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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

A

First Steps for Branstad and the Iowa Statehouse
a Republican House and Senate. He did not fix welfare, education, our prisons, our courts, taxes, or our economy. While he managed the status quo much better than Governor Chet Culver – thanks to dozens of tax hikes and data manipulations – Branstad and the GOP did not repair, restore, or rebuild Iowa. Now that he and Republicans have returned to power, simply invoking a term such as “conservative” isn’t good enough. This group of statehouse leaders must lead, but to lead they must first have a plan. This means not just an agenda, but a specific vision of how we fix Iowa. At this point, every fiber of my being wants to lay out a detailed, point-by-point analysis of the severity of Iowa’s crisis. When my gubernatorialelection campaign released our detailed plans to fix education and the economy in Iowa, the solutions alone consisted of 25 pages. Data analysis and problem identification would consume many more. So, I will simply say government in Iowa is broken, our education system is broken, and our economy is broken. The mountains of empirical data confirm this and can be shared readily with anyone who seeks more evidence. Statehouse leaders from both parties, advocacy groups, unions, business and professional associations, business leaders, and the media ignore mostly, but cover up at times, the severity of the condition Iowa faces. The budget hole is real, property-tax hikes were real, the loss of yet another Congressional seat is real. One hundred percent of the high schools and 95 percent of the middle schools in our 10 largest cities are officially failing. The media won’t report that fact, statehouse politicians and edu-crats deny it, business leaders refuse to believe it, activists apologize for it. Yet this failure is a fact reported by state employees, in a report paid for by tax dollars, on a Web site published by state employees and paid for by tax dollars. So what are the first steps the Branstad administration and the new GOP leadership ought to take to fix Iowa? (1) Institute a four-year flexible freeze, capping spending at the current level, and refusing to increase the budget one dollar more than current levels. (2) Resist simple and irresponsible remedies such as not filling current vacancies. While Culver’s across-the-board cuts were reckless, simply not filling the positions he cut is equally reckless. Instead a department-by-department, division-bydivision, bureau-by-bureau, program-by-program examination of state government must take place. The fat needs to go, but the Culver-sliced lean needs to be restored. For example, we are about 100 troopers short. Leaving those positions vacant serves no one, other than the administration that wants to look like it’s doing something. (3) End the practice of spending 99 percent of estimated revenues and move to zero-based budgeting. Fund what we are supposed to do – keep courts open, public safety, etc. at 100 percent and veto every nonessential expenditure from Planned Parenthood to church projects. Private – not public – dollars should fund such things. (4) Institute a Bounty program, rewarding state workers that help us save money by giving them a bonus – 5 or 10 percent of what they save us. This works in the private sector and the military, and would mobilize those best aware of waste to help us reduce, if not eliminate, it. (5) Reorganize state government, reducing it to fewer than 10 bureaucracies within the governor’s line of authority. For example Regents, College Student Aid, K-12, and Cultural Affairs should all be under one roof sharing one administrative team. They might retain their unique autonomy in the delivery of services, but the vast bureaucracy supporting each must go. This should apply to public safety, economic development, etc. Iowans cannot afford wasteful and duplicative government anymore. (6) End the circumvention of reporting created through the employment of a permanent consultant class. For far too long, started during the Branstad years, agencies such as DHS have used

n Iowa Worth Fighting for was created to serve as a future firewall against entrenched status-quo power following the November 2010 elections. On August 17, 2009, the content of this comprehensive review and recommendations debuted on the Jan Mickelson radio show in Des Moines. It spoke to some basic principles, and addressed core governing concerns – like government is best that governs least. But it offered more than platitudes. It offered specifics that included strategies to reorganize, reduce, and re-prioritize state government; to create accountable, efficient local government; to rebuild our economy based on tax reform and citizen – not government – stimulus; to reform our education system; to promote a healthy Iowa the effective way – not through government mandate; to affirm core rights, such as the right to property; to protect Iowa’s citizens; to interdict Iowa’s severe drug crisis; to reform illegal immigration; and to advance real leadership principles. On November 2, 2010, the political pendulum reversed course. Republicans again control statehouse politics. It was not even a decade ago they controlled both the House and Senate in Iowa. Which is to say: It was not a decade ago that they fought education reform, welfare reform, and the introduction of sound fiscal and management practices. When Terry Branstad left office, he had

Continued On Page 21

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010 

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Celebration of Christmas 2010
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

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by Rich Miller

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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W

House Republicans in an Unenviable Position
that the housing market improves soon, because some of them will have to find new digs to avoid running against another incumbent. The remap always hovers above everything in Springfield. During the last redistricting process in 2001, several state senators were in the secure computer room on September 11. Planes were crashing, buildings were falling, but they were checking on their boundaries. That’s how important this is to them. It’s no secret that Madigan is not the forgiveand-forget type. And he’s not above using something as important as the map to “urge” compliance with his wishes. There are a whole lot of crucial votes coming up during the next several months as the General Assembly attempts to dig the state out of this massive hole. The Republicans have spent the past three years in open, hostile opposition to Madigan, with the situation degrading sharply over the past year or so. Many of those members are trying to figure out how they can best navigate the next couple of years and preserve themselves in the process. It’s not that simple, though. Even if some of Cross’ members bow down to His Royal Highness in exchange for map crumbs, they have another, perhaps even more serious problem to ponder. Several House Republicans have state facilities in their districts, so they are naturally more amenable to “revenue enhancements.” Others, particularly in the suburbs, have long been allies of the teachers’ unions. But many of those same members are surely worried what could happen to them if they vote with the Democrats. Forget Cross; I’m talking about the tea-partiers. Just look at what the tea partiers did to established Republicans in primaries all over the country this year. In Delaware, they beat the most respected Republican in the state with a bizarre candidate who eventually had to run TV ads assuring voters she wasn’t a witch. No way does Harry Reid go back to the U.S. Senate if Nevada Republicans had nominated their sane primary candidate. Illinois’ next primary will be held in a little more than 17 months. Whatever the Republicans do next year will still be fresh in angry voters’ minds. I just wouldn’t want to be in their shoes right now. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and TheCapitolFaxBlog.com.

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ithout a doubt, the worst place to be right now in Illinois politics is the state’s House Republican caucus. Their leader Tom Cross went “all in” this year against House Speaker Michael Madigan and came up way short. There were the innumerable planted newspaper stories about Madigan, including, for instance, how he apparently picked his own Republican challenger. The Republicans then staged a downtown Chicago “fundraiser” for Madigan’s invisible opponent. Then there were the billboards along the Tollway ridiculing Madigan, which ginned up even more unflattering media coverage. Of course, there were also the countless mailers and TV ads claiming that Madigan was the real problem in Illinois. Not to mention the hundreds of times Cross boldly predicted he would win the majority and finally put Madigan in his place. Madigan detested Cross before the election. It’s gone way beyond that now. Maybe Leader Cross truly believed he could take Madigan out. More likely, the boasting was a ruse to raise money from gullible, rich Republican businessmen. Maybe Cross figured that even if he didn’t win, Bill Brady would surely beat Governor Pat Quinn, and then Cross would have someone to protect him and his members from Madigan’s retribution. A Brady win would also have meant that Cross would have a chance at drawing the new legislative-district map next year. And maybe Cross concluded that even if he didn’t win and Brady lost, then at least Democratic Supreme Court Chief Justice Tom Kilbride would lose his retention battle because out-of-state business groups were spending cash hand-over-fist against him. With Kilbride out, the court would at least temporarily lose its Democratic majority and might be frightened into going along with any Republican lawsuit against a Democratic district map. Well, not only is Cross still in the minority, but he won’t have a Republican governor to backstop him. And Chief Justice Kilbride won. Big. Most of Cross’ members are loyal, but they have to be worried about their future. Legislators, like most humans, are mainly concerned with self-preservation. But the Quinn/Kilbride wins mean that Speaker Madigan will draw the new district map. And the power of the map means that some of those Republicans won’t be coming back in two years. One time-tested map trick is to draw two or more enemies into the same district. In other words, the Republicans need to hope

It’s no secret that Speaker Madigan is not the forgiveand-forget type. But even if some House Republicans bow down to His Royal Highness in exchange for redistricting-map crumbs, they have another, perhaps even more serious problem to ponder.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010 

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

by Lynn Campbell, IowaPolitics.com

R

GOP Chair Credits Focus on Independent Voters
leaders in Des Moines speaking with a clear, consistent message, and it clearly penetrated with the voters all the way down to those local legislative levels.” 

epublican Party of Iowa Chair Matt Strawn attributed last week’s big Republican wins at the statewide, legislative, and county levels to the party’s focusing on independent voters – just like President Barack Obama did with his win in 2008 – and a clear, consistent message. “We did it with unprecedented coordination, and we did it by targeting independent voters,” Strawn said two days after the election in which Republicans wrested control of the governor’s office and the Iowa House from Democrats. “One thing that we had learned in the past is Republicans spend a lot of time talking to Republican voters, but they hadn’t reached out to independent voters in this state.” Strawn said that’s what the Obama campaign did very effectively in 2008. So Republicans began identifying and targeting those independent voters in fall 2009, finding out what issues they cared about. “And overwhelmingly it was jobs, it was the economy, it was the overspending, and it was the debt that they saw here in Des Moines,” Strawn said. “And over the course of the year, we continued to talk to those voters, and going into the final weekend of the election we had actually identified 100,000 Iowans – independent voting Iowans – who had identified with the Republican ticket and were part of our turnout operation.” Republicans’ voter program showed that a successful statewide candidate would have to net 100,000 to 120,000 new votes. Former Governor Terry Branstad won the gubernatorial election Tuesday by just under 125,000 votes. In addition, House Republican candidates received 200,000 more votes than House Democratic candidates – roughly 606,000 for Republicans to less than 400,000 for Democrats. Republicans this year increased their major-donor revenue about 30 percent compared to last election cycle and saw a “volunteer surge” at the end of the campaign that allowed them to shift volunteers’ focus in the last 48 hours of the campaign to targeted legislative races. Republicans put volunteers to work contacting voters in those key races, and ended up winning in five out of six targeted Senate districts and eight out of 10 targeted House districts. Strawn also attributed Republicans’ success this year to its candidates using a consistent message since January 2009. “Republicans had a clear, unified message about what one-party Democrat rule was doing in Des Moines,” Strawn said. “So you had all the Republican

Appointment of Three New Justices Key Issue in Transition of Governors
Iowa’s rejection of three Iowa Supreme Court justices last week is a first since the state adopted its merit-selection system for judges in 1962, and the job of appointing three new justices to the state’s highest court is expected to become a hot political issue in the transition between current Governor Chet Culver and Branstad. Branstad said it would be a mistake for Culver to rush to appoint three new Iowa Supreme Court justices before his term ends. “The Judicial Nominating Commission is not balanced. You have 12 Democrats and only one Republican on it, so I think to really restore credibility to the court system it’s important they not rush to judgment to get a nominee to a lame-duck governor,” he said. “It should be I think done in the normal deliberative process.” Branstad said the Judicial Nominating Commission could be changed by legislation, and he sees that as the solution to politicizing the court. “Looking to the future, I know there are many people concerned about it becoming a very political situation, and I think the best way to avoid that is have a more balanced system so you don’t have one party dominating and controlling the process of who will be considered for appointment in the future,” he said. The 15-member commission has 10 days after an opening on the Supreme Court to call a meeting of the commissioners. Within 60 days, the commission must interview applicants and forward a list of three nominees to the governor for each vacancy. The governor then has 30 days to appoint one of those three individuals to serve on the Supreme Court. Culver said November 3 that he was reviewing the process for appointing new Iowa Supreme Court justices following the vote against retention of Justices Marsha Ternus, Michael Streit, and David Baker. For an expanded version of this article, visit RiverCitiesReader.com. This weekly summary comes from IowaPolitics.com, an online government and politics news service. Reporter Andrew Duffelmeyer and other correspondents contributed to this report.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

“Whoa. What Is This?!”
Todd Green Plays Dozens of Unusual Musical Instruments as Quad City Arts’ Latest Visiting Artist

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

T

odd Green, the latest guest in Quad City Arts’ Visiting Artist series, began his professional career as a guitarist. Yet the musician knows that whenever he performs at one of his many school engagements, the guitar is perhaps the last instrument the kids will be interested in. “I have a berimbau,” says Green during a recent phone interview, “which is a very unusual, bow-and-arrow-looking thing that you play percussion on. They really like that. And then, you know, there’s silly stuff. Like, I have animal toenails, I call them. It’s actually goat hooves that are all hooked together and make a percussion sound. “Usually it’s the weirdest ones, you know?” says Green with a laugh. “Especially with the really young kids. You can read their faces – their mouths are open and their eyes are all big – and you can just see them going, ‘Whoa. What is this?!’” To be sure, the sight of someone making music with goat hooves would make many of us exclaim, “What is this?!” But Green’s examples here are just three among dozens of instruments that the touring musician performs in concert, and that seem almost designed to make your spell-check explode. The Bolivian zampoña. The Arabic doumbek. The South American walaycho. The Slavic dvoyanka. The Chinese erhu. The Turkish yali tambur. Some of these – and some two dozen other instruments from around the globe – will be heard when Green, on November 13, presents a public concert at Bettendorf ’s Redeemer Lutheran Church. And while he’s brought with him an intimidating number of musical instruments from his home near Lake Tahoe, Green has not brought along an intimidating number of musicians. Using digital samplers to record himself and create layers of sound, he’ll first discuss and demonstrate the instruments, and then perform as a literal one-man band – or, in this case, a literal one-man world-fusion ensemble. “It’s fun,” says Green in succinctly describing his unique career. “It’s different, that’s for sure.”

“I guess it went all right,” says Green, “because I had a lot of people say, ‘Man, I’ve never seen anybody do that before!’ And so going in that direction really intrigued me. There were a limited amount of musicians to work with anyway, so I said, ‘Well, I might as well do it all myself.’ “So I started exploring more and more instruments,” he continues, “and since I was starting to make connections in the [Lake Tahoe] bay area, I eventually moved to the Tahoe area. Just like New York, the bay area has these huge Chinese, Middle Eastern, Indian, and South American communities. And, oddly enough, some of the best musicians in the world – who play instruments from these countries I was interested in – live part-time or full-time in the United States. So I’d basically play with the best players in the world on a lot of these instruments, studying with them and playing gigs with them. “And,” he adds, “it’s worked out real nice.”

Priority Instruments
Green says that, currently, “I probably play somewhere in the vicinity of 50 different instruments,” all of which he owns, though not all of them travel with him from gig to gig. “In the school programs,” he says, “I present about 20-something to the kids, and my [public] concerts have maybe 30-something. That’s about all I can carry, and really, that’s all I have time for in a two-hour concert anyway.” Yet even as the owner of such unique instruments as the African ashiko drums and the stringed, Afghan rabab, Green says it’s still easy to pick a favorite. “Of the 50-ish that I play, if I had to give them all up but one, I’d keep the one I started with – the guitar. That’s the one I know the most on. And really, along with the Western violin, guitars are probably the most universal instruments. They’re pretty much played in every culture, though they may be played in unusual ways in some cultures. Like in Morocco, they play the Western violin, but they play it in their laps, vertically – not on their neck like we do. And the guitar is played, in some cultures, without the metal frets on it.” Despite his prowess on the guitar, the violin, and all manner of other instruments, Green understands the importance of continual practice. “I have priority instruments that I work on every day,” says Green, “and the guitar is one of them – the variety of guitars, I should say. The pipa, which is the Chinese plucked lute, is one I work on every day. And the bamboo flutes, mainly the bansuri that I started with. But also some of the Middle Eastern neys, they’re called – they’re end-blown flutes. A few different percussion instruments: the tablas from India, the tonbak from Iran, and the riq, which is a Middle Eastern tambourine.

Freelancing on Everything
Green, who grew up in New York, says his interest in music began “when I was probably eight or nine. I initially wanted to play drums. But my mother, I guess, decided she didn’t want a kid whacking on a snare drum, so she said, ‘I don’t think so.’ And so I said, ‘Well, then, I want to play guitar.’ So guitar is what it was.” He began taking lessons and, before long, stopped lessons – “Even at that young age,” says Green with a laugh, “I had a sense that this teacher I had didn’t know what he was doing” – and spent his youth teaching himself to play chords and songs. In the late 1970s, after graduating from high school, Green enrolled in the Berklee College of Music, and he

studied privately with noted musicians Mick Goodrich, George Benson, and Grammy Award-winning guitarist Pat Metheny. “I was hardcore jazz ... ,” he says. “And it was all guitar at that point.” Following his graduation from Berklee, Green moved to New York City and embarked on a career as a professional guitarist. “I was basically playing jazz,” he says, “but kind of freelancing on everything,” and his talents led to session work, music for TV commercials, and tours (with several different bands) throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. (“It’s not something I’m proud of,” says Green, “but in the early ’80s, I was also on some of the first rap records. Which wasn’t even called ‘rap’ then. It was really only a local phenomenon, and I was going to these studios in Brooklyn and doing these recordings.”) Green says, “I eventually got tired of the whole jazz scene in New York. The whole scene period in New York.” His disenchantment with the city, though, was also dovetailing with his burgeoning fascination with instruments beyond the guitar. “New York was where I got more of an interest in Indian music,” says Green, who took a class on the subject at Berklee. “I started studying the tablas, which are Indian hand drums, and the bansuri flute, which is the bamboo flute. But I didn’t do anything with

them. I just studied them and was still just a guitar player. It was when I moved out of New York and moved to Montana, of all places, that I really started exploring them.” Calling Montana “the happy medium” between prospective homes in Colorado (“I thought it had gotten too built up”) and Canada (“I didn’t want to live in another country”), Green settled in the city of Bozeman in 1988, and says that given his growing interest in instruments from other countries, “I tried to put a group together – a kind of jazz/world-music type of thing. And obviously, there’s a limited number of good musicians in Montana compared to New York. But I did find a good bass player, a good percussionist, and a good drummer, so we put a group together, and did a number of concerts all around the region.” Eventually, Green says, the ensemble in which he played guitar “kind of fell apart. But at the same time, these looping digital samplers were starting to come on the market. They were very expensive and they didn’t work very well, initially, but I started experimenting with them.” He began sampling guitar, flutes, and percussion – getting “a guitar synthesizer to make up for the lack of other instruments” – and finally performed his first one-manband set at an outdoor concert in Billings, Montana.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

Continued On Page 17 

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 1, No. 
November 11 - , 010

Anything but Simple
Monte Montgomery, November 17 at the Redstone Room

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

M

532 W. 3rd St. Davenport IA 52801 RiverCitiesReader.com (563)324-0049 (phone) (563)323-3101 (fax) 

onte Montgomery’s guitarplaying is so distinctive, dexterous, and seemingly ingrained that it sounds like he might have had the instrument in his cradle. So it’s surprising that he could have just as easily played the trumpet. His first instruments were trumpet and piano, and he said he only took the guitar seriously “when I no longer had a piano or a trumpet at my disposal, and my Mom had an extra guitar. That’s what I had. I often joke about, ‘Mom, what would have happened if we hadn’t lost that trumpet?’ ... I think fate had other things in store for me.” He’s similarly matter-of-fact about his decision to abandon electric guitar for an acoustic. “I could do a lot of things on acoustic I was relying on electric for,” he said in a phone interview earlier this week. “So why not leave the extra guitar at home and the additional two heavy amps I was carrying around for my electric, and just play acoustic? It really was kind of just that simple.” The playing by Montgomery, who will be performing at the Redstone Room on November 17, is anything but simple. In 2004, Guitar Player magazine named him one of the 50 greatest guitar players of all time, and he’s been called the acoustic Hendrix. I’d cast him more as the child of Hendrix and Michael Hedges, a union evident with the unmistakable echoes “Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)” on the blistering “Can’t Fool Everyone” from his most recent album, 2008’s self-titled disc. Like both of those pioneers, Montgomery employs techniques and effects to transcend the normal uses of guitar – combining sounds clearly originating from an acoustic with a rock player’s aggression and bag of tricks, leading to a palette and range scarcely imagined by most guitarists.

The 44-year-old, Texas-based Montgomery – who came to national attention with a 1999 set on Austin City Limits – said that style developed over time and somewhat by accident: “I suddenly had the ability to make my acoustic sound like electric, with distortion and all that. I didn’t initially set out for that. I just didn’t want to lug around a bunch of gear.” On his 2008 record, Montgomery does all sorts of wicked things to his instrument, and the Jimi comparison feels right from the outset – and not just because of a 10minute version of “Little Wing.” In the instrumental section that is the second half of opener “River,” Montgomery’s work is undoubtedly nimble and technically impressive, but it’s also an outgrowth of the song, with masterful control of tone, and his bandmates aren’t merely wallpaper to the main show. The album was largely recorded live, with few overdubs, and its polish in that context is almost frightening. “I like to take songs and take them out on the road and work them and find out what works well musically ... ,” Montgomery said. “You get to a certain point where you’re just so comfortable, the song is concise, it’s ready to go.” He also credits his longtime relationship with drummer Phil Bass: “When I hint at something, he’s there. We have this weird kind of kinetic relationship. I don’t have

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

look at him or cue him; he knows what I’m doing.” Perhaps the best summation of Montgomery’s talents is the propulsive second track “Let’s Go,” in which the guitarist is judicious with his talent. Where “The River” feels instrumentally boastful, the fireworks explode within the chorus of “Let’s Go,” with the guitar matching the song’s feverish escalation and squall fragments of distortion echoing Montgomery’s barely controlled vocals. The song demonstrates that Montgomery is more than a guitar wiz. While his lyrics tend toward the banal – particularly when they’re front-and-center, as on “Love’s Last Holiday” – his vocals are soulful and expressive. Despite a too-direct chorus, Montgomery’s singing and the tune unearth poignance on “Midlife Matinee.” And his compositions are solid and often exciting, not mere frameworks for noodling. From the abundant funk of “Moonlight Tango” (with digressions ranging from delicate to muscular) to heartfelt ballads, Montgomery rarely engages in guitar heroics at the expense of the song. “I have an ear for melody, and I know a good song when I hear one,” Montgomery said. As for balancing performance joy with the needs of a song, he said, “I like to make it interesting for me first. ... I like to find different little things to do to songs that put my little stamp on it.” Monte Montgomery will perform on Wednesday, November 17, at the Redstone Room (129 Main Street in Davenport). The show starts at 8:30 p.m., and the bill also includes Lojo Russo. Tickets ($12 in advance, $15 the day of the show) are available from RedstoneRoom.com. For more information on Monte Montgomery, visit MonteMontgomery.net.

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Past, Present, and Posters
Hatch Show Prints, Through November 19 at the Catich Gallery

by Michelle Garrison michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com

I

10

n the Hatch Show Prints exhibit in St. Ambrose University’s Catich Gallery, the past and present intermingle through design. Art, design, and culture don’t move forward in a linear way; instead, they diverge, change, and return as new but still familiar styles. Typefaces from almost a century ago manage to look fresh in the hands of a modern designer, and a poster from the 1950s can seem almost prophetic in its similarity to today’s graphics. By presenting designs of the past alongside new designs with a retro bent, Hatch Show Prints reveals the connections between history, culture, and design, and their relationships to music and performance. This show, in the Galvin Fine Arts Center, is a powerful assemblage of 58 letterpress block prints, all made by the Hatch Show Prints print shop in Nashville, Tennessee. The shop opened in 1879 and has created promotional posters for performers of all sorts, and this exhibit includes fresh prints made from eight decades of archived blocks. In recent years, shop manager Jim Sherraden has also made monotypes by combining the old blocks in new ways, and a selection of his original works is also on display. The show samples widely the Hatch collection, although the majority of the posters are for modern music acts including B.B. King, Carrie Underwood, Johnny Cash, the Pixies, and Dashboard Confessional. The posters range in size from about the size of a sheet of legal paper to 26-by-40-inch designs and were all printed in the past eight years. The exhibit was a clever choice for a university audience, highlighting printmaking techniques and design history coupled with popular music. The exhibit creates the atmosphere of a county fair, or a busy city street plastered with signs. Text in an image always begs to be read, and standing among so many visually bold words is like trying to pick out a single voice in a crowd; this exciting and bewildering effect is heightened by the use of bright colors, bold shapes, and diverse typefaces. The prints are left unframed, making it feel like the posters are in their natural environment, but they’re hung in precisely aligned clusters and grids on white walls, which brings about a sense of order. The Catich achieves a pleasant balance between art gallery and poster wall, which allows the viewer to contemplate the works without being overwhelmed, while still feeling their original intent. It’s striking how well the Hatch designers visually capture the sounds and personae of the artists. The color scheme of the Taylor Swift poster is pastel green and pink – two currently popular colors for young girls – and the text is

framed in cherry blossoms. The visible grain of the woodblock creates a down-home feel perfect for a country artist. A different use of the letterpress method can be seen in the poster for the heavy-rock group Korn. The poster includes a vintage block print of a boxer that has been made even tougher by layering new prints of blood splatter on the gloves and a tattoo of a skull on the fighter’s shoulder. Even though the typeface and boxer

image are clearly from a design era of the past, these modern updates make clear the alternative edge of the band. The woodcut medium was embraced and emphasized by the designers for some of the pieces. The Arcade Fire concert poster, for example, has an inked surface that appears faded, smudged, and cracked from gouges in the wood used to create the image. The edges of the typeface are fuzzy, but at the top of the poster we see a sharp vintage photograph of a woman, standing by a car, holding a baby. The use of the old photograph with an intentionally flawed printing method for a contemporary band is a visual potpourri. However, the designer’s use of symmetrical organization, a solid dark-blue background, and a limited color palette hold the work together. And again, the visual choices reference the musical style of the performers. The Arcade Fire’s sound draws on the past through the use of folk and romantic

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

musical motifs, which mesh well with the aged appearance of the poster. Other designs seem so clean and precise that the viewer might at first mistake them for digital or screen prints. A poster for singer/songwriter Melissa Etheridge features an open, ecru background, with simplified slender trees in the foreground. The clean edges and solid color of the shapes, as well as the contemporary aesthetic with which this was created, look much more like a work of digital vector art than a woodcut. This combination of a modern aesthetic within a traditional mode of production draws on Etheridge’s musical style of gruff vocals with slick pop production. Though this print communicates successful, its avoidance of the imperfect nature of the letterpress method robs it of some character; the most compelling prints in this show could not have been created through another medium. While the juxtaposition of old materials and a modern sensibility is a persistent motif in the show, Jim Sherraden’s monotypes combine them in the context of fine art rather than design. His monotypes were made by running the paper through the press several times over different arrangements of blocks, with ink expressively hand-applied. The result is a hybrid of painterly textures with flat, graphic type and pictures. Sherraden’s disciplined fusion of seemingly unrelated prints – with disparate images, letters, and textures – results in a beautiful interplay. In one print, Sherraden has placed a large donkey in the center of the composition. The background is a patchwork of light yellows and blues, with a faint red sun running off the right side. Overlapping all this are blotchy black rectangles, with the ink lightly applied so that the background remains faintly visible beneath. These were printed from blocks, but the ink is too sparse or smudged to make out what the block originally depicted, creating a mysterious texture. All of this is contained in a checkerboard border, suggesting a race victory flag, chess, or a clothing pattern. The sun and the use of warm colors bring to mind summer. The donkey can be associated with many things – the Southwest, farming, carrying loads, or even the Democratic party. Like the posters, this print seems to be a memory – an elusive scrap of the past viewed through the aesthetic of the present. Michelle Garrison is a mixed-media artist who teaches art and design at Geneseo Middle School and J.D. Darnell High School.

Movie Reviews
MEGAMIND

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

Brains, Heart, Courage, and the Wizards of Odd
that so frequently during Waiting for “Superman” that the movie was practically Since Universal Pictures’ fizzy, funny a lower-ab workout. Director Davis animated hit Despicable Me was released Guggenheim’s expansive, informative, a mere four months ago, it’s hardly incensed-yetpossible that level-headed DreamWorks’ documentary new – a rallying Megamind cry for could be publicconsidered an education intentional reform in ripoff, despite America a plot that – examines also finds an how our über-villain school gradually systems are morphing collectively Megamind into an überfailing hero. And our children, and given its admittedly despite the film’s haughty, antagonistic one-sided perspective and the blame protagonist performing his evil deeds laid on our country’s teachers’ unions, alongside a goofy, tag-along minion. And it’s sure to piss off many viewers. (Not despite this blobby little homunculus all teachers, though, are likely to find being named Minion. (Seriously, are there the movie offensive. Just the bad ones.) no fresh ideas in Hollywood?) But in its conversations with lauded So what say we chalk this up to educator Geoffrey Canada, recently coincidence and enjoy director Tom resigned public-school chancellor McGrath’s Megamind for what it is: a Michelle Rhee, and others who’ve clever, quick-witted, and unexpectedly and found surprising success in helping fix awfully smart outing with marvelously a seemingly unfixable system, Waiting vivid visuals and reams of hysterical for “Superman” is at least as inspiring dialogue. (“Good luck on your date!” as it is heartbreaking. And buoyed shouts David Cross’ peeved Minion to by touching interviews with five kids Will Ferrell’s nefarious title character. whose futures depend on their names “I will!” is the senseless reply.) Given being drawn in charter-school lotteries, the movie’s predictable over-reliance on the film is a smashingly entertaining tired pop tunes for comic effect, it’s still real-life tear-jerker, even if some of a bit DreamWorks-y for my tastes. But its most amusing bits are also its most the vocal cast, which includes Tina Fey, infuriating. “Research,” says an onJonah Hill, Brad Pitt, and J.K. Simmons, screen figure, “shows that childrens do provides spirited fun, and for every gag learn.” Considering the person giving that sputters, three more pop just right. the grammatically incorrect quote is The climactic group dance-along to President George W. Bush, you don’t Michael Jackson’s “Bad”? Pretty lame. know whether to laugh or scream. Ferrell’s Megamind disguising himself as Superman’s Jor-El and telling his capeFOR COLORED GIRLS wearing rival, with hilarious Marlon Brando inflections, “I am your fathuh, and Based on Ntozake Shange’s theatrical you are my thun”? Pritheleth. tone poem For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” Is Enuf, the simply titled For Colored Girls finds a group of interconnected You know that sensation you sometimes black women dealing with, and giving feel at a particularly moving film, when lengthy monologues on, such topics as you find yourself tightening your stomach adultery, rape, incest, STDs, spousal muscles to avoid sobbing out loud? I did

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

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LISTeN TO MIKe eVeRy FRIdAy AT AM ON ROCK 10- FM WITH dAVe & dARReN

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What’s Happenin’
Theatre
Pericles
St. Peter’s Episcopal Church Friday, November 12, through Sunday, November 21
hat’s that? How are rehearsals going for the Curtainbox Theatre Company’s forthcoming presentation of Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler? Quite well! Thank you for asking! I’d provide details, but since this production – which runs November 16 through 30 at the Village of East Davenport’s Village Theatre – features me in the cast, it would be tacky to even mention it here. I’ll tell you what bothers me, though: Given the show’s rehearsal and performance schedule, I might, for the first time in more than five years, have to miss out on seeing a new stage work by our area’s classical-theatre troupe, The Prenzie Players. In this case, it’s William Shakespeare’s Pericles, running November 12 through 21. And lemme tell you, it’s not a production I’m happy about possibly missing. To begin with, this infrequently produced title by Shakespeare (or, as has been frequently suggested, by Shakespeare and a possible collaborator) is a weird, wonderful epic involving royal intrigue, heroic deeds, perilous storms at sea, games of skill, murderous machinations, families separated and reunited, and a brief sojourn to a neighborhood brothel. Whether or not it’s the product of one author, Pericles, God bless it, is Bard-ian in the extreme. Then, of course, there’s the matter of the famously unpredictable Prenzie Players being the ones to tackle the material. And with Prenzie veteran Andy Koski serving as director, and a cast that boasts such talented troupe veterans as J.C. Luxton, Maggie Woolley, Angela Rathman, Cole McFarren, Alaina Pascarella, and Jeb Makula, the group’s latest is bound to feature all manner of inventive, stylistic, and performance-based treats. But perhaps my biggest reason for not wanting to miss Pericles? The choice of venue, as the ever-nomadic theatre company will be staging its new show in the beautiful St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, located at 2400 Middle Road in Bettendorf. The Prenzie Players in a church. Now who could’ve predicted that? Pericles tickets are $10 at the door, and information is available by emailing info@prenzieplayers.com or visiting PrenziePlayers.com.

Theatre
M

Monty Python’s Sopamalot
Adler Theatre Sunday, November 21, 7 p.m.

“The Fisch Schlapping Song” and “He Is Not Dead Yet” and “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life.” And these photos.

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onty Python’s Spamalot, based on the film Monty Python & the Holy Grail. Winner of three 2005 Tony Awards including Best Musical, with a book and lyrics by Eric Idle. King Arthur and Sir Galahad and the Lady in the Lake. Vulgar Frenchmen and a Trojan Rabbit and cows lobbed from catapults. (“Run away!!!”) The Holy Hand Grenade and the Knights Who Say “Ni!” and a shrubbery.

Need I say more? Well, maybe a little more. The Broadway touring production of Monty Python’s Spamalot plays at the Adler Theatre on November 21, and tickets are available by calling (800)745-3000 or visiting AdlerTheatre.com.

Movies

Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg
Figge Art Museum Sunday, November 14, 4 p.m.

Yet in this movie that Film Threat calls “a warm reunion wit beloved entertainer” and Film Journal International describes a “a fascinating portrait of a worthy personality and her era,” Ber groundbreaking show is but one of the many, many Berg facto touched on. If you’d care to hazard a guess, which of the follow not one of this largely unsung legend’s accomplishments?

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

er: 4. She was actually cited as the second-most respected n in America. First place went to Eleanor Roosevelt. So, you , that’s not too shabby.

how of hands: How many of you know who Gertrude Berg is? Hmm. I’m not sensing a lot of hands raised there. Granted, some of you may be holding the paper with both hands. And others may be scrolling down the Web page with one and eating a sandwich with the other. But I’m betting the hand count’s still pretty low. Well, that number is about to increase dramatically – at least, it will if you attend the Jewish Federation of the Quad Cities’ presentation of the Berg documentary Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg. Being screened at the Figge Art Museum on November 14, this critically hailed work by documentarian Aviva Kempner explores the life of “the most famous woman in America you’ve never heard of,” the radio and television pioneer whose series The Goldbergs, in 1949, was television’s very first character-driven sitcom.

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1) Became the first performer to win an Emmy Award for B Actress 2) Starred in a second successful sitcom titled Molly 3) Won a Best Actress Tony Award for 1959’s A Majority of O 4) Was once polled as the most respected woman in Americ 5) Was, for a time, the highest-paid guest star in television 6) Wrote a bestselling cookbook 7) Wrote a popular advice column 8) Had her own line of clothing

Admission to Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg is $5, and information is available by calling the Jewish Federation of the Quad Cities (309)793-1300 or visiting JFQC.org.

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Music

Third Sunday Jazz featuring Maggie Brown
The Redstone Room Sunday, November 21

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here is a lot of great music out here,” says performer Maggie Brown in a recent Chicago Defender interview. “It is not popularized. It’s not going to come to you on the radio, or on a CD. You have to look for it.” Well, folks, you can stop looking; great music can be found at Davenport’s Redstone Room on November 21. Appearing as the latest guest in Polyrhythms’ monthly Third Sunday Jazz Series, the Chicago-based Maggie Brown will present a 3 p.m. jazz workshop and a 6 p.m. concert of bound-to-be-thrilling solos, underscoring why the Defender describes her as “a phenomenal artist who has loads of individual style.” Brown would likely credit her dad for that much of that style, as

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the Columbia College graduate is the daughter of Chicago’s legendary Oscar Brown Jr., and paid tribute to the famed musician, poet, and playwright by recording nine of his compositions in her From My Window CD. “That has always been a goal of mine,” Brown told the Chicago Tribune’s Howard Reich, “to shed more light on the gems that I consider to be my family treasure.” Yet with Chicago’s N’DIGO newspaper calling From My Window “a dynamite package of soul-rendering, passionate music in a jazz format,” and Brown earning Chicago Music Award nominations for Best Jazz CD and Best Jazz Performer, she’s clearly a gifted artist in her own right. And while Redstone Room patrons will surely enjoy some outstanding jazz during her visit, they might get more variety than they anticipated, as suggested by the acclaim Brown received for Legacy: Our Wealth of Music, her genredefying, one-woman show about African-American musical heritage. “I am a vocalist,” she told Reich. “I do not consider myself a ‘jazz singer.’” Let’s maybe not mention that to the folks at Polyrhythms. “Third Sunday Jazz/Blues/Spiritual/Hip-Hop/Rap/Performance-Art Series” doesn’t really trip off the tongue. For more information on Brown’s Davenport engagement, call Polyrhythms at (309)373-0790 or visit Polyrhythms.org. equal parts gospel and soul” – and their exquisite harmonies on both classical and contemporary works have amazed audiences worldwide. Among Destino’s prestigious credits are performances at the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, the 2008 Miss America Pageant in Las Vegas, the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, and, this past April, New York’s Carnegie Hall. And during their area stay, Quad Cities audiences will be able to enjoy Destino’s thrilling vocals in not one, but two, public appearances: November 20’s annual Holiday Pops concert at the i wireless Center – an event that also features the Quad City Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Quad Cities, and the Sanctuary Choir of the First Presbyterian Church – and November 21’s engagement at the First Presbyterian Church of Davenport. It probably goes without saying that Destino’s Saturday-night performance will find the group singing tunes from its acclaimed holiday CD Christmas with Destino. But I’m guessing it’s anything-goes on Sunday, as the album Destino Live in Concert includes everything from Josh Groban’s “You Raise Me Up” to The Threepenny Opera’s “Mac the Knife” to “O Sole Mio.” Maybe, in Canada, “destino” actually means “phenomenally gifted in so many different musical genres that you’ll be torn between wanting to applaud and wanting to smack them.” For more information on Destino’s area appearances, call (309)7931213, or visit QuadCityArts.com.

MUSIC

What else Is Happenin’

Music
Destino
i wireless Center and First Presbyterian Church of Davenport Saturday, November 20, and Sunday, November 21
f memories of my high-school foreignlanguage classes are correct, “destino” is Spanish for “fate.” But the vocal ensemble Destino originated in Canada, so I’m thinking that in that country, the word more likely means “young, ridiculously talented, and boasting greater professional accomplishments than anyone should ever amass at their ages.” Remind me to look that up some time. In our area as part of Quad City Arts’ 2010-11 Visiting Artist series, Destino may only have been on the music scene since 2006, but they’ve certainly wasted no time in shooting straight to the top. Composed of Joey Niceforo, Terance Reddick, and Roy Tan, the trio croons in a style oftentimes referred to as “popera” – what the Vancouver Province calls “the romance of opera infused with pop and bumped up with

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Thursday, November 11 – Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett. Noted guitarists perform songs from their Little Feat catalog. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $22. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 12 – Duke Tumatoe & the Power Trio. Blues musicians and frequent The Bob & Tom Show guests in concert. Circa ’21 Speakeasy (1818 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $20. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. For a 2006 interview with Tumatoe, visit RCReader.com/y/tumatoe. Friday, November 12 – The Guess Who. Concert with the chart-topping musicians of “American Woman” and “These Eyes” fame. Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $20-40. For tickets and information, call (800)843-4753 or visit Bettendorf. IsleOfCapriCasinos.com. Saturday, November 13 – The Kenny Barron Trio. A Hancher Auditorium presentation of the jazz masters in concert, with special guest David Sánchez. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 7:30 p.m. $10-39. For tickets and

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

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Dancing Towards

Death The Richard Harris Collection
Now at the Figge
Sponsored by Riverboat Development Authority Contributing Sponsor River Cities’ Reader

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An exhibition to die for.
Thinking about death is one thing…visualizing it is something else. In this exhibition, Death often appears not as an animal or gruesome demon but as a recognizable human figure, albeit one reduced to bones and sinew. See how artists Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt, Max Klinger and others portray the inevitable Dance of Death.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

Thursday, November 18
6 pm • Ballet performance “I, Vampire” by Ballet Quad Cities 7 pm • Lecture “The Queen of Sins and ‘La mort qui danse’: Late 19th Century Femme Fatale Imagery” with Dr. Terri Switzer View behind the scenes of Dancing Towards Death at www.figgeart.org/video1
Albrecht Dürer, The Coat of Arms with the Skull; 1503, engraving, private collection
Sponsored by

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www.putnam.org/harrypotter

563.326.7804 www.figgeartmuseum.org Davenport, Iowa

by Bruce Walters

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Art in Plain Sight: The Black Hawk Statue

“Party with a Purpose”
…a fundraiser to buy holiday gifts & food baskets for seniors in the Quad Cities.

(Editor’s note: This is the first in an occasional series on the history of public art in the Quad Cities.)

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Thursday, November 18, 2010
5:30 – 8:00 pm at CASI
1035 W. Kimberly Road, Davenport
Admission is your tax-deductible donation.

Wear your favorite hat & enjoy Gourmet Appetizers Wine, Beer & Great Music Raffle Prizes Cigar Bar and Hat Contest!
Go to www.HolidayHatBash.com for details, or call 563.265.1HAT(1428).
Can’t attend, but want to donate? Send donation to: Holiday Hat Bash c/o CASI 1035 W. Kimberly Road, Davenport, IA 52806

tanding on a ridge overlooking the Rock River, an 18-ton granite statue of Black Hawk dominates the space before the Watch Tower Lodge at the Black Hawk State Historic Site (1510 46th Avenue in Rock Island). This is near the location of the Native American village Saukenuk, the largest settlement in Illinois when it became a state in 1818. The statue’s commanding presence tells us that this was a man of great importance. At the age of 65, Black Hawk led more than 1,000 men, women, and children in an attempt to reclaim Saukenuk, their former village. War was declared on them in 1832 when they crossed the river from present-day Davenport. The war ended with his capture and the massacre of hundreds of Native Americans trying to cross back over the river. This was the last Indian war fought east of the Mississippi. Black Hawk died in 1838. In the early 1890s, Chicago sculptor David Richards (1829-1897) carved the sculpture freehand and without measurements. It stood in Spencer Square in downtown Rock Island until 1954, when it was moved to its present site. Over the years, Black Hawk’s name has proliferated: A community college, bank,

and hotel are among the many Quad Cities businesses and institutions named after him. So are professional sports teams in the NHL and NBA (the Atlanta Hawks franchise played here from 1946 to 1951 under theTri-Cities Blackhawks banner), as well as a helicopter, a motorcycle, an automobile, and a bewildering range of consumer products. Iowa was nicknamed the Hawkeye State in his honor. Several naval vessels have been named USS Black Hawk. There is even a Black Hawk voodoo cult. With such a legacy, it’s not surprising that the overall height of the sculpture with its pedestal is imposing. But, remarkably, Black Hawk is not depicted as a warrior. His countenance is confident, not fierce. His gaze seems directed to a distant horizon, not fixed on an enemy. In many ways, the artist sculpted an emperor or deity from antiquity with Native American clothing and headdress. Yet when looking at the figure itself, it is almost surprising that it is only life-sized (Black Hawk was about five-foot-eight), and the clenched left hand has a very human quality. One of the treasures of the Quad Cities, the sculpture conveys a sense of the subject’s esteem, yet still allows us to discover a real person within. Bruce Walters is a professor of art at Western Illinois University.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

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“ Whoa. What Is This?!”
And then the sarangi from India and the kemencheh from Iran. Those are the main ones that I try to work on every day. “And then I have other ones that, pretty much, I only play when I perform on them,” he continues. “You know, they’re kind of color instruments. I can do what I want to do on them. I don’t have complete mastery or a big repertoire on any of them, but I know what I’m doing on them, and they’re easy to play, and I feel very comfortable with them. I never really take them out of their cases except to set them up for the performance and play ’em.” While, as he says, “I’m mostly known for doing this one-man-band thing,” Green also does get the chance to perform without the electronic assistance of digital samplers. “Occasionally I do strings-only concerts and guitar concerts,” he says. “I have a variety of different, custom-made guitars, so when I say ‘guitar concert,’ it’s not just one guitar. It’s maybe a half-dozen that are all unusuallooking, with different kinds of stringing and tuning.” He also frequently performs purely as an acoustic musician during the many school residencies and assemblies at which he’s annually booked, engagements that Green says he always looks forward to. “Yesterday,” he says during our October 29 conversation, “a kid came up to me in a highschool program. He played guitar, because he knew about some of the plucking I was doing, and he asked me about the Chinese pipa. He wanted to see up-close how I was doing this technique, which is extremely difficult to learn. And that’ll happen, just out of the blue – somebody will come up and say, ‘What’s that instrument again? Can I see that up close?’ “Every once in a while, I’m totally amazed,” says Green of his school appearances. “I did two programs yesterday – one was [grades] K through six, and the other was seven through 12. It was in a huge auditorium with over 500 kids in each one. And it was totally quiet with both groups. They were all just locked in.”

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

A Pampered Life
As you might imagine, though, neither preparing for a concert with dozens of instruments nor traveling to a gig with dozens of instruments is any kind of picnic for Green, who arrives at his venues “six and a half hours before the official concert. I actually do a live prelude ... . A half-hour prelude, mostly with guitar, when they first open the doors. I used to just play a CD, but it’s what everybody does, and I kind of like the idea of doing it live. So I need six hours before that.” (Green is given something of a break before his school programs, when he only arrives two and a half hours before performances.) Obviously, Green’s preparation requires a

great deal of time even before he reaches his venues. “Yeah, packing can be insane,” admits the musician. “There’s a lot of people who are probably going to bed when I get up. But to be honest with you, the packing has gotten to the point where it’s so automatic that I almost don’t even think about it anymore.” But after he arrives for concerts, several hours are needed not only for Green to practice on the instruments, but for the instruments themselves to respond to environmental changes from one location to another. Says Green, “Especially when there are drastic changes – and we’re going through that period now, where it’s been humid and now it’s getting really dry – the instruments need to adjust. And until they adjust, it’s a lot of tuning. “Like right now,” says Green of his booking in Minnesota, “I’m dealing with an extremely dry theatre and a humid motel room, which is just the way it is a lot on the road. So I basically carry a dehumidifier and a humidifier with me, so I can regulate the rooms kind of closer to what the theatres are, and the instruments aren’t going through as much withdrawal. And I always have to get the van either cooled off or warmed up – I have temperature gauges and humidity gauges everywhere. “I mean, I’m dealing with all the hassles of the road, and these guys,” he says, referring, with tongue in cheek, to his instruments, “they got it good. It’s a pampered life on the road here. They only go out of the building when it’s the proper temperature in the van. They go into a building, I try to make sure the temperature and humidity is as good as we can get it. They go into a rainy season, I start making it more humid in the motel room. We go into a drier season, I start drying out the room. “You know, I love sports, and I watch a lot of ESPN, and I’m always hearing these aging athletes who say, ‘If I could just do the game and not do all the work around it during the off-season, I’d keep playing. But it’s all the other stuff that makes it hard.’ And I understand what they’re saying, you know? Because if I could just have a crew that would do all the other stuff and I could just show up at the gig? Man, I could do this forever.” Green laughs. “But still. With all the crappy weather, all the problems with tuning, all the schleppin’ in and out ... . Once I sit down in front of the kids, or sit down for an evening concert – as soon as I sit down to play – everything else kind of melts away, you know? Todd Green will perform a public concert at Bettendorf ’s Redeemer Lutheran Church (1107 Tanglefoot Lane) on Saturday, November 13, at 7 p.m. Admission is free, though donations will be accepted, and more information on Green’s local appearances is available by calling Quad City Arts at (309)793-1213 or visiting QuadCityArts.com.

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Ask
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What else Is Happenin’
information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu. Thursday, November 18 – Wolf Parade. Montreal-based independent rockers in concert. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $18. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 19 – Paula Cole. Grammy Award-winning singersongwriter in concert. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $25-35. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, November 19, through Sunday, November 21 – Truce of Carols. An Opera@Augustana presentation, with a libretto and music by Michael Taylor. Augustana College’s Wallenberg Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $10-12. For tickets and information, call (309)794-7306 or visit Augustana.edu. written by Scott Naumann. Skellington Manor Banquet & Event Center (420 18th Street, Rock Island). 6:30 p.m. $35. For tickets and information, call (563)3449187 or e-mail info@skellingtonmanor. com, or visit ItsAMysteryQC.com. Saturday, November 13 – Gabriel Iglesias. Storytelling, parodies, sound effects, and stand-up with the Comedy Central veteran. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $36.50. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.

By AMy ALKON

Advice Goddess
.” That doesn’t quite fly with “When there’s a reasonably attractive semi-stranger next door, and Mommy hasn’t gotten her rocks off in the longest time... .” Your kid’s already had his stability rocked by divorce; the last thing he needs is to be wondering who this guy is to you and having any dreams of his parents getting back together crushed in such an upsetting and even threatening way. Sure, you’re divorced, not dead, but first and foremost, you’re somebody’s mommy – somebody who shouldn’t be under the impression he’ll soon be recording a new voicemail message: “Mommy can’t come to the phone right now. I think she’s making a sex tape with the UPS man.” So, yes, an apology is in order – not for having sex, but for turning your bedroom into a peep show for your 10year-old. But, wait – he should’ve knocked! Right. How unbelievable, a 10-year-old failing to follow directions. Because kids mature at different rates, child-rearing experts suggest waiting for a kid to show he’s ready to hear about sex, which he’ll indicate by asking questions. Monitor your son for changes in mood or behavior and ask if there’s anything on his mind about what he saw. If so, be truthful – say that men and women sometimes do stuff to make each other feel good and that’s what you two were doing. In the future, always use protection – a latex condom and a day-planner (to schedule your romps when the kids have a sleepover at Granny’s). You’ll be doing your part to prevent both accidental pregnancies and updated song lyrics: “I saw Mommy kissing Santa Claus, but you’ll never believe what I saw her doing to the Easter Bunny.”

It’s a Booty-full day in the Neighborhood
My male neighbor came over to have dinner with me and my kids. After I put the kids to bed, we started watching a movie and ended up in the bedroom. I’ve taught my kids to always knock, but right in the middle of a naked foreplay session, my 10-year-old son walked in on us. I’m a divorced single mother and am entitled to a healthy sex life, but what do I say to my kid? Should I have the sex talk with him now? I don’t think I should apologize. I’ve taught my son that you apologize when you’ve done something wrong, and I don’t want him interpreting sex as wrong. – Caught According to Random House, What Your Fifth Grader Needs to Know is stuff like long division and where Spain is on the map, not the fact that your neighbor has a birthmark in the shape of Lebanon – well below the equator. (That’s in the as-of-yet unpublished What Your Fifth Grader Doesn’t Need to Know.) Freudian analysts, sans evidence, predicted a laundry list of awful outcomes for children who witness their parents getting it on – including mania, depression, character disorders, learning disturbances, delinquency, and even asthma. Dr. Paul Okami actually investigated – following 200 kids for 18 years in a UCLA study – and found that “no empirical evidence links such experiences with subsequent psychological harm.” Unfortunately, nobody seems to have studied whether there’s a difference in seeing Mommy and Daddy and seeing Mommy doing the neighbor. If the naked people are the kid’s parents, they can at least launch into the old “When two people love each other very much...

MOVIES

THEATRE

Tuesday, November 16 – Western Canada. A presentation in the Putnam’s World Adventure Series, featuring postfilm Q&A with filmmaker John Wilson. Putnam Museum & IMAX Theatre (1717 West 12th Street, Davenport). 1, 4, and 7 p.m. $4-6. For tickets and information, call (563)324-1933 or visit Putnam.org.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

I went on four dates with this woman – each ending in no more than a hug and a kiss on her cheek. She seemed to have fun, yet stopped returning my calls. This isn’t the first time something seemingly good fizzled on me. – Flummoxed

Going Whole Hug

The woman you go out with four times and only kiss on the cheek and hug goodbye is the woman you call Mom. There’s an epidemic of men who need to get the message you do: “Testicles! They’re not just for decoration anymore!” It isn’t entirely men’s fault. Feminist academia pushed a message that caught on wide – that men should feel ashamed for being

male and that male sexuality is basically rape lite. This led some men to hold off on making moves on a woman, thinking it was the nice, polite thing to do. Some other men realized it’s also a great way to spin acting wimpy as a form of respect. Now, it’s possible this woman just wasn’t that into you, but maybe she might’ve been – a few dates back – but found you about as sexually aggressive as a couch cushion. If things are going well on a first date, state your intentions by trying to kiss the woman. She can say no, and you should respect that, but by trying, you’ve told her something important: that your interest goes beyond financing her appletinis and sitting by your phone waiting for her to never call you again.

Thursday, November 11, through Saturday, November 27 – The Complete History of America (Abridged). 600 years of American history in 6,000 seconds, in a comedy directed by Chris Walljasper. Harrison Hilltop Theatre (1601 Harrison Street, Davenport). Thursdays through Saturdays – 8 p.m. (no performance on Thanksgiving); Sundays and Saturday, November 27 – 2 p.m. $18-$20. For tickets and information, call (563)449-6371 or visit HarrisonHilltop.com. Friday, November 12, through Sunday, November 21 – Treasure Island. Family adventure based on the book by Robert Louis Stevenson, directed by Jennifer Kingry. Playcrafters Barn Theatre (4950 35th Avenue, Moline). Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m.; Sundays 3 p.m. $10. For tickets and information, call (309)762-0330 or visit Playcrafters. com. Tuesday, November 16, through Tuesday, November 30 – Hedda Gabler. Curtainbox Theatre Company presentation of Henrik Ibsen’s classic psychological drama, directed by David Bonde. Village Theatre (2113 East 11th Street, Village of East Davenport). Tuesdays through Saturdays – 7:30 p.m. (no performance on Thanksgiving); Sundays – 3 p.m. $12-20. For tickets and information, call (563)322-8504 or visit TheCurtainbox.com.

KIDS’ STUFF

Tuesday, November 23, and Wednesday, November 24 – Sesame Street Live: 1-2-3 Imagine! with Elmo & Friends. A new stage adventure with favorite PBS characters. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). Tuesday – 7 p.m.; Wednesday – 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. $13-55. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.

EVENTS

171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2009, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.

COMEDY

1

Friday, November 12 – Five Card Murder. Dinner, interactive comedy, and a murder, in an It’s a Mystery production

Friday, November 19, and Saturday November 20 – Burlesque Le’ Moustache’s “Mask-a-Raid!” Slapstick humor, comic skits, bawdy songs, striptease acts, and a scantily clad female ensemble, with prizes awarded to the best-masked audience members. Circa ’21 Speakeasy (1818 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $15. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. For a 2010 interview with Burlesque Le’ Moustache founder Danielle Colby-Cushman, visit RCReader.com/y/burlesque. Friday, November 19, through Sunday, November 28 – Quad City Arts Festival of Trees. Annual holiday event featuring displays, miniatures, vendors, and more. RiverCenter (136 East Third Street, Davenport). November 20, 22-24, and 26-27: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. November 19: 9 a.m.-noon. November 21: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. November 25: 5-9 p.m. November 28: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $3-8. Holiday parade: November 20 at 11 a.m. For information, call (563)324-3378 or visit QuadCityArts. com/festoftrees.asp.

Continued From Page 11

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Brains, Heart, Courage, and the Wizards of Odd
abuse, abortion, and (dual) infanticide. I’d long presumed that the 1976 play was unfilmable, but given that horrific list, I suppose the material was destined to fall into Tyler Perry’s hands. For the record, I think the movie’s a mess. Adding characters, narratives, and typically clunky, prosaic dialogue, Perry, for understandable reason, can’t sustain any kind of satisfying rhythm; his adaptation stumbles, lurches, and oftentimes flails. Having said that, I also think For Colored Girls is positively exhilarating, a harrowing yet glorious howl of pain and perseverance, and far and away the auteur’s strongest screen work to date. You can chuckle at the film’s portentousness, but you can’t laugh at Shange’s stunningly lyrical odes to female strength, and you certainly can’t at Perry’s generous, bighearted direction of the astonishingly raw and soulful Kimberly Elise, Loretta Devine, Thandie Newton, Phylicia Rashad, Kerry Washington, Anika Noni Rose, Tessa Thompson, and – giving a way-better-than-expected performance – Janet Jackson. (Only Whoopi Goldberg, channeling Piper Laurie in Carrie, is mildly disappointing.) As is generally the case at my screenings of Perry movies, the packed, appreciative audience applauded at the end. For the very first time, I felt like joining them.

FRee WiLL AstRoLoGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Where I live, 35 percent of all high school students confess (or brag) that they have engaged in binge drinking, which is defined as imbibing five or more alcoholic drinks in a two-hour period. According to my reading of the omens, your inner teenager may soon be longing to flirt with that kind of intense and total release. Can I talk him or her out of it? As much as I sympathize with the younger you’s need to escape the numbing effects of the daily grind, I’m asking the adult you to step in and assert your authority. Try to find a more constructive approach to liberation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Why did feathered dinosaurs evolve wings? Paleontologists in Britain have a new theory: It added to their sexual allure. The head researcher at the University of Manchester speculated that “maybe they ran around with their arms outstretched to show off how pretty their feathers were.” Eventually those forearms became wings that came in handy for flying. In other words, the power of flight did not originate from the urge to fly but rather from the urge to be attractive. Oddly enough, Taurus, this approach to understanding evolution would be useful for you to meditate on in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you could develop some interesting new capacities as you work to enhance your appeal to people who matter. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On the subject of being divided, novelist Iris Murdoch wrote the following: “He led a double life. Did that make him a liar? He did not feel a liar. He was a man of two truths.” Whether you deserve the generosity of that interpretation still remains to be seen, Gemini. It is possible that your version of doubleness will be rooted in deceit or delusion rather than sincere and honest duality. Of course I’m rooting for the latter. Please do all you can to ensure that you’re being authentic, not manipulative. CANCER (June 21-July 22): My friend Ariel’s six-year-old daughter Juno doesn’t understand why anyone would build streets that run in a straight line. Isn’t it more fun if the highways and byways are crooked and curvy? Shouldn’t people want to get to where they’re going by veering this way and that, relishing the playful twists and turns? That’s where the best action is, says Juno, and I agree: in the tweak, in the twirl, in the winding way – not in the beeline route that leaves no room for improvisation. That’s especially true for you right now, my fellow Cancerian. LEO (July 23-August 22): Would you be delighted if I arranged to get an offshore oil-drilling rig named after you? Probably not. Would you celebrate if you won a prestigious all-expenses-paid vacation to the hottest war zones in Afghanistan? I doubt it. So don’t accept dubious honors and gifts like those, Leo. Be clear that you’re not interested in ego strokes that are irrelevant to your longterm dreams. If you hope to get the prize you’re aiming for, you will have to say a definitive no to supposedly good things that you don’t really want. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): The nature of the game is changing. Do you know which game I’m referring to? I mean the one that everyone’s playing but no one’s acknowledging they’re playing. The rules of the game had held steady for quite some time, but recently they began to shift. Now even the game’s rewards are in the process of metamorphosing. My advice? You don’t necessarily need to splash a big dose of raw candor all over the place, but I do recommend that you at least tell yourself the truth about what’s going on. LIBRA (September 23-October 22): My Facebook friend Robert Goldberg has come up with terms for you Libras that puts a more positive spin on your reputation as a fence-sitter. He suggests “fence dancer” or “fence warrior.” You don’t always deserve to be bestowed with those honorable titles, of course. Sometimes you really do molder there in your intermediate position, paralyzed by indecision and unable to do what’s in the best interests of anyone, including yourself. But on other occasions – like now – you have the power to use your in-between status dynamically, coordinating the opposing interests to work as a whole that’s greater than the sum of the parts. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): “I cannot seem to feel alive unless I am alert,” wrote author Charles Bowden, “and I cannot feel alert unless I push past the point where I have control.” Yikes! That’s a pretty extreme approach. But I suggest that you consider trying it out in the coming week. If you hope to seize even one of the multiple opportunities that are swirling in your vicinity, you will need both supreme focus and a looseygoosey willingness to respond to novelty. So don’t tense up and blank out and try to wrestle the mysterious flows into submission. Use your sixth sense to find the groove, and relax into it. SAGITTARIUS (November 22December 21): “Democracy is the worst form of government except for all those others that have been tried,” said Winston Churchill. He was defending his favorite political system, asserting that its imperfections are superior to the flaws of monarchy, plutocracy, anarchy, theocracy, and the rest. I invite you to use a similar gauge as you evaluate the belief system that’s at the center of your life. Does it sometimes lead you astray, cause you to see things that aren’t really there, and fill you with confusion – but in ways that are more life-enhancing than any other belief system you know of? Or is your belief system actually kind of toxic? Should you consider replacing it with

by Rob Brezsny
another set of organizing principles? If it’s the latter, now would be a good time to begin making a change. CAPRICORN (December 22January 19): Connie Post, my beloved former editor at the Dayton Daily News, sent me a haiku-like poem that I’d like you to ponder: “November trees / which are living? / which are dead?” I’m hoping this will put you in the mood to mull over an even bigger question, namely: What parts of your own life are withering and what parts are thriving? In my astrological opinion, it’s very important that you know the difference, and act accordingly. AQUARIUS (January 20February 18): Numerologists say the number 10 signifies completion, wholeness, totality. It could rightly serve as your lucky number in the coming weeks – a symbol of your power to draw long-term processes to a climax on your own terms. But you might also want to consider using 11 as your emblem of good mojo. That number denotes the drive to surpass the success you’ve earned before – to transcend easy triumphs and conventional wisdom so as to reach for a more challenging conquest. Either way, Aquarius, I think you’ll be flying high for the foreseeable future, so there’s no need to worry about which way you should go. If you do choose 11, the risks will be somewhat greater and the rewards more interesting. PISCES (February 19-March 20): In Moby Dick, Herman Melville suggested that ideally a person should be a “patriot to heaven.” Poet Gary Snyder wrote, “I pledge allegiance to the soil / one ecosystem / in diversity / under the sun / with joyful interpenetration for all.” Seminal environmentalist Edward Abbey said, “My loyalties will not be bound by national borders... or limited in the spiritual dimension by one language or culture. I pledge my allegiance to the damned human race, and my everlasting love to the green hills of Earth, and my intimations of glory to the singing stars, to the very end of space and time.” I recommend you experiment with this perspective in the coming weeks, Pisces. You don’t have to tone down your love for your tribe or country. Just see if you can expand your sense of belonging... extend the borders of your comfort zone... and feel at home everywhere you go. Homework: What’s the best, most healing trouble you could whip up right now? Go to FreeWillAstrology.com and click “Email Rob.”

DUE DATE
A hyper-tense Robert Downey Jr. and an oblivious Zach Galifianakis travel from Atlanta to Los Angeles in director Todd Phillips’ road-trip flick Due Date, and wind up delivering something unusual and not entirely welcome: a slapstick drama. Sure, there are plenty of (mostly unamusing) visual and verbal gags sprinkled throughout. But this is one of those rare films in which the actors’ honesty is detrimental to their movie; Downey’s anger and irritation are so forceful, and Galifianakis’ sadness and childish confusion so sincere, that the formulaic jokes involving high-speed car crashes, misappropriated crematorium remains, and masturbating dogs feel even more crass, phony, and stupid than they otherwise might’ve. Due Date isn’t terrible, just terribly misguided, and reveals itself as such early on by casting the expert scene-stealer Juliette Lewis as a skanky pot dealer and giving her absolutely nothing funny to say or do. Talk about a buzz kill.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700

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CARdIOLOGy

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October 28 Answers: Right

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October  Crossword Answers

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1. Like a sleepyhead 5. Trifolium 11. Shank part 15. The Buckeye State 19. Huffy 20. Entertain 21. Jelling agent 22. Part of YMCA 23. Perfunctory 25. Gain courage: 2 wds. 27. Prepared statement 28. Browbeat 30. Line of descent 31. Hgt. 32. Positioned 34. Senesce 36. Part of QED 37. The Olympians 41. Actress _ Swinton 43. Grapple 46. Take by conquest 47. Red River city 49. Sober 51. Lesser actor 52. Cargo carriers 53. City in Lombardia 54. Grape-press residue 55. Container 56. Cover with buttercream 57. Favorite things 58. Approaches 60. Asserted, in a way 61. Colander 63. Advanced degrees 64. Jewish month 65. Elvis’ first No. 1 hit: 2 wds. 69. Within reach: 2 wds. 72. Actor _ Neeson 73. Rigorous appraisal: 2 wds. 77. Cloth workers 78. Gladden 80. Getz and Musial 81. “_ kingdom come ...” 82. Toward the mouth 83. Garden tools 84. Most tractable 86. Man 87. Block

88. Conditions 89. Lyric poem by Horace 90. White-wine variety 91. Old East German money 93. Duck 95. Hankered 97. Koran chapter 98. Blvds. 99. Kinswoman: abbr. 101. Marquee sign 102. Southeastern Indian 105. Doily 107. Look with suspicion 111. Callous 113. Bravery award: 2 wds. 116. _ Minor 117. First Olympics site 118. Classroom need 119. Singing group 120. “_’s Anatomy” 121. Dec. 31 word 122. Starts again 123. Lather
dOWN

1. Kind of blond 2. Wild animal 3. Perry’s creator 4. Empties of air 5. Devise 6. Grasslands 7. Brutish ones 8. Tank 9. Campaigner’s concern 10. Change the decor 11. Tabby 12. Wide open 13. Tarn 14. _ Ogden Nash 15. Greek letters 16. Matinee idol 17. Concerning: 2 wds. 18. Bone: prefix 24. Spiral 26. Put on the payroll 29. Bundle 33. Lab burners 35. Respirator: 2 wds. 37. Tennis-cup name

38. Portray 39. Kind of circle 40. “_ me timbers!” 42. Fearless 43. Turf and Trojan 44. Dern or Branigan 45. Ant 48. Warning 50. Tobacco residue 53. Single-celled organism 55. Resided 57. Claims on property 59. Semihard cheese 60. Molts 62. “_ _ Day’s Night” 63. _ -dieu 64. Be frugal 66. Like one beatified 67. Loathed 68. Irish playwright 69. Stew in the Philippines 70. TV’s Banks and others 71. Wild pansy 74. “_ Frome” 75. Tonsorial event 76. Classified 78. Plug 79. Do a sewing job 80. Marshmallow treat for campers 83. Greek hero: var. 85. Opening 86. Crowns 88. Kind of magical card 90. Vaughan or Bernhardt 92. “Groundhog Day” star 94. Belief 96. Osar 98. Copal or elemi, e.g. 100. Backslide 102. Engine sound 103. Mister, in Munich 104. Like a moray 106. Mimic 108. Did in 109. Wagon 110. Cleveland’s waters 112. Dir. letters 114. Tried for office 115. Pull

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

Live Music Live Music Live
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Alan Sweet -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Benefit for Invisible Children - The Half Hearts CD Release - The New Bodies - The Uniphonics -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Black Hawk College Jazz Ensemble (6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St Rock Island, IL

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Thursday

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The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA

The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL

The Uniphonics -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Pappa-Razzi -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Rootless Experience - The Aces - Emily Jawoisz & Anthony -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D. Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Smooth Groove -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollars Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

The Wiitala Brothers -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

John Wasem -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814 7th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Camanche Ave Clinton, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA

Keep Off The Grass -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA

Buddy Olson -Figge Art Museum, 225 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Deluxe Republic - I Saw a Ghost Once - Drama Major - Surface Tension -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

University of Iowa Jazz Combos -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2010/11/12 (Fri)

FRIday

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Coyote Grace @ Gabe’s – November 13
Gray Wolf Band -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Lee Blackmon (6pm) -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

Duke Tumatoe & the Power Trio -Clarion Hotel and Convention Center / Penguin’s Comedy Club, 525 33rd Ave SW Cedar Rapids, IA Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone, 1516 5th Ave Moline, IL Irish Idol II Karaoke w/ DJ Cash -Molly’s Pub, 311 3rd St. Sherrard, IL Jam Session -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA

56 Hope Road - Spare Parts -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commodore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

The Guess Who -Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA
2010/11/13 (Sat)

Saturday

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Kyle Hollingsworth Band - Messy Jiverson -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Lynn Allen -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd Street Davenport, IA

Blue Collar Band -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA

Jazz Jam with The North Scott Jazz Combo -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Live Lunch w/ Nick Vasquez (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Rootless Experience -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA

Blues & Boogie Woogie Piano Stomp -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Cosmic -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W. Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA DJ Scott Keller & Karaoke (weather permitting) -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL

High Cotton Blues Band -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

Duke Tumatoe & the Power Trio -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ Service -Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252 S State Ave Hampton, IL Funktastic Five -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL

Houndstooth -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jay Siegel & the Tokens (7 & 10pm) - Richie Lee (8:15pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Jazz After Five: Steve Grismore Quartet (5pm) - Natalie Brown CD Release Show (9pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA John Wasem -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd. N. LeClaire, IA Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Live Lunch w/ Ren Estrand (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

Mike Blumme Trio (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Novembeard & Beer Bluegrass Festival: The Awful Purdies (7pm) - Jon Eric (8pm) - Evergreen Brass Band (8:45pm) - Whistle Pigs (10:15pm) - Mountain Sprout (midnight) -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran Church - Rock Island, 1600 20th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL

Armonia -Quad City Arts Center, 1715 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL Big Bill Morganfield and Cobalt Blue -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Chester Brown -Bent River Brewing Company, 1413 5th Ave. Moline, IL

Pappa-Razzi -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL
Red Pepper Sage (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA

Cosmic -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA

Rule #1 - Tear Down the Tower - Eleven FiftyTwo -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera, 601 15th St. Moline, IL Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th St. Moline, IL Smooth Groove -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Orangadang - Sparks Design -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Coyote Grace - River Glen - Sam Knutson -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W. Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA Expo 76 -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL Fifth of Country -Orange Street Theatre, 701 Orange St Muscatine, IA Hap Hazard -Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA

Songwriters in the Round (3pm) -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollars Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Continued On Page 22

Continued From Page 3

by Jonathan Narcisse

First Steps for Branstad and the Iowa Statehouse
full-time, permanent consultants to avoid inflating employment reporting. And at much more expense than our regular workforce. Either they should be made permanent employees, or they should be terminated. I prefer the latter. (7) Fix the board and commission structure. Iowans in 99 counties deserve to be represented. Also broadcast every board and commission meeting live over the Internet. (8) Institute real reform at DHS, beginning with welfare reform by requiring work and personal responsibility. (9) Institute real reform of our justice system and courts, including ending the notion that building prisons is economic development, and restoring work details. Why should Iowans spend $116 million, which will be much more after the obligatory cost overruns kick in, when we have lots of strong backs in prison that can build new jails and prisons as needed? (10) Begin the systematic elimination of the 12,000-plus useless bureaucratic positions in public education, from Regents through K-12, that drain vast taxpayer dollars, and end the practice of funding nonexistent students. (11) Present a bold and comprehensive agenda to address the scourge of illegal immigration within our borders. The impact on our economy, state resources, and communities is devastating. Throughout the campaign, lip service was paid. Now is the time for action to take place. (12) Allow parents to decide who educates their children and let the money follow. (13) Allow real academic competition to exist by allowing independent academies to be formed. (14) Publish full, accurate, and complete academic data hidden by previous administrations, including Branstad’s. (15) End the rampant abuse of the administrativerules process, fully restoring the constitutional role of the legislative department. (16) Introduce a comprehensive plan to phase out corporate taxation; institute real property-tax protection for all Iowans, not just select corporate allies; reduce the sales tax; and phase out the individual income tax. There are many other reforms that ought to take place. This is a start, however. These are things that can be done right away by the new leadership and would prove they are committed to true small government with free-market principles, and not just interested in power and control. Jonathan Narcisse was the independent Iowa Party candidate for governor in 2010. More information can be found at NarcisseForIowa.com. 

1

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Liv
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Troy Harris, Pianist (11:30am) -Bass Street Chop House, 1601 River Dr Moline, IL 2010/11/15 (Mon)

Continued From Page 21
Stephanie Rearick - Olivia Rose Muzzy -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Tapped Out -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 7th Street and the Rock River Moline, IL The Kenny Barron Trio and David Sanchez -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Lovedogs -Hawkeye Tap, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA

monday

15

Shoeless Revolution CD Release Party -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

The Recliners -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

True Blue Mondays Lunch w/ Ellis Kell -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
2010/11/16 (Tue)

Tekno Turkey Fest; DJ Uplift - Lady Espina - Jethro -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL

Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA

Third Rail -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Todd Green -Redeemer Lutheran Church, Utica Ridge and Tanglefoot Lane Bettendorf, IA Tronicity -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL

tuesday

16
Hal Reed & Ellis Kell -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Buddy Olson (6pm) -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Dance Party USA -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

University of Iowa Latin Jazz Ensemble The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Wolf Parade -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Gray Wolf Band -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Jazz After Five: Eric Thompson Trio (5pm) - Damon Dotson (9pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd. N. LeClaire, IA Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Neon Trees @ RIBCO – November 16
Black Hawk College Jazz Ensemble (6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St Rock Island, IL

2010/11/19 (Fri)

FRIDAY

19

Words Like Daggers - Bella - Amidst a Ruined City - Haddonfield -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
2010/11/14 (Sun)

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL

Breille -The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL

sunday

14

Karaoke Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Buddy Olson -Figge Art Museum, 225 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Cletus Got Shot - Adobanga -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA DJ Johnny O -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Fool’s Gold -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

26th Musicians’ Benefit for the Toys for Tots -Bent River Brewing Company, 1413 5th Ave. Moline, IL

Lee Blackmon (6:30pm) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Live Lunch with Tony Hoeppner (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA

Live Lunch w/ Jonathan Turner (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Neon Trees - New Politics - Young the Giant -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL

Monte Montgomery -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -The Torchlight Lounge, 1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL

Karaoke Night -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Polka Club of Iowa, Inc. - Eastern Chapter Dance (1:30pm) -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch performance) -The Lodge Hotel, Spruce Hills & Utica Ridge Bettendorf, IA The Avey Brothers -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL

Hal Reed & Ellis Kell (6pm) -Rock Island Public Library, 401 19th St, Rock Island, IL

Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ the Pena Brothers -Racer’s Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL The Chris & Wes Show -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL 2010/11/17 (Wed)

The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA

Wild Bill’s Rodeo Show featuring Billy Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL 2010/11/18 (Thu)

The Five Bridges Jazz Band (10am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA

wednesday

17

thursday

18

Blackberry Bushes String Band - The New Board of Education -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

Autumn Falls -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA

Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone, 1516 5th Ave Moline, IL Irish Idol II Karaoke w/ DJ Cash -Molly’s Pub, 311 3rd St. Sherrard, IL Jam Session -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Alexander Webb & Taylor Phylan -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commodore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Brown Bag Lunch at Noon: “Tennessee” Tony Cavitt - The Music of John Prine -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA

Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Opiate The Audio and Visual Experience of Tool -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Orchestra Alto Maiz -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Burlesque Le’ Moustache: Mask-a-Raid! -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W. Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA Emily Jawoisz -Fireworks Coffeehouse, 2139 16th St. Moline, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ Service -Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252 S State Ave Hampton, IL

Paula Cole -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Rick K & the Allnighters -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Ron LaPuma Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D. Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Rule #1 - Tear Down the Tower -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Nikki Lunden -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

Smooth Groove -Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, 777 Jumer Dr. Rock Island, IL

Harry Potter Costume Party
Wednesday, November 17 at 6:30pm The Moline Public Library is celebrating the release of the seventh Harry Potter movie with a Harry Potter Costume Party. Join us in your favorite Harry Potter costume or just dress like a Muggle. We'll have food, games, activities and prizes. This free event is open to all ages, but registration is required. Call 309 524-2470 or 309-524-2480 to register or for more information. Sponsored by the Friends of the Moline Public Library.
Moline Public Library 3210 41st Street Moline, IL 61265 309-524-2440 www.molinelibrary.com
Ad sponsored by the Friends of the Moline Public Library 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

ve Music Live Music
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollars Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

Get Your Gig or Venue
Advertise in the Reader.

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

HIGHLIGHTED

Call 563-324-0049

The Bucktown Revue -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL

The Horde - Ageless -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Toys For Tots Benefit Jam -Bent River Brewing Company, 1413 5th Ave. Moline, IL Uniphonics - Brainchild -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Wicked Liz & The Bellyswirls -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA 2010/11/20 (Sat)

Gray Wolf Band -Chopper’s Bar & Grill, 17228 Rt. 5 & 92 East Moline, IL Hi-Fi -Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Just Surrender - Phone Calls from Home - The Scenic -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Justin Morrissey & Friends -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814 7th St Moline, IL Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Camanche Ave Clinton, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Karaoke Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL

Open Mic Night -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA

Live Lunch w/ Mo (noon) -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -Bier Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St Davenport, IA

Open Mic w/ the Pena Brothers -Racer’s Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL The Chris & Wes Show -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL 2010/11/24 (Wed)

Slough Buoys -Legends, 109 E Orange St Geneseo, IL Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -The Torchlight Lounge, 1800 18th Ave East Moline, IL Stephen’s Green -Carriage Haus, 312 W 3rd St Davenport, IA The Burlington Street Bluegrass Band The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA

Saturday

20

Lethal by Default - Plagued by Saints - Emplify - Reelfoot Rift -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

danika holmes @ The Redstone Room – November 20
2010/11/21 (Sun)

wednesday

24

Alexander Webb & Taylor Phylan -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL Bumpus - Flavor Savers - Shoeless Revolution -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

Lynn Allen -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL Mike Blumme Trio (6pm) -Toucan’s Cantina / Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL

SUNday

21

2010/11/22 (Mon)

monday

22

BBI -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA

Cheese Pizza -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Breille -The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA
Destino (4pm) -First Presbyterian Church of Davenport, 1702 Iowa St. Davenport, IA

Minus Six - Allison Scott -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

Burlesque Le’ Moustache: Mask-a-Raid! -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Clayton Jones -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Danika Holmes - Down the Line -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd Street Davenport, IA Rick K & the Allnighters -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera, 601 15th St. Moline, IL Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th St. Moline, IL

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL

True Blue Mondays Lunch w/ Ellis Kell -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
2010/11/23 (Tue)

Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch performance) -The Lodge Hotel, Spruce Hills & Utica Ridge Bettendorf, IA Shawn Pittman (6pm) - Karaoke Night (9pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA The Avey Brothers -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL

TUESDAY

23

Buddy Olson (6pm) -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Dance Party USA -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W. Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA Frank Drew Live in the Westside -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Smooth Groove -Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, 777 Jumer Dr. Rock Island, IL

Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Hollars Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL TPX: Tri-Polar XXXpress -Route 61 Bar & Grill, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Wild Oatz -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA

The Terry Hanson Ensemble (10am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Third Sunday Jazz Series featuring Maggie Brown (6pm) -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Troy Harris, Pianist (11:30am) -Bass Street Chop House, 1601 River Dr Moline, IL

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL

Illinois John Fever - Sam Knutson - Lucas Benson -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Irish Idol II Karaoke w/ DJ Cash -Molly’s Pub, 311 3rd St. Sherrard, IL

Dave Ellis and BackTrack (5pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Drum Circle (6pm) -Teranga House of Africa, 1706 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Grasin’ Distrct -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Hi-Fi -Rieck’s Roadhouse, 916 Albany St. Erie, IL Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL Just Chords -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL Keep Off The Grass -Blueport Junction, 6605 W River Dr Davenport, IA

The Lovedogs -GB’s Sports Bar, 655 Main St. New Liberty, IA uneXpected -Van’s, 3333 Harrison St. Davenport, IA Wild Bill’s Rodeo Show featuring Billy Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL Wild Oatz -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA 2010/11/25 (Thu)

Thursday

25

Maylane - ieatmyfriends - Le Roy - Breakup Art -River Music Experience, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
NINE-1-1 -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

BBI -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone, 1516 5th Ave Moline, IL Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Robbie Bahr -Uptown Neighborhood Bar and Grill, 2340 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL

Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 18 No. 765 • November 11 - 23, 2010

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 17 No. 761 • September 16 - 29, 2010

Learn more by visiting uscellular.com/project or calling 1-888-BUY-USCC.
Things we want you to know: An agreement with a two-year initial term (subject to early termination fee) and credit approval required for all new customers and for existing customers not on an eligible Belief Plan. Existing customers may change to an eligible Belief Plan without signing a new agreement. Use of service constitutes acceptance of the terms of our Customer Service Agreement. Those terms apply for as long as you are a customer. A $30 activation fee may apply. Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee applies; this is not a tax or government-required charge. Additional fees, taxes, terms, conditions and coverage areas apply and may vary by plan, service and equipment. Promotional Phone subject to change. U.S. Cellular Visa Debit Card issued by MetaBank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. Allow 10–12 weeks for processing. Card does not have cash access and can be used at any merchant location that accepts Visa debit cards. Card valid for 120 days after issued. Belief Plans with Data Plus start at $89.99 per month. Smartphone Plans not part of the Belief Project start at $30 per month. Application and data network usage charges may apply when accessing applications. BOGO: Buy one handset and get a second handset for free. Mail-in rebate and activation required on each handset. See uscellular.com/project for Belief Rewards terms and conditions. See store for details or visit uscellular.com. Limited-time offer. Android, Android Market, Gmail and Google Maps are all trademarks of Google, Inc. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners. ©2010 U.S. Cellular. 

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