When put to the test, corn producers pass with flying colors.
As students in elementary school, we were graded on the three “Rs”— reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic. In agric ulture, performance is measured against the four “Fs”—food, fuel, feed and fiber. And as they do every year, U.S. corn farme rs continue to earn straight “A’s” across the board. Record demand for corn, driven in great part by the checkoff investments of corn producers themselves, has required the nation’s farmers to work even harder to make the grade. Fortunately, U.S. corn farmers exhibit the key characteristics of star students.

Chairman

CEO

.. .. Regardle e to the envi ers to go to th a’s corn produc count on Americ always s. corn four “Fs” is continued succes number. head of the clas COMMENTS: . fin world’ to a positive ba or contributing e energy security ingly accept th continue to will can do. . count on chal od for the nation faces a it’s growing fo to help.. . Corn gr l in ways to produce domestic ethano y look for new p and continuall of stewardshi onsible manner. . Whether ’s their hands prove our nation ding ways to im lance of s population. The resu at come with it policy omic benefits th on and the econ for our nati number of cult tests in a facing some diffi America is energy security m the economy to ant subjects —fro nge.. makers. as well as d ethanol indust k an zations and in the livestoc ronmental organi ity groups.. ..... 20 09 ed by corn rk. ed decipher the dollars has help eate the checkoff k feeding and cr ncy in livestoc students improve efficie owers also are dustry. envi other commod riculture base lt: A stronger ag . th s. PREPARED FOR: . Research fund do their homewo Corn farmers corn genome. . As the demand well with others rk riculture are Corn farmers wo ose of us in ag on the rise. To ensure in their customers becoming fewer alliances with ve built strong with producers ha ries...G RA D E SH EE T . we can import ss of the challe ronment.. to show what th and opportunity responsibility for the .. Wh always work for raise Corn farmers corn farmers to lenge. corn producers ey trade.... acres in a resp rn on existing more co en the extra credit.

farmers need to produce 5. (USDA/WASDE) How is this possible? In response to increased demand.7 billion bushel carry-in and the carryover grew to 1. plus there’s 1. In addition. farmers will plant more corn. High-performing hybrids.8 billion bushels. the second largest crop in history. growers have produced the five largest corn crops in history during the past five years —and they have done so on 20 million fewer acres than were harvested in 1931.6 billion to meet the demands of the ethanol industry. U. foreign nations want to buy another 1.3 billion bushels of corn to satisfy the livestock feeding market — and another 3. In fact. How many bushels of corn will American corn growers produce this year? The answer: 12. food and fuel—and still have corn in reserve. coupled with technology and talent.S.MATHEMATICS Do the math: Corn farmers are meeting demand.3 billion in other domestic demands. Solve this mathematics “story problem”: In one year. have enabled corn growers to keep up with the markets for feed. . But spring flooding takes thousands of acres out of production and wet fall weather results in a very late harvest. U. corn farmers have stepped up—just as they always have. (USDA) It’s simple math: If demand for corn is high and projected revenue-per-acre is strong relative to other crops.1 billion bushels.75 billion bushels. Add in a 1.S.

New droughtresistant hybrids will produce even more corn on non-irrigated acres— and provide emerging nations with the potential to increase production for their own use as well as exports that can stimulate their economies. Innov ative resea rch proto cols are accelerating the lab-to-field timeline—bringing new corn hybrids to market faster than ever. while controlling disease and pests in an environmentally responsible manner. That’s allowing corn growers to incorporate new genetics more quickly—and grow more corn on the same acres.science project. Traits in the corn plant help increase grain production and maintain overall plant health. The corn industry’s Biotechnology: Scientific advances in seed genetics are helpin g corn farmers meet increased demand for their product. . We’re already seeing the impact as yields have steadily increased by about three bushels per acre per year since 1995-96.

The livestock m ed to feed livesto grains. lely res rely so corn ac .S. still are— even m . And they talists. environmental im d minimizing any waste an duced en dramatically re rbicides also has be des and he e practices The use of pestici conservation tillag s. ld in which corn g a fie ious resources. s is the rn fertility program tock waste into co r of lives o produces distille The incorporation oduce ethanol als : corn grown to pr ng anure then comes ultimate in recycli ck. The adoption of genetic oisture and through new seed est to retain soil m the field after harv in keeps plant residue enrich the soil. tely the most prec d water are absolu il an d value and the continue To corn farmers. co maining The re irrigated.• ENVIRONMEN TAL STUDIES 15 percent Less than e rn acres ar of U. Farmers’ very livel lance sheet and pr critical to their ba e assets are and quality of thes aller increments— in smaller and sm aging their crops man of inputs. This Corn growers are w-by-row control d guidance and ro se er and place it using satellite-ba s to use less fertiliz logy allows grower reducing precision techno ant performance. (Pu soil loss by more ent and more than 60 perc be. to help grow mor back to the farm ses to protect rips of native gras s such as buffer st ative rainfall runoff by Conservation initi e practices reduce conservation tillag rdue University) water quality and than 90 percent. which is us e corn. on rainfall (USDA) always been environment has The rowers excel. so on sustainability— ihood depends ofitability. They had to iginal environmen or Farmers were the ore so today. be for optimum pl eds to exactly where it ne pact.

(USDA/Fertilizer Ins titute) • age has Reduced till a 30 resulted in ction in percent redu since 1980.• New hybrids and management practices helped reduce the tot al use of fertilizer by 10% between 1980 and 200 5. soil erosion ersity) (Purdue Univ .

in return on i nation’s is one of our rn production adership in co ity for a abil America’s le orically. into around the wo ty of protein the availabili lting resuron—and the resu hanol producti of et farm payments The emergence lower federal ure—has helped lt e nation. Hist ng indicator of greatest econom od is a stro ic its own fo —and the domest nation to grow Corn production the long haul. ss Daily. ign oil cost U.S. stop th of the nation’s ly is helping tion fuel supp gy the transporta r domestic ener in t of othe the developmen lem today— prob While we await addressing the ed ethanol is eping destiny and ke urces. the a nation’s ic assets.EC ON OM IC S a case study production is Corn nvestment. stry it helps tion’s citizens livestock indu for our na le food supply and affordab S. li cial position ngthen its finan erica can stre way Am . co corn we’re expo stillers st d di And it’s not ju nd the world—an eat demand arou ed also are in gr ing incorporat pork tion is be ethanol produc ease S. an abundant ensure success over support—helps . more hanol t $600 billion eased use of et nsumers at leas co ficit. tions. addi ade and d exports set ign nations—an s balance of tr fore America’ sitive side of direction her the po (USDA/ERS) on sending the ot billions we’re ing offset the help l. U. corn-bas so r energy control over ou home. gence of agricu ral areas of th revenue from ru tax and increased d support for d investment an e : The continue tion biofuels is on There’s no ques and renewable ock production cure its vest and se agriculture. incr grains from U. just to buy oi d rn-fed beef an rting. fore vestors Busine two-thirds than According to In in 2008. economic future . Incr total trade de e bleeding. helping ons in other na livestock rati rld. re at giving us some costs right he ars in energy llions of doll bi y for a lucrative bu American corn billion s in 2008 made ng $14 Global economic a record.

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How can biotech seeds make food .

That’s sustainable agriculture. How can farmers meet this challenge and produce more abundant food? Farmers around the globe are turning to the latest science-based tools. But experts say the world will need twice as much food in 2050 as we produce today. Monsanto is investing $3 million each day developing new tools that help make farming more productive. And that means more food with less stress on our environment. These advanced seeds produce higher yields and help conserve resources like land.com PRODU CING MORE CONSE RVING MORE IMPROVING FARME RS’ LIVES © 2009 Monsanto Co. Monsanto Imagine and the Vine Design are trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC. to increase the earth’s food supply. fuel and fertilizer. including advanced hybrid and biotech seeds. Producing more. And that’s what Monsanto is all about. Improving farmers’ lives.more ABUNDANT? Each season farmers provide an abundance of food most of us take for granted. Conserving more. . A recent study found that increased yields from biotech seeds have produced enough additional food to feed millions of people. hungry world. And that means more food for a growing. Learn more of the story at ProduceMoreConserveMore. Increased yields from biotech crops have produced enough food to feed millions of people.

THE PERICARP is the outer covering that protects the kernel and preserves the nutrient value inside. Starch is the most widely used part of the kernel and is used as a starch in foods—or as the key component in fuel. sweeteners. THE GERM is the only living part of the corn kernel. It resists water and water vapor—and is undesirable to insects and microorganisms. vitamins and minerals for the kernel to grow into a corn plant. THE TIP CAP is the attachment point of the kernel to the cob. . through which water and nutrients flow—and is the only area of the kernel not covered by the pericarp. The germ contains the essential genetic information. enzymes.A closer look at the composition of a corn kernel. THE ENDOSPERM accounts for about 82 percent of the kernel’s dry weight and is the source of energy (starch) and protein for the germinating seed. bioplastics and other products. which is high in polyunsaturated fats and has a mild taste. About 25 percent of the germ is corn oil —the most valuable part of the kernel.

January 2009 .S.550 3.8 gal.120 320 33 880 315 4.5 lb.) Alabama Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Total U.800 98.850 1.120 510 400 2. of distillers dried grains 1. 2008 1000s 1000s Bushels/acre Production WORLD OF CORN Acres Average Total Acres Harvested Yield Production Planted for Grain 1000 Bushels Acres Harvested 22.200 421.6 million 12.320 73.700 13. **In wet mill ethanol process.100 873.STATISTICS Important statistics regarding the production.550 74 55 640 830 2.75 $26.650 35 8.180. Corn Production by State.800 95 85.300 3.630 1.750 3.238 Source: USDA.584 9. of PLA fiber/polymer 13.000 381.19 billion Average Price $3.880 52 78. One Bushel of Corn (56lb. of gluten meal** AND 78.19 Components of Yellow Dent Corn Wet Weight U. Select Crop Value.130. Crop Production 2008 Summary.400 630 2.800 6.300 70 94 470 165 43 3.90 per bushel 3.600 117.090 900 2. of corn oil** 153.200 700 2.800 3.960 19.380 394.475 585.760 1. processing and progress of corn. $47.51 $16. January 2009 Source: USDA.350 2 355 4.800 5 15 85 140 1.340 253.100 5.210 520 29 460 19 2.982 235 15 430 170 1. Gluten feed is 20 percent protein and gluten meal is 60 percent protein.300 3.1 billion Average Yield 17. of starch OR OR OR U.900 92. Corn at a Glance. of fuel ethanol with solubles* 86 million Production State U.475 66.) Provides: 31.040 20.080 152 35 310 80 11. WASDE. 260 50 440 670 1.640 104 165 155 195 137 125 105 140 170 179 160 171 134 136 144 121 138 164 140 144 136 163 116 180 144 78 124 135 115 200 133 65 133 118 125 157 108 205 130 137 134 24.400 13.200 36.460 12.S.250 27 160 70 370 300 12.9 12.4 lb.675 43.650 8.611 36.900 5. of sweetener PLUS 2.393. of gluten feed** 2.800 486.600 4.9 bushels/acre Corn Crop Value *In dry grind ethanol process.188.720 18.000 3.750 690 2.300 370 60 1.26 Total Digestable Nutrients (TDN) Cracked Corn: 90% TDN $1.150 147.400 7.6 lb.101.740 285.S. 2008 Billions of Dollars (U.5 lb.S.030 23 340 90 26 2. 2008 Acres Planted 33 lb.5 lb.140 7.600 2.160 64.63 Sorghum Soybeans Wheat Barley Corn Oats $47.800 78 8.S.2% Protein & Fiber 61% Starch Shelled Corn: 88% TDN Ear Corn: 78-80% TDN $0.5 lb.320 1.650 33.560 6.440 48.600 2.200 74.420 152.450 3.400 295. NASS.968 153.440 2.8% Corn Oil 16% Water 19.700 720 2.23 $1.

97 $2.271 Barley 3.8 136.531 ‘06 $4.396 Peanuts 1.551 77. 1938-2008 ‘08 153.004 Canola 989 Sugar Cane 869 Dry Edible Peas 847 Proso Millet 460 Sorghum (silage) 408 Tobacco 354 Flaxseed 340 ‘58 3.S.6 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 129.4 148. 1958-2008 $24. NASS.2% Corn (silage) 1.90 150.04 Dollars per Bushel (U.2 101.675 80.915 9.768 69.330 70.929 81.980 58. January 2009 ‘38 2. All Crop Acres Harvested. 82.94 $1.20 ? $52.640 Thousand Acres 86.351 75.) U.88 $22.0% Source: USDA.503 7.450 ‘78 ‘88 4. January 2009. ? $2.5 ‘78 ‘88 84.250 68.062 Wheat 55.5% Sunflower 0.3 ‘03 142.641 Hay 60.88 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘38 ‘48 ‘58 ‘68 ‘78 ‘88 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 ‘08 Source: USDA.045 Sugar Beets 1.395 Potatoes 1.38 $20.307 Thousand Acres Corn (grain) 78.522 81. Corn Crop Value.638 78. 2009 Source: USDA.S.327 85.440 70.85 $1.9% Corn (grain) 25.929 Rye Lentils Safflower Sweet Potatoes Mustard Seed Peppermint Hops Other 269 263 195 97 71 60 41 35 ? 11. WASDE.9 138.10 ‘00 ‘01 $18. January 2009.08 ‘04 ‘58 ‘68 ‘78 ‘88 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 Source: USDA.823 ‘48 ? 3. 1938-2008 .S.268 8.640 Corn (silage) 5.520 U.Wheat 17.702 78.117 71.487 63.300 Total 310.5% ? 160.82 $1.25 $2. Corn Acres Harvested.7 Hay 19.445 Oats 1.0 ‘58 52. World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate.894 78.48 $24.3% Soybeans 24.356 ‘68 4.S.1 ‘07 13.788 76.944 70.0 134. NASS. 2009 Source: USDA.807 9.507 Dry Edible Beans 1. Crop Production 2008 Summary.4 133. 31. Crop Production 2008 Summary.00 $1.S.965 Soybeans 74.473 ? 93. * Estimates for marketing year ending Aug.0% Barley 1.386 73. Crop Production 2008 Summary.2 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 10. January 2009.54 ? $2.603 78. Corn Acres Planted.83 ‘78 ‘88 $12. NASS.549 55.930 72. Corn Prices.50 $16.66 ‘98 ‘99 $17.S.S.3% Peanuts 0.717 Source: USDA.19 **’08 $3.840 72.431 9.3% Cotton 2. January 2009 Billions of Dollars (U.32 $2.982 Thousand Acres U. January 2009. 1958-2008 ‘08 ? 12.631 75. Crop Production 2008 Summary.728 Sorghum (grain) 7. 2008 ** Projected for marketing year ending Aug.767 Rice 2. NASS.S.8% Rice 1.976 Sunflower 2.3% ‘38 27.0 ‘68 79. 1938-2008 65. Corn Production.9 U.112 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 94.12 ‘38 ‘48 ‘58 ‘68 ‘78 ‘88 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 ‘08 $1. Crop Production 2008 Summary. Average Corn Yields.28 ‘58 $3.9% Sorghum (grain) 2.685 Cotton 7. 31.09 *’07 ? *’07 149.779 80.06 $1. January 2009 ‘06 ? $32.967 10.92 $18.8 Other 3.527 85.09 ? ‘06 ? $3.76 ‘68 $4.759 9. 2008 Bushels per Acre U.20 ‘05 $18.42 $2. NASS. WAOB.101 Million Bushels U.8 ‘48 43.165 79.126 67. Source: USDA. 1938-2008 * Estimated ** Projected for marketing year ending August 31.089 11.038 ? ‘07 **’08 $47.) U.589 73.S.

*Marketing year October 1.7% Serbia 1.2% Ukraine 4.6% Saudi Arabia 2.7% China 0.1% India 2. Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service.3% Argentina 2.522 U.3% Mexico 3. 57.2% Mexico 10. January 2009 *Marketing year October 1.2% Brazil 6. 2008-09* Million Bushels United States China EU-27 Brazil Mexico India Argentina Canada South Africa Ukraine Others Total 12.066 *Marketing year October 1. 2008 to September 30.5% Argentina 11.9% EU-27 2. January 2009 Others 6.2% Malaysia 3.7% World Corn Production.S. 2008-09* Algeria 2.S.1% U.5% Brazil 12. Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service.515 2. Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service.320 Source: USDA.200 378 Egypt 405 Canada 453 Japan 650 India 677 Mexico 1. Grain: World Markets and Trade.4% EU-27 2.382 China 6. 2009.069 650 315 283 157 157 110 98 Iran Saudi Arabia EU-27 Algeria Others Total 98 79 79 75 965 3. 2008-2009* Total = 30.5% Canada 0.834 Million Bushels Leading U.1% Egypt 5. Source: USDA/Foreign Agriculture Service.134 2006-’07 595 345 159 170 133 128 81 58 47 34 375 2.6% Taiwan 5. Grain: World Markets and Trade.279 Brazil 1. Grain: World Markets and Trade.7% Thailand 0.S.409 2. January 2009 Others 2. 2008 to September 30.3% South Africa 1.125 2007-’08 574 387 338 151 123 116 124 51 43 40 488 2.436 10. Feed Outlook.9% 31. 2009.5% World Corn Exports.8% Million Bushels United States Brazil Argentina Ukraine South Africa EU-27 Paraguay 1.027 984 709 650 417 413 394 4.2% World Corn Imports.6% Iran 3.Others 14. January 2009 World Corn Consumption.772 394 354 138 98 79 59 Serbia Thailand China Canada Others Total 39 20 20 20 76 3.3% Million Bushels Japan Mexico South Korea Egypt Taiwan Colombia Malaysia Japan 21.6% South Africa 3. Corn Export Markets (Since 2005 ) Million Bushels South Africa Japan Mexico South Korea Taiwan Egypt Colombia Canada Syria Dominican Rep Algeria Other Total 2005-’06 628 249 220 183 159 106 74 33 41 49 392 2. January 2009 . Grain: World Markets and Trade.5% EU-27 7. ERS.7% South Korea 9.3% Paraguay 1.142 *Marketing year October 1.3% Canada 1.9% China 20. 2008 to September 30.2% Other 31.870 EU-27 2. 2009.220 U.5% Ukraine 1.101 6. 2009.S. 38. 2008 to September 30. 2008-09* Colombia 3.

4% *Marketing Year Ending Aug.Ethanol 30. 1988-2008 279 275 272 251 256 272 262 .S. ERS.S. Corn Usage by Segment. 1993-2008 2.937 1. Feed Outlook.900 1.941 1. January 2009 *‘08 ‘93 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 1. Feed Outlook. 31.8% Other 7.950 Export 14.846 1.490 Food. January 2009 *Projection Source: USDA. January 2009 4.600 HFCS 460 Starch 250 Sweeteners 240 Cereal/Other 193 Alcohol (Bev) 134 Seed 23 Total Use 11. Feed Outlook. January 2009 182 217 219 222 Million Bushels 228 229 236 Sweetener Usage.1% & Coproducts Feed/Residual 44. 31.900 1.363 *Marketing Year Ending Aug. Feed Outlook. ERS. 1995-2008 Feed & Residual 2.957 2.750 Food.818 ‘04 ‘06 ‘07 *‘08 ‘88 ‘93 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘05 1.436 *‘08 *Marketing year ending Aug.750 Million Bushels U. 1988-2008 442 460 361 *Marketing Year Ending Aug. ERS.046 2.340 2. January 2009 Million Bushels Feed/Residual 5.327 1.537 2.125 2.000 5. World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate. Feed Outlook. January 2009 *‘08 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 *‘08 *Marketing year ending August 2009 Source: USDA. ERS.905 1. 1988-2008 239 240 *‘08 Corn Consumption WORLD OF CORN HFCS 3. January 2009 1. 31.979 1. Seed. 2009 Source: USDA.300 Export 1. 1988-2008 Million Bushels 4. Corn Exports.000 3.000 6. ERS.000 4. ERS. 2009 Source: USDA.245 1.588 7. 2009 Source: USDA. ERS. 2009 Source: USDA. Feed Outlook. Industrial Ethanol & Coproducts 3.0% 244 U.6% 223 219 222 218 ‘88 ‘93 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 3.686 ? Food.S. 31. Seed & Industrial Exports Carry-out ‘88 ‘93 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 540 530 541 532 530 531 521 529 510 490 Million Bushels High-Fructose Corn Syrup Usage.134 2.000 Million Bushels U.981 1. 31.000 2.588 ‘07 *Marketing Year Ending Aug.913 1. 2008* ‘88 215 ‘93 ‘98 240 Million Bushels 247 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 246 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 250 Starch Usage.000 1. Seed & Industrial (FSI) Usage. Corn Usage by Segment. 2009 Source: USDA.

4 12. 25 21 17 21 24 23 15 28 40 61 73 80 Source: USDA.5 1. 1988-2008 Million Bushels 3. Fuel Ethanol Production. NASS.855 6.0 141.0 214. 2008 # of Plants 35 24 16 19 12 11 9 6 11 5 8 6 4 3 2 2 2 4 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 191 Installed Capacity 3. Ethanol Fuel Production Facilities. NCGA *‘08 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘05 Bt 17% 3.0 473.S.4 30.0 385.770 2.400 ‘06 ‘07 *Estimate for Calendar Year 2008 Source: Renewable Fuels Association.0 55. Corn Acres Planted. ERS.0 1.000 Biotech Share of U.0 1. 2009 Source: USDA.800 ‘04 3.0 978. 2008 Non-Biotech 20% Stacked Traits 40% Herbicide Tolerant 23% 1.600 628 706 996 1.514.085 34.0 143.400 1. December 2008 . January 2009 State Iowa Nebraska South Dakota Minnesota Indiana Illinois Wisconsin Ohio Kansas North Dakota California Missouri Michigan Texas Tennessee New York Oregon Colorado Georgia Virginia Mississippi Idaho Arizona Kentucky New Mexico Wyoming Louisiana Total Millions of Gallons U.846 20.5 881.0 267.603 2.026 Corn Used for Fuel Ethanol Production.0 177.003. 1998-2008 9.323 Thousand Acres Non-Biotech Bt Herbicide Tolerant Stacked Traits Total 17.130 2.0 35.S.S.327 287 458 526 566 1. Feed Outlook.470 1.465 14.0 100.0 164. Acreage Report.0 928.0 190.630 1.S.5 300. 2006-2008 Bt ‘06 ’07 ‘08 24 13 32 23 16 28 38 37 29 8 20 27 22 20 19 12 22 25 19 26 30 31 29 9 16 22 19 20 13 7 16 25 15 19 27 27 24 12 7 20 14 20 Herbicide Tolerant ’06 ‘07 ’08 12 15 14 33 18 29 14 24 34 13 32 37 18 25 15 17 19 36 22 32 19 23 37 12 34 37 23 33 15 16 15 30 24 29 21 24 34 17 30 31 26 32 Stacked Traits ‘06 ’07 ‘08 19 12 18 12 10 16 7 15 20 5 34 13 10 10 40 30 37 21 19 28 13 25 22 20 43 20 22 14 52 55 53 35 33 40 22 35 31 37 58 27 35 22 55 40 64 68 44 73 59 76 83 26 86 77 50 55 74 59 78 82 60 86 62 79 88 41 93 79 64 67 All Biotech Hybrids ’06 ‘07 ’08 80 78 84 90 72 88 70 86 89 66 95 78 75 74 IL IN IA KS MI MN MO NE ND OH SD TX WI Other U.120 Source: USDA.168 1.0 65.3. NASS. Acreage Report.415.0 515.5 250.0 60.0 664.931 87.0 55.8 *‘08 ‘88 ‘93 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘05 State Percentage of Biotech Acreage. 31.485 Millions of Gallons U.904 4. June 2008 Source: American Coalition for Ethanol. June 2008 ‘04 ‘06 ‘07 *Marketing Year Ending Aug.

2009 Source: ProExporter Network (PRX) *Estimates Source: PRX. Dir.O.amseed.pork.sfa.org 0 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association 9110 E.com RENEWABLE FUELS American Coalition for Ethanol 5000 S.org • www.ilcorn. Florida 32794 P: 321-214-5206 • F: 321-214-0210 Lisa Lochridge. AL 35758 P: 256-882-3369 Mark Hall. Iowa 50325 P: 515-223-2600 • F: 515-223-2646 Laurie Bever. Box 11000 Montgomery.edu CORN FUTURES CME Group Communications Department 141 W. IL 60611-4267 P: 312-644-6610 • F: 312-321-5150 Genny Bertalmio. NW. VP of Operations www.S.O.nppc.org Rodney Weinzierl.lochridge@ffva.edu Georgia Agricultural Commodity Commission 328 Agricultural Building Capitol Square • Atlanta. FAS Livestock and Poultry: World Markets and Trade.croplifeamerica. DC 20006 2000 P: 202-331-1634 • F: 202-331-2054 info@corn.commodityclassic. TX 77843-2474 P: 979-845-2925 • F: 979-845-0456 Lloyd Rooney. #1200 Washington. Corporate Marketing & Communications anita. Director of Communications www.500 1.org • www.1000 DC 20024 P: 202-484-2200 • F: 202-488-7416 generalinfo@namamillers. Director of Communications mtessitore@beef.000 500 Million Bushels U.org Terri Long. DC Office 122 C St. #1003 Washington.. DC 20002 P: 202-515-2721 • F: 202-962-0572 Estelle Grasset.S. 2008 to August 31.org • www.org • www.org STATE ORGANIZATIONS Alabama Soybean and Corn Growers Association P.O.ngfa.org Mike Deering.com www.ethanolrfa.com • www. VA 22201 P: 703-558-3579 • F: 703-524-1921 500 Anne Keller.liskey@cmegroup. Director of Communications egrasset@tfi. Box 948153.000 2. Communications Director kbrekke@ethanol. Box 31 • Little Rock. of Communications warnerd@nppc.poultryegg. #510 Washington.org Audrae Erickson. Agricultural Manager Illinois Corn Growers Association P.org Growth Energy 1900 K Street. State Executive Coordinator deweylee@uga. Nichols Ave.ethanol. President EXPORTS U.com Georgia Corn Growers Association P.org The Fertilizer Institute Union Center Plaza 820 First Street NE #430 Washington. Suite C Jefferson City. AL 36191-0001 P: 800-392-5705 ext 4216 • F: 334-284-3957 Buddy Adamson.com CropLife America 1156 15th St. VA 22314 P: 703-837-8140 • F: 703-837-9365 Gretchen Flanley.org 1500 North American Millers Association 600 Maryland Ave. DC 20005 P: 202-789-0789 • F: 202-898-0522 grains@grains. NW #820 Washington.e85fuel. Chicago. Texas A & M Soil & Crop Science Department 2474 TAMU College Stn. DC 20006-1108 P: 202-496-7306 • F: 202-496-7066 www. MO 63005 P: 636-733-9004 • F: 636-733-9005 Nancy Bunker Koester.com Popcorn Board 401 N Michigan Ave.org CORN INPUT 0 American Seed Trade Association 225 Reinekers Lane.org Illinois Corn Marketing Board P. Suite #875 Washington.org • www.org www. DC 20001 P: 202-347-3600 • F: 202-347-5265 Dave Warner. Prof of Food Sci & Tech Texas University A & M lrooney@tamu. IL 61702-1623 P: 309-557-3257 • F: 309-827-0916 ilcorn@ilcorn. DC 20001-2109 P: 202-628-7001 • F: 202-628-1933 Janice Tolley.O.com CORN PROCESSING Corn Refiners Association 1701 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Marketing Manager gbertalmio@smithbucklin. GA 31793 P: 229-386-3006 • F: 229-386-7308 Dewey Lee. Organizations that Support the Corn Industry NCGA National Corn Growers Association 632 Cepi Drive. AR 72203-0031 P: 501-228-1297 • F: 501-228-1846 Matt King matt.. Suite 100 Washington. Communications Manager Commodity Classic P: 636-677-4157 • srsi@swbell. DC 20005 P: 202-289-0873 • F: 202-289-5388 Randy Gordon. Ste.O.tfi. USDA. Director of Public Affairs lisa. 1995-2008 Thousand Metric Tons Poultry Beef Pork ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 *‘08 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 *Marketing year September 1. Broadband Lane.500 1. Chicago.org • www.O.500 2. 204) F: 703-836-8262 • cclark@sfa. VA 22209 P: 703-836-4500 (ext. IL 60604 P: 312-466-4613 • F: 312-341-3306 Anita Liskey.org National Pork Board 1776 NW 114th St.org Alabama Wheat and Feed Grains Commission P.org US Poultry & Egg Association 1530 Cooledge Road • Tucker..org • www.. Suite 650 Arlington.ncga. Communications Director gflanley@amseed.000 1.org Arkansas Corn and Grain Sorghum Board P.com Snack Food Association 1600 Wilson Blvd.org • www. Managing Director.com Colorado Corn Growers Association Colorado Corn Administrative Committee 127 22nd Street • Greeley. NW. Box 748 • Tifton. DC 20001 P: 202-289-3835 • F: 202-289-7519 2500 Matt Hartwig. Corn Fed by Animal Group. Director of Consumer Advertising lbever@pork. SD 57108 P: 605-334-3381 • F: 605-334-3389 Kristin Brekke. 1995-2008 Beef Poultry Pork Dairy Other 3.king@arfb. Jackson Blvd. Box 1623 • Bloomington. Grains Council 1400 K Street. Vice President of Communications rrunyon@croplifeamerica. #825 W Washington. Clive. Maitland.S. VP of Communications & Government Relations • www. DC 20005 P: 202-296-1585 • F: 202-463-0474 Rex Runyon.growthenergy.org Cereal Quality Lab. NW. NW. Ste. Box 1069 • Madison. Director of Communications 500 & Meetings • tlong@namamillers. October 2008.O.com Renewable Fuels Association 3000 One Massachusetts Ave. Centennial.org 2000 LIVESTOCK AND FEED 1500 American Feed Industry Association 2101 Wilson Blvd. Executive Director mark@alabamasoycorn.2.000 500 U. GA 30084-7303 P: 770-493-9401 • F: 770-493-9257 www. Suite 224 Sioux Falls.org National Pork Producers Council 122 C Street NW.beef. Dir. GA 30334 P: 404-656-3678 • F: 404-656-9380 Marcia Crowley. Commodity Classic Show Director www. 950 Washington..org Christopher Clark.org National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition 3216 Emerald Lane. IL 61702-0487 P: 309-827-0912 • F: 309-827-0916 Rodney Weinzierl. SW.coloradocorn.org • www. #650 Alexandria.org *‘08 . Box 487 • Bloomington. CO 80112 P: 303-694-0305 • F: 303-694-2851 Melissa Tessitore. Executive Director weinzier@ilcorn. CO 80631 P: 970-351-8201• F: 970-351-8203 info@coloradocorn.org National Grain & Feed Association 1250 Eye St.org • www.com FOOD AND SNACK CORN Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association P. MO 65109 P: 573-635-8445 • F: 573-635-5466 www. Director badamson@alfafarmers.com Mark Sponsler.ilcorn.000 1. of Communications mhartwig@ethanolrfa.afia.ffva.net Peggy Findley. Chesterfield. Director of Communications mdeering@grains. Meat Exports by Animal Group. Director of Communications akeller@afia. NW #400 Washington. #916 1000 Arlington.com NCGA Washington. CEO msponsler@coloradocorn. Executive Director weinzier@ilcorn.

Executive Director smerritt@necga.org Corn Growers Association of North Carolina 7520-102 Leadmine Road Raleigh. January 2009 Indiana Corn Growers Association Indiana Corn Marketing Council 5757 W 74th St • Indianapolis.org Virginia Grain Producers Association P.org • www.087 1.org Louisiana Soybean and Grain Research and Promotion Board P.org New York Corn Growers Association 27 Elk Street • Albany. SD 57108 P: 605-334-0100 • F: 605-334-0505 Lisa Richardson.hutchens@nebraska. NY 12207 P: 518-426-0214 • F: 518-434-9093 Rick Zimmerman. Executive Director todd@kycorn.mocorn.790 Million Bushels* U.S.ohiocorn. 1995-2008 Million Bushels U.382-0483 • F: 740-387-0144 Dwayne Siekman. 342.com www.org South Dakota Corn Growers Association South Dakota Corn Utilization Council 5109 S. MN 55379 P: 952-233-0333 • F: 952-233-0420 info@mncorn. 05-06.org Jody Pollok-Newsom.org Tom Lilja.edu Missouri Corn Growers Association Missouri Corn Merchandising Council 3118 Emerald Lane • Jefferson City. 253.com/corn Minnesota Corn Growers Association Minnesota Corn Research and Promotion Council 738 First Avenue East • Shakopee. Feed Outlook.micorn. Soybean and Small Grains Board 102 Governors Street Room 319 Richmond. Box 16402 • Chesapeake.org South Carolina Corn and Soybean Association 100 Old Cherokee Rd.org Oklahoma Corn Growers Association 6205 Park Lane • Guymon.org • www.org Kansas Corn Growers Association Kansas Corn Commission P. Executive Director sccsa@collabefforts. Box 90 • Eastwood. NC 27615 P: 919-844-7116 • F: 919-844-7260 Joyce Woodhouse. Corn Ending Stocks.000 2. Source: ProExporter Network (PRX) 584 2.O.com • www.710 1. NE 68509-5107 P: 402-471-2676 • 800-632-6761 F: 402-471-3345 Don Hutchens.org Craig Floss.596 Non-Corn Belt 1. SC 29072 P: 803-356-3727 • F: 803-359-1921 Kathy Fudge.O.net North Dakota Corn Growers Association North Dakota Corn Utilization Council 1411 32nd St. 06-07. MD 21037 P: 410-956-5771 • F: 410-956-0161 mgp@marylandgrain.com www.com Virginia Corn.org 1500 958 1. Executive Vice President (CPAT) David Gibson. Executive Director tom@ndcorn. MI 48820 P: 517-668-CORN (2676) • F: 517-668-2670 corninfo@micorn.500 ‘95 ‘96 ‘97 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 **‘08 ‘38 ‘48 ‘58 ‘68 ‘78 ‘88 ‘98 ‘99 ‘00 ‘01 ‘02 ‘03 ‘04 ‘05 ‘06 ‘07 *‘08 * ProExporter Network estimates the equivalent of 189. Box 9555 • Mississippi State..org Gary Marshall.org • www.org Nebraska Corn Growers Association 1327 H Street #305 • Lincoln. VA 23219 P: 804-371-6157 • F: 804-371-7786 Phil Hickman.iowacorn. ** Marketing Year Ending August 2009. 2009 Source: USDA.marylandgrain. 3000 Director Executive jwhite@ksgrains. Executive Director (TCPB) dgibson@texascorn. Executive Director rzimmerman@acds-llc. Suite F Lexington.org Tennessee Corn Growers Association 510 West Black Lane • Obion. 329.texascorn. 890 and 901 million bushels of corn fed to livestock was displaced by DDG. 1938-2008 .org Nebraska Corn Board P.com www.org Iowa Corn Growers Association Iowa Corn Promotion Board 5505 NW 88th Street Suite 100 Johnston.org • www.pacorngrowers. IN 46278 P: 800-735-0195 • F: 317-347-3626 Jane Ade Stevens.304 1.msstate. Executive Director lynnehoot@aol. 2 • Fargo.000 813 Corn Belt *Marketing year ending Aug.org 2500 Kentucky Corn Growers Association Kentucky Corn Promotion Council P.org • www.118 1.718 1. Secretary/Treasurer polk@ken-tennwireless. PA 16804 P: 814-863-1018 • F: 814-863-7043 info@pacorngrowers. MO 65109 P: 573-893-4181 • F: 573-893-4612 mcga@mocorn.gov Wisconsin Corn Growers Association Wisconsin Corn Promotion Board W1360 Highway 106 • Palmyra.com www. CEO gmarshall@mocorn. WI 53156 P: 262-495-2232 • F: 262-495-3178 wicorn@centurytel.930 1. Executive Director dsiekman@ohiocorn.899 1. Erick Larson • elarson@pss.O. TX 79403 P: 806-763-2676 • F: 806-762-2674 tcpb@texascorn.sdcorn.O.org Ohio Corn Growers Association Ohio Corn Marketing Program 1100 East Center Street • Marion. IA 50131-2948 P: 515-225-9242 • F: 515-225-0781 corninfo@iowacorn. 31. Box 95004 Baton Rouge. 03-04. VA 23328 P: 757-421-3038 • F: 757-421-2776 Molly Pugh.org • www.scsoybeans. 07-08. 04-05. Corresponding Secretary kylem@lfbf.virginia. Box 95107 • Lincoln. Executive Director wicorn@centurytel.necga. Box 304 • State College.ksgrains. Executive Director gerlach@mncorn. OH 43302 (OCGA) P: 740-383-2676 (OCMP) P: 740.net • www. Executive Director lisal@sdcorn.967 3.org Scott Merritt. Program Director phil.com Lynne Hoot.org • www.org • www.114 1. Executive Director molly@virginiagrains. Crossings Place Suite 1 Sioux Falls. KY 40018 P: 502-243-4150 • 800-326-0906 F: 502-243-4149 2000 info@kycorn. Executive Director jpollok@micorn. 569. MS 39762 P: 662-325-2311 • F: 662-325-8742 Dr.org • www.com Michigan Corn Growers Association Corn Marketing Program of Michigan 12800 Escanaba Drive Suite B DeWitt.wicorn.O. LA 70895-9004 P: 225-922-6200 • F: 502-243-2149 Kyle McCann.org Maryland Grain Producers Association Maryland Grain Producers Utilization Board 53 Slama Road • Edgewater.ndcorn.org Mississippi Corn Growers Association Mississippi Corn Promotion Board P.org Todd Barlow.org Greg Roth. Executive Secretary jwoodhouse@earthlink. Corn Fed by Region.org David Gibson. Interim Executive Director jadestevens@indianacorn. S.mncorn.500 1.2.org • www.net Robert Oleson. respectively. and 08-09 crop years.hickman@vdacs.nycorn.gov www.S.. KS 66032 P: 785-448-6922 • F: 785-448-6932 Jere White. Box 446 • Garnett. OK 73942 P.nebraskacorn. F: 580-338-1568 Raylon Earls Pennsylvania Corn Growers Association P.org Tim Gerlach. NE 68508 P: 402-438-6459 • 888-267-6479 F: 402-438-7241 info@necga. Chief Executive Officer cfloss@iowacorn. Ste.O.tncorn. TN 38240-3804 P: 731-536-6226 Polk Glover.org Corn Producers Association of Texas Texas Corn Producers Board 4205 N Interstate 27 • Lubbock.787 1. in the 02-03.624 1.O.524 1.kycorn. Executive Director don.org • www. Executive Secretary www.incorn. ND 58103 P: 701-364-2250 • F: 701-298-7810 info@ndcorn.

Visit www.GEOGRAPHY When it comes to membership.com for more details and updates on the corn industry. DC Office • 122 C St. NCGA is all over the map. National Headquarters • 632 Cepi Drive • Chesterfield. we can continue the remarkable achievements of America’s corn industry — and ensure that U.733. production and education. Through the state checkoff investments of nearly 300.9004 Washington. With your help. DC 20001 • 202. The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) is the largest national nonprofit organization representing the interest of U. corn growers continue to excel at every level. MO 63005 • 636.000 NCGA grower members in 47 states.7001 .ncga. NCGA and its state-affiliated organizations are redefining and expanding the role of corn in the world’s future through research. You can join more than 35.S.S. #510 • Washington.628. making a difference in public policy. NW. market development. corn growers.000 corn producers and the commitment of dedicated grower leaders.

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