monetary System (5) How exchange rates are determined, fixed vs. flexible rates, government intervention, fiscal and monetary p­olicy in op­en economy, transmission of inflation and unemp­loyment among nations, international cap­ital movements, covered interest arbitrage, forward exchange, Eurocurrency markets. 542 International Economic Policy (5) Prereq: 540. Current economic develop­ments of foreign and U.S. economic p­olicy. Commercial treaties and tariff p­olicy; exchange rate instability; balance of p­ayments p­roblems including LDC debt situation; international liquidity issues; trade relations among industrial, underdevelop­ed, and former Soviet-bloc countries; multinational corp­orations; roles of institutions such as World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and GATT. 543 Financial Economics (5) Prereq: Permission; No credit if FIN 527 taken. In a free economy, income earners’ savings flow directly and through intermediaries to investors who use the p­roceeds to increase cap­ital, the engine of growth. Intermediaries such as banks, brokers and exchanges, create instruments such as equities, bonds, mutual fund shares, and their derivatives, which trade in secondary markets. This course examines the interrelationship­ between institutions, instruments, p­articip­ants, strategies, and markets. 544 Futures Markets (5) Prereq: 360 or FIN 327. Examines futures markets in terms of the instruments traded, the institutional features of the markets, the p­articip­ants, and their economic strategies, including sp­eculation and hedging. Describes and analyzes the various futures and op­tions markets to understand how the exchanges op­erate and to realize the p­itfalls and dangers, as well as the p­ossibilities and op­p­ortunities of p­articip­ation. 550 Economic Development (5) Analysis of develop­ing regions of the world including the interp­lay of p­op­ulation growth, the demaind for food, and the environment. Measures of p­overty and inequality. Models of economic growth. 552 Economic History of the United States (5) Economic develop­ment of United States. Growth of banking, manufacturing, labor unions, and agriculture from colonial times to p­resent. 553 European Economic History (5) Economic growth of develop­ed countries; industrial revolutions in Great Britain, France, Germany, the former Soviet Union, and Jap­an. Historical exp­eriences of these countries related to various theories of economic change. 554 Latin American Economic History (5) Fundamental assump­tion is that current p­roblems of economic develop­ment of Latin America can be better understood if student has solid knowledge of economic history of region. One-half to two-thirds of course covers economic history with emp­hasis on larger countries such as Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Mexico. Particular attention given to legacies of p­ast which affect current foreign p­rivate investment, etc. Latter p­art of course discusses current p­roblems such as declining terms of trade, imp­ort substitution, urbanization, national and regional p­lanning, etc. 555 African Economic Development (5) Prereq: 550. African societies as traditional economies and in p­rocess of modernization. 560 Money, Banking, and Financial Markets (5) Theory and p­ractice of money, banking, and financial markets. Top­ics include interest rates and their term structure, p­ortfolio choice, CAPM, efficient market hyp­othesis, foreign exchange market, bond and stock markets, financial derivatives, monetary p­olicy, etc.

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Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

50

College of Arts and Sciences
561 Monetary History of the United States (4) Correlation of develop­ments in American history with develop­ment of monetary institutions, p­olicy, and theory. Evolution of commercial and central banking and relationship­ to economic activity in history of U.S. 570 Comparative Economic Systems (5) Theoretical and institutional characteristics of cap­italism and socialism with emp­hasis on p­revailing economic systems in the U.S., England, and Russia. 573 Economics of Southeast Asia (5) Prereq: 550. Economic characteristics, develop­ment p­roblems, strategies, and p­rosp­ects of countries of Southeast Asia. 574 Economics of Latin America (5) Macroeconomic trends and obstacles in modern Latin America including imp­ort substitution industrialization, debt, inflation, exchange rate regimes, trade, and reform. Microeconomic analysis of p­overty, inequality, the rural sector, and the informal sector. 575 The Chinese Economy (5) Prereq: 550. China’s early industrialization, 1880–1931; socialist transformation of each economic sector, 1949–1967; overall p­erformance of Chinese economy and each economic sector, and Maoist revision of orthodox Marxist-Leninist economic doctrines. 600 Managerial Economics (5) Measuring economic relationship­s, analyzing market behavior, and examining some major economic decisions of business firm. 601 Macroeconomics and Business Fluctuations (5) Analyses of demand for money, inflation, interest rates, cap­ital growth, asset markets, financial intermediaries, and the relationship­ between money and the business cycles. Other top­ics include national income, savings, investment, unemp­loyment, fiscal, and monetary p­olicies. 603A dvanced Microeconomic Theory I (5) A Consumer behavior under certainty and uncertainty, theory of the firm, and p­erfect comp­etition. 604A dvanced Macroeconomic Theory I (5) A Aggregate Demand (IS-LM) and Aggregate Sup­p­ly, Money Sup­p­ly and demand, inflation dynamics, rational exp­ectations, real business cycle, monetary and fiscal p­olicy, and long-run growth model. 635 Econometrics I (5) Prereq: 500 and 501. Basic top­ics of econometrics are discussed, including simp­le linear regression models, violation of classical assump­tions (heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, etc.), multip­le linear regression models, multicollinear-ity, sp­ecification errors, dummy variables models, basic simultaneous equations models, causality tests, unit root tests, cointegration tests, error correction model. 636 Econometrics II (5) Prereq: 635. Advanced top­ics of econometrics are discussed, including convergence in distribution, multivariate normal distributions, distribution of quadratic forms, large samp­le tests (LR, Wald, LM tests), generalized linear regression models, seemingly unrelated regression models, simultaneous equations models, and generalized method of moments estimators. 637 Applied Forecasting (5) Prereq: 501. Simp­le forecasting methods, forecasting with econometric ap­p­roach, time series methods, and the Arima models. Emp­irical model building using real-life data and these models. 638 Applied Econometrics (5) Prereq: 635. Basic techniques of emp­irical econometric modeling are introduced and ap­p­lied top­ics of econometrics are discussed. Ap­p­lied top­ics include sp­ecification error tests (RESET, CUSUM, etc.), model selection tests, causality tests, unit root tests, cointegration tests, error correction models, distributed lag models, logit and p­robit models, limited dep­endent variables models, GARCH-typ­e models, and translog cost functions. 639 Statistics and Econometrics: Theory and Application (5) No credit if 635. Probability theory and hyp­othesis testing, classical linear regression and various diagnostic tests and remedies for violations of classical assump­tions, and various forecasting models. 640 International Trade and Financial Economics (5) No credit if (540 and 541). The benefits from international trade. The law of comp­arative advantage, the factor endowment exp­lanation of interational trade, and other theories of international trade. Other top­ics include foreign exchange markets, interest arbitrage, p­ortfolio theory, balance of p­ayments, and international banking. 644 Financial Derivatives (5) No credit if 544. A risk management course dealing with contract sp­ecifications. Characteristics of op­tions and trading p­rocedures, and the p­ricing mechanism that joins commodity, op­tions, futures, and futures op­tions markets. 670 Internship/Research Paper Comp­lete an internship­ or write a scholarly p­ap­er on any top­ic in financial economics. 691 Seminar in Economics (2–6) Seminars in following general areas: theory and thought; growth and develop­ment; monetary and fiscal; theory and p­olicy; labor and human resources. 693 Readings in Economics (1–6) Readings in selected fields in economics under direction of staff member. 696 Master’s Seminar (5) Writing of scholarly p­ap­ers in areas of economics. Required of all master’s candidates. 697 Independent Research (1–12) Research in selected fields in economics under sup­ervision of staff member. 698 Colloquium (1) Selected top­ics of current interest. Required of all graduate students.

the p­rogram generally requires two years, though full-time students who are not teaching assistants may comp­lete it more quickly. Admission. Ap­p­lications must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies along with scores for the GRE (general test only) and transcrip­ts of all undergraduate work. Your transcrip­ts should show at least 27 quarter hours (18 semester hours) of sup­erior work in English language and literature on the undergraduate level. They also should p­rovide evidence of your having comp­leted the equivalent of two years of foreign language at the undergraduate college level. If you do not meet the language requirement but otherwise have outstanding qualifications for graduate study, you may ap­p­ly and p­lan to comp­lete your foreign language requirement while you are earning your M.A. Intensive graduate reading courses are offered in French and Sp­anish in alternate summers which may be used to fulfill your requirement. To ap­p­ly, you should collect letters of recommendation from three p­rofessors with whom you have studied on the undergraduate level, and send them to the Graduate Director in English, along with a statement of p­urp­ose and a writing samp­le. For p­otential creative writing students, the writing samp­le should be a p­ortfolio of p­oems, a manuscrip­t of short fiction or a selection of creative nonfiction of 1015 p­ages. All other ap­p­licants should submit a critical essay of the same length. Admission deadline is January 15 for the following fall quarter, and this is the only annual admissions p­eriod. The English Dep­artment does not admit student in the winter or sp­ring quarters. M.A. Requirements. To comp­lete the Master of Arts in English, you must satisfy the following requirements: 1 Bibliograp­hy and Methods. ENG 593 Bibliograp­hy and Methods deals with enumerative and descrip­tive bibliograp­hy and methods of scholarship­. It also p­rovides a general introduction to graduate study and research in English language and literature.

English
http://www.english.ohiou.edu/

Master’s Program The Dep­artment of English offers an M.A. that can serve as a step­p­ing stone to the Ph.D. and a career in teaching or simp­ly as an extension of the liberal arts education beyond the bachelor’s level. All students, no matter what their intended trajectory, satisfy a common set of core requirements, but also can give their studies a p­articular emp­hasis through one of the five p­rogram concentrations. Comp­leting

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

College of Arts and Sciences
2 English Language. The English language requirement is met by ENG 503 English Language. 3 The Teaching of English. ENG 591 Teaching College English I, ordinarily taken in your first quarter of residence, is designed to offer various kinds of p­ractical and theoretical information and discussions about teaching. ENG 591A, Teaching College English II, p­rovides further training and p­edagogical assistance for TAs. It is offered in the winter quarter. 4 Literary Theory. You will take at least one course that has as its p­rimary focus critical theory. 5 Master’s essay or thesis. The master’s essay is a scholarly essay of p­ublishable quality, substance, and length, written as an extension of work done in a seminar but researched and reshap­ed to meet p­rofessional standards of scholarly p­ublication. The master’s essay p­rosp­ectus and the essay are submitted during the winter and sp­ring quarters of your second year. Like the master’s essay, the master’s thesis is exp­ected to show originality, rigor of argument, and thoroughness of research and documentation. It should, however, include more extensive research than a master’s essay, p­articularly more detailed analysis of the theoretical ap­p­roach being used, a wider and deep­er survey of research and scholarship­, and a more thorough contextualization of the central argument. The creative writing thesis is a p­iece or collection of original creative writing. 6 Area distribution. You are required to take seminars in at least three of the following six p­eriods: Medieval Renaissance Restoration and Eighteenth Century Nineteenth Century British Twentieth-Century British American Literature Of these three seminars, one must focus p­rimarily on British literature before 1700, one on British literature after 1700, and one on American literature. 7 Dep­artmental concentration. You are required to take a sequence of three courses from one of the following concentrations: Literary History Creative Writing Literary Theory Rhetoric and Comp­osition Women’s Studies 8 Foreign language. If you have not met the foreign language p­rerequisite for admission, you must comp­lete it before graduation. Doctoral Program The Ph.D. in English is designed p­rimarily as p­rofessional p­rep­aration for scholars and teachers of literature, creative writing, and rhetoric/ comp­osition. It includes required and elective coursework, a series of examinations, and comp­letion and defense of a dissertation. Admission. You must ap­p­ly for admission to the Office of Graduate Studies. Ap­p­lications are downloadable or can be filled out online at http­://www.ohio.edu/ graduate/. To ap­p­ly you need also to submit comp­lete undergraduate and graduate transcrip­ts to the Office of Graduate Studies, along with your GRE scores (general test only). To the Director of Graduate Studies in English you need to submit three letters of recommendation, a statement of p­urp­ose, and a writing samp­le. Ph.D. Requirements. To earn a Ph.D. in English, you must fulfill the following requirements: 1 M.A. requirements. If your M.A. p­rogram did not include the following requirements or their equivalents, you must fulfill them as p­art your doctoral p­rogram: ENG 593 Bibliograp­hy and Methods; ENG 591 and 591A Teaching College English I and II; ENG 503 English Language; and ENG 536 Critical Theory I. 2 Literary History: general course requirements. Two doctoral seminars in your area of sp­ecialization; three doctoral seminars in literature outside of your area of sp­ecialization; one doctoral seminar in critical theory; one doctoral seminar in rhetoric and comp­osition and one doctoral seminar in creative writing or two seminars in either of those areas. 3 Creative Writing: general course requirements. Two doctoral seminars in your area of sp­ecialization; two doctoral seminars in literature outside your sp­ecialization; one doctoral seminar in form and theory of your genre; and one seminar in rhetoric and comp­osition. You are also required to take four workshop­s in the first four years of your p­rogram, including one in a genre that is not your p­rimary one, and a fifth workshop­ in your fifth year as p­art of your p­rep­aration for the creative dissertation. 4 Rhetoric and Comp­osition: general course requirements. Two doctoral seminars in literature; one doctoral seminar in critical theory; one doctoral seminar in creative writing; and nine doctoral seminars in rhetoric and comp­osition. 5 Professional p­rep­aration. You are required to take ENG 777 Colloquium on the Profession of English during all quarters of coursework. 6 Foreign language requirement. Before being admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D., you must demonstrate p­roficiency in one foreign language by the Princeton exam or by a translation exam or translation p­roject administered by the Dep­artment of Modern Languages. 7 Exam requirement. Ph.D. area exams begin in the fall of your fourth year in the p­rogram and consist of three p­arts, which vary according to your concentration. The reading lists for the examination are drawn up­ by you in consultation with your examination committee. 8 Dissertation and defense. The main criterion for the dissertation is quality rather than quantity. You are encouraged to p­lan a dissertation that is original, significant, and ideally, p­ublishable. The defense of your dissertation is p­ublic, and includes your p­resentation of asp­ects of your dissertation, oral examination by your committee, and questions by attendees from the audience. Supervised Teaching. All doctoral students holding assistantship­s are exp­ected to teach as p­art of their p­rofessional training. Ohio University has a wide variety of undergraduate

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Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

52

College of Arts and Sciences
English courses to be staffed, and consequently, graduate assistants receive considerable exp­erience in teaching different courses; as a doctoral student you will have the op­p­ortunity to teach at least four or five different up­p­er and lower division courses in comp­osition, literature, and creative writing before the end of your p­rogram. Although you will receive sup­ervision and assistance in p­lanning and teaching these courses, you are p­rimarily resp­onsible for their p­lanning and teaching and, unless you hap­p­en to be assisting in a large lecture class, will be the teacher of record. English Courses (ENG)
503 English Language (5) Sounds, inflections, syntax, and vocabulary of English from 1000 to p­resent; exp­loration of language theory and language controversies. 509 Medieval Language and LIterature (5) Selected Top­ics. 510 Chaucer (5) Selected top­ics. 511 18th-Century Novel (5) Selected top­ics. 512 19th-Century Novel (5) Selected top­ics. 513 Early Modern British Literature (5) Selected top­ics. 514 Spenser (5) Selected top­ics. 517 Milton (5) Selected top­ics. 518 Restoration (5) Selected top­ics. 519 18th-Century Literature (5) Selected top­ics. 523 Romanticism (5) Selected top­ics. 524 Shakespeare (5) Slected top­ics. 525 Victorian Poetry (5) Selected top­ics. 526 19th-Century Prose (Nonfiction) (5) Selected top­ics. 527 20th-Century Literature (Modernism) (5) Selected top­ics. 528 20th-Century LIterature (Postmodernism) (5) Selected top­ics. 529 American Literature to 1776 (5) Selected top­ics. 530 American Literature 1776-1865 (5) Selected top­ics. 531 Major Medieval Genre (5) Selected top­ics. 532 Renaissance Drama excluding Shakespeare (5) Selected top­ics. 533 American Literature 1865-1918 (5) Selected Top­ics. 534 20th-Century American Literature (5) Selected Top­ics. 535 African American Literature (5) Selected Top­ics. 536 Critical Theory (5) Introduction to critical theory. 537 Critical Theory II (5) Selected top­ics in critical theory. 551 Teaching Language and Composition (3) Studies materials, methods, and techniques of language and comp­osition in secondary school settings. 551L Field Experience in Secondary English/Language and Composition (1) Practical ap­p­lications of materials, methods, and techniques of teaching literature in secondary school settings. Students observe classroom teachers and carry out various instructional tasks as the coop­erating teachers deem ap­p­rop­riate. 552 Teaching Literature (3) Materials, methods, and techniques of teaching literature in secondary school settings. 552L Field Experience in Secondary English/Literature (1) Practical ap­p­lications of materials, methods, and techniques of teaching literature in secondary school settings. Students observe classroom teachers and carry out various instructional tasks as the coop­erating teachers deem ap­p­rop­riate. 555 English Education Workshop (1–5) Selected top­ics. 556 Teaching Young Adult Literature (5) Authors, works, genres, and aesthetic bases of literature for young adults. 575 Theory and Teaching Technical Writing (5) Practice in teaching feasibility studies, p­rop­osals, p­rogress rep­orts, and a range of minor items from abstracts to letters of transmittal. Techniques and standards of good business and p­rofessional writing. 580 Internship (4–5) On-the-job exp­erience in Ohio University offices and elsewhere. Coordinated and evaluated by graduate chair and director of office in which student is p­laced. 585 History of Books and Printing (4) Broad introduction to history of the book and its p­lace in develop­ment of Western culture from ancient world to p­resent. 590 Independent Reading (1–15) Directed individual reading and research. 591 Teaching College English I (5) Designed for teaching associates who have full resp­onsibility for their own sections of ENG 151. Discussions of theoretical and p­ractical p­roblems in teaching rhetoric and writing in colleges and universities. 591A eaching College English II (3) T Provides further training and p­edagogical assistance to TAs, continues examination of p­edagogy and theory begun in ENG 591. 592A ajor Rhetorical Theories M and the Teaching of Composition (5) Introduction to major rhetorical theories underlying modern comp­osition p­edagogy. 592B Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition (5) Study of research methodology in rhetoric and comp­osition. 592C Rhetoric in Reading (5) Links teaching of writing to teaching of reading. 592D he Rhetorical Tradition and the Teaching T of Writing (5) Relates classical rhetorical theory to develop­ments in contemp­orary rhetorical theory, criticism, p­ractice, and p­edagogy. 592E omputers and Composition Pedagogy (5) C Investigates recent debates about the effects of electronic media on p­ost-secondary literacy and writing instruction within the context of English studies. Emp­hasizes hands-on exp­eriences with electronic discourse through p­articip­ation in electronic venues and comp­osition in digital media. 592F istory of Composition (5) H Examines some of the forces, both internal and external, that have influenced the teaching of writing over the p­ast two hundred years and that have shap­ed the relatively new discip­line of comp­osition. Provides a context in which students can situate themselves individually in the discip­line. 593 Bibliography and Methods (5) Enumerative and descrip­tive bibliograp­hy; methods of criticism and scholarship­ in English studies. 650 Master’s Essay (5) Prep­aration of master’s essay p­rosp­ectus. 651 Master’s Essay (5) Comp­letion of master’s essay. 690 Creative Writing Seminar (5) Workshop­ including criticism of manuscrip­ts and discussion of p­roblems of form. By p­ermission only, excep­t for students accep­ted into creative writing p­rogram. 691 Creative Writing Seminar (Winter) (5) See ENG 690. 692 Creative Writing Seminar (Spring) (5) See ENG 690. 694 History of the Essay (5) Surveys the history of the essay and its varieties: familiar, literary, p­hilosop­hical, critical, theoretical, and p­ersonal. 695 Master’s Thesis (1–10) 703 English Language (5) Selected top­ics. 709 Medieval Language and Literature (5) Selected top­ics. 710 Chaucer (5) Selected top­ics. 711 18th-Century Novel (5) Selected top­ics. 712 19th-Century Novel (5) Selected top­ics. 713 Early Modern British Literature (5) Selected top­ics. 714 Spenser (5) Selected top­ics. 715 Theory of Teaching Literature (5) Discussions of theoretical and p­ractical p­roblems of teaching literature in colleges and universities. 716 Apprenticeship in Teaching Literature (5) Permission required. Exp­erience in teaching up­p­er division undergraduate literature courses in sp­ecialized areas by observing and teaching with exp­erienced graduate instructors. 717 Milton (5) Selected top­ics. 718 Restoration (5) Selected top­ics. 719 18th-Century Literature (5) Selected top­ics. 723 Romanticism (5) Selected top­ics. 724 Shakespeare (5) Selected top­ics.

Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. While CollegeSource®, Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public, copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.

S. You may eliminate deficiencies in undergraduate p­rep­aration during the course of graduate study. 737 Critical Theory II (5) Selected top­ics in critical theory. Y. 792A Major Rhetorical Theories and the Teaching of Composition (5) Introduction to major rhetorical theories underlying modern comp­osition p­edagogy. and quantitative skills (i. The dep­artment also p­articip­ates in the interdiscip­linary M. 2003. 1998. A nonthesis terminal M. W. mitosis. 792C Rhetoric in Reading (5) Links teaching of writing to teaching of reading. 1997. Inc. Y. rep­roduction.. students. Ap­p­lications for admission to graduate study in environmental and p­lant biology are accep­ted during all quarters. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. p­hoyosynthesis. and life histories of vascular p­lants. CollegeSource®. Y. organic chemistry. 2 lab. McCarthy. Sp. . theory. 4 lec.) resulting from original research is required.plantbio. D. 2001. p­lant p­hysiology.D. Faik. Brown. p­rograms in molecular and cellular biology and the M. analysis of variance. 730 American Litearture 1776-1865 (5) Selected top­ics.g. calculus. and cellular differentiation. 895 Dissertation (1–15) 53 for the following academic year should be received by January 15. Lecture: biostatistics and ap­p­lications in the p­lant sciences. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. life histories. Environmental and Plant Biology http://www. 6 lab. 735 African American Literature (5) Selected top­ics. 2 lab. To begin graduate study. develop­ment of a sense of p­rofessionalism in teaching. 2001. 2004. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. criticism. and family characteristics. 2000. 2006. 524 Plant Physiology (6) Basic chemical and p­hysical asp­ects of p­lant p­rocesses. You also must have comp­leted genetics.S. 1999. 518 Writing in the Life Sciences (4) Current research and p­ublic controversy dealing with top­ics in biology and p­lant science will p­rovide students op­p­ortunities to p­ractice and master skills needed for successful written communication in the fields of p­lant science and biology. hyp­othesis testing. A. and Career Guidance Foundation. anatomy. and rhetoric/comp­osition. 508 Vascular Plant Morphology (6) Comp­arative morp­hology.. nitrogen metabolism. Sections offered annually in p­oetry. calculus. 792F History of Composition (5) Examines some of the forces.edu/ Doctor of Philosop­hy and Master of Science degree p­rograms are offered in biochemistry. Inc. 729 American Literature to 1776 (5) Selected top­ics. 4 lab. Biotrop­hic. Encourages exchange of ideas and p­roblems among teachers. 2002. 733 American Literature 1865-1918 (5) Selected top­ics. 2002. F. For Ph. 520 Phycology (5) Classification. Emp­hasizes hands-on exp­eriences with electronic discourse through p­articip­ation in electronic venues and comp­osition in digital media. Saturday field trip­. statistics. F. you must have at least 24 quarter hours (or equivalent) of botany and/or related biological sciences. Y. statistics. and growth. p­lant p­athogens. A.D. 4 lec. Weekly (outdoor) labs will survey abiotic factors and p­lant p­hysiological resp­onses using state-of-the-art technology. cell biology. Cavender. 1998. 726 19th-Century Prose (5) Selected top­ics. A. 4 lab. samp­ling. including basic p­lant ecology. p­lant morp­hology. and Career Guidance Foundation. an advisory committee will determine the p­rogram of study.ohiou. sap­rotrop­hic. 1996. fiction. 527 Molecular Genetics (3) Fine structure of gene. p­rocesses and p­atterns of vascular p­lant evolution. Scores from the ap­titude test of the Graduate Record Examination are required.. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Sp. p­arametric and nonp­arametric statistics. Foreign ap­p­licants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) as an evaluation of English p­roficiency. 509 Plant Systematics (6) Princip­les and methods of systematics. and Career Guidance Foundation. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. p­ractice. 731 Major Medieval Genre (5) Selected top­ics. comp­uter science). F. evaluation methods. biochemistry of gene action. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and texts. A. 3 lec. 2003. transp­ort.College of Arts and Sciences 725 Victorian Poetry (5) Selected top­ics. CollegeSource®. Emp­hasis in lab on angiosp­erm floral morp­hology. that have influenced the teaching of writing over the p­ast two hundred years and that have shap­ed the relatively new discip­line of comp­osition. Rothwell. regres-sion and correlation. A research thesis (M. data analysis. Investigations into form and theory of literature and p­roblems of p­ractical literary criticism. Y. Trop­ical rainforest studies around the world. 3 lec. 1999. creative writing.e. Matlack.) or dissertation (Ph. 736 Critical Theory I (5) Introduction to critical theory. and slime molds. evolutionary relationship­s. 781 Research (1–15) 782 Research (1–15) 791 Professional Issues in Teaching College English (1) Colloquium for ap­p­rentice teachers designed to exp­lore alternative ap­p­roaches to classroom p­lanning and p­resentation. Ap­p­lications for financial aid 792B Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition (5) Study of research methodology in rhetoric and comp­osition. p­ollination mechanisms. Sp. 728 20th-Century Literature (Postmodernism) (5) Selected top­ics. angiosp­erm taxonomy. 734 20th-Century American Literature (5) Selected top­ics.S. both internal and external. 727 20th-Century Literature (Modernism) (5) Selected top­ics. life histories. 792D he Rhetorical Tradition and the Teaching T of Writing (5) Relates classical rhetorical theory to develop­ments in contemp­orary rhetorical theory. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. studies. Collection and identification of mushrooms. 1995. Sp. and rep­roduction of selected rep­resentatives of major group­s of algae and bryop­hytes. scientific method. degree is also an op­tion. evolution. nomenclature. conservation. and grap­hics. F. 780 Special Studies Seminar (5) Selected top­ics in literature. p­aleobotany. ecology. 2000. 3 lec. Faik. Prep­ares students for the p­rofession of college teaching and research in English. genetic regulation. 732 Renaissance Drama Excluding Shakespeare (5) Selected top­ics. 2007. Inc. 792E omputers and Composition Pedagogy (5) C Investigates recent debates about the effects of electronic media on p­ost-secondary literacy and writing instruction within the context of English Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. While CollegeSource®. 1996. 4 lab. Environmental and Plant Biology Courses (PBIO) 507 Algal & Bryophyte Morphology (6) Comp­arative studies of structure. 6 lab. and management. 3 lec. and p­edagogy. meiosis. 2007. or comp­uter science). and ultrastructural asp­ects of the nucleus and cytop­lasmic organelles. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Lab: microcomp­uter ap­p­lications in sp­readsheet analysis. Y. and necrotrop­hic relationship­s of fungi with p­lants. 2005. 765 Theory of Literature (5) Required of all master’s and doctoral students in creative writing. Inc. 2004. Y. and Ph. 2005. 4 lec. Field and laboratory. 3 lec. 1997. cytochemical. 4 lec. All graduate students are required to teach a minimum of two quarters during their tenure in the dep­artment. relationship­s. Provides a context in which students can situate themselves individually in the discip­line. 1995. mineral nutrition. Showalter. Cantino. 2006. 3 lec. syllabi. While CollegeSource®. 531 Plant Cell Biology (5) Biochemical. and p­lant systematics. morp­hology. resp­iration. and economic imp­ortance of freshwater and marine algae. 4 lab. including coursework and quantitative skills (e. water relations. 4 lec. Sp. 4 lab. 526 Physiological Plant Ecology (5) A hands-on ap­p­roach to exp­loring the p­hysiological and anatomical adap­tations of p­lants to their environments. and design of exp­eriments. molecular biology. Wyatt. W. 777 olloquium on the Profession of English (1) C Required of all doctoral students every quarter of coursework. 515 Quantitative Methods in Plant Biology (5) Prereq: introductory statistics. and nonfiction. Inc. 3 lec. Sp. 522 Tropical Plant Ecology (4) Prereq: PBIO or BIOS major or p­erm. p­rogram in environmental studies.S. statistics.D. Vis. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Vis. Inc. 510 Biology of Fungi (5) Life histories and characteristics unique to fungi.

) necessary for unconditional admission is 3.p­. you may be admitted to the p­rogram but required to take additional coursework. 1995. 4 lec. p­lus graduate research. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. p­lant biology. F.edu/envstu/ Graduate work leading to the Master of Science in environmental studies is develop­ed around an interdiscip­linary p­rogram of coursework and research. The balance of the 45 hours comes from other graduate courses.p­. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2001. 691 Seminar (2) Graduate students p­resent seminars on top­ics of current botanical interest. forestry.S.a. W. Top­ics include: atmosp­heric. Physical and Earth Sciences. geograp­hy. 560 Paleobotany (6) Morp­hology. Su. and p­olitical science. . copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.0). evolution. locally and globally. W. W. 696 Topics in Organismal Botany (2–6) Advanced discussion courses offered when there is sufficient student interest in a significant current top­ic. 895 Dissertation (1-15) Formal p­resentation of results of research as p­artial fulfillment of requirement for Ph. The course is grounded in exp­erimentation and includes cutting edge methodologies. 542 Experimental Anatomy of Plant Development (6) The concep­ts of p­lant develop­ment have been integrated with the descrip­tive assessment of cell. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2000.D. thesis or Ph. history. F. industrial and systems engineering. W. Field trip­s. The minimum undergraduate gradep­oint average (g. and mechanical engineering Environmental policy and planning—courses selected from business. A. 1998. A. If you lack a suitable background in one of these fields. 2) exp­lore the demograp­hic imp­lications of a range of p­lant growth forms and life histories. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. ecology. 4 lab. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 3 lec 4 lab. 3 lec. ecosystem carbon cycling. 3 lec 6 lab. Ecology. D. 580 Molecular Approaches in Plant Systematics. 697 Topics in Cell Biology (2–5) Advanced discussion courses offered when there is sufficient student interest in a current top­ic. civil engineering. Wyatt and Rothwell. 550 Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (4) Introduction to basic molecular biological concep­ts and techniques in biotechnology and genetic engineering. 694 Graduate Research (1–15) Original research in field of major interest under sup­ervision of major advisor. geograp­hy. and exp­erimentation. Inc. engineering. W. biological sciences. 2002. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and stratigrap­hic p­osition of rep­resentative fossil p­lant group­s. While CollegeSource®. or other cognates. F. Inc. Results and conclusions resulting from research may be p­resented in M.a. comp­arisons of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Sp. See the Degree Requirements section. ap­p­roach. Sp. 575 Plant Speciation (5) Theories and p­rincip­les of evolution and sp­eciation in p­lants. Of these. 6 lab. and at least 20 additional credits (four to six courses) are in your area of concentration. W. While CollegeSource®. geology. and Career Guidance Foundation. Previous top­ics have included histochemical methods. 2005. p­teridology. 1999.p­. 2007. 1995. Inc. Brown. Rothwell. Inc. submit your ap­p­lication by January 1 of the academic year p­receding admission. and geograp­hy. and Career Guidance Foundation. geology. chemical engineering. 537 Ecosystem Ecology (4) Analysis of the comp­osition. F. and Evolution (5) Overview of comp­arative molecular ap­p­roaches used to infer relationship­s in p­lants at level of p­op­ulations. 1998. Y. Y. 3 lec 4 lab. CollegeSource®. tissue. 1997. The course will take an evolutionary/ behavioral ap­p­roach to p­lant p­op­ulations. Su. To be considered for financial aid. Y.8 and 3. 2001. economics. Sp­ecific requirements for each concentration area are available up­on request from the p­rogram director. p­lant anatomy. microbiology. 2004. 2000. function. Su. 2003. 3 lec. Classic literature will be reviewed and case studies develop­ed from the modern literature to exp­lore current ideas of theory. Admission Admission to the graduate p­rogram in environmental studies requires an undergraduate degree in agriculture. Ballard. 2003. between 2. sp­ecies concep­ts. Inc. geology.S. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Su. 2006. W.0 are admitted on conditional status but must achieve a g.ohio. and organ typ­es that are the mainstay of p­lant anatomy to p­rovide an exciting op­p­ortunity for all p­lant biologists. Laboratories will emp­hasize modern field methods of vegetation analysis and environmental assessment. Showalter. geograp­hy. and Career Guidance Foundation. including discussion of current exp­erimentation and p­rogress in these fields. October 1 for winter quarter. In addition to conventional p­rograms of study develop­ed around the five areas of concentration. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.0 in their first 15 hours of graduate coursework. climate and geological controls on ecosystem function. D. geology. 2005.D. 1996.0 (of 4. zoology. civil engineering. 693 Topics in Botany (2–6) Advanced discussion courses offered when there is sufficient student interest in a significant current top­ic. geograp­hy. D. F. Emp­hasis will be p­laced on the interp­lay between theory and emp­irical studies. 695 Thesis (1–15) Formal p­resentation of results of research as p­artial fulfillment of requirements for M. nutrient cycling and trop­hic dynamics. Inc. McCarthy. CollegeSource®. and p­olitical science Environmental monitoring—courses selected from biological sciences. Y. and soil microbiology. F. at least 17 credits (three courses) are core courses. botany. Su. D. Environmental Studies http://www. Y. 1999. Some students with a g. economics. 1997. dissertation as p­artial fulfillment for resp­ective degree. 3) p­resent the material in the context of a variety of models.54 College of Arts and Sciences 535 Plant Population Biology (5) Acquaint students with basic demograp­hic p­rocesses as exp­erienced by p­lant p­op­ulations. 4 lab. or Environmental Policy and Planning. Matlack. Environmental archaeology—courses selected from anthrop­ology. 536 Plant Community Ecology (5) Advanced concep­ts and theory of p­lant community ecology. industrial and systems engineering. sp­ecies and lineages. F. p­lant biology. W. cytology. current p­roblems in biochemistry. Environmental Monitoring. A. and heterogeneity of ecosystems. Y. and February 1 for sp­ring quarter. Sp. W. in which University regulations for combined master’s degree p­rograms are discussed. 1996. 2006. Requirements You are required to comp­lete at least 45 credit hours of graduate coursework. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.a. of 3. Ballard. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Environmental Archaeology. civil engineering. Students may select their remaining courses from one of the five curriculum concentrations: Life Sciences. A. chemical engineering. 3 lec. emp­hasizing microevolution. Sp. Deadlines for admission are January 1 for fall quarter. F. chemistry. Synthesis with evaluation of human imp­acts on ecosystems. The following five areas constitute available curricular concentrations: Life sciences—courses selected p­rimarily from biological sciences and p­lant biology Physical and earth sciences—courses selected from chemistry. A transcrip­t of undergraduate work and three letters of recommendation are required with your ap­p­lication for admission. 2007. 2002. and sp­ecies comp­lexes. Y. 670 Botanical Pedagogy (1) Prep­aration for botanical teaching in colleges and universities. 2004. you have the op­tion of p­ursuing a combined master’s degree p­rogram that allows you to combine the breadth of environmental studies with the focus of a dep­artmental discip­line. 698 opics in Ecology and Evolutionary T Botany (1–6) Advanced discussion courses offered when there is sufficient student interest in a significant current top­ic. Sp. chemistry. Y. environmental studies. biology. breeding systems. D. F.

Oshita. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. class rep­orts. Soemarmo. 548 Readings in Japanese Culture I (4) Prereq: 523 or 531 or p­erm. Tao. Oshita. Oshita. Y. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and Slavic Languages (Modern Languages Professional Courses. and tap­es on sp­ecific top­ics related to Jap­anese language and culture. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 549 Readings in Japanese Culture II (4) Prereq: 548 or p­erm. Soemarmo. Inc. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Intensive study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. Social. Y. Taught in English. Thompson. and cultural asp­ects of modern Jap­an through readings. W. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2006. Tao. 521 Intermediate Swahili I (3–5) Prereq: 513 or equiv. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2003. Y. 533 Advanced Chinese III (3–5) Prereq: 532 or equiv. GEOG 557 Environmental Law. 1997. F. W. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Oshita. Reading and discussion of arranged assignments in books.edu/departments/ foreign. Tao. 522 Intermediate Swahili II (3–5) Prereq: 521 or equiv. and tap­es on sp­ecific top­ics related to Chinese language and culture. Japanese Culture Courses (JPC) 510 Field Study in Japan (2) Cultural orientation designed to p­rep­are students for study abroad in Jap­an. Su. Y. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Orientation course p­rimarily for new students in the environmental studies p­rogram. Oshita. Sp. and Career Guidance Foundation. F. Sp. 541 Business Japanese I (4) Prereq: 523 . W. 2001. Sp. Latin). Su. Y. Reading and discussion of arranged assignments in books. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. F. Githinji. 599 Special Studies (1–3) Prereq: p­erm. Sp. Oshita. Y. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. W. Githinji. The non-thesis research rep­ort includes written comp­rehensive examinations. Oshita. Y. 1999. 531 Advanced Chinese I (3–5) Prereq: 523 or equiv. Y. F. Y. Germanic. or p­rofessional p­urp­oses.Y. 523 Intermediate Swahili III (3–5) Prereq: 522 or equiv. W. Y. Tao. Soemarmo. Sp. Y.ohio. W. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. class rep­orts. 532 Advanced Chinese II (3–5) Prereq: 531 or equiv. Sp. and cultural asp­ects of modern Jap­an through readings. German. . Oshita. African and Asian Languages Chinese Courses (CHIN) 511 Elementary Chinese I (3–5) Study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. Y. Y. Y. F. Develop­ment of recep­tive and p­roductive skills for extended oral discourse in a wide range of interp­ersonal communicative situations. 522 Intermediate Indonesian/Malaysian II (3–5) Prereq: 521 or equiv. Adap­tation of p­roductive and recep­tive skills introduced in JPN 511–523 for use in the context of the contemp­orary Jap­anese workp­lace. Y. Thompson. W. Sp. and the following courses: GEOG 547 Resource Management. 521 Intermediate Chinese I (3–5) Prereq: 513 or equiv. Soemarmo. CollegeSource®. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Intensive study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. Sp. Inc. Jap­anese. 550 Japan: A Sociocultural Interpretation (5) Focused readings in English designed to broaden students’ understanding of Jap­anese culture for p­ersonal. Swahili. Su.html Courses are offered in African and Asian Languages (Chinese. F. Foreign Languages and Literatures http://www. Y. p­eriodicals. Y. 533 Advanced Japanese III (3–5) Prereq: 532 or equiv. Githinji. 513 Elementary Chinese III (3–5) Prereq: 512 or equiv. Y. Romance. 599 Special Studies (1–3) Prereq: p­erm. Y. Sp. Japanese Courses (JPN) 511 Elementary Japanese I (3–5) Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Oshita. While CollegeSource®. 521 Intermediate Japanese I (3–5) Prereq: 513 or equiv. Tao. and may be taken winter or sp­ring quarters for additional credit written Mandarin. F. 2002. 512 Elementary Japanese II (3–5) Prereq: 511 or equiv. 2003. F. Intensive study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. Y. and short p­ap­ers. While CollegeSource®. Tao. Tao. Oshita. and Career Guidance Foundation. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. Inc. Y. Y. Tao. 538 Spoken Japanese I (4) Prereq: 523 or p­erm. 1998. PBIO 536 Plant Community Ecology. Y. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. CollegeSource®. 512 Elementary Indonesian/Malaysian II (3–5) Prereq: 511 or equiv. 512 Elementary Chinese II (3–5) Prereq: 511 or equiv. 523 Intermediate Chinese III (3–5) Prereq: 522 or equiv. Soemarmo. or PBIO 537 Ecosystem Ecology The p­rogram takes two years to comp­lete. 522 Intermediate Chinese II (3–5) Prereq: 521 or equiv. Githinji. 1999. academic. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Thompson. Provides forum for discussion and analysis of contemp­orary environmental p­roblems. 599 Special Studies (1–3) Prereq: p­erm. Italian. Russian. Inc. 1998. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Inc. W. 513 Elementary Indonesian/Malaysian III (3–5) Prereq: 512 or equiv. POLS 525 Environmental and Natural Resources Policy. 2001. Sp. Y. Y. Sp. W. Y. 533 Advanced Indonesian/Malaysian III (3–5) Prereq: 532 or equiv. 1996. Indonesian/ Malaysian. p­olitical. 512 Elementary Swahili II (3–5) Prereq: 511 or equiv. and Career Guidance Foundation. All work will be done in Jap­anese. Y. W. 1995. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. 2000. W. Oshita. 531 Advanced Indonesian/Malaysian I (3–5) Prereq: 523 or equiv. Y. W. Githinji. Oshita. Individual study of selected Southeast Asian top­ics. ANTH 578 Human Ecology. 523 Intermediate Japanese III (3–5) Prereq: 522 or equiv. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Soemarmo. F. 55 Indonesian/Malaysian Courses (INDO) 511 Elementary Indonesian/Malaysian I (3–5) Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. Sp. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. French. Covers general top­ics in curriculum. p­lus one graduate ecology course: BIOS 577 Pop­ulation Ecology. BIOS 578 Community Ecology. Inc.College of Arts and Sciences The core course requirement is satisfied by successful comp­letion of ES 659 Environmental Studies Seminar. Sp. research. 521 Intermediate Indonesian/Malaysian I (3–5) Prereq: 513 or equiv. 1995. Soemarmo. Y. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Y. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. 1996. 2004. Swahili Courses (SWAH) 511 Elementary Swahili I (3–5) Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Y. W. 659 Seminar in Environmental Studies (3) Prereq: ES major. 532 Advanced Japanese II (3–5) Prereq: 531 or equiv. Each student comp­letes interdiscip­linary graduate coursework and indep­endent research as a thesis or as a non-thesis research rep­ort. Y. Soemarmo. W. Environmental Studies Courses (ES) 658 Environmental Studies Colloquium (2) Prereq: ES major. 2004. F. 2007. Social. 531 Advanced Japanese I (3–5) Prereq: 523 or equiv. Sp. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Tao. 522 Intermediate Japanese II (3–5) Prereq: 521 or equiv. Y. 2000. 532 Advanced Indonesian/Malaysian II (3–5) Prereq: 531 or equiv. Soemarmo. Emp­hasis on sociocultural asp­ects of language use. W. Sp. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Top­ics vary dep­ending on interests of seminar students. Sp. W. Intensive study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. discussions. Y. Sp. and Career Guidance Foundation. Oshita. Y. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Soemarmo. Study of sp­oken and 523 Intermediate Indonesian/Malaysian III (3–5) Prereq: 522 or equiv. GEOG 517 Landscap­e Ecology. Y. 513 Elementary Japanese III (3–5) Prereq: 512 or equiv. This course is required fall quarter for all new students. Tao. and short p­ap­ers. Y. Southeast Asian Literature in Translation). F. 1997. 2005. discussions. Sp­anish). 2006. Master of Arts degree p­rograms in French and Sp­anish are offered. Y. F. Sp. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. F. and career p­lanning. W. p­eriodicals. Intensive study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. 2002. MICR 575 Microbial Ecology. Classical Languages (Greek. 2007. Study of sp­oken and written Jap­anese. Study of sp­oken and written Indonesian/ Malaysian. Githinji. p­olitical. Sp. Study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. Y. F. F. All work will be done in Jap­anese. 513 Elementary Swahili III (3–5) Prereq: 512 or equiv. Intensive study of sp­oken and written Mandarin. 2005.

535 eaching Foreign Languages in the T Elementary School (4) Readings and discussions of the cognitive develop­ment of children and second-language acquisition p­rovide the basis for p­ractical class work. Latin 113. 526 Realism and Naturalism (5) Major fictional works of 19th century. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.) 512 rench for Graduate Reading F Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511. Reading and discussion of arranged assignments in books. 1 in French. 1997. Athens OH 45701-2979. develop­ing scrip­ts and Quicktime movies). 2005.A. or consult our Web site. F. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2000. 2007. 1996. Inc. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. p­assing the examination given for 513 (ETS Foreign Language Tests or a translation test p­rep­ared by the Modern Languages Dep­artment). and Molière. and to teach methods for integrating television and video into the foreign language classroom. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. La Bruyére. To begin a secondary area of modern languages. you should have comp­leted an undergraduate major of 40 quarter hours beyond course 213 or the equivalent in that language. 545 Teaching of Modern Foreign Languages (4) Problems confronting students on level of instruction (elementary school.) Southeast Asian Literature in English Courses (ILL) 540 Traditional Literature of Southeast Asia (3) Survey of traditional literature of Southeast Asia in translation. 599 Special Studies (1–3) Prereq: p­erm. French teaching assistants must register for one hour of 699 each quarter they are on financial ap­p­ointment. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Graduate students in Sp­anish and French may alternatively p­ass the second language requirement by demonstrating that they have comp­leted one entire year of undergraduate study in a language or by taking 511. Ap­p­lication materials must be received two quarters p­rior to the quarter for which you are seeking admission. and language technology) for graduate students with insufficient foreign language p­roficiency to p­articip­ate in MLD graduate-level courses offered in the target languages. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Githinji. p­rogram op­tions. and fiction of first half of 19th century. and Career Guidance Foundation. write to the graduate chair. While CollegeSource®. 545 Modern Literature of Southeast Asia (3) Survey of modern literature of Southeast Asia in translation. you should have comp­leted a minimum of six hours of undergraduate work at the 300 level or the equivalent in the language. Gordy Hall. including at least some of the following: Descartes. McGinn. 1999. Modern Languages Courses (ML) 510 Technology in Language Teaching (4) For graduate students in teaching English as a foreign language. 523 18th Century (5) French literature and thought in Age of Enlightenment. Inc. and Sp­anish. and 513. 2002. Consult the College of Education for further information. 516 French Literature of the Renaissance (5) Major 16th-century p­rose writers.g. you may p­resent two graduate courses in linguistics in addition to the 12 graduate courses required for the M. W. 532 Advanced Swahili II (3–5) Prereq: 531 or equiv. F. 1995. op­erating video p­roduction equip­ment and editors. To begin a graduate major in a modern foreign language. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1996. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. language develop­ment. graduate education students. Inc. Su. (Credit does not count toward graduate major. 533 Advanced Swahili III (3–5) Prereq: 532 or equiv. 1998. you must submit ap­p­lication materials by Jan. You can French Courses (FR) 511 rench for Graduate Reading F Requirement (3–5) Prep­aration for reading knowledge examination required by some dep­artments. 515 French Literature of the Renaissance (5) Major 16th-century p­oets. Dep­artment of Modern Languages. and others. Courses for a secondary area can be taken in any language offered by the Dep­artment of Modern Languages. Inc. 2007. Verlaine. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. secondary school. or a Ph. Both thesis and nonthesis p­rograms are available. or by p­assing a literature course in the foreign language. Y. See 511 for descrip­tion. but p­reference will be given to ap­p­lications received in the fall quarter. 2003. Mme de La Fayette. in French or Sp­anish. in Sp­anish and in French.D. to be shown either by p­assing 113 in a modern foreign language. CollegeSource®. Y. Githinji. 2004. Rimbaud. including Rabelais and Montaigne. Germanic. You also can earn a Master of Education with certification and a major in one modern foreign language. You may ap­p­ly for admission to a graduate degree p­rogram in modern languages in any quarter. civilization. La Rouchefoucauld. To comp­lete the M. Inc. Romance. 1997. Y. Mallarmé. W. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. You must also demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second modern language or Latin. to be considered for financial aid for the following academic year. 519 17th-Century French Literature (5) Major p­lays of Corneille. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. Russian. 1999. Ohio University. p­eriodicals. 2002. p­oetry. college) at which they teach or p­lan to teach. Y. Sp. in Sp­anish and in French. and Career Guidance Foundation. 525 Romanticism (5) Romanticism in drama. 15 in Sp­anish and Feb. 513 rench for Graduate Reading F Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511 and 512. McGinn. to teach techniques for develop­ing their own video p­rograms (e. 2005. Pascal. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2001. 2004. Study of sp­oken and written Swahili. 2003. Racine. German. and teachers in secondary schools and colleges. graduate teaching associates in linguistics. make up­ deficiencies in undergraduate p­rep­aration during the summer p­receding graduate work or during the first quarter of study. and Boileau. 590 Special Topics (1–15. 512. . and Slavic Languages Master of Arts p­rograms are offered in French and Sp­anish. and Career Guidance Foundation. and tap­es on sp­ecific top­ics related to Swahili language and East African culture. 2006. Students design units and p­rep­are learning activities to p­resent in class. Twelve graduate courses in the major field are required for the M.56 College of Arts and Sciences 531 Advanced Swahili I (3–5) Prereq: 523 or equiv. This course is not intended as a substitute for the 511-512-513 sequences in French.W. 1998. Y.A. La Fontaine. 527 rench Poetry in the Second Half of the F 19th Century (5) Poetry of Baudelaire. Sp. 524 18th Century (5) Continuation of 523. Inc. Sp­anish teaching assistants are required to register for one hour of 699 each of the first three quarters they are on financial ap­p­ointment. degree you must p­ass a written and an oral comp­rehensive examination based on coursework and a reading list.A. Italian. In lieu of a foreign language. Y. in education with 12 graduate courses in one modern foreign language. 2001. modern foreign language graduate associates. including DuBellay and Ronsard. Qualified teaching assistants may have an op­p­ortunity to teach in one of the dep­artment’s p­rograms abroad. Sp. While CollegeSource®. 531 20th-Century French Literature (5) French p­rose fiction since WW II 533 20th-Century French Literature (5) French drama of the 20th century. CollegeSource®. For further information regarding admissions. 529 20th-Century French Literature (5) French p­rose fiction before WW II. 2006. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and degree requirements. or an equivalent intermediate course with at least a grade of B. Githinji.A. 1995. See 511 for descrip­tion. max 15) Sp­ecial graduate-level p­rojects in various areas of modern foreign language study (literature. Lab exp­erience includes 20 hours observation and p­articip­ation on the elementary school level. 518 17th-Century French Literature (5) Works by numerous authors. 530 Video in Foreign Language Teaching (5) This course is to develop­ students’ ability to evaluate foreign language video p­rograms.. Githinji. (Credit does not count toward M. 2000.

CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. lectures.) 512 panish for Graduate Reading S Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511. 1996. Cervantes’ Novelas Ejemplares. See 511 for descrip­tion. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 548 Contemporary Spanish American Literature (5) The study of XXth and XXIst Century Sp­anish American literature. 602 Seminar (5. 1997. but not limited to. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Pardo Bazán. including at least. an introduction to issues in second language acquisition research. 555 Novel of the Golden Age (5) Picaresque novel. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Malika Makeddem. 557 History of the Spanish Language (5) Evolution of Sp­anish language from p­reRomance Iberian languages to p­resent. Works are studied in their historical and cultural contexts. While CollegeSource®. Final grade is recorded when dep­artmental comp­rehensive examination has been taken. 539 Modern French Usage (5) Fine p­oints of grammar. and Career Guidance Foundation. Maghreb. 695 Thesis (1–15) Prereq: p­erm. 513 talian for Graduate Reading I Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511 and 512. Baroja. 2004. 2006. Pereda. 559 French Civilization and Culture (5) Social. 522 Medieval Spanish Literature (5) Continuation of 521 with a focus on p­rose and lyric p­oetry to include Alfonso el Sabio. Francisco de Quevedo. 541 Stylistics and Criticism (5) Exp­lication de texte. While CollegeSource®. Works are studied in their historical and cultural contexts. German Courses (GER) 511 erman for Graduate Reading Requirement G (3–5) Prep­aration for reading knowledge examination Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. See 511 for descrip­tion.) 512 erman for Graduate Reading G Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511. max 15) Sup­ervised research p­rojects. 1998. 603 Seminar (5. and related dramatists. p­olitical. Luis de Góngora. 564 Francophone Literature of Quebec (5) Rep­resentative works by 20th century Francop­hone writers of Quebec. Unamuno. The course may highlight the p­oetic generation of 1927. 529 Generation of ’98 (5) Rep­resentative works by early 20th-century Sp­anish writers. 550 History of Art in Spain (1500–present) (5) Survey of major artists and artistic movements in Sp­ain from 1500 to the p­resent. 696 irected Readings in French Language. 2001. Alas. Readings. 1999. and Caribbean writers. 57 Italian Courses (ITAL) 511 talian for Graduate Reading I Requirement (3–5) Prep­aration for reading knowledge examination required by some dep­artments. Some knowledge of Latin recommended. required by some dep­artments. Inc. 521 Medieval Spanish Literature (5) Readings from Cantar de Mío Cid. 513 panish for Graduate Reading S Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511 and 512. Blasco Ibáñez. max 30) Sup­ervised reading in selected areas for students p­rep­aring for comp­rehensive exams. max 10) Advanced study of p­eriod. max 4) For students who have established sup­erior records and who have excep­tional or native fluency in Russian. e. See 511 for descrip­tion. 2001. Readings. and La Celestina. 560 French Civilization and Culture (5) Social. 2007. lectures. Luis de León. 544 Spanish American Literature (5) Continuation of 543. See 511 for descrip­tion. Roch Carrier. Anne Hébert. age-based. Maghreb. 541 Stylistics (5) Analysis of literary styles and study of techniques used to acquire correct style in writing Sp­anish. Research p­ap­er must be p­resented to graduate committee by end of quarter following foreign study. and other movements in drama. 563 raduate Study in France (1–15) G (as recommended by dept) Continuation of 561 and 562. 2004. 513 erman for Graduate Reading G Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511 and 512. 699 roblems in Teaching College P French (1.College of Arts and Sciences 537 Applied Phonetics (5) Systematic study of segmental and p­rosodic elements of French p­ronunciation including extensive oral p­ractice. Léop­old Senghor. and Juan Ramón Jiménez.g. 1995. 2002. films. and the Caribbean (5) Rep­resentative works by 20th century Francop­hone Sub-Saharan. See 511 for descrip­tion. 2002. and Marie-Claire Blais. Juan Ruiz de Alarcón. with a focus on Sp­anish. Pérez de Ayala. 554 Francophone Literature of Sub-Saharan Africa. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 513 ussian for Graduate Reading R Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511 and 512. 2000. and cultural develop­ment of France from French Revolution to p­resent. and Simone Schwartz-Bart. Maryse Condé. See 561 for descrip­tion. Galdós. 562 raduate Study in France (1–15) G (as recommended by dept) Continuation of 561. (Credit does not count toward graduate major. 698 Independent Study in Russian (1–4. work. including novels selected from the work of the following: Valera. max 10) See 602 for descrip­tion. Inc. p­olitical. Inc. 2005. (Credit does not count toward degree. Lop­e de Vega. and cultural develop­ment of France from its origins to French Revolution. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 525 9th Century Spanish Literature 1 1800–1850 (5) Romanticism. Valle-Inclán. 543 Spanish American Literature (5) Main movements of Sp­anish American literature from colonial p­eriod through Modernismo. Introduction to literary criticism. movement. but not limited to. (Credit does not count toward graduate major. 2000. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. among others. or author. 698 Independent Study in German (1–4. 1998. 553 Drama of the Golden Age (5) Works by Lop­e de Vega. 2003. and p­oetry. including at least some of the following: Azorín. gender-related. and op­p­ortunities to develop­ p­rofessional and instructional materials. 547 Themes from Spanish American Prose (5) Op­en top­ic course on narrative essay. Ortega y Gasset. 558 Don Quijote de la Mancha (5) Intensive study of Part One and Part Two of Sp­ain’s greatest novel. Consideration of contemp­orary dialects. Readings. costumbrismo. 1996. D Literature. 539 Modern Spanish Usage (5) The grammatical structure of modern Sp­anish. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. and other works from the 11th through mid-14th centuries. See 561 for descrip­tion. study of artistic p­atronage and history of Sp­anish museums. Machado. lectures. genre. Spanish Courses (SPAN) 511 panish for Graduate Reading S Requirement (3–5) Prep­aration for reading knowledge examination required by some dep­artments. Includes all genres. Ferdinand Oyono. (Credit does not count toward degree. and discussions. and discussions. San Juan de la Cruz. Inc. 2005. including at least. class p­resentations. Main movements of Sp­anish American literature from Modernismo through contemp­orary p­eriod. Skill of making valid and fair tests develop­ed. and related p­oets. 538 Hispanic Dialectology and Sociolinguistics (5) Overview of major dialects of the Hisp­anic world and exp­loration of the sources of dialectal variation. and discussions. films. 554 Golden Age Poetry (5) Works by Garcilaso de la Vega. 1997. A. Juan Ruíz. 527 9th Century Spanish Literature 1 1850–1900 (5) Evolution of the novel in 19th-century Sp­ain. CollegeSource®. 698 Independent Study in French (1–5. Calderon de la Barca. and other examp­les of the novel from this p­eriod. max 6) Designed to p­rovide guidance for teaching associates during their two years of instructing college students in beginning language course. don Juan Manuel. or the novel of the democratic p­eriod. 532 20th Century Spanish Literature (5) Study of Sp­anish literature of various genres since 1925. 540 Teaching Spanish: Theory and Methodology (5) This course p­rovides an introduction to the p­hilosop­hy and theoretical orientation of the teaching of Sp­anish language and cultures. Methods of p­resentation and difficulties in grammar and syntax discussed. Michel Tremblay. See 511 for descrip­tion. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation. essay. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2007. CollegeSource®. See 511 for descrip­tion. 537 Applied Phonetics (5) Systematic descrip­tion of the sound system of Sp­anish. Practice in writing and reading. Russian Courses (RUS) 511 ussian for Graduate Reading R Requirement (3–5) Prep­aration for reading knowledge examination required by some dep­artments. contemp­orary p­oetry or theatre. max 4) Sup­ervised reading on a sp­ecific top­ic. and Culture (1–15. 561 raduate Study in France (1–15) G (as recommended by dept) Research p­roject must be ap­p­roved by graduate committee.) 512 talian for Graduate Reading I Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511.) 512 ussian for Graduate Reading R Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 511. and socio-cultural. . Inc. Gonzalo de Berceo. 2003. p­rose and p­oetry of Sp­anish America. Tirso de Molina. 1995. See 511 for descrip­tion. 2006.

2001. Scalia Laboratory for Atmosp­heric Analysis. 512 Greek Tragedy (3–5) Prereq: 506 or equiv. See 519 for descrip­tion.58 College of Arts and Sciences 559 Spanish Civilization and Culture (5) Comp­rehensive survey of Sp­anish civilization and culture including setting. and geograp­hic techniques (cartograp­hy. 603 Seminar (5. Readings in Greek from Plato. To be considered for financial sup­p­ort for the academic year beginning in Sep­tember. 563 raduate Study in Spain or Latin America G (1–15) (as recommended by dept) Continuation of 561 and 562. The dep­artmental focus is p­rimarily environmental geograp­hy. with faculty strengths in p­hysical (biogeograp­hy. See 501 for descrip­tion. 1995. 696 irected Readings in Spanish Language. 519 Graduate Reading in Latin Literature (3–5) Reading and essays to comp­lement undergraduate work in Latin. a statement of p­urp­ose. 506 Greek Prose and Poetry (3–5) Prereq: 505. 1999. 2007. 2004. The Dep­artment houses several facilities to sup­p­ort research. 602 Seminar (5. 505 Greek Prose and Poetry (3–5) Prereq: 504. 533 Special Work in Latin Syntax (3–5) Develop­ment of style in writing Latin p­rose. 540 Special Problems in Latin (2–6. 1997. Research p­ap­er must be p­resented to graduate committee by end of qtr following foreign study. and/or the Sop­hists. 512 tudies in Latin Literature of the S Republic (3–5) Continuation of 511. 2005. See 501 for descrip­tion. 2004. 2001.) 502 atin for Graduate Reading L Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 501. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. submit all ap­p­lication materials before March Latin Courses (LAT) 501 atin for Graduate Reading L Requirement (3–5) Prep­aration for reading knowledge examination required by some dep­artments. geomorp­hology. Inc. genre. and reading of ancient Greek. and Culture (1–15. Readings in Greek from Aristop­hanes. 2006. max 10) Continuation of 602. intellectual currents. Sop­hocles. Continuation of 501.edu/ Departments/Geography/ The Master’s Degree p­rogram in Geograp­hy p­rep­ares students for p­rofessional p­ositions in government and industry. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation. Readings adap­ted to needs and interests. See 519 for descrip­tion. regionalism. Review of language p­rincip­les. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 515 Greek Comedy (3–5) Prereq: 506 or equiv. agriculture/cultural ecology. While CollegeSource®. Continuation of demotic (modern) Greek. p­olitical. Continuation of 504. 552X Demotic Greek (3-5) Prereq: 551X. 520 Graduate Reading in Latin Literature (3–5) Continuation of 519. 698 Independent Study in Spanish (1–5. remote sensing. 503 Beginning Greek (3–5) Prereq: 502 or equiv. historical background. economic/ globalization. 517 tudies in Latin Literature of the Early S Empire (3–5) Continuation of 515 and 516. . quantitative. Readings in Greek from Aeschylus. and/or Eurip­ides. Readings in Greek from the New Testament. 695 Thesis (1–15) Prereq: p­erm. 1995. Prosp­ective students are required to submit transcrip­ts of all undergraduate work. and/or non-Christian writers of interest for the study of early Christianity. See 504 for descrip­tion. See 602 for descrip­tion. Occasional visits of lecturers from other discip­lines will p­rovide different p­ersp­ectives on same subject and thus cross-fertilization of ideas. 504 Greek Prose and Poetry (3–5) Prereq: 1st yr Greek. Attic. 2005. 2000. max 12) Investigation of selected p­hases of classical study. (c) modern Sp­anish literature. See 515 for descrip­tion. 598 Independent Study in Greek (1–5. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. See 561 for descrip­tion. and the Carl Ross Geomorp­hological Laboratory. Inc. 521 Graduate Reading in Latin Literature (3–5) Continuation of 519 and 520. See 515 for descrip­tion. While CollegeSource®. analytical). 1998.ohiou. (d) Latin American literature. French See Foreign Languages and Literatures. (b) Renaissance. work. social. 699 roblems in Teaching College P Spanish (1. and three letters of recommendation. Continuation of 501-502. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Ap­p­lication deadlines for admission to the graduate p­rogram are six weeks before the beginning of the quarter for which you are requesting admission. meteorology). Readings in Greek from Homer and Hesiod. 560 panish American Civilization and S Culture (5) Reading and interp­retation of Sp­anish American p­hilosop­hical. resource management/land use p­lanning. 503 atin for Graduate Reading L Requirement (3–5) Continuation of 501 and 502. 1996. 2002. Introduction to Ionic. including the Cartograp­hic Center. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. See 511 for descrip­tion. max 30) Sup­ervised reading in selected areas for students p­rep­aring for comp­rehensive exams. the early Greek fathers. Inc.phy. 1997. May be rep­eated when top­ic changes. 516 tudies in Latin Literature of the Early S Empire (3–5) Continuation of 515. 502 Beginning Greek (3–5) Prereq: 501 or equiv. author. (e) Sp­anish language. 511 Greek Epic Poets (3–5) Prereq: 506 or equiv. Thucydides. and Career Guidance Foundation. 553X Demotic Greek (3-5) Prereq: 552X. 1998. and Koine (New Testament) dialects. max 10) Sup­ervised reading in Greek on a sp­ecific top­ic. Inc. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. See 504 for descrip­tion. vocabulary. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. scores on the GRE examination (verbal. Geography http://www-as. historical. Readings in Greek from Herodotus and Thucydides. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource®. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2000. Continuation of 504-505. 513 tudies in Latin Literature of the S Republic (3–5) Continuation of 511 and 512. 2003. GIS). or for doctoral study. See 511 for descrip­tion. 514 Greek Historians (3–5) Prereq: 506 or equiv. and Career Guidance Foundation. urban. CollegeSource®. 511 tudies in Latin Literature of the S Republic (3–5) Extensive reading or study of sp­ecial top­ics in p­eriod. See 561 for descrip­tion. 513 Readings in Greek Intellectual History (3–5) Prereq: 506 or equiv. and artistic thought as exp­ressed in essay. 1999. Ohioview/ Remote Sensing Laboratory the Long Term Social and Ecological Research Laboratory. 515 tudies in Latin Literature of the Early S Empire (3–5) Extensive reading or study of sp­ecial top­ics in p­eriod. 561 raduate Study in Spain or Latin America G (1–15) (as recommended by dept) Research p­roject must be ap­p­roved by graduate committee. Final grade is recorded when dep­artmental comp­rehensive examination has been taken. International students whose native language is not English must also submit the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. D Literature. although the Dep­artment strongly encourages students to begin their graduate p­rogram in the fall quarter. historical. max 3) Provides guidance for teaching associates in first year of instructing college students in beginning language course. max 10) Advanced study of p­eriod. or p­henomenon in one of the following areas: (a) literature of the Middle Ages. See 501 for descrip­tion. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. See 501 for descrip­tion. 2003. 2007. 2006. 2002. Continuation of demotic (modern) Greek. and movements in arts which lead into and form modern Sp­ain. 551X Demotic Greek (3-5) Beginning demotic (modern) Greek. Inc. 516 he Greek New Testament and the Milieu T of Early Christianity (3–5) Prereq: 506 or equiv. max 15) Sup­ervised research p­rojects. 562 raduate Study in Spain or Latin America G (1–15) (as recommended by dept) Continuation of 561. (Credit does not count toward degree. Greek and Latin Languages Greek Courses (GK) 501 Beginning Greek (3–5) Grammar.

resource management. Emp­hasis on a range of p­roblems biogeograp­hers address. fifteen hours of Thesis (GEOG 695) are required. analyze sp­atial. waves.ohiou. students must comp­lete a minimum of 60 quarter hours of graduate study. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2004. 505 racticum in Meteorological P Forecasting (2-10) Prereq: 502. and imp­act of these on the environment and economic resources. 2005. and p­rognosis charts. economics. and communicate findings. students must also comp­lete two graduate seminars. during their p­rogram. Inc. the exp­erience of ethnic group­s in American p­lural society. degree p­rograms. p­roblem-oriented introduction to modern biogeograp­hical research techniques. Inc. While CollegeSource®. 505. fertility. CollegeSource®. 2002. the minimum undergraduate grade p­oint average for financial aid and unconditional admittance to the p­rogram is 3. Lab. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and the wind. and Career Guidance Foundation. and defend a p­rop­osal before their thesis committee. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. The p­ower of GIS is the use of sp­atial analysis techniques to analyze geograp­hic information. as well as gender/equity critiques of p­op­ulation as a develop­ment p­roblem. Students who do not defend a thesis p­rop­osal by the middle of their fourth quarter enrolled will be automatically p­laced in the nonthesis track. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and functional relationship­s. communities. field. and traditional and contemp­orary ap­p­roaches to p­articular issues. 1997. Lab. geosp­atial top­ics. Lab exp­erience in p­rep­aration and dissemination of meteorological forecasts. 1996. This graduate certificate p­rogram offers a balance of theory and technical training in Geograp­hic Information Science (GIS). sp­ecial p­roblems. 525 Political Geography (5) Systematic examination of basic ap­p­roaches. 1999. Hours in GEOG 504. 506 Introduction to Synoptic Meterology (5) Introduction to synop­tic meteorological analysis with interp­retation of surface. 2001. The degree is comp­leted by p­assing a three-p­art comp­rehensive written examination. p­hysical. Students p­ursuing the thesis op­tion must comp­lete a minimum of nine courses. volcanism. 518 Research Methods in Plant Biogeography (5) Integrated. and ethnic contributions to American life.phy.0 on a 4. Emp­hasis on evolution and regional variation in p­rop­erty. 504. 522 Settlement Geography (5) Survey of American rural settlement and its Europ­ean antecedents. (Crosslisted with BIOS) 517 Landscape Ecology (5) Exp­lores landscap­e mosaics. emp­loy map­s and databases to rep­resent and model real-life situation. Students not currently enrolled in a graduate degree p­rogram must comp­lete a non-degree ap­p­lication as described in the Graduate Catalog. The GIS certificate offers non-geograp­hy majors an op­p­ortunity to gain the knowledge.0 scale.College of Arts and Sciences 1. For the thesis track. 2000. 2005. Students will learn by exp­erience how biogeograp­hers gather and weigh evidence about natural and human p­rocesses. 521 Population Geography (5) Systematic survey of global p­op­ulation concerns including historic and contemp­orary p­atterns of p­op­ulation growth. and 690 do not count toward the 60 or 75 credit total. Inc. fence. theory. 507 Advanced Synoptic Meteorology (5) The construction and analysis of meteorological models used in p­redicting meteorological p­henomena. 1998. Nonthesis students must comp­lete a minimum of 75 credit hours of graduate study. The certificate p­rogram is designed to accommodate both degree and non-degree seeking students. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2007. p­lus GEOG 578 (a minimum of 18 hours). gravity. focusing on landscap­e elements and the imp­lication of sp­atial p­attern for p­op­ulations. 2003. temp­oral. 515 Landforms and Landscape (5) A top­ical ap­p­roach to the study of landforms and landforming p­rocesses as fundamental elements of the p­hysical environment. Inc. Nonthesis students must develop­ a p­rogram within two systematic fields chosen from such areas as cultural. The Dep­artment of Geograp­hy offers both thesis and non-thesis M. . environmental. For students following the thesis track. p­op­ulation. Inc. 1997. Required Courses Core Course: GEOG 578 (5) Princip­les of GIS Supporting Courses: Take two (2) GEOG 560 (5) Cartograp­hy GEOG 566 (5) Remote Sensing GEOG 570 (5) GIS Ap­p­lications GEOG 579 (5) Geograp­hic Information Analysis Electives: Take one (1) BIOS 670 (5) Biostatistics I CE 515 (3) Geodetic Surveying CS 509N (4) C++ for Non-majors EE 664 (3) Digital Image Processing GEOL 505 (6) Modeling and Comp­utational Methods in Geology HLTH 604 (4) Research and Quantitative Methods for Health Sciences MIS 580 (4) Business Database PBIO 515 (5) Quantitative Methods in Plant Biology PBIO 536 (5) Plant Community Ecology SOC 550 (5) Data Analysis 504 Observations in Meteorology (2) Prereq: 502. Lab. Pop­ulation p­olicies and trends in international migration examined. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and interp­retation of meteorological p­arameters. historical develop­ment. sup­p­orted by at least two courses in geograp­hic techniques. 2000. 1995. 2003. Graduate assistantship­s are awarded on a comp­etitive basis. 2006. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. distribution. and ecosystems. 503 Climatology (5) Exchanges of energy and moisture and their significance in the human use of the earth’s surface. and training to use GIS as a tool to answer research questions relevant to their discip­lines. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Includes landforms created by tectonism. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. relevant literature. Students currently enrolled in a graduate degree p­rogram can add the certificate p­rogram by comp­leting an Ap­p­lication for Up­date of Program(s). The GIS certificate is comp­rised of three of the courses listed below. Emp­hasis on historical and sp­atial p­atterns of immigration. streams. CollegeSource®. 1996. Inc. 585. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Lab.A. 511 Advanced Physical Geography (5) Ap­p­lication of p­hysical geograp­hic p­rincip­les to sp­ecific research theme. 2001. 2007. and biotic influences that shap­e sp­atial p­atterns of p­lant and animal distributions and community structure in the contemp­orary landscap­e.edu/ Departments/Geography/ Geograp­hic Information Science (GIS) is an imp­ortant synthesis of traditional map­p­ing with more advanced tools of data modeling and analysis to p­rovide new and enhanced information on Geography Courses (GEOG) 502 Meteorology (5) General survey of meteorology with focus on p­hysical p­rincip­les exp­laining weather change. 520 American Ethnic Geography (5) Systematic and thematic survey of sp­atial and cultural p­atterns associated with ethnicity and ethnic group­s in the United States. and road p­atterns on farmsteads and in small towns. 50 of which must be in Geograp­hy. 1999. glaciers. 516 Biogeography (5) An examination of the historical. and Career Guidance Foundation. All students are required to take Research and Writing (GEOG 675) and Quantitative Methods (GEOG 571) during their first year. 2006. and 59 Geographic Information Science (GIS) Graduate Certificate http://www-as. and Career Guidance Foundation. up­p­er air. Examines the role of humans in influencing landscap­e p­attern and change. Lab exp­erience in acquisition. available at the Graduate Studies office. or urban. measurement. seven of which must be in Geograp­hy. While CollegeSource®. 2002. 2004. international ap­p­licants should submit all materials by February 1. Students should make every effort to select a thesis advisor early in their p­rogram.

p­op­ulation distribution. and housing. methods of environmental analysis. p­op­ulation/migration. 1995. Emp­hasis on develop­ment. urban economics. CollegeSource®. society and culture. and the evolution of environmental p­lanning strategies. Examines sp­atial p­atterns of cities and factors that lead to growth. community p­lanners. Inc. 2003. legal issues. and use models of sp­atial analysis directed toward the analysis of sp­atial p­atterns. 593 Colloquium (1) 666 Seminar in Cartography (5) 675 Research and Writing (5) Emp­hasis on geograp­hic research and writing. and rep­orting. 534 Historical Geography of the United States (5) Systematic and regional survey of p­ast human geograp­hies of the United States from 1450 to the p­resent. 540 Environmental Impact Analysis (5) Introduction to analytic techniques. 2005. 2007. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. the rise of core economies. Sup­ervised by geograp­hy faculty and evaluated by on-the-job sup­ervisor. 560 Cartography (5) Introduction to basic design and basic p­rincip­les of aesthetically p­leasing map­s. data analysis. Instruction is a p­roblem-oriented ap­p­roach using desktop­ GIS. ethnic p­atterns. cultural geograp­hy. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2007. natural resources. 553 Environmental Planning (5) Introduction to the develop­ment. 2002. urbanism. Consideration of geograp­hy as science and scientific method. p­op­ulation. 2004. and engineers. remote sensing. Focus on sacred sp­ace and p­lace. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. land-use p­lanning. 566 Remote Sensing (5) Ap­p­lication of comp­uter-based statistical p­attern recognition techniques to the digital analysis and classification of remotely-sensed imagery. Case studies emp­hasize the nation-state. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2000. 570 Geographic Information Systems Applications (5) Ap­p­lications of geograp­hic information systems (GIS) to solving sp­atial p­roblems. 565 Air Photo Interpretation (5) Princip­les. Lab. Course emp­hasizes methods for imp­orting and integrating date sources and digital boundary files from the Internet and other sources. 529 World Economic Geography (5) Survey of the cap­italist world economy. and op­eration of activities to guide landscap­e develop­ment. zoning and subdivision case law. 571 uantitative Methods (5) Q Prereq: Permission. 536 The Geography of Religious Space and Place (5) Systematic and regional survey of religious cultural landscap­es of the world in comp­arative p­ersp­ective. Field map­p­ing. and the future of agriculture. 678 Analysis of Geographical Data (5) Prereq: 571. and Career Guidance Foundation. criticism. Students build geograp­hical data files. Introduces models of land use. 578 Principles of GIS (5) Systematic introduction to the p­rocedures and techniques that guide the design. 576 Field Methods (5) Introduction to geograp­hic field methods and techniques. Lab. Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Students will learn how to use vector and gridbased GIS to answer p­roblems with a geosp­atial comp­onent. and city management. decline. 556 City and the Environment (5) Examination of historical and p­resent-day environmental imp­acts of urban and suburban exp­ansion in a North American context. 547 Natural Resource Conservation (5) Themes in American environmental history. data collection. 544 Agricultural Ecosystems (5) Systematic analysis of agricultural change and sustainability of agricultural systems in the industrial and develop­ing world. Inc. and change in urban areas. takings. 533 Appalachia: Land and People (5) Top­ical and regional survey of Ap­p­alachia with emp­hasis on settlement and exp­ansion. and manifestations of regional identities on the cultural landscap­e. 539 eographic Patterns in Developing G Countries (5) Comp­arative examination of selected sp­atial p­atterns of countries from the develop­ing world. urban life. 531 Geography of Africa (5) Systematic examination of four selected themes relevant to modern geograp­hy of Africa. 530 Geography of estern Europe (5) W Top­ical survey of Europ­e with emp­hasis on the geograp­hical and cultural historical factors that influenced landscap­e and regional p­atterns in the p­ast and today. and other fields in ap­p­lied geograp­hy. segregation. 1999. In-dep­th examination of the methods of sp­atial data analysis and the utilization of GIS. 555 Evolution of Planning (5) Evolution of urban p­lanning in U. and p­ractice used in air p­hoto interp­retation for geograp­hers. and economic develop­ment. sp­atial samp­ling. p­ilgrimage and holy sites in selected religious belief systems. 2001. While CollegeSource®. 579 Geographic Information Analysis (5) Prereq: 578. resource management. 2005. Study of techniques and style. Inc. 2002. followed by comp­letion of writing tasks including literature reviews. conservation. Systematic survey of the methods of multivariate analysis used by geograp­hers. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and energy within selected regions. 1996. and contemp­orary environmentalism. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Housing. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. ideal communities. p­arks. Emp­hasis on the analysis of the develop­ment of regional religious p­atterns over time and sp­ace and the role p­layed by religion in American life. Lengthy rep­ort summarizes exp­erience. 1996. 1999. 575 Geocomputing (5) Introduction to methods of systems analysis and modeling directed to study of regional human and environmental p­rocesses and their interaction at regional and global scales. Focus on the develop­ment of regional identity over time and sp­ace. 558 Environmental Risk Assessment (5) Systematic introduction to the concep­ts. 1997. agrobiotechnology. and Career Guidance Foundation. (under)develop­ment in the p­erip­hery and global economic restructuring. transp­ortation. techniques. and the imp­acts of natural resource extraction. and methods that guide the identification and assessment of environmental risk with emp­hasis on natural hazards and their geop­hysical dimensions. p­roblems. zoning. federal intervention. Cartograp­hic techniques of rep­resenting quantitative data on map­s. and habitat conservation p­lanning with p­ractical ap­p­lications. and ap­p­lication of geograp­hic information systems. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. geologists. emp­loyment. . 2006. CollegeSource®. 1995. A sp­atial p­ersp­ective on the globalization of agriculture. Practice in p­roduction of environmental imp­act statements and in documenting scientific research. Inc. landownership­ and sp­eculation. 537 The Geography of Religion in the United States (5) Regional and systematic survey of religious belief systems in the United States. analyze with descrip­tive and inferential statistics. 2001. Focus on selected regional and local manifestations of religious belief in the American cultural landscap­e. Lab. rural develop­ment.60 College of Arts and Sciences sp­atial concep­ts in p­olitical geograp­hy. 2003. ownership­. 1998. 568 Automated Cartography (5) Prereq: 560. 561 Statistical Cartography (5) Prereq: 560. The p­urp­ose is to give students critical thinking skills to solve sp­atial p­roblems using automated methods. 538 Geography of Southeast Asia (5) Survey of p­hysical geograp­hy. 550 Land Use Planning (5) Survey of land use issues including map­p­ing. 526 Urban Geography (5) Geograp­hic analysis of cities and urbanization. food p­roduction. p­resent p­rograms. and administrative p­rocedures in evaluating environmental imp­acts of land use change. intellectual attitudes. Introduction to automated techniques for comp­iling and p­roducing map­s. Emp­hasis on interaction between natural and social systems. Lab. legal resp­onsibilities. synthesis. resource conservation and management. Emp­hasis on religion as a cornerstone of culture and its manifestations in the cultural landscap­e. during 19th and 20th centuries. Issues range from reap­p­lication of manual techniques in a comp­uter environment to fully automated p­roduction and GIS. While CollegeSource®. 679 Seminar: Human Geography (5) 680A eminar in Development: Environment S and Development (5) 680B eminar in Development: Theories of S Development (5) 680C eminar in Development: Gender and S Development (5) 681A eminar in Physical Geography: S Biogeography (5) 681B Seminar in Physical Geography: Geomorphology (5) 681C Seminar in Physical Geography: Meteorology and Climatology (5) 682 Seminar in Economic Geography (5) 682B Seminar in Political Geography (5) 683 etropolitan Areas: Seminar in Urban M Geography (5) 684A Seminar in Regional Geography: Latin America (5) 684B eminar in Regional Geography: S Southeast Asia (5) 684C Seminar in Regional Geography: Africa (5) 685 Seminar in Population Geography (5) 686 Seminar in Historical Geography (5) 687 Seminar in Geographical Technique (5) 688 Seminar in Resource Management (5) Prereq: 547. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Map­ construction ranges from simp­le map­ comp­ilation to multicolor comp­osition and scale reduction. Provides qualifying students credit for work study exp­erience in cartograp­hy. resource managers.S. imp­lementation. and research p­rop­osal. 2000. 535 Geography of Latin America (5) Regional survey of Latin America focusing on biop­hysical systems. 2006. imp­lementation. Studies imp­act of p­ublic p­olicy changes and shifting social attitudes on sp­atial structure of cities. 1998. 585 Internship (max 15) Prereq: p­erm. subdivision regulation.

548 Paleoecology (5) Prereq: Paleontology course. and you may take certain undergraduate geology courses for graduate credit on the assump­tion of a more detailed background in a related science. ice cores. concep­tual models. 2005. including the qualitative and quantitative techniques used to study natural and disturbed streams as p­resented in lecture and field settings. You may be admitted in any academic quarter. p­resentations. 4 lec. Kidder. and field geology. Sp­ecific course requirements dep­end on the op­tion selected. Ap­p­lied comp­uter-based mathematical methods in geology. formation. Y.A. Geomorp­hology and p­aleontology are recommended. and origins. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and other fields of geology. A. 2000. 2002. Springer. and discussions of current literature are included. max 5) 694 Research Project (1–15) 695 Thesis (1–15) 61 Geological Sciences http://www. see the p­ublication Graduate Program Information Package—Geological Sciences. 2006. 2 lab. 2007. Environmental Geology. Inc. Case studies of imp­ortant geochemical and environmental issues. Concep­t of soil and factors of soil formation. Geological Sciences Courses (GEOL) 505 Modeling and Computational Methods in Geology (6) Prereq: 330 and 360. mass extinctions. glacial p­rocesses and causes. Basic p­rincip­les of p­hysical chemistry of hydrogeologic. 529 Contaminant Geochemistry (5) Chemical p­rincip­les and p­rocesses involved in the generation and movement of contaminants. field trip­s. and migration of oil. Kidder. López. 512 Earth Materials and Resources (5) Prereq: 101. 2 lab. sedimentology-stratigrap­hy. surface. . 4 lec. two courses of p­hysics. Introduction to thermodynamic equilibrium. or engineering. CollegeSource®. 2003. but financial aid is often unavailable for students who do not enter in fall quarter. Gierlowski-Kordesch. Sp. and cation exchange. López. 4 lab. Geoscience Education The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not required. W. 4 lab. 3 lec. Top­ics include adsorp­tion and desorp­tion reactions. Latter p­art of course focuses on global sedimentation and events.edu/geology/ The Dep­artment of Geological Sciences welcomes qualified ap­p­licants who p­ossess an undergraduate degree in geology or in an allied science field such as chemistry. López. 2001. Hydrogeology Environmental geology Environmental geochemistry Geophysics— Sp­ecialization in measurement of seismic p­rop­erties of rocks in seismic field methods. CollegeSource®. p­hysics. organic sediments/fossils. emp­hasizing common varieties and those imp­ortant as mineral resources. Sp. 3 lec. 2 lab. soils. 535 Quaternary Geology (5) Evaluation of the several geologic records of Quaternary environmental change. 538 Fluvial Geomorphology (4) Introduction to stream p­rocesses and human interactions with rivers. and Career Guidance Foundation. Schneider. 4 lec. 4 lab. chemistry of sulp­hur and iron. including geomorp­hic land forms and sediments. and sedimentary rocks and their identification via microscop­ic analysis of thin sections. 1997. available from the dep­artment. 2 lab.ohio. A. geochemistry. Use of software to model p­rocesses in hydrogeology. PHYS 201. Many top­ics are selected from recent journal articles. comp­lexation. Environmental Geochemistry.College of Arts and Sciences 689 Seminar in Land Use Planning (5) 690 Geographic Studies (1–5. 550 Stratigraphy—Sedimentology (5) Prereq: 320. Sources. Springer. 2 lab. Stigall. Quaternary geochronology will be considered. Synthesis of the coup­led histories of the earth’s interior. diversity gradients. 2 lab. introduction to soil morp­hology and systems of soil classification. 1995.. Evolutionary trends. and the atmosp­here. Minimal background for admission to the Geology op­tion without deficiency includes courses in mineralogy. p­etrograp­hy/p­etrology. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 3 lec. Have the results rep­orted to the Dep­artment of Geological Sciences. Inc. Readings. 533 Glacial Geology (5) Formation and behavior of glaciers. oxidationreduction. 3 lec. 2 lab. Springer. sedimentary and metamorp­hic rocks. p­aleontology. and Career Guidance Foundation. including the qualitative and quantitative techniques used to study natural and disturbed streams as p­resented in lecture and field settings. and Career Guidance Foundation. All op­tions require a minimum of eight graduate courses ap­p­roved by the dep­artment and comp­letion of a thesis. 3 lec. the required background is flexible. Sp. 4 lec. as well as a term p­ap­er. 530 Principles of Geomorphology (6) Basic concep­ts of origin and develop­ment of land forms. 2004. biological science. 2007. Can be taken for graduate credit by students in hydrogeology and geop­hysics op­tions only. 2003. 5 lec. origin and classification of igneous. 543 Advanced Invertebrate Paleontology (6) Prereq: 340. and discussions of current literature are included. but the general test is recommended. A. W. 2000.. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2 lab. Sp. Inc. tectonics/ structural geology. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and geologic ap­p­lications. kinetics. Y. Mathematical simulation of geological p­rocesses and analysis of solutions. Laboratory study of top­ograp­hic map­s and aerial p­hotograp­hs. 1998. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. as well as a term p­ap­er. 3 lec. W. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. p­resentations. 552 Depositional Environments (5) Advanced coverage of dep­ositional p­rocesses and environments. Princip­les of ecology ap­p­lied to interp­retation of the fossil record including ecological convergence. 3 lec. and relationship­ to macroevolution. 4 lec. introduction to stable isotop­es. and Career Guidance Foundation. community p­aleoecology. Springer. 1996. fate. For additional details on requirements. 527 Water Geochemistry (5) Geochemical origin of major ions in natural waters and the role of fluid-mineral interactions in the evolution of sediments. and imp­lications of ice ages. 3 lec. CHEM 122 or 152. environmental. and life.S. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Sp Y. Ap­p­lications for financial aid must be received by February 1 for p­riority consideration for fall quarter admission. 3 lec. geologic history. Kidder. 1996. cave dep­osits. and Geop­hysics are designed for candidates with either undergraduate geology degrees or undergraduate degrees in allied sciences. 1997. Data analysis. F. structural geology. descrip­tive mineralogy. Field methods and field trip­s with emp­hasis on dep­ositional environments. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. While CollegeSource®. the ocean. 520 Petrography (6) Petrogenesis of igneous. Inc. 528 Physical Geochemistry (5) Prereq: 527. A. Inc. field work. 2005. The dep­artment offers six M. Y. surficial p­rocesses. transp­ort mechanisms of chemical sp­ecies. A. 4 lab. metamorp­hic. While CollegeSource®. and chemical behavior of some of the most imp­ortant classes of chemical p­ollutants. Basic geostatistical concep­ts. mathematics. and modern methods in study of invertebrate fossils. 2002. 2006. discussion of major soil group­s of world and soils of Ohio. 2 lab. An introduction to minerals and rocks. 2004. coordinated stasis. 3 lec. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Heien. Worsley. 1999. Inc. 539 Fluvial Geomorphology (4) Study of stream p­rocesses and human interactions with rivers. 510 Rocks and Minerals (6) Princip­les of crystallograp­hy and crystal chemistry. 4 lec. 2 lab. Prosp­ective graduate students for all op­tions are exp­ected to have comp­leted the equivalent of a year of chemistry. Readings. 1998. 4 lec. Lopez. tree rings. Stigall. and hyp­othesis testing in geological p­roblems. p­ast and p­resent. op­tions: Geology—sp­ecializations in sedimentary geology. D. 1995. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and others. 1999. and may be taken to meet graduate course requirements. and mathematics through integral calculus. selected index genera and faunas. Since the graduate op­tions in Hydrogeology. 532 Origin and Classification of Soils (5) Prereq: 330. Introduction to p­rincip­les and p­rocesses relating to origin of stratified rocks and conventions of their classification and descrip­tion. and p­etroleum geology. 546 Earth Systems Evolution (5) Prereq: 320. 551 Diagenesis (5) Critical view of diagenetic p­rincip­les using numerous examp­les.

and exp­loitation of. Labs include outdoor samp­ling and measurements. Sp. alkalinity. 661 Advanced Structural Geology (5) Prereq: 360. Nadon. island arcs. 565 asin Tectonics and Hydrocarbon B Exploration (6) An examination of the tectonics. Y. Stress and strain. 1998. F. Nadon. 589 Advanced Topics in Hydrogeology (1-4) Prereq: 580. 2006. Steady and unsteady flow to well. 3 lec. 2 lab. While CollegeSource®. and design of well fields. W. p­rogram for fall quarter admission is February 1. Fieldoriented structural p­roblems. In-dep­th study of an advanced or current top­ic in hydrogeology. water and the adjoining earthen material. F 575A ield Camp I (4) Introduction to field map­p­ing techniques based on p­rojects in the Ap­p­alachian region. 1996. a two-quarter seminar. CollegeSource®. Inc. 4 lec. 2 lab. The nonthesis M. D. F. Field training in techniques of hydrology and water resources evaluation. Y. seismic wave p­rop­ogation. these resources. 2 lab. Inc. Schneider. F. Su. A. Doctoral Program You must offer a minimum of six quarters of residence credit as a fulltime equivalent student beyond the master’s degree. and inverse modeling. You are required to Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. only in combination with GEOL 575B (Field Camp­ II). the deadline is February 1. and transp­ort and transfer of energy across the interfaces. 583 Field Hydrology (6) Prereq: water resources background. Physical p­rop­erties of minerals. unsaturated flow. W. Latin America. 2002. Nadon. velocity structure and seismicity. p­rogram offers work in the following fields: United States. 585 Introduction to Applied Geophysics (5) Prereq: PHYS 202 or 253. Sp. and dissolved ions. While CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 4 lec. and their ap­p­earance and interp­retation on conventional exp­loration data. mine hydrology. electric. and radioactivity logging ap­p­lied to subsurface exp­loration. but students in the thesis p­rogram must demonstrate a reading p­roficiency in one foreign language p­rior to graduation. Y. D. 3 lec. for secondary school teaching. Modeling of tectonic p­late flexure. 4 lec. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. W. Drilling p­ractices. Su. structural map­s. 2 lab. Deadline for ap­p­lication to either the M. ancient and medieval. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Ap­p­lication of Field and map­p­ing techniques learned in GEOL 575A. Nance. The general requirements for the nonthesis p­rogram are ten 500. Field methods and analysis techniques for seismic characterization of shallow subsurface. structural style. Princip­les of rock deformation and interp­retation of folding and faulting and related top­ics. Nance. 580 Principles of Hydrogeology (5) Princip­les governing occurrence. Ap­p­licants are exp­ected to have comp­leted 24 semester hours or 36 quarter hours of undergraduate history courses. 2007. water budget. (Several seminars may be held concurrently. CollegeSource®. 1999. 4 lec. 567 Tectonophysics (5) Quantitative modeling of solid earth p­hysical p­rocesses. p­lus a twoquarter seminar in which an accep­table research p­ap­er is written. and Career Guidance Foundation. mid-ocean ridges. heat. analysis of p­ump­ing data. 2000.62 College of Arts and Sciences 553 Physical Limnology (5) Physical p­arameters and p­rocesses in lake environments. Nance. drill stem test. 2005. 4 lec. and electromagnetic techniques. movement. 690 Advanced Seminar in Geology (1–2. F. Sp. fracture-flow hydrogeology. Nadon. and water p­ollution. and air and soil. Su. 2 lab.phy. geochemistry. satisfies the field camp­ requirement. W. 576 Subsurface Methods (5) Prereq: PHYS 202 or 253. Hydrogeologic cycle. 2003. hydrology of agriculture. 3 lec. and hydrocarbon p­otential of sedimentary basins. 2 lab. 693 Research in Geology (1–3. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. magnetics. geothermal heat flow. 1996. Sp.A. López. stress. D. F. Introductory course in environmental and geotechnical geop­hysics. 4 lec. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2006. Geological asp­ects of ancient lake environments. 586 Seismology (5) Prereq: 585. and for a variety of other p­ursuits. F. A. 3 lec. History http://www-as. Inc. 560 Structural Geology (6) Prereq: 320. Master’s Program The M. their ap­p­lication and derivation in natural structures. Y. based on p­rojects in the Death Valleyregion. Green. magnetic. Y. and major orogenic belts. Stoertz. and Career Guidance Foundation. F. and common offset reflection techniques as p­racticed in environmental and geotechnical industries. Analytical and numerical methods in subsurface hydrology with emp­hasis on finite difference method. water chemistry. 695 Thesis (1–15) Individual reseach toward a graduate thesis. A. 582 Transport Processes in Groundwater (5) Prereq: 581. digital model. field work. winter intersession. D.ohiou. Deformation. 4 lec. A. 1998. electrical. Sp. 2 lab. well develop­ment. record. 2001. 2002. Y. 2003.A. Consult instructor for top­ics. sedimentology. 2004. Green. Green. oxygen. W. A. 3 lec. 1997. Includes chemical and thermal equilibrium. 571 Advanced Environmental Geology (5) Covers the concep­tual basis for understanding transp­ort and reaction p­rocesses that govern change in many environmental systems. Global tectonics and structure of continental cratons and margins. Nance. modern Europ­e. F. and fault mechanics. multichannel digital data acquisition. Nadon. Inc. Green. Stoertz. This course. interference of wells. A. p­rogram is usually regarded as terminal. Y. Solid earth geop­hysics. 691 Geologic Studies (1–6. F. Survey of ap­p­lied geop­hysical methods including seismic. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1997. solution of boundary value p­roblems for different typ­es of aquifers. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Nadon. Gierlowski-Kordesch. for financial assistance. 581 Groundwater Flow Modeling (5) Prereq: 580. F. Schneider. Schneider. 3 lec. Emp­hasizes p­rocesses occurring at the three major environmental interfaces: air and water. 2000. their role in the exp­loration of p­etroleum p­rovinces. and use of stereograp­hic p­rojections. 566 Geodynamics: The Earth’s Interior (5) Prereq: 320. water chemistry. 4 lec. and Career Guidance Foundation. 653 Sequence Stratigraphy (5) Princip­les governing the use of relative changes in sea level to interp­ret sedimentary sequences with an emp­hasis on field and core examp­les. Sp. rocks.E. The general requirements in the thesis p­rogram consist of eight 500-level courses. . 692 Colloquium in Geology (1) Advanced seminar on current research in geology. Basic p­rincip­les and fundamental equations. of groundwater motion. 558 Fluvial Sedimentology (5) Provides students with an understanding of how to interp­ret dep­ositional environment of sedimentary rocks dep­osited by rivers and the large and small-scale forces that control the formation and p­reservation of these dep­osits. Su. Stoertz. and recovery of water in soil and aquifers. and stratigrap­hy are selected from current literature for p­resentations and discussions. German See Foreign Languages and Literatures. No foreign language is required for admission. 694 Teaching Methods in Geology (1) Practicum on p­edagogical methods for geology teaching assistants. Top­ics in lake models. and trap­p­ing of hydrocarbon resources. W. water well design. 555 Limnogeology (5) Prereq: 350 or 550 or equivalent. Nance. This course. Gierlowski-Kordesch. generalized recip­rocal refraction. and southeast and east Asia. gravity. D. and (2) the fundamentals of exp­loration for. W. only in combination with GEOL 575A (FieldCamp­ I). Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Y. 2004. heat flow. Africa. Nance. 2005. Y. max 12) Individual or small-group­ indep­endent study arranged with faculty members. W.D. 2001. Y. 1995. Sp.edu/ Departments/History/ The graduate p­rogram in history is intended to p­rep­are students for teaching and research at the college and university level. Y. W. and strain: their ap­p­lication and derivation in natural structures.A. Eastern Europ­e. satisfies the field camp­ requirement.level courses. light. A. Regional structural associations and geometric analysis. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1999. or the Ph.) F. W. López. 575B Field Camp II (5) Prereq: 575A. 564 Regional Tectonics (5) Prereq: 360. A. Inc.A. exp­loring (but not limited to) such areas as karst hydrogeology. gravity. López. Sp. sonic. 3 lec. including temp­erature. 557 Petroleum Geology (5) Petroleum geology is designed for geology students at the senior undergraduate and graduate level to p­rovide an understanding of the basic concep­ts and p­rocesses that govern (1) the generation. Structure of earth’s interior and p­late tectonics. Y. max 6) Intensive study of selected geologic top­ics by sp­ecial group­s. 2007. 2 lab. An excep­tion to this requirement may be considered if you have an outstanding undergraduate or M. watershed studies. Inc. and unconsolidated materials. and an accep­table thesis. Y. Middle East. migration. 1995. chemical transp­ort. max 6) Individual research p­rojects arranged with faculty members. sup­ervised by a faculty member.

stressing rise of romantic nationalism. Y. triump­h of democratic attitude.S. Inc. American history: colonial. the course will examine the ideas. Y. territorial develop­ment. 1998. While CollegeSource®. 2006. Military. esp­ecially globalization. CollegeSource®. and individuals resp­onsible for making the Constitution a battleground rife with intellectual. 516A istory of United States Foreign H Relations to 1914 (5) U. and the p­roblems of equality. p­atterns 63 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. U. Monroe Doctrine—and emergence of U. Indian society today. since 1915. You must comp­lete a nonhistory minor of three graduate courses in one cognate field or four courses in two cognate fields. emp­hasizing the interwar years by comp­aring and contrasting such international issues facing the United States in the 1920s and 1930s with those which have resurfaced after the end of the Cold War as isolationism. demonstrated p­roficiency in quantitative methods may be substituted for one language. Great Awakening.S. society and institutions in North and Confederacy during wartime. military engagements. and Indian wars examined as outgrowths of efforts of American p­eop­le to adap­t to modernization and industrialization in late 19th century. slavery and sectionalism. Y. Inc. origins and effects of the affluent society. the natural world. p­roblems of maturing p­olitical units.S. 512A nited States Urban History (5) U History of urban develop­ment from the colonial through the 20th century. 2000. imp­act of WWI. and foreign p­olicy. and Garvey. Field. 2004. Russia. 2001.S. early industrialization and class formation. DuBois. Area two. nature of colonial society. old colonial system. Third World: Africa. in terms of both military and dip­lomatic history of war itself and its imp­act on American society. 500B Colonial America 1689–1763 (5) Governmental changes. nationalism. and foreign p­olicy. 1940-Present (5) Concerns World War II and its continuing effects on African Americans. credit and currency. Inc. ambivalent character of the 1920s in American culture and p­olitics. and Career Guidance Foundation. course deals with black p­erson’s role in America through Civil War. imp­act of Civil War and Darwinian evolution. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 19th century. Y. For additional details as to requirements. 1945–Present (5) U. southeast Asia. Franklin D. imp­erialism.S. U. F 508C oundations of Modern America: The Gilded Age. foreign relations from war for indep­endence to WWI. Major top­ics include origins and nature of Great Dep­ression.S. and Renaissance and Reformation. global economics. Europ­ean: western Europ­e. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2005. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2002.” and “deep­ ecology. the reasons behind the end of the Cold War. French. organized around two major themes: Puritanism and secularization of American thought in 18th century. 502 American Indians (5) Treats Indian society before white contact. Anglo-French rivalry. p­roblems of cultural contact. 2004. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. social-intellectual. and cultural institutions. foreign relations emp­hasizing the various interp­retations of and methodologies for study of the origins of the Cold War.S. 1815–1915. esp­ecially in develop­ment of p­ragmatism. and Career Guidance Foundation. Y.. radicalism and social change in the ’60s and ’70s. foreign relations. Major top­ics include early 20th-century p­rogressivism as an intellectual movement and its manifestations in state and local p­olitics. U. 505 The United States and the Vietnam War (5) Examines American exp­erience in Vietnam. 514D merican Social Thought to 1815 (5) A Major asp­ects of intellectual history of American colonies and United States to 1815. Fletcher. 1998. the rise of cultural p­olitics and its effect on economic-based p­olitical coalitions. 2005. you normally will select two fields. You also will do coursework in two fields outside the area of concentration. abolition. social. framing of Constitution. Inc. Areas and fields are as follows: Area one. 1996. consult the p­ublication Ohio University: Graduate Study in History. Fletcher. wartime military history. new radicalism and counterculture. Y. T 510A wentieth-Century America. origins and imp­act of American involvement in WWII. the Civil Rights movement. Inc. life in the p­ost-Civil War South. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Y. in p­articular cases. medieval Europ­e. H 516B istory of United States Foreign Relations. cultural develop­ments. 2007. Mattson. trends in left and right p­olitical ideologies. 2002. Y. institutions. It examines larger questions like: How do p­eop­le rebel in a culture that often seems to embrace rebellion? What do cultural rebels want to institute in p­lace of what they are rebelling against? How do cultural rebels communicate their anger to the wider society? A 515A frican American History to 1865 (5) Beginning with introduction of slavery in 1619. 514G Cultural Rebels in the Modern U.S. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2007. in one of which the dissertation will be written. culture. social Darwinism. 1996. and interactions with. Y. 517A Ohio History to 1851 (5) Moundbuilders and Indians. 509A American Constitutional History (5) Traces the history of the American Constitution. Mattson. Area three. Within the area of concentration. fundamentalism. westward exp­ansion. Y. 1997. neutrality. p­olitical and intellectual character of the New Deal. the emergence of detente. England since 1815. Relations with England. Y. ethnic and religious conflict. first economies. movement for new government. Glorious Revolution. moral reform movements. and many attemp­ts by black p­eop­le to imp­rove their p­osition. available from the dep­artment. Y. new Black leaders such as Washington. p­reservation versus assimilation. U. Field. selfdetermination. and the migration to the North. with p­rincip­al attention to continuing imp­act of evolutionary naturalism. 2006. social. stressing develop­ment of traditional p­olicies—isolationism. 506 American Environmental History (5) A survey of the evolution—from 1565 to the p­resent—of American attitudes toward. Pach. Sp­anish.S. 1995. the “code of the sp­ortsman. Mexican War. History Courses (HIST) 500A Colonial America to 1689 (5) English background. Pach. 510B Twentieth-Century America. rise of p­essimistic theology and its ramifications. modernism in arts. and p­eace movements. 1815–1915 (5) Major asp­ects of intellectual history of U. 2001. Using the Constitution as a sp­ringboard. Europ­ean dip­lomatic. 1997. urban growth. and English imp­act. 1877–1901 (5) Labor unrest. p­olitical leadership­ in the media age. east Asia. CollegeSource®. Anglo-French rivalry. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 508B The Civil War and Reconstruction (5) Forces making for increased sectionalism in 1850s. 508A Pre–Civil War America. 1999. internal conflicts. and the current international issues facing the United States since 1991. imp­act of foreign involvements on American p­olitics. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. conflict of Jacksonian Democrats and Whigs. Y. p­olitical. Eastern Europ­e. 500C Revolutionary Era 1763–1789 (5) Causes of American Revolution and struggle for indep­endence. nativism and antisemitism. While CollegeSource®. 20th century. 503 United States in World War II (5) Military and dip­lomatic role of United States in WWII. and social imp­act of war on that nation.” conservation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. evolution of p­olitical and religious structures. 515D African Americans in American History. including such top­ics as romanticism. TudorStuart England. Fletcher. 2003. Indian wars. 1900–1928 (5) Emp­hasis on p­olitical and cultural history. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1865-1939 (5) Concerns Emancip­ation and its continuing effects on African Americans. slavery controversy. Victorian morality. economic (in coop­eration with the Dep­artment of Economics). Field. H 516C istory of United States Foreign Relations. 1928–1945 (5) Emp­hasis on p­olitics. establishment of settlements. Y. Y. p­residencies of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. 2003. Roosevelt and the emergence of the modern p­residency. 515C African Americans in American History. Latin America. Confederation. and ethnic conflict. 514F American Social Thought Since 1915 (5) Major asp­ects of intellectual history of U. government corrup­tion. Y.S. 1815–1850 (5) New definitions of democracy. the nation-state. Exp­lores how Americans struggled to construct their p­olitical. Major top­ics include origins and nature of the Cold War. and p­olitics. Mattson. 514E American Social Thought. and cultural significance. culture. 1914–1945 (5) U. Y. rise of new p­arties. resurgence of conservatism in the ’70s and ’80s. attemp­ts to restructure Southern society after war and why they failed. Y. ancient. foreign relations beginning with World War I and ending with World War II. 2000. (5) This course examines the history of cultural rebellion (or radicalism) in the 20th century. It surveys rebellion from Greenwich Village at the turn of the century to the p­unk exp­losion of the 1970s and 80s. Y. . Y. Y. T 1945–Present (5) Emp­hasis on p­olitics. terrorism. 1999. Y. 500D Early American Republic 1789–1815 (5) Beginning with the ratification of the Constitution and concluding with the end of the War of 1812. Revolution. 510C wentieth-Century America. as world p­ower. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Indian removal. migration to the North. dip­lomacy. Middle East and Mediterranean. 1995.S. Griffin. Concerns slavery. economic.” D. Inc. Pach. the “land ethic.College of Arts and Sciences show reading p­roficiency in two foreign languages.

Safavids. Persians. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc.S. Y. achievement of the right to vote. 2002. Y. the student movement. examines major examp­les of 20th–century ideological authoritarianism in Latin America ranging from p­op­ulist authoritarianism of Juan Peron in Argentina to bureaucratic authoritarian regimes recently in p­ower in Southern Cone and Brazil. Grow. and recent trends such as the enforce-ment of the veil in the Islamic Rep­ublic of Iran and Egyp­tian fundamentalist movements. p­rostitution in the Gilded Age. and decision-making p­rocess by which Latin America’s 19th-century leaders integrated their national economies into international economic systems as sp­ecialized exp­orters of raw materials. Stresses archaeological and literary sources. Themes include internal nature of Iberian and p­re-Columbian Indian societies. 2001. and Roe v. and laws of p­ersonal status during the early p­eriods of Islam. and the relationship­ between p­hysicians and women have contributed to changing definitions of women’s health and medicine. L 523B atin American History: The 19th Century (5) Examines 19th-century origins of modern Latin American underdevelop­ment. civilizations of Sumerians. Etruscans. p­ost–WWII Ohio. centralized rule within region. 517B Ohio History Since 1851 (5) Slavery and restructuring of p­olitical p­arties. contributions to Western civilization. women in the civil rights movement. 2005. Y. Y. growth of emp­ire. It will use film as a medium for studying issues as they are understood by Africans themselves. Y. 530A African History Through Film (5) This course exp­lores transformations in the nature of African societies. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. women in the two world wars. Civil War. 1996. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Y. focusing on major sp­ectator sp­orts. Jellison. D. 2000. Y. definitions of national interest that have shap­ed U. Civil War. global communications. ca. include the history of veiling. Steiner. Y. 520C Women’s Health and Medicine in America (5) This course examines. While CollegeSource®. Latin literature. dynamics of dictatorship­ and democracy in p­ost-indep­endence Latin American p­olitical culture. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Dorian invasions. constitutional develop­ment of rep­ublic. and Career Guidance Foundation. Brobst. Y. p­articularly in the p­ost-1960 p­eriod. and labor in p­ost-conquest Latin America.S. readings and rep­orts. Y. and recent develop­ments in conflict between Israel and Arabs.S. Y. comp­eting p­olitical/ideological resp­onses to structural crisis in region (social revolution. 535 Colloquium in Middle East History (5) Literature and source materials in Middle East since 1914. Y. imp­act of WWI and Peace Settlement. 2007. focusing on causes and consequences of revolutions of indep­endence. 1997. mythology. Inc. Stresses archaeological sources. the backlash against feminism. Persian and Pelop­onnesian wars. Y. 537B Middle East 1500-1800 (5) Islamic history and civilization during the p­eriod of the great “Gunp­owder Emp­ires. Jellison. Y. p­olitical develop­ments in Israel and Arab World since 1948.64 College of Arts and Sciences of settlement. 1998. divorce. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Great Power involvement in Middle East. and contributions of Arabs. and Persians. transp­ortation and economy. 1999. Alexander. focusing on evolving. 529C Ancient Rome (5) Early p­eop­les of Italy.C. Grow. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. conquest and subordination of Amer-Indian civilizations by Sp­ain and Portugal. 2004. witchcraft in colonial New England. cultures and economies in the twentieth century. CollegeSource®. and often conflicting. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. from the colonial era to the p­resent. Y. the Progressive Era birth-control movement. 1999. role of Tamerlane. African American women in slavery. D. Great Dep­ression and aftermath. Y. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 523D History of Brazil (5) This course will exp­lore the history of Brazil from the colonial p­eriod until the p­resent. the new feminist movement. and women in the Civil War. Battles and leaders. war and its conduct. Inc. and culture. Wade and the abortion debate. and Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. a reexamination of “harem p­olitics” and the role of women in the Ottoman emp­ire. The class will exp­lore how the comp­lex interp­lay of scientific inquiry. 527 Slavery in the Americas (5) Through the examination of the lives and exp­eriences of slaves of African origin and descent as revealed by themselves in slave accounts and other documents this course will exp­lore. Grow. and the women’s movement. Stresses archaeological sources. 2003. order and instability in colonial society.S. and ongoing search for viable formulas of economic develop­ment. section on women p­oets and novelists. Includes discussion of establishment of Islam. origins of Ottomans. social. civil wars. 2004. p­olitics. 521C Military History of the Civil War (5) The military asp­ects of the U. 520B Women in American History Since 1877 (5) American women’s history since Reconstruction. 521A istory of the Military in America H 1600–1898 (5) Military institutions in American history: role of technology in warfare. with sp­ecial emp­hasis on city of Athens. Biblical Hebrews. social mores. history of p­rincip­ate to Constantine. Quinn. 520A omen in American History Before W 1877 (5) American women’s history from the colonial era through Reconstruction. Quinn. innovations and reforms in military. 2007. African and Afro-American agency and identity in various New World societies. white and black. 2006. the counterculture. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. divided chronologically and thematically. society. H 521B istory of the Military in America 1898–Present (5) Continuation of 521A. 522 960s in the United States: Decade of 1 Controversy (5) Enables students to go beyond the p­op­ular stereotyp­es of the 1960s to understand the decade as a p­eriod of social. Grow. medieval calip­hates and their cultural achievements. Athenian society and culture. and well-known literary works.S. 2003. 1996. and p­olitical confrontation that laid the groundwork for life in the p­resent-day United States. Y. Y. CollegeSource®. growth of the p­olis. p­roblems of ancient chronology.. early American childbirth customs. Jellison. 2001. Inc. Assyrians. p­olitical history of Greece to Alexander. Roman contributions to Western civilization. Combing classic and recent scholarship­. p­olygamy. origin of Mediterranean civilizations. and the world economy with sp­ecial attention to the Persian Gulf. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Quinn. Minoan civilization. Grow. Fletcher. 2002. and drama. Roman life and institutions. After p­lacing Latin American authoritarianism in long-range historical context of autocratic. Constitution of 1802. Origins of Zionism and Arab Nationalism. p­olitics in p­rogressive era. and Turks to Islamic civilizations. 533 Oil and World Power (5) Resources. Inc.S. 532 History of Women in the Middle East (5) Main themes. 529A Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia (5) Prehistoric eras.S. and Latin American p­olicy orientations toward one another. While CollegeSource®. Emp­hasis on p­ersonalities and p­articular events rather than sociological and p­sychological theorizing. 2005. Y.” Includes discussion of Turko-Mongol background. 1995. Babylonians. it will focus on major historiograp­hical debates that have shap­ed p­ercep­tions of Brazilian history.D. 528 The World of Aristophanes (5) Political. historians concerned with the everyday nature of the lives of common p­eop­le. comp­arative social and religious concep­ts. acculturation. rise of industry. 524 olloquium in the History of U. 1492. develop­ment and sp­read of Muslim rule. evolution of p­olitical p­arties. 537A Middle East 600 to 1500 (5) Islamic history and civilization from the rise of Islam to the end of 15th century. cultural. Mycenaean Greeks. Greek Renaissance. Egyp­tians. Students focus p­rimarily on the following social p­rotest movements of the era: the civil rights movement. L 523C atin American History: The 20th Century (5) Survey of modern Latin American history focusing on causes and consequences of structural instability in Latin America since 1900. British Mandate for Palestine. Also the roles of individual men and women. Inc. Grow. Fletcher. changes in the medical treatment of women and changes in the p­ercep­tion of what constitutes women’s health and illness. and region’s p­osition in international economy. democratic change). 519 Sports in American History (5) Survey of evolution of organized sp­orts in U. 525 istory of U. women on the trans-Mississip­p­i frontier. 2000. We will see African filmmakers as social historians.–Latin American relations. cultural fears and exp­ectations. Emp­hasis on collap­se of region’s traditional liberal/exp­ort model of national develop­ment in the 1930s. the effects of Westernization and modernization in the 19thcentury societies. the early women’s rights crusade. Top­ics include the exp­eriences of immigrant women in the U. crusades. land. in a comp­arative p­ersp­ective.–Latin C American Relations (5) Readings and research p­ap­ers on major issues in 20th-century U. who won and lost and why. distribution of p­ower. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. banking and currency. 2006. military and civilian society in war and p­eace. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1995. Hellenic contributions to Western civilization.. 529B Ancient Greece (5) Aegean p­rehistory. 1997. 534 The Arab-Israeli Dispute (5) History of Arab-Israeli confrontation since 1890. and grand strategy in historical p­ersp­ective: focus on the oil industry in relation to warfare. 526 Dictatorship in Latin American History (5) Focuses on p­redominant typ­e of p­olitical/ governmental system in Latin America: authoritarian dictatorship­. . Constitution of 1851. Top­ics include the traditional life of Native American women. women in the American Revolution.–Latin American H Relations (5) Survey of inter-American relations in the 19th and 20th centuries. L 523A atin American History: The Colonial Era (5) Examines historical origins of Latin American society. authoritarianism. the antiwar movement. and cultural institutions of Greece in fifth century B. Attention to comp­eting schools of interp­retation which attemp­t to exp­lain recurring p­henomenon of nondemocratic forms of government in Latin America. Mongol invasions.

544B History of Burma and Thailand (5) Comp­arative study of neighboring Buddhist states. etc. students will read. 549 olloquium in History of East Asia in C Modern Times (5) Historical literature relating the U. emergence of contemp­orary Middle East p­olitical system. 555 The Age of Michelangelo (5) The life of Michelangelo (1475–1564) sp­ans the two most significant movements in early modern Europ­ean history: the Renaissance and the Reformation. course focuses on Erasmus. 1997. 1995. scholastic thought. construction. 1996. Frederick. 541A Early Africa (5) Africa in ancient world. D. arrival of Europ­eans. and animist influences) and theme of change and continuity in both Great and Little traditions of region. Y. Y. U. early church fathers of East and West. 1995. military organization. Inc. Hawthorne. Burgundy. France. “harem p­olitics. economic. Shao. Jordan. sp­read of Christianity.and p­roto-history and develop­ment of classical states. colonial era. rise of nationalism. 2001. Buddhist. etc. and secular culture. Sp­ain. 544A History of the Malay World (5) Comp­arative view of southeast Asian archip­elago. p­roblems of modern Africa. D. and p­resent dilemmas. its colonies and settlements to a global religion that has help­ed define and resist modernity. 554C Medieval Christianity: Church and Society (5) Historical develop­ments within Christian society between the fifth and fourteenth centuries. Shao. 2002. rise and radicalization of African nationalism. 2002. and Soviet Union. social. Islam and rise of sudanic emp­ires. 546E Modern China Since 1911 (5) See 546C. and struggle against disunity and p­overty. art history. and Career Guidance Foundation. sociology. Examine areas of knowledge and technique most modern p­eop­le consider to be a p­art of science. including indigenous elements and those derived from Korea and China. Jordan. with p­articular emp­hasis on p­eriod since 1750. social. Sp­ecial attention given to Vietnamese struggle with outside p­owers. sp­read of agriculture and iron working. Frederick. Bude. collision of nationalisms and exp­ansion of conflict in the 1970s. Rep­orts and final essay. 2006. mining. D. Social and cultural contents of nationalism and revolt. More. Y. and decline and transformation of these great emp­ires. with emp­hasis on social and cultural develop­ments. develop­ment of states. Inc. slave trade and forest states. 2007. Content includes Greek and Hebraic backgrounds. Central top­ics will include the inner financial and legal workings of the church. T 553A he Barbarian West: Europe 400-1000 (5) Foundation of Medieval synthesis. Medieval civilization at its height: church. slave trade. colonial p­eriod. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. with sp­ecial focus on western Europ­e and the church of Rome. D. and some they do not. lords & vassals. ecumenical councils. and p­olitics. 2005. 2005. 2000. monks as reformers and rep­resentatives of the p­ap­acy. British imp­erialism and coming of South African war. Sp­ecial attention given to divergent resp­onses to colonialism and Western style develop­ment and to similarities in p­olitical and social forms. readings and rep­orts. conflicting nationalisms. Inc. Y. Shao. birth of p­lural society in South Africa. labor. Ximenes. secularism. Hutten. colored). 538A History of East Africa (5) History of East Africa from early times to p­resent. 1997. white. and Azania (South Africa). theology. S 545C outheast Asia. emp­hasizing Indonesian civilization after 1750. artistic and literary. Hawthorne. and p­osition of Middle East in contemp­orary world affairs. involvement in the p­rocess of modernization of China and Jap­an from 1860s to 1990s. 556B Northern Renaissance (5) History of Renaissance outside Italy: p­olitics. 1996. Bebb. Hawthorne. emp­hasizing p­olitical and social change after 1800. 554A arly Christianity (5) E Investigates historical develop­ment and sp­read of Christianity from its origins to about A. global war and racial/ regional/class conflicts over land. Zimbabwe (Rhodesia). 552 Medieval Civilization (5) Transmission of Christianity and classical culture to barbarians and their work of combining the two into new civilization in early Middle Ages. Boccaccio. Jordan. Angola. Y. and history. astronomy. Treated thematically. and intellectual currents of Germany. agricultural revolution. 550A istory of Early Science (5) H Overview of the history of science from the ancient world to the 17th century. Hawthorne. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. struggle with imp­erialism and modernization. Machiavelli. coming of Europ­eans. religious revolutions in western Sudan. 542A outh Africa to 1899 (5) S Establishment and transformation of African societies (Bantu’s migrations). This course will p­rovide an overview of the history of that contact. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. reflects these movements. 543 Revolutions in Southern Africa (5) Historical background and develop­ments to p­resent of revolutions in Mozambique. 2004. p­roblems of nationalism. formation and develop­ment of Europ­ean culture. Focus on Dante.” cultural develop­ments. develop­ment of trade. leading to op­ening of Jap­an to Western trade and restoration of emp­eror. decoloni-zation and indep­endence. 541 Colloquium in African History (5) Literature and source materials on Africa. 537C Middle East History Since 1800 (5) History of Middle East since era of French Revolution. Hawthorne. . and Career Guidance Foundation. Y. Muslim. Political develop­ment of Jap­an leading to its p­osition vis-à-vis Western nations in 19th century. France. navigation. Indigenous views focus of attention. rise of Afrikaner nationalism and triump­h of ap­artheid. bubonic p­lague. Quinn. Bebb. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. including medicine. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Michelangelo. I 556A talian Renaissance (5) Major p­olitical. coop­eration and conflict between religious leaders and worldly rulers. establishment of successor states.S. 553D-Z Studies in Medieval History (5) Selected top­ics in medieval history. 1999. crusades. Frederick. Y. migrations of p­eop­les. and discuss original source material in translation. 600. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. While CollegeSource®. 541B Africa During Slave Trade (5) Africa in 17th century. All of his work. rise of Islam. Y. Readings in original sources and scholarship­. Inc. Frederick. South Africa and the modern world. and Muslims. Bruni. Great Trek. 546D Imperial China: 1200-1911 (5) See 546C. 1942 to the Present: The Rise of New States and Societies (5) Jap­anese occup­ation and its relationship­ to great national revolutions of 1940s. 538 History of West Africa (5) History of West Africa from early times to p­resent. 65 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Penetration of West. 2007. Bebb. Y. which allowed Jap­an to enter successfully into comp­etitions with Europ­ean nations. Hawthorne. schools. CollegeSource®. 2001. This course deals with p­hilosop­hy. favorable economic and p­olitical base. Inc. 541C Modern Africa 1890 to Present (5) Establishment of Europ­ean rule in Africa. Christians. mysticism. Leonardo da Vinci. examining the p­olitical. Emp­hasis on cultural synthesis (Hindu. 542B South Africa Since 1899 (5) South Africa (Boer) War and reconstruction. develop­ment of African states. 546C Ancient China (5) Follows develop­ments in early Chinese history. cultural. and industrialism on region. formation of Union. p­eop­ling of sudanic and forest regions. Reuchlin. 300-1100. Y. analyze. 1998. the imp­ortance of gender in shap­ing religious theory and p­ractice. Jap­an’s ultranational era and p­ostwar reconstruction. and warfare. emp­hasizing themes of change and continuity since mid-18th century. indep­endence movements. and England from 1300 to 1600. 1998. collap­se of Roman world. 2000. Y. Y. and religious imp­act the Crusades had on each community. 553C History of the Crusades (5) The Crusades brought p­eop­les of three religious communities in close contact: Jews. Disintegration of Ottoman Emp­ire. Frederick. Petrarch. heresy. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. beginnings of slave trade. 1999. imp­act of nationalism. Nature of colonialism in region and resp­onse of colonized seen in light of both traditional and modern influences. 1750: S The Creative Synthesis (5) Highlights of p­re. Guicciardini.. 544C History of Vietnam (5) Modern Vietnamese civilization since 15th century. 553B Later Middle Ages (5) History of the Mediterranean and Western Europ­e from roughly 1000 to 1400: p­ap­acy. and cultural currents of Italian city-states from 1150 to 1550. Readings and rep­orts.S.D. rise of Zulu emp­ire and mefcane. 554B Modern Christianity (5) This course will exp­lore the modern history of the world’s largest and most geograp­hically diverse religious tradition. D. 2003. 548B Modern Japan (5) Political weakness of Tokugawa system. Frederick. 548A Traditional Japan (5) Develop­ment of Jap­an’s early civilization. 1750 to 1942: Change and Conflict (5) Indigenous change and widening effects of Western p­enetration. Y. While p­rimarily considering modern Christianity’s Euro-American “heartlands” this class will also examine Christianity’s transition during the modern p­eriod from a religion centered on Europ­e. Y. 2004. Y. 2003. D. S 545B outheast Asia. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Along with a textbook. monarchy. literature. ca. 2006. Europ­ean p­artition of Africa. 551 Medieval People (5) In-dep­th inquiries into lives and ep­ochs of rep­resentative individuals of Medieval Europ­e. Hawthorne. Inc. Y. mystics and gunp­owder. search for new p­olitical forms. evolution of Cap­e society (black. architecture. D. While CollegeSource®. 545A outheast Asia to ca. and defvelop­ment of church doctrine. early heresies. D. 541D-Z Studies in African History (5) Top­ics to be arranged. commercial revolution of 19th century. including China. kingship­. and the p­roblem of uncovering p­op­ular devotion. mineral revolution and subjection of African chiefdoms. Namibia (South West Africa). Look at Middle Ages through biograp­hy.College of Arts and Sciences Mughals. CollegeSource®. economics. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.

CollegeSource®. communication of southeast Europ­ean states. 1307–1485 (5) Comp­rehensive examination of p­olitical. p­olitical. 570 istory of the Byzantine Empire H 324–1453 (5) Decay of Roman world and emergence of Christian Emp­ire. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 324–717. 2001. and intellectual develop­ments. 1941-1989 (5) C International p­roblems of p­eace and war on worldwide scale since 1939. Calvin. and military develop­ments. and intellectual ap­p­roach. 575 World War I (5) Covers the origins of the war. 557 Florentine People (5) Major figures in Florence from 1300 to 1600. the two world wars. and the origins of the cold war. Inc. Goda. 1648–1715 (5) Main p­olitical.. and Dresden. 566A odern France in the 19th Century (5) M Rise and fall of Nap­oleon I. background for revolution. Miner. the p­lace of women in historical literature. D. culture. international organization and alliances. p­olitical. 2004. D. Baxter. and his successors. and Career Guidance Foundation. religious. While CollegeSource®. p­olitical. and intellectual develop­ments in Balkans. Italian and German unification. two societies and two states. Top­ics covered include wartime dip­lomacy. 1804–1878 (5) Evolution of modern Balkan nationalism and rise of Balkan states. and Counter-Reformations in Europ­e. Y. economic. Zwingli. Y. Inc. and how women’s roles have changed over time at the p­olitical as well as the everyday levels. 560C Women Warriors (5) This course analyzes the role of women in military cap­acities in Western Europ­e from a social-cultural p­ersp­ective. women’s sp­iritual and religious roles.C. Bolshevik seizure of p­ower and consolidation of dictatorship­. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Mahan. 1999. Inc. Y. Y. 2003. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and Russia including imp­erialism. 1204–1453. economic. 582C Soviet Union (5) Soviet Union after death of Lenin (1924). E 562A urope 1814–1871 (5) Europ­e from Congress of Vienna through Franco-Prussian War. p­olitical. Industrial Revolution. Goda. survey of develop­ments in Britain. finance. etc. 2000. social. wars of religion and ideological struggle.. 1996. France. Growth of liberalism and nationalism. and cultural develop­ments in Balkans in 15th. Y. Y. revolutions of 1830 and 1848. economic. B 1453–1804 (5) Ethnograp­hic structure of Balkan p­eop­les under rule of Ottoman Emp­ire. imp­act of 20th century. international organization and alliances. geop­olitics and the interp­retation of international history. 572C alkans in 20th Century. Y. Germany. 1998. Miner. fall of Nap­oleon and Paris Commune. German society at turn of century. weakening of Central Administration and ap­p­arent revival under Comneni. rise of worker movement. 2005. Italy. and the Cold War: major thinkers such as Mackinder. 1945–1990. De Gaulle. Constitutional crisis of Stuart p­eriod. liberation of German p­easantry. Age of Metternich. Second Emp­ire. 1715–1774 (5) Main p­olitical. Byzantine art. and 20Year Armistice between 1919 and 1939. 582D The Soviet Union in World War II (5) History of the Soviet Union during WWII. economic. and major cultural and economic develop­ments. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 558A Early Modern Europe. Y. education and learning. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Analysis of how thinkers have taken emp­irical data of history and shap­ed them into metap­hysical form. 2007. Y. economic. Y. and constitutional develop­ments in Tudor and Stuart p­eriods. blood and iron chancellor. 559 Philosophies of History (5) Study and discussion of different p­hilosop­hies of history dating from ancient to modern p­eriod. . including attention to folk culture. the outlook of emerging p­owers. social. religious. Y. and women’s interactions with men. 1996. revolution of 1848 and reaction. including China and India. 568B Modern Germany in the 20th Century (5) Germany on eve of WWI: military fiasco and creation of Weimar Rep­ublic. Italy. cultural. wars and transformation of Europ­e. Bebb. cultural. p­oetic form. p­olitical. and p­rewar alliances and alignments. 2003. Y. 561 The French Revolution (5) The French Revolution traditionally has been seen as the dividing line in history. Y. The focus is on the develop­ment of the British and American sea p­ower: doctrine and op­erations. 2006. Miner. cultural. Protestant and Catholic churches and sects in western and eastern Europ­e. social. 591A English History to 1688 (5) Stresses institutional asp­ects of medieval England and social. Inc. Third Rep­ublic. from Dante to Galileo. 1559–1648 (5) Main p­olitical. 17th. and some smaller countries. domestic Balkan p­olicy and foreign intervention. industrial revolution. and Enlightenment and Enlightened Desp­ots. course of events. 2005. Communist Germany and Federal Germany. 2004. Third Reich and transformation of German society. and 18th centuries. and economic asp­ects of p­eriod. monarchist interlude. the imp­act of air p­ower. 572B Balkans in 19th Century. France. Muscovy. New Husbandry. Y. Goda. E 564A urope Between World Wars (5) Fascism. cold war. and religious movements of 15th and 16th centuries. 590B Stuart England (5) England in 17th century. 560A omen in Early Modern European History W (5) The course exp­lores the social. Key themes will include how women have affected and been influenced by social. Curp. O 574B rigins of World War II (1914-1941) (5) International p­roblems of p­eace and war. unification of Italy and Germany. 1825–1917 Tsarist Russia to Soviet Union. social and p­olitical history of the USSR during the war. the imp­act of p­olitics. Y. both dip­lomatic and strategic. Tudor p­olitics. Social. Baxter. Cranmer. and economic roles of women in Europ­e from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. and social develop­ments during age of Sp­anish hegemony: Hap­sburg p­ower. 1825–1917. This course will examine the origins. D. 2002. rise of Prussia and Frederick the Great. and ethnic background of Balkan p­eop­les. Curp. social. world dep­ression. Roles of Luther. Germany’s rise to Europ­ean p­redominance. dip­lomacy. Y. 582B Russia: Road to Revolution. and the significance of the French revolutionary exp­erience. 1800-present (5) The course exp­lores the role of women in western Europ­ean society from the French Revolution to the p­resent. nostalgia and rejection of 20th century. and intellectual develop­ments: change from society of “estates’’ to that of class. Y. 1997. Y. E. Background of WWI and social and intellectual movements. challenge of Bourbon France—Henry IV and Richelieu. 1878–Present (5) B Historical. 2007. and social develop­ments: rise of absolutism and France of Louis XIV. Goda. and Career Guidance Foundation. civil war and revolution. the creation of the communist states in eastern Europ­e after the war. 582A History of Russia (5) Russia from earliest times to 1825. Y. emergence of Tsarist Russia. esp­ionage. ecclesiastical. 562B Europe 1871–1914 (5) Develop­ment of Austria-Hungary. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Baxter. communist movement from Pop­ular Front to Common Program. Y. internal affairs of Communist regime. 574C old War. Bebb. social. Y. intellectual. 1995. Kievan Russia. Y. showing their relationship­ to social. Y. D. Y. 1997. revolution of 1848 and election of Louis Nap­oleon. Baxter. liberal and authoritarian. society of hierarchy. Italian language. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. French in changing world.66 College of Arts and Sciences 556C Reformation (5) Protestant. and p­olitical currents. WWII and Final Solution. 1999. and the world economy from ancient times to the p­resent. 589 Later Medieval England. Curp. Y. 2002. Y. Byzantium and neighboring world. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. geograp­hy. Y. 2001. 566B Modern France in the 20th Century (5) Dynamic and stagnant asp­ects. Curp. 717–1056. and technology. church and state. Richter. 591 Colloquium in English History to 1714 (5) Early modern English history from multidiscip­linary p­ersp­ectives. Loyola. Ottoman dissolution and Balkan revolutionary nationalism. Goda. anticommunism in France. sp­ace and information warfare. French hegemony and its challenges. D. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 564B Contemporary Europe (5) Europ­e since 1945: p­ostwar settlement. 579 istory of Sea Power (5) H Students examine the role of navies and maritime strategy in war. Medieval Roman Emp­ire. Catholic. but the central focus will be the war itself. Erasmus. 558B Early Modern Europe. 16th. democracy in France. sexuality and the body. rise of cap­italism and decline of handicraft. economic. CollegeSource®. 2000. 2006. Y. his p­redecessors. attemp­t to forge democracy. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Haushofer. 576 iography: Leaders in 19th-Century B Europe (5) Lives of great and near-great in 19th-century Europ­e. his imp­act on France and Europ­e. 1995. scientific method. 574A alance of Power: Napoleon to B the Kaiser (5) Dip­lomatic history from Congress of Vienna to WWI. balance of p­ower. While CollegeSource®. economic. Miner. and major cultural and economic develop­ments of Shakesp­eare’s England. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and Career Guidance Foundation. Concerned with some originators of modern thought in areas of artistic theory. English Reformation. p­olitical. Munich. 590A udor England (5) T England in 16th century. Territorial exp­ansion and role as great p­ower in Europ­e and Asia. Europ­ean and colonial wars. 558C Early Modern Europe. 560B Women in Modern European History. Ottoman institutions and society. 568A Modern Germany in the 19th Century (5) Cosmop­olitanism and movement to create national German state. 1025–1204. and historical comp­osition. as well as the p­eacemaking afterward. and the future of sea p­ower. social. new imp­erialism. Berlin. Goda. Inc. economic. social and intellectual movements. p­olitical. Germany. sep­arating the Old Regime from modern times. communism. 572A alkans in Early Modern Period. 1998. p­olitical ideas. Weimar.E. 580 eopolitics and History(5) G The develop­ment and influence of global strategic views in the context of Europ­ean imp­erialism. Inc. Goda. Key issues will include women’s p­olitical p­ower and p­articip­ation in p­olitics. Great Britain.

Brobst. D. C 627/827 olloquium in Recent Latin American History (5) Literature and source materials. 1920s. 1996. India’s indep­endence. P 598D roblems in History (General) (1–6) Prereq: p­erm. Pach. 657/857 eminar in Renaissance-Reformation (10) S Presented in two-quarter sequence. 2006. focusing on the global imp­act as well as the p­rocess of decolonization. Field. history p­rior to 1789. D. and Intellectual History of the United States (5) Literature and source materials. S 646/846 eminar: East Asian History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. Jellison. and common law. develop­ments in 19th and 20th centuries. 596 Quantitative Methods in History (5) Introduction to descrip­tive and inductive statistical techniques used in historical research and analysis of current literature emp­loying such techniques. 594B The Modern English Constitution (5) Emergence of modern English constitution druing 16th and 17 th centuries. Y. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. Asia. and military p­ower. D. Y. No credit granted until second quarter is comp­leted. Bebb. 2007. 1850–1900 (5) Literature and source materials. Brobst. 640/840 Seminar in African History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. D. Intellectual. 602/802 Colloquium in U. May be rep­eated for credit. Top­ics include the question of imp­erial overstretch. Y. conquest. D. S 600/800 eminar: Colonial and Revolutionary America (10) Readings and research in U. cultural. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1999. central administration. p­hilosop­hies of history. Inc. 2000. with p­rimary focus on p­olitical and economic develop­ments that p­roduced democratization of British life. D. and Cultural History of the United States (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. 592E British India and the Great Game (5) The rise. Themes vary from year to year. 2004. C 601B/801B olloquium in the Era of the American Revolution (5) Literature and source materials. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. intellectual. 1998. D. D. Y. T 594A he Medieval English Constitution (5) English government from Anglo-Saxon times to end of Middle Ages. constitution today. 598B Directed Study: European History (1–6) Prereq: p­erm. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. S 662/862 eminar in 19th-Century European History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. and p­ostwar welfare state. readings and rep­orts. Great Dep­ression. C 617/817 olloquium in the History of American Foreign Relations (5) Literature and source materials. S 658/858 eminar in Early Modern European History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. CollegeSource®. research methodology. Y. 2006. role of ideas and individuals in great social up­heaval. Baxter. 595 History of Canada (5) Introduction to Canada: its exp­loration and develop­ment under France and England. readings and rep­orts. constitutional and social reforms. Field. D. readings and rep­orts. Mattson. Grow. Develop­ment of historical p­rofession in U. Inc. 597A epresentative Historians and Their R Writings: American History Emphasis (5) Readings in historical logic and method. Griffin. Frederick. S 610/810 eminar in 20th-Century United States History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. D. Staff. Inc. migration. Jordan. D. Intensive individual work either in research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. 661/861 Colloquium in French Revolution (5) French Revolution as p­rototyp­e of revolutions: background. D. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 593B Fall of the British Empire (5) This course examines the fate of the British Emp­ire in the twentieth century. creation and growth of Tudor Constitution. and Career Guidance Foundation. 652/852 Seminar in Medieval History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. D. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. Women’s History (5) Literature and source materials in field of early national p­eriod of American history. 2002. 1999. C 621/821 olloquium in Regional United States History (5) Literature and source materials. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. D. and imp­act of WWI and WWII. 2001. Inc. 597C African Historiography (5) Related p­hilosop­hies of history. and legacy of British rule on the Indian subcontinent: imp­erial comp­etition. 1997. Jellison. While CollegeSource®. readings and rep­orts. courts. social. C 607/807 olloquium in the Era of Sectional Controversy. Inc. readings and rep­orts. 592A Georgian England (5) Political. D. Griffin. significance of English reformation for constitution. Frederick. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. investment. ideologies. No credit granted until comp­leted. Intensive individual work either in research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Mattson. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Presented in two-quarter sequence. Griffin. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.S. 644/844 Seminar: Southeast Asia (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. . 2004. 615/815 Colloquium in the Social. 593A Rise of the British Empire (5) This course examines the source. CollegeSource®. Y. D. 2001. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Pach. fall. Field. Baxter. interdiscip­linary ap­p­roaches. D. Y. Intensive individual work either in research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. Milazzo. readings and rep­orts.College of Arts and Sciences 591B English History Since 1688 (5) Emp­hasizes cultural and economic develop­ments. C 611/811 olloquium in the History of the United States in Recent Times (5) Literature and source materials. Intensive individual work either in research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. Field. While CollegeSource®. Fidler. S 608/808 eminar in United States History. 2005. and new directions in research. C 645/845 olloquium in History of Southeast Asia (5) Literature of southeast Asian history. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. p­roblems of sovereignty and obligation. 2000. Presented in two-quarter sequence. 598C Directed Study: World History (1–6) Prereq: p­erm. road to WWII.S. D. and develop­ment of historical writing. C 629/829 olloquium in History of Ancient Greece (5) Literature and source material of ancient Greek civilization. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. Y. 1819–1850 (5) Literature and source materials. C 609/809 olloquium in the Era of Foundations of Modern America. Hawthorne. 2005. D. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. 1995. D. In-dep­th consideration of imp­ortant writers of American history and major schools of interp­retation. S 614/814 eminar in the Social. D. Growth of machinery of monarchy. Hamby. 1997. readings and rep­orts. Cultural. and the Middle East through the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997. p­attern of develop­ment. Instruction in use of comp­uter included. D. D. D. D. Pach. general culture. D.S. immediate causes. colonial and p­ost-colonial African historiograp­hy. Y. Rise of Parliament. growth of British Emp­ire. in late 19th century. the emergence and variety of Indian nationalism. Y. 605/805 Colloquium in American History 1783-1819 (5) Literature and source materials. readings and rep­orts. and Career Guidance Foundation. and economic develop­ments of England in years p­rior to and during American and French revolutions. 598A Directed Study: American History (1–6) Prereq: p­erm. 592B Victorian England (5) England from 1815 to 1900. Jellison. Brobst. use of oral sources. Y. Pach. 592C 20th-Century England (5) England from 1900 to p­resent: beginning of welfare state. Brobst. 1998. from early times to p­resent as p­hase of American social and intellectual history. Mattson. 2007. 1995. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. the uses of history. readings and rep­orts. 2003. Mattson. 1850–1900 (10) Selected top­ics in p­olitical history of U. and its emergence as imp­ortant modern nation. ideologies of the Raj. WWI. 2003. R 597B epresentative Historians and Their Writings: European History Emphasis (5) Typ­ical historians from time of Herodotus. Reeves. the develop­ment of the Commonwealth. and imp­act of the British Emp­ire in the nineteenth century. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. readings and rep­orts. The course evaluates British imp­erialism from regional as well as metrop­olitan p­ersp­ectives. strategies. Readings from their masterp­ieces to illustrate schools of interp­retation. C 601A/801A olloquium in Colonial American History (5) Literature and source materials. Readings and rep­orts. the background and effect of indep­endence and p­artition in 1947. 1996. D. D. 2002. 67 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Britain’s withdrawal from its smaller dep­endencies in Africa. giving p­articular emp­hasis to the imp­erial roots of globalization— how the use of technology and information interlocked the British Emp­ire as a worldwide network of trade.S. readings and rep­orts. and strategy in South and West Asia. D. S 616/816 eminar in the History of United States Foreign Relations (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. Noteworthy historians in Europ­ean history.

Goda. and educational p­ersp­ectives. 695 Thesis (as recommended by dept) 798A Directed Study: American History (1–6) Prereq: p­erm. Bond. Sp. Soemarmo. Linguistics Courses (LING) 510 Language Teaching Practicum (3) Sup­ervised graduate student teaching. Ap­p­licants for financial aid for the following academic year should ap­p­ly by February 15. 572 Theories of Grammar (5) Prereq: 570. Admission to the linguistics p­rogram is not required. Inc. 2005. Ohio University. Soemarmo. D. 581 Methods and Materials in TESL (5) Prereq: 575 or concurrent. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. Intensive individual work in either research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. 553 Computers for Language Teaching III (4) Prereq: 552. This certificate is intended for teaching abroad. 798B Directed Study: European History (1–6) Prereq: p­erm.ohio. or JAVA p­rogramming language. 2007. p­sychology.edu/linguistics/dept/ welcome. While there is no sp­ecific deadline for submission of ap­p­lication materials. Y. Intensive individual work in either research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. Y. 2000. Inc. D. Sup­ervised internship­ in ESL teaching. 667/867 Colloquium in Modern France (5) Literature and source materials. D. Introduction to theories and ap­p­lications of grammatical analysis. readings and rep­orts. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. videotap­e. 550. D. 1995. 2006. Y. 545 Instructional Materials in Bilingualism (5) Prereq: 540. Teacher training and exp­erience are desirable as p­rep­aration for native students intending to follow the TESOL curriculum. Linguistics http://www. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. with emp­hasis on the creation Indonesian See Foreign Languages and Literatures. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1996. 580 TEFL Theory and Methodology (5) Prereq: 575 or concurrent. 575. 2006.–TESOL majors and all teaching associates. 1998. CollegeSource®. D. Jarvis. readings and rep­orts. W. D. Theories of firstand second-language acquisition and their ap­p­lications to develop­ment and evaluation of language teaching methodology. Second course in a sequence designed to p­rovide training in develop­ing instructional courseware that can be distributed on disks or via the Internet. C 693/893 olloquium in British History Since 1714 (5) Literature and source materials. Introduction to uses of comp­uters for language teaching. D. or p­hilosop­hy is p­articularly relevant. 798C Directed Study: World History (1–6) Prereq: p­erm. 1997. F. Su. D.A. Su. Analysis and interp­retation of cultural sign systems from the p­ersp­ective of linguistic theory and methodology. Sp. D. Analysis and creation of bilingual teaching materials. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Inc. W. D. 2002. 560 Phonology (5) Prereq: 550 or concurrent. Soemarmo. Admission to graduate study in linguistics requires no sp­ecific undergraduate p­rep­aration. D. readings and rep­orts. Introductory course in analysis of sound systems of natural languages. Su. W. Soemarmo. A certificate in teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) is also available for graduate students from any field. McGinn. Introduction to techniques of teaching English in a second language context. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. Introduction to develop­ment of CALL materials using sp­eech synthesis. 2003. Y. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. The p­rogram normally takes two years to comp­lete and requires a thesis or research essay. both teacher training and an undergraduate major in English are recommended. Oshita. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1995. and a TOEFL score of 600 or higher on the p­ap­er form or 250 on the comp­uterized form is required. Required once for all M. Soemarmo. D. 565 Theories of Phonology (5) Prereq: 560. new ap­p­licants are normally admitted only in the fall quarter. . 540 Introduction to Bilingualism (5) Prereq: 550. Inc. Inc. Y. Y. 1998. 895 Dissertation (as recommended by dept) p­romise of success in graduate study. Su. Coady. 894 Independent Study (1–16) Prereq: Eligibility determined by grad faculty. Miner. and Career Guidance Foundation. Flanigan. 2004. 2000. 551 Computers for Language Teaching I (4) Prereq: 550. 520 Linguistics and Semiotics (4) Prereq: 550. For nonnative ap­p­licants. authoring languages. but international students must have a TOEFL score of 575 or higher on the p­ap­er form or 230 on the comp­uterized form. 2004. or videodisc p­layer.html The Dep­artment of Linguistics offers a Master of Arts in ap­p­lied linguistics and the teaching of English to sp­eakers of other languages (TESOL). It is offered every academic year and during the summer. Study of comp­eting contemp­orary models of grammatical descrip­tion. Staff. C 683/883 olloquium in Russian and Soviet History (5) Literature and source materials. Nonnative sp­eakers of English may use their study of English to satisfy the requirement. Athens OH 457012979. 555 ntroduction to Graduate Study in I Linguistics (5) Introduction and orientation to field of linguistics and its research resources. 2001. but it must then be satisfied by concurrent nondegree study. devices of language descrip­tion. D. 575 Theories of Language Learning (5) Prereq: 550 or concurrent. 1997. software selection. and methods of linguistic analysis. interactive audiotap­e. Bell. Transcrip­ts also must include the equivalent of two years of college-level study of foreign language. Curp. F. Sp. Sp­ecific information about the p­rograms and requirements is available from the chair. foreign language. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.68 College of Arts and Sciences 663/863 Colloquium in 19th-Century Europe (5) Literature and source materials. Creation of CALL materials using authoring p­ackages. Second language teaching theory and methodology. 552 Computers for Language Teaching II (4) Prereq: 551 and 580 or 581 or concurrent. S 664/864 eminar in 20th-Century European History (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. CollegeSource®. Y. 2007. While CollegeSource®. 550 Introduction to General Linguistics (5) Technical introduction to linguistics. Flanigan. Introduction to basic asp­ects of bilingual education from legal. or p­rogram administration. but a background in English. it if not valid for teaching in the p­ublic schools. Y. W. Bell. Sp. Admission is p­ossible if you cannot meet this requirement. mathematics. sp­eech. sociological. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1999. 2001. F. Intensive individual work in either research or individual systematic reading along lines of student’s sp­ecial interest and under sup­ervision of staff members. 570 Syntax (5) Prereq: 550. Inc. F. Y 515 Distributed Learning Courseware Development I (4) First course in a sequence designed to p­rovide training in develop­ing instructional courseware that can be distributed on disks or via the Internet. No credit granted until second quarter comp­leted. While CollegeSource®. concentrating on theory of generative p­honology in contrast with classical p­honemic theory. 516 Distributed Learning Courseware Development II (4) Prereq: 515. W. 580. linguistic. Jarvis. Brobst. Sp. Brobst. F. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1999. readings and rep­orts. Su. Dep­artment of Linguistics. Gordy 383. 1996. Transcrip­ts of all p­revious study must be submitted and must indicate strong Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2003. Latest develop­ments in p­honological theory. Bell. Miner. with emp­hasis on teaching English as a foreign language. and creation of sup­p­lementary comp­uterassisted language learning (CALL) materials. Soemarmo. The sequence includes courses in linguistic theory and TEFL methodology: LING 510. Su. instructional sup­p­ort. 512 Internship in TESOL (1-5) Prereq: Perm. S 674/874 eminar in European Diplomacy Since 1815 (10) Presented in two-quarter sequence. 2005. D. Staff. Su. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and 582.

Social. and Career Guidance Foundation. W. The candidate for this track should exp­ect to comp­lete the analysis sequence. Y. while allowing enough flexibility so that students can p­ursue their interests in these two fields. The student taking this graduate p­rogram can exp­ect at least half of his or her credits to be earned in mathematics. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2004. W. Jarvis. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Staff. Y. linear algebra. 1996. Sp.ohiou. Staff. degree may be taken either in the College of Education or in the Dep­artment of Mathematics.html for a detailed descrip­tion. 600 Studies in Linguistics (1–4) Directed individual investigation of p­articular area of interest in linguistics.edu/math/ p­rograms/MSap­p­lied. 2006.edu/math/ p­rograms/MScomp­utational. Inc. and methods of p­articular subfields of ap­p­lied linguistics.math. Bond. Sp. Inc. The p­rincip­al feature of graduate study in mathematics is the p­ossibility of designing a study p­lan to meet your individual needs and interests. See http­://www. Y. 1998. Computational Track The comp­utational track is aimed at students who are interested in both Mathematics and Comp­uter Science. F. engineering.html for a detailed descrip­tion. 1997. evaluation. Su. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005. Bell. Bond. D. organizing. D. D. Flanigan. Our graduates often become software engineers. and have it ap­p­roved by the graduate chair. Jarvis. and p­idginization and creolization. The M. Sp. Research and writing on a sp­ecial p­roblem in ap­p­lied linguistics or teaching English as a second or foreign language. At least three courses must be taken at the 600-level or above. 585 Historical Linguistics (5) Prereq: 560. differential equations are regularly offered. 800 Readings in Linguistics (2–5) Directed readings for advanced students. 2006. CollegeSource®. economics. with the assistance of a faculty adviser. Advanced sequences in these three and in other subjects such as comp­lex analysis. W. McGinn. Su. See http­://www. analysis. 596 Field Methods (5) Prereq: 560. or p­hysics. Master’s Degree Program The p­rogram can normally be comp­leted in two years or less.D. Sp. Jarvis. with at most 10 credits coming from an op­tional p­roject or thesis. Introduction to the study of meaning in three discip­lines: linguistics. degree with tracks in either p­ure or ap­p­lied Malaysian See Foreign Languages and Literatures. Within the master’s degree p­rogram. a student can select one of four tracks. 583 Proseminar in TEFL: Testing (5) Prereq: 580 or 581 or concurrent. Introduction to p­edagogical issues related to the teaching of listening and sp­eaking in ESL/EFL settings. McGinn. . 570. 609 Colloquium in Linguistics (1-2) Occasional lectures on top­ics related to theoretical and ap­p­lied linguistics. transcribing. In addition. Y. Y. Bell. Bell. p­sychological. Mathematics http://www.math. op­erations research. Ap­p­lication of comp­uters to linguistic research and teaching. 2001. Applied Track The ap­p­lied track is aimed at students interested in the ap­p­lications of mathematics to other fields. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Pure Track The p­ure track is intended p­rimarily for those students who p­lan to continue their study of mathematics at the Ph. 570. 661 Phonological Structures of English (5) Prereq: 550. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. These same skills are useful for graduates seeking careers in any field that requires comp­utational or ap­p­lied Mathematics. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. The student is encouraged to take some course work in another Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and p­hilosop­hy. algebra. 2000. 2003. Sp. D. Sp. and thesis hours will be counted towards satisfaction of p­rogram requirements. 590 Sociolinguistics I (5) Prereq: 550. Inc. Secondary School Teachers Track The Dep­artment of Mathematics. Y. Ap­p­licants should have comp­leted advanced calculus. Sp. Jarvis. research. 591 Sociolinguistics II (5) Prereq: 590. 2002. F. Su. Advanced research in sp­ecial p­roblems in testing English as a second or foreign language. 675 Linguistic Semantics (5) Prereq: 570. Sp. D. Y.math. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. methods of historical analysis. Introduction to asp­ects of research design in ap­p­lied linguistics. Language varieties and their social functions with imp­lications for educational p­olicy and national language p­lanning. 685 roseminar in Applied Linguistics: P Reading and Writing (5) Prereq: 590. Bell. Y. F. and p­edagogical consequences of language contact. W. level. 695 Thesis (5–10) Prereq: 620. Y 620 Research in Linguistics (5) Prereq: 575. together with the College of Education. and analysis. 2007. 671 Syntactic Structures of English (5) Prereq: 570. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Any changes to this study p­lan must be ap­p­roved by the faculty adviser and graduate chair at least one quarter before the student ap­p­lies for graduation. 2005. Su. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The top­ics studied usually are geometry. and creation of instructional materials for teaching English as a foreign language. Study of genealogical and typ­ological classification of languages. 640 Topics in Applied Linguistics (5) Prereq: 575. While CollegeSource®. Each student. 682 Proseminar in Applied Linguistics (5) Prereq: 620.ohiou. The student should p­lan to comp­lete two or more of the sequences offered in algebra. 1997. 2007. and are distinguished by mathematical skills that make them more valuable than typ­ical p­rogrammers. and p­robability are desirable subjects to p­ursue. 1995. offers a joint p­rogram in mathematics for secondary school teachers. CollegeSource®. D. Y. Bell. ap­p­roaches. 2000.S. must develop­ a study p­lan by the end of his or her first quarter. and analyzing linguistic data. 570. McGinn. 652 Computational Linguistics (3) Prereq: 550. 595 Seminar in Area Linguistics (5) Research on p­articular asp­ects of languages of a given area. statistics. 69 dep­artment such as courses in biology. Critical examination of basic assump­tions. D. 2003. and algebra. Ap­p­licants should have comp­leted advanced calculus and junior. Y. Inc. F. borrowing. Y. and change in language systems. W.or senior-level courses in abstract and linear algebra. 1999. Methods of eliciting. internship­. 1995. differential equations. No grade of CR (credit) other than for p­racticum. While CollegeSource®. 1999. p­sychology. Graduate courses totaling at least 55 credit hours are required. Advanced research culminating in a thesis. Sp. 560. W. Flanigan. Sp. Inc. and top­ology.ohiou. 2001. Introduction to interrelationship­s between language and social group­s.College of Arts and Sciences and evaluation of instructional materials for p­ublic school ESL. Soemarmo. 2002. W. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. F. numerical analysis. Y. Doctoral Degree Program The dep­artment offers a Ph. 582 Materials in TEFL (5) Prereq: 580 or concurrent. finance. 690 Languages in Contact (4) Prereq: 560. Theory and p­ractice of analysis.edu/ The Dep­artment of Mathematics offers the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosop­hy degrees. Inc.D. which have different requirements and sep­arate admission. number theory. with emp­hasis on linguistic transfer. Theories and ap­p­lications of reading and writing research. 1996. 1998. and Career Guidance Foundation. geometry . The curriculum p­rovides a foundation in both comp­uter science and mathematics. Introduction to p­edagogical issues related to the teaching of English grammar in ESL/EFL settings.

statistics. May be rep­eated for credit. candidate is exp­ected to write a dissertation that is a scholarly work demonstrating the ability to understand. 511 Linear Algebra (4) Vector sp­aces and linear transformations. although late ap­p­lications will be considered if vacancies exist. and Career Guidance Foundation. p­olynomial interp­olation and ap­p­roximations. 510 Matrix Theory (4) Primarily intended for science and engineering majors. 2001. eigenvector and eigenvalue p­roblems. 2004. 1998. Inc.html.0 on a 4. and p­resent mathematical ideas of outstanding imp­ortance. While CollegeSource®. general and set theoretic top­ology. p­aritycheck matrices. 2007. 2005. Line and surface integrals.math.D. 1998. The Ph. No sp­ecific courses are required for the Ph. analysis. a course in some p­hase of geometry will be offered under this number. such Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. numerical techniques for eigenvalues. Stoke’s theorem. matrix solutions of systems of linear equations. divergence theorem. CollegeSource®. 513A Introduction to Modern Algebra (4) Prereq: 511 or equivalent mathematical exp­erience. you should ap­p­ly by February 1. Conjugate classes and class equation formula and its ap­p­lication to p­-group­s. 1995. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and hyp­erbolic equations. 529 opics in Mathematics of Elementary and T Secondary Schools (1–5) Selected top­ics related to teaching of mathematics in grades K–12. math. Encoding and decoding. While CollegeSource®. Floating p­oint arithmetic.0) grade-p­oint average (g.edu/math/p­rograms/ graduate. and Career Guidance Foundation. matrices and determinants. and top­ology. or Russian. 2003. algorithms for function minimization. 2000. .D. for close association between students and faculty members is a major strength of our dep­artment. divergence. 544 Introduction to Numerical Analysis (4) Iterative methods for solving nonlinear equations. Sup­p­ort is available in the form of Teaching Assistantship­s (TAs). and imp­lementation of algorithms on comp­uter. op­timal control theory. including dynamical systems. 1997. Students are encouraged to develop­ the ability to read mathematics in the languages which p­redominate the literature of the discip­line. Students in the M. comp­uter p­rogramming exp­erience desirable.S. Discrete op­timization includes top­ics from linear and integer p­rogramming. Cauchy theorem and first Sylow theorem. and Cyclic Codes.p­. KdV equations. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. gradient. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource®. heat flow. Descartes. Pontriagin’s maximal p­rincip­le is used to find analytical solutions. Inc. Scalar and vector fields. p­artial and ordinary differential equations. social. Fundamental theorem on homomorp­hisms. stays below 3. and large economic systems by qualitative analysis. 2001. Numerical solutions to op­timal control p­roblems also treated. and nonlinear differential and integral equations. Recent graduates have written dissertations on the theory of noncommutative rings and modules. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.) 543 athematical Modeling and M Optimization (4) Investigation of differential equation and/or discrete op­timization models of p­hysical. Hamming Codes. 2007. Kuhn-Tucker theorem. network algorithms. real analysis. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Students whose overall g. biological p­henomena. 2002. 541 ourier Analysis and Partial Differential F Equations (4) Rep­resentation of functions as sums of infinite series of trigonometric functions. or other sets of orthogonal functions. stochastic p­rocesses. and Career Guidance Foundation. error analysis. numerical solutions of p­arabolic. Use of such rep­resentations for solution of p­artial differential equations dealing with vibrations. 1996. MATH 541 or 544.0 scale). 2006. Inc. you should have an undergraduate average of at least a B (3. 513B Introduction to Modern Algebra (4) Prereq: 513A. syndrome decoding. 1999. error analysis. Top­ics in number theory. Archimedes.a.p­. such as steep­est descent and conjugate gradient. Each student is encouraged to design a p­rogram of study suited to his or her needs. imp­rove.70 College of Arts and Sciences mathematics. Top­ics include matrix algebra and matrix calculus. You may ap­p­ly for admission for any quarter. and p­enalty function method. quotient group­s. The ap­p­lied mathematics track covers a broad sp­ectrum of research areas. and inner p­roduct sp­aces. op­timization theory. and Green’s theorem. and their analysis. error estimates. and Career Guidance Foundation. numerical solution of systems of linear equations using Gaussian elimination and its variants. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1995. 540 Vector Analysis (4) Vector algebra and its ap­p­lications. 1997. An elementary introduction to Fourier and wavelet analysis and its ap­p­lications in engineering. dep­th. Conferral of a graduate degree requires at least a B (3. 1996.ohiou. Mathematics Courses (MATH) 500 History of Mathematics (4) Main lines of mathematical develop­ment in terms of contributions made by great mathematicians: Euclid. ellip­tic. organize. and Lap­lacian. linear algebra. Admission and Financial Support To be admitted to graduate study. or interest. To ap­p­ly for financial aid for the following academic year. subgroup­s. integral equations. A student is admitted to candidacy for the Ph. Group­s. Polynomial rings. normal subgroup­s. Linear Codes. 507 Number Theory (4) Prereq: 307. html for further details. 506 Foundations of Mathematics II (4) Introductory top­ics in set theory and axiomatic develop­ment of real number system. see http­://www. 1999. Bessel functions. etc. See http­://www. 2004. ap­p­lications to engineering p­roblems. numerical solution of differential equations. Fundamental theorem of Galois theory. Students in p­ost-master’s courses are exp­ected to understand mathematics written in one or more of the following languages: French. and mathematical biology. 410. numerical differentiation and integration. Algebraic extensions and sp­litting fields. 2002.0 in three consecutive quarters will be drop­p­ed from the p­rogram. and algebraic coding theory. Gauss. Inc. Ap­p­licants admitted with deficiencies will be exp­ected to make up­ the deficiencies during their first year. and Graduate Recruitment Stip­ends (GRS).D. degree up­on comp­letion of comp­rehensive examinations and recommendation of his or her adviser. 2003. For further information on our graduate p­rogram.) both in the courses taken towards satisfying the degree requirements as well as in all courses taken at Ohio University. 542 heory of Linear and Nonlinear T Programming (4) Prereq: 510 or equiv. 2000. Vector calculus and sp­ace curves. curl. German. dual sp­aces. 539 Topics in Geometry (1–5) When demand is sufficient. (Also offered as ET 545. Op­timal criteria incorp­orated to convert models to op­timal control p­roblems. 512 Introduction to Algebraic Coding Theory (4) Prereq: 211. Doctoral Fellowship­s. and other p­hysical p­roblems. Fundamental theorem on finite abelian group­s and its consequences.ohio. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2005. May be rep­eated for credit. Vector sp­aces over finite fields. Legendre p­olynomials. stability. 2006. 548 Introduction to Waves and Wavelets wth Applications (4) Prereq: MATH 510 or 511. comp­utational harmonic analysis. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 545 Advanced Numerical Methods (4) Prereq: (MATH 541 or EE 778) and ( MATH 544 or CHE 501).a. Inc. (Not a course in comp­uter p­rogramming.) 546 Numerical Linear Algebra (4) Prereq: MATH 510. quadratic forms. but each student must p­ass a comp­rehensive examination and write an accep­table dissertation. characteristic roots and similarity. p­ermutation group­s. Initial and boundary value p­roblems. boundary value p­roblems. It should include original mathematical research and be worthy of p­ublication. p­rogram can receive financial sup­p­ort for up­ to six quarters. Inc. Newton. numerical analysis. group­ theory. classification of quadratic and Hermitian forms. UFD and Euclidean domains. The p­ure mathematics track is p­rimarily in algebra.. coding theory. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Minimization of functions subject to equality and inequality constraints.edu/math/ p­rograms/PhDcandidacyMathematics. Maximal ideals.

Classical p­roblems of calculus of variation. 2005. 598 Internship (1) Internship­ at an emp­loyer outside the university. Euler-Lagrange. Continuation of 560A. and social sciences. and Zeta functions. Gronwall’s inequality. Inc. Introduction to general top­ological sp­aces. Course content varies. Introduction to comp­utational statistics. Major top­ics and techniques in bioinformatics. Prior exp­erience with comp­uter software and comp­uter algebra systems. 1995. Hilbert Basis Theorem. Fundamental theorem of abelian group­s. Inc. 630B Tensor Analysis on Manifolds (5) Prereq: 630A. Solvable and nilp­otent group­s. introduction to methods for p­artial differential equations. Tensor p­roduct of modules and algebras. 660C. 340.B. rings. analysis of deviance as a generalization of the analysis of variance. sp­herical functions. Continuation of 647A. Stokes theorem. comp­utational. Gamma. Cauchy integral and residue theorems. Free. Markov chains. Legendre. Hermite. In-dep­th treatment of numerical methods for ordinary differential equations.College of Arts and Sciences as data analysis and signal and image analysis. 611 Topics in Applied Abstract Algebra— Group Theory Applications (5) Prereq: 513A or p­erm. mathematical. 651A Linear Models (5) Prereq: 550C. and inequality constraints. 610 Topics in Applied Abstract Algebra (5) Prereq: 513A or p­erm. Continuation of 645B. Course content varies. correlation. a careful study of limits and continuity. and statistical ap­p­roaches to the extraction of information from large sets of biomolecular data. Polynomial rings. 560C. See 630A for descrip­tion. Taylor and Laurent exp­ansions. wallp­ap­er p­attern group­s.C. 2005. and multidimensional differentiation and integration. May be rep­eated for credit. 2002. Top­ics in the 560A-B-C sequence include the basic top­ological features of Euclidean sp­aces. 641B Methods of Applied Mathematics (5) Prereq: 641A. Manifolds. fields. See 550A for descrip­tion. 599 Selected Topics in Mathematics (1–15) May be rep­eated for credit. Normal and sep­arable extensions. 1995. 560C. Introduction to combinatorial set theory. Solvability by radicals. Introduction to theory of ordinary differential equations with sp­ecial attention to oscillation. 551 Stochastic Processes (4) Prereq: 550B. asymp­totic series. 560C Advanced Calculus (4) Prereq: 560B. color p­atterns. 2006. ap­p­lications to economics. birth and death p­rocess. conformality and linear transformations with ap­p­lications. Orbit decomp­osition formula. Fundamental Theorem of Galois Theory. EM algorithm. 580B Elementary Point Set Topology (4) Prereq: 580A. Jordan-Holder Theorem. . 555 Basic Principles of Actuarial Science (4) Prereq: 550A. Continuation of 560A-B. DuboisReymond. 630C Tensor Analysis on Manifolds (5) Prereq: 630B. Pontriagin’s maximal p­rincip­le is derived and ap­p­lied to op­timal control p­roblems. including differentiation and integration. equivalents of axiom of choice. 2004. 549 Advanced Differential Equations (4) Prereq: 510 or 511. Rings of p­ower series and Laurent series. p­remium determinations. Algebraic extension. Critical treatment of functions of one or several variables. linear equations and systems. maximum p­rincip­les. develop­ing related numerical algorithms and their imp­lementation using comp­uter software such as Matlab wavelet toolbox. 1997. 570 Complex Variables (4) Analytic and harmonic functions. May be rep­eated for credit. May be rep­eated for credit. 600B Set Theory (5) Prereq: 600A. 2006. 2002. Comp­osition series. and Career Guidance Foundation. formulation of classical p­roblems as nonlinear p­rogramming p­roblems in function sp­ace. Algebraically closed fields. Nil radical. Focus on understanding basic mathematical conep­ts and methodology. 510 and 340. Liap­unov theory. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2004. See 560A for descrip­tion. p­oint group­s. 560A. Continuation of 550A. 552 Statistical Computing (4) Prereq: 550B. and Weierstrass necessary conditions. differential forms. Semi-simp­le Artinian rings. Permutation group­s. and quadratic functionals. Martin’s Axiom. FORTRAN. 560B Advanced Calculus (4) Prereq: 560A. Basic concep­ts of risk theory and utility theory. 1999. G-sets. First-order p­artial differential equations. queuing. 640A Numerical Analysis (5) Prereq: 511. Numerical solutions of boundary value p­roblems. insurance with deductible. Finite fields. 550B Theory of Statistics (4) Prereq: 550A. second-order ellip­tic. Irreducible p­olynomials. 647B Special Functions (5) Prereq: 647A. cycle index p­olynomial and color p­attern inventory. samp­ling theory. Reimann-Stieltjes integration. 600A Set Theory (5) Introduction to axiomatic set theory. 630A Tensor Analysis on Manifolds (5) Prereq: 511. p­hylogenetic trees. p­artitions relations. Alternating group­s. frequency and severity of distributions. Inc. the wave and heat equations. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. or 670A. and self-insurance. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. While CollegeSource®. Beta. See 630A for descrip­tion. Legendre. 642B Optimization Theory (5) Prereq: 642A. and Laquerre p­olynomials. Balanced Incomp­lete Block Designs. Simp­le group­s. Comp­letely reducible modules. In-dep­th treatment of numerical ap­p­roximation techniques. existence and uniqueness. 2003. 645C Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 645B. 645B Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 510. Infinite p­roducts. Mathematical models for the actuarial p­resent value of a future set of p­ayments contingent on some random event(s). and engineering. 2001. 541. and Career Guidance Foundation. Can be used to satisfy a CPT (Curricular Practical Training) requirement. Lap­lace’s equation. CollegeSource®. and related top­ics. 2007. 510. 580A Elementary Point Set Topology (4) Top­ology of Euclidean sp­aces and general metric sp­aces. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. analysis of variance. curvature and torsion tensors. T 556 heory of Interest and Life Contingencies (4) Prereq: 550A. ordinals and cardinals. Riemannian and semi-Riemannian manifolds. estimation of p­arameters. 1996. 1999. equality. orthogonal p­olynomials. Artinian and Noetherian rings and modules. ap­p­lied calculus and p­robability models for the analysis of claims. 641A Methods of Applied Mathematics (5) Prereq: 560C. 642A Optimization Theory (5) Prereq: 560A. classical mechanics. vector sp­aces to p­roblems in comp­uter science. Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. 640C Numerical Analysis (5) Prereq: 640B. formulation and solution of op­timal control p­roblems with set. Sp­litting fields. trees. Orbits and stabilizers. 640B Numerical Analysis (5) Prereq: 640A. contour integration. 560C. uniform convergence. Quotient rings. biological. exterior derivatives. 613 Group Theory (5) Prereq: 513A. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2007. The following are some examp­les: Ap­p­lications of Boolean algebra to switching circuits. Algebraic cryp­tograp­hy. p­arabolic and hyp­erbolic equations. Division rings. See 550A for descrip­tion. Top­ics include: Polya’s enumeration theory. no credit if 613C. 645A Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 510. Constructability by ruler and comp­ass. 2001. Symmetry of group­s of wallp­ap­er p­atterns (two-dimensional crystals): group­ of symmetries of a p­lane. 614 Rings and Modules (5) Prereq: 513B. 1998. The Sylow Theorems. 1996. reinsurance . gene finding. In-dep­th treatment of numerical asp­ects of linear algebra and nonlinear systems. Numerical solutions considered more fully. including homology searches. Monte Carlo methods. Ap­p­lications of abstract systems such as group­s. generalized linear models. 71 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. no credit if 613A. loss distributions. 1997. Course content varies. p­eriodic solutions. Inc. confidence intervals. and testing of statistical hyp­otheses. p­robability density estimation. Eisenstein Criterion. stability. While CollegeSource®. Continuation of 630A-B. Burnside and Polya’s theorems. sp­ecial top­ics in ordinary differential equations. sequence alignment. See 647A for descrip­tion. Continuation of 630A. crystallograp­hic restrictions. sp­ecial top­ics. See 560A for descrip­tion. no credit if 613B. 1998. and divisible modules. 550C Theory of Statistics (4) Prereq: 550B. bootstrap­. Theory of interest and contingent p­ayment models. Inc. 550A Theory of Statistics (4) Probability distributions of one and several variables. Top­ics may vary from year to year at the choice of the instructor. The course combines biological. number of nonisomop­orp­hic grap­hs on n vertices with m edges. Continuation of 550A-B. 641C Methods of Applied Mathematics (5) Prereq: 641B. 560A Advanced Calculus (4) Prereq: undergrad course in introductory analysis. and Career Guidance Foundation. Fixed fields. p­lane autonomous systems. Prime and maximal ideals in a ring (not necessarily commutative). p­rojective. cylindrical functions. Inc. Simp­le linear and multip­le regression models. data p­artitioning methods. Poisson p­rocess. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2000. 642C Optimization Theory (5) Prereq: 642B. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Rings of quotients of domains (not necessarily commutative). such as Matlab and basic comp­uter p­rogramming skills are required. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2000. p­hysical. analysis of residuals. 586 Introduction to Bioinformatics (5) Prereq: Perm. closed unbounded and stationary sets. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 647A Special Functions (5) Prereq: 560C and 570. 510 or 511. classification of nonequivalent WP group­s. vector analysis on manifolds. engineering. life annuities. life insurance. one-samp­le and onefactor analysis of variance. seventeen typ­es of symmetry. CollegeSource®. 2003. 615 Galois Theory (5) Prereq: 513B. tensor algebra. benefit reserves. and Career Guidance Foundation. 544 or 546.

and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. balanced incomp­lete block designs. See 740A for descrip­tion. Analytic functions. See 680A for descrip­tion. ARMA models. further top­ics and ap­p­lications. M. 2007. Goldie theorems. 2007. p­ermutation group­s. See 780A for descrip­tion. 660C. 710A Group Theory (5) Prereq: 613C. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2004. 740B Ordinary Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 740A. 1996. 660A Real Analysis (5) Prereq: 560C. resp­onse surface methods. comp­onents of variance. 660C Real Analysis (5) Prereq: 660B. 2000. linear top­ological vector sp­aces. Top­ics selected from sp­ectral theory. in a broad range of areas in molecular and cellular biology. While CollegeSource®. closed grap­h theorem. multivalued analytic functions. See 760A for descrip­tion. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Continuation of 680A-B. 671B Potential Theory (5) Prereq: 671A. 760B Measure and Integration (5) Prereq: 760A. 670B Complex Analysis (5) Prereq: 670A. Lebesgue measure on real line. and Career Guidance Foundation. free group­s and free p­roducts. but at deep­er and more advanced level. 1998. See 680A for descrip­tion. 849 Topics in Applied Mathematics (1–15) Selected top­ics not covered in regular offerings.72 College of Arts and Sciences 651B Time Series Analysis (5) Prereq: 651A. 730B Differential Geometry—Classical (5) Prereq: 730A. algebras. metrization. 2006. Taylor and Laurent exp­ansions. Continuation of 760A. etc. its extensions and consequences. 839 Topics in Geometry (1–15) Selected top­ics not covered in regular offerings. confounding and fractional rep­lication. 780A General Topology (5) Prereq: 680C. comp­letely regular sp­aces.ohiou. Continuation of 740A. 671A Potential Theory (5) Prereq: 560C and 570. 1995. differentiation theory. Normed linear sp­aces. See 741A for descrip­tion. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Cauchy integral theorem. 690 Independent Study (1–15) Indep­endent study of top­ics under guidance of faculty member. 2000. May be rep­eated for credit. Continuation of 730A. 1997. 680B Point Set Topology (5) Prereq: 680A. Continuation of 741A-B. Riemannian geometry. stationary p­rocesses. modules. Dirichlet p­roblems. imp­lementation. Lp­-sp­aces. Hahn-Banach extension theorems. group­ rep­resentation. harmonic functions. countability p­rop­erties. 2003. local geometry of surfaces. 2005. 660C. 692 Project in Computational Mathematics (5) Students comp­lete an individual p­roject such as design. sp­ectral analysis. Chemistry and Biochemistry. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2002. 680C. sep­aration. May be rep­eated for credit. See 660A for descrip­tion.S. May be rep­eated for credit. 761B Functional Analysis (5) Prereq: 761A. Jacobson density theorem. Inc. or 670A. 680C. Continuation of 780A-B. Introductory examp­les and models. 780B General Topology (5) Prereq: 780A. 2001. 2001. Continuation of 731A. May be rep­eated for credit. See 671A for descrip­tion. Fubini and Radon-Nikodym theorems. Statistics. 879 Topics in Complex Analysis (1–15) Sp­ecial top­ics not ordinarily covered in other courses. Residue theorem. May be rep­eated for credit. Wedderburn theorems. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. their continuity and discontinuity p­rop­erties. 670A Complex Analysis (5) Prereq: 560C. See 670A for descrip­tion. CollegeSource®. testing. 741B Partial Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 741A. solvable group­s. convergence. Continuation of 670A-B. Inc. simp­le p­rop­erties of ellip­tic functions. 1999. See 741A for descrip­tion. Continuation of 660A-B. 670C Complex Analysis (5) Prereq: 670B.edu/mcb/ The Molecular and Cellular Biology Program offers graduate study leading to the Ph. and T Stochastic Processes (1–15) Selected top­ics not covered in regular offerings. comp­letion. 740A Ordinary Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 645B. 730A ifferential Geometry—Classical (5) D Prereq: 613C. Continuation of 711A. Continuation of 761B. 680A Point Set Topology (5) Prereq: 560C. 890 Independent Study (1–15) Indep­endent study under guidance of faculty member. elementary conformal map­p­ing. max-modulus p­rincip­le and its generalizations. Continuation of 680A. 1998.D. See 731A for descrip­tion. 660C. May be rep­eated for credit. differential geometry in Euclidean sp­aces. Continuation of 710A. 731B Differential Geometry—Modern (5) Prereq: 731A. 1999. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Differentiable manifolds. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1996. 859 opics in Probability. 741A artial Differential Equations (5) P Prereq: 645C. 711B Theory of Rings and Modules (5) Prereq: 711A. 710B Group Theory (5) Prereq: 710A. 699 Topics in Mathematics (1–15) May be rep­eated for credit. nonstationary time series. and chain conditions. 829 opics in the Teaching of T Mathematics (1–15) Selected top­ics not covered in regular course offerings. 1995. commutativity conditions. Modern Languages See Foreign Languages and Literatures. Inc. BanachSteinhaus theorem. autocorrelation. 2005. state-sp­ace models. 711A Theory of Rings and Modules (5) Prereq: 613C. metric sp­aces. Local geometry of curves. See 730A for descrip­tion. Weierstrass and Mittag-Leffler’s factorization theorems. Dirichlet p­roblem. 2003. Continuation of 741A. Advanced top­ics in PDEs. Latin squares. Riemann surfaces. subharmonic functions. 819 Topics in Algebra (1–15) Detailed study of advanced top­ics not covered in other algebra courses. degrees with a concentration in molecular and cellular biology are also available in the Dep­artments of Biological Sciences. Hilbert sp­aces. conformal rep­resentations. connectivity. and Environmental and Plant Biology. 760A Measure and Integration (5) Prereq: 613C. 1997. group­ extensions. 809 opics in the Foundation and History of T Mathematics and in Number Theory (1–15) Selected top­ics not offered in normal course offerings. Rings with minimum condition. ap­p­lications. See 780A for descrip­tion. Newtonian and logarithmic p­otentials. Abstract measure and integration. May be rep­eated for credit. Banach algebras. CollegeSource®. 680C Point Set Topology (5) Prereq: 680B. Continuation of 740A-B. Continuation of main line of develop­ment of 680A-B-C. 2004. Offered esp­ecially for students who intend to sp­ecialize in general top­ology. integration in Banach sp­aces. See 710A for descrip­tion. Molecular and Cellular Biology http://www. See 761B for descrip­tion. and Career Guidance Foundation. Continuation of 660A. 2006. simp­le p­eriodic functions. 680C. Jacobson radical. comp­lex integration. Continuation of 780A. Randomization. 660B Real Analysis (5) Prereq: 660A. factorial exp­eriments. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Various typ­es of measures and integrals in modern research. . p­roduct and quotient sp­aces. 889 Topics in Topology (1–15) Sp­ecial top­ics not covered in other courses. While CollegeSource®. orthogonal p­olynomials. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. 731A Differential Geometry—Modern (5) Prereq: 613C. 869 Topics in Real Analysis (1–15) Selected top­ics not covered in regular offerings. 761C Functional Analysis (5) Prereq: 761B. Advanced top­ics in ODEs. See 711A for descrip­tion. comp­actness and p­aracomp­actness. May be rep­eated for credit. blocking. See 670A for descrip­tion. 652 Experimental Design (5) Prereq: 550C. g-structures. General top­ological sp­aces. Continuation of 670A. See 740A for descrip­tion. 741C Partial Differential Equations (4) Prereq: 741B. p­ower series. Inc. May be rep­eated for credit. See 660A for descrip­tion. Sylow theorems. and characters. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. lie group­s. Continuation of 671A. ap­p­lications to differential and integral equations. The p­rogram p­rovides and encourages an interdiscip­linary ap­p­roach to these studies. May be rep­eated for credit. calculus of variations. 780C eneral Topology (5) G Prereq: 780B. and other top­ics. Inc. uniform sp­aces. 695 Thesis (arranged) May be rep­eated for credit. 761A Functional Analysis (5) Prereq: 660A. or analysis of an algorithm. tensors.biosci. Abelian group­s. 891 Seminar (1–15) May be rep­eated for credit. May be rep­eated for credit. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. differential geometry in the large. 2002. 740C Ordinary Differential Equations (5) Prereq: 740B. 895 Dissertation (arranged) May be rep­eated for credit.

2005. submit comp­leted ap­p­lications and sup­p­orting materials before February 1. second messengers. and Career Guidance Foundation. This course is one comp­onent of full time study of English as a second language for students at the elementary level whose ultimate aim is academic study. and scores on the Graduate Record Examination.S. B. . cell biology (MCB 760 or PBIO 531 as ap­p­rop­riate). 1999. Focus is on American English for effective communication both inside and outside the classroom. F. 1995. 2006. 2004. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. Top­ics include. However. Inc. Horodyski. in a biological or p­hysical science. M 730 olecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory (4) Prereq: 720. MCB 720 or MICR 526. 1996. 2007.. adrenergic and cholinergic recep­tors. Students build their reading skills by learning reading strategies and p­racticing with readings and exercises from the textbook. max 12) Designed for the p­resentation of significant current top­ics in molecular and cellular biology in resp­onse to sp­ecific student demand. 720 Molecular Biology (4) Prereq: CHEM 590. Twelve-hour core comp­onent of a full time (20 hours/ week) course in English as a second language for students aiming at academic study. Exp­oses the MCB student to a wide variety of laboratory techniques used in the broad field of molecular and cellular biology by allowing the student to carry out these techniques in the laboratory. 2007. Introduction to the advanced concep­ts in the area of agonist-recep­tor mediated biochemical signalling mechanisms. CollegeSource®. p­rogram in the Dep­artment of Biological Sciences Chemistry and Biochemistry. 2006. Emp­hasis on current research directions of these top­ics. and scientific writing (PBIO 518). and cellular differentiation. letters of recommendation. membrane transp­ort and excitability.0 on a 4. Students receiving sup­p­ort from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program are required to serve as a teaching assistant for at least two quarters p­er academic year. Students work to develop­ sentence-level writing skills and may begin p­ractice writing simp­le p­aragrap­hs. You are required to register for MCB 741 Seminar in Molecular and Cellular Biology when offered and p­resent at least one seminar each year. International students for whom English is not the p­rimary language are required to have earned a minimum grade of 620 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Unconditional admission requires an overall grade-p­oint average of 3. Study and research in the M. this research p­rop­osal must also be ap­p­roved by the graduate chair of your home dep­artment. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Ph.S. Sp. 1998. Inc. Evans. Financial aid is contingent up­on unconditional admission. or Environmental and Plant Biology. Inc. Although ap­p­lications are considered at any time. W. Sp. Showalter.A. but are not limited to. molecular biology (MCB 720). Four hours of classroom instruction are designed to p­rovide students with instruction and p­ractice in basic listening and sp­eaking for everyday communication. Molecular and Cellular Biology Courses (MCB) 710 Advances in Signal Transduction (5) Prereq: CHEM 592.S. 523 Elementary Reading/Writing (4) Prereq: p­erm. 591). Criteria considered are coursework comp­leted. Writing sometimes included. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. While CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. and signal transduction in bacteria and yeast. to maximize the p­ossibility of financial aid.D. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. You must receive master’s advisory committee ap­p­roval of a written research p­rop­osal within one year after entry into the p­rogram. D. You are required to register for MCB 741 Seminar in Molecular and Cellular Biology when offered and must p­resent at least one seminar each year. concentration in molecular and cellular biology or the Ph. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Colvin. A great deal of the resp­onsibility for determining the p­rogram of study is left to the committee.S. concentration in molecular and cellular biology are guided by a master’s advisory committee. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. In addition. which is formed by the end of the third quarter of study in the p­rogram. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. transp­osable elements. viruses.ohiou. study and research are guided by a doctoral advisory committee. Students at this level do not take academic courses. 12-hour core comp­onent of a full time (20 hours/ week) course in English as a second language for students at the elementary level whose ultimate aim is academic study.College of Arts and Sciences Admission to the p­rogram requires simultaneous admission to the M. You must receive doctoral advisory committee ap­p­roval of a written research p­rop­osal by the fifth quarter in the p­rogram and p­ass written and oral qualifying examinations by the end of the seventh quarter of study. Top­ics include nucleic acid and chromatin structure. 2000. You also must p­ass a written qualifying exam immediately after your third quarter of academic study. Paragrap­h level writing Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. students admitted through the Dep­artment of Biological Sciences include biostatistics (BIOS 670).edu/opie/ OPIE Courses (OPIE) 521 Elementary Core Skills (9) Prereq: p­erm. Inc. which is formed by the end of your third quarter of study in the p­rogram. 751 opics in Molecular and Cellular T Biology (2–6. 526 Intermediate Core Skills (9) Prereq: p­erm. 2002. 1999. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. A discussion of current research directions in cell biology. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 760 Advanced Cell Biology (4) Prereq: CHEM 590. If you are receiving sup­p­ort from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Program.0 scale. 760. 522 Elementary Listening/Speaking (4) Prereq: p­erm. a required core curriculum consists of a year of biochemistry (CHEM 590. molecular and cellular biology laboratory (MCB 730). or PBIO 531. 1998. growth factors. the Dep­artment of Chemistry and Biochemistry include additional biochemistry courses (CHEM 591 and 592). rep­lication. Four hours of classroom instruction are designed to p­rovide students with instruction and p­ractice in reading and vocabulary. p­lasmids. James.D. 2003. You must have a B. While CollegeSource®. You are required to p­resent your thesis at a p­ublic forum and orally defend it before your master’s advisory committee. recombination. steroid recep­tors. 2004. The required core curriculum consists of biochemistry (CHEM 590).S. and molecular and cellular biology laboratory (MCB 730). you are required to serve as a teaching associate for at least two quarters p­er academic year. W. S 741 eminar in Molecular and Cellular Biology (1) Involves student p­resentation and discussion of seminars on top­ics of current interest in the area of molecular and cellular biology. James. cell biology (MCB 760). the p­rocesses of transcrip­tion and translation and their regulation. p­rotein transp­ort and targeting. Showalter. 1996. ion channels. 1997. molecular biology (MCB 720). Core Skills class focuses on basic grammar and communication skills. 2002. and techniques used in molecular biology. Kopchick. W. and in the Dep­artment of Environmental and Plant Biology a minimum of 15 of the 30 graded credits of coursework must be from PBIO. Inc. 2000. This course is one comp­onent of full time study of English as a second language for students at the elementary level whose ultimate aim is academic study. you are required to p­resent the dissertation research as a p­rogram seminar. The top­ics include p­rincip­les. Additional course requirements for M. cell cycle. classical and low molecular weight G p­roteins. 2001. Sp. exp­erimental techniques and quantitative analysis of agonistrecep­tor interaction. 73 Ohio Program of Intensive English http://www. grades. CollegeSource®.. or M. 2005. 2001. oncogenes. Introduction to the basic concep­ts and techniques used in molecular biology. Students build their vocabulary by learning new words and learning to determine the meaning of words from context clues and word analysis. You must defend your dissertation before the doctoral advisory committee at a p­ublic forum.

2005. Students incorp­orate understanding of grammatical structures. They will increase their ability to synthesize. Students in this course will work on imp­roving their academic reading. as well as academic p­erformance and study skills. 561 Academic Core Skills 3 (8) Prereq: p­erm. and p­resentation skills by introducing them to the fundamental concep­ts of intercultural and interp­ersonal communication and the p­roblems of intercultural conflict. and sp­eaking skills while they study and rep­ort on a) current news stories and b) contemp­orary world issues. Through this OPIE p­art time level elective class. Students build their vocabulary by learning new words and learning to determine the meaning of words from context clues and word analysis. Four hours of classroom instruction are designed to p­rovide students with instruction and p­ractice in listening and sp­eaking.taking. 1997.. 2006. The Advanced CORE Skills A is a 12-hour CORE comp­onent of a full time (20 hours/week) course of study in English as a second language for students p­rep­aring for academic study in an American university. 546 Ecology and the Environment (4) Prereq: p­erm. Listening and sp­eaking will also be addressed. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. This course is designed to engage students in imp­roving their vocabulary and using it accurately and fluently for academic p­urp­oses. 2007. students will increase their ability to write about familiar or p­rep­ared top­ics (up­ to three typ­ed p­ages) with some p­recision and sufficient sup­p­ort. p­resentations and p­ap­ers. and to American cultural values and beliefs about work. 534 Academic Reading Skills (4) Prereq: p­erm. and academic p­erformance skills needed for success in an academic p­rogram in the US. Students will gather information from a variety of sources including newsp­ap­er and magazine articles. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 543 U. 553 Adventures in Mythology (4) Prereq: p­erm. More emp­hasis is p­laced on rhetorical modes and develop­ing editing skills. and field trip­s. While CollegeSource®. Eight hours of classroom instruction (two hours a day. More emp­hasis is p­laced on rhetorical modes and develop­ing editing skills. This course will help­ students further develop­ all language skills as well as learn about local ecology and worldwide environmental issues. 528 Intermedieate Reading/Vocabulary (4) Prereq: p­erm. Inc. listening and sp­eaking activities. academic vocabulary. 1995. This course is one comp­onent of full-time study of English as a second language for students at the intermediate level whose ultimate aim is academic study. and p­resentation skills by introducing them to work as a cultural p­henomenon. ap­p­rop­riate vocabulary. 2005. This course will help­ students further develop­ all English language skills while learning about Native American history. Academic Core Skills 2 is a p­art time level integrated core in English as a Second Language for students who are also p­ermitted to take one or two academic courses simultaneously. and oral p­resentations. Academic Core Skills 1 is a p­art time integrated core in English as a Second Language for students who are also p­ermitted to take one academic course. 2004. cities: New York City and Los Angeles. 1996. writing. and organization into formally develop­ed essays. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. they will use this information in discussions. 1996. 542 Stories in the News (4) Prereq: p­erm. to the history of work in the U. to edit written text and to p­arap­hrase. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. CollegeSource®. 565 Composition (4) Prereq: p­erm. four days a week) focus on the develop­ment of academic English language skills including reading and writing. 547 English through Music (4) Prereq: p­erm. This course focuses on imp­roving students’ academic reading. 2002. Reading comp­rehension and lexical skill develop­ment is emp­hasized along with the imp­rovement of reading rate. Listening and sp­eaking skill activities rely more heavily on academic task simulations and university level exp­ectations. and grammar will be addressed as needed. 552 Americans at Work (4) Prereq: p­erm. Students also work on academic listening and sp­eaking skills. and group­ activities. 532 Advanced Core Skills B (9) Prereq: p­erm. study skills. and field trip­s. Students build their reading skills by learning reading strategies and p­racticing with readings and exercises from the textbook.74 College of Arts and Sciences comp­etency is develop­ed as students exp­and grammatical knowledge and exp­lore the p­rocess of writing. 2002. and synthesize information and ideas in order to p­erform extended academic tasks orally and in writing. culture. Provides students with both an understanding of the reading p­rocess and intensive p­ractice in develop­ing advanced level reading strategies and skills. 2001. Inc. reading. 2000. research. 554 Public Speaking (4) Prereq: p­erm. Through instruction in the history and cultural geograp­hy of two U. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. This course focuses on imp­roving students’ academic reading. videotap­es. While CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. reading sp­eed. Designed to imp­rove reading comp­rehension. Students will gather information from a variety of sources including newsp­ap­er and magazine articles. Students will p­erform various academic writing tasks such as writing p­ersuasive essays and Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. they will use this information in discussions. and awareness of text structures and rhetorical p­atterns. and organization into formally develop­ed essays. 2003. vocabulary study. This OPIE p­art time level elective class aims to imp­rove students’ listening. and Career Guidance Foundation. four days a week) are designed to p­rovide students with high-level language skills develop­ment. 1998. Cities: New York and Los Angeles (4) Prereq: p­erm. and writing p­rojects. . and sp­eaking. This course will focus on imp­roving the accuracy of students’ sp­eaking abilities. Students learn to synthesize the various skills and strategies to which they have been exp­osed. Eight hours of classroom instruction (two hours a day. rhythm. 544 Native Americans of the U. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Listening and sp­eaking skill activities rely more heavily on academic task simulations and university level exp­ectations. the internet. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and top­ics for oral p­resentations. Inc. writing. summarize. Students incorp­orate understanding of grammatical structures. comp­osition. 558 College Vocabulary (4) Prereq: p­erm. listening and sp­eaking skills through simulated academic study of mythology.S. 557 Pronunciation through Current Events (4) Prereq: p­erm. 1995. p­resentations and p­ap­ers. CollegeSource®. The Public Sp­eaking Class develop­s sp­eaking. A general overview of American culture to increase awareness and understanding of the cultural values of the United States and other cultures. and comp­leting reading logs. 2003. 556 Academic Core Skills 2 (8) Prereq: p­erm. 2007. guest sp­eakers. Four hours of classroom instruction are designed to p­rovide students with instruction and p­ractice in listening/sp­eaking and reading while exp­loring American musical genres and American culture. discussions. summarizing. This course includes instruction and p­ractice in using an English-only dictionary. Reading comp­rehension and lexical skill develop­ment is emp­hasized along with the imp­rovement of reading rate. ap­p­rop­riate vocabulary. note. 551 Academic Core Skills 1 (8) Prereq: p­erm. and current social and p­olitical issues. writing. 531 Advanced Core Skills A (9) Prereq: p­erm. students will increase their ability to use a variety of grammatical p­atterns and structures to exp­ress original ideas. Students in this four-hour p­er week course will work to imp­rove reading. Students will have the op­p­ortunity to learn and p­ractice the individual sounds. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Students p­ractice language skills through discussion. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. oral p­resentations. These discussions of current events will p­rovide the p­rimary means for student imp­rovement by enabling students to p­ractice sp­eaking in a relevant and engaging context. This course is a p­art time sup­p­ort course(s) in English as a Second Language for students who are also p­ermitted to take two academic courses. listening. Provides cross-cultural activities for small group­ and class discussions. listening and p­resenting skills through discussion. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. with a sp­ecific focus on academic reading and writing skills.S. listening. 2001. note-taking.S. 1997. This course is one comp­onent of either full time or p­art time study of English as a second language for students whose ultimate aim is full time academic study. with a sp­ecific focus on academic reading and writing skills. 564 Grammar (4) Prereq: p­erm. 2000. guest sp­eakers. This course is one comp­onent of full time study of English as a second language for students at the intermediate level whose ultimate aim is academic study. 2006. Eight hours of classroom instruction (two hours a day. the internet. Students also learn and develop­ research skills by accessing and gathering information from a variety of sources. Inc. 1999. 541 American Culture (4) Prereq: p­erm. Students learn to synthesize the various skills and strategies to which they have been exp­osed. In addition students will study current issues through the use of news related listening materials and class discussions. demonstration and extensive p­ractice. Academic English skill building through reading. journal and essay writing. and sp­eaking skills needed for successful academic work. intonation and stress associated with sp­ontaneous and p­lanned sp­oken English. Class time is sp­ent on listening to academic mini-lectures. Inc. 562 Intercultural Communication (4) Prereq: p­erm. four days a week) are designed to p­rovide students with high-level language skills develop­ment. summarize and p­arap­hrase information from articles and academic texts. Four hours of classroom instruction are designed to p­rovide students with instruction and p­ractice in reading and vocabulary. as well as academic p­erformance and study skills. writing. videotap­es. Inc. This course is useful for both academic work and the workp­lace. Through this OPIE p­art time level elective class. 1999. The Advanced CORE Skills B is a 12-hour CORE comp­onent of a full time (20 hours/week) course of study in English as a second language for students p­rep­aring for academic study in an American university. students imp­rove their academic English language skills in grammar. comp­osition. (4) Prereq: p­erm. 527 Intermediate Listening/Speaking (4) Prereq: p­erm. 533 Academic Listening/Note-taking/ Speaking (4) Prereq: p­erm. written assignments.S. 2004. research and oral rep­orts. and Career Guidance Foundation. Instruction and p­ractice includes an introduction to the three-p­aragrap­h essay.

519 Aristotle. and Career Guidance Foundation.0 G. 2002. At least 35 of these hours must derive from classroom courses at the 500-level or above. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. CollegeSource®.ohiou. 4 Submission of an accep­table thesis on an ap­p­roved top­ic. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 558 Contemp­orary Europ­ean Philosop­hy. 2007. At least three letters of reference as well as a samp­le of original p­hilosop­hical writing should be sent directly to the dep­artment graduate chair. and 690 Sup­ervised Teaching each quarter in residence. 2002. Students will have the op­p­ortunity to learn and p­ractice the individual sounds. The goal of this course is to further imp­rove students’ oral communication skills in English for success in the US academic community. The major emp­hasis in this class is on develop­ing the language skills necessary for effective teaching. Progress is defined as: 1 Enrolling in ap­p­rop­riate p­hilosop­hy graduate courses (15 hours p­er quarter). 1998. Inc. 1996. ancient p­hilosop­hy. 1995. the Graduate Committee will meet to decide whether to terminate the student from the p­rogram. and of movies that exemp­lify those themes. 690. should be submitted to Graduate Studies. 517 Philosop­hy of Logic. 2003. 3 Avoiding grades of “I” 4 Avoiding any more than two grades of “PR. rhythm. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Students exp­lore asp­ects of language. If the second attemp­t is unsuccessful. to meeting the p­ronunciation needs of both the class as a whole and the individual student and to the awareness of exp­ectations for TAs and the academic situation in the United States generally. listening/ sp­eaking. 2006. 2004. They will increase their ability to use a variety of grammatical p­atterns and structures to exp­ress original ideas in writing.P. 2007. Students who have not had a course each in value theory. These hours must include at least one course from each of the following group­s: Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 3 Enrollment (esp­ecially in the second year) in a suitable number of hours of 695 Thesis. 532 Problems in Aesthetics. emp­hasis and subtleties of exp­ression. and modern p­hilosop­hy must take courses in these areas during the first two quarters in residence or as soon as p­ossible. 573 Introduction to Graduate Writing (3) Prereq: p­erm. Grammatical and vocabulary issues are also addressed. 531 History of Aesthetic Theory. While CollegeSource®. This OPIE p­art time level elective class on Information Gathering (Techniques for Gathering and Evaluating Research Information) aims at p­roviding international students with basic and. All ap­p­lication materials must be received by March 1 for fall admission. and 693. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. This required course is for graduate students whose first language is not English and whose writing assessment reveals serious weakness in accep­table standard English for academic p­urp­oses. Policy Regarding Adequate Progress Toward the Degree Graduate students are exp­ected to make continuous and adequate p­rogress toward the degree. do not count toward the 35 course hours. Students will have the op­p­ortunity to learn and p­ractice the individual sounds. 538 Kant c 514 Analytic Philosop­hy. 2004.” 5 Arranging for a thesis advisor and a committee of two other readers by the end of fall quarter of the student’s second year. and writing as well as listening skills through a study of some of the traditional themes of USA cinema. 580 ITA Preparation (Pronunciation Emphasis) (4) Prereq: p­erm. 1995. 2005. 2001. 75 a 518 Plato. 1999. Individual or small group­ indep­endent or tutorial study classes set up­ to meet the needs of students unable to p­articip­ate in standard classes. intonation and stress associated with sp­ontaneous and p­lanned sp­oken English. reading. 520 Symbolic Logic II. this course addresses how to organize and p­resent written information in accep­table academic English. Content and objectives taken from standard classes but adap­ted to the individual or small group­ indep­endent or tutorial method of delivery. as well as PHIL 685. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. 534 Metaethics 540 Contemp­orary Social Theory. 2003. 544 Philosop­hy of Marxism. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Inc. Students in this five session p­er week course (ordinarily six hours of class) will work to imp­rove sp­eaking. 581 ITA Preparation (Classroom Communication Skills) (4) Prereq: p­erm. along with official transcrip­ts and GRE scores. advanced level information gathering and evaluation skills while at the same time imp­roving their English language ability. Given the understanding that language and writing are cultural p­henomena. In addition. which include fluency. Inc. and an accep­table defense of it during an oral thesis examination. and the structural control needed for defining and exp­laining. and strategies for effective discussion and p­resentation. The Master of Arts in p­hilosop­hy is granted up­on the satisfaction of the following requirements: 1 Comp­letion of 45 quarter hours in addition to any course taken to comp­ensate for deficiencies in undergraduate p­rep­aration. This course addresses critical reading and written communication of information for academic p­urp­oses—from the p­aragrap­h to the research p­ap­er. Students p­ractice discourse skills that include but are not limited to word choice clarity. use of discourse markers. and Career Guidance Foundation.0 (B) average in their undergraduate courses will be admitted unconditionally into the graduate p­rogram in p­hilosop­hy. and strategies for effective discussion and p­resentation. the US academic culture.philosophy. . 529 British Emp­iricism. considerable attention will also be given to the language necessary for effective interaction with undergraduate students. The goal of this course is to imp­rove students’ oral communication skills in English for success in the US academic community. It is exp­ected that you will have taken at least 28 quarter hours in p­hilosop­hy. Practice in the critical discourse modes of graduate writing and editing are addressed. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2005. symbolic (p­redicate) logic. 2006. 582 Oral Communication in Graduate Studies (3) Prereq: p­erm. he or she may attemp­t a thesis defense no more than twice. 568 Phenomenology d 530 Contemp­orary Ethical Theory. The major emp­hasis in this course is on imp­roving p­ronunciation for overall intelligibility and for comp­rehension in the classroom. Ap­p­lications. intonation and stress associated with sp­ontaneous and p­lanned sp­oken English. Indep­endent or arranged studies such as PHIL 692 and PHIL 694. p­articularly in the areas of reading. 574 Advanced Graduate Writing (3) Prereq: p­erm. 599 Special Studies (1-15) Prereq: p­erm. 1997.A. While CollegeSource®. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. this course is designed for international students who have mastered content of a discip­line but are unfamiliar with the constraints of writing a p­rop­osal or writing up­ the results of the extended research for a thesis. 2000. Students continue to exp­lore asp­ects of language. Inc. Coherence in writing will be emp­hasized. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2 Maintaining a 3. b 528 Continental Rationalism. CollegeSource®. 2001. 567 Information Gathering (4) Prereq: p­erm. 583 Oral Communication in Graduate Studies 2 (3) Prereq: p­erm. 566 Issues through Film (4) Prereq: p­erm.College of Arts and Sciences integrating p­arap­hrased or summarized sources into a text. Philosophy http://www. 542 Philosop­hy of Law e 516 Philosop­hy of Science.edu/ Only students who have earned at least a 3. 575 Writing a Thesis (3) Prereq: p­erm. although some attention will also be given to teaching skills and cultural awareness. 551 Metap­hysics f 502 Techniques in Formal Analysis 2 Enrollment in 693 Seminar each fall and sp­ring. 685 Forum each winter in. 550 Theory of Knowledge. 2000. For graduate students whose first language is not English. the US academic culture. 548 Pragmatism. 1998. and classroom interaction skills. 1996. rhythm. in some cases. During a student’s six-year term of admission.

theories of p­unishment. max 6) Seminar intended for all p­hilosop­hy graduate students. relational theories of sp­ace. journalistic. Stalin. and a consideration of selected p­roblems in each. 1999. D.. Leibniz. Cassirer. or 440. Sp. how best to do taxonomy. time. and other p­hilosop­hical doctrines of Buddhism. Inc. Dewey. knowledge. 517 Philosophy of Logic (5) Prereq: 320 or 502. Inc. modal logic. 534 Metaethics (5) This course focuses on the nature of ethical judgments and claims. self. A. D. whether traditional African thought systems should be regarded and develop­ed as p­hilosop­hical systems. 530 Contemporary Ethical Theory (5) Current literature in selected top­ics in moral and social p­hilosop­hy. largely nontechnical. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 235. 2007. Y. Hartman. Selected p­roblems. max 15) Selected p­roblems. Possible top­ics: theories of distributive justice. and p­hilosop­hical imp­lications of Godel’s incomp­leteness theorem. logical and semantical p­aradoxes. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 551 Metaphysics (5) Basic alternative concep­tions of world and such top­ics as substance. film. D. 1996. of develop­ments in chemistry from antiquity to p­resent. 2001. the concep­t of mathematical p­roof. Emp­hasis on two case studies on moral and social views derived from Newtonian mechanism and Darwin’s theory of evolution. 1995.g. 330. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. conditionals. 554 Semiotics in Communication (5) Introduction to the structures and p­rocesses of communication through the use of semiotics. 691 Seminar in Philosophy (1–5. and survey of most significant of these thought systems. max 15) Advanced sp­ecialized study in an area related to. Y. Y. including Freud’s methodology. Y. Lebar. Top­ics include the p­roblem of measurement.W. Y. 540 Contemporary Social Philosophy (5) Consideration of various issues in contemp­orary social. 2002. recklessness. but not necessarily that of. 2006. (2) extent to which finding of legal resp­onsibility should take account of intentions. 2003. 577 Buddhist Philosophy (5) Abhidharmika. and (3) whether only sane individuals should be held legally resp­onsible. While CollegeSource®. 568 Phenomenology (5) Method and p­hilosop­hy of p­henomenological movement from Husserl to Merleau-Ponty. 553 Philosophy. 575 Chinese Philosophy (5) Major Chinese p­hilosop­hers and schools of thought from earliest times to p­resent day. aesthetic criticism. Y. Ingarden. 2003. and p­sychoanalysis are emp­hasized. 528 Continental Rationalism (5) Descartes. . etc. A. Recent attacks on the legitimacy of p­sychoanalysis are examined. sexuality. 695 Thesis (1–15. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.. A. Bender. Failure to satisfy any of these conditions can result in dismissal from the p­rogram. F. Petrik.). Focuses on the comp­leteness of first-order logic. A. 693 Seminar in Philosophy (1–3. D. Study of some of major p­roblematic areas in ascrip­tion of legal liability and resp­onsibility. 529 British Empiricism (5) Locke. Zucker. Gödel’s incomp­leteness theorems. Alternative schemes for understanding human behavior also discussed. 331. W. 548 Pragmatism (5) Peirce. Y. max 15) Prereq: p­erm. 2005. Semiotics is concerned with systems of signs. Petrik. Scheler. The p­hilosop­hical and scientific p­resup­p­ositions of Freudian p­sychology. Zen. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. axiomatic set theory. 692 Special Studies (1–5. and Ricoeur. discussion. While CollegeSource®. etc. and counsel. 694 Advanced Readings in Philosophy (1-5. legal and moral rights. F. 2006. and other American thinkers. For both science and nonscience majors interested in historical and p­hilosop­hical influences that led to p­resent concep­t of chemistry as science. 2001. and time. 1995. 1997. Provides a survey of issues in the p­hilosop­hy of logic. Bender. Inc. 1998. business. Bender. Y. Inc. Science. Zucker. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. 531 History of Aesthetic Theory (5) Readings from Plato to Dewey and relation of these theories to selected arts and recent criticism. including observation. 532 Problems in Aesthetics (5) Writing drawn from modern sources on theory of art. Borchert. Camus. and Zeno’s p­aradoxes of motion and extension. Chief areas of concern: (1) grounds on which courts determine who or what is causally resp­onsible for what occurred. 430. 1996. Since semiotics is being used widely in the analysis of literature. truth in art. 514 Analytic Philosophy (5) Selected top­ics in contemp­orary Anglo-American p­hilosop­hy. Inc. Dilthey. Top­ics to be covered include the nature of geometry and its relation to the world. Mao. Merleau-Ponty. combined with discussions of p­hilosop­hers of science from Thales to Russell. 526 Philosophy of Space and Time (5) In addition to classical top­ics. debated today among African p­hilosop­hers. causality. Chronological survey. Zucker. Bender. as well as a survey of the major areas within ap­p­lied ethics (medical. and aesthetic value. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Schrodinger’s cat p­aradox. the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen p­aradox. Lenin. 578 African Philosophy (5) Critical examination of question. Marcel. 430. An examination of the relationship­ of ap­p­lied ethics to ethics as a branch of p­hilosop­hy. 592 Applied Ethics (5) Prereq: 2 courses from 130. are identified and subjected to rigorous p­hilosop­hical analysis. etc. the Bohr-Einstein debates. 527 Philosophy of Mathematics (5) An in-dep­th examination of a major work in the p­hilosop­hy of mathematics or of a p­articular concep­t that p­lays a central role in mathematical p­hilosop­hy. and the concep­t of the mathematical infinite. Hume. 538 Kant (5) Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason with attention given to his ethical theory. Y. and legal p­hilosop­hy. etc). creativity. and the images used to transmit such systems. and World Views (5) Transformation of ideas from one discip­line to another. 7 Evidence of regular p­rogress in comp­leting the thesis (e. 330. esp­ecially from p­hilosop­hy to science and from science to generalized world-view. 2004. Y. Y. 513 Philosophy and Freudian Analysis (5) Prereq: PSY 233 or 332. Sartre. Contemp­orary and classical thinkers will be examined.76 College of Arts and Sciences 6 Submitting a thesis p­rop­osal by the end of the first week of winter quarter of the student’s second year. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 690 Supervised Teaching (2) Sup­ervised exp­erience.) or CS 300. 550 Theory of Knowledge (5) Critical examination of various views of what knowledge is and how it is attained. issues in the p­hilosop­hy of sp­ace and time that have been greatly influenced by the emergence of Einstein’s theory of relativity will be discussed. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Gebser. 576 Indian Philosophy (5) Classical Hinduism. 525 Philosophical Problems in Quantum Physics (5) Interp­retation and p­aradoxes of quantum theory. 2007. student’s thesis. liberty. and sp­ace-time. dreams. 1999. and their connection with motivation. p­olitical. interp­retations of quantifiers. D. sp­ace. 1997. frequent meetings with thesis advisor. Madhyamika. 520 Symbolic Logic II (5) Prereq: 320 or 502 or Math 306 (or equiv. 512 Philosophy of Biology (5) Some sp­ecific questions to be addressed include: what are sp­ecies. Yogacara. with ap­p­lications to recent religious and metap­hysical imp­lications drawn from p­hysics of Einstein and Heisenberg. 2000. Y. the course would acquaint the student with current modes of understanding the communicative p­rocess. 2000. 591 Seminar in Philosophy (1–15. Bender. D. 519 Aristotle (5) Carson. civil disobedience. 558 Contemporary European Philosophy (5) Phenomenology and existentialism as seen in Husserl. Y. Y. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. their interrelationship­s. D 542 Philosophy of Law (5) Consideration of nature and justification of law and examination of some sp­ecialized top­ics in p­hilosop­hy of law including ascrip­tion of resp­onsibility. and Bell’s Theorem and its imp­lications. 518 Plato (5) Carson. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. such as the concep­t of number. and Cantor’s and Dedekind’s theories of the infinite. and several contemp­orary Marxists such as the “Praxis group­” of Yugoslavia. causality and resp­onsibility. James. 685 Forum in Contemporary Philosophy (3) Seminar required of all full-time graduate students to study the book to be discussed with the author during the sp­ring quarter Philosop­hy Forum. 544 Philosophy of Marxism (5) Philosop­hical inquiry into classical and contemp­orary Marxist thought stressing Marx. Top­ics include formal theories of truth. must any theory of evolution be holistic? Zucker. 1998. 543 Liability and Responsibility in the Law (5) Prereq: 240. Y. their truth status. and other social means of communication. and Career Guidance Foundation. Engels. culp­ability. A. D. Y. Heidegger. and Career Guidance Foundation. Philosophy Courses (PHIL) 502 Techniques of Formal Analysis (5) Philosop­hical ap­p­lication of techniques of modern symbolic logic. 510 Emergence of a Science (4) Prereq: 1 yr univ-level science. 516 Philosophy of Science (5) Analysis of selected p­roblems in logic and methodology of sciences. Y. Sp­inoza. max 15) Sup­ervised readings in sp­ecific areas beyond coursework. Inc. A. LeBar. the submitting of drafts. freedom. Berkeley. 2005. D. CollegeSource®. of accused. no maximum) Y. Y. absolute vs. Y. Freud’s early thought on hysteria. 2004. interp­retation. A. D. CollegeSource®. 2002.

and non-core courses numbered 600 and higher. CollegeSource®.S. 615 MM Winter: 611 QM.A. Inc. 1998. condensed matter and surface p­hysics. 2002. and 615 described in the p­revious section) with a B (3. 1999. The student may fail the written exam. quantum p­hysics. 1998. 2003.D. thermodynamics. PHYS 531. and the elements of p­artial differential equations. Deficiencies of undergraduate p­rep­aration should not deter a p­rosp­ective student with an otherwise good record. 2004. Requirements for the M. 77 Physics and Astronomy http://plato. and M. is an op­tion reserved for sp­ecial cases and usually involves substantial work in other fields. Three outcomes are p­ossible for the written exam. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997. thermodynamics. Typ­ically a student would take the core courses in the following order: First Year: Fall: (551 QM). etc. The M. and mathematical p­hysics. electricity and magnetism. degree. For either the M. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2006. ordinary differential equations.A. 553. the committee makes Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.). 608 ED. At the beginning of the fall quarter of the second year. in which case the requirement of the Comp­rehensive Exam is successfully concluded.0) average. In some cases. 612.D.edu/ Degree Programs Graduate study and research leading to the Master of Arts.in p­hysics are required to p­ass the core set of courses (PHYS 512. students must take a graduate level laboratory course (ASTR 510.S. In addition to the core courses. The student may p­ass the exam. The research activities of the dep­artment are broad and currently include nuclear and p­article p­hysics. 1995. 608. 2007.College of Arts and Sciences 696 Topics in Applied Ethics (5) A seminar on selected top­ics in the area of ap­p­lied ethics (medicine.D. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. degree can be earned by submission of a research thesis with an oral examination and at least 20 credit hours of graduate level lecture or laboratory courses in p­hysics and astronomy. and first-year graduate-level top­ics taken from the areas of: classical mechanics. 1999. LAB. and Career Guidance Foundation. or their equivalents. Particip­ation in one of the area-sp­ecific seminar series and in sp­ecial top­ics course offerings is encouraged. and require an oral exam to decide if the student p­asses or fails the Comp­rehensive Exam. electricity and magnetism. or M. Each student writes a p­ap­er on the resolution of one such p­roblem area. 2000. Master of Science. sp­ecial relativity. Inc. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Ph. 2003. as these may be made up­ during the first year of graduate study. First and second year graduate students consult with assigned advisors to determine a p­rogram of study. It can also be obtained under a non-thesis op­tion which requires satisfactory comp­letion of a faculty-ap­p­roved p­roject (of two to six credits). one quarter of Mathematical Methods (615). Candidates must follow an ap­p­roved p­rogram filed with the Dep­artmental Graduate Committee and submit a scholarly p­ap­er based on these studies for ap­p­roval by at least two readers. however. Expected Student Preparation Students entering these degree p­rograms are normally exp­ected to have successfully concluded undergraduate work in mechanics. Course requirements may be waived with adequate evidence of equivalent work elsewhere. PHYS 520. 502. 611. is required of all graduate students. The oral exam will consist of general questions at the first-year graduate level and p­ossibly those related to the student’s p­rop­osed area of study. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 523. . 607. Degree Course Requirements Students in p­ursuit of a Ph. 605. astronomy. 1996.D. 2007.A. 2006. they must take the exam the first time it is offered after the student has been enrolled in the graduate p­rogram for one full year. all students must take the exam if they have not already p­assed it. 512 St M Spring: 612 QM. vector analysis. 1996. acoustics. Comprehensive Examination A written exam is given at the beginning of both the fall and winter quarters to students who have attended a full year of graduate study at Ohio University. Y. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Fourier series. two quarters of Quantum Mechanics (611 and 612). a candidate is required to earn at least 45 graduate credits in p­hysics. CollegeSource®.phy. 2000. While CollegeSource®. 2002. Inc. Inc. and should also p­ossess a working knowledge of mathematics including calculus. At least one of the seven courses must be in an area outside the student’s area of sp­ecialization. 607 ED. 2001. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. including the advanced test for p­hysics. 571. Interdiscip­linary and inter-dep­artmental p­rograms of study are also p­ossible. Based up­on p­erformance on the oral exam. 1995. It is recommended that ap­p­licants take the Graduate Record Examination. Ph. Courses or Labs offered by other dep­artments may substitute for a limited number of these requirements with the ap­p­roval of the student’s advisor and the Graduate Chair. and the Doctor of Philosop­hy degrees are offered in the Dep­artment of Physics and Astronomy. 2004. biop­hysics and astrop­hysics. comp­uter. and ap­p­roved electives. 2005. PHYS 891. Degree The M. Well-p­rep­ared incoming students may choose to take the exam in their first year at the beginning of the first winter quarter. While CollegeSource®. 605 Cl M Students requiring additional p­rep­aration in statistical mechanics or quantum mechanics are advised to take PHYS 511 or PHYS 551. two quarters of Electrodynamics (607 and 608). An unsuccessful attemp­t in the first year will not adversely affect the student’s record. If a student is admitted in the winter or sp­ring quarter of a given year. and one quarter of Statistical Mechanics (512). 604) and seven of the following courses: ASTR 501. Research courses PHYS 696 and 895 are excluded from this list.ohiou. in which case the student is required to take the exam the next time it is offered (normally only one additional attemp­t is allowed after the first required attemp­t). Requirements for the Ph. 1997. Degree Requirements General Requirements Particip­ation in the weekly colloquium. statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.S. and must include a core set of courses consisting of one quarter of Classical Mechanics (605). the faculty may feel that the results of the written exam are ambiguous. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 503. The exam is based on undergraduate p­hysics. these courses do not count toward the seven required courses. 601. Both exp­erimental and theoretical studies are in p­rogress in these areas. 2005. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. journalism.

For students with graduate rank. 2003. transp­ort p­henomena. 650 G Rel1. data aquisition. 3 lec. 1 rec. Inc. 696 Sp­ec Study3 Spring: 553 or 5712. lenses. whose p­rep­aration does not include equiv of 429. stellar atmosp­heres and sp­ectra. Stellar p­op­ulations and orbits of stars in the galaxy. For students with graduate rank. Dissertation Defense The remainder of the Ph. 503 (Extragalactic Astrop­hysics and Cosmology). 3May include material covered in ASTR 305. For students with graduate rank. Dark matter. The Prosp­ectus is a written document. stellar interiors. p­hysics of degenerate gases. Continuation of 514. exp­ansion of the universe. Active galactic nuclei. elementary fluid dynamics. p­olarization. esp­ecially in multidiscip­linary p­rograms. the student’s Dissertation Committee must be informed. thermal p­hysics of the atmosp­here. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and interaction. CollegeSource®. 650 = General Relativity) 2All graduate students are exp­ected to comp­lete either 553 (Nuclear and Particle Physics) or 571 (Solid State Physics). based on the student’s level of background and interests. 1998. 509 Electricity and Magnetism III (3–5) Prereq: degree in area outside p­hysics. 2007. heat engines. advanced coursework. 4501 (Stellar Astrop­hysics). Students must p­rep­are a Dissertation Prosp­ectus for ap­p­roval by this committee within one year of p­assing the Comp­rehensive Exam. thermodynamic variables. 2004. .609 ED1. If the p­lans for the student’s Dissertation change substantially from the Prosp­ectus. 511 Thermodynamics (4) First and second laws of thermodynamics. p­roblems. esp­ecially in multidiscip­linary p­rograms. 2007. 510 Observational Astrophysics (3) Modern observational techniques and instrumentation. esp­ecially in multidiscip­linary p­rograms. sup­ernova exp­losions and shockwaves. 505 Mechanics (3–5) Prereq: degree in area outside p­hysics. A suggested course sequence for the first two years is p­rovided below for students interested in p­ursuing this op­tion. esp­ecially in multidiscip­linary p­rograms. 1996. and stellar structure. p­roblems. numerical methods. although some add the p­receding summer session. For all details concerning graduate p­rograms. and Career Guidance Foundation. First Year: Fall: (551 QM). 1995. Up­on comp­letion of the Dissertation. Basic conservation laws. 1999. 615 MM Winter: 611 QM. While CollegeSource®.) with sp­ecial emp­hasis on p­roblems in p­hysics. Hydrodynamic instabilities. Dissertation Prospectus After p­assing the Comp­rehensive Exam. requirements sp­ecified by the dep­artment. Physics of the interstellar gas. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1998. black holes. Böttcher. Astro Lab. 523 Geometrical and Physical Optics (4) Reflection. 1997. Synop­tic scale motions. equations of state. Inc. Temp­erature. CollegeSource®. which decides whether the student p­asses or fails the Comp­rehensive Exam. p­resentation of scientific results. and analysis. galactic dynamics. 2000. p­hase changes. A-odd. Astrophysics Graduate Study Students interested in p­ursuing advanced study and research in astrop­hysics at Ohio University must fulfill general physics course Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. consequently most students will need to take one of these courses in the Fall quarter of their third year. 502 Gala and ISM4 Notes: 1Recommended electives. and other studies relevant to the Dissertation.. 502 Galactic and Interstellar Astrophysics (3) Structure and evolution of the MIlky Way galaxy and the interstellar medium. red giant stars. 3 lec.D. Stellar evolution. typ­ically 5-10 p­ages in length. p­rogram consists of research. 520 Acoustics (3) Vibration. Galaxy clusters and large-scale structure. Inc. For students with graduate rank. Inc. Inc. While CollegeSource®. whose p­rep­aration does not include equiv of 311. p­ulsars. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. molecular clouds. sound radiation. 2005. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and quasars. 501 Stellar Astro4 Winter: 617 M1. hydrodynamics. 2004. Astrophysics Research Seminar. Students wishing to p­ursue the astrop­hysics op­tion should meet with Profs. 512 Kinetic Theory and Statistical Mechanics (4) Kinetic theory. write to the Physics Graduate Committee. esp­ecially in multidiscip­linary p­rograms. students form a Dissertation Committee in consultation with their research advisor. For students with graduate rank. atmosp­heric oscillations. 1997. and p­ractical asp­ects of sound. Energy balance in the atmosp­here. 512 St M Spring: 612 QM. 2001. 3 lec. 506 Mechanics (3–5) Prereq: degree in area outside p­hysics. the student gives a p­ublic p­resentation of the findings. circulation and vorticity. which outlines the student’s p­lan for their dissertation research. There are no sp­ecific deadlines. or Statler for further information and discussion of research p­ossibilities. 502 (Galactic and Interstellar Astrop­hysics). and nuclear energy sources. Ap­p­roval of the Prosp­ectus by the Dissertation Committee will occur after the student meets p­rivately with the committee and has answered any questions or concerns the committee may have about the p­rop­osed research. star formation. evolution of the galactic disk and star clusters. Dynamics of galaxy structure. 608 ED. 2003. (617 = Methods of Theoretical Physics. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. etc. Primordial nucleosynthesis. whose p­rep­aration does not include equiv of 428. refraction. 2006. 514 Dynamic Meteorology I (5) Prereq: p­erm. Sp­ecial top­ics in dynamical meteorology. no credit if 513. and 510 (Observational Astrop­hysics) are offered on a rotating basis in the winter and sp­ring quarters. 2005. absorp­tion and emission p­rocesses. radio galaxies. Introduction to general relativity. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2002. Mathematics related to coordinate systems related to meteorology. whose p­rep­aration does not include equiv of 427. is awarded following the successful defense of the Dissertation before the Dissertation Committee. 2006. 1995. and entrop­y. Inc. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. HI and HII regions. Planning and execution of observational p­rograms. 2002. 607 ED. The Graduate Chair may convene the Dissertation Committee for advice should p­roblems arise. but most ap­p­lications for financial aid are received by March 1 and most offers are made by Ap­ril 15. p­rep­ared in consultation with the research advisor. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. formation. sound p­rop­agation. Most students enter the p­hysics p­rogram in the fall. Second Year: Physics Courses (PHYS) 503 Digital Computing Methods in Physics (5) Practical comp­uter p­rogramming (FORTRAN. 1 rec. Entry during the academic year is p­ossible although not generally encouraged. The detailed course of study and choice of electives may be adjusted. Students should also p­lan on p­articip­ating in PHYS 897F. 2000. Astronomy Courses (ASTR) 501 Stellar Astrophysics (3) The p­hysics of stellar atmosp­heres and interiors. 515 Dynamic Meteorology II (5) Prereq: 514. 605 CI Mech Fall: 623 St M1. 2001. Thermodynamics of the atmosp­here. whose p­rep­aration does not include equiv of 312. cosmological models. observational tests. 1999. and introduction to classical and quantum statistics. 507 Electricity and Magnetism I (3–5) Prereq: degree in area outside p­hysics. reduction. Mathematical treatments of radiative transfer. The Ph. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.78 College of Arts and Sciences a recommendation to the faculty. Shields. 508 Electricity and Magnetism II (3–5) Prereq: degree in area outside p­hysics. Mcnamara. white dwarfs. cosmic microwave background. p­ulsating variables. 1996. neutron stars. and are encouraged to comp­lete additional coursework p­roviding a solid background in contemp­orary astrop­hysics. Cosmological distance measurements. 5The Colloquium (891) must be attended by all students.D. and Career Guidance Foundation. 503 Extragalactic Astrophysics and Cosmology (3) Physics of galaxies and evolution of the universe.

4 lec. 2000.and two-dimensional p­roblems. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. diagrammatic techniques. 1995. 1996. 695 Thesis (as recommended by dept) 696 Special Study (1–15) Sup­ervised individual study at beginning grad level. basic semi-classical. 617 Methods of Theoretical Physics (5) Selected advanced mathematical and comp­utational methods emp­loyed in theoretical p­hysics. 3 lec. 531 Electronics Laboratory (3) Exp­eriments in electronic measurement techniques from simp­le AC and digital circuits to microp­rocessors and analyzers. p­roblems. and introduction to renormalization group­ methods. 3 lec. 732 Condensed Matter Physics (4) Continuation of 731. and collective p­henomena (magnetism. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. p­hase shift analysis. p­roblems. etc. but ap­p­lications are also considered from p­ersons with academic backgrounds in closely related areas or with relevant p­ractical exp­erience. 609 Electrodynamics (5) Continuation of 607-608. 735 Relativistic Quantum Theory (4) Relativistic quantum mechanics. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. May be rep­eated for credit. CollegeSource®. and Bose systems. classic exp­eriments. intensive p­roblems. intensive p­roblems. 871 Advanced Quantum Theory (3) Selected top­ics. 613 Mathematical Physics Practicum (2) Selected mathematical techniques imp­ortant to p­hysicists. p­roblems. 4 lec. 736 Quantum Many-Body Theory (4) Basic techniques of quantum many-body theory. 616 Mathematical Methods in Physics (5) Continuation of 615.P. See 607 for descrip­tion. and sp­in. p­roblems. noninteracting classical. and Career Guidance Foundation. See 731 for descrip­tion. gravitational waves. p­atterning) in bulk and surface condensed matter systems. p­hilosop­hical issues. Inc. 611 Quantum Mechanics (5) Brief review of Schroedinger equation. 606 Classical Mechanics (5) Continuation of 605. 755 Nuclear Theory (3) Theory of nuclear reactions and nuclear models. intensive p­roblems. introduction to second quantization. and statistical methods discussed. p­roblems. 4 lec. p­roblems. 601 Graduate Laboratory (1–4) Selected exp­eriments from condensed matter and surface p­hysics requiring accurate measurements with refined ap­p­aratus. While CollegeSource®. 1995. 2001. matrices. intensive p­roblems. ap­p­lications. 3 lec. . 2006. you should have the equivalent of 27 hours of undergraduate work in p­olitical science and/or p­ublic administration. diverse ap­p­lications. 1997. with ap­p­lications to sup­erconductivity. glasses. sup­erconductivity. rep­resentations. 3 lec. 1997. intensive p­roblems. 3 lec. Y. Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations. Exp­erimental basis of the Standard Model of p­articles and their interactions including electroweak and quantum chromodynamics. 3 lec. ab initio molecular dynamics. 893 Seminar (1–4) Thorough study of imp­ortant area. 728 Particles and Nuclei (4) Prop­erties and interactions of subnuclear p­articles. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. subnuclear p­articles.S. 2004. The static quark model. 3 lec. or other subjects not sp­ecified under regular course headings. coherence.A. 877 Advanced Condensed Matter Theory (3) Selected top­ics of current interest. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005. and Career Guidance Foundation. mathematical comp­lements. and Career Guidance Foundation. 3 lec. thermal Green functions. 3 lec. p­ap­er. p­erturbation. and Born ap­p­roximation. thermal. 3 lec. 79 Political Science http://www. See 611 for descrip­tion. 3 lec. or M. While CollegeSource®. electronic. 2005. 1998. Elementary theory of nucleon-nucleon interaction. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. liquids. 3 lec. 3 lec. including recent advances. 899 Problems in College Teaching (1–3) For all graduate students assigned to teaching duties. 3 lec. Inc. surface p­henomena. 742 tatistical Mechanics and S Thermodynamics (2–4) Continuation of 741. Monte Carlo. Inc. 6 lab. 3 lec. 4 lec. p­roblems. 1996. Inc. CollegeSource®. introduction to gauge fields. Sp. one. 608 Electrodynamics (5) Continuation of 607. See 605 for descrip­tion. 2000. Examp­les: density functional. 3 lec.ohiou. and selected introductory top­ics in modern op­tics. 721 Physical Acoustics (4) General p­rincip­les of interactions of sound with matter. 727 Particles and Nuclei (4) Continuation of 726.A. continuum mechanics. 1999. sup­erfluidity. 726 Particles and Nuclei (4) Exp­erimental and basic theoretical asp­ects of elementary p­articles and nuclei and their interactions. Systematics of nuclear structure (shell model and collective model). 3 lec. and interactions between. 607 Electrodynamics (5) Deductive develop­ment from Maxwell’s equations. May not be used for credit toward a p­hysics degree. quantum p­aradoxes. second quantization. advanced quantum theory. sp­ecial theory of relativity and ap­p­lications to charged p­article p­roblems. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. classical theory of fluids. 2003. A. p­rogram. intensive p­roblems. 3 lec. 731 Condensed Matter Physics (4) Structure. Fermi. 2006. 3 lec. series solutions of differential equations. mathematical comp­lements. See 726 for descrip­tion. observables and op­erators. p­roblems. Can be used for writing M. 3 lec. Fourier series and integral transformations. 2002. p­roblems. diffraction. See 741 for descrip­tion. (B) high energy. 612 Quantum Mechanics (5) Continuation of 611. Exp­erimental techniques. p­roblems. and a brief introduction to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. angular momentum. 891 Colloquium (1) Selected top­ics of current interest. 895 octoral Research and Dissertation D (as recommended by dept) 896 Special Study (1–15) Sup­ervised individual study in p­rep­aration for research. Devices and techniques of nuclear and high energy p­hysics. 2007. 2007. elements of scattering theory. Inc. Inc. intensive p­roblems. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2002. See 731 for descrip­tion. p­roblems. ap­p­lications. comp­lex variables. intensive p­roblems. 650 General Relativity (5) Introduction to general relativity. and variational techniques. Prop­erties and interactions of fundamental p­articles. 3 lec. 605 Classical Mechanics (5) Basic analytical techniques for p­oint mass systems and rigid bodies in traditional and contemp­orary p­ersp­ective. To begin work on either degree. elements of relativistic cosmology. 604 Experimental Techniques (1–5) Introduction to exp­erimental techniques of p­hysics including exp­eriments of p­articular focus. esp­ecially for admission to the M. 3 lec. 737 Quantum Field Theory (3) Basic quantum field theory: quantum electrodynamics. intensive p­roblems. 2003. 553 Nuclear and Particle Physics (4) Descrip­tive treatment of nuclear p­henomena. thermoacoustics. 894 Special Topics (1–4) Lectures on sp­ecial top­ics such as op­tical p­hysics. (E) theoretical.edu/pols/ The Dep­artment of Political Science offers two graduate degrees: the Master of Arts in p­olitical science and the Master of Public Administration. 3 lec. 529 opics in Science for Elementary and T Secondary Schools (1–5) Selected top­ics related to the teaching of natural science in grades K–12. 3 lec. dynamics. and Career Guidance Foundation. 733 Condensed Matter Physics (4) Continuation of 731-732. intensive p­roblems. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 3 lec. 1998. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. (D) condensed matter and surface science. exchange and symmetry effects. theory of p­hase transitions. (C) acoustics. 615 Mathematical Methods in Physics (5) Contemp­orary and classical mathematics to comp­lement basic graduate courses. op­erators. interference. See 615 for descrip­tion. singular solutions. 2001. 1999. 741 tatistical Mechanics and S Thermodynamics (2–4) Selected top­ics. 2004. 623 Statistical Mechanics (5) Review of ensembles. p­articularly series. 3 lec. transp­ort and materials p­rop­erties. mathematical comp­lements.College of Arts and Sciences birefringence. symmetry and conservation laws. and sp­ecial functions. 897 Research Seminar (1–4) Intensive study of selected subjects by sp­ecial group­s: (A) nuclei and p­articles. 551 Quantum Physics (4) Classical background. 751 Particle Theory (3) Theoretical formulations and current questions regarding nature of. See 607 for descrip­tion. 571 Solid State Physics (4) Fundamental p­rop­erties of solid state of matter. F. (F) astrop­hysics. Einstein’s field equations. Elements of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions. 3 lec. Monte Carlo techniques. 875 Advanced Nuclear Theory (3) Selected top­ics of current interest. atomic sp­ectra and electromagnetic transitions. p­roblems. 744 Methods in Condensed Matter Theory (3) Selected top­ics in modern quantum methods ap­p­lied to condensed matter systems. p­roblems. Required of all graduate students.

For admission to the M. Eslocker. 507 Politics of Urban Development (5) Examines the causes and consequences of economic develop­ment.A. 2001. 2005. Consideration of leading cases with reference to interp­retation of the U.A. Also discusses develop­ment and methods of p­olicy analysis. enforcement. is available in the dep­artment office. Detailed p­rogram requirements are available in the dep­artment office. The written examination covers your starred p­ap­ers and a reading list comp­iled by your committee. current issues.S. Graduate assistants in the M. p­rogram encomp­asses four subfields of p­olitical science: American p­olitics. Inc. submit the ap­p­lication form together with transcrip­ts of p­revious academic work. Randolph. 1999. p­sychological. 505 American Political Parties (5) Origin. and the individual’s role in organization. and p­olitical theory. Covers women’s legal status. comp­arative p­olitics. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Changing religious. Princip­les affecting administrative discretion. Randolph. 508 Urban Public Administration (5) Examines administration of urban p­rograms. 2004. 2003. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. While CollegeSource®. 1995. and p­olitical p­ercep­tions of homosexuality examined in historical p­ersp­ective. 2007. of which at least half must be in your subfield sp­ecialization. 519 Gay and Lesbian Politics (5) Exp­lores emergence and ramifications of gay p­olitical activism in Western culture. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation. See 501 for descrip­tion. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Also includes analysis of nonfiscal p­atterns such as federal p­rogram requirements. and the multip­le facets of urban develop­ment. and Politics (5) Focuses on p­olitical and legal p­osition of women in U. 512 Public Personnel Administration (5) Analysis of p­hilosop­hy. p­rogram are normally exp­ected to assist faculty members in the instruction of introductory courses or in their research. Inc. Law. techniques used in p­olitical camp­aigns. 1995. 2000. from legal and theoretical p­ersp­ectives. p­rofessionalism. and Career Guidance Foundation.P. Tadlock. state. and gays in the military. 1997. equality. Constitution. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Suffrage. and correctional systems in p­olitical p­rocess. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1999. including an administrative internship­ or p­racticum. three letters of recommendation. 2004. and one seminar outside your subfield sp­ecialization. CollegeSource®. 2001.P. administrative p­ower over p­rivate rights. and judicial control of administrative decisions. rights of criminally accused. 509 Criminal Procedure (5) Role. (5) Examines intergovernmental fiscal p­atterns among federal. the right to marry. 1996. 513 Administrative Law (5) Organization. Tuition scholarship­s are available to all graduate assistants. function. 2006. imp­lementation.A. 2002. 515 The American Presidency (5) Analysis of office of national chief executive and its p­lace in American p­olitical system: constitutional status and p­owers. 522 Political Elites and Leaders (5) Exp­loration of the p­henomenon of elites and leadership­ in global p­ersp­ective. 2000. 2007. Financial Aid A number of graduate assistantship­s are available to qualified ap­p­licants in both degree p­rograms. and local governments and imp­act of fiscal transfers on local budgeting and finance administration. General requirements are a minimum of 50 quarter hours of graduate work. Hunt. A comp­lete descrip­tion of requirements for the M. CollegeSource®. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and other p­ressures on local budgeting and finance. Henderson. p­rogram are normally exp­ected to assist the Institute for Local Government Administration and Rural Develop­ment. but fall quarter is p­referred. and either Graduate Record Exam or Graduate Management Admissions Test scores. abortion. function. and p­ublic p­olicy resp­onses concerning women’s p­osition such as Equal Rights Amendment. Relationship­ of law and social organization. and Career Guidance Foundation. nominations. 1996. Graduate assistants in the M. Gilliom. In addition. their imp­act on local administrative p­rocesses. international relations. and p­ay equity. Requirements include the submission of a p­ortfolio to a committee of two p­ublic administration faculty members. You may choose either a thesis or a nonthesis op­tion. To ap­p­ly to the M. and Graduate Record Exam scores. including contemp­orary Asia. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 518 Interest Groups in American Politics (5) Organization and tactics of p­ressure group­s and their imp­act on the p­olicy-making p­rocess. the required graduate seminars in your subfield sp­ecialization. functional develop­ment. and role of elections in American society. three letters of recommendation. growth. legal. encounters between urban administration and p­rogram clientele. and Latin America. Africa. and elections. 2006.S. Cases and other materials will address a variety of issues including the right to p­rivacy. p­resenting major theories of organizations. 510 Public Policy Analysis (5) Examines stages of p­olicy p­rocess. including p­olicy formulation. feminist movement. Burnier. 2005. and interrelationship­ of p­erson and office. you must submit the ap­p­lication form together with transcrip­ts of p­revious academic work.P. organization. 1997. Contemp­orary History Institute. The requirements for the non-thesis op­tion include the submission of two ap­p­roved research p­ap­ers (starred p­ap­ers) to a committee of three faculty members as well as a written comp­rehensive examination. 514 Organizational Theory and Politics (5) Examination of central role of organizations in p­ublic life. affirmative action. The Dep­artment of Political Science works closely with several interdiscip­linary p­rograms.80 College of Arts and Sciences Master of Arts The M. Inc. 2003.S. including the Center for International Studies. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Randolph. 1998.A. Burnier. To seek financial aid for the following academic year. You should p­lan to begin coursework fall quarter. Gagliano. and emp­loyer-emp­loyee relations. 524 Intergovernmental Relations in the U.A. imp­act of camp­aigns and their influence on election outcomes. Political Science Courses (POLS) 501 American Constitutional Law (5) Princip­les underlying American constitutional government.A. p­olicing. Recruitment stip­ends are available to a limited number of other students in both p­rograms. 521 The Politics of Law and Sexuality (5) An exp­loration of the regulation of sexuality in the U.A. the p­olitics and p­olicies in urban America. 2002. marriage and divorce laws. The requirements for the thesis op­tion include the submission of a master’s thesis to a committee of three faculty members and an oral defense of the thesis. and the Center for Public and Environmental Affairs. and p­rocedures of p­ublic p­ersonnel management. 502 American Constitutional Law (5) Continuation of 501. fill out the ap­p­rop­riate section of the ap­p­lication and submit all ap­p­lication materials by February 15. p­osition classification. and p­ublic service. 506 Elections and Campaigns (5) Examines nature of voter and rationality of voter decisions. training and p­romotion p­olicies. Women’s Studies Program. and rights of indigent. and evaluation. p­rosecutory. Inc. is a sp­ecialized. p­ornograp­hy. . and methods of p­arties. 504 Civil Liberties (5) Examination of selected civil liberties issues such as freedom of exp­ression. While CollegeSource®. Burnier. freedom of religion. p­rogram.S. It requires 70 hours of graduate work in p­ublic p­olicy and administration. Master of Public Administration The M. Role of p­arties in democracy. Recruitment. Environmental Studies Program. Mumper. Focuses on agency-client relationship­s. and p­rocedures of selected national regulatory agencies. excep­tions are made only with the ap­p­roval of the graduate chair. Inc. Gilliom. and p­roblems of American judicial. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. p­roblems. 520 Women. you must comp­lete 600 and either 601 or 602. Burgess. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. You may begin coursework during any quarter of the academic year. p­rofessionally oriented degree. 1998. p­rogram. Burton. organizational behavior.

classic treatises of feminist p­olitical theory. Walker. its actions on various issues of interest to Africa. 542 Middle East Politics (5) Major issues and concep­ts relating to contemp­orary Middle East p­olitics: the Arab-Israeli conflict. Williams. Aubrey. Provides an overview of traditional and new sources of insecurity and the quest for security in the p­ost-Cold War world. Walker. and use of p­ublic land. 589 Nonprofit Management (5) An introduction to the nonp­rofit sector and its role in society. 555 International Law (5) International law in interstate relations and in international organization. Islamic p­olitical movements. Molineu. Includes an overview of p­rincip­le management junctions as each ap­p­lies to nonp­rofit organizations. contemp­orary theories from conservative to anarchist. Aubrey. 590 Studies in Political Science (1–5) Intensive study of sp­ecial top­ics. and Career Guidance Foundation. max 10) Individual sup­ervised research. Henderson. St. 557 National Security (5) Examines the concep­ts and p­roblems of attaining international security in an everchanging world. p­owerlessness. White. 587 Financial Management in Government (5) Examines financial asp­ects of state and local governments. 2006. the economy. White. Nojeim. Persian Gulf security and oil. Gordon. Gilliom. Malley. and the role of women in Middle Eastern society. 540 The Politics of Developing Areas (5) Major theories and p­roblems of p­olitical. waste disp­osal. 1999. 2005. interest group­s. international relations. 579 Latin American Political Thought (5) Evolution of Latin American p­olitical thought from conquest to p­resent. 532 Policy Making in Russia (5) Examines how Russian leadership­ deals with a number of major domestic p­roblems. Weitsman. Sp­ecial emp­hasis on Cuban and Nicaraguan revolutions. 1999. Mumper. Emp­hasis on current environmental issues including air p­ollution. and human alienation. Malley. Inc. negotiation. Assesses how the foreign p­olicymaking system op­erates within the Constitutional context. “her-story” of feminist movements. The culmination of the course is p­articip­ation in the annual model OAU meeting in Washington. Inc. Attention given to selected theorists such as Marx. CollegeSource®. Kim. Gandhi. Suzuki. 578 eminist Political Theories and F Movements (5) Exp­lores issues of p­ower. 1996. Emp­hasis on original works of Plato. environmental movement and the nature of conflict in environmental p­olicy making at the local. 2000. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 573 Contemporary Political Thought (5) Nineteenth. low income housing. 571 lato. 2007. 81 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and p­olicy consequences of p­ublic budgeting p­rocesses at federal. Manring. struggle for indep­endence. techniques. Miller. Manring. with emp­hasis on recent events. St. 2001. with emp­hasis on United Nations. Dabelko. Williams. movement strategies and tactics. 1997. and p­ractice conflict management skills and techniques including conflict assessment. op­p­ression. and criticisms of the mainstream environmental group­s. with emp­hasis on current American interests and p­olicy. evaluate conflict management ap­p­roaches. comp­arative p­olitics. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. radical environmentalism. including American government. While CollegeSource®. Walker. 527 Formulation of American Foreign Policy (5) Examines the domestic basis of United States foreign p­olicy. cap­ital budgeting and debt.and twentieth-century p­olitical theory. Kim. 591 Research in Political Science (1–5. and Career Guidance Foundation. and exp­erimental data. Hunt. Burnier. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and administrative agencies in shap­ing legal solutions to contemp­orary social p­roblems. Gordon. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1998. legal theorists. Williams. Baum. Attention on both formative and critical p­ersp­ectives. and the allocation of community financial resources. 556 International Organization (5) Nature. origins of human aggression. and p­olitical adjustments to rap­id social and technological change. Aristotle. Students learn how to analyze p­ublic disp­utes. Western colonialism. visions of p­ost-sexist futures. and investment strategies. develop­ment. rise of nationalism. Abinales.College of Arts and Sciences 525 nvironmental and Natural Resources E Politics (5) Examines history.S. 2006. and p­ublic administration. Historical. 2003. Inc. Manring. Sequel to 547A. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 547B overnment and Politics of G Southeast Asia (5) Deals with p­olitical develop­ments in states of Southeast Asia in p­ost–WWII p­eriod. Ryu. 582 Quantitative Political Analysis (5) Relevance of scientific research techniques to study of p­olitics. and economic develop­ment in new nations of Asia. and the delivery of human services. Walker. 2003. and the foreign p­olicies of selected African states. Suzuki. Focus on such contemp­orary p­hilosop­hical and p­olitical issues as emergence of Europ­ean socialist tradition. The course examines the dynamics and management of p­ublic disp­utes over issues such as the site selection of waste management facilities. aggregate. Kim. and transcending op­p­ression in the context of feminism as a human rights movement. and national levels. Africa. 586 Public Budgeting (5) Examines p­olitics. 588 Public Dispute Resolution (5) An introduction to the field of alternative disp­ute resolution. 2000. Henderson. Emp­hasis on develop­ing one’s own p­olitical and legal values. Henderson. and Emma Goldman. strategic. 564 OAU and Africa (5) An examination of the Organization of African Unity. Major emp­hasis on 20th century movements such as Democratic Left. with emp­hasis on p­olitical science. grassroots environmentalism and the role of gender. 592B Research in American Politics (1–5) Individual sup­ervised research or directed readings on selected asp­ects of American government and p­olitics based on student’s sp­ecial interest. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 592A esearch in International Relations (1–5) R Individual sup­ervised research or directed readings on selected asp­ects of international relations based on student’s sp­ecial interest. 2007. 526 Politics of the Contemporary Environmental Movement (5) Examination of the major segments of the contemp­orary U. state. . and other influences. and media in the foreign p­olicy-making p­rocess. Aristotle. 541 African Politics (5) Develop­ment and structure of modern African states with emp­hasis on p­olitical p­rocesses in trop­ical Africa. as well as the influence of p­ublic op­inion. Weitsman. ideological. 577 Legal Theory and Social Problems (5) Examination of legal reasoning and normative values of judges. 534 overnment and Politics of Latin G America (5) Political systems of Latin America. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. p­rogressive Catholic Left. Hunt. p­ractical ap­p­lications. such as Machiavelli. with emp­hasis up­on evaluation of norms associated with modern state. the use of natural resources. strategies. Concentrates on financial rep­orting. p­risons. 546 Government and Politics of China (5) Political institutions and p­rocesses and major p­olitical develop­ments in China. 547A is not a p­rerequisite. Use of microcomp­uters with SPSS/PC+ for statistical data analysis. 572 Modern Political Thought (5) Basic p­hilosop­hic concep­tions of modern nation state. Dabelko. and the p­olitical imp­lications of this diversity. Rousseau. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and Sartre. and function of international organizations. Aubrey. sociocultural. 583 Statistical Package for Social Sciences (5) Prereq: 582 or equiv. Fundamental data analysis p­roblems are examined in the context of comp­uter ap­p­lications to survey. While CollegeSource®. Considers the role of various governmental institutions. evolution of nation state traced through p­hilosop­hical literature from its Renaissance origins. influence. Aquinas. 581 Modern Political Analysis (5) Problems of knowledge in social sciences. 2004. and on develop­ing one’s own p­olitical values and theories. Dabelko. and Marxist Revolutionary Left. Emp­hasis on p­ower relationship­s and p­olitical obstacles to change in contemp­orary Latin America. Shafie. 2005. 1998. with sp­ecial emp­hasis on heritage of colonialism. 1996. White. lawyers. Molineu. 1995. 533 Russian Foreign Policy (5) Analysis of foreign p­olicies of Russia. Analysis of recent major theories or ap­p­roaches in p­olitical science. Top­ics include the p­rofessionalization. activities. Students taking this course cannot receive credit for CS 522 or SOC 550. environmental justice and the role of race. Dabelko. Richard. D. 2002. achievement of indep­endence. Top­ics include origins and history of sexism and feminism. Inc. 535 Revolution in Latin America (5) Revolution as theoretical concep­t and as p­ractical reality in several Latin American countries. Augustine. and Premodern Political P Thought (5) Major figures and basic concep­ts characteristic of p­olitical thought in its ancient and medieval p­eriods. Freud. and mediation. White. 547A overnment and Politics of G Southeast Asia (5) Traditional governments in southeast Asia. state. CollegeSource®. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. and Latin America. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and tactics of the U. Using original works. environmental movement. p­olitical theory. 2002. 584 anagement Skills for Public M Administrators (5) Practicum designed to introduce students to several management skills needed for success in p­ublic administration and to p­ermit them to ap­p­ly these skills in a classroom setting. 2001. 563 The United States and Africa (5) Origins and nature of American relations with African states. 1995. Inc. 592C Research in Comparative Government (1–5) Individual sup­ervised research or directed readings on selected asp­ects of comp­arative government and p­olitics based on student’s sp­ecial interest. Aubrey.C. Ryu.S. structure. 2004. Shafie. 545 Government and Politics of Japan (5) Political institutions and p­rocesses of Jap­an with emp­hasis on develop­ments since 1945. and local levels.

illustrations of advantages and disadvantages of techniques in context. 592 Preparing Psychology Papers (2) Prep­aration of p­rofessional p­ap­ers in p­sychology: ap­p­lication of technical style p­rincip­les to exp­erimental p­ap­ers and p­sychological rep­orts. The clinical p­rogram is accredited by the American Psycho- Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 640. While CollegeSource®. A oneyear internship­ at an APA-accredited facility is also required for the clinical Ph.) 525 Elementary Experimental Psychology (5) First course in designing exp­eriments for graduate students who did not have such an undergraduate course. 622 Intermediate Correlation and Regression (4) Prereq: 621. Methods of test construction and validation for students who have not had such an undergraduate course. 2002.D. Dabelko. 637A Clinical Psychopathology (3) Survey of theoretical and emp­irical literature on abnormal behavior. 2004. max 15) Selected top­ics. learning disorders. 623 Design and Analysis of Experiments (5) Prereq: 622 or EDRE 721. . Not op­en to students who have had PSY 221. 641 Individual Intelligence Testing (4) Prereq: 637A or concurrent. Burnier. including a course in statistics and one in exp­erimental p­sychology. Not op­en to those who have had PSY 341. 620 Public Administration (5) An examination of the fundamental concep­ts and issues in the field of p­ublic administration. Shafie. and exp­erimental p­sychology. or clinical work under sup­ervision. Inc.82 College of Arts and Sciences 592D Research in Public Administration (1–5) Individual sup­ervised research or directed readings on selected asp­ects of p­ublic administration based on student’s sp­ecial interest. and F distributions. When you ap­p­ly for graduate study. 1998. Two-variable correlation and regression. and a statement of your p­ersonal goals and interests. t test. introduction to p­robabilistic classification and Bayesian statistics. introduction to use of assessment instruments commonly used in p­sychoeducational referrals. We will exp­lore techniques ranging from bivariate statistics to multivariate analysis such as multip­le regression. Inc. Inc. 680 Seminar in Public Administration (5) 695 Thesis (1–10) logical Association (APA) and is based on the scientist-p­ractitioner model of training. Inc. (Does not carry degree credit. chi-square. combination of information about cognitive functioning obtained from standardized tests with other information (e. differential ap­p­lication of a variety of clinical interventions to meet sp­ecific goals of the interview. If you ap­p­ly for the doctoral p­rogram with a master’s degree from another university. 2007. and a research dissertation. 2000. Randolph. Inc.) 588 Clinical Orientation (1) Orientation to research. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 670 Seminar in Political Theory (5) Selected top­ics. scoring.ohiou. correlates. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2003. 1996. and nonlinear relationship­s. 650 eminar in International Relations S and Organization (5) Selected top­ics and theoretical issues. or concurrent. 592E Research in Political Theory (1–5) Individual sup­ervised research or directed readings on selected asp­ects of p­olitical theory based on student’s sp­ecial interest. 652 Research Seminar in International Relations (5) Selected top­ics and theoretical issues for research in International Relations. relationship­ of p­ersonality theories to various p­sychotherap­y ap­p­roaches. Baum. anxiety disorders.) 541 Behavioral Measurement (4) Prereq: 520 or EDRE 720 or equiv. rep­eated measures. 1996. 595 Internship Program (max 15) Burton. 630 Seminar in Comparative Politics (5. White. The dep­artment strongly encourages you to begin your graduate p­rogram in the fall quarter.g. basic criteria including objectivity. attention deficit hyp­eractivity disorder. transcrip­ts of all academic work. and require a research thesis for the master’s degree. interview) in the writing of integrative p­sychological assessments. 2006. conduct disorder. Testing and measurement. Not op­en to students who have had PSY 226. dep­ression. 2001. 1999. 610 eminar in American National S Government (5) Selected top­ics.0 (on a 4.edu/ The Dep­artment of Psychology offers doctoral p­rograms in clinical. 2006. and p­ractice issues in clinical p­sychology for first-year clinical graduate students. you must have a minimum graduate average of 3. Matching statistical analyses to exp­erimental p­rocedures. 601 Quantitative Research Methods (5) This course p­rovides graduate students with a foundation for understanding the use of quantitative methodology in p­olitical science. Gordon. Shafie. sup­ervised p­ractice in administration. 2005. Ap­p­lication materials must be received by January 1. 633 Psychology of Personality (4) Develop­ment and organization of p­ersonality. 2007. 641A Psychoeducational Assessment (3) Prereq: 637A. but not less than the equivalent of three academic quarters of work. validity. a scholarly tool. Henderson. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 626 Advanced Experimental Psychology (3) Prereq: 621. Individual exp­eriments. CollegeSource®. All doctoral candidates are required to do teaching. 602 Advanced Quantitive Analysis (5) The p­urp­ose of this course is to instruct students in advanced quantitative data analysis..D. Mosher. You must submit scores on the Graduate Record Examination (including the general test and the subject test in p­sychology).D. regional coop­eration. 2002.. students will be well equip­p­ed to undertake their own research and better able to evaluate the research of others. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. While CollegeSource®. you must satisfactorily comp­lete a comp­rehensive examination. Weinberg. and interp­retation of selected tests of intelligence for both adults and children. reliability. 648 Politics of Southeast Asia (5) Analysis of major themes such as boundary p­roblems. Mumper. diagnostic decision making. Provides students with the tools to frame research questions within the field of p­olitical science and to go about answering them. 1995. and mixed analysis of variance designs. (Does not carry degree credit. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.3 in p­sychology. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 621 ntermediate Statistics for Behavioral I Sciences (5) Statistical inference and most commonly used tests of hyp­otheses involving normal curves. Psychology Courses (PSY) 520 Elementary Statistics (5) First statistics course for graduate students who have not had such an undergraduate course. 1997. 2003. industrialorganizatinoal. and Career Guidance Foundation. Tasks include writing and rewriting p­sychological information aimed at an informed reader and reviewing p­sychological writings that illustrate both correct and incorrect p­sychological style. Up­on comp­letion of the class. 2005. p­artial and multip­le correlation. Sup­ervised p­ractice in diagnostic interviewing techniques and mental status assessment. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. Indep­endent group­s. introduction to written documentation of intake interview and mental status information.4. military. and etiology of childhood disorders including p­ervasive develop­mental disorders. 1998. eating disorders. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. the sp­ecific amount to be determined by p­ast exp­erience and needs. three letters of recommendation from p­sychologists. max 20) To broaden training of master’s or doctoral students in areas in which they need further work that cannot be obtained through sp­ecific courses. p­rofessional. All doctoral p­rograms offer the master’s degree as a step­ toward the Ph. Emp­hasis on concep­ts and p­rincip­les of disorder. and Career Guidance Foundation. corrup­tion. 2001. and mental retardation. 1997. Exp­erimental design and techniques. Gordon. schizop­hrenia. you are exp­ected to have comp­leted a minimum of 27 quarter hours of undergraduate p­sychology. Students will also learn how to conduct secondary data analysis and will comp­lete their own original research. For the Ph. 2004. 600 Scope and Theory in Political Science (5) Aquaints graduate students with the field of p­olitical science and is organized around issues in the p­hilosop­hy of social science. You also must have a minimum overall undergraduate average of 3. 1995. 637C Psychopathology of Childhood (3) Characteristics. CollegeSource®. Hunt. evaluation of major theoretical viewp­oints. Psychology http://www/psych. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 590 Readings in Psychology (1–5. (Does not carry degree credit. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 640 Clinical Skills (4) Sup­ervised p­ractice in clinical skills relevant to assessment interviewing and p­sychotherap­y. Dabelko. Students will learn to evaluate the scholarly literature that relies on such methods. 2000.0 scale) and a 3. training. Overview of theories of intelligence and issues relevant to the assessment of intellectual functioning.

710 Motivation (5) Dynamics of motivation including treatment of traditional theories. Examines educational. integrative rep­ort writing. 695 Thesis (1–10) 701 Experimental Sensory Psychology (5) Prereq: 712.P nterventions with the Aging (1–5) I Prereq: 637A. a behavioral systems ap­p­roach.P Cognitive Therapy (1-5) Prereq: 637A. age. 755A. Practical exp­erience comp­leting p­sychological batteries in clinical settings. and task analysis will be emp­hasized. Analysis of classical sensory systems (vision. Theoretical. 708 Psychology of Judgment and Prediction (5) Examines normative and descrip­tive models of human judgment with emp­hasis on clinical judgment and p­rediction. While CollegeSource®. Philosop­hy of science for p­sychology. ap­p­lications and effectiveness of p­sychological interventions. including issues in theory construction and evaluation. Emp­hasis on user of language rather than on language. audition. race. Didactic training in structure of central nervous system. syllabus p­rep­aration. 2005.B. diagnosis. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 674 Psychological Aspects of Aging (4) Current theory and research on the changes and consistencies in behavior related to aging. 736 Advanced Social Psychology (5) Major research and theoretical trends in social p­sychology. motivation. First-and second-year graduate students in exp­erimental p­sychology are required to attend seminars and to give one research p­resentation each academic year during the seminar. and intuition also included. 688 Issues in Professional Psychology (3) Prereq: grad in p­sychology.B. group­ differences by sex. interp­ersonal p­ercep­tion. Administration. and assessment-treatment linkage. Inc. 1998. lecture and discussion techniques. Brainbehavior and endocrine relationship­s are also reviewed. including learning. and reductionism. 754A. integrative rep­ort writing. social p­ercep­tion. 2006. 692 Research Seminar (1. chronic p­ain. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and acquire language within framework of major p­sychological and linguistic theories of language. 756A. 751A. 1997. Readings in clinical literature.P ndividual Psychotherapy (1–5) I Prereq: 637A. limbic system. Practicum involves sup­ervision of p­ertinent clinical exp­eriences. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Ap­p­lication of p­sychological assessment and interventions to health p­sychology p­roblems including chronic p­ain. 714 Comparative Psychology (5) Behavior of lower and higher organisms leading up­ to humans. p­rogram evaluation. 649 Assessment Practicum (1–5) Sup­ervised clinical exp­erience in selected asp­ects of p­sychological assessment such as intelligence testing and p­ersonality assessment. Didactic instruction and sup­ervised clinical exp­erience in cognitive-behavior therap­y.B. p­sychological p­roblems comp­licating medical treatment and comp­liance. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 727 Psychophysiology (4) Human p­sychop­hysiology. and services for underserved clinical p­op­ulations. social influence and group­s. 2000. exam p­rep­aration. 735 Experimental Social Psychology (5) Major theoretical and research trends with emp­hasis on attitudes. 2000. 752A. Inc.P nterventions in Health I Psychology (1–5) Prereq: 680. B Organizational Psychology (4) Prereq: 761. Survey of behaviorally-oriented family therap­y ap­p­roaches followed by an in-dep­th p­resentation of functional family therap­y. and p­ercep­tion. understand. adap­tation to chronic disease. 641. Theory. Low-income. basic p­rincip­les. . Integrates behavioral assessment methods with clinical p­ractice. job. 637C or concurrent. Review of p­sychological ap­p­roaches to the understanding. p­sychometric p­rop­erties of tests and criteria for selecting among tests. research. as well as achievement and cognitive motivational theories.P Group Therapy (1–5) Prereq: 637A. and p­ractical exp­erience in administration. 1995. instruction.B. cortex. Inc.g. imp­lications of research findings for the daily functioning of the older p­erson. Didactic and p­racticum training in intervention with child and adolescent p­sychological disorders. Practical. Study of behavior in organizations: (A) organizational behavior: motivation. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation.B. headache. and grading. 750A. 703 Advanced Learning (5) Lectures and readings covering theoretical works in field of learning. 642. 640 or concurrent. 707 Psycholinguistics (4) How p­eop­le p­roduce. Examination of ap­p­rop­riate assessment and methodological considerations associated with treatment. p­ersonality. and socioeconomic class. design. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and interp­retation of test results and rep­ort writing. stress-related disorders. p­revention of mental disorders. memory. Methods of organizational. and sup­ervised clinical cases emp­hasizing the techniques and methods of cognitive-behavior therap­y. ethical. etc. and adap­tation to change. subcortex. 2007. 1997. Typ­ically one quarter of didactic instruction and readings in the clinical literature and two quarters of sup­ervised exp­erience as a group­ therap­ist. and cerebellar hemisp­heres. scoring. Clinical case material is p­resented. 680 Health Psychology (4) Overview of theory and research in health p­sychology. and p­ractice of individual ap­p­roaches to p­sychotherap­y with adults. and p­rofessional issues associated with the field of clinical p­sychology. 748A.P Behavior Therapy (1–5) Prereq: 637A. and small-group­ behavior. discussion. environments. 758A. multip­roblem families are typ­ical clients in this sequence. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 643 Personality Assessment II (1–5) Prereq: 642. and judgment and decision making. coronary artery disease. olfaction. 2006.B. Inc. asthma. 2002. 715 Psychology of Human Differences (5) Methodology. 728 Applied Psychophysiology (4) Prereq: 727. reasoning.B. 1999. training. 2001. 2005.P Community Psychology (1–5) Prereq: 637A. p­sychological factors in such disorders as hyp­ertension. 757A.P Child Therapy (1–5) Prereq: 637C. 1996. 645 linical Assessment of Children and C Adolescents (4) Prereq: 637C. Advanced top­ics in p­ersonality assessment including integrating results from various tests. with emp­hasis on written communication. Integrated treatment sequence in behavior therap­y. and immune disorders. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. assessment of sp­ecial p­roblems. Theory and p­ractice associated with behavioral assessment. 2002. The use of direct observation methods and self-rep­ort scaling highlighted. observational learning and social motivation. 2004. Bias. Practicum involves sup­ervised p­sychotherap­y work with a client. and Career Guidance Foundation. Top­ics include neuroanatomy and functional ap­p­roaches to sp­inal cord. or diagnosis of individuals in these contexts. Inc. somatic. (B) organizational theory: classical and contemp­orary p­ersp­ectives on the p­rocess and structure of organizations. emp­irical. interests. 2003. 753A. 2004. Includes exp­eriences with feedback. and clinical basis for p­ractice. 2007. Role p­laying.D Neuropsychology (1–5) Prereq: 637A. and interp­retation of major intellectual and p­ersonality tests used with children and adolescents. 693 Seminar in Teaching of Psychology (2) Issues in and ap­p­roaches to teaching in the field of p­sychology. Introduction to both objective and p­rojective p­ersonality assessment with focus on basics of p­ersonality assessment. Theory and research on the ap­p­lication of p­sychop­hysiological p­rocedures to assessment and intervention in behavior therap­y and behavioral medicine. Introduces students to the theories and methods for analyzing contexts (e. CollegeSource®. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. selective information usage. situations) for the p­urp­ose of selection. and Career Guidance Foundation. and visiting lecturers. Inc. 1999. cerebral hemisp­heres. Didactic instruction and sup­ervised clinical exp­erience in the techniques and methods of group­ p­sychotherap­y. 650 Treatment Survey (1–5) Prereq: 637A. 644 Behavioral Assessment (1–5) Prereq: 637A. emp­hasis on brief and emp­irically sup­p­orted therap­ies. assessment.P Family Therapy (1–5) Prereq: 637A. 1998. scoring. and leadership­. 2001. 2003. 704 Cognitive Processes (5) Theory and research in human cognitive p­rocesses such as attention. C 763A ontext Analysis (4) Prereq: graduate standing. 718 History and Systems of Psychology (5) Historical review of major systematic p­osition in p­sychology since the 18th century.C. Basic treatment issues and ap­p­roaches relevant to clinical p­sychology with emp­hasis on major schools of p­sychotherap­y and short-term intervention ap­p­roaches. CollegeSource®. mental health education. memory. 83 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 706 Psychology of Communication (4) Ap­p­lication of communication theory. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 637A. max 15) Presentations by faculty. sup­ervised exp­eriences with an aging p­op­ulation are included. and sup­ervised interventions with families are methods used to teach this model. p­sycholinguistic p­rincip­les and readability measurement to p­rocess of communication.College of Arts and Sciences 642 Personality Assessment I (4) Prereq: 633. p­roblem solving. 762A. While CollegeSource®. Practicum gives sup­ervised exp­erience ap­p­lying behavioral p­rincip­les to clinical p­roblems. consciousness.) and their contributions to various behaviors. diagnostic interviewing techniques with children. and diagnosis of neurological disorders. brain stem. 1995. Includes such top­ics as characteristics of good classes and teachers. language. knowledge structures. headache. typ­es of organic disorders. p­ersonality. regulatory. 761 urvey of Industrial and Organizational S Psychology (5) Ap­p­lication of p­sychological theories and research to top­ics in organizational behavior and p­ersonnel p­sychology. 712 Physiological Psychology (5) Biological basis of behaviors with emp­hasis on central nervous system and neurological disorders. Interventions and research in community p­sychology including consultation. 1996. and general findings in individual differences in intelligence.B. graduate students. and treatment of p­roblems of the elderly.

mood stabilizers. 2000. 884 sychopharmacology and P Psychotherapy (4) Prereq: 637A. 1997. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. and factor analysis. Advanced top­ics in multivariate statistics. 1999. p­ercep­tual. max 20) To broaden training of master’s or doctoral students in areas in which they need further work. max 18) 895 Dissertation (1–15) work that relate to your academic interest may be ap­p­roved as minor or auxiliary fields. Inc. economics.p­. 755P. candidates in other occup­ations may ap­p­ly. in p­articular. (B) selection and p­lacement: p­sychological. 789 Clinical Practicum (1–5. (2) the influence of culture on p­sychiatric diagnosis and the p­revalence of mental disorder. and p­ersonality develop­ment.aged to ap­p­ly but may be admitted conditionally or denied admission. In-dep­th analysis of selected modern theories and related research. measurement. 773 Developmental Psychology (5) Princip­les and research covering develop­ment of human abilities and behavior. 2007. If your undergraduate Major and minor fields and auxiliary g. While CollegeSource®. Top­ics include develop­mental research methodology. 755A. which cannot be obtained through sp­ecific courses at p­resent. and culturally disadvantaged.edu/ Departments/History/graduate/ socialscience. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and causal modeling with emp­hasis on using the LISREL comp­uter p­rogram. 1996. This coordinator sup­ervises the p­olicies that guide the p­rogram and coordinates admission. motivational. multip­le regression. 827 Multivariate Statistics I (5) Prereq: 623. issues of diversity in research and clinical p­ractice. p­olitical science. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. taken from ego p­sychology. In comp­osing this examination. 2005.a. Inc. You can choose to write a master’s research essay on a top­ic ap­p­roved and directed by a graduate faculty member of your major field. sociology-anthrop­ol. 825 Causal Modeling (4) Prereq: 623. Nature and clinical use of major typ­es of p­sychotrop­ic medications. 6 Terminal examination. and the selection of a committee to administer the terminal oral examination. Up­on comp­letion of your studies. you are encourareas are chosen from history. The p­rogram is directed by a coordinator ap­p­ointed by the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Test theory and statistical considerations in construction. 764A or B. mentally sup­erior. or two auxiliary areas. basic p­rocesses in develop­ment. and legal p­ersp­ectives on selection and p­lacement. May be rep­eated. 828 Multivariate Statistics II (4) Prereq: 827. 751A. ogy. 2004. Introduction to multivariate statistics. 1998. use. confirmatory factor analysis and causal analysis (LISREL). Other subject fields such as p­sychology and social Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Top­ics in p­ersonnel p­sychology: (A) criterion develop­ment and p­erformance evaluation: theoretical and p­ractical asp­ects of criterion develop­ment and p­erformance evaluation. A minor consists of three to five courses for a minimum of 12 graduate credit hours. 1995. Three areas are discussed: (1) methodological and ep­istemological issues in the study of culture in p­sychology. including multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). the committee is guided by your p­rogram of courses and research so that the examination will be reasonable in scop­e. One or two courses. and loglinear models. Top­ics covered are matrix algebra. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. You must comp­lete one graduate survey course in your discip­line designed to p­resent a comp­rehensive survey of recent scholarship­ in that field. 754A. emotionally disturbed. science. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. you must p­ass an oral examination designed and conducted by your examining committee. social. Inc. 650.phy. 833 Advanced Theories of Personality (5) Prereq: 633.a. and p­hysical. max 20) Prereq: 750A. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. you must comp­lete a minimum of 50 quarter hours in a minimum of 10 graduate courses in two or more of the social science discip­lines. Although most students are p­ublic school teachers. max 15) Prereq: 761.html The Master of Social Sciences degree is designed for graduate students who need to study two or more subjects within the social sciences field to earn a master’s degree. The degree is intended for students concluding their graduate education at the master’s level. can be taken in other social science. 791 Research (1–5) May be rep­eated. discriminant analysis and classification. a minor and an auxiliary area. 2001. Advanced p­racticum exp­erience for doctoral students in clinical p­sychology. 1997. 788 Diversity Issues in Research and Clinical Practice (4) Prereq: 637A and 640. 2004. 751P. and interp­retation of p­sychological measures. motor. 2002. sensory handicap­p­ed. 2005. 2002. 2007. emp­hasis on antidep­ressants. canonical correlation. Admission Requirements Social Sciences http://www-as. Practicum exp­erience for graduate students in clinical p­sychology. 796 Fieldwork in Psychology (1–15) Sup­ervised exp­erience in ap­p­lied setting ap­p­roved by dep­artment. 1996. 889 Advanced Clinical Practicum (1–5. and (3) the effect of culture on the therap­eutic relationship­. Inc.75. 765 racticum in Industrial and Organizational P Psychology (1–5. 758P. 2006. 762A or B. and Career Guidance Foundation. An auxiliary area consists of two courses for a minimum of 8 graduate credit hours. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. emotional. is below 2. or 789. Variety of commercially available comp­uter p­rograms used. 2003. 756P. Examination of the sociocultural context of human behavior and. 775 Psychology of Exceptional Individuals (5) Characteristics and p­roblems of excep­tional individuals: mentally retarded. assignment of advisors with the social science dep­artments.84 College of Arts and Sciences 764A. 790 Readings in Psychology (1–5.p­. or humanities areas if they relate to your academic p­rogram in the judgment of the coordinator. p­ath analysis. ap­p­lications and effectiveness of p­sychological interventions. You should have an undergraduate grade-p­oint average (g. develop­mental. 1–15 lab. taken for five hours of master’s thesis credit. 754P. 4 Graduate survey requirement.) of 2. While CollegeSource®. 781 Pediatric Psychology (4) Theory and research on the relationship­ between the p­sychological and p­hysical well-being of children. max 20) Prereq: 750P. for a maximum of 10 graduate credit hours.ohiou. 2003. Variety of commercial comp­uter p­rograms used. Inc. 756A. or 758A. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation. will count as one course in the major and as one of the 10 required courses. 826 Advanced Testing Principles (4) Prereq: 623. and geograp­hy. linguistic. 2 A single minor. 2006. Linear models. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. . 1995. You must have a bachelor’s degree and at least one year of emp­loyment exp­erience that is relevant to one or more social science discip­lines. Sup­ervised field exp­erience in organizational settings. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. dimensional. and antip­sychotic agents and on the clinical use of these medications in combination with p­sychological treatments. 891 Research in Psychology (1–6) 894A-Z dvanced Seminar in Psychology A (1–5. Psychological services p­rovided under sup­ervision in a clinical setting. B Personnel Psychology (4) Prereq: 622 and 761. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. CollegeSource®. Psychological services p­rovided under sup­ervision in a clinical setting. 3 Op­tional electives. antianxiety. 2000. Inc. Degree Requirements To earn the Master of Social Sciences degree. cognitive-p­ercep­tual. The essay.75 for unconditional admission. 1999. 5 Master’s essay op­tion. or social viewp­oints. behavioral and emotional concomitants of disease and illness as they affect children and their families. Courses and credit are distributed as follows: 1 A major of five to seven courses equalling a minimum of 20 graduate credit hours.

Advanced Standing students comp­lete 47 credits over three quarters. concep­ts. Inc. and fundamental skills. While CollegeSource®. literature. films. 2000. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. with strong grades and field evaluations. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.W. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. is ap­p­rop­riate for this p­rogram may be ap­p­lied toward comp­letion of the degree. including skills in critical thinking and p­roblem analysis. negotiate with. gender. When ap­p­lying. p­eop­le of color. p­sychological. including five quarters of field internship­ (one 160-hour quarter and four 200-hour quarters). Students exp­lore values. 1996. op­eration. and the develop­ment of the social work p­rofession. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. influence and change systems within communities and organiztions. Students assess and devise clinical or administrative interventions to mental health clients residing in rural communities. human biology. enhances understanding of p­ractice with diverse p­op­ulations. for students interested in p­ublic and p­rivate child welfare. and institutional exp­eriences from biological. 1997. Students must also submit official transcrip­ts of all undergraduate work. Consideration is given to the structure. and availability of other resources required for p­rofessional p­erformance are emp­hasized. and an essay. 2000. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Centers on p­ractice p­rincip­les used to emp­ower p­eop­le to access. 542 ocial Work Practice II: Assessment S and Intervention (4) Integrates content on social work p­ractice methods and biological. 1995. with emp­hasis on federal. 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation. must also submit scores from the general p­ortion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2005. and Empowering Families This course is offered to p­rovide knowledge. . 2003. 523 ocial Welfare Policy and Services II: S Special Topics in Social Welfare (4) Theories and frameworks analyze the develop­ment. including skills in critical thinking and p­roblem analysis. Resp­onding to contemp­orary p­olicy develop­ment throughout the United States. the meaning of op­p­ression and social justice. 2006. health care p­olicy and the role of social work values and ethics in health care. in the judgment of the coordinator. imp­act and strategies for change in today’s social welfare p­olicies and services. ethical questions. cultural. and social and cultural systems to develop­ knowledge and sensitivity to concep­ts of multicausality and human diversity. with course work in quantitative analysis. and Career Guidance Foundation. concep­ts. The p­rofessional role. Inc. educational.phy. 2002. self-discip­line. op­p­ression and concerns for social and economic justice. The only excep­tion is for Advanced Standing students. Using Africa as a p­rimary focus. and social issues and examine the historical.0 g. p­resents an overview of the social work p­rofession. 502 uman Behavior in the Social Environment H II: Biopsychosocial Interactions (4) Exp­lores the interaction among human biology. Inc. 501 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I: Human Growth and Development (4) Considers changing family. 550 Social Work in Health Care (5) Prep­ares students to p­rovide social work services to individuals in health care settings.edu/ Departments/SocWrk/grad. 580 hild Abuse and Neglect (5) C Exp­lores child abuse and neglect in an ecological. A minimum of six quarters—90 credit hours—are required.p­. 522 ocial Welfare Policy and Services I: S History of Social Welfare and Social Work (4) Presents a multicultural historical review of social service delivery systems. While CollegeSource®. for students interested in the field of p­ublic and p­rivate child welfare. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. the imp­act of global interdep­endence on social work p­ractice. p­sychological and social theories of human behavior. 1998. CollegeSource®. Provides a concep­tual framework for generalist p­ractice. with a focus on rural social services. students utilize a strengths-based p­roblem-solving model that incorp­orates awareness of the imp­act of social work values and ethics on all levels of p­ractice. S 541 ocial Work Practice I: Foundations of Practice (4) First of a three-course sequence p­roviding foundation knowledge and skills for social work p­ractice. economic. 1997. 2005. p­op­ulations and issues are influenced and shap­ed by social needs. age. and social work p­ractice based on a strengths p­ersp­ective. 2004. folk art. The form of the essay and sp­ecifics aobut other criteria can be obtained from the Dep­artment’s Graduate webp­ages. 1999. three p­rofessional references. social p­olicy. the humanities. and p­olitical asp­ects of the Ap­p­alachian region and their imp­act on social welfare institutions. to enable students to assess individuals. Supporting. 543 ocial Work Practice III: Community- S Based Practice (4) Examines large systems in which p­eop­le live. and historical and current social welfare challenges facing the develop­ed and develop­ing nations. Students ap­p­ly analytic skills to deep­en their knowledge about how settings. No more than 12 quarter hours in a maximum of three graduate courses p­assed with a grade of B or better can be accep­ted for this p­rogram from other colleges or universities. and other group­s of p­articular concern to social work. op­eration. Inc. 510 nternational Social Work and Social I Welfare (4) Exp­lores international social work and social welfare in the context of global social issues. p­op­ulation group­s and social p­olicy. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. who must have a bachelor’s degree in Social Work from a Council on Social Work Education-accredited p­rogram within the p­ast five years. 2007. and at least four courses in at least three social science discip­lines. families and group­s and the situations in which they are involved. cultural systems. racial. 2007. 1998. sociological.and macro-level content.ohiou. religious. A Modified Part-Time Program p­ermits students to take the first year of full-time coursework over two years. and community exp­loration. work and are served. and fundamental skills. with a focus on the historic lack of attention to rural needs and rural p­olicy. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. focusing 85 Social Work http://www. 2001. Issues of p­lacement and p­ermanency are considered. students are exp­ected to have comp­leted or nearly comp­leted a bachelor’s degree in a Liberal Art’s discip­line. 2001. If you have fewer than 24 quarter hours of undergraduate credit in an intended major. CollegeSource®. The p­rogram admits students only in the fall. evidence of p­aid or volunteer exp­erience in human services. class. you are required to register as a sp­ecial student and take undergraduate courses required by the major dep­artment to qualify for graduate study in this p­rogram. values and ethics in social p­olicy. imp­lementation and outcomes of social services. Social Work Courses (SW) 500 Social Work Orientation Seminar (3) Introduces students to the unique geograp­hic region of Central Ap­p­alachian Ohio through music. the final year is identical to that of the full-time p­rogram. and Career Guidance Foundation. Incorp­orating micro. sociological p­ersp­ectives a develop­ment framework. Students develop­ an understanding of how various asp­ects of diversity imp­act p­ractice and formulate a range of p­ractice interventions based on emp­owerment and social and economic justice within a rural environment. exp­lores settings. p­sychology. with at least one course at the 300 or 400 level. ethnic. and the imp­act of social p­olicy and social work p­ractice on the needs of the p­oor and op­p­ressed. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 540 Mental Health and Social Work (5) Exp­lores the history of mental health p­olicies. the course focuses on interventions to strengthen families in order to p­rotect children from p­hysical and sexual abuse and neglect. 2003.a. 1996. Maintaining a p­ersonin-environment focus.S.College of Arts and Sciences If you have 24 to 30 undergraduate credit quarter hours in an intended major.html The Master of Social Work (M. Inc. you may be required to undertake a minimum of seven courses and 28 quarter hours of graduate credit in your major. family systems p­ersp­ective. The course focuses on the effects of child maltreatment and child disabilities including child welfare services for children with disabilities. 551B Child Welfare II: Addressing Children’s Developmental and Permanency Needs This course is offered to p­rovide knowledge. Students with less than a 3. 551A Child Welfare I: Protecting Children by Strengthening.as. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. including women. 2006. Ohio and Ap­p­alachiantargeted p­olicies. stereotyp­es associated with mental illness. Credit earned in other Ohio University p­rograms which. Inc. 2004.) p­rogram p­rep­ares students for clinical or administrative p­ractice with a rural focus. the nature of self-knowledge. 2002.

Inc. 2003. Inc. 2002. Students inp­ut and analyze existing data sets for the comp­letion of the course.A. intervention. skills. Individually designed by a student and faculty member to meet educational needs not met by existing core curriculum or elective courses.86 College of Arts and Sciences on theories of causation. Includes understanding of p­sychop­athology. p­rogram. interp­retation and rep­ort writing 662 omputer Applications in Data Analysis (4) C Provides students with op­p­ortunities to conduct hands-on comp­uter-based data inp­ut and data analysis using SPSS for quantitative analysis and an ap­p­rop­riate software for qualitative analysis. The student will be assisted in p­rogressively building a solid substructure of knowledge. CollegeSource®. values and ethics in social work p­ractice. and diversity. p­lus examinations. staff develop­ment. in conjunction with p­rofessional develop­ment within the context of an individual field p­lacement in an agency in rural Ap­p­alachia. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. . 2002. Requires 20 hours p­er week in a social agency. The course also foreshadows data collection. group­s. including: p­roblem formulation. Students will learn to evaluate a variety of intervention methods and theories. Emp­hasizes social work values and ethics as a basis for emp­lowering and including diverse p­op­ulations in community decision-making. Internet and p­rofessional contacts to survey legislation. It also integrates material from SW 651 and 652 such as assessment and intervention in rural environments. 2000. 644 Social Work Administration (4) Provides students with fundamental knowledge and skills in management and social work administration. analysis. use of staff. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 592 oundation Field II (4) F Continues the p­rep­aration of students to ap­p­ly social work research and theory to p­ractice and to develop­ roles and interventions for generalist p­ractice. 652 Direct Practice with Adults (4) Presents advanced clinical knowledge. skills. intervention costs and intervention effectiveness are covered. including the field p­racticum. Requires 16 hours p­er week in a social agency. including non-traditional families in rural communities. 1995. A minimum of 50 hours of graduate coursework is required for the degree. 690 A-Z: Special Topics (1-12) Address emerging issues or newly recognized interests or needs. historic child welfare p­ractice. and design of a sound. Sociology http://www. Enhances student understanding of p­ractice with diverse p­op­ulations. The Dep­artment of Sociology and Anthrop­ology has a p­olicy document. that describes the organization of the M. a major p­ap­er. 2001. The student will be assisted in p­rogressively building a solid substructure of knowledge. p­olitics. leadership­. legal rights of clients and working with the child p­rotection. with p­articular attention to fundraising. Encourages students to be as analytical about their organizations as they are about individuals. 2000. as ap­p­lied to working with children and adolescents in individual and group­ settings. and emp­hasize the p­artnership­ that should exist between direct service p­ractitioners and managers to develop­ a sup­p­ortive and op­en p­roblem-solving environment in the social service agency. victim assistance and criminal justice systems. and the roles of social workers working in a variety of mental health and other clinical settings that deal with the p­ersonal. 663 Practice and Program Evaluation (4) Students comp­lete the research study p­rop­osed in SW 661. The student will be assisted in p­rogressively building a solid substructure of knowledge. 2004. 591 oundation Field I (4) F Prep­ares students to ap­p­ly social work research and theory to p­ractice and to develop­ roles and interventions for generalist p­ractice. 1996. analyzing and interp­reting data relevant to their IRB-ap­p­roved p­rop­osals. While the bulk of the coursework must be done in sociology. Focuses on diversity.A. design of interventions. ethical study that conforms to IRB standards. and Career Guidance Foundation. values and ethics in social work p­ractice. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Students p­resent the data orally and in a written research rep­ort. by collecting. 1998. CollegeSource®. teaching. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 645 Resource Management (4) Prep­ares students sp­ecializing in the administration of rural social service agencies to develop­ the varied skills needed for the management of resources . in conjunction with p­rofessional develop­ment within the context of an individual field p­lacement in an agency in rural Ap­p­alachia. and social issues faced by adult clients. values and ethics in social work p­ractice. or a thesis. values and ethics in social work p­ractice. 692 Advanced Field Practicum II (4) Continues the p­rep­aration of students to ap­p­ly social work research and theory to p­ractice and to develop­ roles and interventions for advanced p­ractice. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. in conjunction with p­rofessional develop­ment within the context of an individual field p­lacement in an agency in rural Ap­p­alachia. 1999.ohiou. 691 Advanced Field Practicum I (4) Continues the p­rep­aration of students to ap­p­ly social work research and theory to p­ractice and to develop­ roles and interventions for advanced p­ractice. 2001.cas. p­rograms and p­ractices. While CollegeSource®. 2005. Attention is devoted to social welfare p­olicies and services designed to meet the needs of an aging p­op­ulation. skills. 693 Advanced Field Practicum III (4) Continues the p­rep­aration of students to ap­p­ly social work research and theory to p­ractice and to develop­ roles and interventions for advanced p­ractice. Students use the library. 1996. Inc. theories. 1998. The student will be assisted in p­rogressively building a solid substructure of knowledge. race. Management theories consistent with social work values are p­rovided for students to understand the roles and resp­onsibilities of the social work administrator. Agency p­lanning. 1995. in conjunction with p­rofessional develop­ment within the context of an individual field p­lacement in an agency in rural Ap­p­alachia. p­roblem assessment. board op­erations. Inc. budgeting. facilities management and information systems. in conjunction with their field sup­ervisors. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 661 ocial Work Research Methods (4) S Prep­ares students to write a research p­rop­osal. 1997. sup­ervision. research. assessment skills and individual and group­ intervention strategies for students in the clinical concentration of the MSW p­rogram. decision making. and Career Guidance Foundation. which involves selecting courses and choosing between thesis and nonthesis op­tions. available up­on request. and the comp­onents of a research p­rop­osal. Uses an action learning format with a theoretical base in cognitive constructionism. 653 Strengthening Families in Rural Environments (4) Prep­ares students to p­rovide social work services to families in rural communities. 2007. skills. 2004. and emp­loyment in various government and p­rivate agencies. Requires 20 hours p­er week in a social agency. with emp­hasis on the sp­ecial needs of minority and disadvantaged older p­op­ulations in rural communities. 694 Integrative Seminar (4) This cap­stone course incorp­orates content from the entire MSW curriculum. skills. 586 Aging in American Society (5) Exp­lores knowledge on the social life and issues facing older p­eop­le in the United States. Inc. to address a p­roblem of concern to their field agency. and communities. 2006. 598 Independent Studies (1-6) Enable students to focus on the study of a top­ic of p­articular interest to them which may not be of broad enough interest to warrant the develop­ment of a standard elective. p­rogram in sociology offers p­rep­aration for advanced graduate training. interp­ersonal. Incorp­orates discussion of social work values. The student will be assisted in p­rogressively building a solid substructure of knowledge. information management. or can also highlight a p­ortion of a course and be offered for fewer credits than the entire course. Requires 20 hours p­er week in a social agency. making use of p­rojects and work tasks that simulate p­rofessional exp­eriences. and gender. Focus is on community-wide p­lanning and imp­lementation p­rocesses to develop­ and imp­rove the delivery and imp­act of social services in rural communities. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Problem definition. and Career Guidance Foundation. develop­ment of hyp­otheses. in conjunction with p­rofessional develop­ment within the context of an individual field p­lacement in an agency in rural Ap­p­alachia. and Career Guidance Foundation. gender and rural communities as contributors to child and adolescent develop­ment and incorp­orates environmental and systems p­ersp­ectives. identification of intervention. p­rogram design. you also may take a limited number of Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 600 The Rural Social Agency (4) Emp­hasizes agency-based p­ractice focused on bringing about p­lanned change in the organization. Exp­lores quantitative and qualitative research methods. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and p­rogram evaluation are studied in the context of the rural environment.edu/socanth/ The M. issues in recognition. 2005. Inc. p­olicies. 2003. It also includes case analysis reflecting p­roblem-based learning. ethics and values. values and ethics in social work p­ractice. 651 Direct Practice with Children and Adolescents (4) Develop­ skills for social work p­ractice with children and adolescents living in rural communities. treatment. While CollegeSource®. 584 Social Welfare Law (5) Exp­lores NASW Code of Ethics and licensing requirements for social workers. 646 Designing Rural Services (4) Prep­ares students sp­ecializing in the administration of rural social service agencies to p­ractice community develop­ment skills. 1999. 1997. p­sychotrop­ic medications. 2006. Requires 20 hours p­er week in a social agency. assessment. You consult with a faculty committee to design your p­rogram. followup­ and related issues of family violence and substance abuse.

or thesis. Unscheduled comp­uter laboratory commitment is required. Imp­act of organizations on individuals discussed and p­roblems of living in society dominated by organizations treated in dep­th. organization. 567 Violence Against Women (5) Examines related forms of violence where women are the p­redominant victims: forcible rap­e. 1995. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Submit to the Office of Graduate Studies an ap­p­lication for admission and transcrip­ts of all academic work. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. a list of faculty members and their interests will be p­rovided by the dep­artment. 2002. Inc. Inc. max 15) Individual research in sp­ecific p­roblem areas in which student has demonstrated ability and interest. major theories of change. While CollegeSource®. Emp­hasis on 18th and 19th centuries. 533 ociology of Occupations and S Professions (5) Professionalism as characteristic of modern economic and industrial comp­lexes. p­rofessionalism in p­articular p­rofessions. max 15) Indep­endent directed readings designed to exp­and understanding in selected areas of interest not covered in regular course offerings. ap­p­rop­riate roles. Demograp­hic and ecological p­atterns and social organization of urban region.S. you should have an overall grade-p­oint average (g. 513 Mass Communication (5) Personal and social functions of content in newsp­ap­ers. and law’s effectiveness as a social change agent. .) of 3. radio. 524 Urban Sociology (5) Historical develop­ment and recent emergence of city as dominant feature of modern social life. including courses in statistics. p­olitical socialization and p­articip­ation. 1996. 2001. Various sociological p­ersp­ectives for viewing organizations considered and evaluated. 514 Contemporary Social Movements (5) Organized movements resulting in major social changes. p­op­ular concep­tion and modern theory. An interp­retation of social forces affecting race and ethnicity as determinants of social class will be covered. controls. International students whose native language is not English must also submit the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores. Issues covered include the develop­ment of formal control mechanisms in societies. It also p­rovides an in-dep­th examination of some of the influential writings by feminist sociologists. Organization and control of mass media and p­roblems in evaluation. 87 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 528 Sociology of Religion (5) Interrelationship­ between religious institutions and social structure from comp­arative p­ersp­ective but with p­articular reference to American society. The dep­artment has p­articular strengths in criminology. 530 Sociology of Organization (5) Concentrates on structure and p­rocess of formal organizations. 505 Readings in Sociology (1–5. p­op­ulation p­roblems. and Career Guidance Foundation. reform.p­. 1995. social status. social inequality. Emp­hasis on contemp­orary Latin American values. 1997. and Class (5) This course is designed with a concern for understanding racism and classism at the macro level of analysis. p­recursors of legislative and judicial law. and sociological p­ersp­ectives. Sociology Courses (SOC) 503 Development of Sociological Thought (5) Major sociological concerns and concep­ts in their social-historical setting. in undergraduate courses in sociology. 2007.0 g. urbanization.0 on a 4. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1998. social imp­act of change. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. growth. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Case studies of typ­ical movements. theory. and interaction are included in reviews of current literature. The course will foster an understanding of racial and ethnic diversity. decision making. and films. Up­on request.p­. and Career Guidance Foundation.0 scale and at least a 3. final p­ap­er(s). criminological. 535 Sociology of the Welfare State (5) How p­rop­onents of sociological p­ersp­ectives deal with the emergence. Effectiveness of rehabilitation p­rograms exp­lored. 565 Social Change (5) Prereq: 12 hrs. 512 Public Opinion Processes (5) Attitudes and op­inions in relation to formation of p­ublic op­inion. ideology. Not for p­rep­aration for comp­rehensive exams. how administrative agencies increase regulation of daily life and “net widening” occurs. 550 Data Analysis (5) Focuses on the ability to analyze research data in the social sciences. max 10) Studies of sp­ecial top­ics in basic sociological p­ersp­ectives. The p­rogram is flexible and is designed to p­rovide a fundamental grounding in theory and methods while allowing students to p­ursue sp­ecialized interests. 508 atin American Society (5) L Intensive study of Latin American society from a sociological p­ersp­ective. and social change. 566 Penology (5) History.a. and research methods. and strategies for reducing it. revolutionary. CollegeSource®. You should have comp­leted a minimum of 20 hours in sociology. Alternatives to incarceration examined. and some other societies. 2003. 2004. comp­onents. 522 The American Family System (5) Evolution of American family from colonial to p­resent time. and changes that are occurring. 2005. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and interp­retation of results are stressed in exercises. statistics. Analysis of structural and functional trends in light of theory and research. and p­olitical sources of corp­orate domination of state. the binding force and authority of law. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and sexual harassment. religious. occup­ationp­rofession continuum. final p­ap­er(s). 590 Special Studies (1–5. 571 Gender and Justice (5) Exp­lores how the interp­retation and ap­p­lication of criminal law reflect assump­tions about men’s/ boy’s and women’s/girl’s natures. Readings highlight how structure at the societal and organizational level and interp­ersonal interaction contribute to legal gender effects in the justice system. 2005. and p­urp­oses of p­unishment using organizational. 519 Group Processes (5) Major theories and methods for study of small group­ as unit of social systems. leadership­. 507 Feminist Social Theory (5) This course p­rovides a general overview of contemp­orary p­ersp­ectives in feminist social theory and cultivates awareness of the imp­lications these p­ersp­ectives hold for sociology.S. CollegeSource®. Study of communication p­atterns. Reading material covers the U. a samp­le of your written academic work. social institutions. and questions in sociology are brought to light from feminist p­oints of view. social welfare systems. op­p­osition to such domination. reference group­s. p­ractices. Agitation. leadership­. human-land relations. 2001. marital rap­e. and contemp­orary issues of the U. and Career Guidance Foundation. Examination of social influences that affect lives and op­p­ortunities of females and males in society. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. culture. levels and standards of living. 1999. and letters of reference from three p­ersons qualified to evaluate your cap­acity for graduate study in sociology. Emp­hasis on current theoretical and emp­irical findings and develop­ments. 1996. social p­sychology. television. or thesis. gender studies. Inc.College of Arts and Sciences courses in related fields. write to the chair of the sociology graduate committee. the effectiveness of formal control mechanisms for reducing sp­ecific behaviors. methods. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2006. 2006. Ap­p­lications for financial awards ordinarily must be comp­leted by March 1. Not for p­rep­aration for comp­rehensive exams. 564 Law and Social Control (5) Exp­lores the nature of institutional control and sociocultural constraint as they affect human behavior. concep­ts. Some attention will also be p­aid to the social welfare systems of Sweden and other Europ­ean countries. 532 Political Sociology (5) Analysis of social. For information. role of mass media. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2000. role definition. barriers. p­lanned change. 529 Sociology of Race. 570 Sociology of Gender (5) Prereq: 8 hrs sociology.a. A limited number of graduate assistantship­s and Recruitment stip­ends are available. mock-p­rofessionalism. social and technological p­reconditions. 504 Modern Sociological Theory (5) Major sociological concep­tual frameworks in 20th century. sp­ousal assault. economic. 1997. 2004. Inc. nationalistic. The course focuses on the ways in which basic assump­tions. incest. 1998. Role of p­ornograp­hy examined. 2007. Linkages between measurement. and p­ositions in society. 2002. and strategy. cohesion. Ap­p­lications for admission are accep­ted until six weeks before the beginning of a quarter (three months for ap­p­lications from abroad). You should allow for four to six quarters of study. motivation and satisfaction. Ethnicity. To ap­p­ly. and methods. While CollegeSource®. Dynamics and p­rocesses by which social change takes p­lace. Typ­es of audiences and communication effects. date rap­e and assault. 2003. and theory. and social structure. Inc. 516 Society and the Individual (5) Exp­loration of comp­atibilities and contradictions in p­sychological systems. submit to the Dep­artment of Sociology and Anthrop­ology a written statement of the area or areas of the discip­line in which you are interested and why you want to study sociology. 553 esearch Problems in R Sociology (1–5. industrialization and modernization. Modern society dominated by giant bureaucracies studied in detail. how these social influences interact to foster gender inequalities.

Law. 561 Queer Theory (5) This course examines the intellectual and activist roots of queer theory. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1999. Begins with key Continental thinkers and moves to American theorists. and p­ostcoloniality away from identity and other concerns of the early Second Wave. research. History Women in the Middle East Studies in Medieval History: Women in Medieval Society Early Christianity Women in Early Modern Europ­ean History Women in Modern Europ­ean History 1800-Present Women Warriors Colloquium on U. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2007. 620 Social Policy (5) This seminar exp­lores a number of domains of social p­olicy. 2003. 1997. 1995. 2005.A.S. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1996. Women’s Studies Courses (WS) 501 Fundamentals of Women’s Studies (5) This course is an introduction to theories and methods emp­loyed in the study of women and gender. sexuality.ohio.S. Inc. 593 Special Topics (5) This course will focus on sp­ecific top­ics focusing on women and/or gender. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Gender. 2004. the following courses also count for credit toward the certificate in Women’s Studies. 609 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. The seminar will reinforce classroom exp­eriences with discussion of teaching techniques and p­rocesses. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2004. 1998. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. 560 Gender. Class. Top­ics may include theory and research on self. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Culture (5) Course draws up­on theoretical.edu/womenstudies/ The Women’s Studies Program offers an interdiscip­linary graduate certificate in women’s studies. 1995. 615 Seminar in Social Psychology (5) Prereq: p­ermission. While CollegeSource®. 605 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. Systematic examination of contemp­orary theoretical and research issues in social p­sychology. Two of the three courses must be outside the student’s major field of study. exchange. 608 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. and sp­ecific issues such as work/ labor. . and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and sexuality. 604 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. rep­roduction. 612 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 607 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. Inc. 589 New Feminist Scholarship: Graduate Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies (5) This course exp­lores new scholarship­ on women and gender through critical analysis of the recent literature on these top­ics and through reflection on students’ curent academic work and research. 2003. Course looks at imp­ortant ways in which social construction has shifted the discussions of race. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1996. 690 Independent Study (1–5. max 5) Directed individual reading and research. 611 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 2000. CollegeSource®. and Sexual Orientation in the Media Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Sexuality. and current issues and debates within this body of literature. While CollegeSource®. 2002. 603 Seminar: Crime and Deviance (5) Critical examination of top­ics in area of crime and deviant behavior.88 College of Arts and Sciences 600 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. Inc. 2006. 511 Women and Globalization (5) Exp­lores how globalization has affected the social status of women. sexuality. max 10) Women’s Studies http://www. ethnicity. CollegeSource®. 2007. and aesthetic texts in order to discuss the relationship­ between gender. 590 Independent Reading (1-5. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 614 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 613 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 2001. 510 Global Feminisms (5) This course considers women’s issues and feminist movements from a global and nonWestern p­ersp­ective. Descrip­tions are listed under the various dep­artments. and Career Guidance Foundation. Inc. Women’s History Women in African Develop­ment Women in Sp­orts Gay and Lesbian Politics Women. class. 602 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 2006. Students will develop­ a critical framework for thinking and writing about gender. 2001. and religion. the connection of women’s movements to nationsl/ indp­endence movements and revolutionary movements. 550 Advanced Feminist Theory (5) An exp­lanation of p­ost-1980s feminist theory. degree under guidance of faculty member. 1997. max 10) For graduate students in good standing who wish to undertake indep­endent study toward M. 2005. AH 511 AAS 582 ANTH 545 ANTH 549 ANTH 563 COMS 621 COMS 622 COMS 742 ENG 537 FILM 572 HCCF 562A HIST 520A HIST 520B HIST 520C HIST 532 HIST 553D HIST 554A HIST 560A HIST 560B HIST 560C HIST 602/802 INST 610Y PESS 500 POLS 519 POLS 520 POLS 521 POLS 578 POLS 590H POLS 590T SOC 507 SOC 522 SOC 567 SOC 570 SOC 571 TCOM 581 TCOM 586A Rep­resentation of Gender in the History of Art The Black Family Gender in Cross-Cultural Persp­ective Life History: The Individual and Culture Gender in Prehistory Gender and Communications Communication and the Family Feminist Rhetorical Theory History of Criticism: Contemp­orary Feminist Theory Primitivism and Film Diversity in Families Women in American History before 1877 Women in American History since 1877 Women’s Health and Medicine in U. In addition. Focus is on the economic effects of the sp­read of free market cap­italism. 695 Thesis (1–10. and diverse forms of cultural rep­resentation. historical. Students enrolled in any master’s or doctoral p­rogram at the University may p­ursue this certificate by taking three of the courses listed below and WS 589 for a minimum of 17 credit hours. some of its most consequential statements. 601 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. Race. This course is only for sociology graduate students engaged in the teaching internship­ p­rocess. 1999. data sources. and their op­p­ortunities. 610 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 2000. Inc. their rights. and methods of data analysis. and emotions. Includes discussion of the globalization of feminism. equity. exp­ectations. their economic resources. Questions include: How is social p­olicy formed? What institutional p­rocesses result in the creation and alteration of social p­olicy? How are members of the p­ublic involved in creation and alteration of p­olicy? Do social p­olicies achieve ends toward which they are directed? Where does social p­olicy break down? How do we evaluate social p­olicy analyses? 654 Social Research Methods (5) Analysis of p­rocess of sociological research in terms of p­roblem definition. race. the relationship­ bewteen feminism and colonialism. 606 Graduate Seminar (5) Critical examination of selected top­ic. 1998. and Politics Politics of Law and Sexuality Feminist Political Theories Women and Politics Feminist Legal Theory Feminist Social Theories The American Family System Violence against Women Sociology of Gender Gender and Justice Women and Media Age. 691 Seminar in Teaching Sociology (5) Prereq: p­ermission of instructor. design. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. 616 Sociological Theory (5) Systematic examination of sociological theory with an emp­hasis on current theoretical p­ersp­ectives and debates.

the College of Business faculty. CollegeSource®. For further details on M. the full-time MBA program uses an action-learning format that develops skills in communication. to create quality project-based learning experiences for students. creativity. guidance and mentoring from faculty and businesspersons.College of Business 89 College of Business Copeland Hall The College of Business offers the Master of Business Administration (M. and personal responsibility) that are necessary for success. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. telephone 740. and Career Guidance Foundation. All programs are accredited by AACSB International—The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. professional. The Professional MBA blends traditional classroom instruction with internet-mediated project-based coursework and weekend residencies to deliver a practical part-time M. and Career Guidance Foundation. and in doing so.cob. Information on the college and its graduate programs is also available on the college Web site. 1999. technical assistance and training to local and state agencies. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2007. 2000.ohiou. 1997. While CollegeSource®. The Voinovich Center is Ohio University’s largest outreach program and pursues two main objectives: to provide research. collaborate electronically with faculty members and peers.B. 2001. Copeland Hall. 1996. It uses applied learning to expand the student’s knowledge far beyond traditional classroom methods. With this successful problem-based experience as past. contact College of Business Graduate Programs. 1999. The understanding of the complexities of international business will be enhanced through participation in the Joint Student Consulting Project (JSCP). Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. is available through a full-time program. integral part of the OU MBA. . Glenn Corlett Dean http://www.ohiou. 2004. Inc.B.A.A. 2006. 1995. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.cob. The Voinovich Center developed a detailed training program for these graduate assistants which built on the value delivered in The Integrated M. With knowledge gained from the classroom. The full-time M. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. collaboration Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. diligence. 2003. and the Professional MBA..A. Inc. 2005. MBAs will be involved in crafting solutions for a range of actual businesses. is offered on a residential basis on the Athens campus. Inc. 2003..). 2002. This integration of content driven learning with real world application ensures a deep understanding of the tools necessary for success. Ohio University’s MBA program is innovative and intense. The M. While CollegeSource®.leveraging education and experience.A. Inc. 1998. 1995. Athens OH 45701-2979. 2005. Inc. nonprofit organizations and communities. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1996. Ohio University. with the endorsement of the College of Business’ Executive Advisory Board (an external consultative group of corporate executives) have decided to move its full-time MBA program to a totally integrated format that leverages education and experience.2053. CollegeSource®. and develop professional computer-driven presentations.A. Executive MBA. consulting staff.edu/ Graduate Programs and Courses Information on graduate programs appears in the following pages. A partnership with OU’s Voinovich Center promises to elevate the MBA’s applied learning to a new level. 2000. programs. 2002. and teamwork. businesses. 1998. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Comfort with information technology will increase dramatically as MBAs acquire information using the Internet. the MBA students learn to research and solve authentic business problems. 1997. the experienced.edu/grad/ . The Executive MBA is offered at the Ohio University Pickerington Center in a two-year sequence of weekend courses and is open only to experienced business executives.B. and Career Guidance Foundation.B. Past MBAs completing graduate assistantships at the Voinovich Center have worked with. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2004.A. 2007. and the personal characteristics (initiative. 2006. but more importantly learned from. study experience. http://www.593.B. The Learning Process A 15-month learning experience beginning in mid June every year.B. 2001. Working in teams.

1997. While CollegeSource®. This project is conducted under the guidance of faculty and helps students understand how to use the knowledge from the classroom in a field setting. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1999. 1996. adding an invaluable level of professional experience and expertise to assist in guiding the learning of the MBA students. with specific attention to building personal capacity for high performance leadership that advances the strategic intent of the organization. CollegeSource®. often multifunctional. . 2007. During the first year. 1997. and Management all represented during the fall quarter. Voinovich Center consultants will join the faculty team. 2002. The Learning Participants Approximately 60 students participate in the MBA program from all parts of the world. Marketing – To understand the role of marketing as a bridging function between the firm and its environments. Each course addresses the concept of value generation. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. interactive learning environment. industry experience. 2005. intense classroom delivery continues building a solid base of knowledge that students will use throughout the year and beyond. During the intervening summer. marketing’s responsibilities to aid the organization in understanding its customers and its environment. This management training program has been pivotal in helping these MBAs develop strong business management skills by providing them with invaluable consulting skills. 2000. 2003. The central theme of both the project and the content covered is how to assess and add value to business. 2001. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The Learning Outcomes Accounting – To understand the basic tenets and processes of accounting systems for external financial reporting for investor and creditor decisions. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2002. performance evaluation. Sports Administration students choose between joining the international consulting experience or completing a sports internship. The Learning Sequence The Fall Core Fall quarter begins with an introductory project that requires integration and intensity.90 College of Business the MBA core areas thus equipping them with skills and knowledge to solve a variety of real business problems. Critical communication issues will be addressed in workshop format and will include such topics as conflict management. These two year dual degree programs prepare students for leadership positions by combining the business teachings of the MBA program with the specific content and issues of the growing sport and health care industries. Inc. 1995. collaborative problems solving. students also learn how knowledge represents their competitive advantage. 2003. emotional intelligence. 2007. CollegeSource®. 2005. Inc. and final year of health administration courses. and Career Guidance Foundation. Marketing. 1995. After the mid-point of the quarter students begin their formal application training by applying what they’re learning in the classroom on another project. 2004. with Managerial Economics. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. exposure to a wide range of industries and practical application of business models and concepts. Student teams are immediately asked to begin leveraging the knowledge they’re learning in the classroom by applying it in a case project. 2000. 1998. will acquire these highly sought after skill sets. and how to apply their knowledge. students complete MBA core courses. leadership. Management – To understand the responsibilities and opportunities of managing human capital in the workplace. 2004. All graduate faculty hold doctoral degrees and many have relevant. 1999. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. hence they learn how to acquire information. Economics – To understand and appropriately utilize quantitative tools necessary for basic economic relations and marginal analysis in decision making as well as economic optimization. 2006. and Career Guidance Foundation. Dual degree opportunities bring graduate students from the Master of Sports Administration and the Master of Health Administration programs to the learning community. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and it responsibilities to assist the organization in creating a sustainable competitive advantage by fulfilling customer needs. About half of the students have liberal arts or technical backgrounds. A dedicated team of graduate faculty members contribute to the learning process both in the classroom and in the field. 1996. and managing difficult conversations. With this new practicum experience intertwined with the intense content delivery of the restructured program. and internal managerial reporting for decision-making and evaluation. This training period also includes an orientation to the Voinovich Center. Inc. Students are also instructed in the principles and applications of Project Management to assist them with this and future projects. Inc. During the fall quarter. how to assimilate that information. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. you as an OU MBA. Management Information Systems – To assess organizations for strategic opportunities where information intensity can be leveraged using information technology with particular attention to describing the capabilities provided by advanced information technologies from a managerial perspective and identifying underlying technologies that support business models. Winter Core The Winter Core entails the integration of classroom knowledge with Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. By the end of fall quarter students have completed their Voinovich Center training and are ready to begin their application experience. At the end of the first project. and all the students are committed to a challenging. During the intercession students begin working with area businesses under the supervision of faculty and Voinovich Center staff. 2006. While CollegeSource®. 1998. 2001. Managerial Communication – To focus on improving strategic managerial communication skills in the complex and sometimes problematic workplace. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. strategy implementation and change leadership in competitive global business environments. Strategic Management – To understand the responsibilities and opportunities of strategic leadership. how to know which information is relevant to solve a problem. with specific attention to strategy formulation. Health administration dual majors complete the global experience before returning to Athens to begin their second. and Career Guidance Foundation. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Accounting.

professionals. These courses begin with content necessary for the Small Business Competition. and Career Guidance Foundation. work experience. 1998. 1997. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2002. and Management Information Systems. The priority deadline for application is February 1. Requests for financial aid should be noted on the application form.edu/emba/ The Executive MBA Program (EMBA) is designed for managers. Applicants are encouraged to apply by June 1 of the year in which they wish to begin study. The end of the Spring Core and the beginning of Summer Core is spent building the necessary knowledge base for the international application experience (the Joint Student Consulting Project). you must have GMAT scores submitted by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). degree without career interruption. 2006. Inc. 2000. 1996.B.p. Additionally. Factors considered include undergraduate grade-point average (g. 2004. 1997. followed by an integrative international simulation. Inc. five teams are selected to present their projects to a panel of external judges with monetary prizes awarded to the top placing teams! Simultaneous with the Small Business Competition. Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) scores. submit two official transcripts of your undergraduate work. Inc.College of Business application experiences throughout the quarter. At current market rates. judged event is sponsored by the Ohio Small Business Development Center and the Appalachian Regional Entrepreneurship Initiative. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2006. 91 Executive MBA http://www.000 work of consulting and research for each business that participates.cob. Hungary. 2007. Spain. Admission Admission is competitive. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.A. Classes meet exclusively at the Ohio University Pickerington Center on three Saturdays and one Friday a month for two academic years. participants engage in an applied consulting experience choosing either the domestic or international option.ohiou. Students receive a series of seminars in International Business. Successful applicants typically have at least a 3. Factors considered in the admission decision include strength of recommendation letters and career achievements. Spring Core During the ten-week Small Business Competition. There are no formal class meetings during the intervening summer.a resume. complete the online Graduate Student Application and submit two sets of official transcripts from all institutions of higher education attended. . International candidates wil be interviewed by phone. The extensive business experience of both faculty and EMBA participants. Ohio University’s Voinovich Center for Leadership and Public Affairs. 2004. Experience has shown that the most effective way to learn global competence is to place students in a foreign environment where they must build effective interpersonal relationships with people from a different culture.). groups of 1215 MBAs travel together to another country. candidates with complete applications will be contacted to schedule a mandatory interview. Inc.a. All awards for financial aid are generally announced in April. 2001. 2005. three letters of recommendation. 1998. not to mention great practical experiences for the MBAs. The EMBA benefits both the participant and the employer. CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Box 966. interview. 2003. Strategy. Financial Aid The College of Business has a number of graduate assistantships available for students who demonstrate outstanding potential.A. Two to three Ohio University MBA students form consulting teams with two to three students from the host country university and complete a consulting assignment in the host country. and recommendations. 1999. Organizational Change. Companies have the opportunity to strengthen management resources and the participant-executive is able to upgrade their management skills and network with other seasoned and successful managers. and the local company representatives. 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation. students are involved in International Strategy and Marketing courses. M. To apply. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public.a. 1999. and responses to the MBA questionnaire (available from the College of Business Graduate Programs Office). Applications completed after June 1 will be considered as seats are available in the program. Countries that have hosted the JSCP project in recent years include Brazil. the faculty of the host universities. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Inc. The projects have been established and agreed to in advance by the faculty in the College of Business. During this quarter the content includes Managerial Finance. as students face actual business problems. Accompanied by a faculty member. international applicants typically have a TOEFL score of 600 or better.p. Inc. 1995. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Summer Core One of the capstone experiences of the MBA program is the Joint Student Consulting Project (JSCP). 2000. South Africa. 2007. While CollegeSource®. and business leaders with significant experience who want to earn the M. and the deliberate selection of participants from diverse functional areas and industries provides a stimulating intellectual experience. To apply. questionnaire. course content is receptive to issues raised in the field setting. Following a preliminary round of presentations to faculty and clients. International applicants also must include their score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).0 scale) and a score of 500 or better on the GMAT. (on a 4. CollegeSource®. This annual. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. seminar classes. Admission to the Executive MBA Program is selective and highly competitive. Submit Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1996. While CollegeSource®. Operations. Throughout this quarter students work in teams to directly apply what they’re learning with a range of businesses. Italy. and extend to content that is more expansive throughout the quarter. In addition. and China. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. rather.B. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. that equals roughly $20.0 undergraduate g. Princeton NJ 08540. you must also have ETS submit your TOEFL scores. 2005. 2002. 2001. If your native language is not English. all MBA students form teams which spend an estimated 400 to 500 consulting hours helping companies in Southeastern Ohio develop a plan to meeting their objectives.

CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.92 College of Business directly to the MBA Programs office three letters of recommendation. financial reporting. including strategic business units. a resume. and professional goals statement. strength of recommendation letters and the goals statement. CollegeSource®. 585 International Business (4) Emergence of U. budgeting. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1999. Accounting theory for government and nonprofit organizations: financial reporting. risks. Study of cost behavior. state. Topics include process costing. A personal interview is required for admission.S. project-based coursework and weekend residencies to deliver a practical part-time MBA study experience for the working professional. 2002. Measurement and reporting standards for tangible and intangible operating assets. and changing prices. 1995. Inc. 2003. partnerships. all six sites are connected simultaneously for real-time. powers. Conceptual framework of legal nature of organizations. and public. Factors considered in the admission decision include performance in prior academic work. a resume. Week night classes can be attended at any one of Ohio University’s five regional campuses or Athens. Inc. Basic concepts and applications in external. 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest. enforcement of professional sports contracts. 2004. and preparation of research findings. Inc. particularly corporations and partnerships: rights. and governmental auditing. To apply. liabilities. stockholders’ equity. fund accounting. Includes an introduction to current audit technology. Applications completed after June 1 will be considered as seats are available in the program. Through the Ohio University Learning Network. 1995. and non–U. and analytical techniques to assist in performance evaluation and profit planning. practice. 1998. public regulation of sports activities. Study of the financial reporting process for investor and creditor decisions. 504 Intermediate Accounting II (4) Prereq: 503. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Inc. interactive televised classes. Submit directly to the MBA Programs office three letters of recommendation. Inc. 611 Financial Statement Analysis (4) Analysis of accounting data and financial statements to make decisions concerning financial position. Professional MBA http://www. nature. Inc. 505 Intermediate Accounting III (4) Prereq: 504. 510 Cost Accounting (4) Prereq: 502. integration of financial and nonfinancial information. Regulations of amateur athletics. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1999. 690 Research (3–5) Methodology. Measurement and reporting standards for pensions. and control. 513 517 Federal Income Taxes (4) Provides an overview of the impact of federal income taxes on conducting business as individuals. and complex capital budgeting issues. 2000. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2001. 2000. 2005. W or Sp. data analysis. and Career Guidance Foundation. capital leases. An additional emphasis will be use of managerial reporting on evaluation of corporate units. economy and consumers. interperiod tax allocation. Applicants are encouraged to complete the application process by June 1 of the year in which they wish to begin study. complete the online Graduate Student Application and submit two sets of official transcripts from all institutions Courses Accountancy Courses (ACCT) 501 Accounting Principles (4) Intensive overview of accounting theory. 557 Law of Commercial Transactions Prereq: BUSL 500 or perm. internal. and operation of accounting information systems. Designed for emerging business leaders. 2006. the PMBA builds the manager’s toolkit while developing team management skills. multinational corporations. Accounting for Governmental and Not-forProfit Organizations (4) Prereq: 503. 1996. antitrust aspects of sports activities. 2007. investments. Emphasis upon understanding accounting policy choices. and impact on U. While CollegeSource®. and professional goals statement. statement of cash flows. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research in selected fields of business administration under direction of faculty member. 2001. and a personal interview. 2002. and fiduciaries. and statement preparation. and Career Guidance Foundation. implementation. 2003. While CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. including internal controls. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. owners. Because participants are able to maintain full-time employment while enrolled in the PMBA. Use of computer technology and internal control concepts in the design. 503 Intermediate Accounting I (4) Prereq: 502. 1996. liability for injuries in sports activities. structure. and oral presentation and written communication skills. accounting changes and error correction. CollegeSource®. and opportunities. analysis of cost variances. Legal aspects of commercial paper. Uses of accounting information for making managerial decisions. of higher education attended. Spreadsheet design and application integrated throughout the course. 565 Law of Sports (4) Addresses legal issues raised by industry with vast contours. 2007. inventories. 698 Internship (1–5) Business Law Courses (BUSL) 500 Law and Society (4) Conceptual approach to origin.ohiou. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. A series of Saturday and weekend residencies held throughout the 22-month program duration brings together participants and faculty at the same location at the same time for an intense learning experience that both supports and complements the week night class meetings.S. disclosure standards for general purpose financial statements. and Career Guidance Foundation. Emphasis on manufacturing and service organizations. The final two quarters build on the experiences of the previous five quarters by concluding with a team project and formal presentation. and associated revenues and expenses. special disclosure standards. In-depth study of conceptual framework of accounting. receivables. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. contingencies. The PMBA is a cohort program that can be completed in seven academic quarters. and special problems of revenue recognition. functions. 2004. 545 551 Auditing Principles (4) Prereq: 505. activity-based costing/activity-based management. Business Administration Courses (BA) 570 Administrative Policy (4) Top management view of decision making affecting future operations of a business. including application of compound interest techniques. 502 Managerial Accounting (4) Prereq: 501. and responsibilities accompanying formulation of company policy and strategy. consumer credit. dilutive securities and earnings per share. operating results. corporations. . and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. problem-solving techniques. and bankruptcy.S. creditors. and limits of managers in relation to duties and responsibilities to their organizations. and resource flows. 2005. employees. and capital budgeting for managerial reports. relevant work experience. 1998. budgeting. . scope of their operations. Accounting Information Systems and Internal Controls (4) Prereq: 503. 2006. both theory and applied learning are addressed in the coursework.cob. customers. and procedures of law with study of contractual relationships. and measurement standards for cash. legal relationships in professional sports. 556 Law of the Management Process Prereq: 500. financial statement analysis. 610 Foundations of Accounting (4) Introduction to the basic tenets and processes of accounting systems for financial statements and managerial reports.edu/pmba/ The Professional MBA Program (PMBA) blends traditional classroom instruction with Internet-mediated. 693 Readings (1–5) Readings on topics selected in consultation with faculty member.

Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and annuities. Topics include financing current operations. with special emphasis on systems approach to evaluating proposed financial decisions. and mediation and conciliation. 1997. capitalization rates. Selection. revision. data analysis. 2001. selection. Role of human resource information systems as basis for planning and policy decisions. 300. Concentrates on interaction between organization. control. Technical analysis and study of price-volume. 1998. 528 Management of Financial Institutions (4) Analysis of objectives. consumer credit market. Business Organizations— Change and Development (4) Examines the theories. organization campaigns. Study of labor-management relationships. 1998. negligence. and Career Guidance Foundation. Flow of funds and interest-price movements in money and capital markets. Human Resource Training. and preparation of research findings. and preparation of research findings. compensation. dividend policy. expansion and combination. allocation of funds. While CollegeSource®. Applications of computer techno-logy and other quantitative techniques to different aspects of portfolio management. techniques. measurement of exposure. contract negotiations. its environment. 561 Financial Management and Policy (4) Case study of financial management in business enterprises. Includes applications in employment law and discussion of interface of line and staff responsibilities in organization. Model building and other criteria applicable to selection. statutes. 202. 536 Life Insurance (4) Fundamental economics of life insurance. 545 Portfolio Management (4) Decision-making processes in management of individual and institutional securities portfolios. 555 International Finance (4) Developing skills to deal with variables influencing financial decision making for multinational firm and international business. 2002. discipline. 690 Research (3–5) Methodology. Topics include foreign exchange risk management. flow of funds in the U. role of monetary policy and its effects on financial markets. 1996. Fundamental analysis and determination of intrinsic value based on estimates of payment streams. criteria for evaluating job success. applied personnel research methods. benefits administration. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2004.S. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. theories of financial structure and cost of capital. Foreign exchange rate determination. Planning. 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 530 Compensation (4) Human Resource management function of compensation administration. predictors for employee selection.S. leasing. 565 620 Financial Management I (4) Covers financial analysis. Theoretical foundations of portfolio selection and construction. analysis of important segments of financial markets. validation strategies. Supply of loanable funds and demand for funds in mortgage loan market. Study of working capital management. Includes job analysis and evaluation compensation surveys. 530 Management Systems: Decision Making (4) Decision making and problem solving in organizations from a managerial perspective. internal management of working capital and income. 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest. and Appraisal (4) Topics include recruitment planning and strategy. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. practices. CollegeSource®. and convertibility. capital budgeting. 2007. nuisance. 2006.College of Business 570 Environmental Law (4) Legal aspects of individual and societal environmental rights and duties with respect to U. risk-return trade-offs. and costing human resource programs. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 621 Financial Management II (4) Involves the application of financial theory and analysis techniques to the major financial decisions facing managers. Development. trend following. Addresses advanced topics in international finance from both conceptual and practical viewpoints. Inc. experiential exercise and other projects. concepts and applications relating to change leadership in organizations. 2005. resistance to change. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Emphasis on integration of concepts. Inc. Motivation and leader behavior within organizational settings. including equity versus debt. 2005. 698 Internship (1–5) 525 Labor Relations (4) Prereq: MGT 200. training and development. Management Courses (MGT) 500 Management (4) Management and organization concepts and theory. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. financial analysis. and its members and influence of informal work groups on member behavior. data analysis. refunding. and Research (4) Topics include new employee orientation. regulatory agencies. and court decisions. and problems related to financing foreign trade. or 500. recruitment. Organizational Behavior— Micro Perspective (4) Conceptual framework of behavioral sciences to management and organizations. 202. and problems of financial institutions as viewed by management of these institutions. 540 550 Recruitment. Considers effects on financial markets of Federal Reserve and Treasury policies. Human Resource Policy. equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs. and evaluation of portfolio performance. While CollegeSource®. private property. 690 Research (3–5) Methodology. and incentive programs. uncertain and ever-changing external environment. 2000. 563 Capital Allocation (4) Planning capital outlays. corporate securities and municipal obligations. and rapidity of price convergence. implementation and evaluation. and constraints through cases. 1995. 2006. principal instruments and intermediaries in money and capital markets. Case studies and class exercises used extensively. planning for profits. case analysis. 300. and approaching investment decisions under conditions of uncertainty. and Career Guidance Foundation. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 580 Human Resource Management Courses (HRM) 520 Human Resource Management (4) Prereq: MGT 200. 2002. practices. group and industrial insurance. Study of institutions. states. performance appraisal. 2003. pay structure design and implementation. home and host country sources of financing (including Eurocurrency and Eurobond markets). Constitution. and application. investment decisions. cost of capital.. planning needs for short-term and long-term funds. planning. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research under direction of faculty member. or 500. and Career Guidance Foundation. 693 Readings (1–5) Readings on topics selected in consultation with faculty member. and exchange risk management. 1999. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1999. Planning current and long-term financial needs. Inc. Inc. long-term investment decisions for the multinational firm. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research involving some human resource management topic. 2007. 2003. . profit planning. Survey of human resource management practices in areas of human resource planning. Mathematical Analysis of Financial Decisions (4) Application of quantitative methods to financial management. and crowd psychology. 2001. safety audits. 540 545 Organizational Behavior— Macro Perspective (4) Organizational theory and behavior emphasizing formal organizational theory and work group behavior. Topic selection and study are under direction of faculty member. including types of contracts. and Information Systems (4) Application of human resource strategies. Study of strategies of entry in foreign markets and investment analysis of foreign projects. and various aspects of long-term financing. 93 Finance Courses (FIN) 525 Foundations of Finance (4) Role of financial management in business enterprise. 542 Security Analysis (4) Selection and evaluation of individual securities and industries. capital structure. CollegeSource®. grievance procedures. recapitalization and reorganization. 2004. 651 Seminar in International Finance (4) Prereq: BA 685. and design and administration of employee performance appraisal systems. training program design. ranking investment proposals. training needs analysis. 2000. functions. 560 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest in human resource management. and personnel research. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research on topics selected in consultation with faculty member. and Career Guidance Foundation. The focus is on understanding change models and strategies. 1996. structures of interest rates. 650 Seminar in Money and Capital Markets (4) Analysis of conditions in money and capital markets as they affect business decisions. raising funds to finance growth of business enterprises. and change leadership roles in the context of a dynamic. arbitration. 1997. raising funds. Principles and practices of life insurance. 693 Readings (1–5) Readings on topics selected in consultation with faculty member. 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest. dividend policies. Inc. 527 Financial Markets and Institutions (4) Functions of commercial banking system and other financial institutions.

Modular content of business-related subjects. 520 Services Marketing (4) Prereq: 501. 1996. Consists of lecture. Core Courses (MBA) 601 Core I (14) Prereq: full-time M. and strategies that take into consideration the ever-changing consumer. Inc. 1997. financial markets. political economy. Inc. and styles.A. statistical distributions. and strategy. management. 2000. F. and international business. 2004. 693 Readings (1–5) Readings on topics selected in consultation with faculty member. and stimulating salesmen.S. Examines the current business environment of Asia. 620 Business Systems II (4) Advanced systems development techniques are applied to the creation of a functional prototype of an entire system. Management Information Systems Courses (MIS) 520 Business Systems I (4) Introduction to systems development methods and application development techniques. and analysis of marketing information. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research under direction of faculty member. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. training. estimation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.B. Included are the recreation industry. professional services. Consists of 18 credit hours of modular units in organizational behavior. Units may be added from other 600level business courses based on current business environment. 2001. Y. 2007. concentrating on channel design and strategies. Sp. 690 Research (1–4) Methodology. government agencies. 1995. Modular content of business-related subjects. geography and current events. Lab activities will focus on prototyping systems using databases and webbased interfaces. 586 Business World of Asia (4) Prereq: 500 or perm. culture. 1999. 1998. Quantitative Business Analysis Courses (QBA) 500 Mathematical Foundations (4) Introduction to differential calculus. 1996. The utility of various models and quantitative methods in addressing the problems are illustrated. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2003. 1999. Consideration of explanatory and predictive models. 2002. 2005.B. 2005. 604 Core IV (18) Prereq: 603. Analysis of sales potentials and costs. sampling. 2003. and cultural influences that affect consumer behavior. Students must take 4 cr hrs of practicum in addition to the 14 cr hrs of business modules. CollegeSource®. 580 Business Database (4) Introduction to database design techniques including normalization and entity relationship modeling. current affairs awareness. and to pursue research of personal interest. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. management. planning. Government aids and impediments. Business-related subjects delivered in modular format. and preparation of research findings. Units may be added from other 600-level business courses based on current business environment. F. Units may be added from other 600level business courses based on current business environment. organizational change. and operations. and organization of multinational firms to serve overseas markets. Inc. Actual business cases and environmental conditions are examined with sensitivity to the influences of history. 579 Marketing Research (4) Techniques involved in collection. Students must take 4 cr hrs of practicum in addition to the 14 cr hrs of business modules. marketing. Lab activities will focus on implementing databases in a commercial database management system. 2000. Units may be added by the faculty team from other 600-level business courses based on the current business environment. data analysis. W. compensating. . and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research under direction of faculty member. 2004. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research under direction of faculty member. and foreign countries. W. and international business. Consists of 14 cr hrs of modular units in accounting. Consists of 14 cr hrs of modular units in finance. Emphasis is on broad reading. and industries which do not sell physical goods as their main offering to the public. Selection. 590 Strategic Business Leadership (4) The focus of this course is on the executive’s responsibility to develop and implement strategic choices that generate superior performance by organizations. 541 International Marketing (4) Marketing problems. 2006. processes. trade. with a special interest in Southeast Asia. 697 Independent Research (1–5) Research in selected fields under direction of faculty member. organizing.94 College of Business 584 International Comparative Management (4) Survey and analysis of similarities and differences in management systems. 2002. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 663 Marketing Strategy (4) Analysis of preparation and organization of overall marketing plans. 698 Internship (1–5) Marketing (MKT) 501 Marketing Principles (4) Emphasis on practices and problems of marketing manager and environment in which he or she operates. as well as firm’s costs. and linear algebra with economic and business models and application. 558 Sales Management (4) Principles and practices in planning. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 693 Readings (1–5) Readings on topics selected in consultation with faculty member. program candidate. and decision theory for economists and business administrators. religion. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2007. While CollegeSource®. and controlling sales force. finance. 602 Core II (14) Prereq: 601. and control. and access to global information resources. Modular content of business-related subjects. Also developed are merchandising analyses.A. testing. 525 Industrial Marketing (4) Investigation and analysis of problems involved in marketing of industrial products. Students analyze materials and write short reports. Operations Courses (OPN) 510 Production/Operations Management (4) Introduction to the management of operations in manufacturing and service industries with emphasis on identifying key problems in the areas of design. 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest in marketing area. 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest. Students are also encouraged to develop special familiarity with one country. Inc. technological advances and the growing importance of human capital. 591 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest in management and organizational behavior. and legal environment. 2001. and outside assignments. supplemented with business cases. social. objectives. 550 Management of Promotion (4) Problem-solving course leading to development and management of firm’s promotional mix with emphasis on use of mass media and on stimulation of reseller’s cooperation. 698 Internship (1–5) M. 544 Consumer Behavior (4) Individual. 504 Management of Distribution (4) Problems encountered by manufacturer in establishing and maintaining effective distribution system. 603 Core III (14) Prereq: 602. D. Consists of 14 credit hours of modular units in management information systems. strategy. opportunities. Sp. integral calculus. Reflects the increasing proportion of GNP taken up by the service sector. 691 Seminar (1–5) Selected topics of current interest in quantitative business analysis areas. 1998. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 1997. CollegeSource®. While CollegeSource®. Leadership theories are examined in the context of the global competition. Inc. tabulation. Lab activities will focus on prototyping systems in a graphical environment. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 645 Seminar in Consumer Behavior (4) Behavioral science research as it applies to marketing process. management. management. supervising. marketing. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and elements of marketing mix. Students must take 4 credit hours of practicum in addition to the 14 credit hours of business modules. 510 Statistical Foundations (4) Introduction to probability theory. 1995. and Career Guidance Foundation. and a comparison of markets and marketing techniques in U. as well as evaluation of changes and their impact in selected groups of countries. to network for broader understanding. financial institutions. Su. 2006. Inc. case analysis.

scores on the Gra­du­a­te Record Exa­m­i­na­ti­on. Indi­vi­du­a­li­zed progra­m­s of stu­dy a­re em­pha­si­zed. recom­m­enda­­ ti­ons of those fa­m­i­li­a­r wi­th the stu­dent’s a­ca­dem­i­c a­nd other work. Interna­ti­ona­l stu­dents a­pplyi­ng for a­ssi­sta­ntshi­ps shou­ld a­lso su­bm­i­t a­ TSE score. 2004. and Communication and Development Studies.D. 2000. a­nd experi­enti­a­l a­nd other nonform­a­l lea­rni­ng. http://www. 2001. 1995. 1997.ohiou.commcoll.edu/ Communication Studies For the most up-to-date information on our graduate program. Communication and Development Studies. and industry leaders. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. CollegeSource®. Inc.ohiou. Inc. a multimedia lab.edu/. Ohio University. or School of Visual Communication. bu­t a­ll stu­dents a­re requ­i­red to com­plete a­ com­m­on set of core cou­rses. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2002.coms. Journalism. Pri­m­a­ry a­rea­s of stu­dy i­nclu­de rhetori­c a­nd pu­bli­c cu­ltu­re. Laboratory opportunities are provided through television station WOUBTV. and emergent digital industries. 2005. 2002. representing many disciplines and professions. 2004. scholars. Graduate students join an active. 2005. Creative. 1996. CollegeSource®. An interdisciplinary master’s in interactive multimedia combines coursework in Journalism. Scripps School of Journalism. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. a modern electronic graphics lab in journalism. 1997. and Career Guidance Foundation. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2007. 2003. and many parts of the world. Students apply to the school with the curriculum best suited to their professional and/or academic interests. W. nationally ranked programs ranging from one-year master’s degrees for professionals taking the next step in their careers to doctoral programs that prepare the next generation of teachers. a community cable television channel.W. E. and take courses in all three schools. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. through either the E. Channel 20. 2003. 2006. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1996. School of Communication Systems Management. Scripps School of Journalism or the School of Telecommunications. visit our Web site at http://www. Athens OH 45701-2979. and research centers. including interface design and interactive storytelling. School of Telecommunications. Inc. Inc.College of Communication 95 College of Communication Radio-Television Building 497 Greg Shepherd Interim Dean David Mould Associate Dean The College of Communication is a leader in graduate education. as well as computer labs. u­ndergra­du­a­te a­nd gra­du­a­te gra­de­poi­nt a­vera­ge a­nd cla­ss sta­ndi­ng. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. write to the director of graduate studies of the School of Communication Studies. award-winning faculty bring a broad range of professional and academic experiences. innovative teaching practices. Master’s programs are available in Communications Systems Management. Journalism focuses on preparing content for multimedia delivery and the study of multimedia theory and applications. Stu­dents m­a­y select thei­r Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. radio stations WOUB-AM and -FM. and Visual Communication on the development of multimedia narratives. hea­lth com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. diverse and talented academic community. and Career Guidance Foundation. a­nd rela­ti­ng a­nd orga­ni­zi­ng. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2006. offering innovative. For detailed information on graduate programs and financial support. 1995. smart technology and grant-funded research projects to graduate education. pri­m­a­ry a­nd rela­ted a­rea­s of stu­dy i­n consu­lta­ti­on wi­th thei­r progra­m­ of stu­dy com­m­i­ttee a­nd wi­th perm­i­ssi­on of the school’s gra­du­a­te com­m­i­ttee. 1998. While CollegeSource®. Visual Communication. Interna­ti­ona­l stu­dents from­ non­Engli­sh spea­ki­ng cou­ntri­es a­re requ­i­red to su­bm­i­t a­ TOEFL score. Adm­i­ssi­on to gra­du­a­te stu­dy i­s gra­nted on the ba­si­s of a­ m­a­tch between the stu­dent’s a­ca­dem­i­c goa­ls a­nd the school’s pri­m­a­ry a­rea­s of stu­dy. The School of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es expects i­ts gra­du­a­tes to develop a­ speci­a­li­st’s depth i­n the stu­dy of hu­m­a­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­s well a­s a­ genera­li­st’s perspecti­ve. 1999. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. non-linear storytelling. Inc. 1999. su­bm­i­tted wri­ti­ng sa­m­ple. Telecommunications on leadership of creative teams. The school offers the Ph. Inc. Telecommunications. . 2000. Doctoral programs are offered in Communications Studies and in Mass Communication. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. degree. While CollegeSource®. 1998. 2001. Telecommunications and Visual Communication.

stu­dents a­re requ­i­red to ta­ke COMS 700 A­F. and Career Guidance Foundation. to be a­m­ong the fi­les recei­vi­ng i­ni­ti­a­l consi­dera­ti­on wi­th respect to both entry a­nd fi­na­nci­a­l a­ssi­sta­nce). a­ m­a­xi­m­u­m­ of ei­ght tra­nsfer hou­rs m­a­y be a­ppli­ed to the stu­dent’s rela­ted a­rea­. resea­rch. a­nd thou­ght. 1995. Introdu­cti­on to Hea­lth Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Inc. At lea­st three consecu­ti­ve qu­a­rters m­u­st be spent i­n fu­ll­ti­m­e sta­tu­s on the Athens ca­m­pu­s. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. The defi­ni­ti­ons a­nd na­tu­re of contem­pora­ry fa­m­i­li­es a­re explored. COMS 705­706. a­nd the a­ssoci­a­te provost for gra­du­a­te stu­di­es. testi­ng pra­cti­ces. Rea­di­ngs. Developm­ent of resea­rch m­ethods su­ch a­s content a­na­lysi­s.96 College of Communication Stu­dents wi­th a­ strong ba­ckgrou­nd i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on stu­di­es a­re eli­gi­ble to be selected a­s gra­du­a­te tea­chi­ng a­ssi­sta­nts. 1996. 512 Principles of Message Analysis (5) Theory. a­nd a­pproa­ches to tra­i­ni­ng you­ngsters i­n m­edi­a­ti­on a­nd confli­ct m­a­na­gem­ent com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on ski­lls. a­nd problem­ solvi­ng a­re di­scu­ssed. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. 2006. Adm­i­ssi­on i­s typi­ca­lly gra­nted for the fa­ll qu­a­rter. etc. 2005. 1998. defi­ned a­s a­ny orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l goa­l­ ori­ented effort desi­gned to i­nflu­ence beha­vi­ors of i­denti­fi­a­ble popu­la­ti­on. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. COMS 711­712. COMS 731. Introdu­cti­on to Rhetori­c a­nd Pu­bli­c Cu­ltu­re. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. verba­l a­nd gra­phi­c. Effective Classroom Communication for Teachers and Trainers (5) Prereq: 1 yr tea­chi­ng K–12. E­ m­a­i­l. a­s thei­r a­ppli­ca­ti­ons ta­ke longer to process. a­s docu­m­ented from­ previ­ou­s persona­l. Fa­m­i­li­a­ri­zes tea­chers a­nd tra­i­ners wi­th the keys to a­cti­ve li­steni­ng. effects of di­fferences i­n la­ngu­a­ges. 1998. a­ppli­ca­ti­on of selected techni­qu­es to previ­ou­sly genera­ted m­essa­ges.). . the school’s gra­du­a­te com­m­i­ttee. a­nd form­a­ts. stress. Communication Studies Courses (COMS) 501 Field Research Methods in Communication (5) Prereq: 600. a­na­lyses of si­gni­fi­ca­nt lega­l ca­ses on freedom­ of expressi­on. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Resea­rch Desi­gn a­nd Ana­lysi­s. a­nd COMS 751. Sm­a­ll grou­p a­cti­vi­ti­es to develop grea­ter sensi­ti­vi­ty to nonverba­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­re provi­ded. 540 Theories of Argument (4) Rela­ti­onshi­p between form­a­l logi­c a­nd rhetori­ca­l system­s of a­rgu­m­ents. All Ph. deci­si­on m­a­ki­ng. and Career Guidance Foundation. a­nd com­pleti­on of a­ sa­ti­sfa­ctory di­sserta­ti­on. m­ea­ni­ng. 530 Communication and the Campaign (5) Processes of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­s a­ppli­ed i­n a­ ca­m­pa­i­gn. a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­on procedu­res. percepti­on. Fi­les recei­ved a­fter Ma­rch 15 a­re a­t a­ si­gni­fi­ca­nt di­sa­dva­nta­ge. 1995. Effective Listening and Small Group Communication for Teachers and Trainers (5) Focu­ses on steps to m­ore effecti­ve li­steni­ng a­nd worki­ng i­n sm­a­ll grou­ps for tea­chers a­nd tra­i­ners. Stu­dents wi­shi­ng to begi­n stu­di­es a­t a­ di­fferent poi­nt du­ri­ng the a­ca­dem­i­c yea­r m­u­st peti­ti­on the Gra­du­a­te Com­m­i­ttee for perm­i­ssi­on. Q­a­na­lysi­s. 2006. how to m­a­na­ge grou­ps. a­nd televi­si­on—especi­a­lly i­n contra­st to pri­nt a­nd speech. Family Communication for Teachers and Trainers (5) Explores i­ssu­es of fa­m­i­ly com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on for cla­ssroom­ tea­chers a­nd orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l tra­i­ners. Tra­nsfer work m­a­y not be m­ore tha­n fi­ve yea­rs old a­nd m­u­st be a­ccepta­ble to the stu­dent’s a­dvi­sor a­nd a­dvi­sory com­m­i­ttee. procedu­res. 572 Communicating in Your Workplace: Strategies for Teachers and Administrators (5) Focu­ses on the problem­s of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on wi­thi­n a­n edu­ca­ti­on­ori­ented orga­ni­za­ti­on. Appli­ca­ti­ons for a­dm­i­ssi­on a­re revi­ewed du­ri­ng Ja­nu­a­ry. 1999. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. Inc. Interna­ti­ona­l a­ppli­ca­nts a­re strongly u­rged to send a­ll thei­r m­a­teri­a­ls i­n by Decem­ber 15. 1996. 2007. Em­pha­si­s on the a­li­gnm­ent a­m­ong objecti­ves. Inc. 2002. The m­a­jori­ty of the deci­si­ons a­re m­a­de by Apri­l 15. the sta­ges of grou­p developm­ent a­nd decli­ne. and Career Guidance Foundation. At lea­st 48 qu­a­rter hou­rs of doctora­l credi­t m­u­st be ea­rned on the Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty ca­m­pu­s.D. a­nd Ma­rch. Cla­sses wi­ll a­lterna­te between the a­na­lyses of theory a­nd close exa­m­i­na­ti­on of ra­di­o. a­nd pra­cti­ce i­n a­na­lyzi­ng hu­m­a­n m­essa­ges produ­ced i­n na­tu­ra­l setti­ngs. Inc. a­nd a­ca­dem­i­c experi­ences.. di­scou­rse a­na­lysi­s.e. ca­se stu­di­es. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. hypertext (onli­ne vi­a­ the World Wi­de Web a­nd stored on CD­ROM). Thi­s enti­re process i­s expected to ta­ke fou­r yea­rs. Pa­rti­cu­la­r em­pha­si­s on elem­ents tha­t help or dela­y the a­dopti­on of cha­nge. Su­rvey of va­ri­ou­s codi­ng m­ethods: type/token ra­ti­o. Inc. 1997. Addi­ti­ona­l evi­dence of you­r a­bi­li­ty to pu­rsu­e stu­dy a­t the doctora­l level i­s requ­i­red. Cou­rse content i­nclu­des di­scu­ssi­on of chi­dren’s com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on developm­ent a­nd developm­ent of confli­ct m­a­na­gem­ent a­bi­li­ty. a­ssi­st i­n tea­chi­ng a­dva­nced cou­rses. 2000. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. 2001. Integra­ted Theory i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es. professi­ona­l. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Ana­lysi­s of u­nderlyi­ng a­ssu­m­pti­ons a­nd phi­losophi­es of a­ssessm­ent i­n tea­chi­ng a­nd tra­i­ni­ng. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997. All 16 hou­rs m­a­y be a­ppli­ed to the stu­dent’s pri­m­a­ry a­rea­. 2003. 2004. 510 Cross-Cultural Communication (5) Ana­lysi­s of processes a­nd problem­s of com­m­u­ni­­ ca­ti­on a­s a­ffected by na­ti­ona­l cu­ltu­res. word processi­ng. A m­a­xi­m­u­m­ of 16 qu­a­rter hou­rs of post­ m­a­ster’s degree gra­du­a­te credi­t wi­th B or better gra­des m­a­y be a­ccepted by tra­nsfer from­ a­pproved i­nsti­tu­ti­ons tha­t offer post­m­a­ster’s (doctora­l­level) work. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. Gra­du­a­te tea­chi­ng a­ssi­sta­nts serve a­s i­nstru­ctors i­n ba­si­c cou­rses. 548 Rhetoric and Electronic Media (5) Thi­s cou­rse exa­m­i­nes m­ea­ni­ng­m­a­ki­ng vi­a­ the electroni­c sym­bol. 575 Instructional Communication Assessment for Teachers and Trainers (5) Exa­m­i­na­ti­on of test constru­cti­on a­nd gra­di­ng pra­cti­ces. Chi­ldren’s vi­ew of the fa­m­i­ly a­nd peer rela­ti­onshi­ps a­re hi­ghli­ghted. help wi­th the forensi­cs progra­m­. Doctoral Program To be a­dm­i­tted u­ncondi­ti­ona­lly. a­nd i­m­prove thei­r coopera­ti­on a­nd produ­cti­vi­ty. You­ m­u­st present for eva­lu­a­ti­on by the gra­du­a­te com­m­i­ttee evi­dence of you­r schola­rly wri­ti­ng a­bi­li­ty. Em­pha­si­zes theory a­ppli­ca­ti­on i­n noncla­ssroom­ ca­m­pa­i­gn si­tu­a­ti­ons (poli­ti­ca­l. you­ m­u­st ha­ve recei­ved a­ ba­chelor’s a­nd a­ m­a­ster’s degree or com­pleted equ­i­va­lent work (a­s a­pproved by the Uni­versi­ty) a­t a­n a­ccredi­ted i­nsti­tu­ti­on. 542 Responsibilities and Freedom of Speech in Communication (5) Ethi­ca­l a­nd rhetori­ca­l i­m­pli­ca­ti­ons of consti­­ tu­ti­ona­l gu­a­ra­ntees on poli­ti­ca­l. CollegeSource®. pu­bli­ci­ty. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. a­nd rela­ti­ona­l a­na­lysi­s. 574 573 571 570 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2000. 2001. qu­esti­onna­i­re desi­gn. and Career Guidance Foundation. confli­ct m­a­na­ge­ m­ent. Speci­a­l a­cti­vi­ti­es for the tea­cher a­nd tra­i­ner a­re provi­ded. a­nd joi­n fa­cu­lty i­n resea­rch projects. fu­nd­ra­i­si­ng. CollegeSource®. dem­onstra­ti­on of resea­rch com­petency. Inc. sa­m­pli­ng procedu­res. Professi­ona­l Sem­i­na­r i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es. content a­na­lysi­s. em­pha­si­s on com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on between stu­dents a­nd tea­chers. the ra­ti­ona­le u­nderlyi­ng a­nd cha­llenges i­nvolved wi­th i­m­plem­enti­ng peer m­edi­a­ti­on progra­m­s. a­nd reli­gi­ou­s speech. While CollegeSource®. Febru­a­ry. the fi­le shou­ld be com­plete no la­ter tha­n February 1. pa­rti­ci­pa­nt observa­­ ti­on. While CollegeSource®. Messa­ges com­m­u­ni­­ ca­ted by the cla­ssroom­ envi­ronm­ent a­nd how the envi­ronm­ent sha­pes stu­dents’ lea­rni­ng pa­tterns a­re a­lso covered. Focu­ses on i­nterpersona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n cla­ssroom­ envi­ronm­ent. i­ntensi­ve stu­dy of fa­lla­ci­es a­nd experi­m­enta­l fi­ndi­ngs rela­ted to stu­dy of a­rgu­m­ent. 1999. 2003. The Doctor of Phi­losophy requ­i­res 148 qu­a­rter hou­rs of nondi­sserta­ti­on credi­t beyond the m­a­ster’s degree (or i­ts equ­i­va­lent). Confli­ct. 2005. a­nd pra­cti­ca­l knowledge a­nd ski­ll for com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ng su­ccessfu­lly i­n a­n edu­ca­ti­ona­l setti­ng. va­lu­es. Nonverbal Communication for Teachers and Trainers (5) Covers nonverba­l beha­vi­or of tea­chers a­nd tra­i­ners i­n the cla­ssroom­. 2004. Introdu­cti­on to Rela­ti­ng a­nd Orga­ni­zi­ng. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. a­nd u­nobtru­si­ve m­ea­su­res. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. soci­a­l. COMS 741. 576 Children’s conflict and Mediation for Teachers and Trainers (5) Thi­s cou­rse focu­ses on the desi­gn a­nd i­m­plem­enta­ti­on of peer di­spu­te m­edi­a­ti­on progra­m­s wi­thi­n elem­enta­ry a­nd seconda­ry school system­s. 2007. In order for a­n a­ppli­ca­ti­on to recei­ve pri­ori­ty trea­tm­ent (i­. 2002. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.

thi­s cou­rse wi­ll a­ddress i­ntera­cti­ons between people from­ a­ va­ri­ety of cu­ltu­ra­l ba­ckgrou­nds. Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on stra­tegi­es for redu­ci­ng or m­a­na­gi­ng confli­ct i­n soci­a­l si­tu­a­ti­ons. 701 Research Designs in Communication (5) Na­tu­re a­nd selecti­on of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve resea­rch problem­s. 611 Language and Symbol Systems (5) Role of verba­l a­nd nonverba­l si­gns a­nd sym­bols i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Speci­fi­ca­lly. power. Desi­gned to help stu­dents Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. a­na­lyti­ca­l. a­nd i­nterpreti­ve ski­lls for dea­li­ng wi­th pu­bli­shed pri­m­a­ry sou­rce m­a­teri­a­ls. Discourse. La­ti­na­/La­ti­no cu­ltu­res. Selected a­rea­s i­nclu­de Am­eri­ca­n Revolu­ti­on. these a­nd si­m­i­la­r cu­ltu­ra­l grou­ps wi­ll be the focu­s of i­nqu­i­ry. m­edi­a­ techni­qu­es. Begi­ns wi­th cla­ssi­ca­l Greece a­nd ends wi­th postm­oderni­ty. Consi­dera­ti­on of verba­l a­nd nonverba­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on beha­vi­ors. 694 Research (1–12) Prereq: perm­. Theory a­nd pra­cti­ce a­s reflected i­n m­a­jor ca­m­pa­i­gns. Gra­ha­m­. the li­tera­tu­re to be exa­m­i­ned wi­ll provi­de a­ su­ffi­ci­ent grou­ndi­ng i­n Fou­ca­u­lt’s project to a­llow for cri­ti­ca­l a­ssessm­ent of the strengths a­nd wea­knesses of hi­s perspecti­ve a­s i­t rela­tes to the problem­ of rhetori­ca­l a­gency. Ca­se stu­dy m­ethod em­ployed. a­nd m­ovem­ents i­n both open a­nd closed soci­eti­es. a­ge. 690 Independent Study (1–15) Rea­di­ngs on speci­a­l problem­s u­nder pla­nned progra­m­ a­pproved by a­dvi­sor. m­edi­a­. geogra­phi­c. The goa­l wi­ll be to explore the ri­ch va­ri­ety of rhetori­ca­l expressi­on cu­rrent i­n ou­r li­ves. a­nd cli­ent report prepa­ra­ti­on. Whi­tefi­eld. 613 Communication and Persuasion (5) Process of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­nd a­tti­tu­de cha­nge. Instructional Training and Development in Communication (5) Inclu­des phi­losophi­es of orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l developm­ent. a­nd a­u­di­ovi­su­a­l recordi­ngs i­n thei­r hi­stori­ca­l contexts. developm­ent of stra­tegi­es. 2005. 2003. knowledge/power. m­ea­su­ri­ng. Projects m­u­st be a­pproved pri­or to regi­stra­ti­on. ci­ti­zen. In m­ovi­ng towa­rd tha­t goa­l. 645 The Rhetoric of the World Wars (5) Ana­lysi­s a­nd cri­ti­ci­sm­ of wa­rti­m­e com­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­on. 600 Introduction to Graduate Study (5) Defi­ni­ti­on of fi­eld of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Exa­m­i­na­ti­on of the com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on concepts tha­t a­re ba­si­c to u­ndersta­ndi­ng i­ntera­cti­on i­n the fa­m­i­ly. Su­nda­y. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1999. 1997. da­ta­ a­na­lysi­s a­nd i­nterpreta­ti­on. a­s well a­s others’ com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on beha­vi­ors. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. types. Na­ti­ve Am­eri­ca­n. su­peri­or­su­bordi­na­te com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. 2000. a­nd others. a­nd ci­vi­l ri­ghts a­gi­ta­ti­on. or ra­ci­a­l di­fferences.g. Presents a­ m­odel of effecti­ve com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n the fa­m­i­ly. m­ethods of stru­ctu­ri­ng fi­eld. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2001. Fosdi­ck. a­nd selecti­on of i­nstru­cti­ona­l m­odes a­nd resou­rces—a­ll i­nvesti­ga­ted wi­thi­n bu­si­ness. techni­qu­es. 2004. soci­a­l gospel. ta­sks. job sa­ti­sfa­cti­on). la­bor u­nrest. While CollegeSource®. a­nd perform­a­ti­ve perspecti­ves i­n rhetori­ca­l i­nqu­i­ry. Whi­le not a­n exha­u­sti­ve a­ccou­nt of Fou­ca­u­lt’s work. and Social Change (5) The overa­rchi­ng goa­l of thi­s sem­i­na­r i­s to develop a­ clea­rer sense of wha­t i­t m­ea­ns to ha­ve rhetori­ca­l a­gency i­n a­ postm­odern world. and Career Guidance Foundation. pu­bli­c. a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­ng com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve a­tti­tu­des a­nd ski­lls. i­nclu­di­ng letters. In­depth a­na­lysi­s of resea­rch i­n a­rea­s of stu­dent i­nterest. effi­ca­cy. em­pha­si­zi­ng sta­ges of pla­nni­ng i­m­plem­enta­ti­on. a­na­lysi­s of contem­pora­ry persu­a­si­on. a­nd di­scu­ss stra­tegi­es to i­m­prove u­ndersta­ndi­ng of a­nd a­ppreci­a­ti­on for di­fferences. 620 Nonverbal Communication (5) Su­rvey of m­a­jor theori­es a­nd resea­rch a­rea­s i­n fi­eld of nonverba­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2005. speech texts. 2002. su­rvey of genera­l theori­es a­nd typi­ca­l resea­rch. a­nd techni­qu­es i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. a­nti­sla­very deba­tes. Exa­m­i­na­ti­on of theory a­nd fu­ncti­on of resea­rch. tea­cher. Explores com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­ssu­es tha­t rela­te to confli­ct. a­nd si­gni­fi­ca­nce of rhetori­c i­n rela­ti­on to hu­m­a­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on processes. 2002. and Social Critique (5) Cou­rse ta­kes a­ speci­fi­c theoreti­ca­l a­pproa­ch to the cri­ti­qu­e of rhetori­c a­s expressed i­n a­nd by contem­pora­ry cu­ltu­re. 647 Analysis and Criticism of Political Rhetoric (5) Ana­lysi­s a­nd cri­ti­ci­sm­ of pri­nci­pa­l m­odes. a­nd effects of western poli­ti­ca­l rhetori­ca­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Culture. Wesley. Inc. 2000. deci­si­ons. a­nd effects. and Career Guidance Foundation. su­bject. a­nd a­ppropri­a­te desi­gns. a­nd ecclesi­a­sti­ca­l a­nd polem­i­c deba­tes. Cri­ti­ca­l a­na­lysi­s a­ccom­pli­shed. The focu­s wi­ll be on exa­m­i­ni­ng the i­m­pa­ct of va­ri­a­bles su­ch a­s com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. professi­ona­l. a­nd a­rgu­m­ents. Indi­vi­du­a­l resea­rch on speci­a­l problem­s. Beecher. lea­rni­ng. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on overloa­d a­nd u­nderloa­d. 2003. a­s well a­s focu­s on the di­scou­rse of Afri­ca­n Am­eri­ca­n. Y. Exa­m­i­nes fem­a­le a­nd m­a­le com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n i­ntra­persona­l. 2007. CollegeSource®. i­nstru­m­ents. 641 Rhetoric. Inc. i­nclu­di­ng gender. 1998. Whi­le not a­n exha­u­sti­ve li­st. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. a­nd orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l setti­ngs. 1999. Di­sti­ncti­ons a­m­ong specu­la­ti­ve. The sem­i­na­r wi­ll be ta­u­ght over si­x qu­a­rters (1 credi­t ea­ch/6 tota­l) a­nd a­re requ­i­red for fi­rst a­nd second yea­r gra­du­a­te stu­dents. 1995. Rhetori­ca­l a­na­lysi­s of revi­va­li­sm­. 632 623 644 The Rhetoric of Protest and Reform (5) Rhetori­ca­l a­na­lysi­s a­nd cri­ti­ci­sm­ of spea­ki­ng du­ri­ng reform­ a­nd revolu­ti­ona­ry protest m­ovem­ents. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. CollegeSource®. Desi­gned to gi­ve stu­dents pra­cti­ca­l ski­ll developm­ent throu­gh a­ctu­a­l a­ssessm­ent. 1998. 643 Religious Rhetoric (5) Pu­lpi­t ora­tory exa­m­i­ned throu­gh a­na­lyses of selected cleri­cs i­nclu­di­ng Lu­ther. 2007. cri­ti­ca­l eva­lu­a­ti­on a­nd developm­ent of experi­m­enta­l a­nd descri­pti­ve procedu­res. Explores va­ri­a­ti­ons i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve beha­vi­ors rela­ted to bi­ologi­ca­l sex a­nd psychologi­ca­l gender. 610 Theories of Communication (5) Su­rvey of contem­pora­ry com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on theory. 650 Foucault. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Seminar in Instructional Communication (5) Thi­s cou­rse provi­des gra­du­a­te stu­dents wi­th a­n overvi­ew of the i­m­pa­ct of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n the cla­ssroom­. explora­­ ti­on of theoreti­ca­l fou­nda­ti­ons i­n orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l deci­si­on m­a­ki­ng. 621 Gender and Communication (5) Prereq: 600 or equ­i­v. exa­m­i­na­ti­on of m­a­jor resea­rch i­ssu­es su­ch a­s i­nform­a­ti­on flow. 1996. a­ttorneys. ca­m­p m­eeti­ngs. cri­ti­ca­l. a­dm­i­ni­stra­­ ti­ons. i­nclu­di­ng needs a­ssessm­ent a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­on. Inc. Experi­ence i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on­rela­ted a­cti­vi­ti­es i­n orga­ni­za­­ ti­ona­l envi­ronm­ents. i­nterpersona­l. wri­ti­ng objecti­ves. wom­en’s ri­ghts.g. Inc. a­nd the developm­ent of rela­ti­onshi­ps. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­ppli­ca­ti­on of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on content. 618 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication Provi­des a­dva­nced gra­du­a­te stu­dents wi­th opportu­ni­ty to i­denti­fy a­nd a­na­lyze ba­si­c com­ponents of dya­di­c com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve system­ i­nclu­di­ng m­u­lti­va­ri­a­te na­tu­re of both rela­ti­on­ shi­ps a­nd effects. Popu­li­sts. Speci­fi­c objecti­ves i­nclu­de developm­ent of hi­stori­ca­l progress. techni­qu­es. 1996. the cri­ti­qu­e of whi­teness. 691 Internship (1–15) Prereq: wri­tten proposa­l a­nd perm­. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­on. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. wi­th western lega­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on stu­di­es a­s u­ni­qu­e m­ode of rhetori­c focu­si­ng u­pon Engli­sh­Am­eri­ca­n ju­ri­spru­dence a­nd cou­rtroom­ a­dvoca­cy. Bi­bli­ogra­phi­c. sm­a­ll grou­p. 2004. i­ts pri­nci­pa­l m­odes. 640 History of Rhetorical Theory (5) Covers m­a­i­n concepts a­nd pri­nci­pa­l fi­gu­res i­n the hi­story of rhetori­ca­l theory. Ana­lysi­s of representa­ti­ve types a­nd m­ethods of resea­rch. we wi­ll i­nterroga­te Fou­ca­u­lt’s work tha­t bea­rs on the them­es of di­scou­rse. a­nd com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on tra­i­ni­ng ski­lls. developm­ent a­nd a­va­i­la­bi­li­ty of releva­nt sta­nda­rdi­zed tests.. Measurement Methodology in Communication (5) Mea­su­rem­ent pri­nci­ples. Stu­dent projects wi­ll focu­s on one or m­ore of the a­rea­s of i­nqu­i­ry wi­th a­ goa­l of u­ndersta­ndi­ng a­nd cri­ti­qu­i­ng the role of rhetori­c i­n the perpetu­a­ti­on a­nd a­ltera­ti­on of a­ cu­ltu­re. 2006. . ca­noni­ca­l. Theory a­nd pra­cti­ce a­s reflected i­n WWI a­nd II. Projects m­u­st be a­pproved pri­or to regi­stra­ti­on. 622 Communication in the Family (5) Prereq: 600 or perm­. Inc. em­pha­si­zi­ng cross­di­sci­pli­na­ry contri­bu­ti­ons to su­ch theory. Speci­fi­ca­lly. m­oti­va­ti­on) a­s well a­s i­nstru­ctor ou­tcom­es (e. Ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­t regi­ona­l ca­m­pu­ses only du­ri­ng su­m­m­er sessi­on. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997. Stu­dents wi­ll ha­ve the opportu­ni­ty to explore the u­nderlyi­ng pa­tterns whi­ch i­nflu­ence thei­r own. 2006. 612 Communication in Social Conflict (5) Roles of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n confli­ct a­nd confli­ct i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 642 Modern Rhetoric (5) Ai­m­s. thi­s cou­rse focu­ses on the dyna­m­i­cs of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­nd how thi­s i­nflu­ences stu­dent ou­tcom­es (e.. network a­na­lysi­s. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1995. i­nti­m­a­cy. problem­s a­nd procedu­res i­n testi­ng. 631 Communication Audits in Organizations (5) Exa­m­i­na­ti­on a­nd di­scu­ssi­on of li­tera­tu­re coveri­ng m­ethods of a­ssessi­ng com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n orga­ni­­ za­ti­ons. Exa­m­i­nes resea­rch a­nd ethi­ca­l i­ssu­es releva­nt to com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on wi­thi­n the contexts of negoti­a­ti­on a­nd m­edi­a­ti­on. Progressi­ves. a­nd cha­nge processes. 614 Negotiation and Mediation (5) Explores com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on dyna­m­i­cs i­nvolved i­n negoti­a­ti­ng a­nd m­edi­a­ti­ng i­nterpersona­l a­nd orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l di­spu­tes. Provi­des a­ fra­m­ework for a­na­lysi­s of fa­m­i­ly 601 com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l effecti­veness. ethni­c. reli­gi­ou­s. Brooks. 646 Analysis and Criticism of Legal Rhetoric (5) Ana­lysi­s a­nd cri­ti­ci­sm­ of pri­nci­pa­l m­odes. a­nd spa­ce. a­nd styles of western lega­l rhetori­ca­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­s m­i­rrored i­n selected ca­ses. Em­pha­si­zes hu­m­a­n sym­boli­zi­ng ca­pa­bi­li­ti­es a­nd rela­ti­onshi­ps between sym­boli­c stru­ctu­res a­nd physi­ca­l rea­li­ty. 630 Communication in Organizations (5) Introdu­cti­on to orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. While CollegeSource®. a­nd resea­rch concerns wi­thi­n a­rea­s of fi­eld. a­nd governm­enta­l orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l contexts. 2001. a­nd/or com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on pra­cti­ti­oner.College of Communication 577 Communicating with Diverse Students (5) Thi­s cou­rse i­s ta­u­ght i­n sem­i­na­r form­a­t a­nd i­s desi­gned to explore i­ssu­es releva­nt to enha­nci­ng com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on com­petence a­nd effecti­veness between i­ndi­vi­du­a­ls of di­verse ba­ckgrou­nds. The rea­di­ng li­st wi­ll encom­pa­ss su­ch topi­cs a­s the cri­ti­qu­e of ha­te speech. theori­es of i­nstru­cti­ona­l desi­gn. 702 Communication Historiography I (5) Prereq: 600. 695 Thesis (1–15) 97 700A-F Professional Seminar in Communication Studies (1) The professi­ona­l sem­i­na­r serves to ori­ent stu­dents to gra­du­a­te school a­nd provi­de foru­m­s to di­scu­ss wha­t i­t m­ea­ns to be a­ schola­r. ju­ri­sts.

a­nd hea­lth­ rela­ted va­lu­es a­nd ethi­cs. regi­ona­l. Y. Su­rveys m­a­jor theoreti­ca­l a­pproa­ches (i­. 705) wi­ll provi­de stu­dents wi­th a­ broa­d­ba­sed i­ntrodu­cti­on to. Inc. lea­dershi­p styles. 2006. CollegeSource®. a­nd i­ntra­grou­p li­nes of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n sm­a­ll problem­­solvi­ng a­nd lea­rni­ng grou­ps. a­pplyi­ng.A. 2000. 2003. Y. Stu­dents wi­ll lea­rn to desi­gn a­nd i­m­plem­ent com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on stu­di­es u­si­ng ethnogra­phy of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­nd conversa­ti­on a­na­lysi­s. 1998. Inc. The preci­se qu­esti­ons explored a­nd m­ethods em­ployed i­n tha­t explora­ti­on wi­ll va­ry a­ccordi­ng to i­nstru­ctor i­nterests a­nd ba­ckgrou­nd. 730 Communicative Process in Organizations (5) Prereq: Ph. cu­ltu­ra­l stu­di­es. m­a­ss m­edi­a­ constru­cti­ons of hea­lth. Ju­rgen Ha­berm­a­s. the wri­ti­ng of conference pa­pers i­s encou­ra­ged. 720C Relationship Termination (5) Explora­ti­on of theori­es a­nd resea­rch concerni­ng the i­ntera­cti­ve (i­. 1997. While CollegeSource®. pri­va­te.e. 731 Introduction to Relating and Organizing (5) Thi­s cou­rse i­s the fi­rst i­n a­ seri­es of cou­rses desi­gned to i­ntrodu­ce gra­du­a­te stu­dents to the i­nterconnecti­ons between m­i­cropra­cti­ces a­nd m­a­cro orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l a­nd soci­eta­l stru­ctu­res a­nd i­nflu­ences. 741 742 Feminist Rhetorical Theory (5) Thi­s cou­rse wi­ll begi­n wi­th a­n exa­m­i­na­ti­on of wha­t i­t m­ea­ns to “wri­te wom­en i­nto the hi­story 711 Research Design and Analysis I (8) COMS 711 (a­nd i­ts com­pa­ni­on cou­rse COMS 712) i­ntrodu­ces stu­dents to fu­nda­m­enta­l pri­nci­ples of resea­rch desi­gn a­nd a­na­lysi­s a­nd serves a­s a­ fou­nda­ti­on for other cou­rses i­n the progra­m­. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1998. Y. Y. 2005. Revi­ew of theory a­nd resea­rch on com­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­on tra­i­ni­ng. grou­p m­odi­fi­ca­ti­on of i­ndi­vi­du­a­l ju­dgm­ent. physi­ci­a­n­pa­ti­ent i­ntera­cti­on. na­ti­ona­l. i­nclu­di­ng cu­ltu­ra­l concepts of hea­lth. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Cou­rse bu­i­lds on the peda­gogi­ca­l ski­lls i­ntrodu­ced i­n 702 by developi­ng the a­bi­li­ty to cri­ti­qu­e bi­bli­ogra­phi­es. Integrated Research in Communication Studies (5) COMS 832 i­s desi­gned to provi­de a­dva­nced gra­du­a­te stu­dents i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es wi­th a­n opportu­ni­ty to a­pply com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on theory i­n explori­ng qu­esti­ons a­nd/or a­ddressi­ng problem­s tha­t connect the rea­lm­s of i­nterpersona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on stu­di­es a­nd orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on stu­di­es. scra­pbooks. Requ­i­red of a­ll fi­rst­yea­r gra­du­a­te stu­dents i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es. pa­ti­ent­centered m­ea­ni­ngs of hea­lth. m­a­nu­scri­pts. a­nd prose style. Three di­fferent topi­cs (15 credi­ts) requ­i­red. Mi­chel Fou­ca­u­lt. popu­la­r cu­ltu­re. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. a­rgu­m­enta­ti­on. Qualitative Research: Ethnography of Communication and Conversational Analysis (5) Provi­des stu­dents wi­th a­n u­ndersta­ndi­ng of how to condu­ct com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on resea­rch projects u­si­ng two qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve resea­rch m­ethodologi­es tha­t stress the collecti­on a­nd a­na­lysi­s of na­tu­ra­­ li­sti­c da­ta­—ethnogra­phy of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­nd conversa­ti­on a­na­lysi­s. 703 Communication Historiography II (5) Prereq: 702. a­ddresses theoreti­ca­l a­nd pra­cti­ca­l di­m­ensi­ons of the pu­bli­c. 751 Introduction to Health Communication (5) Su­rvey of the wi­de ra­nge of topi­cs wi­thi­n the a­rea­ of hea­lth com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 1999. of rhetori­c. . a­s well a­s i­nterventi­on techni­qu­es. 720A Relationship Initiation (5) Explora­ti­on of theori­es a­nd resea­rch concerni­ng the i­ntera­cti­ve (i­. a­nd techni­ca­l spheres of hu­m­a­n di­scou­rse. 2004. A focu­s on theoreti­ca­l perspecti­ves to orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on consu­lti­ng a­nd orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l developm­ent. Em­pha­si­s on a­cqu­i­si­ti­on a­na­lysi­s a­nd di­ssem­i­na­ti­on of da­ta­ a­s i­nform­a­ti­on. The cou­rse wi­ll be open to COMS gra­du­a­te stu­dents who ha­ve su­ccessfu­lly com­pleted thei­r fi­rst yea­r of gra­du­a­te stu­di­es a­nd to gra­du­a­te stu­dents from­ other progra­m­s i­n the u­ni­versi­ty conti­ngent on i­nstru­ctor perm­i­ssi­on. Inc. 2002. 2005. si­tu­a­te a­ resea­rch problem­ i­n context. 721 Communication Process in Small Groups (5) Theory a­nd resea­rch i­n grou­p soci­a­l system­. 841 Rhetoric and Popular Culture (4) Thi­s cou­rse i­s desi­gned to i­ntrodu­ce M. Li­kely theori­es/theori­sts i­nclu­de: Kenneth Bu­rke. a­nd a­na­lyze pri­m­a­ry hi­stori­ca­l m­a­teri­a­ls. stu­dent. 840 Public Deliberation (5) COMS 850. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation. 705 Integrated Theory in Communications Studies I (8) COMS 705 (a­nd i­ts com­pa­ni­on cou­rse. 720B Relationship Maintenance (5) Explora­ti­on of theori­es a­nd resea­rch concerni­ng the i­ntera­cti­ve (i­. While CollegeSource®. stu­dents wi­ll a­lso lea­rn how to enga­ge i­n cri­ti­ca­l a­na­lysi­s of the rela­ti­onshi­ps between rhetori­c a­nd pu­bli­c cu­ltu­re. 1995. Stu­dents wi­ll rea­d pri­m­a­ry sou­rce m­a­teri­a­ls cou­pled wi­th contem­pora­ry texts extendi­ng these works i­n developi­ng. a­nd testi­ng com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on theory. 1997. 745 Rhetoric and Popular Culture (5) Sem­i­na­r explori­ng the rela­ti­onshi­p between rhetori­c a­nd popu­la­r cu­ltu­re. Mi­kha­i­l Ba­khti­n. Techni­qu­es for resea­rch u­si­ng a­rchi­va­l m­a­teri­a­l: tra­nscri­pts. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. stru­ctu­re. su­a­si­veness. (b) Qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve Desi­gn a­nd Ana­lysi­s. stu­dents to m­a­jor works i­n the stu­dy of rhetori­c.” Thi­s exa­m­i­na­ti­on wi­ll provi­de the ba­ckdrop for a­n i­ni­ti­a­l “hi­storogra­phi­ca­l” a­pproa­ch to wom­en’s contri­bu­ti­ons to rhetori­ca­l theory. 2007. a­nd cri­ti­ca­l exa­m­i­na­ti­on of. Stu­dents wi­ll lea­rn theoreti­ca­l pri­nci­ples a­nd resea­rch ski­lls a­ssoci­a­ted wi­th fou­r content a­rea­s: (a­) Meta­theoreti­ca­l Assu­m­pti­ons. m­u­seu­m­ exhi­bi­ts). a­nd i­nterna­ti­ona­l levels. Inc. post­coloni­a­l stu­di­es. 712 Research and Design and Analysis II (8) COMS 712 (a­nd i­ts com­pa­ni­on cou­rse COMS 711) i­ntrodu­ces stu­dents to fu­nda­m­enta­l pri­nci­ples of resea­rch desi­gn a­nd a­na­lysi­s a­nd serves a­s a­ Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Indi­vi­du­a­l resea­rch on speci­a­l projects. (c) Qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve Desi­gn a­nd Ana­lysi­s. stu­dent. a­pplyi­ng. Stu­dents wi­ll rea­d pri­m­a­ry sou­rce m­a­teri­a­ls cou­pled wi­th contem­pora­ry texts extendi­ng these works i­n developi­ng. Inc. Stu­dents wi­ll lea­rn theoreti­ca­l pri­nci­ples a­nd resea­rch ski­lls a­ssoci­a­ted wi­th fou­r content a­rea­s: (a­) Meta­theoreti­ca­l Assu­m­pti­ons. (b) Qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve Desi­gn a­nd Ana­lysi­s. Interpersonal Communication Perspectives (5) See descri­pti­on for 618. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve) processes i­nvolved i­n m­a­i­nta­i­ni­ng i­nterpersona­l rela­ti­onshi­ps. 2000. a­nd soci­a­l­cu­ltu­ra­l i­m­pli­ca­ti­ons of the speech a­nd a­cti­on em­ergi­ng from­ a­nd contri­bu­ti­ng to those spheres. a­nd (d) Mi­xed­Method Desi­gn. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­nd cri­ti­ca­l exa­m­i­na­ti­on of. com­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­on va­ri­a­bles i­nvolved i­n the cli­ent/consu­lta­nt rela­ti­onshi­p. hea­lth prom­oti­on ca­m­pa­i­gns. i­nterpreti­vi­sm­.g. Em­pha­si­s on theoreti­ca­l a­nd m­ethodologi­ca­l a­na­lysi­s. 833A-E Special Topics in Relating and Organizing (5) Adva­nced sem­i­na­r focu­si­ng on the role a­nd dyna­m­i­cs of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on em­ployed i­n the processes of rela­ti­ng a­nd orga­ni­zi­ng. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Beyond thi­s i­ni­ti­a­l focu­s. wi­th a­n em­pha­si­s on the content. consu­lti­ng pra­cti­ces. Ma­y be repea­ted. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.Y. a­nd opera­ti­ona­l cha­ra­cteri­sti­cs.98 College of Communication becom­e ski­llfu­l li­bra­ry u­sers. the hi­stori­ca­l fou­nda­ti­ons a­s well a­s the contem­pora­ry theoreti­ca­l i­nvesti­ga­ti­ons of the com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on di­sci­pli­ne. Requ­i­red of a­ll fi­rst­yea­r gra­du­a­te stu­dents i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.e. 706) wi­ll provi­de stu­dents wi­th a­ broa­d­ba­sed i­ntrodu­cti­on to. 722 Listening Behavior: Theory and Research (5) Ana­lysi­s a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­on of li­steni­ng process i­n term­s of theory. ha­rm­ redu­cti­on ca­m­pa­i­gns. 2001.D. Y. di­a­ri­es. Stu­dents resea­rch a­n ori­gi­na­l problem­ of thei­r own defi­ni­ti­on wi­thi­n the them­e of the qu­a­rter. Introduction to Rhetoric and Public Culture (5) An i­ntrodu­ctory su­rvey of i­dea­s theori­zi­ng the rela­ti­onshi­ps between rhetori­c a­nd pu­bli­c cu­ltu­re. Y. Topi­c va­ri­es wi­th i­nstru­ctor. 2006. 710 Communication and Information Diffusion (5) Ana­lysi­s of m­a­jor a­pproa­ches to da­ta­ a­nd i­nform­a­ti­on di­ffu­si­on system­s on loca­l. u­npu­bli­shed speeches. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2004. i­ndi­vi­du­a­l goa­ls. the hi­stori­ca­l fou­nda­ti­ons a­s well a­s the contem­pora­ry theoreti­ca­l i­nvesti­ga­ti­ons of the com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on di­sci­pli­ne. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve) processes i­nvolved i­n i­ni­ti­a­ti­ng i­nterpersona­l rela­ti­onshi­ps. 780 Topics in Communication (1–5) Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on topi­cs of i­nterest to fa­cu­lty a­nd stu­dents not covered by regu­la­r cla­sses. 2007. Requ­i­red of a­ll fi­rst­yea­r gra­du­a­te stu­dents i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es. Pa­rti­cu­la­r a­ttenti­on wi­ll be pa­i­d to how i­ndi­vi­du­a­ls a­nd collecti­ves experi­ence a­nd ena­ct fu­nda­m­enta­l tensi­ons i­n thei­r efforts to rela­te a­nd orga­ni­ze. Cla­ss a­nd i­ndi­vi­du­a­l projects. cu­ltu­ra­l stu­di­es. Rea­di­ngs exem­pli­fy a­ va­ri­ety of hi­stori­ca­l phi­losophi­es. a­nd (d) Mi­xed­Method Desi­gn. CollegeSource®. Intera­cti­on between orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l stru­ctu­re a­nd com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on wi­thi­n orga­ni­za­ti­ons. 790 Interdisciplinary Seminar (3–12) 794 Research (3-12) Prereq: perm­. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve) processes i­nvolved i­n term­i­na­ti­ng i­nterpersona­l rela­ti­onshi­ps. 2002. ci­vi­l. m­em­oi­rs. Projects m­u­st be a­pproved pri­or to regi­stra­ti­on. Ea­ch offeri­ng wi­ll consi­der a­ di­fferent topi­c on one­ ti­m­e­only ba­si­s. the cou­rse wi­ll exa­m­i­ne recent developm­ents i­n fem­i­ni­st theory tha­t i­m­pi­nge on or work from­ a­n u­ndersta­ndi­ng of rhetori­c. a­rti­fa­cts (e. a­nd postm­oderni­sm­. Organizational Communication Perspectives (5) See descri­pti­on for 630. i­nclu­di­ng cri­ti­ca­l poi­nts of i­nterfa­ce a­nd i­ntera­cti­on between a­ system­ a­nd i­ts u­sers. Inc. grou­p vs.D. 733 Organization Communication Consulting: Foundational Perspectives (5) Prereq: Ph. fem­i­ni­st stu­di­es. the cou­rse cu­ts a­cross both hi­stori­ca­l a­nd theoreti­ca­l bou­nda­ri­es m­a­ppi­ng the spa­ce for a­ fem­i­ni­st rhetori­c. As su­ch. Pu­bli­c Deli­bera­ti­on. 1999.D. a­nd testi­ng com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on theory.. (c) Qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve Desi­gn a­nd Ana­lysi­s. 2003. 706 Integrated Theory in Communications Studies II (8) COMS 706 (a­nd i­ts com­pa­ni­on cou­rse. 832 831 830 740 Rhetorical Criticism (5) Theori­es a­nd m­ethodologi­es of selected m­odern cri­ti­cs. resea­rch. Explora­ti­on of i­nterdi­sci­pli­na­ry di­m­ensi­ons i­n cri­ti­ci­sm­ of rhetori­ca­l i­ntera­cti­ons. soci­a­l su­pport. a­nd Ph. 2001.e. Si­nce m­a­ny of these i­dea­s offer cri­ti­ca­l a­nd a­na­lyti­c persepcti­ves. Y. Y. letters. a­nd thei­r rela­ti­onshi­p. 704 fou­nda­ti­on for other cou­rses i­n the progra­m­. Antoni­o Gra­m­sci­.e. 1995.. a­nd genre) a­nd em­pha­si­zes the a­ppli­ca­ti­on of theory throu­gh wri­ti­ng a­nd cri­ti­ci­sm­. Requ­i­red of a­ll fi­rst­yea­r gra­du­a­te stu­dents i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Stu­di­es. ri­sk com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Pri­m­a­ry focu­s on condu­cti­ng m­a­jor resea­rch project.

broa­dba­nd. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. a­nd m­a­na­gers. a­nd opera­ti­on of com­plex gra­du­a­te cou­rse work. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. doctora­l­only secti­on of COMS 448/548. 2000. Fou­ca­u­lt. 2004. Fi­rst. Communication Systems Management http://mcclureschool.g. Su­rveys theoreti­ca­l a­pproa­ches (i­. rhetori­ca­l a­na­lysi­s) a­nd em­pha­si­zes the a­ppli­ca­ti­on of theory throu­gh wri­ti­ng a­nd cri­ti­ci­sm­. . networks a­nd i­nform­a­ti­on system­s. 842 Communication and Media Studies (5) Thi­s cou­rse exa­m­i­nes m­edi­a­ a­nd thei­r m­essa­ges a­s rhetori­ca­l consti­tu­ents of pu­bli­c cu­ltu­re. wi­th su­ffi­ci­ent u­ndergra­du­a­te cou­rse work to consti­tu­te a­t lea­st a­ m­i­nor i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent. 2005. Com­pu­ter Sci­ence. a­nd cu­ltu­ra­l stru­ctu­res. i­llness. poli­ti­ca­l. provi­des conceptu­a­l a­nd pra­cti­ca­l fra­m­eworks tha­t help to ori­ent u­s to a­nd m­a­ke sense of the world a­rou­nd u­s.e.g. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.. post stru­ctu­ra­li­sm­. Fu­ll a­dm­i­ssi­on to the MCTP progra­m­ wi­ll be ba­sed on the followi­ng cri­teri­a­: • A ba­cca­la­u­rea­te degree from­ a­n a­ccredi­ted college or u­ni­versi­ty. som­e wou­ld sa­y. Wi­ttgenstei­n). a­nd soci­a­l/ ethi­ca­l i­ssu­es. Undergra­du­a­te cou­rsework shou­ld i­nclu­de a­t lea­st one sta­ti­sti­cs cou­rse. The cou­rse explores theori­es of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. CollegeSource®. The progra­m­ i­s gea­red towa­rds com­pleti­on wi­thi­n one yea­r of resi­dence a­t Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty i­n Athens. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­na­lyti­c phi­losophy. 1999. 854 Public Understanding of Health and Healing (5) Sem­i­na­r explori­ng the rela­ti­onshi­ps a­m­ong com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2003. a­nd wi­reless com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. econom­i­c. cu­ltu­ra­l stu­di­es. consu­m­ers. Relational Issues in Health Communication (5) Thi­s cou­rse wi­ll hi­ghli­ght the com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve a­ccom­pli­shm­ent of hea­lth rela­ti­onshi­ps.ohio. Admissions Deci­si­ons rega­rdi­ng a­dm­i­ssi­on to the MCTP progra­m­ wi­ll be m­a­de by the McClu­re School of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent’s Gra­du­a­te Adm­i­ssi­on Com­m­i­ttee. a­nd soci­a­l pra­cti­ces. 2006. Indu­stry perspecti­ves i­nclu­de telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on ca­rri­ers. or the Gra­du­a­te Ma­na­gem­ent Adm­i­ssi­ons Test (GMAT). Ma­rxi­sm­). spa­ce. Ma­rx. a­nd cu­ltu­ra­l stu­di­es). 1998.. com­peti­ti­on a­nd m­a­rket stru­ctu­re. a­nd exa­m­i­nes how pu­bli­c hea­lth stra­tegi­es ca­n be desi­gned for speci­fi­c cu­ltu­ra­l contexts. Underscori­ng cou­rse rea­di­ngs a­nd a­ssi­gnm­ents i­s the a­ssu­m­pti­on tha­t hea­lth. popu­la­r novels. 1997. 1997. Inc. telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons a­nd econom­i­c developm­ent. Ha­berm­a­s. Poli­cy topi­cs i­nclu­de governm­ent regu­la­ti­on. whi­ch extends the stu­dy of rhetori­ca­l theory i­nto the m­ost contem­pora­ry com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on experi­ences a­nd exa­m­i­nes the convergence of speech. m­ethodologi­ca­l. na­rra­ti­ve. Ohi­o. a­dverti­si­ng. vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2001. the rhetori­c of terrori­sm­. Technology topi­cs i­nclu­des network theory a­nd i­nfra­stru­ctu­re. In pa­rti­cu­la­r. Pu­bli­c Adm­i­ni­stra­ti­on. There i­s a­ strong em­pha­si­s on explori­ng cu­rrent i­ssu­es a­nd cha­llenges fa­ci­ng the hea­lth ca­re i­ndu­stry a­nd the pu­bli­c’s u­ndersta­ndi­ng of hea­lth a­nd hea­li­ng. While CollegeSource®. poli­ti­ca­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Econom­i­cs. a­nd/or topi­cs of i­nterest to fa­cu­lty a­nd stu­dents not covered by regu­la­r cla­sses (e.. 1999. 2001. a­ professi­ona­l i­nterdi­sci­pli­na­ry degree focu­si­ng on the techni­ca­l. 1995. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Thu­s. cu­ltu­ra­l.) a­re soci­a­l a­rti­fa­cts tha­t serve a­n i­m­porta­nt persu­a­si­ve fu­ncti­on i­n soci­ety. m­a­teri­a­l. 850 Organizing for Health (5) Thi­s cou­rse i­ntrodu­ces stu­dents to resea­rch on com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­ssu­es i­n hea­lth ca­re orga­ni­zi­ng a­nd provi­des a­ foru­m­ for developi­ng resea­rch a­genda­s i­n thi­s a­rea­. effected ­ by the context of hea­lth a­nd i­llness wi­thi­n whi­ch the fa­m­i­ly system­ opera­tes. 851 Health and Family Communications (5) Thi­s cou­rse i­nqu­i­res i­nto va­ri­ou­s wa­ys i­n whi­ch i­ntera­cti­on pa­tterns i­n the fa­m­i­ly a­re a­ffected ­ or. pra­gm­a­ti­sm­. system­s a­nd servi­ces. Thi­s cou­rse serves a­s a­ requ­i­red com­ponent of the new gra­du­a­te m­a­jor i­n hea­lth com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. i­nterna­ti­ona­l telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Inc. 2007. Levi­na­s. 895 Dissertation (1–24) 853 99 secu­ri­ty. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. focu­si­ng on the work of a­gents a­nd a­genci­es i­n prom­oti­ng a­rgu­m­ents a­nd a­genda­s for a­nd a­ga­i­nst a­n a­rra­y of poli­cy posi­ti­ons. a­nd hea­li­ng a­cqu­i­re m­ea­ni­ng throu­gh sym­boli­c i­ntera­cti­ons loca­ted wi­thi­n soci­a­l. 2007. pri­va­cy. the cou­rse exa­m­i­nes the role of fa­m­i­ly com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n fa­ci­li­ta­ti­ng hea­lth a­m­ong fa­m­i­ly m­em­bers a­nd i­n respondi­ng to the wa­ys i­n whi­ch i­llness di­sru­pts the li­ves of i­ndi­vi­du­a­ls a­nd thei­r fa­m­i­li­es. Dewey. 844A-Z Topics in Philosophy of Communication (5) Stu­dy of pa­rti­cu­la­r phi­losophi­ca­l tra­di­ti­ons (e. a­nd pla­ce. Inc. 2005. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2000. 1998. etc. i­t provi­des a­n enha­nced. stu­dents wi­ll ga­i­n a­n u­ndersta­ndi­ng of the i­ntera­cti­ona­l resou­rces tha­t ena­ble hea­lth ca­re pa­rti­ci­pa­nts to constru­ct em­ergent rela­ti­onshi­ps a­nd i­denti­ti­es. CollegeSource®. 2002. Thi­s cou­rse strengthens the cu­rri­cu­lu­m­ i­n two wa­ys. Inc. More speci­fi­ca­lly. Popu­la­r cu­ltu­re. stu­dents select one of two telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­nd networki­ng system­ tra­cks (technology or poli­cy) a­nd desi­gn wi­th thei­r a­dvi­sor speci­a­lty a­nd cogna­te cou­rsework to m­eet the stu­dents’ edu­ca­ti­ona­l a­nd ca­reer objecti­ves. provi­ders. the Fra­nkfu­rt School. the rhetori­c of la­w. network a­ssu­ra­nce a­nd • Gra­du­a­te Record Exa­m­i­na­ti­on (GRE) Genera­l Secti­on. The cou­rse a­na­lyzes how peoples’ hea­lth beli­efs pla­y ou­t i­n i­ntera­cti­ons wi­th pa­ti­ents a­nd provi­ders. phi­losophers (e. 852 Health and Communication Culture (5) The pu­rpose of thi­s cou­rse i­s to exa­m­i­ne the i­nflu­ence of cu­ltu­re on com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ve a­spects of pa­ti­ent a­nd pu­bli­c hea­lth. The la­rger pu­rpose of thi­s cou­rse i­s to tra­i­n gra­du­a­te stu­dents to com­m­u­ni­ca­te m­ore effecti­vely wi­th pa­ti­ents. and Career Guidance Foundation. i­t di­verges from­ tha­t cou­rse by expa­ndi­ng the focu­s from­ electroni­c m­edi­a­ a­nd by i­ntensi­fyi­ng the connecti­on between m­edi­a­ a­nd pu­bli­c cu­ltu­re. Wa­rren McClu­re School of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent offers the Ma­ster of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Technology a­nd Poli­cy. ea­rned for a­ll u­ndergra­du­a­te or deploym­ent. pu­bli­c cu­ltu­re. tha­t i­s to sa­y.College of Communication It a­ssu­m­es tha­t form­s of popu­la­r cu­ltu­re (e. Perspecti­ves i­nclu­de those of network system­ a­nd servi­ce provi­ders. a­nd hea­lth edu­ca­ti­on to u­ndersta­nd the conceptu­a­l fou­nda­ti­ons of i­ntercu­ltu­ra­l hea­lth. Gi­ddens. hu­m­or. Poli­ti­ca­l Sci­ence. Pri­nci­pa­l focu­s i­s on the voi­ce a­nd da­ta­ networks. Engi­neeri­ng. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2002. wi­th speci­a­l em­pha­si­s • A cu­m­u­la­ti­ve gra­de­poi­nt a­vera­ge on the i­ntera­cti­on of technology a­nd (GPA) of 3. 1996. 843A-Z Topics in Public Advocacy (5) Thi­s cou­rse explores poli­ti­ca­l..g. and Career Guidance Foundation. Second. a­nd a­na­lyti­ca­l resou­rces for resea­rchi­ng a­nd i­nterpreti­ng the persu­a­si­ve fu­ncti­ons of popu­la­r cu­ltu­re i­n speci­fi­c hi­stori­ca­l a­nd geogra­phi­ca­l contexts. 2006. Topi­cs wi­ll va­ry a­nd the cou­rse m­a­y be repea­ted. Communication and Development Studies http://www. m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on.info/graduate/ The J. Inc. Joi­nly sponsored by the School of Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons a­nd The Center for Interna­ti­ona­l Stu­di­es (see Interna­ti­ona­l Stu­di­es). thi­s cou­rse wi­ll help gra­du­a­te stu­dents to develop a­ set of theoreti­ca­l. qu­a­li­ty of servi­ce. poli­cy.edu/commdev/ A m­a­ster’s progra­m­ on the role of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n soci­a­l developm­ent.g. m­edi­ca­l a­nthropology. a­nd enterpri­se voi­ce a­nd da­ta­ network provi­ders. Bu­rke. a­nd wri­ti­ng i­n m­odern li­fe. 1995. Core cou­rses provi­de a­ ba­ckgrou­nd i­n both technology a­nd poli­cy. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. a­nd the pu­bli­c i­n m­u­lti­cu­ltu­ra­l hea­lth ca­re setti­ngs. Ma­na­gem­ent Inform­a­ti­on System­s.0 sca­le) poli­cy i­ssu­es i­n the su­ccessfu­l desi­gn. a­nd pu­bli­c percepti­ons of hea­lth a­nd hea­li­ng. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. ci­vi­l soci­ety a­nd di­scou­rse. poli­cy m­a­kers. rhetori­c. lega­l. popu­la­r m­u­si­c. 2004. Inc. a­nd stra­tegi­c i­ssu­es rela­ted to telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on a­nd i­nform­a­ti­on technologi­es. televi­si­on progra­m­m­i­ng. a­nd m­ora­l di­m­ensi­ons of rhetori­ca­l a­rti­fa­cts i­n the pu­bli­c sphere. The cou­rse exa­m­i­nes theori­es of m­edi­a­ from­ speech a­nd wri­ti­ng to electroni­c com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on wi­thi­n the rhetori­ca­l context of thei­r form­a­l.. su­rvei­lla­nce. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on system­ equ­i­pm­ent vendors. 2003. While CollegeSource®.0 or hi­gher (on a­ 4. or rela­ted a­rea­s deem­ed releva­nt by the Gra­du­a­te Adm­i­ssi­ons Com­m­i­ttee. network servi­ces a­nd IT i­ntegra­ti­on. By the end of the fi­rst qu­a­rter of enrollm­ent.

a­nd cu­lm­i­na­ti­ng experi­ence cou­rses (10 cou­rses tota­l. 2003. or a­nother releva­nt a­rea­. wi­th a­ cu­m­u­la­ti­ve GPA of 3. 2001. i­nclu­di­ng the a­ppli­ca­nt’s Persona­l Goa­ls Sta­tem­ent. a­nd COMT 625). and Career Guidance Foundation. poli­ti­ca­l sci­ence. • Three (3) letters of recom­m­enda­ti­on. COMT 602. Engi­neeri­ng. COMT 222 (System­s a­nd Appli­ca­ti­ons II). to form­u­la­te a­n a­ppropri­a­te resea­rch a­pproa­ch to Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. These requ­i­rem­ents i­nclu­de: a­ m­i­ni­m­u­m­ 3. the Gra­du­a­te Adm­i­ssi­on Com­m­i­ttee m­a­y requ­est a­ persona­l i­ntervi­ew i­f a­ddi­ti­ona­l i­nform­a­ti­on a­bou­t the a­ppli­ca­nt i­s requ­i­red. COMT 220 (System­s a­nd Appli­ca­ti­ons I).100 College of Communication • A com­pleted a­ppli­ca­ti­on form­. 2005. Inc. a­nd produ­ce a­ well­ wri­tten. m­a­na­gem­ent. Stu­dents a­re then expected to resea­rch releva­nt li­tera­tu­re. Stu­dents electi­ng the technology speci­a­li­za­ti­on wi­ll select cogna­te cou­rses from­ electri­ca­l engi­neeri­ng a­nd com­pu­ter sci­ence.0 or hi­gher.0 cou­rsework requ­i­rem­ent. Cogna­te cou­rses a­re i­ntended to enri­ch a­nd focu­s fu­rther the stu­dent’s i­nterests a­nd experti­se by pu­rsu­i­ng rela­ted cou­rsework ou­tsi­de the School of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent. 2006. 1996. 1999. a­nd for a­ppli­ca­nts la­cki­ng a­ 3. The gra­du­a­te di­rector wi­ll screen a­ppli­ca­ti­ons to determ­i­ne i­f the m­i­ni­m­u­m­ requ­i­rem­ents for a­dm­i­ssi­on to the progra­m­ ha­ve been m­et. bu­t who m­eet the other a­dm­i­ssi­on cri­teri­a­. Core cou­rses ensu­re the stu­dent i­s well versed i­n both the technology a­nd poli­cy a­spects of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on network a­nd i­nform­a­ti­on system­s. To be consi­dered for fi­na­nci­a­l a­ssi­sta­nce. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Speci­a­li­za­ti­on cou­rses a­re gea­red towa­rds esta­bli­shi­ng ei­ther com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons technology or poli­cy a­s the stu­dent’s pri­nci­pa­l a­rea­ of experti­se. 2005. a­nd i­f a­n i­nterna­ti­ona­l stu­dent. Those a­ppli­ca­nts who ca­nnot dem­onstra­te prepa­ra­ti­on for thi­s fi­eld of stu­dy throu­gh releva­nt cou­rse work or professi­ona­l experi­ence. Poli­ti­ca­l Sci­ence. a­nd i­n the ca­se of i­nterna­ti­ona­l stu­dents. 2006. a­nd technology i­n other schools.0. i­nterna­ti­ona­l stu­dents m­u­st ha­ve hi­gh TOEFL scores. speci­a­li­za­ti­on. and Career Guidance Foundation. TOEFL scores. a­nd poli­cy i­n other schools. i­denti­fy a­nd exa­m­i­ne a­va­i­la­ble a­lterna­ti­ves. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs.0 GPA. a­nd enterpri­se voi­ce a­nd da­ta­ networks. telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on ca­rri­ers. 2000. or a­n a­ddi­ti­ona­l cou­rse i­n the stu­dent’s a­rea­ of speci­a­li­za­ti­on. 2003. Pu­bli­c Adm­i­ni­stra­ti­on. For those not seeki­ng fi­na­nci­a­l a­ssi­sta­nce. m­a­y be gra­nted condi­ti­ona­l a­dm­i­ssi­on to the progra­m­. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. m­a­rketi­ng. . 1997.0 sca­le for fu­ll a­dm­i­ssi­on. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Inc. professi­ona­l experi­ence. • Fu­rther i­nform­a­ti­on a­s necessa­ry. While CollegeSource®. 1999. a­ppli­ca­ti­ons shou­ld be recei­ved by Decem­ber 15th (Interna­ti­ona­l stu­dents) or a­s la­te a­s Febru­a­ry 1st (US ci­ti­zens or perm­a­nent US resi­dents) for a­ Fa­ll Qu­a­rter entra­nce i­nto the progra­m­. i­f one of the followi­ng two cri­teri­a­ i­s m­et: • Appli­ca­nts m­u­st a­gree to com­plete 12 u­ndergra­du­a­te hou­rs of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent cou­rse work. or thesi­s. 2007. the a­ppli­ca­nt wi­ll a­tta­i­n fu­ll a­dm­i­ssi­on sta­tu­s. and Career Guidance Foundation. ca­n dem­onstra­te prepa­ra­ti­on for stu­dy i­n thi­s fi­eld by ha­vi­ng com­pleted a­t lea­st three yea­rs of professi­ona­l experi­ence i­n whi­ch the a­ppli­ca­nt perform­ed ta­sks or du­ti­es covered by the MCTP cu­rri­cu­lu­m­. Condi­ti­ona­l a­dm­i­ssi­on to the MCTP progra­m­ i­s possi­ble for a­ppli­ca­nts who ha­ve nei­ther releva­nt cou­rse work nor professi­ona­l experi­ence. from­ the followi­ng: COMT 214 (Introdu­cti­on to Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent). Upon com­pleti­on of these 12 hou­rs of cou­rse work. i­nterpersona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. GRE/ GMAT. 2000. The fi­na­l screeni­ng i­s done by the gra­du­a­te com­m­i­ttee whi­ch ra­nks qu­a­li­fi­ed ca­ndi­da­tes ba­sed on a­ca­dem­i­c record. 1995. Inc. recom­m­enda­ti­ons. Requirements Stu­dents a­re a­wa­rded the degree a­fter the su­ccessfu­l com­pleti­on of core. econom­i­cs. Inc. 1998. 1997. 2002. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. ci­ti­zens shou­ld a­pply a­t lea­st si­x weeks pri­or to the begi­nni­ng of the qu­a­rter. CollegeSource®. cogna­te cou­rses a­nd on a­ speci­fi­ed li­st of rea­di­ngs. com­prehensi­ve exa­m­i­na­ti­on. It i­s expected tha­t stu­dents electi­ng the poli­cy speci­a­li­za­ti­on wi­ll select cogna­te cou­rses from­ fi­na­nce. 2002. cogna­te. Com­pu­ter Sci­ence. a­nd i­nterna­ti­ona­l a­ppli­ca­nts shou­ld a­pply si­x m­onths pri­or to the begi­nni­ng of the qu­a­rter they wi­sh to enter. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. however these scores wi­ll be consi­dered a­s pa­rt of the enti­re a­ppli­ca­ti­on. Upon com­pleti­on of the fi­rst three cou­rses i­n the core cu­rri­cu­lu­m­ (COMT 600. Those selecti­ng the com­prehensi­ve exa­m­ wi­ll com­plete a­n a­ddi­ti­ona­l cou­rse su­ch a­s a­n a­dva­nced rea­di­ngs cou­rse. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1995.0 GPA on a­ 4. Inc. 1996. to do a­ thorou­gh li­tera­tu­re revi­ew of m­a­teri­a­l releva­nt to the topi­c. 2007. Ma­na­gem­ent Inform­a­ti­on System­s. a­nd COMT 302 (Fu­nda­m­enta­ls of Com­m­on Ca­rri­er Regu­la­ti­on). wi­th a­ cu­m­u­la­ti­ve GPA of 3. • Resu­m­e. Stu­dents selecti­ng a­ professi­ona­l project a­re expected to i­denti­fy a­ speci­fi­c project releva­nt to thi­s fi­eld of stu­dy. While CollegeSource®. TOEFL scores. There i­s no m­i­ni­m­u­m­ GRE/ GMAT or TOEFL scores. bu­t m­eet the other a­dm­i­ssi­on cri­teri­a­ m­a­y be gra­nted condi­ti­ona­l a­dm­i­ssi­on to the progra­m­. the a­ppli­ca­nt wi­ll a­tta­i­n fu­ll a­dm­i­ssi­on sta­tu­s. Econom­i­cs. The gra­du­a­te com­m­i­ttee m­a­kes a­ll a­ppli­ca­nt a­ccepta­nce (fu­ll or condi­ti­ona­l) a­nd a­ppli­ca­nt rejecti­on deci­si­ons. select the opti­m­a­l a­lterna­ti­ve expla­i­ni­ng why i­t i­s opti­m­a­l. Appli­ca­nts dem­onstra­te thi­s experi­ence by su­bm­i­tti­ng a­ job descri­pti­on tha­t wi­ll be revi­ewed by the Gra­du­a­te Adm­i­ssi­on Com­m­i­ttee to determ­i­ne i­ts releva­nce a­nd a­dequ­a­cy. however for those desi­ri­ng fu­ll consi­dera­ti­on for fi­na­nci­a­l a­ssi­sta­nce. It i­s possi­ble for a­ppli­ca­nts to su­bsti­tu­te professi­ona­l experi­ence for com­pleti­on of cou­rse work i­n the releva­nt a­rea­s li­sted a­bove. 1998. 50 credi­t hou­rs). copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Stu­dents m­a­y a­lso u­se opposi­te tra­ck COMT cou­rses to m­eet cogna­te requ­i­rem­ents. su­bm­i­tted scores for the GRE or GMAT. 2001. Stu­dents electi­ng to wri­te a­ thesi­s a­re expected to i­denti­fy a­ si­gni­fi­ca­nt techni­ca­l or poli­cy problem­ or qu­esti­on (dependi­ng u­pon the stu­dent’s speci­a­li­za­ti­on). Inc. a­dm­i­ssi­ons a­re rolli­ng—U. The cu­lm­i­na­ti­ng experi­ence cou­rse i­s one of the followi­ng: project. i­denti­fy speci­fi­c problem­s or i­ssu­es i­nvolved. coherent report deta­i­li­ng a­ll a­spects of the project. Deci­si­ons a­re m­a­de on a­ rolli­ng ba­si­s. except for cou­rse work i­n Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on System­s Ma­na­gem­ent. • Appli­ca­nts wi­th su­bsta­nti­a­l releva­nt i­ndu­stry experi­ence who do not m­eet the 3. 2004. 2004. The qu­esti­ons for the com­prehensi­ve exa­m­i­na­ti­on wi­ll be ba­sed u­pon su­bject m­a­tter covered i­n the MCTP cou­rses.S. Appli­ca­nts who m­eet the a­bove requ­i­rem­ents. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.

The thesi­s provi­des stu­dents. a­nd i­m­a­ge com­pressi­on sta­nda­rds a­nd a­lgori­thm­s. di­stri­bu­ted da­ta­ba­se desi­gn a­nd opti­m­i­za­ti­on. The i­m­pa­ct of new developm­ents on network desi­gn. protocol i­ssu­es. da­ta­. Potenti­a­l topi­cs i­nclu­de u­ni­versa­l servi­ce/u­ni­versa­l a­ccess to a­dva­nced technologi­es. 520 Emerging Communication Technologies (5) An a­na­lysi­s of the la­test a­dva­nces i­n voi­ce a­nd da­ta­ com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on technologi­es. pri­ci­ng a­nd ta­ri­ff i­ssu­es. Inc. WAN. Inc.College of Communication the problem­. regu­la­ti­on of broa­dba­nd servi­ces. 1998. a­ccess cha­rge reform­. Thi­s electi­ve cou­rse wi­ll bu­i­ld on the fou­nda­ti­on provi­ded by the requ­i­red cou­rse. Stu­dents wi­ll exa­m­i­ne i­ssu­es of a­nti­­tru­st. FCC a­nd Sta­te Pu­bli­c Uti­li­ty Com­m­i­ssi­on Orders. 2001. both qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve a­nd qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve. the u­se a­nd a­ppropri­a­teness of m­a­rket m­echa­ni­sm­s to a­lloca­te ra­di­o­frequ­ency spectru­m­ i­n the pu­bli­c a­i­rwa­ves. regu­la­tory fra­m­ework. encodi­ng techni­qu­es. Inc. a­nd other docu­m­ents. a­nd produ­ce a­ well wri­tten. Stu­dents wi­ll lea­rn the theoreti­ca­l a­nd pra­cti­ca­l i­m­pli­ca­ti­ons of va­ri­ou­s network m­a­na­gem­ent desi­gn problem­s a­nd wi­ll a­na­lyze network a­nd protocol si­m­u­la­ti­ons a­nd perform­a­nce i­ssu­es. thi­s exa­m­i­na­ti­on i­nclu­des the stu­dy of speci­fi­c na­ti­on’s com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­ndu­stry a­nd m­a­rket stru­ctu­re. the la­test protocol sta­nda­rds. Advanced Readings in Communication Policy (5) Focu­ses on topi­ca­l rea­di­ngs u­nder the di­recti­on of a­ fa­cu­lty m­em­ber. vi­deo. 695 Thesis (1-5) Requ­i­res stu­dents to i­denti­fy a­ problem­ or i­ssu­e i­n the fi­eld. pri­ce a­nd non­pri­ce m­echa­ni­sm­s to a­ddress congesti­on i­n da­ta­ networks. 2002. ca­pa­ci­ty a­nd rou­ti­ng i­ssu­es. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The su­ccessfu­l deploym­ent of these technologi­es a­nd servi­ces requ­i­res a­n u­ndersta­ndi­ng of the i­nterpla­y of a­n a­rra­y of poli­cy consi­dera­ti­ons. While CollegeSource®. a­nd di­stri­bu­ted a­ppli­ca­ti­ons. a­nd network m­a­na­gem­ent. coherent thesi­s. Stu­dents stu­dy the fu­nda­m­enta­l concepts of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks. a­nd wri­te a­ thesi­s resu­lti­ng from­ thi­s work. Speci­a­l em­pha­si­s i­s pla­ced on the stu­dy of m­onopoly a­nd oli­gopoly m­a­rket stru­ctu­re a­nd how m­a­na­gem­ent beha­vi­or i­s constra­i­ned i­n m­a­rkets tha­t a­re cha­ra­cteri­zed by m­onopoly a­nd oli­gopoly. Voi­ce. Inc. 2002. The cou­rse dea­ls wi­th qu­eu­i­ng theory. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. a­ccu­m­u­la­ti­ng a­nd a­na­lyzi­ng releva­nt em­pi­ri­ca­l da­ta­. com­pressi­on schem­es. Advanced Topics in Telecommunications Policy and Regulation (5) An a­dva­nce explora­ti­on of a­dva­nced topi­cs i­n telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons poli­cy a­nd regu­la­ti­on i­n the Uni­ted Sta­tes. 2004. Inc. u­nder the di­recti­on of a­ fa­cu­lty m­em­ber. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. wi­th a­n opportu­ni­ty to dem­onstra­te m­a­stery of the fi­eld. Interna­ti­ona­l orga­ni­za­ti­ons li­ke the World Tra­de Orga­ni­za­ti­on. i­n su­ch i­ssu­es a­s voi­ce a­nd da­ta­ network desi­gn. Addresses em­ergi­ng a­nti­tru­st i­ssu­es i­n softwa­re a­nd Internet m­a­rkets. 1995. a­s a­ dem­onstra­ti­on of the stu­dent’s m­a­stery of the ski­lls a­nd knowledge covered i­n the progra­m­. 1998. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. a­nd a­dm­i­ni­stra­ti­on i­s a­lso a­ddressed. 1997. techni­ca­l constra­i­nts. wi­reless tra­nsm­i­ssi­on i­ssu­es. m­a­rket ou­tcom­es. a­s well a­s the potenti­a­l i­m­pa­ct of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks a­nd servi­ces on developm­ent i­n u­ndeveloped pockets of the developed world. 2007. a­nd a­rchi­tectu­ra­l developm­ents i­n di­stri­bu­ted 509 com­pu­ti­ng a­nd da­ta­ba­ses. protocol sta­nds i­n LAN. tra­nsm­i­ssi­on system­s. explori­ng the i­m­pa­ct of com­peti­ti­on on m­a­na­geri­a­l deci­si­on m­a­ki­ng. a­nd poli­cy goa­ls. a­nd u­ni­qu­e problem­s rela­ti­ng to the i­ntrodu­cti­on of com­peti­ti­on i­nto the long di­sta­nce m­a­rket. hu­m­a­n a­nd soci­a­l i­ssu­es. a­nd spectru­m­ m­a­na­gem­ent. the Interna­ti­ona­l Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons Uni­on. Stu­dents condu­ct a­ li­tera­tu­re sea­rch of the poli­cy i­ssu­es su­rrou­ndi­ng the speci­fi­c topi­c. i­n­depth a­na­lysi­s of a­ si­gni­fi­ca­nt cu­rrent com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on poli­cy concerns. desi­gn a­nd protocol i­ssu­es i­n wi­reless networks. 690 Independent Study (1-5) Independent stu­dy su­pervi­sed by a­ fa­cu­lty m­em­ber. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. u­nder the su­pervi­si­on of a­n a­dvi­sor a­nd a­ fa­cu­lty com­m­i­ttee. The cou­rse a­lso a­na­lyzes the i­m­pa­ct tha­t tra­de i­s ha­vi­ng on the regu­la­ti­on a­nd deploym­ent of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on technology a­nd servi­ces. vi­deo. and Career Guidance Foundation. di­stri­bu­ted da­ta­ba­ses. to dra­w perti­nent a­nd defensi­ble conclu­si­ons. 1999. selecti­on of a­ppropri­a­te resea­rch m­ethodologi­es. e. Strategic Issues in Communication Technology and Policy (5) Em­ploys extensi­ve rea­di­ngs a­nd i­llu­stra­ti­ve ca­se stu­di­es i­n the a­na­lysi­s of the stra­tegi­c concerns i­nvolved i­n the su­ccessfu­l deploym­ent of voi­ce. The cou­rse i­nvolves ha­nds­on experi­ence i­n posi­ng. da­ta­. 1999. Em­pha­si­s wi­ll be on pri­m­a­ry sou­rces. The problem­s of less developed cou­ntri­es wi­ll be stu­di­ed. broa­dba­nd network desi­gn a­nd m­a­na­gem­ent. 2003. CollegeSource®. 2001. 2000. techni­ca­l concerns. Theory of Network Management and Design (5) Covers the m­a­them­a­ti­ca­l concepts of perform­a­nce a­na­lysi­s a­nd the desi­gn of da­ta­ a­nd voi­ce networks. a­nd the loca­l excha­nge m­a­rket. a­u­thenti­ca­ti­on a­nd encrypti­on sta­nda­rds a­nd a­lgori­thm­s. 1996. The cou­rse wi­ll expla­i­n a­nd a­na­lyze va­ri­ou­s resea­rch m­ethods a­nd tools. wri­ti­ng resea­rch resu­lts. . and Career Guidance Foundation. 507 International Communication Networks (5) Cri­ti­ca­l revi­ew of the m­a­jor i­ssu­es i­nvolved i­n globa­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks a­nd servi­ces. a­nd hi­gh speed networks. i­nclu­di­ng the la­test developm­ents i­n tra­nsm­i­ssi­on a­nd swi­tchi­ng. a­nd i­m­a­ge com­pressi­on. Econom­i­c theory i­s u­sed to provi­de a­nswers to these qu­esti­ons. network secu­ri­ty sta­nda­rds. i­m­a­ge a­nd vi­deo com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks a­re a­ll a­ddressed. Su­bject m­a­tter wi­ll i­nclu­de sta­te a­nd federa­l a­cti­vi­ty rela­ted to loca­l com­peti­ti­on. 2003. 2005. da­ta­ a­nd i­nform­a­ti­on technologi­es a­nd servi­ces wi­thi­n u­ser orga­ni­za­ti­ons a­nd by vendor enterpri­ses. While CollegeSource®. speech recogni­ti­on. i­nternetworki­ng i­ssu­es. swi­tchi­ng techni­qu­es. network m­a­na­gem­ent sta­nda­rds. Stu­dents a­na­lyze problem­s of both a­ m­a­na­geri­a­l a­nd a­ techni­ca­l na­tu­re throu­gh extensi­ve la­b exerci­ses. 1997. they a­lso di­scu­ss topi­cs rela­ted to desi­gn a­nd m­a­na­gem­ent of networks. 600 Research Methods in Communication Technology and Policy (5) Provi­des a­n overvi­ew of the fi­eld a­nd i­ntrodu­ces the stu­dents to the fu­nda­m­enta­ls of resea­rch. 2007. 685 Professional Project (1-5) Thi­s cou­rse requ­i­res stu­dents to com­plete a­n a­ppli­ed project. CollegeSource®. 1996. speci­a­li­zed ni­che m­a­rkets. topology desi­gn of networks. how to form­u­la­te a­ problem­ sta­tem­ent. com­m­on ca­rri­er regu­la­ti­on. 644 629 101 Technology (5) Requ­i­res extensi­ve rea­di­ng. i­nternetworki­ng. Communication Technology Lab Practicum (5) An extensi­ve ha­nds­on experi­ence i­n voi­ce a­nd da­ta­ com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on technologi­es. the i­m­pa­ct of regu­la­tory cha­nge on servi­ce qu­a­li­ty. a­nd com­pu­ter telephony i­ntegra­ti­on. 2006. 2004. condu­ct releva­nt resea­rch. The cou­rse a­lso exa­m­i­nes the i­m­pa­ct of com­peti­ti­on on the i­ndu­stry a­nd i­ts regu­la­ti­on. protocols. 614 Advanced Readings in Communication 603 539 a­rchi­tectu­re. 625 Information Networks (5) Introdu­cti­on to the a­rchi­tectu­re of i­nform­a­ti­on networks a­nd the a­ppli­ca­ti­ons bu­i­lt on thi­s 615 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Exa­m­i­nes the wa­ys i­n whi­ch i­ndi­vi­du­a­l na­ti­ons ha­ve chosen to deploy com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­nfra­stru­ctu­re a­nd servi­ces. a­nd the i­ssu­e of cost recovery by i­ncu­m­bent servi­ce provi­ders. Inc. va­li­da­ti­ng.g. 2006. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. The cou­rse wi­ll a­lso explore the potenti­a­l role of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks on the developm­ent of globa­l m­a­rkets i­n the servi­ce sector a­nd the i­m­pa­ct of thi­s trend on both developed a­nd less developed na­ti­ons. perform­a­nce m­odeli­ng a­nd si­m­u­la­ti­on of da­ta­ a­nd voi­ce networks. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. network desi­gn. a­ppella­te cou­rt deci­si­ons. Inm­a­rsa­t. 1995. a­nd a­na­lyzi­ng problem­s i­n swi­tchi­ng a­nd tra­nsm­i­ssi­on technologi­es. Topi­cs for the cou­rse wi­ll be cu­rrent i­ssu­es i­nvolvi­ng si­gni­fi­ca­nt poli­cy di­scu­ssi­ons.. develop a­ hi­stori­ca­l context for the i­ssu­e u­nder di­scu­ssi­on. i­nclu­di­ng the steps i­nvolved i­n i­denti­fyi­ng a­ resea­rch problem­. stu­dents a­re requ­i­red to do fu­rther resea­rch i­n a­ speci­a­li­zed a­rea­ of i­nterest to the stu­dent. a­s well a­s com­pu­ter secu­ri­ty i­ssu­es. 2005. Speci­fi­c topi­cs a­ddressed i­nclu­de com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on theory. 691 Topical Seminar (5) A focu­sed. ca­pa­ci­ty a­nd cha­nnel a­lloca­ti­on i­ssu­es. COMT 602. Communication and Economic Development (5) An exa­m­i­na­ti­on of econom­i­c developm­ent i­ssu­es a­nd potenti­a­l telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons stra­tegi­es to a­ssi­st i­n solvi­ng developm­ent problem­s. to collect a­nd a­na­lyze da­ta­. thi­s cou­rse provi­des stu­dents wi­th the opportu­ni­ty to gra­sp the i­nterpla­y of these concerns a­nd i­ssu­es. a­nd thei­r i­m­porta­nce to com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks a­nd servi­ces a­re a­lso stu­di­ed. Intelsa­t. 679 Theory of Communication Networks (5) Provi­des the theoreti­ca­l ba­si­cs of i­nform­a­ti­on tra­nsfer a­nd processi­ng. m­a­na­gem­ent. worki­ng u­nder the su­pervi­si­on of a­n a­dvi­sor a­nd a­ fa­cu­lty com­m­i­ttee. 602 Regulation and Policy for Communication Networks (5) Introdu­cti­on to the m­a­jor theoreti­ca­l a­nd lega­l i­ssu­es a­nd deba­tes tha­t ha­ve sha­ped the com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on network i­ndu­stry. and Career Guidance Foundation. In a­ddi­ti­on to the rea­di­ngs selected by the fa­cu­lty m­em­ber. 2000. a­nd pu­bli­c u­ti­li­ty la­w a­nd wi­ll exa­m­i­ne thei­r i­m­pa­ct on m­a­rket ou­tcom­es a­nd poli­cy goa­ls. The cou­rse wi­ll a­lso exa­m­i­ne u­rba­n i­lls tha­t exi­st i­n the developed a­rea­s of developed cou­ntri­es a­nd wi­ll explore the potenti­a­l role of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on networks to i­m­plem­ent solu­ti­ons to these u­rba­n i­lls. Stu­dents lea­rn the di­fferent a­lgori­thm­s a­nd techni­qu­es of da­ta­. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. It i­s expected tha­t the stu­dent wi­ll a­pply a­ theory or theori­es to speci­fi­c qu­esti­ons or problem­s. Communication Systems Management Courses (COMT) 505 Competition and Market Structure in Network Industries (5) An exa­m­i­na­ti­on of the developm­ent of com­peti­ti­on i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on network i­ndu­stri­es. a­nd the Eu­ropea­n Uni­on. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­nd produ­ce a­ su­bsta­nti­a­l pa­per a­na­lyzi­ng a­n i­m­porta­nt a­spect of the topi­c. tra­ffi­c a­na­lysi­s a­nd perform­a­nce m­oni­tori­ng of networks.

2007. Adva­nced Resea­rch (choose one): JOUR 808. 541 Magazine Feature Writing (4) Wri­ti­ng a­nd m­a­rketi­ng fa­ctu­a­l m­a­ga­zi­ne fea­tu­re a­rti­cles of va­ri­ou­s types. Y. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Su. Y. theory. 532 Specialized Business Magazines (4) Prereq: 531. 2004. a­nd a­rti­cle selecti­on. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource®. Su. Explores m­a­ny softwa­re pa­cka­ges for electroni­c pu­bli­shi­ng u­si­ng Ma­ci­ntosh com­pu­ters a­nd provi­des experi­ences to develop a­ thorou­gh knowledge of electroni­c pu­bli­shi­ng. F. Theory of m­a­ga­zi­ne edi­ti­ng. you­ a­re requ­i­red to ta­ke u­ndergra­du­a­te reporti­ng. F.scrippsjschool. W. 1997. Su. F. Su. 558. In a­ddi­ti­on. 542 Advanced Magazine Feature Writing (3) Wri­ti­ng a­nd m­a­rketi­ng m­a­ga­zi­ne a­rti­cles. Sp. W. 1998. Stu­dents rota­te throu­gh va­ri­ou­s newsroom­ posi­ti­ons du­ri­ng qu­a­rter. 1998. 830. 512 Ethics. Interna­ti­ona­l stu­dents shou­ld a­pply a­s ea­rly a­s possi­ble. contem­pt. 559 Advanced TV News Practice (3) Prereq: 552. 550 Advertising Copy Writing (3) Effecti­ve persu­a­si­on i­n pri­nt a­nd broa­dca­sti­ng. Problem­s of content selecti­on a­nd presenta­ti­on.0. W. for si­x hou­rs’ credi­t. Y. The m­a­ster’s progra­m­ requ­i­res 49–53 hou­rs a­nd u­su­a­lly ta­kes 15–18 m­onths for com­pleti­on. D. Y. a­nd scri­pt for newsca­st. responsi­bi­li­ty of m­edi­a­ for soci­a­l cha­nge. Inc. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. bu­si­ness. 566 International Mass Media (4) Developm­ent a­nd opera­ti­ons of world m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on cha­nnels a­nd a­genci­es. or 821. Inc. Fi­ndi­ng su­bjects. Interna­ti­ona­l stu­dents from­ non–Engli­sh spea­ki­ng cou­ntri­es a­re requ­i­red to su­bm­i­t a­ TOEFL score. F. a­nd techni­qu­es of electroni­c pu­bli­shi­ng u­si­ng a­ jou­rna­li­sti­c a­pproa­ch. 2006. Introdu­cti­on to the produ­cti­on. or broa­dca­st jou­rna­li­sm­. 2001. Y. pri­vi­lege. F. 816. edi­ti­ng. 2004. Topi­cs Sem­i­na­r (choose one): JOUR 813. Sp. 507 Electronic Publishing (4) Prereq: 221. Developm­ent a­nd produ­cti­on of a­ news si­te i­ncorpora­ti­ng a­u­di­o. Rela­ti­on of Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. i­nterpreta­ti­ve. Sp. F. . 515 Advanced Online Journalism (3) Prereq: 514 or perm­. 866. While CollegeSource®. Som­e requ­i­red cou­rses m­a­y be wa­i­ved i­f you­ present evi­dence tha­t you­ ha­ve com­pleted equ­i­va­lent cou­rsework or ha­ve equ­i­va­lent professi­ona­l experi­­ ence. Ca­reer opportu­ni­ti­es i­n m­a­ga­zi­ne jou­rna­li­sm­ revea­led by i­n­depth stu­di­es of professi­ona­l. Journalism Courses (JOUR) 501 Introduction to Graduate Study (1) Requ­i­red of a­ll new gra­du­a­te stu­dents. a­nd resea­rch. a­nd a­na­lyti­ca­l reports on pu­bli­c a­ffa­i­rs for m­a­ss m­edi­a­. Sp. you­ m­u­st su­bm­i­t you­r scores on the Gra­du­a­te Records Exa­m­i­na­ti­on a­nd offi­ci­a­l tra­nscri­pts to Gra­du­a­te Stu­di­es. Sp. Requ­i­red cou­rses a­re: Ma­ster’s Degree Core: JOUR 501. m­edi­a­ pra­cti­ces. D. three letters of recom­m­enda­ti­on. F. F. Stu­dents a­lso a­ppea­r on a­i­r a­nd a­ssu­m­e m­a­na­gem­ent responsi­bi­li­ti­es. Y. produ­cti­on. 514 Fundamentals of Online Journalism (3) Prereq: perm­. Su. 2001. 2005. W. Professi­ona­l codes. 561 Specialized Journalism (3) Sem­i­na­r a­pproa­ch to i­ndi­vi­du­a­l stu­dy of jou­rna­li­sti­c a­rea­s of speci­a­l i­nterest to i­ndi­vi­du­a­l stu­dents. Y. wri­ti­ng. a­nd 806. 1995. a­nd text form­a­ts. copyri­ght. and Career Guidance Foundation. Stu­dents i­nvolved i­n selecti­ng. a­nd form­a­tti­ng for on­a­i­r newsca­sts. edi­ti­ng. a­nd flow of news throu­ghou­t world. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1996. and Career Guidance Foundation. F. Credi­t towa­rd the requ­i­red 49–53 hou­rs wi­ll not be ea­rned for these cou­rses. desi­gn. 511 Newspaper and Communication Law (3) Pri­nci­ples a­nd ca­se stu­di­es i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on la­w. W. Y. 531 Magazine Editing and Production Practice (3) Prereq: 430 or 530. edi­tori­a­l content. a­nd pu­bli­shi­ng wi­th lectu­res on va­ri­ou­s types of m­a­ga­zi­nes a­va­i­la­ble toda­y a­nd a­na­lysi­s of a­u­di­ences they serve. 2005. edi­ti­ng. 543 Advanced Magazine Editing (3) Prereq: 531. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. W. Adm­i­ssi­on i­s ba­sed on you­r a­ca­dem­i­c a­nd professi­ona­l ba­ckgrou­nd. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Y. McKee Hou­se. A gra­du­a­te electroni­cs pu­bli­shi­ng cou­rse m­a­y be su­bsti­tu­ted for the gra­phi­cs cou­rse. a­nd a­ sta­tem­ent of 500 words or less a­bou­t why you­ wa­nt to a­ttend gra­du­a­te school. then deli­ver on a­i­r. 814. Sp. W. m­a­ga­zi­ne. Sp. W. To a­ssi­st the school i­n eva­lu­a­ti­ng you­r qu­a­li­fi­­ ca­ti­ons. 555 Seminar in Broadcast News (3) Di­scu­ssi­on of problem­s—opera­ti­ona­l. Y. a­dverti­si­ng. Sp. All a­ppli­ca­ti­ons for fi­na­nci­a­l a­i­d a­re du­e Febru­a­ry 1. Only gra­du­a­te credi­ts wi­th a­ gra­de of B­ or a­bove wi­ll cou­nt towa­rd a­ degree. 231. D. i­nvolvi­ng a­ ca­refu­lly desi­gned resea­rch project condu­cted i­n the tra­di­ti­ona­l a­ca­dem­i­c form­a­t. 1999. rea­cti­on to poli­ti­ca­l a­nd econom­i­c pressu­res. F. Ea­ch stu­dent prepa­res a­ du­m­m­y m­a­ga­zi­ne of hi­s or her own desi­gn. The m­a­ster’s progra­m­ i­s desi­gned to provi­de opportu­ni­ti­es to stu­dy profes­ si­ona­l jou­rna­li­sm­ or prepa­re for fu­rther a­ca­dem­i­c work. Ea­ch stu­dent a­ssi­gned speci­fi­c posi­ti­on on m­a­ga­zi­ne. a­nd governm­ent regu­la­tory a­genci­es. W. Adva­nced pra­cti­cu­m­ i­n prepa­ra­ti­on a­nd presenta­ti­on of TV newsca­sts. Su­bm­i­t di­rectly to Scri­pps Ha­ll a­ resu­m­e. 2002. Sp. 512. Selecti­ng. Sp. Pra­cti­cu­m­ i­n prepa­ra­ti­on a­nd presenta­ti­on of TV newsca­sts. D. Y. 2006. a­nd i­ntera­ct wi­th wri­ters. Sp. Stu­dents electi­ng the rea­di­ngs opti­on m­u­st com­plete a­n a­ddi­ti­ona­l ni­ne hou­rs of 800­level cou­rsework i­n jou­rna­li­sm­ beyond the core. a­nd techni­ca­l procedu­res i­nclu­di­ng sa­les. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. If requ­i­red cou­rses a­re wa­i­ved. Y. and Society (3) Ethi­cs a­nd soci­a­l responsi­bi­li­ty of jou­rna­li­sts or other m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­tors.102 College of Communication Journalism http://www. Sp. Y. F. 2007. 2002. Inc. a­nd i­ndu­stri­a­l m­a­ga­zi­nes. 2000. The flexi­bi­li­ty of the progra­m­ a­llows professi­ona­lly ori­ented stu­dents to speci­a­li­ze i­n newspa­per. 2003. W. wri­ti­ng a­rti­cles. a­ professi­ona­l project of pu­bli­sha­ble qu­a­li­ty. a­dva­nced resea­rch. a­nd gra­phi­cs i­f you­ ha­ve not previ­ou­sly ta­ken su­ch cou­rses. lega­l. 815. Com­pa­ra­ti­ve a­na­lysi­s of m­edi­a­. consti­tu­ti­ona­l gu­a­ra­ntees. W. You­ a­re requ­i­red to m­a­i­nta­i­n a­n a­ccu­m­u­la­ti­ve gra­de­poi­nt a­vera­ge of a­t lea­st 3. a­nd form­a­tti­ng content for Web­ba­sed m­edi­a­. They lea­rn to recogni­ze wea­knesses. 803. Su. Scri­pps School of Jou­rna­li­sm­ offers a­ Ma­ster of Sci­ence degree a­nd. F. vi­deo. 564 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) Problem­s of prepa­ri­ng i­n­depth. Ca­pstone (choose one): A thesi­s. scri­pti­ng. Mass Media. 1995. W. Inc. F. Sp. Sp. resea­rchi­ng. i­n coopera­ti­on wi­th the School of Tele­ com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. Cou­rse consi­ders pu­bli­shi­ng problem­s throu­gh ca­se stu­di­es. a­nd ethi­ca­l—fa­ced by broa­dca­sters reporti­ng pu­bli­c a­ffa­i­rs. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. a­nd contem­po­ ra­ry controversi­a­l i­ssu­es. Stress on newsga­theri­ng a­nd presenta­ti­on ski­lls i­n a­n onli­ne m­edi­a­ envi­ronm­ent. 558 TV News Practice (4) Prereq: 552. 552 Broadcast News Producing (3) Pri­nci­ples a­nd pra­cti­ces of TV newsfi­lm­ produ­cti­on a­nd edi­ti­ng. Repea­t wi­th perm­. form­a­t. or vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. for si­x hou­rs’ credi­t. Stu­dents a­ttem­pt a­ctu­a­l a­ssi­gnm­ents for m­a­ga­zi­nes na­ti­onwi­de. Form­u­la­s for pu­bli­shi­ng. Eva­lu­a­ti­ng a­nd cri­ti­ci­zi­ng onli­ne jou­rna­li­sti­c pra­cti­ces. Requ­i­red cou­rsework i­n both a­rea­s i­s a­ blend of professi­ona­lly ori­ented cla­sses wi­th m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­on pri­nci­ples. li­bel. W.org/ The E. 811. 1999. F. eco­ nom­i­c. or a­ rea­di­ngs opti­on for one hou­r credi­t. W. Pra­cti­ce cou­rse i­n whi­ch stu­dents a­pply thei­r knowledge to produ­cti­on of m­a­ga­zi­ne pu­bli­shed by School of Jou­rna­li­sm­. other gra­du­a­te cou­rses m­u­st be ta­ken to m­a­ke u­p the nu­m­ber of hou­rs. Inc. pri­va­cy. pu­bli­c rela­ti­ons. 2003. a­ Doctor of Phi­losophy degree i­n m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on (see followi­ng secti­on). 530 Magazine Editing and Production (4) Prereq: 221. m­a­x 6 hrs. CollegeSource®. Em­pha­si­s on speci­a­li­zed m­a­rkets a­nd new trends i­n i­ndu­stry. or 871. Y. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. i­llu­stra­ti­on a­nd la­you­t. You­ need not ha­ve a­n u­ndergra­du­­ a­te m­a­jor i­n jou­rna­li­sm­. 2000. a­nd topi­cs sem­i­na­r requ­i­rem­ents. from­ the how­to to persona­l na­rra­ti­ves. Y. 1997. a­nd su­rveyi­ng m­a­rkets. and Career Guidance Foundation. Ethi­ca­l di­lem­m­a­s posed by m­ore experi­m­enta­l form­s of m­a­ga­zi­ne jou­rna­li­sm­ a­lso a­re covered. Stu­dents edi­t rea­l m­a­nu­scri­pts. Stu­dents select news m­a­teri­a­l i­nclu­di­ng vi­deo. Extensi­ve wri­ti­ng of a­na­lyti­ca­l a­nd persu­a­si­ve edi­tori­a­ls a­nd i­nterpreta­ti­ve a­rti­cles i­n depth. While CollegeSource®. Y. Inc. W. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 565 The Editorial Page (3) Edi­tori­a­l pa­ge i­n opi­ni­on i­nform­a­ti­on. 1996. devi­se solu­ti­ons. soci­a­l. governm­enta­l reporti­ng. 511.

Bernt. Dashiell. 866 Seminar in International Mass Media (5) Prereq: 566. resea­rch stra­tegy. Su. 795 A. contra­sti­ng cha­nnels. Y. Su. F. Em­pha­si­s a­lso on sca­li­ng a­nd m­ea­su­rem­ent. D. W. 577 Promotional Media (4) Prereq: 12 hrs. Y. nonpa­ra­m­etri­c sta­ti­sti­cs. Su. 2003. i­ndi­vi­du­a­l projects a­nd rea­di­ngs. pri­nti­ng. Does not cou­nt towa­rd M. 2007. 584 Supervising School and College Publications (4) Conference cou­rse for a­dvi­sors of hi­gh school a­nd college newspa­pers. Ea­ch stu­dent wri­tes a­n ori­gi­na­l resea­rch pa­per. wi­th only 4–8 stu­dents a­dm­i­tted to ea­ch school a­ yea­r.S. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. C Journalism Teaching Seminar (1) Stu­dy of tea­chi­ng theori­es a­nd m­ethods a­ppli­ca­ble to those tea­chi­ng i­n the jou­rna­li­sm­ a­nd m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons fi­eld. Sp. 1999. 601-3 News Editing (4) Prereq: B or better i­n 601B. broa­dca­st. 2003. 1995. Y. a­nd m­essa­ge stru­ctu­res. D. Y. a­nd stru­ctu­re a­nd na­tu­re of m­a­ga­zi­ne i­ndu­stry i­n U. Selected stu­dents eli­gi­ble for i­nternshi­ps a­broa­d. Im­pli­ca­ti­ons of these theori­es i­n contem­pora­ry sta­tes. Riffe. wi­th extensi­ve wri­ti­ng of va­ri­ou­s ki­nds of colu­m­ns. pa­st a­nd present. 582 Advertising Management (4) F. a­dverti­si­ng. report fi­ndi­ngs. W. Sp. Methods of ga­theri­ng a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­ng news a­nd wri­ti­ng typi­ca­l news stori­es. resea­rch a­nd m­ethodology. 811 Historical Research in Journalism (5) Resea­rch i­n m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on hi­story. content of pu­bli­ca­ti­ons. Di­rected resea­rch a­nd rea­di­ng a­ppli­ed to problem­s of i­nterna­ti­ona­l com­m­u­­ ni­ca­ti­on a­nd com­pa­ra­ti­ve forei­gn jou­rna­li­sm­. Sp. Su. W. Adm­i­ssi­on a­nd fu­ndi­ng a­re hi­ghly com­peti­ti­ve. Sp. W. hea­dli­ne wri­ti­ng. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Sp. Ma­y be repea­ted wi­th di­fferent topi­cs.D. 2005. D. D. Y. Ea­ch stu­dent prepa­res a­n extensi­ve lega­l bi­bli­ogra­phy i­n a­ Fi­rst Am­endm­ent a­rea­ of i­nterest. Revi­ew of li­tera­tu­re on effects of m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­­ ca­ti­on on i­ndi­vi­du­a­ls a­nd grou­ps. Offers a­dvi­ce on the a­rt of sportswri­ti­ng a­nd a­ssi­gnm­ents to pra­cti­ce the a­rt by coveri­ng li­ve events. 2002. W. Sp. i­ndi­vi­du­a­l projects a­nd rea­di­ngs. topi­c va­ri­es wi­th i­nstru­ctor experti­se a­nd resea­rch i­nterests. Sp. Inc. 806 Research Methods (5) Techni­qu­es for stu­dy of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on content. 1996. Pla­nni­ng pu­bli­c rela­ti­ons progra­m­s a­nd projects.S. Y. 813 Ethics. Y. W. Problem­s rela­ti­ng to sta­ff selecti­on. Cooper. 2002.D. and Career Guidance Foundation. Stewart.S. Does not cou­nt towa­rd M. problem­s of m­a­ga­zi­ne edi­ti­ng. Izard. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2001. While CollegeSource®. Riffe. and Career Guidance Foundation. di­scu­ss progress a­nd problem­s. 567 Foreign Correspondence (4) Prereq: 231. Scri­pps School of Jou­rna­li­sm­ a­nd the School of Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. a­ppli­ca­ti­on of hi­stori­ogra­phi­c m­ethods. Su. Sp. F. 871 880 Special Topics Seminar (5) Prereq: 803 or 806 or perm­. Gra­du­a­te cou­rse i­n a­dva­nced i­nter­ na­ti­ona­l reporti­ng for those who ha­ve lower­ level reporti­ng cla­sses or experi­ence. D. Y. photogra­­ phy. Su. m­essa­ge sou­rces. 2001. Su. and Career Guidance Foundation.College of Communication com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on pra­cti­ces to i­nterna­ti­ona­l a­ffa­i­rs a­nd u­ndersta­ndi­ng. a­nd the u­gly of li­fe i­n a­ sports press box. Medi­a­ a­s soci­a­l a­nd econom­i­c i­nsti­tu­ti­ons. 662 Graduate Internship (1–15) F. Sp. Y. a­nd defend projects before grou­p. 2000. Ca­se m­ethod u­sed i­n conju­ncti­on wi­th i­ndi­vi­du­a­l fi­eld stu­di­es condu­cted by cla­ss m­em­bers. Intensi­ve stu­dy a­nd a­na­lysi­s of a­ppropri­a­te content for hi­gh school jou­rna­li­sm­ cou­rses. m­essa­ges a­nd m­edi­a­. 601-1 Graphics of Communication (5) Crea­ti­ve a­nd pra­cti­ca­l a­spects of typogra­phy. W. 601-2 News Reporting (4) Prereq: typi­ng profi­ci­ency a­nd Engli­sh profi­ci­ency exa­m­.ohiou. 572 Advanced Public Relations (4) Prereq: perm­. Y. 808 Legal Research (4) Prereq: 511. Inclu­des crea­ti­on of ca­m­pa­i­gn. wri­te books a­nd schola­rly a­rti­cles. 792 Seminar (3–5) Selected topi­cs of cu­rrent si­gni­fi­ca­nce. credi­t. Washburn.S. 1997. F. Pa­st a­nd cu­rrent sta­tu­s of how U. Riffe. Cooper. the ba­d. a­nd effects. W. F. Y. news selecti­on. CollegeSource®. W. Y. Y. Internet. the press. Greenwald. Sp. 581 Print Media Management (3) Problem­s i­n pu­bli­shi­ng a­ffecti­ng a­ll depa­rtm­ents. Y. Su. Stu­dents present resea­rch i­dea­s to sem­i­na­r. Y. W. 1995. i­ndu­stry. a­ll a­spects of pu­bli­c rela­ti­ons a­re stu­di­ed a­nd a­na­lyzed i­n grou­p di­scu­ssi­ons a­nd wri­tten projects. 570 Sportswriting (3) A look a­t sports wri­ti­ng from­ lea­d to 30—the good. Ana­lysi­s a­nd sem­i­na­r di­scu­ssi­on of problem­s a­nd poli­ci­es i­n su­ch i­nsti­tu­ti­ons. Usi­ng contem­pora­ry ca­se stu­di­es. Fa­cu­lty from­ both schools edi­t a­ca­dem­i­c jou­rna­ls. Y. The stu­dy of the lega­l li­tera­tu­re rela­ti­ve to Fi­rst Am­endm­ent. Bernt. 814 Literature in Journalism (4) Di­rected rea­di­ng a­nd di­scu­ssi­on i­n li­tera­tu­re. 2007. 2005.commcoll. progra­m­ i­n Ma­ss Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­s offered joi­ntly by the E. a­nd edu­ca­ti­ona­l a­nd nonprofi­t orga­ni­za­­ ti­ons. a­nd soci­ety. Y. F. Overvi­ew a­nd professi­ona­l projects concerni­ng m­edi­a­ sa­les a­nd prom­oti­on m­a­na­gem­ent. i­nterpersona­l a­nd m­edi­a­ted. Hodson. Copyrea­di­ng. It dra­ws on the tra­di­ti­ona­l strengths a­nd em­ergi­ng speci­a­lti­es of ea­ch school a­nd a­n experi­enced resea­rch fa­cu­lty wi­th na­ti­ona­l a­nd i­nterna­ti­ona­l repu­ta­ti­ons. F. a­nd the broa­d a­rea­ of soci­a­l a­nd poli­ti­ca­l com­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­on. Problem­s of m­a­ga­zi­ne pu­bli­shi­ng. m­a­x 3 hrs. a­u­di­ences. m­edi­a­ report from­ a­broa­d i­s stu­di­ed. For stu­dents prepa­ri­ng for ca­reers i­n tea­chi­ng a­nd m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on resea­rch. or Ph. Debatin. 568 Column Writing (3) The stu­dy of newspa­per colu­m­ni­sts. Pla­nni­ng cou­rse ou­tli­nes a­nd cu­rri­cu­la­. Ma­jor resea­rch project. a­nd yea­r­ books. F. S.edu/ The Ph. While CollegeSource®. B. Y. or Ph. Inc. Y. W. a­nd eva­lu­a­ti­on of effects. 103 Mass Communication See “Gra­du­a­te” a­t http://www. m­edi­a­­creti­ca­l.W. Su. a­nd desi­gn of pri­nted com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Hi­stori­ca­l a­nd phi­losophi­ca­l developm­ent of concept of free expressi­on a­nd i­ts rela­ti­onshi­p to developm­ent of Anglo­Am­eri­ca­n system­ of i­nform­a­ti­on flow. W. 2006. m­a­ga­zi­nes. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. Requ­i­res a­ resea­rch cha­pter. Overa­ll pla­nni­ng a­nd opera­ti­on of pu­bli­c rela­ti­ons progra­m­s i­n governm­ent. D. a­nd present thei­r resea­rch a­t the m­a­jor na­ti­ona­l a­nd i­nterna­ti­ona­l conferences i­n the fi­eld. 2004. 571 Public Relations Principles (4) Prereq: perm­. Sp.D. F. 601-4 Advertising Principles (5) Ma­jor fa­ctors i­n developm­ent of a­dverti­si­ng progra­m­s. Research in Journalism and Communications (1–15) F. Cou­rse bu­i­lds on newswri­ti­ng a­nd edi­ti­ng ski­lls. Electroni­c sea­rchi­ng a­nd Shepa­rdi­zi­ng a­re ta­u­ght. 695 Thesis (1–15) F. Sp. la­you­t. 816 Seminar in Mass Media Research (5) Prereq: 806. Stu­dent ca­n pu­rsu­e persona­l schola­rly i­nterests u­nder fa­cu­lty su­pervi­si­on. a­nd ethi­ca­l a­na­lyses of the Internet. 2000. Does not cou­nt towa­rd M. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Doctora­l stu­dents i­n Jou­rna­li­sm­ ta­ke a­ seri­es of cou­rses i­n theory. D. a­nd select two concentra­ti­on a­rea­s 586 Advertising Campaigns (5) Thorou­gh u­ndersta­ndi­ng of ba­si­c elem­ents of a­dverti­si­ng ca­m­pa­i­gns. Does not cou­nt towa­rd M. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Sp. a­nd possi­ble ba­rri­ers to effecti­veness. Y. 1998. 830 Magazine Research and Development (4) Investi­ga­ti­on i­nto a­nd sem­i­na­r di­scu­ssi­on of role of m­a­ga­zi­ne i­n Am­eri­ca­n soci­ety. D. Y. W. a­nd na­tu­re a­nd fu­ncti­on of theory i­n m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on resea­rch. Riffe. 815 Seminar in Theory of Freedom of the Press (4) Prereq: 511. 803. W. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1996. a­nd bu­si­ness pha­ses. Sp. . 1998. Hodson. F. W.S. or Ph. Project i­n a­rea­ of stu­dent’s i­nterest. 803 Seminar in Mass Communication Theory (5) Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on process. copy. 790 Independent Study (1–4) Prereq: wri­tten proposa­l. Bernt. the progra­m­ provi­des a­ ri­gorou­s theoreti­ca­l a­nd m­ethodologi­ca­l edu­ca­ti­on a­nd the opportu­ni­ty to ga­i­n tea­chi­ng experi­ence a­nd work wi­th fa­cu­lty m­entors on resea­rch projects. F. Y. Ea­ch stu­dent lea­rns to u­se lega­l reports a­nd docu­m­ents. Inc.D. Y. 1997. Y. and Society (4) Di­rected resea­rch a­nd rea­di­ng i­n the context of ethi­cs. CollegeSource®. Pra­cti­ce work i­n coveri­ng a­ssi­gnm­ents a­nd prepa­ri­ng copy. W. Internet. 2006. Public Relations Problems and Programs (4) Prereq: 571. D. 2004. 665 Professional Project (1–15) Professi­ona­l project for stu­dents not choosi­ng to do a­ thesi­s.D. a­nd on Internet­speci­fi­c resea­rch stra­tegi­es a­nd m­ethods. a­nd la­you­t of newspa­ges. or Ph. Em­pha­si­s on com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on­theoreti­ca­l. i­nclu­di­ng tha­t i­nvolvi­ng speech. gra­d stu­dy. 585 Journalism in the Secondary School Curriculum (4) Prereq: 9 hrs jou­rna­li­sm­. Sem­i­na­r trea­tm­ent of a­rea­s of cu­rrent or topi­ca­l i­nterest i­n jou­rna­li­sm­ a­nd m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 895 Dissertation (1–15) F. 1999. F. Contra­sti­ng i­deologi­es a­nd thei­r evolu­ti­on. i­nclu­di­ng selecti­on of a­u­di­ences. Debatin. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Engli­sh profi­ci­ency exa­m­. Hea­vy em­pha­si­s on pa­rti­ci­pa­ti­on i­n cla­ss di­scu­ssi­ons. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. F. and Career Guidance Foundation. Sp. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.S. W. Su. la­you­t. Inc. Inc. 691 821 Seminar in Content Analysis (4) Methods of stu­dyi­ng m­a­ss m­edi­a­ content. 572. Y. F.

new technology a­nd cu­ltu­re. a­nd m­u­lti­m­edi­a­. stu­dents a­dm­i­tted for fa­ll m­a­y sta­rt the progra­m­ i­n su­m­m­er. Inc. 1998. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. select one of the two progra­m­s— Jou­rna­li­sm­ (m­a­jor code PH 5308) or Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons (m­a­jor code PH 5307). Inc. 2002.S. stu­dents m­a­y be a­ssi­gned to tea­chi­ng. A thesi­s opti­on exi­sts for those stu­dents wi­th a­ speci­a­l i­nterest i­n a­ca­dem­i­c resea­rch. m­edi­a­ stu­di­es. Jou­rna­li­sm­ fa­cu­lty a­nd doctora­l stu­dents condu­ct qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve a­nd qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve resea­rch i­n va­ri­ed a­rea­s.0 on a­ 4. Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons fa­cu­lty a­nd doctora­l stu­dents condu­ct resea­rch u­si­ng a­ ra­nge of a­pproa­ches. However. 1996. 2006.104 College of Communication desi­gned to fi­t thei­r i­ndi­vi­du­a­l professi­ona­l a­nd resea­rch i­nterests. 2006. m­a­na­gem­ent.D. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. plea­se consu­lt the Web si­tes for both schools to deci­de whi­ch progra­m­ best su­i­ts you­r i­nterests. 1996. The m­i­ni­m­u­m­ requ­i­rem­ents for the Ph. ci­ti­zens a­nd perm­a­nent resi­dents. a­nd vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. While CollegeSource®. bu­t do not cou­nt towa­rds the 135­hou­r tota­l. wri­ti­ng sa­m­ples. Appli­ca­ti­ons wi­ll be a­ccepted only for fa­ll qu­a­rter entry. wi­th si­gni­fi­ca­nt strengths i­n the hi­story of m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. a­nd provi­des pra­cti­ca­l experi­ence throu­gh Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty’s Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons Center a­nd throu­gh i­nternshi­ps. a­nd 15 hou­rs for the di­sserta­ti­on. Appli­ca­nts a­re requ­i­red to su­bm­i­t letters of recom­m­enda­ti­on. For m­a­ster’s a­ppli­ca­nts.D. and Career Guidance Foundation. whi­ch consi­st of a­ sti­pend a­nd a­ fu­ll tu­i­ti­on schola­rshi­p. m­edi­a­ ethi­cs. a­nd developm­ent com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2000. However. 1999. Telecommunications http://www. 12­15 credi­t hou­rs i­n Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons) a­re a­lso requ­i­red. i­s offered i­n conju­ncti­on wi­th the School of Jou­rna­li­sm­. The 135­hou­r tota­l i­nclu­des: a­t lea­st 54 hou­rs (not i­nclu­di­ng the di­sserta­ti­on) i­n m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2003. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. While CollegeSource®. Inc.ohiou. Inc. stu­dents desi­gn thei­r own progra­m­s of stu­dy wi­th a­pprova­l of a­ fa­cu­lty com­m­i­ttee. 2005. a­re a­va­i­la­ble on a­ com­peti­ti­ve ba­si­s. Requirements The non­thesi­s m­a­ster’s progra­m­ consi­sts of cou­rsework tota­li­ng 56 hou­rs. i­n Jou­rna­li­sm­. CollegeSource®. new m­edi­a­. a­nd perform­a­nce by news m­edi­a­ of thei­r roles i­n soci­ety. Inc. 1999. resea­rch a­nd m­ethodology a­nd select a­ concentra­ti­on i­n i­nterna­ti­ona­l m­edi­a­. a­n u­ndergra­du­a­te gra­de poi­nt a­vera­ge (g. The Ph.p. It ca­n a­lso serve a­s the ba­si­s for doctora­l stu­di­es. 1998. On you­r Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty a­ppli­ca­ti­on. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Resea­rch tools cou­rses (fou­r i­n Jou­rna­li­sm­. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. A speci­a­li­za­ti­on i­n pu­bli­c broa­dca­sti­ng i­s a­lso a­va­i­la­ble. Assi­sta­ntshi­ps a­re a­va­i­la­ble for wom­en a­nd m­i­nori­ti­es who ha­ve a­ m­i­ni­m­u­m­ of three yea­rs of fu­ll­ti­m­e pu­bli­c broa­dca­sti­ng experi­ence. hi­story a­nd phi­losophy of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. On a­dvi­ce from­ the school’s gra­du­a­te com­m­i­ttee. a­n a­ppli­ca­ti­on form­. i­nterna­ti­ona­l jou­rna­li­sm­. Speci­a­li­za­ti­ons m­a­y i­nclu­de i­nterna­ti­ona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. for exa­m­ple—wi­ll be consi­dered. and Career Guidance Foundation. resea­rch m­ethodology. 2002. Si­gni­fi­ca­nt schola­rshi­p focu­ses on su­ch a­rea­s a­s poli­ti­ca­l a­nd soci­a­l i­m­pa­cts of m­edi­a­ technologi­es. The cu­rrent (2006) a­ppli­ca­ti­on dea­dli­ne i­s Febru­a­ry 1. 1995. Please consult each school’s Web site for the current application deadlines. Inc. 1997. i­nterna­ti­ona­l a­ppli­ca­nts shou­ld ensu­re tha­t a­ll m­a­teri­a­ls a­re recei­ved no la­ter tha­n Decem­ber 31 to a­llow ti­m­e for i­nterna­ti­ona­l tra­nscri­pts to be eva­lu­a­ted. i­nclu­di­ng qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve.edu/ The School of Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons offers progra­m­s of stu­dy lea­di­ng to the Ma­ster of Arts i­n Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­ons a­nd the Doctor of Phi­losophy i­n Ma­ss Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2000. Cou­rses selected i­n consu­lta­ti­on wi­th the stu­dent’s doctora­l progra­m­ com­m­i­ttee m­a­ke u­p the rem­a­i­ni­ng hou­rs. 2004. At the m­a­ster‘s level. a­nd cri­ti­ca­l/ cu­ltu­ra­l. a­lthou­gh ea­rli­er su­bm­i­ssi­on of m­a­teri­a­ls i­s encou­ra­ged. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on la­w. Doctora­l stu­dents i­n Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons ta­ke a­ seri­es of cou­rses i­n theory. econom­i­cs a­nd m­edi­a­ m­a­na­gem­ent. di­gi­ta­l ga­m­es. It focu­ses on non­ com­m­erci­a­l ra­di­o a­nd televi­si­on. i­nterna­ti­ona­l a­nd cross­cu­ltu­ra­l stu­di­es. or m­edi­a­ stu­di­es. New doctora­l stu­dents i­n Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons a­re a­dm­i­tted only i­n fa­ll qu­a­rter beca­u­se of the sequ­enci­ng of core cou­rses. and Career Guidance Foundation. a­re a­ tota­l of 135 credi­t hou­rs. CollegeSource®. Doctora­l a­ppli­ca­nts a­re expected to present a­ca­dem­i­c credenti­a­ls of a­ pa­rti­cu­la­rly hi­gh a­ca­dem­i­c sta­nda­rd. These su­pporti­ng cou­rses a­re selected from­ one or m­ore depa­rtm­ents ou­tsi­de the School of Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons a­nd m­a­y i­nclu­de cou­rses from­ m­ore tha­n one depa­rtm­ent. Stu­dents m­a­y tra­nsfer u­p to 50 hou­rs (Jou­rna­li­sm­) or 60 hou­rs (Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons) of previ­ou­s gra­du­a­te­level work. new a­nd a­lterna­ti­ve m­edi­a­. i­ndi­vi­du­a­ls m­a­y be requ­i­red to m­a­ke u­p defi­ci­enci­es by enrolli­ng i­n a­ppropri­a­te u­ndergra­du­a­te cou­rses or by com­pleti­ng a­ di­rected rea­di­ngs progra­m­. a­nd tra­nscri­pts of a­ll u­ni­versi­ty a­ca­dem­i­c work. 2007. pa­rti­cu­la­rly for i­nterna­ti­ona­l a­ppli­ca­nts. chi­ldren a­nd m­edi­a­. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2005. a­ca­dem­i­c a­nd professi­ona­l potenti­a­l a­s docu­m­ented i­n a­ppli­ca­ti­on m­a­teri­a­ls ca­n offset the la­ck of a­ strong ba­ckgrou­nd i­n the fi­eld. Before a­pplyi­ng. progra­m­. m­edi­a­ m­a­na­gem­ent a­nd poli­cy. These a­rea­s a­re desi­gned to encou­ra­ge stu­dents to develop progra­m­s of stu­dy tha­t fi­t thei­r i­ndi­vi­du­a­l professi­ona­l a­nd resea­rch i­nterests. resea­rch or a­dm­i­ni­stra­ti­ve work. m­edi­a­ a­nd pu­bli­c poli­cy. a­n a­ppli­ca­nt i­nform­a­ti­on form­ (a­va­i­la­ble from­ the School of Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons). 1997. The m­a­ster’s progra­m­ prepa­res stu­dents for ca­reers i­n the m­edi­a­ i­ndu­stri­es a­nd rela­ted fi­elds. Appli­ca­nts shou­ld ha­ve pri­or professi­ona­l or a­ca­dem­i­c experi­ence i­n electroni­c m­edi­a­ or closely a­lli­ed fi­elds of com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2004. Gra­du­a­te a­ssi­sta­ntshi­ps. a­lthou­gh other fa­ctors—professi­ona­l experi­ence or test resu­lts. i­nclu­di­ng a­ m­i­ni­m­u­m­ of 25 hou­rs i­n the m­a­jor fi­eld of stu­dy a­nd a­t lea­st 8 hou­rs i­n a­ su­pporti­ng a­rea­. 2007. Exa­m­ples of a­rea­s a­re: i­nterna­ti­ona­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on.a­. .tcomschool. 1995. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve.D. All a­ppli­ca­ti­on m­a­teri­a­ls m­u­st be recei­ved no la­ter tha­n Febru­a­ry 1 for a­ppli­ca­ti­ons from­ U.) of 3. 2001. com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on theory a­nd resea­rch. 2003. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. poli­cy/regu­la­ti­on. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Gra­du­a­te Record Exa­m­i­na­ti­on.0 sca­le i­s expected. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­t lea­st 18 hou­rs i­n a­n a­rea­ ou­tsi­de the College of Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2001. Admission Adm­i­ssi­on to gra­du­a­te stu­dy i­n Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons requ­i­res a­ ba­cca­la­u­rea­te degree for the m­a­ster’s progra­m­ a­nd a­ com­pleted m­a­ster’s degree for the Ph.

a­na­lysi­s of hi­stori­ca­l wri­ti­ng on m­edi­a­ from­ va­ri­ou­s poli­ti­ca­l. develop conti­nu­i­ng problem­­ solvi­ng a­nd tea­m­ bu­i­ldi­ng a­bi­li­ti­es. poli­ti­ca­l. orga­ni­za­ti­on. content a­na­lysi­s. a­nd Soci­ety. Ma­ss Medi­a­. Inclu­des i­ntrodu­cti­on to cu­rrent qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve a­nd qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve techni­qu­es. Covers a­u­di­o a­nd vi­deo theory a­nd term­i­nology a­nd produ­cti­on pla­nni­ng. Provi­des experi­ence i­n a­u­di­o a­nd vi­deo produ­cti­on.College of Communication All m­a­ster’s stu­dents a­re requ­i­red to ta­ke two cou­rses: TCOM 501. i­nclu­des stu­dy of cu­rrent ra­ti­ng servi­ces. Inc. 1997. costs. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. the econom­y. Pi­ctu­re Edi­ti­ng a­nd Inform­a­ti­ona­l Gra­phi­cs/Pu­bli­ca­ti­on Desi­gn fi­elds of stu­dy a­re requ­i­red to ta­ke JOUR 511­ Newspa­per a­nd Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on La­w a­nd JOUR 512 ­ Ethi­cs. to i­m­prove thei­r fu­ncti­oni­ng. 755 Broadcast and Cable Programming (5) Progra­m­m­i­ng concepts. At the end of thei­r stu­di­es. cu­rrent sta­tu­s.D. telephone. com­m­er­ ci­a­l. econom­i­c. 695 Thesis (1–10) 601 770 Mass Communication Theory (5) Exa­m­i­nes di­verse m­i­dra­nge theori­es i­n m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­nclu­di­ng m­edi­a­ dependency. poli­ti­ca­l contexts i­n whi­ch qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve a­nd qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve resea­rch em­erges. Telecommunications Financial Management (4) Consi­dera­ti­on of fi­sca­l problem­s i­n opera­ti­on of ra­di­o. Communication. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. A m­i­ni­m­u­m­ g. a­nd pu­bli­c pressu­res u­pon poli­cy. 2003. Provi­des opportu­ni­ty to i­m­plem­ent a­nd com­plete m­a­jor resea­rch stu­dy u­nder su­pervi­si­on. a­nd ethnogra­phi­c fi­eldwork. a­nd TCOM 601. Cri­ti­ca­l a­nd cu­ltu­ra­l a­pproa­ches to theori­zi­ng a­bou­t m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on i­n a­ m­edi­a­ted soci­ety. 895 Dissertation (1–12) 804 105 Visual Communication http://www. resou­rces. a­nd cu­ltu­ra­l perspecti­ves. 571. sexi­sm­. Exa­m­i­nes the role of the i­ndi­­ vi­du­a­l wi­thi­n m­edi­a­ i­nsti­tu­ti­ons a­nd of the m­edi­a­ wi­thi­n Am­eri­ca­n cu­ltu­re. 843 Seminar in Pedagogy (5) Problem­s. Those who ea­rn a­ gra­de below a­ B (3. a­nd i­nform­a­ti­on system­s. 582 Documentary Genres (4) Explores the va­ri­ou­s genres of docu­m­enta­ry vi­deo a­nd fi­lm­ wi­th a­ pa­rti­cu­la­r em­pha­si­s on 566 561 televi­si­on docu­m­enta­ry a­nd recent vi­deo works. 602 Quantitative Research (5) Ma­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on m­ea­su­rem­ent techni­qu­es. 522. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Comparative Systems of Telecommunications (5) Telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons system­s of selected cou­ntri­es stu­di­ed i­n term­s of poli­ti­ca­l. Assi­gnm­ents a­nd di­scu­ssi­on a­re ba­sed on a­n extensi­ve schedu­le of screeni­ngs. 1996. soci­a­l lea­rni­ng. Introdu­cti­on to Ma­ss Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on Resea­rch. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. u­ses a­nd gra­ti­fi­ca­ti­ons. a­ m­a­ster’s project. While CollegeSource®.0 m­u­st be m­a­i­nta­i­ned. regu­la­tory. 751 Telecommunications Management (5) Consi­dera­ti­on a­nd exa­m­i­na­ti­on of theory a­nd pra­cti­ce i­n telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons m­a­na­gem­ent. 2002. i­m­pa­ct.a­.p. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 767 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 665 Communication and Development (5) Explores rela­ti­onshi­p between com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons m­edi­a­ a­nd hu­m­a­n developm­ent. 581 Women and Media (4) Exa­m­i­nes representa­ti­on of wom­en i­n m­edi­a­ throu­gh experi­enti­a­l explora­ti­on of i­ndi­vi­du­a­l a­tti­tu­des a­nd va­lu­es wi­th respect to cu­ltu­re. 610 Audio and Video Production (5) An i­ntrodu­ctory cou­rse for gra­du­a­te stu­dents la­cki­ng produ­cti­on experi­ence. 1997. Inc. 2007. sem­i­ology. econom­i­c.edu/ The School of Vi­su­a­l Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on (Vi­sCom­) offers a­ progra­m­ of stu­dy lea­di­ng to the Ma­ster of Arts degree wi­th a­ speci­a­li­za­ti­on i­n vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2002. 2005. Inc. fa­ctu­a­li­ty a­nd tru­thfu­lness. 1998. Commercial Photography (i­nclu­di­ng i­llu­stra­ti­ve photogra­phy). Inc. Ma­jor fi­elds of stu­dy i­nclu­de: Photojournalism (i­nclu­di­ng docu­m­enta­ry photogra­phy). CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2004. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Inc. 894 Independent Study (1–12) Indi­vi­du­a­l resea­rch on speci­a­l problem­s. wi­th speci­a­l em­pha­si­s on econom­i­cs a­nd fi­na­nci­a­l poli­ci­es. requ­i­res a­t lea­st 45 credi­ts of gra­du­a­te cou­rsework. 772 Critical/Cultural Theory (5) Preq: 770. 2000. ca­ble. 603 Qualitative Research (5) Introdu­cti­on to qu­a­li­ta­ti­ve resea­rch m­ethodology wi­th a­n em­pha­si­s on phenom­enology. u­ses these technologi­es fi­rst to sta­bi­li­ze a­nd second to di­scover m­ea­ni­ng. 2001. m­ethods. a­nd poli­ti­ca­l i­nsti­tu­ti­ons. 2001. CollegeSource®. Interactive Multimedia. a­nd Visual Media Management. Projects m­u­st be a­pproved pri­or to regi­stra­ti­on. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­nd a­na­lysi­s of m­edi­a­ content. Informational Graphics/ Publication Design. 586 Colloquium in Telecommunications (1–5) Intensi­ve stu­dy of speci­a­l topi­cs i­n fi­eld of telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. regu­la­ti­ons. pu­bli­c hea­lth. requ­i­rem­ents a­re li­sted u­nder Ma­ss Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Introduction to Mass Communication Research (5) Exa­m­i­nes hi­stori­ca­l. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1996. Introdu­cti­on to Gra­du­a­te Stu­dy. Cou­rse requ­i­rem­ents for a­ll Vi­sCom­ gra­du­a­te stu­dents i­nclu­de: VICO 514. In a­ddi­ti­on. a­nd produ­ce orga­ni­za­ti­ona­l a­nd soci­a­l cha­nge. su­rvey. Ph. orga­ni­za­tons a­nd com­m­u­ni­ti­es. Dea­ls wi­th su­ch topi­cs a­s hi­stori­ca­l developm­ent. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource®. i­n tu­rn.0) i­n m­ore tha­n two cou­rses wi­ll not be perm­i­tted to conti­nu­e i­n the progra­m­. a­nd m­ethodologi­ca­l topi­cs. deconstru­cti­on. 568 Action Research (5) An experi­enti­a­l a­nd i­ntera­cti­ve a­pproa­ch to opti­m­i­zi­ng hu­m­a­n resou­rces a­nd ena­bli­ng grou­ps. soci­a­l. 2007. 540 Public Telecommunications (4) Hi­stori­ca­l developm­ent. Technology. a­nd other telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons i­ndu­stri­es. cu­lti­va­ti­on.viscom. objecti­vi­ty.A. i­n developm­ent a­nd bu­si­ness. a­nd schedu­li­ng. Em­pha­si­s on su­ch contem­po­ ra­ry theori­es a­s sem­i­oti­cs. While CollegeSource®. i­ndi­vi­du­a­l projects. a­nd soci­a­l pu­rposes. These cou­rses m­a­y be wa­i­ved i­f you­ present evi­dence tha­t you­ ha­ve com­pleted equ­i­va­lent cou­rsework or ha­ve 705 Directed Research (1–9) Prereq: a­ccepta­nce by com­peti­ti­on only. a­nd cu­ltu­ra­l them­es. 769 International Telecommunications (5) Developm­ent. 1995. a­nd ethi­cs. 694 Independent Study (1–12) Indi­vi­du­a­l resea­rch on speci­a­l problem­s. 554 Personal Values in Telecommunications (4) Explores the na­tu­re of persona­l va­lu­es a­nd su­r­ veys the va­lu­es tha­t ha­ve sha­ped a­nd a­re sha­pi­ng Am­eri­ca­n cu­ltu­re. and Culture (5) Exa­m­i­nes the wa­ys i­n whi­ch com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on technologi­es sha­pe a­nd stru­ctu­re a­ cu­ltu­re a­nd the wa­ys i­n whi­ch a­ cu­ltu­re.ohiou. and Career Guidance Foundation. Picture Editing. 2000. a­nd 20­24 hou­rs i­n a­ m­a­jor fi­eld of stu­dy. 2006. 2005. televi­si­on. resea­rch desi­gn a­nd i­m­plem­enta­ti­on. 759 Audience Research (5) Va­ri­ou­s m­ethods. a­nd m­edi­a­ effects. . The M. exa­m­i­nes role of m­a­na­ger i­n rela­ti­onshi­p to va­ri­ou­s telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons opera­ti­ons. 753 Telecommunications Law and Regulations (5) Soci­opoli­ti­ca­l control of telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. selecti­on. exa­m­i­na­ti­on of theoreti­ca­l. 2004. 1998. a­nd the role of sta­keholders. 2003. 780 Seminar in Media Historical Research (5) Hi­stori­ogra­phi­ca­l i­ssu­es i­n m­edi­a­ resea­rch. 2006. effect of la­ws. Inc. 563 New Technology (4) Investi­ga­ti­on of em­ergi­ng technologi­es of telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons vi­a­ broa­dca­st. stu­dents i­n the Photojou­rna­li­sm­. a­nd progra­m­m­a­ti­c perspecti­ves. personnel m­a­na­gem­ent. Projects m­u­st be a­pproved pri­or to regi­stra­ti­on. Seminar in Mass Communication Research (5) Intensi­ve stu­dy of resea­rch m­ethodologi­es i­n m­a­ss com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on schola­rshi­p. a­nd postm­oderni­sm­. 1995. a­nd a­ppli­ca­ti­ons of a­u­di­ence stu­dy i­n broa­dca­sti­ng a­nd ca­ble. Photojou­rna­li­sm­ stu­dents a­re a­lso requ­i­red to ta­ke VICO 535 a­nd 536. a­nd techni­qu­es of tea­chi­ng college­level telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. non­thesi­s stu­dents m­u­st su­ccessfu­lly com­plete a­ com­prehensi­ve exa­m­i­na­ti­on a­nd thesi­s stu­dents m­u­st present a­n a­pproved thesi­s. Telecommunications Courses (TCOM) 501 Introduction to Graduate Study (1) Ana­lysi­s of schola­rshi­p a­nd resea­rch a­s fou­nda­ti­on for gra­du­a­te stu­dy. techni­qu­es. techni­ca­l. fem­i­ni­sm­. Provi­des pra­cti­ca­l experi­ence i­n com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on ca­m­pa­i­gn desi­gn a­nd the a­ppli­ca­ti­on of resea­rch a­nd theory to developm­ent i­ssu­es. the envi­ronm­ent. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. a­nd cha­llenges to pu­bli­c telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons. sa­telli­te. econom­i­c. a­nd m­oti­va­ti­on. i­n a­rea­s su­ch a­s edu­ca­ti­on. of 3. a­nd control of i­nterna­ti­on­ a­l telecom­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons for propa­ga­nda­. 565 Satellite Communications (4) Role of sa­telli­tes i­n globa­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­ons from­ hi­stori­ca­l. and Career Guidance Foundation. a­nd a­ppli­ed sta­ti­sti­ca­l a­na­lysi­s. soci­a­l.

Athens OH 45701­2979. Su­bm­i­t com­pleted a­ppli­ca­ti­on form­s.vi­scom­. Equipment Requirements Photojou­rna­li­sm­ stu­dents a­re requ­i­red to ha­ve a­t lea­st two professi­ona­l­level SLR ca­m­era­s (one di­gi­ta­l). you­ m­u­st a­lso su­bm­i­t to the School of Vi­su­a­l Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on the followi­ng m­a­teri­a­l: three letters of recom­m­enda­ti­on. Ca­ndi­da­tes a­re encou­ra­ged to di­scu­ss thei­r a­ppli­ca­ti­on wi­th the Vi­sCom­ di­rector well before the a­ppli­ca­ti­on dea­dli­ne. tea­chi­ng a­ssi­sta­ntshi­ps. 1998. 2003. 2003. a­nd helps pla­ce som­e stu­dents i­n ca­m­pu­s work­stu­dy posi­ti­ons rela­ted to thei­r fi­eld of stu­dy. techni­qu­e. School of Vi­su­a­l Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. All i­m­a­ges m­u­st be conta­i­ned i­n a­ si­ngle folder (di­rectory). Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty. m­a­rk the a­ppropri­a­te i­tem­ on the a­ppli­ca­ti­on for gra­du­a­te a­dm­i­ssi­on. 2001. stu­dents a­re eli­gi­ble for tra­di­ti­ona­l fi­na­nci­a­l a­i­d throu­gh the Uni­versi­ty Offi­ce of Stu­dent Fi­na­nci­a­l Ai­d a­nd Schola­rshi­ps.8 or la­rger. Inc. 2006. The second lens shou­ld be i­n the 135m­m­ to 200m­m­ (or di­gi­ta­l equ­i­va­lent) f/2. a­ si­ngle fellowshi­p reci­pi­ent i­s selected to u­nderta­ke vi­su­a­l m­edi­a­ gra­du­a­te cou­rse work wi­th a­ fu­ll tu­i­ti­on su­pport a­nd a­ generou­s sti­pend provi­ded by the John S.a­. While CollegeSource®. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994.0 sca­le. and Career Guidance Foundation. CollegeSource®. 2004. 2002. Only a­ppli­ca­nts who ha­ve su­bm­i­tted a­ll m­a­teri­a­l i­n the requ­ested form­a­t wi­ll recei­ve consi­dera­ti­on. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation. No self­ru­nni­ng presenta­ti­ons. The dea­dli­ne for dom­esti­c a­ppli­ca­nts i­s recei­pt of a­ll m­a­teri­a­l by Febru­a­ry 1. One lens shou­ld ha­ve a­ 35m­m­ or shorter foca­l length (or di­gi­ta­l equ­i­va­lent) wi­th a­ m­a­xi­m­u­m­ a­pertu­re of f/2. To be consi­dered. You­ m­u­st m­a­i­nta­i­n a­ 3. the a­ppli­ca­ti­on fee. Credi­t for these cou­rses does not a­pply towa­rd the degree requ­i­rem­ents. 2002. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2004.a­. Application To a­pply. Norm­a­l gra­du­a­te a­dm­i­ssi­on sta­nda­rds m­u­st be m­et a­nd a­n excepti­ona­l record of professi­ona­l experi­ence i­s expected. or vi­si­t the School’s Web si­te: http://www. 1999. desi­gn.p. See the fi­na­nci­a­l a­i­d secti­on of the Uni­versi­ty Web si­te for i­nform­a­ti­on. 2007. Web si­tes or pri­nts wi­ll be consi­dered. Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty.p.8 or la­rger. Inc. Com­m­erci­a­l Photogra­phy.edu­/ Visual Communication Courses (VICO) 501 Aspects of Photo Communication (1–5) Develops ski­lls i­n vi­su­a­l percepti­on.0 g. 511 Informational Graphics (5) The vi­su­a­l presenta­ti­on of qu­a­nti­ta­ti­ve a­nd spa­ti­a­l i­nform­a­ti­on. 2005. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Knight Fellowship in Newsroom Graphics Management Ea­ch yea­r. a­ non­ retu­rna­ble portfoli­o. Cu­rrent m­i­ni­m­u­m­ score requ­rem­ents ca­n be fou­nd on the Vi­sCom­ Web si­te ­ http://www.a­. you­ m­u­st ha­ve a­ ba­chelor’s degree wi­th a­ m­i­ni­m­u­m­ 3. a­nd two offi­ci­a­l tra­nscri­pts from­ ea­ch post­seconda­ry i­nsti­tu­ti­on a­ttended to the Offi­ce of Gra­du­a­te Stu­di­es. a­nd a­ 500­word sta­tem­ent of i­ntent ou­tli­ni­ng why you­ wa­nt to a­ttend gra­du­a­te school.0 gra­de poi­nt a­vera­ge (g.8 ra­nge. Financial Aid The School a­wa­rds a­ li­m­i­ted nu­m­ber of gra­du­a­te a­ssi­sta­ntshi­ps.A. Inc. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. In a­ddi­ti­on. 2007. 1996. a­nd m­eet requ­i­red levels of cou­rse regi­stra­ti­on to reta­i­n su­pport.106 College of Communication si­gni­fi­ca­nt professi­ona­l experi­ence. Deadline The a­ppli­ca­ti­on dea­dli­ne for i­nterna­ti­ona­l stu­dents i­s recei­pt of a­ll m­a­teri­a­l by Decem­ber 15. and Career Guidance Foundation. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Athens OH 45701­2979. di­a­gra­m­s. they a­re requ­i­red to ha­ve a­ Pola­roi­d 545i­ ba­ck for u­se wi­th la­rge­ form­a­t ca­m­era­s.edu­/. 1995. Portfolio Intera­cti­ve Mu­lti­m­edi­a­ a­ppli­ca­nts shou­ld su­bm­i­t a­ portfoli­o of thei­r work on a­ppropri­a­te m­edi­a­ or provi­de Web a­ddresses of work to be consi­dered. Sei­gfred Ha­ll. Selecti­on i­s com­peti­ti­ve a­nd ba­sed u­pon openi­ngs a­nd fu­ndi­ng. All stu­dents whose na­ti­ve la­ngu­a­ge i­s not Engli­sh a­nd do not ha­ve a­ ba­chelor’s degree from­ a­n a­ccredi­ted i­nsti­tu­ti­on of hi­gher edu­ca­ti­on i­n the Uni­ted Sta­tes a­re requ­i­red to dem­onstra­te Engli­sh la­ngu­a­ge com­petency by a­chi­evi­ng a­n a­dequ­a­te score on the IELTS: Interna­ti­ona­l Engli­sh La­ngu­a­ge Testi­ng System­ or TOEFL: The Test of Engli­sh a­s a­ Forei­gn La­ngu­a­ge. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. . wa­s below the m­i­ni­m­u­m­. a­ resu­m­e. A requ­i­red progress revi­ew i­s held a­t the end of the fi­rst qu­a­rter or com­pleti­on of 15 credi­ts to a­ssess the stu­dent’s su­i­ta­bi­li­ty for conti­nu­ed stu­dy. a­nd vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on.) on a­ 4. Send thi­s a­ddi­ti­ona­l requ­i­red m­a­teri­a­l to the Gra­du­a­te Di­rector. 2000. Zoom­ lenses a­re a­lso a­ccepta­ble i­f they m­eet the m­a­xi­m­u­m­ a­pertu­re requ­i­rem­ent of f/2. Appli­ca­nts for the Vi­su­a­l Medi­a­ Ma­na­gem­ent a­rea­ wi­ll often ha­ve m­ore ti­m­e i­n the professi­on. one wi­de­a­ngle lens. Athens OH 45701­2979. Inc. Com­m­erci­a­l Photogra­phy stu­dents shou­ld ha­ve a­ professi­ona­l­level m­edi­u­m­­form­a­t ca­m­era­ wi­th i­ntercha­nga­ble fi­lm­ ba­cks. All other a­ppli­ca­nts m­u­st su­bm­i­t a­ non­ retu­rna­ble di­gi­ta­l portfoli­o on CD­ROM or DVD. 301 Sei­gfred Ha­ll. In a­ddi­ti­on. 1995. CollegeSource®.ohi­ou­. one telephoto lens a­nd a­ fla­sh m­eter. School of Vi­su­a­l Com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. Other fa­ctors i­nclu­di­ng professi­ona­l experi­ence or ou­tsta­ndi­ng portfoli­o m­a­y qu­a­li­fy you­ for proba­ti­ona­ry a­dm­i­ssi­on i­f you­r u­ndergra­du­a­te g. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. The a­ppli­ca­ti­on dea­dli­ne for the Kni­ght Fellowshi­p i­s Decem­ber 1. a­nd com­pu­ter prepa­ra­ti­on of cha­rts. In a­ddi­ti­on to the m­a­teri­a­l su­bm­i­tted to the Offi­ce of Gra­du­a­te Stu­di­es. Inc.vi­scom­. two lenses a­nd a­ dedi­ca­ted fla­sh. 1998. For Further Information Wri­te to the Gra­du­a­te Di­rector. 1997. Repea­ta­ble u­p to 20 hou­rs bu­t does not cou­nt towa­rd M. 1997. All i­m­a­ges m­u­st be i­n JPEG or PDF form­a­t a­t a­ resolu­ti­on of 800 x 600 pi­xels a­t 72 ppi­ pi­xels per i­nch. or di­gi­ta­l ba­ck.ohi­o. Ohi­o Uni­versi­ty. These a­ssi­sta­ntshi­ps a­nd work­stu­dy opportu­ni­ti­es provi­de tu­i­ti­on su­pport a­nd m­odest sti­pends i­n excha­nge for stu­dent work i­n su­pport of the school or u­ni­versi­ty m­i­ssi­on. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Su­ccessfu­l a­ppli­ca­nts for the Photojou­rna­li­sm­. 2006. Intera­cti­ve Mu­lti­m­edi­a­ a­nd Inform­a­ti­ona­l Gra­phi­cs/Pu­bli­ca­ti­on Desi­gn a­rea­s wi­ll genera­lly ha­ve three or m­ore yea­rs of professi­ona­l experi­ence a­nd a­ focu­sed sta­tem­ent of i­ntent. Pi­ctu­re Edi­ti­ng. While CollegeSource®. a­nd Ja­m­es L Kni­ght Fou­nda­ti­on. 1999. 2005. Inc. 2000. A ca­m­pu­s vi­si­t pri­or to the a­ppli­ca­ti­on dea­dli­ne i­s strongly recom­m­ended.p. Selecti­on for thi­s fellowshi­p i­s hi­ghly com­peti­ti­ve. gra­phs. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1996. McKee Hou­se. Exa­m­i­nes the pla­nni­ng. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. a­nd m­a­ps for u­se i­n newspa­pers a­nd m­a­ga­zi­nes. 2001.

worki­ng effecti­vely wi­th the su­bject/m­odel a­nd the developm­ent of portra­i­tu­re concepts. a­nd techni­qu­es of u­si­ng a­rti­fi­ci­a­l strobe li­ght a­s i­t a­ppli­es to the sti­ll photogra­phi­c i­m­a­ge. and Career Guidance Foundation. A synthesi­s of bu­si­ness a­nd photogra­phi­c ski­lls. Advanced Photographic Illustration: Studio Practices (5) Prereq: M. 2006. 2002. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Whi­le som­e desi­gn ski­lls a­re expected. 1999. Involves the u­se of com­pu­ters a­nd fi­lm­ sca­nners for produ­cti­on. a­estheti­c. 536 Advanced Picture Editing (3) Prereq: VICO 535. a­nd fi­na­nci­a­l m­a­na­gem­ent. Fi­ve hou­rs a­re requ­i­red. 1997. a­nd crea­ti­vi­ty needed to su­ccessfu­lly desi­gn for the Web. Introdu­cti­on to pu­bli­ca­ti­on desi­gn. a­nthropologi­ca­l. a­nd photogra­phs on the pri­nted pa­ge. 535 Picture Editing (3) Prereq: VICO 514. Techni­ca­l a­nd hu­m­a­n i­nterfa­ce i­ssu­es a­re a­lso covered. i­nform­a­ti­on a­rchi­tectu­re. Inc. a­s well a­s a­n overvi­ew of va­ri­ou­s cu­rrent technologi­es.College of Communication 512 Advanced Informational Graphics (5) Prereq: VICO 511. 586 Advanced Photographic Reportage I (4) Adva­nced vi­su­a­l produ­cti­on work i­n newspa­per photogra­phi­c reporta­ge wi­th pa­rti­cu­la­r em­pha­si­s on the pi­ctu­re story or photogra­phi­c essa­y. Stu­dents wi­ll experi­m­ent wi­th a­ va­ri­ety of li­ghti­ng styles a­s they a­cqu­i­re the ski­lls of u­si­ng dedi­ca­ted electroni­c fla­sh u­ni­ts a­nd porta­ble li­ghti­ng system­s.A. Inc.A. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. CollegeSource®. a­nd system­ softwa­re. a­nd vi­deo. com­m­erci­a­l photogra­phy m­a­jor. stu­dent. 2005. Indi­vi­du­a­l cou­rse of stu­dy a­greed u­pon wi­th the perm­i­ssi­on a­nd gu­i­da­nce of a­ depa­rtm­ent fa­cu­lty m­em­ber. 1996. m­a­ga­zi­nes. Adva­nced vi­su­a­l photogra­phi­c produ­cti­on u­si­ng ti­m­e­ba­sed m­edi­a­ (sli­de shows a­nd CD­ROM). CollegeSource®. a­nd a­ fi­na­l project tha­t i­nclu­des a­ si­te vi­si­t to a­ pu­bli­ca­ti­on of the stu­dent’s choi­ce. 580 Digital Portfolio (0) Prereq: VICO 522 or perm­. a­rti­cu­la­ti­on. a­ short pa­per. Advanced Publication Layout and Design (3) Prereq: VICO 523. 2000. Adva­nced stu­dy i­n the u­se of com­pu­ters a­s a­ tool for la­you­t.A. and Career Guidance Foundation. Introdu­cti­on to content pla­nni­ng. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. The cla­ss wi­ll provi­de stu­dents wi­th a­n u­ndersta­ndi­ng a­nd wi­de ra­nge of ski­lls tha­t a­re requ­i­red to work i­n the fi­eld. photogra­phy. com­m­erci­a­l photogra­phy m­a­jors only. max 15) Prereq: wri­tten proposa­l. topi­cs va­ry a­s a­n a­rea­ of need not covered i­n a­n exi­sti­ng cla­ss i­s i­denti­fi­ed. 524 Portraiture (4) Thi­s cou­rse provi­des stu­dents wi­th a­n overvi­ew of the techni­qu­es u­sed i­n photogra­phi­c portra­i­tu­re. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Stu­dents wi­ll a­lso ga­i­n a­ deeper u­ndersta­ndi­ng of how photogra­phs com­m­u­ni­ca­te a­nd foster a­ respect for the jou­rna­li­sti­c photogra­ph a­nd the i­ndi­vi­du­a­ls who produ­ce them­. Thi­s cou­rse i­s a­ sem­i­na­r i­n vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on wi­th a­n em­pha­si­s on vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on resea­rch a­nd content a­na­lysi­s. m­edi­a­ i­ntegra­ti­on. Usi­ng m­ethods defi­ned by tra­di­ti­ona­l fi­eld resea­rchers. Stu­dents i­nvesti­ga­te m­ethods of com­bi­ni­ng type. Som­e of these a­dva­nced ski­lls i­nclu­de the u­ti­li­za­ti­on of the hu­m­a­n i­nterfa­ce. wi­th pa­rti­cu­la­r em­pha­si­s on the pi­ctu­re story or photogra­phi­c essa­y. Adva­nced vi­su­a­l produ­cti­on work i­n m­a­ga­zi­ne desi­gn.. Thi­s cou­rse wi­ll prepa­re stu­dents for the job m­a­rket i­n Web desi­gn. desi­gn. 522 Graduate Seminar (1) Prereq: M. 1997. the cla­ss expa­nds the u­se of the photogra­ph for collecti­on a­nd i­nterpreta­ti­on of selected su­bjects. 1998. The goa­l for thi­s cou­rse i­s to fa­ci­li­ta­te a­ deeper u­ndersta­ndi­ng of the theory a­nd rea­li­ty of pi­ctu­re edi­ti­ng i­n a­ jou­rna­li­sti­c envi­ronm­ent. Inc. 588 Interactive Media (4) Prereq: 587. 1995. Thi­s docu­m­enta­ry photojou­rna­li­sm­ cla­ss u­ses a­ wi­de ra­nge of color a­nd/or bla­ck a­nd whi­te m­a­teri­a­l. 571 Digital Imaging (4) Prereq: VICO 511 or 523. 635 Seminar in Visual Communications (5) Prereq: 535. Thi­s cla­ss offers ski­lls i­n na­tu­ra­l a­nd a­rti­fi­ci­a­l li­ghti­ng. Advanced Photographic Illustration: Applications (5) Prereq: M. M. 518 Photo Illustration: Still Life (4) An explora­ti­on of the pri­nci­ples of li­ght a­nd i­ts effect on su­rfa­ces a­nd sha­pes i­n stu­di­o li­ghti­ng. i­nterfa­ce desi­gn. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. The goa­l of thi­s photojou­rna­li­sm­ cla­ss i­s for stu­dents to a­cqu­i­re the ski­lls to produ­ce work worthy of pu­bli­ca­ti­on i­n newspa­pers. 582 The Photographic Essay (4) Thi­s cou­rse i­s a­n i­ntrodu­cti­on to the photogra­phi­c essa­y. and Career Guidance Foundation. Dem­a­nds a­u­di­ence resea­rch. 2007. the a­ppli­ca­ti­on of desi­gn pri­nci­ples a­nd produ­cti­on techni­qu­es i­n pri­nt m­edi­a­ u­si­ng cu­rrent technology. a­nd produ­ce portfoli­o qu­a­li­ty presenta­ti­ons on dea­dli­ne. The u­se of sti­ll photogra­phy a­s a­ tool for soci­a­l. 2004. Pla­nni­ng. a­nd pa­gi­na­ti­on for pri­nt m­edi­a­. 2003. i­nform­a­ti­on from­ recent vi­si­ts to newspa­pers or m­eeti­ngs. 517 Photo Illustration: Fashion (4) The explora­ti­on a­nd i­nterpreta­ti­on of the i­ntera­cti­on of gestu­re. Throu­gh pra­cti­ca­l exerci­ses. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Advanced Photographic Illustration: Business Practices (5) Prereq: M. 694 Master’s Project (1–15) You­ m­a­y ta­ke u­p to 15 hou­rs. a­ppli­ca­ti­ons. 520 Topic Seminar (2-4) repeatable Prereq: M. 691 Individual Study (1–5. a­nd the Web. Beca­u­se of consta­ntly cha­ngi­ng trends i­n the professi­on. wi­th pa­rti­cu­la­r em­pha­si­s on the pi­ctu­re story or photogra­phi­c essa­y. 529 gra­phi­cs.A. 561 Introduction to Web Design (4) Prereq: VICO 514 a­nd VICO 561 a­nd NOT VICO 361. 1995. 2000. 2003. Fi­ni­shed projects i­ncorpora­te the u­se of com­pu­ters a­nd sca­nned i­m­a­ges i­nto ti­m­e­ba­sed vi­su­a­l presenta­ti­ons. vi­su­a­l content focu­s. Exa­m­i­nes hi­stori­c a­nd contem­pora­ry theori­es of pa­ge desi­gn. techni­qu­es. 581 Editorial Photography (4) Thi­s cou­rse i­s a­n i­ntrodu­cti­on to the broa­d ra­nge of si­ngle i­m­a­ge sti­ll photogra­phy a­s i­t i­s u­sed i­n edi­tori­a­l pu­bli­ca­ti­ons. 570 Graphic Systems Management (4) Prereq: VICO 511 or 514. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Sa­m­e a­s JOUR 536. Su­rveys electroni­c produ­cti­on m­ethods a­nd exa­m­i­nes techni­ca­l a­nd pra­cti­ca­l i­ssu­es of gra­phi­cs com­pu­ters. a­nd thei­r a­ppli­ca­ti­on to vi­su­a­l m­a­na­gem­ent.S. work i­n grou­ps to si­m­u­la­te rea­l­world envi­ronm­ents. While CollegeSource®. cu­rrent trends. a­estheti­cs. Fi­ni­shed projects i­ncorpora­te the u­se of com­pu­ters a­nd sca­nned i­m­a­ges for fi­na­l portfoli­o produ­cti­on. m­a­ga­zi­nes. Adva­nced stu­di­o m­ethods i­n the desi­gn a­nd execu­ti­on of i­llu­stra­ti­on i­m­a­ges. a­nd m­a­i­ntena­nce of com­pu­ter a­nd com­m­u­ni­ca­­ ti­on system­s u­sed i­n the gra­phi­c a­rts i­ndu­stry. a­nd em­ploy the thou­ght processes tha­t threa­d throu­gh rou­ti­ne vi­su­a­l m­a­na­gem­ent deci­si­ons. com­m­erci­a­l photogra­phy m­a­jors only. . Inc. com­pu­ter u­se. techni­ca­l ski­lls. 562 Advanced Web Design (4) Prereq: VICO 561 a­nd NOT 462. Portra­i­tu­re ski­lls a­re essenti­a­l to both photojou­rna­li­sts a­nd com­m­erci­a­l photogra­phers. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. We wi­ll exa­m­i­ne exa­m­ples. Inc. gra­phi­cs. speech. sou­nd. 573 Interactive Media (4) Prereq: VICO 570. exposes stu­dents to m­a­jor com­ponent m­edi­a­ i­nclu­di­ng com­pu­ter text. self­prom­oti­on. 2002. A flexi­ble form­a­t for exa­m­i­ni­ng cu­rrent a­nd fu­tu­re topi­cs i­n vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on. 2001. Introdu­cti­on to Web desi­gn wi­ll provi­de gra­du­a­te stu­dents wi­th a­n overvi­ew of Internet desi­gn a­nd u­ser­i­nterfa­ce. 2001.A. 1998. crea­ti­ve desi­gn. grou­p di­scu­ssi­ons. Inc. 514 Desktop Publishing (4) Prereq: perm­. a­nd li­ght i­n rela­ti­on to ca­ptu­ri­ng the essence of people a­nd ga­rm­ents. to pra­cti­ce the ski­lls essenti­a­l for the ta­sk. 1999. a­nd on the Internet. 528 527 526 Pa­rti­cu­la­r em­pha­si­s pla­ced on the professi­ona­l perform­a­nce i­n produ­ci­ng i­m­a­ges u­si­ng a­dva­nced equ­i­pm­ent a­nd techni­qu­es. 587 Advanced Photographic Reportage II (4) Prereq: VICO 586. photogra­phy. The goa­l of thi­s photojou­rna­li­sm­ cla­ss i­s to enga­ge stu­dents i­n the resea­rch a­nd i­m­a­gi­ni­ng processes necessa­ry to orga­ni­ze a­nd produ­ce i­n­depth photogra­phi­c covera­ge on selected topi­cs perti­nent to a­nd worthy of pu­bli­ca­ti­on i­n newspa­pers. Adva­nced cla­ss u­si­ng the Ma­ci­ntosh com­pu­ter a­nd produ­cti­on­qu­a­li­ty sca­nners a­s tools to crea­te com­posi­te a­nd a­ltered photogra­phi­c i­m­a­ges for crea­ti­ve a­nd i­llu­stra­ti­ve presenta­ti­on. An i­nvesti­ga­ti­on of the pri­nci­ples of stu­di­o m­a­na­gem­ent. 523 Publication Layout and Design (3) Prereq: JOUR 536. ethi­cs. a­nd vi­su­a­l lea­dershi­p i­n content ori­gi­na­ti­on. a­ni­m­a­ti­on. fi­eld resea­rch. 521 Documentary/Essay (5) Prereq: VICO 586. a­nd a­estheti­cs. a­nd only these fi­ve wi­ll cou­nt towa­rd you­r degree. stu­dents only. The vi­su­a­l presenta­ti­on of spa­ti­a­l i­nform­a­ti­on wi­th em­pha­si­s on desi­gn a­nd produ­cti­on techni­qu­es a­s they perta­i­n to newspa­pers a­nd m­a­ga­zi­nes. wri­ti­ng. 2004. a­nd jou­rna­li­sti­c i­nvesti­ga­ti­on of contem­pora­ry i­ssu­es. 2005. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2006. Professi­ona­ls vi­si­ti­ng ca­m­pu­s a­re a­lso a­sked to spea­k on topi­cs concerni­ng the vi­su­a­l com­m­u­ni­ca­ti­on professi­on. i­nternshi­ps. a­nd produ­cti­on. and Career Guidance Foundation. desi­gn. confi­gu­ra­ti­on. Use of a­ wi­de ra­nge of ski­lls to produ­ce a­ prototype m­a­ga­zi­ne pu­bli­ca­ti­on. The a­cti­ve lea­rni­ng cou­rse stru­ctu­re i­nclu­des worki­ng i­n a­ grou­p envi­ronm­ent where si­tu­a­ti­ons stress both effecti­ve wri­tten a­nd spoken ski­lls. Introdu­cti­on to pla­nni­ng. While CollegeSource®. Thi­s cla­ss wi­ll consi­st of rea­di­ngs. m­ovem­ent. Topi­cs i­nclu­de su­ch a­rea­s of ra­pi­d cha­nge a­s technology. 2007. crea­ti­on/ produ­cti­on of m­u­lti­m­edi­a­­ba­sed vi­su­a­ls a­nd a­u­di­o fi­les. peri­phera­ls. Thi­s docu­­m­enta­ry photojou­rna­li­sm­ cla­ss u­ses a­ wi­de ra­nge of photogra­phi­c m­a­teri­a­ls. Stu­dents gi­ven si­m­u­la­ti­ons ba­sed on a­ com­plete project concept tha­t reflects the rea­li­ti­es of worki­ng professi­ona­lly. the em­pha­si­s i­s on jou­rna­li­sti­c­ba­sed logi­c. Area­s of stu­dy i­nclu­de copyri­ght. Dea­ls wi­th su­ch topi­cs a­s ethi­cs. The goa­l of the cou­rse i­s to provi­de stu­dents wi­th the knowledge a­nd a­na­lyti­ca­l ski­lls. a­nd produ­cti­on techni­qu­es a­nd tools of i­ntera­cti­ve m­u­lti­m­edi­a­. 107 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Stu­dents wi­ll be requ­i­red to seek ou­t portra­i­tu­re su­bjects a­nd photogra­phs on loca­ti­on a­nd i­n the stu­di­o. 594 Small Systems Lighting (4) Thi­s cou­rse wi­ll explore the hi­story. 1996. Thi­s cou­rse helps stu­dents u­ndersta­nd a­nd pra­cti­ce the ski­lls necessa­ry to fu­ncti­on a­s pi­ctu­re edi­tors a­nd vi­su­a­l lea­ders i­n a­ jou­rna­li­sti­c envi­ronm­ent.

Successful completion of a written and oral comprehensive examination is required after most coursework is completed. Associate Dean Dianne Gut Associate Dean http://www. faculty recommendations and completion of at least nine hours of course credit.D. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.108 College of Education College of Education McCracken Hall Graduate study and research in the College of Education are designed to bridge the gap between theory and practice—between research and the educational and human problems that confront students. you must have a program of study planned and approved by a faculty advisor to meet your professional needs and objectives. Inc. curriculum workers. Inc. 2006. McCracken Hall 124. and other professionals in related fields. Interdisciplinary study is encouraged. 1995. before completing the doctoral dissertation. Full­time students can complete most master’s programs in a minimum of four academic quarters. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Detailed information concerning graduate programs is available from the Office of Student Services. Athens OH 45701­2979 or online at http://www. While CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. . All professional education programs are fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 1999. 2005. 2001. You are assisted throughout your program of study by a faculty advisor and a doctoral program committee. and online at http://www/ohio. Specific information regarding criteria for admission. 1996. 2002. 2000. 2007. Inc. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. is offered in the College of Education.ohio. Master’s students may attend full or part time. 1998. Admission is based on review of your progress. Ohio University.edu/education/ Doctoral Programs Advanced preparation leading to the Ph. 1998. While CollegeSource®. McCracken Hall 124. CollegeSource®. Inc. 1999. Doctoral programs require a three­quarter continuous residency on the Athens campus and can usually be completed in a minimum of three academic years. ohio. Master’s programs are offered in several areas of professional education: Department of Counseling and Higher Education College Student Personnel Counselor Education (school. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. There is no residency require­ ment for a master’s degree. 2006. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. depending on program requirements and. Doctoral candidates then submit a research proposal for review by the faculty chair and committee. and scholarships is available from the Office of Graduate Studies.edu/ education/. administrators. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1995.edu/ education/. Department of Educational Studies Computer Education and Technology Cultural Studies in Education Educational Administration Educational Research and Evaluation Department of Teacher Education Adolescent to Young Adult Education Curriculum and Instruction Mathematics Teaching at the Adolescent to Young Adult Level Middle Childhood Education Reading Education Special Education Tom Davis Interim Dean Glenn Doston Sr. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2003. you are expected to apply for admission to advanced studies after two quarters of coursework.ohio. teachers. 2005. financial assistance. and online at http://www. Field experiences and internships coupled with research integrate theory with practice. 1996. 1997. Master’s Programs To major in a given area. College of Education. or Ed. Following admission to a doctoral program. CollegeSource®. Inc. 2004. 2004. The Counselor Education Program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) and CORE. 2003.D. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2002. 2007. College of Education. College of Education. The minimum number of credit hours required will vary. community and rehabilitation counseling) Higher Education Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. when applicable.edu/education/. Specific admissions criteria and program requirements are available from the Office of Student Services. 1997. counselors. requirements for licensure. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2001.

teaching.D.a. Alternative admission may be based on the achievement of a compensating test score. Graduates function in a variety of roles. 2000.D. and School Counseling are offered leading to graduate degrees in Counselor Educa­ tion. other departments in the University. Alternative admission may be granted if you do not meet the required grade­ point average or test score on one of the required standardized tests. Athens OH 45701­2979. as well as graduates in such areas as psychology. middle. you must reapply for admission to a doctoral level of study through the Office of Graduate Student Services. 2002. 1998. colleges.D. Inc. telephone 740. Counselor Education (EDCE) Programs in Community Counseling. Ph.D) Educational Research and Evaluation (Ph. 2006. Further information regarding programs and admissions procedures is available from the Department of Counseling and Higher Education. Within these programs.) Higher Education (Ph. you will have met the academic requirements to become a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC).) Math Education (Ph. Rehabilitation Counseling. If you have not taken the GRE within the past five years. successful completion of an interview with program area faculty. note that this examina­ tion is administered on specified dates and that the interval between adminis­ tration and receipt of scores is ordinarily six weeks. 1995. applicants are required to take a writing exercise at the time of the admission interview. Inc. in private practice.) Department of Educational Studies Cultural Studies Instructional Technology (Ph. agency work. 1999. as follows: Department of Counseling and Higher Education Counselor Education (Ph. and community agencies. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.9 overall (4. 1999. and Career Guidance Foundation. or secondary schools. arrange to complete the application process well in advance of the quarter in which you expect to begin study.D. The Community Counseling Program is designed for those interested in profes­ sional counseling services in a community mental health center. college counseling. McCracken Hall. Inc. 2005. and score performance on standardized tests. on the last 90 quarter hours (4. You may apply for graduate assistantships and fellowships.25 g. consultation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. To pursue graduate study in the Department of Counseling and Higher Education you must meet established graduate requirements and be accepted for admission by the relevant program faculty. you are required to submit scores (verbal plus quantitative) on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).D. While CollegeSource®. The program meets academic require­ ments necessary to become licensed in Ohio as a Professional Counselor (PC) with the option of completing the additional academic hours for a clinical endorsement in mental health counsel­ ing (Ohio Professional Clinical Counselor. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.0 scale) or a 3. Ohio University. and with additional clinical courses you will be eligible for the PC license. and Career Guidance Foundation.D.) Middle Level Education (Ph. 2000. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®.D. 2003.0 scale). and research. 2004. 1995. 1997. an autobiographical statement and/or resume. While CollegeSource®. 2006. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 2003. It also meets academic and experience requirements for becoming a National Certified Counselor (NCC).College of Education Doctoral degree programs are offered within each of the College’s three departments. education.4440. chemical dependency. including administration. You may also take this exam by computer at selected locations for a faster turnaround time. Inc. and human ser­ vices. If you are considering graduate work in CHE.) Note: If you have earned a master’s degree in education at Ohio University and plan to take additional coursework in education. you may emphasize courses and fieldwork lead­ ing to a professional counseling career in elementary. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Inc. Doctoral­level work also leads to supervisory and university faculty positions. Upon completion of the program.593.p. or such factors as extensive work experi­ ence or outstanding recommendations.D. Applicants at all levels must submit letters of recommendation and an autobiography. 2004. 1998. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. business and industry. 2001. Criteria for admission to a doctoral program in the College of Education include evidence of continuing potential for academic and professional success as reflected in prior grade­point averages at master’s and bachelor degree levels of study. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2002.) Social Studies Education (Ph. . Inc. CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and/or an invited interview. or other institutions or agencies outside the University. or private practice. 2005. and Career Guidance Foundation.D. and may include the quality of evidence provided in letters of recommendation. 2001. 2007. counseling. or in other agencies or business settings that provide health and social services. Additional requirements at point­of­application vary by the specific program. 1996. If you are applying for a doctoral program.) Department of Teacher Education Curriculum and Instruction (Ph. 2007. in addition to providing flexibility to meet specific student interests and competency needs.ohio. The Rehabilitation Counseling Program meets the needs of personnel presently employed in public and private rehabilitation agencies. PCC). Programs are designed to meet state licensing requirements where applicable. results of the GRE (verbal and quantitative) are required of all applicants.D.) Educational Administration (Ed. you will do research or be assigned teaching responsibilities in the College of Education.edu/education/ The Department of Counseling and Higher Education (CHE) prepares students for professional positions in schools. supervision. 109 Department of Counseling and Higher Education http://www. and may be required to appear for interviews.D. If you are an applicant for a master’s degree program and do not have a 2. sociology.) Reading and Language Arts (Ph.) Special Education (Ph. and Career Guidance Foundation. 1996. 1997. CollegeSource®. If you are accepted for a graduate assistantship.

1998.D. 2000. and group lab experience. Y. D. Sp. and the normal functioning of body systems. Inc. 529 Job Placement Theory and Techniques (4) Provides rehabilitation counselor trainees with requisite skills to perform job analyses. group leadership. 1999. program planning. multiple approaches to provision of guidance services with emphasis upon role of elementary school counselors in child study counseling. Implications of life­ span development issues for counselors. conduct job development activities that affect successful job placement for individuals with disabilities. counselor education. ethics. Inc. Sp. scope. . most helpful. W.D. contact the Coordinator for Counselor Education. Study of problems. Community counseling (M. are accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. consultation. vocational. psychosocial and vocational implications. to consult the credentialing agencies to determine their exact requirements. 2001. Topics include history. Affective. consultation. 1997. Olsheski. Su. students are admitted each year. scope. 1997. 2007. theoretical foundations. 1995. Be aware that credentialing agencies periodically change their qualification requirements. lectures. W. Testing portion provides introduction to intelligence. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Application and evaluation of techniques to modify behavior that involve counselor clients and the counselor in the behavior change process with effective communication emphasized. physiology. community. Y. 2004. Y. and the Behavior Change Process (5) Theories of behavior­change process in educational. Hazler. place of rehabili­ tation counseling in community. Those interested in school counseling may be required to have teaching certification or licensure and teaching experience for work in Ohio and many other states. and business settings. and nature of elementary school guidance. For further information. Inc. CollegeSource®. depend­ ing upon the area of concentration. CollegeSource®. and Career Guidance Foundation. The array of courses included in the curriculum may be used to meet the requirements for professional certification or licensure. Approximately 25 to 35 M. 1998. Olsheski. 2000. Academic credentials. 1996. Olsheski. review and/or implementation of career­related research. 1996. Inc. 2003.110 College of Education The School Counseling Program is for those who wish to practice as elemen­ tary or secondary school counselors. Many core courses are offered during the summer. and all College of Education programs. Olsheski. counseling process. 2006.D. Inc. It meets the academic and counseling experience requirements to receive state Department of Education certification as a school counselor in Ohio and most other states. demonstrations. Y. 555 Counseling Theory and Techniques I (5) Didactic phase includes a review of the basic counseling competencies applicable to all theoretical approaches. and the Ph. exploration of career education Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and business settings. sociology. 1995. and the role of the rehabilitation counselor in understanding the dynamics of disability. 2001. Y. Inc. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. Theories. 550 Counseling in Groups (5) Introduction to group processes and their application in a variety of settings. including counselor education. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling (4) History and development of counseling of individuals with disabilities. All degree programs in counselor education are nationally accredited. 2007. Y. including diagnostic interviewing. 528 Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (4) Explores the emotional and social factors contributing to disabilities. 2004. coordination of services.). counseling. and many late afternoon and evening classes are available during the regular academic year to accommodate students with full­time employment. 530 Foundations of Counseling (4) Rationale. Issues in counseling and counseling needs throughout the life span will be explored. theory. The lab phase of the course allows students to Career Development: Research and Theory (4) Prereq: 520 or 530 or 541. program in counselor education and supervision are accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP). Y. rating scales. 522 and counseling opportunities. observational systems. achievement. and cognitive­oriented approaches to counseling also discussed from a general perspective. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. community. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. suggest job modifications or restructuring. and research and evaluation. The doctoral program in counseling is psychological in content. 2002. and communications. and relevant practical experience. review programs which develop career planning/ life components. Teaching. and nature of counseling services in educational. business. 545 Counseling Over the Life Span (4) Prereq: 520. Su. education. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 525. practices. Ph. however. and ethical responsibilities in the field of counseling. Hazler. exper­ ience. methods. including psychology. two quarters of required internship (600 total work experience hours) provide extensive experience. research methodology. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and curriculum development for diverse populations. Y. Su. specializations are available in counseling. Such accreditation can be advantageous in gaining professional credentials and employment after graduation. 1999. While CollegeSource®. 521 Counseling. Other topics include philosophy. Y. the interaction of these factors in the rehabilitation process. Y. community. Ohio licensing as a PC or PCC requires an additional 18 hours for a total of 90 quarter hours. group dynamics and counseling. experience. interactional analysis. issues. F. Along with a counseling practicum (120 work experience hours). behavioral.). While CollegeSource®. 541. school counseling (M. F. Techniques and strategies for counselors to use in dealing with the needs of persons of different ages will be covered. Emphasis on basic appraisal techniques. and curriculum development. and compatibility of personal characteristics and professional goals with advanced study in the field of counseling and counselor education are all taken into consideration in the evaluation process.Ed. research and evaluation. supervision. and nature. legislative aspects. classroom group guidance and coordination. They are designed on the basis of the specialty sought and the background you bring to the program. 530. 2002. F. W. techniques. Concepts of reliability and validity as applicable to appraising human characteristics set stage for considering critical role that clinical judgment plays in professional helping. Undergraduates interested in such work will find knowledge in the areas of the behavioral and social sciences. Hazler. Counselor Education Courses (EDCE) 520 Elementary School Counseling (4) Rationale. 2005. F. Olsheski. and overview of agency activities. The courses of study combine personal growth. It is your responsibility. Su. 2006. Master’s degree programs consist of a minimum of 72 quarter hours of study and can be completed in six to eight quarters of full­time attendance. students and 8 to 14 Ph. rehabilitation program is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).Ed. 2005. and processes of career development for varied settings: school.Ed.Ed. You may apply for admission at any time. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Su. aptitude. W. trends. and educational and psychological testing. but priority will be given to those applications completed prior to March 1 since admissions and financial aid decisions are made early in the spring for summer or fall quarter entry. and personality (objective and projective) measures. and Career Guidance Foundation. multiple approaches to provision of such services with emphasis on role of counselor in needs assessment. The program requires a minimum of 135 quarter hours beyond a bachelor’s degree and 90 quarter hours beyond a master’s. 525 526 Medical Issues in Rehabilitation (4) Overview of basic anatomy. and also meets academic requirements for PC and NCC. the M. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and perceptual. 531 Appraisal I (4) Prereq: 520 or 530 or 541. Emphasis on functional aspects of disability. and importance of incorporating a sense of wellness. and Career Guidance Foundation.

W. Course requirements will include on­site supervision by staff. On­ site supervision by staff is required. Doctoral seminar providing students with preparation for in­depth study of counseling in educational. theory. community. business. Inc. Doston. community. are part of the experience. etc. Methods. Sp. D. 623C Special Topics Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling (1–3. counseling services that promote career and vocational development and research. mental. 1996. 735 Counseling the Exceptional (4) Prereq: advanced standing. consulting with other professionals. and community settings. max 15) Prereq: advanced standing. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. rehabilitation counseling. family. Su. D. 700B Advanced Practicum: Community (5–15. 1998. F. Biofeed­ back. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Sp. F. Counseling. and racial differences and similarities in American society.. max 18) Study of human sexuality and stereotypical attitudes. and mental health facilities. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. and business settings. critiquing audio­ and videotapes of their counseling sessions. with particular attention to personality measures. role playing. These include individual psychology. 700A Advanced Counseling Practicum: School (5–15. Student should have a clear idea of type of field experience desired and required setting for the experience before enrollment. Students must submit an application for admis­sion to the practicum the quarter before expected enrollment. Sp. Lecture. participating in practical seminars. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. cognitive intervention. D. etc. Davis. child care. knowledge of developmental periods of aging. Provides an opportunity to familiarize oneself with the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. and Research (1–3. Y.. W. 1995. F. Su. Alternative treatment and planning are reviewed. etc. 722 Career Development and Counseling (4) Prereq: advanced standing.. and private practice. Olsheski. 720 Advanced Seminar in Counseling (2–15) Prereq: advanced standing. Su. max 12) Study and interpretation of scientific research on community mental health or selected gov­ ernment agencies. 623D Special Topics Seminar: Assertiveness Training (1–3. and implementation of assertive behavior. and Career Guidance Foundation. and leisure settings for working successfully with America’s multicultural population. max 15) Prereq: advanced standing. 1997. max 15) Prereq: advanced standing. 710 Counseling Internship (8–16) Prereq: advanced M. 2000. 2005. research. and sources of stress and distress. F. D. 2002. reality. Hazler. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Preparing case notes. While CollegeSource®. 660 Chemical Dependency Counseling (3) Focuses on the addictive process. W. Preparing case notes.g. and psychotherapy methods and techniques will be demonstrated. F. business. critiquing audio­ and videotapes of their counseling sessions. F. 732 Advanced Appraisal (5) Prereq: 531 and practicum. 652 Laboratory: Group Counseling (5) Prereq: 550 Advanced study of group theory. max 18) Provides overview of holistic approach to well­ being.. and multimodel theories of counseling. F. Students conduct supervised counseling sessions. Attention to goal setting. 695 Thesis (2–10) F. 2003. Y. and vocational school settings. max 18) Analysis of factors contributing to marital and family dysfunction. Y. Beamish. normal and dysfunctional physical.College of Education practice the counseling competencies addressed in the classroom. Specific applications in occupational and life settings suggested. Preparing case notes. 2001. training and development. and techniques are examined as they apply to various settings. 2007. and applications. Focuses on preparing professionals in educational. 736 Counseling and Behavioral Aspects of Special Populations (4) Prereq: advanced standing. D. Y. and each student is expected to develop applied expertise with a method of each type. and emotional development. These skills have generic application for helping professionals in educational. Group dynamics. perm. and understanding sexual dysfunction and sexual adequacy. critiquing audio­ and videotapes of their counseling sessions. 2002. Students must submit an application for admission to the practicum the quarter before expected enrollment. and private practice settings. Advanced appraisal techniques reviewed. Special attention devoted to intelligence theory and tests (e. Sweeney. 1996. The course content can be considered for a variety of work settings such as business and industry. W. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and professional practice. Davis. 700C Advanced Practicum: College (5–15. 623G Special Topics Seminar: Human Relations Skills for a Multicultural Society (1–3) Provides for understanding of human relations skills Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Emphasis on differentiating nonassertive. 570 Organizational Theory and Techniques in Counseling and Personnel Services (4) Prereq: 520 or 530 or 541. Y. and report writing and communication of appraisal results to other professionals. and Self­Control (1–3. F. Inc. Methods and practices in career planning and decision making. Sp. Su. Y. Intervention and treatment of special populations such as 111 610 Field Experience in Counseling (1–12) Supervised field work in educational or community setting selected with regard to professional needs and interests of individual student. Students must submit an application for admission to the practicum the quarter before expected enrollment. Leinbaugh. W. max 18) Focuses on theory and strategies of assertiveness training. 623H Special Topics Seminar (1–3. D. and Career Guidance Foundation. W. rehabilitation. . religious. Actual case appraisals analyzed and critiqued. Identification of need for counseling and human resource development programs in the workplace. community. Sp. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. F. 2007. 1999. participating in practica seminars. basic gerontological counseling concepts. critiquing audio­ and videotapes of their counseling sessions. Students conduct supervised counseling sessions. 1997. Su. Su. D. 2005. 623E Special Topics Seminar: Counseling and Human Sexuality (1–3. developing and imple­ menting counseling services for exceptional individuals in educational. stages and symp­ toms of chemical abuse. Inc. Y. and aggressive behavior. D. Sp. etc. W. are part of the experience. 638 Gerontological Counseling (3) Attitude awareness regarding older persons. D. 2004. and assertive behavior. A culminating experience providing counseling and related services to clients in educational. consulting with other professionals. Students conduct supervised counseling sessions. W. and career development issues addressed. 691 Seminar in Education (4) Prereq: 35 grad hrs. Y. consulting with other professionals. 2006. and intervention and treatment strategies for addiction. Services may include functions related to special problems and populations. max 18) Theory. F. Development and imple­ mentation of selected counseling models and strategies commonly used in working with couples and families. Sp. Sp. community mental health agencies. 620 Readings and Research: School Counseling (1–5. Inc. evaluating consequences. Y. CollegeSource®. behavioral. racial. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. regularly scheduled on­campus conferenc­ es. Y. F. and other groups. Stanford­Binet and Wechsler instruments): case data interpretation.Ed. nature. alternative behavior. 700D Advanced Practicum: Rehabilitation (5–15. D. 623F Special Topics Seminar: Adlerian Theory. awareness of sexual abuse and violence. 664 Mental Health Consultation (3) Introduction to the theory and process of mental health consultation as practiced in such settings as social service. 731 Appraisal II (5) Prereq: 531. and progress and terminal reports. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2003. 662 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in Counseling (4) Emphasis on diagnostic and treatment process facing the mental health professional. secondary. The lab phase allows practice of theoretical approaches addressed in the classroom. participating in practica seminars. Readings and Research in Community Counseling (1–5. cultural and value differences among ethnic. health maintenance organizations. schools. effects of distress upon mind­body systems. prisons. Sp. research. employee assistance programs. career patterns and theories. standing. Focus on skill development. 2001. EDRE 501. demonstration. and leisure settings. and business settings. rational emotive. 1999. consulting with other professionals. 2006. Su. ethnic. 621 623B Special Topics Seminar: Stress. Sp. Davis. are part of the experience. W. Characteristics of exceptional individuals. along with regular on­campus conferences. 655 Counseling Theory and Techniques II (5) Prereq: 555. Students conduct supervised counseling sessions. Independent and directed projects. Employee assistance programs. Doston. Seminar topics include areas of study in human potential. 685 Multicultural Education (4) Provides understanding of cultural. W. Y. Didactic phase of the course focuses upon specific theoretical orientations of counseling. D. W. max 12) Study and interpretation of professional literature on counseling and other guidance services provided in elementary. Y. and applications of individual psychology in educational. Independent and directed projects. F. max 15) Prereq: advanced standing. as well as two­year colleges. as well as to interpret and make diagnostic assessment with a confederate client. 2000. While CollegeSource®. community. Both objective and projec­ tive techniques considered. educational institu­ tions. Students must submit an application for admission to the practicum the quarter before expected enrollment. 1995. Inc. Sp. gestalt. assertive. integration of data from a variety of appraisal procedures and professional communication of results emphasized. community. participating in practica seminars. 2004. W. Su. Y. attainment of basic knowledge. and skills in applying knowledge of aging and counseling to work with older persons are emphasized. are part of the experience. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. F. 1998. Davis. CollegeSource®. Inc. A culminating evaluative experience involving the scholarly application of research. and group lab experiences. and Career Guidance Foundation. leadership styles. max 18) Prereq: perm. work. and methods that are important for developing physical and mental relaxation.. consultation. for effective interpersonal communication. Preparing case notes.

and other noneducational settings. recent research. Review and critique of papers on selected literature are expected. 2002. Students in this program are involved in direct services. and Career Guidance Foundation. F. and rights of persons receiving counseling. Sp. Specific applications in occupational and life settings suggested. W. 2004. F. Stewart. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. development. nature and sources of stress and distress. Beamish. 740 Family Counseling Practicum (2–5) Prereq: 623C. Su. and human service workers reviewed. and use of staff meetings for counselee study. and local statutes relevant to professional functioning. Davis. Inc. rehabilitation counseling. Inc. 755 Counseling Theory Advanced (5) Theories and systems of psychology as applied to counseling and psychotherapy. Provides an understanding of college student development theories and how they are applied in student affairs. These skills have generic applica­ tion for helping professionals in educational. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Doctoral programs emphasize the study. 821G Special Topics Seminar: Human Relations Skills for a Multicultural Society (1–3. 2007. and leisure time settings. Biofeed­ back. Other activities may include student and staff evaluation. 759 Counselor Supervision (2–4) Prereq: adv standing and/or clinical counseling field exp. F. and behavioral disorders. Indivi dual readings and research on selected group counseling models. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 823 825 Colloquium (1. consultation. Personnel Services (4) Law and ethics considered for educational and mental health contexts. emotional.Ed. 1997. Su. Sp. D. and education of pre­ and in­service counselors. and current issues and research. 1996. Counseling. Sp. While CollegeSource®. 1999. and society. Inc. Provides an understanding of college environment theories and their application. 1998. Includes supervising of. mentally. which are educational and developmental in nature. Su. Review and critique of papers on selected literature are expected. D. alternative behavior. values. Review and critique papers on selected literature are expected. 1996. Y. community. awareness of sexual abuse and violence. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. max 18) Provides for understanding of human relations skills for effective interpersonal communication. critical cases. Davis. 2006. 2004. Individualized project. College Student Personnel Courses (EDCP) 520 Introduction to College Student Affairs (4)Introduction to field of student personnel including history and development of the profession. Review and critique of papers on selected literature are expected. Students progress through the degree levels from M. Inc. CollegeSource®. . counseling and intervention for disenfranchised. and program management. max 18) Focuses on theory and strategies of assertiveness training. max 3) Doctoral­level seminars to examine contempo­ rary issues in counselor education. Young. Higher Education The area of higher education consists of graduate programs in College Stu­ dent Personnel and Higher Education Administration. Master’s programs focus on the development and application of skills. 2000. 2003. F. consulting with. Y. Y. staff consultation. psychologists. 2003. Integration of theories and methods of counseling and psychotherapy to assessment and diagnosis. religious. 2001. D. and Self­Control (1–3. and evaluation of progress and outcomes. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Sp. and other groups. The deadline for completed applications is February 1. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. but also in business and industry. or physically disabled or incarcerated. 2007. Individualized readings and study of group counseling theory and techniques. evaluating consequences. Doston. and research related to individual psychology and its applications to educational. and functions of student affairs professionals. D. Stewart. family. Development and implementa­ tion of selected counseling models and strategies commonly used with couples and families. and study of cultural and socio­logical influences on culturally different and implications for counseling. effects of distress upon mind­body systems. Beamish. and testing of theoretical concepts. F. social and government agencies. normal and dysfunctional physical and emotional development. D. and implementation of assertive behavior. while increasing integration among the components of the individual. Y. work. Inc. max 18) Overview of holistic approach to well­being. Sweeney. Application of concepts of human development to personal growth and career­life planning. and issues and trends. attitudes. Federal. Legal and Ethical Aspects of Counseling Community. or Ph. organization of personnel programs. Adult learning occurs not only in traditional institutions of higher education. and/or school settings. max 18) Theory. Supervised counseling experiences with families. organi­ zation. Court decisions. and other agencies devoted to adult learning. 821E Special Topics Seminar: Counseling and Human Sexuality (1–3. and psychotherapy methods and techniques will be demonstrated. 762 Advanced Practicum in Specially Oriented Community Services (5) Doctoral­level practicum and seminar providing in­depth practical experience in selected human services in varied colleges and universities. Focus on skill development. max 18) Study of human sexuality and stereotypical attitudes. role­playing. Y. Review and critique of papers on selected literature are expected. 1999. Intern works full­time in professional setting consistent with program emphasis for at least two quarters of full­time work or three quarters of half­time work. selection. attainment of basic knowledge. Methods. 821C. goal­ setting. and aggressive behavior. and psychological services considered. 821D Special Topics Seminar: Assertiveness Training (1–3. Review of innovative methods. and private practice settings. etc. roles. W. and methods important for developing physical and mental relaxation. Inc. including those who are emotionally. business. and skills needed by entry­ level student affairs practitioners. Attention to goal setting. Guidelines for ethical behavior in delivery of services. max 15) Supervised experiences in group counseling in a variety of community mental health. Y. D. Advanced Readings and Research in Counseling and Student Personnel (1–10) Prereq: advanced standing. Su. 2006. The master’s degree is a two­year program that follows national standards for professional preparation for student affairs practitioners. max 18) Other seminar topics include areas of study in human potential.D. 1995. community. and/or supervised counseling experience required. and legislation analyzed and interpreted. 1997. Use of case study to demonstrate knowledge in the treatment of selected mental. 821F Special Topics Seminar: Adlerian Theory. Advanced Laboratory in Applied Group Dynamics (5) Group experience as method of studying and applying selected theoretical models of group counseling. College Campus/Student Environment: From Theory to Practice (4) Prereq: 521. CollegeSource®. 2002. Independent studies and specialized projects for doctoral students.112 College of Education substance abusers. program design for pre­ and in­service training. 750 Practicum in Group (5. While CollegeSource®. Participants experience membership and leadership roles. business. W. max 18) Analysis of factors contributing to marital and family dysfunction. and Research (1–3. 521 College Student Development: Theory with Practice (4) Prereq: 520. 821H Special Topics Seminar (1–3. and Career Guidance Foundation. These programs differentiate applica­ tion and theoretical conceptualizations according to degree level. and understanding sexual dysfunction and sexual adequacy. 522 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and health care organizations. and Career Guidance Foundation. the military. state. 1998. procedures. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. cognitive intervention. Emphasis on differentiating nonassertive. 2005. Sp. assertive. 763 800 Internship (10–15) Prereq: perm quarter prior to enrollment. D. 760 Counselor Education (4) Counselor education history and development including standards. F. treatment. D. The primary mission of this area is to prepare people for leadership roles in colleges. community agencies. 761 Practicum in Counselor Education (5–15) Experience in program development and professional counselor preparation activities. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. cultural and value difference among ethnic. F. methods. and retention policies and practices. Hazler. 2000. F. university. racial. D. 2005. Beamish. 852 895 Dissertation (2–15) F. D. and Career Guidance Foundation. Students participate in both didactic and lab activities. D. Internship may be taken at pre­ or postdoctoral level. College Student Personnel (EDCP) The college student personnel program focuses upon the knowledge. 821B Special Topics Seminar: Stress. 821C Special Topics Seminar: Marriage and Family Counseling (1–3. Offers advanced graduate students theories and models of clinical supervision used in the counseling profession. Code of ethics for counselors. Su. 1995. 2001. universities. Review and critique of papers on selected literature are expected. F. W. and assertive behavior presented.

721 College Student­Environmental Interactions (4) Prereq: advanced standing. Present status of various types of institutions. Su. questionnaires. directed research project in area of college student personnel. W. CollegeSource®. current practice and potential improvement of college teaching. Stewart. regional campuses. and adult education programs. Young. A critical analysis of the role of higher education in contemporary American society. 2001. and Career Guidance Foundation. W. Stewart. Sp. F. engage in library research. and evaluation methods used in the development of holistic learning in higher education. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 1998. 2001.. Finance and Budgeting in Higher Education (4) The course is an overview of the principles and practices of financing institutions of higher education. Principles of long­range planning. 2002. Young. 803 820 College Student Affairs Administration and Organization Theories and Research (4) Study of selected theories of administration. 687 History and Philosophy of American Higher Education (4) Prereq: 588 or equivalent. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. In administration. Inc. Students master skills necessary to understand the use of computers and new technology in their field. policy perspectives. and the nature of students and the collegiate environment. 691 Seminar in Education (4) Prereq: 35 grad. F. F. analysis. Young. 722 Advanced Seminar in Student Personnel: Current Issues (2. Special problems related to admini­ stration of community colleges. 689 Legal Issues in Higher Education (5) Deals with the history.. W. F. Inc. . Sp. and practices of leadership. Young. and research and graduate education missions. skills. Moden. Cutright. 544J Supervision (2) Prereq: 520. 2000. 2004. Independent. F. W. 1999. The course will also focus on the structure. Young. 603 Practicum in Student Personnel (3–5) Must be taken 3 times for total of 12 hrs. Administration and Organization of Student Affairs Programs (4) Prereq: 520. Sp. Institutional Research and Self­Study in Higher Education (4) Prereq: advanced standing. faculty. Problems of institu­ tional research office including institutional need and methods of data collection and reporting. Required coursework exa­ mines the background of higher educa­ tion. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. decision making. with a particular focus on gender. and staff. race. Study of critical legal and ethical issues that student affairs practitioners confront. Inc. Sp. W. and Career Guidance Foundation. organizational patterns. W. and Career Guidance Foundation. Explores the philosophical base. The course considers basic legal relationships involving: governance. 1995. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and sexual orientation. Conley. Sp. F. W. 544C Residential Campus Issues (2) Prereq: 520. the study of internal organizational standards. Sp. Included are examinations of current and ideal roles and of the factors that influence the evolution of American higher education. Stewart. Ongoing. federal and state regulations. F. Young. and on approaches for improving academic programs and support services. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. F. 544K Two­Year College Students (2) Prereq: 520. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Sp. 544E Assessment (2) Prereq: 520. process. 544D Legal Ethical Issues (2) Prereq: 520. Research and guest speakers used extensively. A study of the principles. Critical study of factors and issues involved in curriculum develop­ment. CollegeSource®. Conley. 781 Directed Experiences in College Instruction (1–10) Individualized program under guidance of instructor or department which would include field study and experience in college teaching. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2006. Young. College Student Development: Theories and Research (4) In­depth study of the major theories of college student development that are used in college student affairs. 1996. 2002. the comprehensive university. Inc. 544F Student Learning Imperatives (2) Prereq: 520. 544G International Student Services (2) Prereq: 520. 743 Advanced Practicum in College Student Personnel (3–6) Doctoral­level practicum and seminar providing in­depth experiences in selected student affairs offices on various campuses. Su. development of the profession. 1999.S. 2000. emphasizes assessment of environment for purposes of changing environment to foster student development. and roles. Cutright. and the foreign student experience in institutions of higher education. While CollegeSource®. Sp. While CollegeSource®. Sp. and personnel styles of effective supervision. 1996. the program assists students in examining pedagogy and curriculum development on the collegiate level. 2007. components. Su. Stewart. professional develop­ ment. W. 890 Advanced Readings and Research in College Student Personnel (2–6) Independent studies and specialized projects for doctoral students. 544H Wellness Issues of College Students (2) Prereq: 520. development. functions. An introduction to the budgeting processes and issues related to student affairs programs. 690 Issues in Higher Education (1–9) Prereq: 590. Analysis of theories of multicultural student development in a broad spectrum of areas. Young. EDRE 501. organization. 544B Budget Management (2) Prereq: 520. Stewart. and current status of legal issues in higher education. and write a substantial scholarly paper. and practices of health education and wellness in regard to the development of college students. W. 782 Curriculum Development in Higher Education (4) Prereq: advanced standing. Young. 2005. Conley. and skills of building institutional budgets. W. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. In college teaching. interpretation.College of Education 523 Multicultural Student Development (4) Prereq: 521. Young. Stewart. 2003. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. and administration to student affairs. Sp. 2005. An exploration of the 778 Assessment and Evaluation (4) Provides students with an understanding of the principles and practices that are associated with assessment in higher education. Cutright. interviews. Theories of multicultural development for individuals and organizations also will be considered. Young. 544L Computer Applications and New Technology (2) Prereq: 520. Stewart. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. events and concepts that have shaped American higher education. and issues in the profession. functions. 688 Contemporary Higher Education (4) Prereq: 588 or equivalent. Study of the role of assessment in student affairs administration. 783 784 Practicum in Higher Education Administration (3–6) Practice in working under supervision in offices in the university and other institutions of higher education. and synthesis of professional literature on college student person­ nel. the functions and services performed. hrs. 695 Thesis (2­10) 113 Higher Education (EDHE) Higher education focuses on adminis­ tration and teaching. F. Focus is on the evolution of the undergraduate college. 2003. 1997. Ping. Study of theories related to leadership development and student organizations. Types of curricula and underlying philosophies. Students must submit a proposal to the instructor by the ninth week of the quarter prior to the quarter enrollment. management styles and practices. Focuses on the rationale for foreign student services. relationship with students. Provides the opportunity to develop knowledge about concerns of residential students. Moden. Young. Relates theories. Sp. Inc. Dressel. 620 Readings and Research in Student Personnel (1–12) Survey. Emphasizes application in higher education settings. Stewart. 1997. 589 Community Colleges (4) Prereq: 590. and the principles of finance and governance. vocational and technical colleges. F. and liability issues. Future trends and several models are included. Students choose area of study. Sp. Inc. 544A Leadership Issues of College Students (2) Prereq: 520. The study of practices in the two­ year college setting. Focuses on the reasons for the development of the current assessment movement. Supervised experiences in offices of the university or of neighboring educational institutions. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Explores several person­ environmental theories. Curriculum research and evaluation in higher education. organization. etc. Introduces students to concepts. F. W. up­to­date treatment of significant developments in higher education. Su. Coursework provides an opportunity to examine the theory and practice of college teaching. 1998. 622 720 College Student Affairs: Theories and Research (4) Introduction of college student affairs field including history. 2004. Higher Education Courses (EDHE) 588 Introduction to American Higher Education (4) Background and growth of higher education in the U. 779 780 Dynamics of College Teaching (4) Examination of the intent. and leadership with specific application to student affairs operations in higher education. Moden. 2006. 1995. max 8) Seminar format concerned with specific professional issue each quarter. The course focuses on issues of retention and campus involvement. Young. the program focuses on preparing indi­ viduals for leadership positions in higher education. Emphasis on understanding and critiquing the theories and related research. Sp.

certifi­ cation and tenure. (May be repeated for credit. 2006. 604 611 Educational Law (5) Prereq: 601. Sp.. Explores public and private policy questions about the success of contemporary higher education. State program of education. staff development. educational organization. 2007. 690 Research in Educational Administration (1–6) Prereq: 601. development of problem situations and simulations of practical problem­solving techniques. Su. For more information about programs. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. uni­ versities. The academic specialties of the department faculty and the courses they teach are interdisciplinary in nature and relate to programs across the entire College of Education. case. Ohio University. social­political forces. models of communication. 631 Personnel Administration in Education (4) Prereq: 601. and federal programs of financial support for education. and writes a substantial. F. CollegeSource®. W. The program is committed to an ethic of leadership that is attentive to the human side of school change. Inc. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 895 Dissertation (2­15) other education agencies. While CollegeSource®. Educational Administration Courses (EDAD) 592A­Z Workshop for School Leaders (1­4) Designed to provide practicing school leaders with short courses. U. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Organization and implementation of personnel functions. technology in teaching and learning. Su. 2007. engaging. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and secondary schools in actual job setting and simulated settings. 1995. 2001. and media in effective public relations. Examines the economic and social benefits for individual citizens and for society as a whole. and Career Guidance Foundation. Administration of Education in Other Countries (4) Prereq: 601. It considers the evaluation and selection of instructional programs. instructional leadership. and approaches to the professional development of teachers. Emphasizing the knowledge. W. Introduction to Educational Administration (4) Nature and critical tasks of educational administration. theories. . and Career Guidance Foundation. 695 D. questionnaires. McCracken Hall. Athens OH 45701­2979. F. Cutright. and sports administration. 1996. 2003. The Educational Administration Program offers graduate degrees at the master’s and doctoral levels as well as coursework required for Ohio licensure as an elementary­middle or middle­high school principal or as a superintendent. W. W. advising. Individual research studies. 642 The Role of the Principal in Instruction (4) This course examines the role of principal in instructional supervision. educational finance as type of public finance. 1997. Su. Covers organizational structure. The program places special emphasis on rural and small schools. Student chooses area of study. interviews. statutory. and decision making in educational organizations. 691 Seminar in Education (4) Prereq: 35 grad. Sp. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1995. Policy perspectives in higher education. processes. engages in library research. educational research and evaluation. purposes. higher education administration. Areas of concentration include: (A) School Business Functions. and Career Guidance Foundation. 671 Community Education (4) Introduction to philosophy of community education with emphasis on role of school administrator in conceptualizing philosophy and then taking leadership in developing and implementing community education programs. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. grounding leadership practice in a thoughtful appreciation of the context in which schooling takes place. 2002. assistance programs for educational administra­ tion in developing nations. Leadership theories and practices. (May be repeated for credit. Department of Educational Studies. F. 1999. inviting schools where administrators. organizational structure. and summer institutes directed toward their identified needs. preparation. and challenge. Students must submit a proposal to the instructor by the ninth week of the quarter prior to the quarter of enrollment. 1997. 2004. cultural studies of education. Focus on internal management issues and practices. EDRE 501. and secondary school administration. 2005. Readings and Research in Higher Education (1–3) Independent study and specialized research projects for advanced students in field of higher education. Sp. and conditions of service for people in the organization. 703 Conflict Management in Educational Administration (4) Theories. Focuses on understanding conflict 731 Educational Administration (EDAD) The Educational Administration Program at Ohio University prepares individuals for leadership positions in K­12 schools and Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. and strategies for managing conflict. in­ service training. 661 Public Relations in Education (4) Principles. Human Behavior in Educational Organizations (4) Provides potential leaders of educational institutions with the theoretical knowledge and skills necessary to function effectively within the human element of educational organizations. concepts. program organization.) F. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation.. teacher appraisal. teaching. 641 The Principalship—Skill Competencies (4) Prereq: 9 hrs incl 601. and (C) Superintendency.S. CollegeSource®. (B) Principalship. Su. professional opportunity. and students work democratically to promote academic excellence. hrs. staff selection. staff procurement. 2001. F. elementary. 1998. and evaluation. workshops. Conley. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. development. leadership. scholarly paper. teachers. state. and research. Su.114 College of Education 785 Organization and Governance of Higher Education (4) In­depth study of internal organizational patterns and structure of a variety of institutions of higher learning. state responsibility. School/ community organization. national problems in education. 621 Educational Finance (5) Examines economics and education. F. agents.ohio. and control of education in other countries. Inc. W. the program fosters a vision of humane. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. While CollegeSource®. 1999. problems and issues. 603 Technology for Administrative Decision Making (4) This course prepares aspiring administrators to use various technologies including telecommunications and information systems to enrich curriculum and instruction as well as to manage the business functions of schools and districts. examples from public school administration. Sp. 2006. attitudes. 702 Thesis (2–10) State and National Administration of Education (4) Prereq: 601. F.) W. and common law affecting schools and school personnel with special reference to Ohio school law. etc. Sp. attitude change. College of Education. 823 890 Special Topic Seminar (1­4) Seminar treatment of areas of current or topical interest in field of higher education. The faculty work in close collaboration with the other two departments in curriculum planning. 1998. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2000. personal assessment. 2005. and practices of responsive leadership. techniques of supervision. Coursework and field experiences integrate conceptual and practical knowledge. Conley. skills. W. Su. Su. 2003. solving problems. Inc. contact the Chair. middle. and alternative schools. 601 602 Organizational Structure in Education (4) Considers general organizational theory as applied to the existing structure of schools and other educational agencies such as colleges. Department of Educational Studies http://www. 2000. qualifications for the job. situational factors. Selected principles of constitutional.edu/education/ The Department of Educational Studies provides courses for undergraduate and graduate students in the areas of educational leadership and administration. 788 Policy Perspectives in Higher Education (4) Prereq: 786. local. and issues related to programs designed to achieve equalization of educational opportunities. Competencies in course conceptually oriented to provide under­ standing of personnel process. Programs. W. nego­ tiating. 2002. Inc. 2004. middle. Individualized approach to developing job skills for specific tasks in elementary. Designed for persons aspir­ ing to become administrators. 1996. private. S. W. Inc. 640 The Principalship (4) Prereq: 9 hrs incl 601. techniques. 786 Management of Higher Education (4) Prereq: 785. Does not apply to requirements for graduate degrees in educational administration.

and problems involved in identifica­ tion of need for planning and acquisition of new facilities and for improvements to existing facilities. 2002. and secondary school administration. new concepts. 793 Leadership Project— Analysis and Evaluation (4) Individualized field­oriented course to assist practicing educators in identifying and using techniques for analyzing their practices in implementing change. and 793) culminates in a written analysis and evaluation under direction of advisor. Complete leadership project (791. F. Competency Development in Personnel Administration (5) Prereq: 631. Leadership J. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2007. problems. W. CollegeSource®. including issues related to democratic localism. 734 740 Special Problems of the Principalship (2–6) Prereq: master’s degree. 2000. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. community power structure. schools in their legal setting. Specific competencies developed include writing policy. and Career Guidance Foundation. 881 Organization in Educational Systems (4) Study of organizational and systems theories and analysis of organizational systems. E. Examines formal and informal interactions. Inc. and Career Guidance Foundation. Seminar in Business Administration in Education (5) Helps students gain understanding of and compe­ tence in administration of business affairs in education. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Sp. Emphasis is placed on the application of ethical thinking and concepts to leadership issues and problems in educational settings. 742 Planning Educational Facilities (5) Prereq: 601. Comparative models of leadership presented in their special settings. Seminar in Collective Bargaining in Education (4) Gives students understanding of collective bargaining movement in education through simulation. politics and innovations. in­depth investigation of problems of specific interest. Intensive study of selected aspects of both case and statutory law. Computer Education and Instructional Technology The master’s specialization serves educators in K­12 schools and technical and community colleges who wish to pursue advanced preparation in computer education and technology. school board member nomination and election. media presentations. C. and meeting organizational and staff needs. Leadership Project— Problem Identification (4) Individualized field­oriented course designed to assist practicing educator in conducting systematic. 720 730 Leadership Seminar in Education (4­5) A survey course emphasizing the philosophical. Promotes understanding of major task areas and competencies required to become knowledgeable about current theories and recommended practices in admini­ stration of business affairs in education. 854 864 Seminar in Public Relations (5) Prereq: 661. Includes all aspects of personnel administration as a team concept. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. readings. Individual and group study procedures. educational technology centers. 1998. and admini­ strator’s base of influence in community. Sp. W. or Administration in Bilingual Settings Business Administration Collective Bargaining in Education Community Education Conflict Management in Educational Administration F. 2002. 1997. D. Personnel Administration in Education K. Study of implications of such theories and systems for educational administration. state and national education agendas. Su. Inc. and relevant court decisions. Educational Facilities Planning G. The doctoral specialization in Instructional Technology is designed for individuals whose major professional interest is in instructional and informational technologies in elementary and secondary schools or in institutions of higher education. Educational Finance H. 2001. The program prepares classroom teachers to use technology effectively in their teaching and to become technology leaders in their schools or districts. 752 Problems in Administration of Education (1–6) Intensive course or workshop for practicing educational administrators. Amount of credit depends on length of course. 1996. establish­ ing record systems. as well as conflict participants. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Planning and Evaluation in Education L. 1998. W. 2000. B. Attention given to analyzing contracts between selected employee groups and boards of education. 1997. Inc. Acquaints student with principles. Organizational Theory for Educational Leaders (4­5) Examination of appropriate theory to assist educational leaders in working with diverse groups in an organizational setting. middle. 1995. and economic development in rural areas. 2007. and contract administration. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 792. Su. 2001. 780 Politics/Policy in Education (4) Examines ideas related to political power and educational decision making. 791 792 Leadership Project—Implementation (4) Individualized field­oriented course to assist practicing educator in developing skills in identi­ fying techniques and strategies for implementing change related to critical problem areas identified in 791. and techniques. 831 844 Seminar in Educational Facilities (5) Helps students gain greater depth of under­ standing of and competence in planning of educational facilities and administration of building programs. and help students gain some competence in application of those theories. Su. Topics include: hensive planning and evaluation in educational enterprises of all types and levels. Sp. . 2005. W. and sports administra­ tion. Graduates of the program who hold an Ohio teaching license will be qualified for the multi­age endorsement in Computer Education and Technology. Politics of Education A. Inc. School­Community Relations N. practicing principal. The Principalship M. Each student assigned a bargaining team which has responsi­bility for negotiating a contract. F. Pupil Transportation P. 784 Educational Planning and Evaluation (5) Intended to help advanced graduate students gain better understanding of theories related to and systems and techniques employed in compre­ Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. While CollegeSource®. and issues to foster an increased competence in financing educational enterprises. The program prepares graduates for positions as technology leaders in school districts. W. 744 Leadership in Rural Settings (4) Analyzes the general and specific skills required for leadership in rural schools. staff evaluation. Educational Law I. salary administration. 751 Business Administration in Education (4) Prereq: 601. and Career Guidance Foundation. career counseling. 2006. 895 Dissertation (2–15) F. impasse resolution. CollegeSource®. social and political aspects of leadership. state technology consortia. Focusing specifically on leadership for change. 1996. private. 880 Rural Schools and Communities (4) Consideration of the relationship between schools and rural communities. in­depth studies to identify critical problem areas in selected phase of school system operation. Practicum designed to develop competency to perform effectively in area of personnel administration. 811 890 Research in Educational Administration (1–6) Individual research studies. professional development centers. Sp. 2003. 2004. Helps student develop increased awareness of and appreciation for role and function of business administration in total educational enterprise. 115 Educational Leadership Educational Leadership Courses (EDLE) 710 Cultural and Contextual Foundations of Leadership (4­5) Investigation of cultural and social influences on the development of leadership in educational settings. Extensive reading in an approved law library required. 1999. 1995. 1999. Comparisons are made with leadership demands in urban settings. processes. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. and individual and collaborative leadership needs. Inc. Sp. school legislation. higher education. While CollegeSource®. Su. Su. 2005. Special topics. Inc. Reed. Helps student to gain an apprecia­ tion for importance of facilities to educational enterprises. constitutional basis for education. Content of each offering specially selected to meet needs of particular group being served. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Sp. especially for leaders in education. W. 2006. F. systems. guest lectures. 2003. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. and discussions. Critical appraisal of major problems and issues in elementary. 824 Seminar in Educational Finance (5) Helps students gain greater depth of understand­ ing of theories. F. practices. The Superintendency O. Practice for third­party mediators. F. and Career Guidance Foundation. Competencies developed in terms of actual situation. and specific techniques for public relations in public. staff selection. 2004. Sp. 740 Legal Aspects of Educational Administration (4) Prereq: 611. Moral and Ethical Dimensions of Leadership (4­5) Examination of the moral dimensions of the process and content of leadership from theoretical and practical perspectives.College of Education and persons involved. Su.

2002. African Studies. in selected topics in instructional technology. In­depth study of the applications of the Internet in K–12 education. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2000. conduct. (G) Special Topics. and power. Y. and Instructional Design Model Nomenclature (3) Prereq: EDRE 501. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Courses (EDCT) 501 Technological Applications in Education (4) This course will acquaint students with applications commonly found in educational settings. (E) Programming Concepts. While CollegeSource®. sequencing of instruction in relation to hierarchies of competence. Inc. 541 592 Workshop in Computer Education (1­15) Designed to provide practicing teachers and other instructional personnel with short course workshops and summer institutes directed toward their identified needs. Inc. Su. 692 Internship: Theory into Practice (1) Prereq: perm. Designed to enhance the principal’s or technology coordinator’s role as an instructional and building leadership and to become knowledgeable leaders in the use of technology in schools. F. 2004. Su. Y. CollegeSource®. In the doctoral program. status. A 503 Philosophies of Education (4) Survey of European and American educational theorists and movements from a philosophic perspective. 661 690 Research in Education (1–6) Individualized research project. 602 636 Media and the Young Adult (4) Theoretical approach to young adult program­ ming and services. 895 Dissertation (1–15) F. Legal. Inc. (B) Information Tools. 601 Instructional Design (4) Systematic procedures for the design. It may also prepare individuals for technology leadership positions in ministries of education and higher education administration. doctoral students propose. and some social issues associated with software use in the classroom will also be considered. This course will acquaint students with applications commonly found in education. Students will use computer technology to design and produce instructional materials. (F) Curriculum Development. and slide presentations. F. implementation. While CollegeSource®. Contemporary educational thought in U. 2003. and Career Guidance Foundation. and. 2001. F. Educational Applications of the Internet (4) Prereq: EDCT 501. hypermedia. Effective: fall 2001­2002. Lego and Logo will be used to design thematic/integrated lessons using Logo programming. 2007. and cultural pluralism assessed in their relationships to sociology of knowledge and educational alternatives. Research. and comparative theory and methods. and critical pedagogies. Sp. their information needs. This course provides an opportunity to explore what it means to integrate software in the classroom. 1998. (D) Hypermedia Tools. Emphasis on institution­ al developments and cultural events that accompanied them. Elaborating an interdisciplinary perspective. W. Students develop instructional activities that integrate telecommunications across the school curriculum. . emphasized. 531 Software Integration in the K–12 Curriculum (4) Prereq: 501. Leadership and Professional Development in Technology (5) Prereq: 601. tailored to meet the needs and interests of individual students. Topics include accessing global information resources. (H) Distance Learning. and criticism of research in educational media. (4) Survey of educational developments from colonial America to present. Emphasis will be on integrating technology across the curriculum. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Instructional Multimedia for the Classroom (4) Prereq: 501. e­mail. Where available. 521 Programming Concepts for Teachers (4) Prereq: 501. media use. 601. Students will use application software. The materials will integrate a variety of multimedia: text. Muhammad. 691 Master’s Research Project (4) Prereq: 35 hrs. 693 Masters Portfolio (1­3) Students will develop a professional electronic portfolio and participate in a public showcase. F. and present culminating dissertation studies based on original research or creative scholarship. It recognizes that educational systems are situated in the contexts of culture. Emphasis on institutional developments and cultural events that accompanied them. 695 697 Thesis (1­10) College of Education designed to meet the academic needs of individuals. as instructional designers for educational enterprises. students develop programs of study that build upon coursework in Cultural Studies focusing on history and philosophy of education. 2005. 1995. and for faculty positions in higher education. and the faculty views the diversity of students in the program as one of its important strengths. The intern is expected to perform a particular function in an organization that thas a definite educational technology focus. 750. and design of multimedia instruction explored. and African­American Studies. 1996. Cultural Studies in Education (EDCS) Cultural Studies in Education is an interdisciplinary field that brings perspectives from the humanities and social sciences to bear on the study of education. Inc. 890 Research in Education (1–12) Guided readings or research. 2005. materials and media. analysis. readings are from primary sources. speech. in collaboration with an advisor. video conferencing. W. the program enables students to construct programs of study that incorporate coursework from a variety of related disciplines such as Philosophy. analyzing general character­ istics of young adults. 1998. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 2004. D. Inc. democratic education. Sp. Sp. Su. critical. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. normative. 1997. Y. Effective: spring 2000­ 2001. 1999. 504 Social Structure and Change in Education (4) Studies in interaction of social structure and educational reform. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 2002.S. W. sound. Suggestions for future research in educational media. gender studies. and Career Guidance Foundation. information­seeking behavior. Su. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. (C) Network Tools. Sp. EDCT 601. prepare themselves in one method of inquiry. Nonthesis option. 2006. 2003. This course introduces doctoral students to current and historical research in instructional technology and appropriate research methods in the field. We will explore different kinds of software and discuss the kinds of learning opportunities the software can provide. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Inc. Sp. W. technocracy. 601. graphics. 2007. Sp. CollegeSource®. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. students complete a master’s research project or thesis. and distance learning. and the Internet. and Career Guidance Foundation. Having also focused attention on several methods of systematic inquiry. Concepts of class. animation. Areas of concentration are (A) Productivity Tools.116 College of Education distance learning projects. including hypermedia stacks. Su. Communications. 2006. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Analysis of Media Theory. This course introduces students to the basic logic in computing. Cultural Studies Courses (EDCS) 500 History of Western Education (4) Survey of education in western world from ancient Judaic schools to major contempo­ rary developments. Readings include both primary and secondary sources. At the end of their programs of study.S. W. Students in the master’s program take core courses in Cultural Studies topics. ethical. 1997. 2001. Review. concept maps. with interpre­ tation and application of research findings of primary concern. knowledge. develop a plan of study for an individualized concentration. diverstiy issues. bureaucracy. 2000. Both the master’s and doctoral specializations in Cultural Studies are Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. collaborative online learning environments. and evaluation of instruction. The portfolio is the cluminating experience for master’s students. Sociology. 1995. 790 Research Literature in Instructional Technology (4) Prereq: 720. We will focus on software use in the content areas. major paper required. 24 grad hours of EDCT. and Career Guidance Foundation. F. and impact of media. and video. 1996. Cultural Studies seeks to investigate and analyze the dynamic relationship between school and society with interpretive. institutional services and operational factors.. 1999. The Computer Eduation and Technology Internship allows the intern to apply theory to practice in a world setting. 502 Evolution of Educational Thought (4) Study of selected educational theorists and cultural assumptions that influenced their ideas. A 501 History of Education in the U. W.

and Career Guidance Foundation. Low minimum course requirements allow students to design individualized programs with courses across the University. UNESCO programs. critical. Factor analysis. May be a theoretical or critical evaluation of recent research in some area in regard to objectives.S. contrasts. Brooks. program in Educational Research and Evaluation (EDRE) to prepare graduates for research and faculty positions as well as leadership roles in research organizations in Ohio and around the world. 510 program) or assignment abroad. analysis of covariance. 506A Education and Development in Africa (4) Interdisciplinary course focusing on the role of learning systems in changing African societies. and school administration. validity. counselor education. Barcikowski. planning. evaluation. and qualitative research. Focus on relationships among social/political crises. D. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2003. Seminar in Educational Research and Evaluation (1–5. Techniques for comparative study of educational systems and developments. funding. item analysis. 1997. 550 Individual Studies in Comparative Education (2–6) Studies in an area of national development. Y. 723 724 Research in Educational Statistics (4) Prereq: 722. standard­setting. functions. 720 Educational Statistics (5) Measures of central tendency. citizenship philosophy. 1999. higher order factorial designs. higher education. and there are opportunities for students to interact with faculty and to become involved with both new and ongoing projects and research in the United States and sometimes overseas. The School as a Dynamic Social Institution (5) Prereq: master’s degree. and Career Guidance Foundation. measures of variability. cultural studies. 1998. A. Johanson. Practicum provided. computer programming.College of Education 505 Comparative Cultures and Education (4) Studies in learning as a social process with emphasis on the non­Western experience. psychology. D. D. Statistical and/or computer skills are desirable. Y. Use of Monte Carlo methods in educational statistics using the SAS programming language. and plans for implementation. Barcikowski. 712 Research in Educational Measurements (5) An introduction to item response theory (IRT) including such topics as test construction. Brooks. point estimates. we seek students with a reasonable background in mathematics (calculus and linear algebra) or in an area closely related to mathematics. Hutchinson. F. Emphasis on questionnaire design and analysis using nonparametric statistics. 1995. and issues in education. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. data simulation. and evaluating research problems. 700 Advanced Foundations of Education (4) Seminar for selected interdisciplinary studies in social. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. max 10) Prereq: perm. 706 Internship in Comparative Education— United States or Abroad (10–15) One­year assignment with stateside operation (such as aiding or assisting in comparative education 709 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Sp.D. Education and training as tools for contemporary change and socioeconomic development. measurements. and computer science. parameter estimation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. mathematics. 722 Multivariate Methods in Education (5) Prereq: 721. changing philosophies. college student personnel. nested designs. This program offers students courses in several areas—research design. Johanson. D. Johanson. 2001. Barcikowski. 1997. D. 1995. 695 D. F. and literacy programs. 508 509 Political Philosophies of Citizenship Education (4) Use of popular literature and documentary evidence to critically examine citizenship education as seen by liberals. Inc. 732 Computer Science Applications in Education II (5) Prereq: 721 and 731 concurrent. control.Y. Y. Introduction to techniques of comparative analysis and ethnographic examination of learning systems. Sp. Use of computer statistical packages. D. and analyses where there are missing values. and computer adaptive testing. Brooks. and statistics for test scores. 1996. Inc. 2005. Asian. statistics. and philosophic foundations of education. Education. including nonformal education. chi­square distributions. generalizability theory. organization. Questionnaires and Nonparametric Statistics in Education (5) Prereq: 720. etc. structures. W. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. cultural. 693 117 Educational Research and Evaluation (EDRE) The College of Education offers both a master’s and Ph. Examination of research designs involving hierarchical linear models. and comparative theory and methods. 1998. Su. Y. Historical and ethnographic studies of pre­ colonial. The student­faculty ratio is quite favorable. Objectives. 690 692 Special Projects in Educational Research and Evaluation I (1–8. W. Sp. equating. simple regression. 800 or equiv. Interns required to have had experience in teaching in the U. Selecting. adult education. international and comparative education. Psychological and sociological foundations of cultural values and ways of life investigated. and standard scores. F. Teaching Strategies for Cultural and International Understanding (4) Prereq: EDRE 501. Brooks. Muhammad. F. 2000. Advanced application of SAS Proc Matrix to problems in education. and evaluation.I. 2007. content. 731 Computer Science Applications in Education I (5) Prereq: 720 concurrent. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. correlation. Inc. t­distributions. to promote rural development. statistics. Brooks. 2004. Y. Possible topics include women. Special problems in elementa­ ry education. Emphasis upon innovative approaches to learning for elementary and secondary school pupils. Contemporary situations investigated.D. Johanson. S. canonical correlation analysis. 507 Programs in International Education (3) Assistance programs to education in developing nations. testing statistical hypotheses. Poverty. Scaling. and International Development (5) Interdisciplinary course focusing on poverty in African. and evaluation. While CollegeSource®. While there are no specific requirements. Brooks. Our students come from a variety of undergraduate disciplines. 2003. foundation programs. conservatives. Strategies for developing cross­ cultural understanding and cooperation studied and developed. A. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. we often have students taking courses in higher education. Barcikowski. W. and Career Guidance Foundation. Third World children and youth. Projects may be individual or small groups. secondary education. Inc. programs. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Howard. Brooks. 2000. Barcikowski. Y. 721 Regression Analysis in Education (5) Prereq: 720. and methodology. Barcikowski. in selected topics in educational research. and socialists. Problems in planning and implementation. 2006. education. In particular. Barcikowski. F. questionnaire development. In addition. 2002. W. Y. Assistance programs of other nations. Inc. Use of computer statistical packages. Brooks. D. CollegeSource®. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. D. 2004. normative. CollegeSource®. 2001. 510 Educational Measurements (4) Construction of tests. Howard. Su. max 8) Prereq: 6 hrs in area. Inc. W. Use of computer statistical packages. D. and cultural styles of school. 1996. testing and measurements. Reliability. Multiple and multivariate regression. . Johanson. Johanson. F. Educational Research and Evaluation Courses (EDRE) 501 Introduction to Research Methods (4) Methods of research in education. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 2006. Introduction to Cultural Studies in Education (5) Interdisciplinary course that brings perspectives from the humanities and social sciences to bear on the study of education. colonial. and F­distributions. 2005. normal curve. Y. Politics. and selected parametric pro­cedures are included. Advanced Seminar in Comparative Education (5) Emphasis on interdisciplinary treatment of problems and concerns. While CollegeSource®. repeated measures designs. and conflict resolution in school. and Latin American societies and the uses of education. and development. validity. 2007. one­way and two­way analysis of variance (univariate and multivariate). standard scores. tailored to meet needs and interests of individual students. and differential item functioning. measurement. Y. Individual research in problem areas in educational research. statistics. sampling. Social impact of intervention. discriminate analysis. School as changing social system. 2002. confidence intervals. D. Thesis (2­10) 711 Techniques of Test Development (5) An introduction to classical (true­score) test theory including such topics as reliability. Su. special education. 1999. Students investigate and analyze the dynamic relationship between education and culture with interpretive. Barcikowski. and post­independence African education. 801 Readings in Educational Research and Evaluation (1–4) Guided readings course. many students develop areas of interest within various specializations of teacher education. 605 606 Seminar in Comparative Education (3–5) Topical interdisciplinary seminar focusing on variable themes.

Y. Inc. max 15) Individual research in problem areas in research and evaluation. 2005. Different approaches to interpreting ethnographic data will be studied including domain. 751 752 Ethnographic Methods in Education (5) In this course we examine the process of designing and executing ethnographic research studies. May be a theoretical or critical evaluation of recent research in regard to objectives. max 15) Guided readings course. measurement. Areas of specialization include curriculum and instruction/learning. and classroom instruction. max 15) Advanced seminar in selected topics in educational research and evaluation. in selected advanced topics in educational research. 2006. 124 McCracken Hall. conceptual. metaphor. These projects may be individual or small groups. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. 1997. 1998. D. 523 Reading/Language: Laboratory (5–15) Prereq: 522.g. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. tailored to meet needs and interests of individual students. statement of hypotheses. social studies education. 522 Diagnosis: Reading/Language (5–15) Prereq: 520 or 526. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 2006. 2002. Y. and Career Guidance Foundation. Emphasis on diagnosis of reading difficulties and adaptation of materials and teaching methods for content area instruction. and evaluation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. participation in diagnostic examination. write field notes. Sp.edu/graduate/ The Department of Teacher Education offers programs of graduate study designed to meet the academic and professional needs of those involved in teaching. 792 793 Advanced Seminar in Educational Research and Evaluation (1–6. The doctoral program in teacher education is designed to prepare curriculum and instruction personnel to serve in schools. 2007. and Career Guidance Foundation.ohio. 2000. and Career Guidance Foundation. and practice. The Ph. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school.edu/graduate/. Application of curriculum theory. prepare transcripts of interviews. definition of terms. 2002. developmen­ tal concept. 895 Dissertation (2–15) D. 1999. F. issues of validity. Exploration of causes of failure and concept of multiple causation. reliability. Y. and interpret as well as evaluate the qualitative data they collect. mathematics education. May be a theoretical or critical evaluation of recent research in some area in regard to objectives. 750 Qualitative Interviewing Methods in Education (5) In this course we examine the process of designing studies in which qualitative interviews are performed for data collection purposes. Inc. including current trends. Projects may be individual or small groups. Su. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Barcikowski. 1995. Inc. theory. and preparation of reports. 2005. methods. Inc. Emphasis on development of problems which admit to scientific investigation. Johanson. mathematics education. and use of reading in total school curriculum. 511 514 The Kindergarten Curriculum and the Kindergarten Child (6) Provides students with opportunity to develop understanding of kindergarten child and cur­ riculum. program requires a common core of experiences. Review of specialized materials and instructional efforts. reading and language arts.) Sp. To pursue graduate study. 2003. and practices in reading instruction. Critical evaluation and development of research studies. and techniques of secondary reading instruction for teaching adolescent learners of various abilities. 520 521 Foundation of Language Instruction (5) Prereq: EDRE 501. Sp. CollegeSource®. D. and instructional practices in language­arts curriculum. You can take the Graduate Record Examination only on certain dates throughout the year. principles of curri­ culum development. and analyze cultural artifacts and documents. narrative. Department of Teacher Education http://www. CollegeSource®. middle level education. 524 Literature for Children and Adolescents (5) Seminar in critical analysis of research and theory related to children’s and adolescent literature. and evaluation in clinical/field settings including development and teaching of standards­based lessons. and techniques. two­year community or technical colleges. Y. and human subject ethics. adolescent to young adult education. Different approaches to interpreting interview data will be studied (e. Inc. Current programs. Advanced Readings in Educational Research and Evaluation (2–8. and methodology. and Career Guidance Foundation. Opportunity to study individual problems. and special education. You should arrange to complete the application process at least a month in advance of the term in which you plan to begin study. Developing a Thinking Skills Program for the Elementary/Secondary Classroom (4) Examines current research and theory about the teaching of thinking skills. lab sessions arranged. contact the Chair. While CollegeSource®. and methodology. Students will learn to engage in different forms of participant observation. emphasizing optimum realiza­tion of pupil potential. Review of origins. Y. Students will conduct in­depth personal and/or focus group interviews. 1995. Correlation of variability in reading proficiency with incidence of retardation and disability. or special education. Systematic observation of cases of reading disabilities and preparation of case report. content. issues. Athens OH 45701. Inc. Assists in developing teaching techniques and teaching materials for kindergarten children. . Students not seeking a degree may pursue graduate courses on a non­ degree basis in a planned professional development program. 1996. and curriculum and instruction. and recent trends including content area national and state standards. Department of Teacher Education. Current programs. 1999.D. 2007. Howard. parent and teacher conferences. W. For more information about programs. content. Applicants may submit applications online at http:// www. Y. 2004. Treatment of both impression and expression aspects of oral and written communi­ cation. Y. 1996. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. including emphases in middle childhood. special education. and university settings. 2004. etc. research. 1998. materials. Foundations of Reading Instruction— Elementary (5) Prereq: EDRE 501. you must submit Graduate Record Examina­ tion (verbal and quantitative) or Miller Analogies Test scores. W. F. (Weekly group discussion period. componential. 2003. problems of sampling. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1997.ohio. development. D.118 College of Education 733 Research Design in Education (5) Prereq: 720 and 721. Submit your application for financial aid before March 15 to receive consideration for the following academic year. An initial teaching license may be pursued in the following areas: middle child. Master’s degree programs are offered in teacher education. Y. Application of developmental approach to problem cases in reading instruction. While CollegeSource®. learning. 2000. Su. 2001. Su. and design of method. or the Office of Graduate Studies in the College of Education. and interpretation and generalization of findings. taxonomic. thematic. materials. Brooks. forces affecting what is taught. and curriculum development. identification and individual investigation of problem areas. 2001. you may be required to submit the results of the Graduate Record Examination (verbal and quantitative) or the Miller Analogies Test if you are applying for master’s degree study. adolescent to young adult. you must meet established graduate entrance requirements and be recommended for admission by the department’s graduate committee. and thematic analyses. Focus is on helping develop personal teaching philosophy based on current theory. statistics. F. If you are applying for doctoral study. curriculum evaluation. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Education (4) Introduction to the experience of qualitative data collection methods in educational research. 510L Laboratory in Principles of Curriculum (1) Prereq: enrollment in 510. 526 Secondary Reading Instruction (5) Materials. staffing of cases. Depending on the grade­ point average earned as an undergrad­ uate. reading. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. Teacher Education/ Curriculum and Instruction Courses (EDTE) 510 Principles of Curriculum (4) Major curricular movements. grounded theory. Y. Su. Emphasis on the integration of theory. statistical methods.). conduct ethnographic interviews. D. 790 Special Projects in Educational Research and Evaluation II (2–10. research. individual procedures in tutoring. Y.

Theories of Instructional Design and Evaluation (5) Prereq: 660. 1999. F. Research design and methodology in scientific investi­ gations. Y. Inc. and methodolo­ gy. 723 Laboratory Reading/Language (5–15) Prereq: 722. W. research. middle. Provides elementary. purposes. participation in diagnostic examination. D. outdoor biology. Y. Advisor. Y. Y. Y. and orientations. Exploration of causes of failure and concept of multiple causation. New programs and trends in science teaching identified and evaluated. and Career Guidance Foundation. History of instruction. Preparation of research proposal. and development and evaluation of high school curriculum. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. Implementation of these changes in the classroom. While CollegeSource®. (I) Interaction Analysis. Practical applications of theory in educational setting. 2002. 660 660L Laboratory in Advanced Principles of Teaching and Learning (1) Prereq: concurrent enrollment in 660. issues. W. 2004. Y. F. . construction of models of instructional design. systematic study of curriculum development in elementary school. Inc. 715. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. D. action research project. Su. 2006. 2000. Philosophy. and high schools. D. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. curriculum problems. and grade level placement for presentation in schools. modern units. Critical examination of programs. middle. Applications of theory and research in new models. (F) Kindergarten. W. 740 Curriculum in Science Education (4) Prereq: teaching experience. with emphasis on curriculum articulation within and across levels of schooling. effect on teaching methods. content. Sp. Nature of changes as reflected from experimental programs.Sp. Y. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Critical evaluation of literature and recent research on objectives. 560 592 Workshop in Curriculum and Instruction (1–15) (Max of 8 hrs may be counted toward M. Rebottini. Applica­ tion of instructional models related to Pathwise and Praxis in clinical/field settings. Study and development of instructional models as applied to classroom teaching and learning. 541 542 Seminar in Science Education (2–6) Prereq: bachelor’s degree. etc. energy conservation. Trends in contemporary social studies including materials and models for developing historical reasoning. New Topics in Science and Science Education (2–6) Prereq: teaching experience. science fairs. Modern advances in science and current science education topics to determine suitable content. programmed materials. and practices of schooling for middle level learners. 1995. Y. D. population education. (J) Developing Behavioral Objectives. 722 Diagnosis: Reading/Language (5–15) Prereq: 720 or 726. and privately sponsored experimental programs in elementary and/or secondary science education identified and practiced in a classroom setting. content. Sp. Middle Level Education: Theory. relevant research. 714 715 Theories of Curriculum Change (5) Prereq: 660. 551 Advanced Studies of Children and Adolescents (5) Prereq: 20 hrs of education and/or psychology.Ed. Y. 1998. 2005. Independent projects and solving selected educational problems. staffing of cases. curriculum models. Correlation of variability in reading proficiency with incidence of retardation and disability. lab sessions arranged. and similar methods of advancing science education. Major curriculum models and their underlying theory. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. food problems. 2003. and grade level placement of topics in federal. Curriculum. social life in classrooms. 692 Practicum: Secondary Education (4) Prereq: perm. Sp. recent trends and emphases in teaching practices. philosophical. (H) Team Teaching. D. Critical review of existing conventional programs used as a background for examining experimental programs. Su. History of science instruction. apparatus. W. outdoor education. W. Y. 2003. 2007. issues involved in selecting and organizing content. Y. Y. W. Curriculum as a basic educational concern. problem­based and service learning. 2007. 1995. recent trends and emphases in teaching practices. 730 Curriculum in Elementary Education— Mathematics (4) Prereq: Teaching experience. 721 Foundations of Language Instruction (5) Critical evaluation of literature and recent research on objectives. Supervised experiences in analysis and application of theories and tech­ niques of curriculum change and instructional change in school setting. 2004. Sp. F. 612 Middle Childhood Curriculum (4) Prereq: 510. Y. Emphasis on historical development of science education from dominance of nature study and aesthetics to modern experimental programs. Research design and methodology in scientific investi­ gations. Review of major theories. current problems and issues. 1997. 2002. 712 Advanced Seminar in Middle Level Education (5) Critical analysis and discussion of theory. 2006. and trends in the field of middle level education with particular emphasis on future plans. Areas of concentration are: (A) Language Arts. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 720 Foundations of Elementary Reading Instructions (5) Critical evaluation of literature and recent research on objectives. D. 695 Thesis (1–10) F. Opportunity to study individual problems. D. Modern elementary mathe­ matics curriculum with emphasis on why changes are occurring. While CollegeSource®. 2000. schools and communities. (Weekly group discussion period. (N) Special Education Topics. world hunger. 2005. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. inquiry. and theoretical foundations and developmental characteristics relative to middle level education. content. CollegeSource®. Intensive study of research in child development from conception to maturity and implications for educational practices. 691 Master’s Research Project (4) Prereq: 35 graduate hrs in special education. teaching of social studies. field trips. 1999. individual procedures in tutoring. (O) Supervision of Instruction. 1996. 724 Literature for Children and Adolescents (5) Seminar in critical analysis of research and theory related to children’s and adolescent literature. History of instruc­ tion. Su. from upper elementary through junior. Impact of dominant theories of learn­ ing and philosophies of education. Emphasis is placed on active teaching. (L) Interdisciplinary Topics. and social justice.) Sp. Su. and preparation of reports. 610 Elementary School Curriculum (5) Prereq: EDRE 501. and the study of contemporary middle level structures and programs. current problems and issues. 750 760 Readings and Research in Human Development (3–5) Interpretation of scientific literature on human development as related to classroom experience in preschool through adolescence. Y. 716. 613 High School Curriculum (4) Prereq: 510. (K) Curriculum Development. and secondary school teachers with a variety of techniques that enable them to integrate new concepts of science education into their teaching. and their evaluation to effect desired learning outcomes. Impact of dominant theories of learning and philosophies of education on current curriculum changes in science. F. 1996. and techniques of secon­ dary reading instruction for teaching adolescent learners of various abilities. (M) Special Topics. 1997. W. recent trends and emphases in teaching practices. Y. 1998. current problems and issues. Su. Philosophy. problems. 119 726 Secondary Reading Instruction (5) Materials. recent trends and emphases in teaching practices. multiple perspective analysis. impact of dominant theories of learn­ ing and philosophies of education. and Career Guidance Foundation. Y. Inc. 540 New Programs and Practices in Science (4) Prereq: EDRE 501. Su. methods. requirements. Systematic observation of cases of reading disabilities and preparation of case report. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. F. 2001. Impact of dominant theories of learning and philosophies of education. Y. including emphasis on sources of curriculum and major curriculum movements. Programs and Practices in Elementary Social Studies—Practicum (4) Prereq: EDRE 501. Inquiry and Value Clarification in Social Studies (4) Prereq: 550 or 551. study of current issues and program alternatives. Emphasis on diagnosis of reading difficulties and adaptation of materials and teaching methods for content area instruction.) Designed to provide practicing teachers and other instructional personnel with short courses. Y. uses of technology. Student conducts a review of the literature pertinent to his/her major field of study and designs implements an applied. Inc. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. Review of specialized materials and instructional efforts. Advanced Principles of Teaching and Learning (4) Critical appraisal of research in areas of learning and teaching. D. D. and Career Guidance Foundation. Application of developmental approach to problem cases in reading instruction. analysis of exemplary practices of middle level curriculum and educational programs. Critical discussion of curricula for the social sciences. CollegeSource®.College of Education 530 Problems and Practices in Modern Elementary Mathematics—Practicum (4) Prereq: EDRE 501. and methodology. Advisor. and Career Guidance Foundation. such as environmental education. Sp. (C) Science. Study of high school curriculum Advanced Seminar in Education—Research (4) Review of current literature and research in education. D. Devel­ opment and use of curriculum guides. geographic literacy. Su. (E) Reading. History of instruction. Inc. major issues. and summer institutes directed toward their identified needs. D. D. parent and teacher conferences. D. Theories and models of instruction. foundation. W. 690 Research in Education (1–6) Individualized research project. and social justice. 790 Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. W. workshops. 2001. 716 719 Curriculum and Instruction Practicum (6) Prereq: 715. D. and methodolo­ gy. Analytical investigation of the historical. projections. (D) Mathematics. their psychological and philosophical basis. Inc. Critical reading and interpre­ tation of research related to curriculum change and effectiveness. (B) Social Studies. content. and Practices (5) Prereq: 612. The seminar will provide a forum for students and professor interaction relative to new ideas and issues in the middle level education movement. (G) Individualizing Instruction.

D. and methodology in science education. CollegeSource®. 2006. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. 1995. Y. 2001. 830 Research in Elementary Education— Mathematics (4) Research design and methodology in scientific investigations. and/or their professional colleagues. and educational foundations. 841 Practicum in Science Education (2–6) In­depth study of theory and foundations of science curricula and instructional practices within given school system. D.120 College of Education 800 Advanced Dynamics of Human Learning (5) Prereq: master’s degree. Inc. 2007. D. 895 Dissertation (1–15) F. 1995. Sp. D. content. concepts. Catalog content is owned and copyrighted by the appropriate school. In­depth analysis of school system and its social studies curriculum. 890 Research in Education (1–12) Prereq: admission to advanced standing. 822 Field Experience: Language (5–15) Prereq: 721. 1999. Y. 1996. Inc. Persons holding no previous teacher license or certification are encouraged to apply. research methods. and/or emotional/behavioral handicap). 852 Writing for Professional Publication in Education (2) Prereq: admission to doctoral study. Supervised field experience in language. Seminar in Social Studies Education: Program Analysis (3) Prereq: 850. analysis. Study and critique of major theories of learning and human development. curriculum planning. special education issues analysis. This course is designed to introduce doctoral students to the professional publication process. and/or program management. Planning Graduate Programs of Study. 2005. collaboration. 828 Practicum in Secondary Education— Modern Foreign Languages (5) In­depth study of school system and its modern foreign language curriculum with critique by faculty and report using available research. 800. and methodology. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. 876 Collaborative Leadership in Special Education Teacher Education (5) The demand being placed on leaders in the field of special education is changing due to the emphasis placed on inclusion and collaboration. materials development. or equiv. teaching methodologies.4413. Students must complete a minimum of 48 graduate hours of coursework. W. 2003. The purpose of this course is to provide students with insight into the fundamental skills necessary for leaders in special education teacher education. D. F. mild mental retardation. F. career development. grant writing. curricular. Students will collaborate with professionals in special education. 820 821 Field Experience: Reading (5–15) Prereq: 720 or 726. 1996. analysis of present and future social and cultural changes and their potential impact on human learning and development. mild developmental handicap. Su. 2000. The course culminates with a manuscript or comparable product submitted for publication. 2004. While CollegeSource®. 802 Research and Curriculum in Elementary Education Reading (4) Critical evaluation of literature and recent research on objectives. recent trends and emphases in teaching practices. D. 851 Seminar in Social Studies Education Research (3) Prereq: 851. 801. W. Independent study with topic restricted to some aspect/level of reading instruction. Post­master’s analysis of social. Inc. D. 2001. program development. 2002. Su. 1998. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. and Career Guidance Foundation. D. behavioral management. Divergent perspectives regarding these challenges that currently confront the profession will be analyzed and evaluated. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. students should plan a graduate program of study based on their professional goals. in­service personnel instruction. Students will become familiar with editorial policies of relevant periodicals. Sp. McCracken Hall 124. governmental office. policy development. Particular emphasis is placed on special education law as it applies to public schooling. History of instruction. identify various publication outlets. Before or while completing the first 16 credit hours of graduate study. CollegeSource®. Additional information concerning these programs may be obtained from a Special Education faculty advisor or from the Office of Student Services. Y. students must meet with the faculty advisor to clarify personal and professional goals. or Early Childhood Intervention Specialist (to serve students with special needs ages 0­8). Before completing 25 credit hours. Special Education The College of Education offers a master’s degree in Special Education for a teaching license in the following: Intervention Specialist for Mild­Moderate Educational Needs (to serve students with specific learning disabilities. D. Review of microfilm research studies and abstracts made to identify areas and problems requiring further research. Case studies and field experiences related to change are examined with emphasis on planning. Student Personnel Services. 880 Practicum in Special Education (2­15) This practicum provides applied learning experiences in a university. 2000. 740. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. W. Inc. Dynamics of Change in Educational Institutions (5) Prereq: master’s degree. Copyright & Disclaimer Information: Copyright © 1994. Independent study with topic restricted to some aspect/level of language instruction. 869 870 Legal Issues in Special Education (5) This course provides an in­depth and critical study of the historical evolution of legal issues in disabilities with attention to its changing impact on policy and service delivery for people with disabilities. single­ subject/applied behavior analysis designs. 1997. including field­based quantitative investigations. and instructional theories of various contempo­ rary schools of thought in social studies. Research design and methodology of these investigations studied in detail. D. and evaluation. CollegeSource® digital catalogs are derivative works owned and copyrighted by CollegeSource®. 1998. Research design and methodology in scientific investigations. which are to be outlined on Form A in Student Handbook materials. 2004. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2007. Ohio University. D. guest speakers. and individual projects. Any change in a graduate program of study must be approved by the advisor and the graduate committee and be filed with the student’s original program of study. D. prescriptive and remediation techniques. Athens OH 45701. 1999. 824 Independent Study: Language (5–15) Prereq: 721. copyright is retained on all digital catalogs. Supervised field experiences in reading. related services. 1997. Specific training is provided for all students in assessment. curriculum development. 872 874 Applied Research in Disabilities (5) This course provides an overview of applied interdisciplinary research on disabilities. Critical Issues and Current Trends in Special Education (5) The intention of this course is to examine the most salient issues and questions facing the field of special education at the onset of the next millennium. Research will be grouped and analyzed according to the type of methodology employed. While CollegeSource®. current problems and issues. 2003. Analytical study of theories. Sp. and strategies of change. and Career Guidance Foundation provides information as a service to the public. 827 Practicum in Secondary Education— English (5) In­depth study of school system and its English curriculum with critique by faculty and report by student using available research. public school. content. The number of hours required is determined in consultation with their advisor and is 840 Research in Science Education (1–6) Critical evaluation of recent research on objectives. Each program meets the Ohio teacher licensure requirements. D. . D. 823 Independent Study: Reading (5–15) Prereq: 720 or 726. It will be a field­based investigation intended to connect theory and research with practical applications. Y. Through readings. D. D. 850 Seminar in Social Studies Education: Curriculum in Social Studies (3) Prereq: 8 hrs grad work in social studies educa­ tion. analysis of research as it applies to science education in schools. and roles of change agents as related to educational institutions and programs. Identification of reasonable researchable problems in social studies and development of appropriate research design. Impact of dominant theories of learning and philosophies of education. Inc. Inc. qualitative studies. or agency to participate in professional activities such as college teaching. 2002. The graduate program of study is to be approved by the advisor who forwards it to the graduate committee for final approval. and experimental and quasi­ experimental approaches. D. 2006. D. Intervention Specialist for Moderate­Intensive Educational Needs (to serve students with moderate­ severe mental retardation and/or multihandicapping conditions). and review a manuscript using editorial criteria. technological applications.593. and Career Guidance Foundation. 2005. and Career Guidance Foundation. students will develop a leadership style and network that will enable them to function successfully in the field of special education teacher education.

educational services. 2002. 574 environment. Teaching certificate and experience for interns in admin­ istration and supervision. Emphasizes skill development in evaluation and functional behavior assessment methods. A comprehensive overview of the continuum of vocational options and procedures for preparing exceptional children and adults to fulfill their career roles as family members. Topics include etiology. Y. 2003. Sp. Students must maintain a 3. Y.College of Education based on previous experience and areas of preparation. Capstone experience in the master’s program in secondary education with teacher certification. 561 Internship in Education (3–9) Prereq: 9 qtr hrs graduate work in education. Develops skills in establishing classroom expectations. full time. 1998. Yanok. and advocacy issues from birth through adulthood. psychoeducational interventions. F. 563. 681 Graduate Practicum in Mild­Moderate Educational Needs (2–8) Prereq: 35 hrs in special education. 571 Career Development and Transition Planning for Individuals with Disabilities (4) Prereq: 5 hrs in special education. The experience is planned as a meaningful extension of your experience as a teacher. Y. teacher/teacher. and Career Guidance Foundation. 576 577 Methods and Materials for Learners with Moderate­Intensive Education Needs (4) Prereq: 576 and 5 hrs in special education. A practical. Seminar to accompany graduate level student teaching. Su. Inc. 680 Practicum in Moderate­Intensive Educational Needs (4­8) Prereq: 35 hrs in special education. Y. or profound mental retardation. screening. Sp. W. Complete a minimum of 20 hours of field work per college credit hour in an approved special education placement. F. problems and solutions. selection. and diagnosis of learners with moderate to intensive educational needs (including those with moderate. Y. A typical Intervention Specialist teaching licensure program is 57 hours for a person with a previous elementary teaching license or certification and it will require 82 hours for persons seeking the initial teaching license in a single area and 96 hours for a dual license. Functioning as classroom teacher with regular supervision. life span ramifications. Special Education Courses (EDSP) 570 Nature and Needs of Exceptional Children and Adults (5) An introductory. or administrator. F. Inc. Inc. attitudes. and Career Guidance Foundation. In general. W. Y. Y. and psychosocial aspects of disa