September 2010 www.cranestodaymagazine.

com
The interview
Andrew Rooke on the growth of Manitex
North America
US construction experts call for long term
infrastructure investment
Dockside lifting
The latest in transshipment cranes, and new
technology from the US Navy
Contents
3 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
This month
05 Comment
07 Job of the month
ALE lifts and skids a huge module in
Tampico, Mexico
09 News
New Terex truck crane—New Altec
cab—Dulles airport link—Jumbo Javelin
at Greater Gabbard—Appointments
Case study
People
The Back Page
74 Backpage
A profile of specialist recruiter MPS
25
41 Maestro Marchetti
Stuart Anderson remembers Luigi
Marchetti, who ran his eponymous
crane builder for more than 50 years
North America
45 Spending for the future
In the US, the lifting and construction
industry is lobbying for a commitment to
much-needed long term infrastructure
investment. Myra Pinkham reports
52 Job map
Nicole Robinson reviews recent jobs
in the US and Canada
20 London link
Adrian Greeman describes two key
projects within the upgrade of
London’s Thameslink rail line
25 Docking without a dock
Will North looks at some of Liebherr’s
latest cranes for transshipment, and
a new lifting device developed by the
US Navy
07
37
People
19 The interview
Andrew Rooke talks to Will North
about the history of Manitex, and its
plans for the future
Dockside
Special transport
29 Wind transport
Kevin Walsh reviews transporters
aimed at the wind energy sector
33 Down in the bayou
COVER Alice Attwood profiles Louisiana-
based Berard Transportation, and
examines the challenges of working in
such difficult terrain
37 Mammoet floats boats
Will North reports on one of the first
jobs for Mammoet’s new pontoon,
launching a frigate for Damen
shipbuilders
33
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Editor’s view | Comment
5 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
A
t times, it seems as if life is merely
plodding along, that nothing is
changing, while at other times it’s
hard to keep up with the pace of change.
For many in the lifting industry right now,
it is one of those times when business is
moving frustratingly slowly. Recent
results from some of the companies we
follow most closely have shown the first,
very tentative signs of a recovery in the
industry. Looking at the pitiful state of the
US economy though, where as many as
one in ten of the working population are
unemployed, by official measures, it would
take a foolish level of optimism to suggest
that we are on the verge of another boom.
In the US, the big political battle for the
construction industry is to get a plan for
long term investment in infrastructure in
place (p45). A big part of that battle is
finding a way to fund this investment. The
same is true across the Atlantic. In the UK,
the new coalition government is looking to
cut as much as 25% from government
spending. One of the targets for those cuts
looks likely to be the new Crossrail link
from Heathrow to the City of London, and
the upgraded Thameslink line (p20).
It’s easy to be cynical, to see calls for
sustained investment in infrastructure as
pleading for government support for private
business. The reality is though, that these
calls are coming from the people who know
their country’s infrastructure requirements
the best. Without investment, they know
their country’s economy will continue to
flounder. They should be listened to.
While the politicians are slow to move,
and crane sales are only tentatively picking
up, here at Cranes Today, things are moving
fast. Just last month, our then editor
Richard Howes introduced our new reporter,
Alice Attwood. Since then, Richard has left,
moving on to a new job for another
magazine. I’ve been given the opportunity
to take on editing Cranes Today, as well as
our sister titles, Hoist and OCH.
It’s an opportunity I relish. Over the last
five years, I think I’ve got a pretty good
grasp of the crane industry. I wouldn’t say
I know everything there is to know (not
even a significant chunk of what there is to
know), but I have found plenty of experts
who are always happy to help me. I hope
that will continue, that I will be able to put
forward the industry’s concerns, and that
Cranes Today will continue to act as the
forum for industry discussion.
We have another new starter this
month, too. Kevin Walsh is joining us as
features editor. Previously, he has worked
on a couple of well known UK construction
titles, so some of our readers and
interviewees will know him already. I
hope you will all give him, and our new
reporter Alice Attwood, the same,
fantastic, level of support you’ve given me
in my time reporting on the lifting
industry.
Will North Editor
wnorth@cranestodaymagazine.com
The pace
of change
Find out more about our range of products and read daily news at www.cranestodaymagazine.com
September 2010 Issue 429
EDITORIAL
Editor Will North
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8269 7779
wnorth@cranestodaymagazine.com
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Reporter AliceAttwood
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T
he job involved the lifting and
positioning of a living quarter
module and deck at an
offshore yard in Tampico for Dragados
Offshore’s Litoral project.
The lifting and pulling components
of the job were driven and controlled
by two computers on site. The
2,000t, 27.6m high top module of the
living quarter platform was lifted 25
metres using eight 500t HLS5000
units, keeping the module level
throughout, a job which took the
team eight hours.
The lower deck (1,800t with a deck
height of 19.1m, with 23.35m
mezzanine height) was pulled using
skid shoes to an area below the upper
module of the superstructure. Pulling
was conducted using four 70t SLS700
units across a 68 metre distance, this
part of the job took 5 hours.
Later the top module was lowered
by approximately one metre, fitting
the modules together to create the
superstructure.
A fleet of 300s and 500s Weightor
weighing jacks were used at various
points of the project, with 4,000t and
20,000t capacities respectively. ■
7 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
ALE has completed lift work in Tampico, Mexico,
using a hydraulic lift and skid system and providing
weighing services for a total weight of 92,945t.
Job of the month | News
Experience the
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LR crawler cranes from
Liebherr.
The Group
Liebherr-Werk Ehingen GmbH
P.O. Box 1361
D-89582 Ehingen
Tel.: (0 73 91) 502-0
Fax: (0 73 91) 502-3399
www.liebherr.com
Roundup | News
9 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Terex has launched its first truck-
mounted crane with all terrain
superstructures, the Roadmaster 8000,
that demonstrates how modular design
and an international supply chain is
allowing the company to offer new
products from similar components.
Terex product marketing manager,
Arndt Jahns, explains that the crane was
designed in response to customer
demands for an all terrain superstructure
on a commercial carrier: “We were the
only manufacturer that could offer our
customers an all terrain superstructure
within a width of 2.55 m. It offers the best
lifting capacity in its class.”
Terex’s US plant in Waverly has built
truck-mounted telescopic cranes for some
time, all with welded four plate square
booms. This new crane was designed, at
least in part, at one of Terex’s French plants,
Montceau-les-Mines. It is almost 25%
stronger than any of the previous range.
The crane is a product of Terex’s
international network of production plants,
with the firm promising to make
increasing use of those plants in future.
Jahns says, “The superstructure is built in
Zweibrücken and the outriggers in
Montceau-les-Mines. The first step will be
to sell the crane in Europe, but we could
manufacture this type of crane overseas.
“We can mount the superstructure
and outriggers on any suitable truck
carrier, at one of our own plants, or it
can be mounted in the customer’s yard:
it’s a simple task. We prefer to deliver
the whole crane—we can order carriers
for less if we buy a lot—but some
customers may want to mount them
on their own carrier.”
The new crane was launched at
Journées de Levage (JDL, ‘Lifting Days’)
in Paris on September 9-10. The
Roadmaster 8000 features a choice of main
booms: 59.4m (from the AC100/4L) or 50m
(from the AC100/4), for a respective
maximum system length of 81.7m or 77m.
The manufacturer is aiming squarely
at the taxi crane market, pointing out that
it is fully roadable on a five axle
commercial carrier and is useable as a
“one-man” crane.
Jahns says, “It’s good for customers
who don’t, all the time, need off road
capability. On residential job sites,
where the ground is prepared, you don’t
always need an all terrain. But on the
capacity side, it is the same as an all
terrain crane.
“It will be used for more long distance
jobs, in emergencies, or when customers
re-hire to other rental companies.”
Terex launches newtruck mounted crane
Altec has announced the release of a tilt cab option
for all riding seat crane models.
The option allows the operator to adjust the angle of
the cab from 0 to 20 degrees above horizontal, with
hydraulic power.
The product aims to ensure operators will enjoy
better vertical visibility and less neck strain during
work applications, such as setting cross arms on
transmission structures. Additionally, the tilt cab is
located forward of the centerline of rotation,
providing better horizontal visibility when rotating
the crane clockwise.
This increased visibility and reduced operator
strain gives Altec the potential to meet or exceed
customers requirements, relative to the boom truck
crane work applications.
Altec tilt cab option now available
10
News | Roundup
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
The deal ensures the security of 76 jobs
at Sparrows, the Aberdeen-based
offshore lifting specialists, while also
creating a number of new positions.
The contract marks a 40 year unbroken
relationship between firms, and will see
Sparrows provide all crane and lifting
engineering services on BP’s 26 UK
offshore installations, and 4 onshore
terminals until 2015.
The contract secures 76 jobs at
Sparrows in the BP ‘core’ team, on and
offshore, and is likely to create a further 6-
10 jobs at the firm. In 2009, additional
work such as maintenance, modifications,
and repair work, resulted in the equivalent
of a further 52 full time employees at
Sparrows, and the workload for 2010 has
increased greater again.
The new contract includes: crane
management, operation, maintenance,
modification and upgrade, provision of
offshore riggers, rigging lofts and rigging
equipment, and lifting engineering
support for shutdown.
Sparrows executive director, Eastern
Hemisphere, Richard Wilson, said:
“Taking together the core team, the wider
engineering work scopes, and the support
teams in HSEQ, HR, Finance, etc, the BP
contract (which is Sparrows’ largest in the
UK) provides secure employment for 140-
150 Sparrows Aberdeen-based staff.
“Winning the new BP contract was an
important measure of Sparrows ability to
adapt to new client needs in the rapidly
changing world energy market. In no way
is the new contract a simple renewal of
the previous deal- it represents new ways
of delivering greater value to BP, while
still maintaining the highest standards of
safety and equipment integrity which are
vital for safe offshore lifting operations.”
Sparrows chief executive, Doug Sedge,
said of the deal: “Sparrows 40 year
partnership with BP is an example of all
that is best about what the oil and gas
industry has brought to Aberdeen. As our
first client in 1975, BP gave us the
opportunity to form a new Aberdeen
company. Their contracts have already
provided 35 years (almost a career
lifetime) of highly skilled and well-paid
work for 100+ of our people locally.
“The company they helped us to create
now employs around 1500 people
worldwide, over 900 of them in Aberdeen
and offshore UK, and is one of Aberdeen’s
big success stories on the world energy
services stage.”
Sparrows and BP in multi-million pound 5 year deal
PaR Systems is to supply the main
cranes systems for the Chernobyl plant
in Ukraine.
The US-based firm has won a
subcontract to supply the main cranes
system (MCS) to be used within the New
Safe Confinement (NSC) at the
construction site, unit 4 of the Chernobyl
nuclear power plant in Ukraine.
PaR Systems are set to design the
MCS, as well as taking responsibility for
the site supervision of the crane system
erection. The design, fabrication and
testing will take place at the firm’s
subsidiary, Ederer, in Seattle.
The MCS, which includes two 55USt
trolley hoists, integrates overhead crane
bridges, trolleys, and a remote control
and video monitoring system for
operation in a radioactive area. The NSC
building will house the MCS, allowing
the dismantling and cleanup of the site
in a controlled environment.
The NSC will be an arch structure,
built next to the damaged reactor
building, then slid into position to
environmentally isolate the unit as future
operations continue. The structure is set
to confine the plant for 100 years.
A mobile tool platform (MTP) will hold
a third trolley with a RoboCrane
technology, licensed to PaR, developed
at the US National Institute of Standards
and Technology (NIST).
The MTP will also house a Modular
Suspended Manipulator (MSM), also
developed at NIST. The MTP is a device
using three sets of paired winches to
suspend and manipulate a platform with
six degrees of freedom: lateral,
longitudinal, vertical, roll, pitch and yaw.
PaR will subjoin a number of
multifunction tools to the MSM,
including: high power vacuum system,
closed-circuit television viewing system,
shear, robotic arm, jackhammer and drill;
all of which will be remotely operated.
The NSC at Chernobyl was contracted
to French firm, Novarka consortium,
made up of Vinci Construction Grands
Projets S.A.S and Bouygues Travaux
Publics S.A., in 2007.
Since 1961, PaR has specialized in the
design and supply of remote handling
and automated systems for high
radiation, high temperature, inert gas,
and vacuum operations.
The Chernobyl regeneration project is
funded by 29 donor countries through
the Chernobyl Shelter Fund.
PaR Crane System for Chernobyl
Regeneration Project
The Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project on
Route 123 has seen the landscape of
Tyson’s Corner transform.
The Metrorail line and station
construction, 26 miles from Washington,
began in August 2009 along the north side
of Route 123 from the Dulles Connector
Road to Route 7 in Tyson’s Corner.
A new bridge will carry Silver Line
trains 30ft above the Capital Beltway to
the airport. The Beltway will also act as a
flyover, reaching up to 65ft high.
Also under construction is an overhead
crane/truss which will hoist 25USt blocks
of concrete, to be suspended from the
crane. The blocks, which will be held
together by tendons, are being made at
nearby Dulles Airport, using specialist
moulds for each area of the bridge.
The custom built cranes are required to
build the first 11.5 miles of the rail line,
expected to be running by 2013.
Construction also is taking place on
Route 123 using piers to support the
widening of the Beltway for carpool lanes.
The bridge has remained open to 12 lanes
of traffic during construction. Thus, the
flyover has been built and installed in
stages, by laying concrete slabs between
the piers to support the subway tracks.
Custom built cranes
for Dulles Metrorail
project
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Copyright Terex Corporation 2010 Terex is a registered trademark of Terex Corporation in the United States of America and many other Countries
www.cargotec.com

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MD 2006/42/EC places high requirements on stability
supervision and safety. We set out to comply and to find
solutions that add value. Hence, it is now possible to find
light and lean combinations of truck size and stabilizer
equipment, combined in a unique way – to give even
better capacity in some, critical, working areas than
cranes without the same sophisticated solution. Or, you
can go for smaller and lighter stabilizer extensions since
you don’t have to refrain from crane capacity in positions
where it is most needed. This is possible thanks to the
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Roundup | News
13 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Rotterdam based Jumbo Offshore has
completed its part of the Greater
Gabbard Offshore Wind Farm
(GGOWF) following the installation of
131 transition pieces (TP’s).
Greater Gabbard, based off the UK’s
south coast, was aided by Jumbo’s DP2
heavy lift vessel ’Jumbo Javelin’ at a
record-breaking installation rate of
more that one TP per day.
Jumbo Offshore installed 131 TP’s,
out of 140 in the field. The project was
the first time that TP’s have been
transported and installed using a free
floating vessel on dynamic position
(DP); the firm were tasked with
transporting, installing, leveling and
grouting of the TP’s.
For each trip, after loading nine 280t
TP’s in the Port of Flushing, the Jumbo
Javelin sailed to the offshore location,
remained at DP while overboarding the
first TP onto the monopile. Each TP was
based in the required location, and
leveled to its final position; the space
between the TP and monopile (the
annulus) was then filled with grout for a
permanent fixture. Once surveyed, the
TP was then handed over to client Fluor.
Each TP weighs up to 300t, with the
Jumbo Javelin able to transport nine at
a time at a transit speed of 17 knots,
thus making it a useful tool for wind
farm installation work.
Client Fluor deals in engineering,
procurement, construction,
maintenance (EPCM), and project
management companies.
Jumbo completes Greater Gabbard job
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Brazilian business boost for Cargotec
Cargotec’s marine crane division,
MacGregor, will provide a suite of
equipment for two offshore support
vessels, owned by Navegação São
Miguel, set for delivery in 2012, and
due for long-term charter to Brazilian
oil giant Petrobrás.
In a bid to expand its presence in
Brazil, Cargotec has recently won
contracts that will see it supply a set
of MacGregor offshore load handling
and rescue handling equipment for
two offshore support vessels under
construction for Brazilian shipping
company Navegação São Miguel.
The vessels have been ordered to
serve an eight-year charter agreement
with Petrobrás, set for operation in the
Campos Basin in Macaé, Rio de
Janeiro.
14
News | Roundup
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Philadelphia-based AmQuip Crane
Rental LLC has announced that Frank
Bardonaro, Jr. has stepped down as
president and CEO of the company.
Bardonaro will continue his
relationship with AmQuip through a
newly-created board position, and will
retain his shareholdings in the firm.
Al Bove, who joined AmQuip last
December, will succeed Bardonaro.
Bove was COO of General Crane’s
operations in the Southwest and
Western U.S. before joining AmQuip.
Yuki Narula, a director of AmQuip who
represents the largest shareholders,
Altpoint Capital Partners, said: “We
thank Frank for taking us through this
transition since our acquisition in 2007.
Our board is committed to providing the
resources and leadership necessary to
take advantage of the economic upturn
over the next several years.”
Frank Bardonaro said: “I feel good
about the performance of AmQuip, our
team, and the leading position AmQuip
continues to have in its markets. This
change will allow me to move on with
my career and personal goals, knowing
that Al Bove is on board to continue
with senior leadership at the company.”
AmQuip owns and operates
hundreds of cranes; from small 6t
industrial machines, to 500t all-terrain
and crawler cranes.
Self cited as, ‘the crane people’, the
firm was founded by Joe Wesley
through deals with other big eastern
and south eastern US regional players,
before its sale to a team of investors,
led by Bard Capital, in 2007.
Frank Bardonaro to step
down as AmQuip CEO
Cosalt appoint Williams in bid for expansion
A full line of industrial mobile cranes,
electric battery operated,
diesel and hybrid:
capacities from 2 to 90 ton
(4,400 - 198,000 lbs)
Via Piacenza, 45 - 29010 Calendasco (PC) Italy
Ph + 39 0523 762025 - Fax +39 0523 760531
www.valla.com info@valla.com
V
Cosalt has appointed Alan Williams
as sales manager (wire ropes) to help
extend business in the marine and
industrial wire rope market.
The role will bear particular focus
on specialist crane and hoist
applications. Williams brings over
twenty years experience in the
industry, working for a number of
organisations, including, British Ropes
and Certex. While predominantly
working in the wire rope sector,
Williams has extensive knowledge of
fibre ropes and lifting equipment.
In early 2010, Cosalt was named as
a UK distributor for Bridon
International’s steel rope products;
Williams new role will see him
working in tandem with Bridon to
support Cosalt’s key wire rope
accounts across the country.
Nick Dennison, Cosalt’s sales
director said: “Alan’s appointment
signals our commitment to developing
the specialist crane wire market.
“With his tremendous experience
and extensive product knowledge
across all these areas, Alan can help
us provide customers with a highly
customer focused sales and service
package.”
Williams commented: “I am really
looking forward to raising Cosalt’s
profile in the specialist wire rope
market and firmly establishing Cosalt
as a Bridon distributor in the UK.
Together we can build out market
share. I have sold Bridon products for
most of my working life so I know
their team and these products very
well. This job is an ideal opportunity
for me to use my experience and
knowledge to the full.”
Bridon’s wire rope products are
used extensively in the operation of
container cranes, tower cranes, mobile
cranes, dockside cranes, etc. Cosalt
distributes Bridon’s high strength
Endurance range: DYFORM 34LR,
DYFORM 8PI, DYFORM 6 and
Endurance 50DB wire rope products.
Cosalt predominantly provides
safety equipment for marine, offshore
and industrial markets in Europe, and
supplies protective clothing and
equipment for the emergency
services, military, transport and
construction industries in the UK.
16
News | Roundup
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Port Freeport, Texas, has awarded
Avtron Crane Systems a contract to
upgrade a mobile harbour crane,
including adding a new drive system.
The project will be undertaken due to
the need for equipment upgrade: the
Gottwald mobile harbour crane is used
continuously, therefore, the now dated
electrical components were due for
renewal, including the DC drives and
programmable logic systems.
Avtron Crane Systems, based in Ohio,
worked in tandem with port personnel to
ensure an appropriate solution for Port
Freeport was achieved; a main
requirement being that the upgrade would
utilise equipment available in the US, with
service and support for the future.
The upgrade includes the ADDvantage-32
DC drive platform, which has a proven track
record in port crane equipment. Designed for
the rugged use of a crane, the platform aims
to ensure the port trouble free operation.
Port Freeport may potentially be
operational at any time, thus constant
access is required to service personnel.
Therefore, a 24 hour hotline will also be
provided by Avtron, which will ensure
that a qualified field service engineer is
available by phone or on site at all times.
The DriveView Plus diagnostic system
will also help to support the Gottwald
mobile harbour crane in an attempt to
reduce troubleshooting time. The system
provides a graphical tool, helping
technicians identify and resolve problems
quickly. Other features include, real-time
operating values, interlock status and
electrical drawings. DriveView operates
over an Ethernet network for
communication and data access with the
DC drives and PLC.
Avtron Crane Systems awarded upgrade project
Iowa-based Stellar Industries, Inc. has
launched the 77,800 ft-lb Model 12628
telescopic service crane to serve the niche
between Stellar models 10,000 lb 10628
crane and the 14,000 lb 14528 crane.
The Stellar 12628 features the CDT
(Crane Dynamics Technology) control
system. The 77,800 ft-lb crane has a
maximum all hydraulic reach of 28’4” with
a 12,000lb lift capacity at 6’6”.
The Stellar model 12628 features a
hexagonal boom design for reduced flex,
increased strength, variable speed, and a
multi-function radio remote control with
the Stellar CDT system as a standard.
The Stellar CDT system incorporates
two-way communications and a feedback
feature, incorporated into the handheld
controller. The system automatically,
through visual and sensory signals,
indicates to the operator when the load
being transported is increasing. The
signals are transmitted from the Stellar
handheld controller using colour-coded
LED lights and varying cyclical vibrations.
The system allows operators who
encounter overload situations to operate
through, by increasing crane capacity to
118% for a short time. The 12628 also
incorporates a refined safety system; if a
capacity monitoring device fails, the crane
enters ‘safe’ mode. Operation can then
continue at a reduced speed until the safety
device is repaired, replaced, or proper
working order is resumed.
Product manager, bodies and cranes, Tim
Davison, said: “The 12628 and its recent
updates fit nicely into our product line-up.
We have a 10,000 lb and 14,000 lb crane that
both offer market-leading features, so the
12628 fits the growing needs of many
customers.”
Stellar has also designed a new
mechanic truck body to accommodate this
new 77,800 ft-lb crane: the Stellar TMax2.
The body of the Stellar TMax2, part of the
new TMax series, uses the same Torsion
box understructure, the Torq-Isolator
crane compartment and E-coat primer as
standard. Compartments are up to 60”
high and 22” deep, with double door
panel doors and stainless steel hinges to
accommodate the Stellar CDT Equipped
cranes when in boost mode.
Stellar Industries update model to serve niche
The Crane Industry Council of Australia
(CICA) held its Annual General Meeting
in Perth on 1 September 2010 as part of
the preliminary day of the Conference.
As part of the AGM, CICA president
John Gillespie announced the new CICA
Board for 2010/11; including three new
directors: Cheryl Woodhart of RMB
Engineering (elected), Dean Short of Freo
Group (elected), and Ray Brenton of
Thiess (newly appointed).
Alan Marshall, CICA’s chief
executive officer said of the new board:
“It is an exciting time with three
fresh directors coming on board.
Cheryl, Dean and Ray are well known
in the industry due to their expertise
and experience plus their active
involvement at their respective state
association committee level already.”
CICA announces newboard following Perth AGM
UK mini-crane specialist, GGR Group,
invited industry experts to a
demonstration of a prototype of a new
battery powered crane, the URW-295,
on Friday 10 September.
Hundreds of visitors attended the
two open days organised by the firm
last year, which were held in Oldham in
the north of England, and Long
Crendon in the south.
As well as the prototype of the new
battery powered crane, GGR also
previewed the latest addition to its
Unic cranes, the URW-245 mini crane,
and its newly established line of GGR
Cladding specialist attachments.
The URW-295 is a solely battery-
powered crane which is aimed for indoor
applications where noise and fumes may
cause issues. Weighing 2100kg and
with a maximum boom length 8.65m, the
crane is only 0.6m wide; therefore
making it narrow enough to fit through a
standard doorway.
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The interview | People
19 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
M
anitex has its roots in the deals
that made Manitowoc a global
crane builder. Rooke explains,
“In March 2002, Manitowoc acquired
Grove. As a result, the competition
authority required them to divest one of
their boom truck operations. Manitowoc
divested Manitex in January 2003.
“Manitex was acquired by a group of
private investors in January 2003 and in
July 2006, merged with Veri-Tek Intl,
which had interests in testing equipment
design and assembly. Veri-Tek Intl
brought access to the stock exchange;
Manitex added scale to the operation.”
With Manitex on the stock market, the
investors moved to develop the range of
products it built. Since 2006, the company
has acquired Liftking (a forklift manufacturer
based in Toronto); Noble (lift trucks); Crane
& Machinery Inc. (a Chicago based Terex
dealer and parts supplier); Schaeff (lift
trucks); Loadking (a Terex-owned trailer
manufacturer); Badger Equipment (cranes,
excavators, and, newly, rough terrains) and
CVS, an Italian manufacturer of container
handling equipment. Rooke says, “We were
trying to build a core of lifting equipment
specialised businesses.”
At the same time as building the
company, Manitex’s board has kept an eye
on the company’s profitability. Rooke
says, “Our performance on a financial
basis has been good: we’ve remained
profitable and cash generative.”
Looking overseas
While Manitex has worked to build the
range of products it offers, it has also
looked to expand the geography of its sales
network. Rooke says, “If you go back to the
roots of Manitex, all of these businesses
(before CVS) were North American centred.
Liftking had sold some products overseas,
but generally Manitex looked to North
America for products and dealers.
“I came out to the US in 2002. I was
working for the British company GKN, in
the automotive sector. They wanted me
to work for a division headed in Michigan.
Later, I saw an opportunity with Manitex;
I came on board with them in 2006.
“Russia was the first market we aimed
at. The boom truck market there is twice
the size what it is in North America. Our
focus on product development has been to
increase the capacity and reach of our
boom truck. We’ve aimed at demand in
the oil and gas sector, and Russia has a lot
of demand for that type of equipment.
“In May 2007, we launched our first
50USt boom truck, and sold 140-150 of those
in one year. But, for us, the timing in Russia
was not good. We’d attended ConExpo
Russia, and been the only American
manufacturer of boom trucks there. In late
2008 though, the market there began to go,
just as it had around the world.
“The second area we focussed on was
the Middle East. Our dealership in UAE
has been great, one of our strongest
distributors.
“One focus of development has been to
place the crane on international chassis:
MAN, Mercedes Benz, and Volvo. We’re
not just entering new markets with our
existing product, but becoming an
international product.
“We’ve strengthened Liftking’s focus on
international and military distribution and
recently signed a five-year contract to
supply a US agency that works
internationally. Getting the first contract is,
in some ways, often the easiest. It’s when
they sign up for subsequent contracts that
you feel the product has been out in the
field, it’s been well tested, that people like
it. They’ve got the equipment shipped out
to them on schedule, the parts orders have
come through.
“CVS’s principal product, the reach
stacker, has similar attributes to our
existing product lines. It brings a great
brand and legacy, in a niche market with
not many players. Like any market, it
has seen declining demand recently, but
we anticipate higher growth here than in
markets like general construction.
“Globally, CVS is historically strong in
EMEA, Asia, Latin America, but not in
North America. It will allow us to move
our products where we haven’t been
strong, and to move their products here.
“The first thing we have to do is to get
CVS operating as it once was. We have to
win back the distributors and end users,
and convince them the product is there
and can be supported.
“The general direction of the business
is to focus on specific key uses, both in
terms of end use and of product. We
don’t have the desire or capability to be
on the same global scale as the big
manufacturers. What we do have, is the
ability to focus on niches in key end use
markets.
“We think Russia will come back, and
the Middle East will continue to be strong.
We will continue to develop
internationally.
“We’ve consistently increased the
lifting and reach capacity of the Manitex
crane product. We launched the 50155
early this year, targeted at utility, power
and grid maintenance. We’ve added a
new version of the 50USt crane, and a
shorter boom version of the 50155. In the
oil and gas sector, we are looking to their
special requirements. This month, we’re
launching our first trailer-mounted crane.
“We will continue to develop our core
product line, increasing lifting capacity
and reach capacity, ensuring our cranes
are up-to-date and meeting end user
requirements.” ■
Boom reach
Since being sold by Manitowoc in 2002, Manitex has been busy buying up
lifting companies in new niches, developing its core crane products, and
expanding its international dealer network. COO Andrew Rooke talked Will
North through the history of the company, and its plans for the future.
20
Thameslink | Case study
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
C
omplex river and rail deliveries,
advanced use of time-saving pre-
made factory components, reduction
of disruptive street closures, access to
difficult underground locations and
advanced heavyweight precast installation,
are all aspects of work now underway on
the Thameslink railway upgrade. Most
would be impossible or much more laborious
but for the versatility and capacity of modern
cranes and lifting mechanisms.
Crane lifts, strand jacks and ram pushes
come to the fore particularly for the
Blackfriars bridge across the Rºiver Thames,
while Farringdon station renovation and
extension has relied on major heavy lifts to
help deal with its awkward location
surrounded by busy streets close to the
centre of London’s City financial district.
Large, up to 800t mobile crane operations
have been used at both sites.
Both stations are undergoing virtual
rebuilds in very congested and
complicated locations. London Bridge
station will also be rebuilt eventually,
though this busy commuter interchange
and terminus with its complex viaducts is
only scheduled to start work later.
All three stations are key projects in the
upgrade of the increasingly important
Thameslink north-to south rail link, one of
the few passing right through London,
with its crossing of the Thames at
Blackfriars. Most of the conurbation’s other
rail links finish at terminus stations around
London, like Waterloo or Euston.
North of the river the original Victorian
line passed through a short tunnel to link to
King’s Cross and a route north to Luton. The
tunnel was closed before the Second World
War however and only finally renovated,
electrified and re-opened as a minor
suburban rail service in the 1980s.
To the surprise of then British Rail, now
Network Rail, the new Thameslink service
has become more and more popular,
largely because it fills a gap in the London
Underground network which has no lines
to south-east London and beyond, and
because of its route out to Luton airport.
So the now overcrowded link is being
massively upgraded to take many more
trains, more through trains and longer ones
of up to 12 carriages. £2bn pays for new
trains and £3.5bn for civil engineering, rail,
and signalling upgrading. Most stations
will simply have lengthened platforms and
new signalling, but the three in the
central area will need to deal with very
large increases in passenger numbers.
Across the river
The most visible will be Blackfriars
station. Currently there are four platforms
here, sitting at the north end of a rail
bridge over the river. Two are terminals
for south-east services and two are
through lines to Farringdon and beyond.
Below ground is an additional London
Underground tube station for the District
Line which runs along the northside
Embankment, connecting at right angles
to the rail lines.
A complete demolition of the
nondescript station is underway. It will be
rebuilt to give the rail and Underground
services a futuristic new common entrance
hall and ticketing facility. Beneath, the
tube station is being simultaneously
excavated and completely rebuilt.
The main building will link to a dramatic
extension of the four platforms over the
river. No longer will these simply sit at the
north end under canopies, but will become
the centre point of the station, stretching
right along the bridge’s spans enclosed
within a steel and glass superstructure.
The longitudinal transparent box is
destined to be a major architectural
landmark close to St Paul’s Cathedral.
Design is by main consultant, Jacobs.
At the south end a new “pavilion style”
entrance building will be added, giving a
The upgrade of London’s underused Thameslink railway, and construction of a new line linking the City
to Heathrow, has provided work for a range of different lifting equipment. Adrian Greeman reports
London link
Above: Kobelco crawlers working along Backfriars bridge
Above, right: A Weldex Liebherr LTR 1100 set up on a barge
Case study | Thameslink
21 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
direct connection to the river walk on the
South Bank and the under-served south side.
All this demands major structural
upgrading work. The river bridge itself, a
five-arch masonry pier Victorian structure
has to be stripped right down to renovate
and strengthen the 57m long wrought iron
arches. Piers will be widened to
accommodate additional new arch
sections being added alongside to old
ones, to widen the station space above.
The job requires two phases, with trains
running on two of the lines throughout and
the other half of the bridge under 24 hour
working, seven days a week. The vital live
train services transfer to the rebuilt side
halfway through, this Christmas, to allow
the remainder to be done.
On the construction side the old rail
tracks, steel deck and support posts, or
spandrels, are ripped out leaving the
wrought iron arch rib sections. Thousands
of old rivets have to be deheaded and
punched out to allow this to happen.
The parallel ribs which make up the
width of the bridge, are inspected by the
structural engineers, specialist bridge
engineer subconsultant Tony Gee &
Partners, and steel plate added where they
are corroded. New steel arch sections are
placed alongside the old, and new steel
spandrels, deck plates and track built up,
with new platforms and roof added last.
Key to all this work are five brand new
Kobelco 70t mobile cranes, says Laurence
Whitbourn, Network Rail’s senior
programme manager. There is one for each
span, because once work has started there
is no deck on which to move to the next
pier. The 33.4m boom cranes allow a
strongly river-based logistical organisation
for the work, which makes economic and,
equally importantly, environmental sense.
It also reduces truck deliveries around the
site which has the busy Blackfriars road
bridge on one side, two busy City roads on
the north and the embankment on the
south. Reducing road congestion is one
aim, pleasing Transport for London and the
local boroughs, and speeding delivery for
the site is another, pleasing the contractor
Balfour Beatty and client Network Rail.
The units can lift a maximum 21.1t at
7.3m radius, allowing them to move some
8,000t of old scrap into barges for disposal
downstream, while 14,000t of new steel is
delivered the same way.
“We have a loading point at Thames
Wharf near Greenwich” says Whitbourn.
A 120t Hitachi mobile works here using a
30.4m boom. It has a maximum 60t
capacity at 8m, sufficient for the big rib
arch sections fabricated in the Midlands
and delivered by truck. On site the first of
these are currently being lifted into
position by a 100t barge-mounted Liebherr
LTR1100 which will remain on site for the
rest of the project.
The five Kobelcos were themselves
lifted into position onto the bridge track
level by a 135t Kobelco operating with a
45.7m boom on the track viaduct to the
south of the site. The same crane also lifted
in two smaller 25t Hitachi mobiles with 21m
booms which are used for general site
duties, lifting up to 7.2t at 4.5m. All these
cranes are on hire from Balfour Beatty
Crane Hire, the obvious choice.
Critical for most of the crane operations
is continuous interaction with the Port of
London Authority, which only allows lifts
from the water if bridge spans are closed to
river traffic. During the summer tourist
boat season especially this can mean a
need for close liaison to obtain permissions.
The cranes also have to be aware of
the live railway alongside, which limits
their daytime slews. At night however,
when services are stopped between 10pm
and 5am, they are able to traverse a full
360 degrees. Weekend possessions also
allow this. For the building work at either
end of the project, there are luffing jib
tower cranes, two on the north side and
another south.
Several special operations have
required larger cranes too. A 500t mobile
was hired for two weekends early on to
lower 39 special steel guard sections down
a ventilation shaft into the Tube station.
The 8t U-shaped units sit on special
temporary steel tracks along the station
platforms to create a protective hood over
the tracks. The guard means tube trains
can continue to run through while
demolition, piling, excavation and major
concrete building operations go on all
around to create a renewed and expanded
Underground station and its links to the
entrance building and ticket concourse.
A 500t mobile was also used during site
clearance above the station when the old
Blackfriars entrance building was removed.
“It reached over the crowded site to remove
a Vierendeel truss” says Whitbourn.
Blackfriars has also seen a significant
bridge slide operation. The station
comprises several linked bridges which
continue the track beyond the main river
bridge. One small linking bridge on the
north side had to be replaced in order to
allow a track changeover halfway through
the project. The through tracks are to be
given a slew connection onto the newly
renovated downstream half of the bridge
this Christmas, allowing the upstream
side to be worked on. To do it the
connector bridge needed to fan out for
new track and so a new wider version
was built alongside the old one, on trestle-
supported steel slide rails. The concrete
trough section was pushed into position
by hydraulic jacks in the Christmas
holiday period last year.
One other major lifting operation is
needed. The second phase work will
widen the bridge even more, using some
old piers from a second rail bridge which
22
Thameslink | Case study
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
used to run alongside. Its deck was
removed in the 1980s but the iron columns
remain, in four rows of three, matching
the Blackfriars pier locations. The closest
pier from the triplets will be cut back to
the masonry bases which are to be built
up with concrete. A precast section will
then link this to the main station bridge
allowing three more steel rib sections to
be added to widen the spans upstream.
For this operation next year a strand
jack is anticipated, lifting the precast from
a barge and again avoiding any disruption
in the streets above.
The edge of the City
The £250m Farringdon station renewal
meanwhile, which also began work at the
end of 2008, has no special lifting and
fewer onsite cranes but is making much
greater use of heavy craneage, working
from outside the site.
The station sits in a narrow cutting,
originally the Fleet River valley which was
boxed in and built up by retaining walls
and two level column-supported
basements, in the time of Charles Dickens.
Smithfield meat market is close by and
numerous offices, shops, flats and
restaurants. Roads enclose the site on four
sides including the busy Farringdon road.
Four lines run through, two for
Thameslink and two for London
Underground which peels off towards the
City on the south side, where there are
small sidings. An old rail spur also peeled
away but this is being removed to make
space for a new second ticket hall and to
allow extension of the existing platforms.
“The platforms can only be lengthened
southwards because of a steep incline into
tunnel for Kings Cross on the north end”
says project manager for Network Rail,
Richard Walker.
Complicating this work is the fact that
the platform level is the “basement”
underneath brick arches which support a
listed Victorian and Edwardian ticket hall
above, which cannot be altered. But the
four interlocking arches have to be
removed and new bridge supports put in
for the building, and for the road running
in front of its entrance at the modern,
built-up, “ground level”. Complex
underpinning is needed and there will be
new station rooms added too.
Further complications arise because the
future Crossrail scheme’s east-west tunnels
cross through the south end of the site.
Here there will be a station below ground
with links to Thameslink and the Tube.
Crossrail’s ticket hall at the southern
end of the station, will extend the new
Thameslink hall into a common entrance
on a site which has already been cleared
of an old office building. The additional
space is free for the moment which helps
Thameslink; in return it does some
preparation for Crossrail.
Initial work on the site has involved
some major lifting from the small streets
alongside. First came a new footbridge
halfway along the station which gives it a
new entry and exit route, helping
passenger flows during construction and
eventually to be a permanent entrance
from a new side concourse which is being
added to the length of the station along
the small Turnbull street.
For this lift the Costain-Laing O’Rourke
joint venture contractor hired an 800t
Demag AC2000 via its craneage supplier
Select Plant Hire/Select Tower Cranes
which in turn uses Ainscough Cranes for
the big lifters. The machine was used
with full outriggers and 160t of ballast
with a 55.5m main boom, which allowed it
to place the parts for the new steel
footbridge at a maximum radius of 34.8m
and maximum load of 38t. A second 100t
LTM 1100 was used for the ballast
placement during the week long operation.
“We had to build up a part of the
permanent basement foundations with
RMD Megashors to take the outriggers”
says Walker. He adds that the maze of
Victorian basements and retaining
structures requires that every heavy
equipment movement follows only after
careful ground inspection. Other
outriggers were placed on spreader mats.
Meanwhile a variety of heavy cranes
have been used to place plant and
machines for the basement level work on
the new ticket hall. Some very large
diameter piles are needed here for later
multistorey office construction and rigs for
these were lowered in using a 500t
Liebherr LTM 1500 which was short
rigged with 105t of ballast. Loads
included a 73t Bauer BG36 piling rig at
13.5m, a 44t Liebherr LR1130 crawler
crane lifted at 16m and a Cassagrande
B180 60t piling rig again at 13.5m.
A 250t Liebherr LTM 1250 on full
outriggers and 72.5t of ballast has also been
used for lifting in a Sumitomo SCX 800
crawler crane, a load of 49.4t at 11m radius.
Two other major lifts are planed for
later which will require a 300t crane to lift
in precast concrete elements. There is also
to be a new platform roof to be installed in
the main existing station. Prefabricated
steel frame sections will be lifted using
another 500t crane, primarily to achieve
the long reach needed out over the tracks.
All these lifts are done at weekends
when the busy commuter station passenger
throughput is much reduced and street and
station closures are less disruptive.
Biggest crane of all will be a 1,600t
Terex CC2800 crawler which will be
needed on site for some five months
during which time it will erect the
superstructure for the new ticket hall
using a 54m main jib and a 12m fly jib.
On site meanwhile general lifting
duties are being done with a Comedil
luffing jib tower crane, a CT180 with a
54m high tower and 35m jib. A second
CT630 with a 42m tower and a 60m jib
will join it later. Both are fitted with SMIE
electronic controllers to limit their jib
movements to prevent overflying of site
boundaries of tracks during operational
hours, a critical matter in a station which
remains live throughout the works.
Finally of course there will be some
major lifting to be done at London Bridge.
But that is another complicated story. ■
Above: At work at Farringdon
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Transshipment | Dockside
25 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
O
dessa, Ukraine, based Transship
specialises in the transhipment of
cargo and containers, working from
a fleet of floating cranes in the Kerch Straits,
the narrow channel connecting the Sea of
Azov to the Black Sea. One of its specialties
is the transfer of grain, coming from the
fertile fields of Ukraine, to seagoing vessels,
for delivery across the Black Sea, out to the
Mediterranean and beyond.
Transship currently has Liebherr CBG
300 high performance bulk handling
cranes fitted on two barges in the straits,
the Atlas-1 and Atlas-4. The cranes are
built to load and unload vessels, all the
way up to capsize.
These Liebherr CBG 300 cranes have a
maximum lifting capacity of 25 tonnes in
grab operation with a jib outreach of 30
metres. This outreach is extended
through an ex-centre arm of 10 m and 6 m
respectively, making a total outreach of 40
m and 36 m. This means that it is not
necessary to reposition the crane to reach
all holds during unloading, and the cycle
can be reduced by approximately 20% in
comparison to conventional cranes. The
barges Atlas-1 and Atlas-4 can transship
600,000t–800,000t of cargo each within a
navigation period of 200 days. During the
peak season for grain each crane
transhipped around 200,000t of grain per
month, limited only by the lack of barges
and not crane turnover.
Two further Liebherr cranes type CBG
300 have recently been installed on
Transship’s new vessel the Alina, which
has a buffer capacity of 30,000t. These
two cranes also have lifting capacities of
25t at 30m outreach (40m including the
ex-centre arm).
The Liebherr range of CBG four-rope
grab cranes is designed for high speed
and continuous performance, and all three
motions can be operated simultaneously
at full speed. A wide rope field for
stabilising the grab ensures safe operation
and cargo handling without the need of an
additional stabilizing winch. Specially
designed heavy duty hoisting winches,
heel trim alarm systems and emergency
operation functions make these cranes
suitable for operation in heavy sea state
condition. According to Transship Ltd.,
the two barges fitted with Liebherr FCC
CBG floating cranes are conclusively
better adjusted to bad weather conditions
than other floating cranes.
Precision and safety are of utmost
importance and are supported by
Liebherr’s own Litronic crane control and
management system. This system controls
the simultaneous operation of crane
motions (luffing, hoisting and slewing), so
ensuring best possible performance and
protection for the crane. It also records
data about all individual components, all
alarm signals and failures as well as peak
values. The lifetime of components can
thus be analysed and plans for
preventative maintenance and spare parts
supply can be established. Relevant
values such as load indication/limitation,
operation mode, etc. are displayed on the
LCD monitor in the cabin.
To complement the support of
Liebherr’s world-wide service network,
these FCC CBG cranes are equipped with
a modem for data-transfer enabling
remote diagnosis. This allows for system
checks as well as fault-finding which can
cost-effectively be carried out without the
presence of a service engineer.
Looking to the future
While Liebherr looks to provide one of the
most up to date solutions for regular users
around the world, the US Navy’s Office of
Naval Research (ONR) is looking to the
future. A new project, the Large Vessel
Interface Lift On/Lift Off (LVI Li/Lo)
system, has been developed to handle
transshipment in rough seas.
The system has been under
development by the US Office of Naval
Often, cargo needs to be transferred between ships without docking. A recent Liebherr order
demonstrates the state of the art; and research by the US Navy points to the future. Will North reports
Docking without a dock
26
Dockside | Transshipment
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Research (ONR) and contractor
Oceaneering Advanced Technology for
the past six years. The project was
developed as part of the US Navy’s Sea
Base Concept, which envisages the
capacity to establish ‘Sea Bases’ or
offshore floating ports that would allow
the Navy to ensure logistics flow between
ships without securing a deep harbour.
US ONR programme manager Paul
Hess says, "In a lot of recent events, both
military or humanitarian, we’ve had a lot
of challenges to move supplies inland,
without safe harbours. There is only so
much you can do with helicopters.
"The thinking behind the sea base
concept is to be able to get in container
ships, and then move cargo to smaller
ships that are able to go into more austere
environments."
Recent examples of where this sort of
transshipment has been needed include
Haiti, where Port-au-Prince’s harbour was
destroyed by the earthquake that
devastated the country, and Thailand,
where the navy flew in post-tsunami
supplies by helicopter.
The cranes built by Liebherr, or rivals
such as Gottwald, are perfectly suited to
transshipment in calm waters. The
ONR’s aim was to develop a system that
could work in tougher conditions. Hess
says, “We want to work with waves of
up to 2.5m; sea state 3 or sea state 4, in
naval architecture terms. The intent was
to be able to work offshore, where you
have no protected port or wave breaks.”
The system could offer a new approach
to container handling, both in ports that
are frequently subject to poor weather
conditions, and in the offshore sector. The
ONR’s partner on the project,
Oceaneering, is working on
commercialising the technology.
Hess says, “In some ports, they have to
stop work during bad weather. On
offshore platforms, they have a lot of
replenishment needs, and that is severely
sea state limited.”
Hess explains, “It relies on a sensor
package to understand the relative motion
between platforms. There are no tag
lines, no need for people guiding the
payload. That input data makes the
system simple to operate.
“The control systems are based on a
commercially available MacGregor crane.
The system is adapted to invisibly control
the extra joints, allowing the operator to
work with a joystick.
“It’s like operating a marionette puppet.
The macro crane is as normal, but the
micro crane adds eight sets of cables and
extra joints to control the spreader, to an
accuracy of less than an inch.”
A demonstrator version of the system
was installed on the SS Flickertail State in
2009. Earlier in 2010, the Flickertail State
performed tests of the system in the Gulf
of Mexico, safely transferring 128
containers from one ship to another, with
a significant wave height of 1m. The
crane’s operators were able to lift and
place unobstructed containers, to lift
containers obstructed on multiple sides,
and to place containers into obstructed
holes in a container pile.
The ONR’s specification for LVI Li/Lo
calls for it to be able to maintain optimal
cargo throughput rates through Sea State
4 (when waves can reach from 1.25–2.5m).
It should be able to transfer cargo
between two ships directly alongside each
other at zero forward speed or underway
at slow speed in the open ocean. Motion
sensing and compensation for the ships
and/or the cranes should allow safe and
efficient transfer of cargo.
Oceaneering said its OTECH division’s
effort had concentrated on the science and
technologies required for a crane to move
large containers between ships while they
are underway. The control system was
proven through the use of a 1/20th scale
version of the crane that included all
electrical sensor hardware interfaces,
including motion sensors. The Large-
Scale Demonstrator reaches 85ft and can
lift a 20,000 lb container in Sea State 4,
and 40,000lb in Sea State 3. ■
Sector report | Special transport
29 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
A
s the 2020 deadline for a fifth of
Europe’s power generation to be
achieved by renewable means
looms ever closer, wind turbine
manufacturers are striving to provide even
more powerful units.
With the release of manufacturer
Vestas’ V112 wind turbine model for on
and off-shore wind farms, new transport
options have had to be designed to
accommodate the particular
specifications of this latest addition to the
Vestas range.
Capable of producing up to 3MW of
power, and boasting the highest level of
electricity generation in the 3MW class of
wind turbines, demand for the V112 has
already seen 140 turbines sold to the
Macarthur Wind Farm Project in
Melbourne the day after they became
commercially available.
However with such advancements
come new challenges, for instance, how
do you transport 54.6m long rotor blades
when the standard length catered for prior
to the V112 was just 45m?
Rotor blades
Transport trailer manufacturers, all of
whom have been working feverishly to
provide vehicle movement options for
these abnormal loads, have been preparing
for the release of the V112 wind turbine.
Danish trailer builder Goldhofer has
been working with Vestas to develop a
flatbed semi-trailer to manoeuvre the
V112’s extra-large rotor blades around
Turbine
transport
Rapid advancement in wind
turbine specs means transport
options must ring the changes.
Kevin Walsh reports
Top: A TII group nacelle transporter
Above: Nooteboom’s Super Wing Carrier
30
Special transport | Sector report
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Europe’s road networks with the minimum
of fuss.
The SPZ-P 3AAA semi-trailer’s design,
approved by Vestas, has been developed to
handle loads of up to 13t on the vehicle’s
spine while accommodating a rotor blade
length of anything up to 62 metres.
The trailer, which has a gross
combination length (GCL) of just 24m once
the triple telescopic spine is retracted,
provides the ability to retract the vehicle
under load using sliding sleds. In tandem
with a steering angle of 60° this is intended
to make the negotiation of roundabouts
and other obstacles less troublesome.
For the elimination of instability over
uneven terrain, the SPZ-P 3AAA also has
pendular axles.
Not to be outdone, Nooteboom Trailers
have developed the TELE-PX Super Wing
Carrier in conjunction with specialist
transporters Ter Linden. Their approach to
manoeuvrability has taken a slightly
different tack with the Super Wing Carrier.
The three axles at the rear of the
carrier can be moved longitudinally
underneath the length of the load floor,
allowing the wheelbase to be extended or
shortened by up to 7m.
With a slight increase of 70cm in the
carrier’s height achievable via the wheel
mechanisms and the gooseneck, the Super
Wing Carrier allows a good degree of
latitude when deciding how to attack
difficult legs of a journey.
However Ter Linden claim that
transporting large rotor blades would still
be almost impossible without the Super
Wing Carrier’s featured pendle steering.
In an attempt to provide good close
control when manoeuvring, instead of
each wheel pair steering around a point in
the middle of the axle as is typical with
turntable steering, using pendle steering
each wheel is individually steered around
a point above the wheel.
Tight site access routes can often be an
issue with abnormal loads, so to add
another tool to the haulier’s arsenal TII
Group’s Scheuerle arm has developed the
Blade Adaptor, to provide an unusual
degree of manoeuvrability.
Intended for use with the InterCombi
SP, the Scheuerle Blade Adaptor permits
lifting and turning of the rotor blade being
transported to avoid various obstacles such
as low walls or trees. The blade can be
tipped upwards to an angle of 23° as well
as being able to rotate on its longitudinal
axis to cater for strong wind conditions.
Scheuerle claim that this is an ideal
solution for the last leg of arduous
journeys with difficult site access.
Tower sections & nacelles
Where the length of the V112 rotor
blades provides a challenge in terms of
dimensions, weighing in at well over 100t
the sheer mass the V112 nacelle does
provide food for thought.
For instance, with the drive train alone
weighing in at a substantial 60t, Goldhofer
has chosen the simplest route and
provided a separate transport option for
the drive train, thereby reducing the unit’s
gross combination weight.
This allows the generator to be
transported via a seven or eight axle semi-
trailer or a drop deck vehicle (using the
Goldhofer pallet transport system).
While Nooteboom also opt for a similar
solution, TII Group’s approach takes the
bull by the horns with the Nicolas
telescopic tower adapter.
Exhibiting an impressive lift capacity of
120t, ample for most tower sections (and
even the V112 nacelle with the drive shaft
still incorporated), the versatile Nicolas
adapter can be fitted with special clamps
for lifting nacelles in addition to tower
sections. The adapter can be fitted to
platform trailers manufactured by the TII
Group companies Scheuerle and Kamag.
Although incapable of lifting the V112’s
mammoth nacelle, Goldhofer’s Futtog
(roughly translated as ‘Roadtrain’) can still
provide much needed versatility during
transport, and even allow tower sections
to navigate hairpin bends en route.
Consisting of a two to four axle jeep
dolly at the front and a five to seven axle
steering dolly at the rear, both attached
by a free-turning device to RA 3-100
tower adaptors.
Combined, the tower adaptors can
support a load up to 100t and can lift or
lower this load by 3m to avoid obstacles.
This makes the use of cranes for initial
loading of the vehicle redundant. And
thanks to the free-turning bogies, the load
can be manoeuvred into 80° angles
allowing the vehicle to take hairpin bends
while loaded.
Nooteboom’s Mega Windmill
Transporter offers a similar level of
adaptability to differing road scenarios.
Despite it only being capable of raising
loads 1.5m, as opposed to the Futtog’s 3m,
the addition of remote control for the lift
adaptors does add some very useful
functionality.
Just one month on from commercial
availability of Vestas’ V112 wind turbine,
and trailer manufacturers are already
getting to grips with the practicalities of
moving these demanding specialised
components.
So with increasingly rapid
advancement in the capabilities and
specifications of modern wind farms
promised over the next few years, the
main players’ will need to build on the
success of their responses so far. ■
Above: A TII group tower section teansporter
Simply excellent cranes
32
Special Transport | Profile
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
B
erard is a family business: it has its
roots in a deal made by sugar cane
farmer Roy Berard Sr in 1945, who
was paid $50 to move a friend’s house,
using a tractor and homemade trailer.
Today, the company is still owned by the
Berard family. Roy Sr’s sons Johnny and
Randy are president and vice president,
respectively. Randy’s son, Brett, is a civil
engineer in the operations division, and
Johnny’s son, Braedon, is operations
Between storms and swamps, Louisiana’s Berard Transportation have their work cut out for them.
As operations manager Braedon Berard tells Will North and Alice Attwood, they’ve been building a
reputation for reliable engineering expertise since 1945.
Down on the bayou
Below: Loading out a module, ready to be shipped to Alaska
Profile | Special transport
33 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
manager and head of engineering.
One can imagine an ideal landscape for
a special transport company to be looking
for work in: developed enough to have
miles of convenient roads, but distant
enough to be free of obstacles, with a
steady, pleasant, climate. Lousiana,
unfortunately, is not like that. 450,000
cubic feet of water per second flows from
the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge,
soaking the surrounding ground, thus
reducing its ability to take the thousands
of ton weights of ship components and oil
and gas modules that Berard’s clients pay
it to move. Once Berard does have a job
set up, its equipment and its clients loads
are, for months at a time, at the mercy of
the sort of hurricanes that so recently
devastated New Orleans and ravaged the
Gulf of Mexico oil industry.
It is hard to imagine how one could
argue that starting a special transport
company in a place like this is a good idea.
But, with strong demand from the oil and
gas and shipping industry, and three
generations of hard work, the Berard
family—like so many others in the Gulf
Coast lifting and transport sector—has built
a thriving business. Today, the company
works across the USA, and is looking to
new business in Trinidad and Mexico.
The secret, Braedon Berard says, is
building a relationship with customers:
“They’re looking for a company they can
trust, that can deliver on time, and can
handle everything they throw at us at any
given time. They feel comfortable with us
because we have the latest state of the art
equipment, and we can get our projects
done on time.
“Our equipment and expertise causes
no worries for customers. We take pride
in equipment maintenance, getting the job
done on time, and most importantly doing
the job safely.”
Those relationships are built on
engineering excellence. “We focus on
heavy transport,” Berard says, “offshore
and shipyards are the biggest source of
demand. We also operate in the petro and
chemical industries. Around 85% of our
projects use SPMTs.
“Customers want our engineering
expertise: the jobs that are too heavy for
others, we want as we are the specialists.
“A good example of the sort of job we
do for shipbuilders, is a recent barge job
we worked on. The customer wanted to
build the barge in shop, so they could
keep the price and schedule down, but the
shop was too small. They built modules
one at a time. Each was 30ftx74ft, and
weighed 300USt. We took them out,
placed them on supports, and helped to fit
them together. Fitting them was a
challenge, as space in the yard was
limited. But with our equipment
capabilities we were able to make turns in
really tight spaces to get the job done.
The assembled barge weighed 1200USt.
We then transported it to the drydock and
placed it on stands. We can take vessels
to customers own yards, or, we can offer a
turnkey service, sourcing a yard for them.
“There are many ways to move.
Last week a customer wanted a ship
to be made longer. We offered a turnkey
service. Berard offloaded the barge,
and the customer cut the ship in half.
We moved the stern out, so they could
bring in the new mid-section, and
Utility and process module loadout
A 4000USt utility module and 3500USt process module required
transport to Alaska; Berard was hired to transport and loadout each
modue on to two 400’x105’x25’ heavy deck barges. The equipment
used includes 40 lines of Goldhofer PST-SLEs and 72 lines of Kamag
SPMTs. Modules were lifted by the hydraulic capabilities of the
transporters; each with 23-27in of hydraulic stroke. Two operators
were required to complete the job, of which a particular challenge
was manoeuvring the modules in very tight spaces.
34
Special Transport | Profile
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Profile | Special transport
35 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
then we moved the modules back and
attached them.
“With hurricane season upon us
weather can play a big role. On a recent
project in Lafitte, Louisiana, we
encountered an episode of bad weather.
While on the job, news came in of a
hurricane that could possibly be heading
our way. With $20m of equipment at the
job site, we had to decide whether to take a
shot at it.
“We called a 07:00 emergency meeting.
I was receiving hourly updates on the
weather and closely monitoring the path of
the hurricane. If it was due to hit, the job
would have to be postponed. It is a
challenging and gut wrenching time during
hurricane season.
“Back in 2005, hurricanes Katrina and
Rita taught us some very expensive
lessons. The storms brought massive
flooding to our area. We had never
encountered that sort of flooding before.
On one job, during Rita, we were able to
get our crew out in time, but had to leave
the equipment at the customer’s yard.
When we returned after the storm, our
equipment was under 8ft of water.
“South Louisiana is marshland.
Marshland as you know equals soft
ground conditions. When dealing with
SPMTs which have wheel sets that can
turn a total of 270°, operating on these
ground conditions can be tricky. When
you’re on soft ground, that turning will
cause you to dig into the ground, and get
stuck. To compensate, we travel with
several sheets of steel plate, ready to be
laid out where the conditions may not be
adequate. The SPMTs spread the load
well, so we only need to use plate that is
3/8in thick and are approximately 6’ x 20’.
“At Berard, we are faced with
challenges on a daily basis, but with the
skill and knowledge of our engineers and
key personnel we can overcome any task at
hand. We are a 3rd generation family
owned and operated business. The
fundamentals of safe and effective moving
and rigging procedures have been passed
down from generation to generation. Berard
has the equipment together with the skill
set and over 65 years of experience to
handle your projects on time and with a
safety attitude that makes us an industry
leader in the field of heavy transport.” ■
Above and left: Loading out a liftboat
3200USt liftboat
Berard was hired for a turnkey project to get a cutomer’s lifeboat in the water. The 195’x145’
liftboat was transported using a heavy deck barge (260’x72’x16’), tugs, ballasting equipment,
engineering, SPMTs, steel plate, labour personnel and followed months of planning. Berard
used 60 lines of PST-SLE Goldhofers and 32 lines of PST-ESE Goldhofers to transport the load.
The liftboat was lowered on to the SPMTs then, using hydraulics, the load was held steady
until the water covered the legs of the liftboat, the barge pulled out and the liftboat lowered
into the water to be towed. The job presented a number of challenges for Berard: the poor
ground conditions resulted in 112 sheets of steel plates being ‘shuffled’ by 3 forklifts for around
100ft. Perhaps the biggest challenge for the job was the time frame: the US Coast Guard only
awarded a 12 hour permit; despite this, the job was completed, safely, smoothly and even early.
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Case study | Special transport
37 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
T
he Schelde is a seagoing pontoon,
capable of being used for roll
on/roll off (Ro/Ro) and conventional
transport, and as a tool for launching large
ships. It measures 85m x 22m. It is 5m
high, with an unloaded draft of 950mm. It
can carry a load of 80t per sq m along the
centre line of the pontoon, and 15t per sq
m over the rest of the vessel surface. It is
fitted with four spud poles, each
measuring 26.9m.
One of the first jobs for the new pontoon
was the launch of new frigate at Damen
shipyard in Sloehaven, in the south of the
Netherlands. The launch was the first
carried out this way for both Mammoet and
Damen. The job started during the night
at high-tide on Monday 12 July, when the
Schelde was positioned over Damen’s
Ro/Ro quay. As the tide went down, the
Schelde settled on the dry part of the quay.
The frigate was placed on 104 axle
lines of SPMTs and rolled onto the deck of
the Schelde. On Tuesday afternoon, the
Schelde carried the frigate from the Ro/Ro
quay to Sloehaven’s Jetty E, where it met
Mammoet floats boats
Mammoet has purchased a new multi-purpose pontoon, the
Schelde, and put it to work on two boat load outs.
The frigate mounted on SPMTs
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Case study | Special transport
39 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
a range of equipment that Mammoet had
prepared ready to float the frigate. This
included the Purmer and Weiringer
pontoons, each of which was fitted with a
winch frame. There were also two winch
frames on the quay, both fitted with 12
ballast boxes as counterweight. The
operation was commanded from a central
container, using two laptops.
As high winds came in on 15 July,
the decision was taken to delay the
operation. The next day, the frigate was
launched as planned. ■
Right: The frigate on its way to Jetty E;
Below: Floating the frigate
People | Profile
41 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
I
t was with deep regret that I heard
the news of the death of Luigi
Marchetti, who passed away after a
brief illness on February 6th. Born on July
20th 1927, he had served the crane
company and industry that he loved for
fifty years. Last year I had the immense
privilege of interviewing Marchetti as he
looked back over his career.
In 2009, Marchetti’s business celebrated
its 50th birthday. Over those years, more
than 150 crane builders have come, and
often gone, in Europe, and at least half of
those in Italy. Throughout, Luigi Marchetti
managed his business, taking day-to-day
responsibility for its operations.
Marchetti was an Italian entrepreneur
and artisan engineer in the classical
tradition. Even at 82-years ‘young’, Luigi
still drove his car to work everyday to
control his crane making and numerous
other business activities. And on most
Saturdays he could be found walking the
floors of the factory checking product
quality, activity and the tidiness of the plant.
Very much in the Italian tradition,
Marchetti’s business activities remain
located in the family hometown of
Piacenza, one of Northern Italy’s most
heavily industrialised towns. It was here
in 1956 that Luigi Marchetti with his
brothers established a small carpentry
business. The energetic Luigi was already
looking for fresh opportunities and it didn’t
take long for him to branch out on his own,
fabricating iron reinforcements for bridges,
tunnels and electricity generating power
plants. Through this venture he soon had
his first encounter with mobile cranes,
which he needed to rent to lift and handle
his heavier fabrications.
After paying for just a few days crane
rental, the young Luigi Marchetti
recognised a business with much greater
appeal to him than simple metal fabricating.
One day after observing a small and very
basic mobile crane being used by a local
food processing company, he approached
the owner and purchased it on the spot.
The ‘crane’ was in fact a short jib and front
winch mounted on a modified US Army
war-surplus Jeep. The Jeep and its ‘crane’
were not in the best working condition so
with the help of an associate with
connections in Germany, Luigi Marchetti
purchased the components necessary to
bring the machine up to proper working
order. Demand in and around Piacenza for
Luigi’s ‘crane’ quickly developed to the
extent that he decided to build more
machines and through a business associate
from Rome, he purchased four more US
war-surplus Jeeps and set about converting
them into small mobile cranes.
Marchetti was not alone in Italy or
indeed in Europe during the 1940s and
1950s converting war-surplus vehicles as
the base for rudimentary mobile cranes.
Most of these, like Luigi’s first efforts,
employed two-axle trucks which when
modified for lifting duties tended to bog
down and get stuck. So, with the
assistance of three technicians from the
carpentry business, Luigi Marchetti set
about modifying his crane, adding a third
axle and wider tyres to improve both
flotation and stability. This became the
Marchetti MG 3, a lattice boom truck
crane of 3t capacity.
Marchetti established his business on
solid commercial grounds. “I’m proud to
say that whatever problems came my way,
I always solved them personally. The
company had no mortgages or debts.
What we had, we owned. I never needed
to go to the banks to ask for money. From
the very beginning I was independent and
financially healthy.”
By 1960 Marchetti’s crane business had
progressed significantly. That year saw
the introduction of the 6t capacity MG
6T3AM, a truck crane mounted on a
purpose-designed carrier available with a
choice of lattice and hydraulic telescopic
booms and offering outriggers as well as
pick-and-carry capacities. Building on his
early experience, Marchetti placed heavy
emphasis upon off-highway travel
capabilities with 6x6-wheel drive standard
on his new crane.
By 1963 a larger 8t capacity version was
added and soon afterwards this was
followed by the 16t capacity MG 16T 3AM.
To broaden the international appeal as well
as improving performance and serviceability,
the new 16-tonner was powered by a Ford
diesel engine and had US hoist reduction
gearboxes. In 1970 the 20t capacity MG 77
TEL fully hydraulic telescopic boom truck
crane joined the family.
From the beginning it was Marchetti
himself who handled sales. He travelled
the length and breadth of Italy to find
customers as well as agents. When he
travelled on component purchasing trips to
Germany, he’d use the opportunity to find
local distributors. Marchetti’s willingness
and ability to develop innovative vehicle
concepts also opened new doors.
One particularly memorable sale was to
the leading Spanish international
contractor Dragados. Marchetti was
invited by Dragados to consider their
requirement for twenty front-discharge
concrete delivery trucks, which were
needed for a hydroelectric scheme in
Luigi Marchetti, a leading figure in the Italian crane industry, ran his
eponymous company for 50 years. Stuart Anderson had a
chance to speak with him, and review his illustrious career, before
his death this February.
Maestro Marchetti
Above: Luigi Marchetti
42
Profile | People
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Turkey. The mountainous job site
involved very narrow tracks with no space
available for the large diameter steering
circles needed by conventional trucks. To
solve the problem Marchetti proposed an
entirely new 4x4 wheel-steer truck with
wheels that had extraordinarily sharp
steering angles of 90-degrees axles -
allowing them to quite literally turn on the
spot. The idea won the contract and the
trucks proved so successful in Turkey that
Dragados’ French consortium partner
ordered a further twenty of them for use
on a major hydroelectric project in
Argentina. Remarkably, the French placed
the order before there had been any
discussion on price and the blank order
document was completed by Marchetti!
Soon afterwards, product development
flowed through to Marchetti’s crane line
where crab steer was introduced as an
option on his 4x4 wheel drive truck
cranes. However, despite this example of
‘diversification’, from the early days of his
business, Marchetti was fully focused on
the crane business. “From the beginning
we offered a line of standard cranes, not
machines designed to customer order.”
As Marchetti’s reputation grew and the
company’s network of sales agents and
distributors broadened, customers still
wanted to do business directly with Luigi
Marchetti. A favourite customer was Snr
Campari, a contractor based in Milan who
specialised in the transport and erection of
pre-fabricated concrete buildings.
“Campari became a ‘lover’ of our cranes
and wanted to be the first customer for
our new models”, he told me. “Even if we
simply mentioned an idea for a new crane,
Campari wanted to be the first buyer. My
local agent would visit Campari and try to
get him to give him the order but Campari
would say ‘Thank you for your visit but I
want to close the deal with Snr Marchetti’.
The agent would try to explain how the
crane worked, etc to Snr Campari but he’d
reply, ‘don’t worry we know that better
than you do. Please call Snr Marchetti’”,
smiled Luigi Marchetti.
Unfortunately the relationship ended in
tragic circumstances, with Campari’s
family the victims of mafia extortion. The
matter was resolved, but, Marchetti says,
“The experience shattered him and
changed his life. Soon afterwards he gave
up the business but thankfully lived on
until about ten years ago when he passed
away peacefully.”
When asked what problems he has
encountered during his long career, Luigi
Marchetti is sanguine and philosophical.
“There have been no problems to speak of,”
he shrugs. “I had my own job. The first
crane I built was for my own use. My
business and my cranes had a good
reputation. I never worried about anything
because I had no debts and owned
everything. Even the economic crisis of the
1980s was not a big problem. When other
manufacturers were laying people off or
even closing down, I kept all of my
employees and built 40 cranes for stock. At
the start of the crisis the typical market
price had was Lira 80 million but afterwards
I was able to sell them at Lira 120 million!”
Luigi Marchetti remained as close to the
product as he has always been. “My
favourite crane was the MG 364, a 32t
capacity telescopic truck crane that we
introduced in 1978. That year we became
an SpA and moved into our new factory in
Via Caorsana. The MG 364 became a
fabulous best seller for us and when we
eventually discontinued it, many customers
were disappointed. So as we began to sell
new models we’d look for old MG 364s we
could take as trade-ins to sell them to ‘fans’
of the older model. Two years later we
produced our first rough terrain crane, the
30t capacity MG 244 TEL, as well as our first
all terrain, the 28/30t capacity MG 344 TEL,
which was also the first AT made in Italy.
Another one of my favourite cranes was the
five-axle 100t MG 195 with large single tyres
all round that we introduced in 1983. It was
the first 100t truck crane built in Italy and
today would have been called an all terrain”.
So, looking back, what gave Luigi
Marchetti the most satisfaction? “Most
important of all is the legacy, the
achievements over these 50-years, the
respect that the name Marchetti has with
crane users not only in Italy and Europe
but in more than seventy countries around
the world. The fact that customers place
repeat orders for Marchetti cranes and
trust us to satisfy their needs. That it very
important and really makes me happy.
But on a personal level what I have
enjoyed the most is that it’s my business
and I don’t have any partners.” ■
Above: A 70t Marchetti AT arrives in
Tanzania; Right: The brochure for one of
the first cranes designed by Luigi
Marchetti, the 3AM
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W
hile the US economic stimulus
wasn’t a total washout, it
wasn’t everything that the
construction crane industry had
expected, according to Joel Dandrea,
executive vice president of the
Specialized Carriers & Rigging
Association (SCRA), Fairfax, Virginia.
The $787bn stimulus programme did
just what it was designed to do, “To be a
lifeline to the construction industry amid
what was otherwise an abhorrent
construction economy,” says Jeff Solsby, a
spokesman for the Washington-based
American Road & Transportation Builders
Association (ARTBA), who adds, “It was
never meant to be viewed as a
substitution for the highway bill.”
In fact, Tony Dorsey, spokesman for the
American Association of State Highway and
Transportation Officials (AASHTO), calls
the economic stimulus “a godsend” for the
construction industry, which has been
experiencing over 20% unemployment;
twice the unemployment rate of the rest of
the US economy. While he admits that
many people expected it to do more than it
has done, he maintains, “without the
stimulus the unemployment rate would a
whole lot higher.”
Dorsey observes that as of the end of
June, 12,408 highway and bridge projects
valued at $25.3bn were out of bid with
11,792 projects worth $23.9bn under
signed contracts, of which 10,999 projects
totaling $23.1bn are under way and 4,571
projects totaling $3.9bn are completed. He
says that throughout the life of the
programme 1,264 bridges will be
improved, replaced or newly constructed
and 35,399 miles of pavement will be
improved, resurfaced or widened.
The construction crane business,
however, won’t see much of this benefit,
says Al Cervero, senior vice president of the
Association of Equipment Manufacturers
(AEM), Milwaukee, who declares that only
about $4bn of the $47.8bn is going to
highway and bridge transportation projects.
This funding will be used for improving
and/or replacing existing cranes.
“So far I don’t see any increase in our
business due to stimulus money,” says
Brax Snyder, manager of worldwide sales
for Link-Belt Construction Equipment Co.,
Kentucky. “They have taken much of the
money that is to be dedicated to
transportation to repave roads and to make
old things pretty. They really haven’t built
many new things and I don’t see much of
that happening next year either,”
However, it could result in more than this
year, as the government hasn’t released all
the ARRA money yet, but is expected to do
so in the coming year.
“The economic stimulus was a bait and
switch programme,” says Ron DeFeo,
chairman and chief executive officer of
Terex Corp., Westport, Conn., explaining
that when it was first discussed, and
called an infrastructure spending
programme, the notion of using federal
dollars to invest in infrastructure, and
therefore leave something lasting, was
something that everyone could sign up for.
“But it was the best laid plans of mice
and men. The government couldn’t find
projects that were shovel ready enough,”
so more of the projects involve fixing
potholes and only about 6% of the total
dollar amount is being spent on “real
infrastructure,” including roads, bridges
and energy infrastructure.
“People thought they were investing in
the infrastructure with the stimulus
package, but what they got was public
relations and not substance,’ says DeFeo.
“$20 million was spent on signs
(stating that projects were ARRA
affiliated), those in the industry are very
annoyed about that. We know that
economic development and infrastructure
Investment | North America
45 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
US construction crane builders and rental companies, who didn’t get the push that they expected with
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) economic stimulus programme, are hoping that
they will get the boost they need should the federal surface transportation legislation, commonly known
as the highway bill, be reauthorised soon. Unfortunately the odds of this occuring by the end of the
year are dwindling. However, it’s possible that an about-turn will surprise the industry, in the aftermath
of the lame duck legislative session, following the mid-term Congressional elections in November.
Myra Pinkham reports
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Investment | North America
47 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
are linked together.”
So does the general public. Cervero
says that according to a recent AEM
survey, 88% of voters nationwide believe
that having modern, safe and efficient
transportation, clean water electric power
and flood control systems is necessary to
having a healthy, growing economy, and
66% of voters believe that given current
economic conditions, it’s a good time to
build and repair America’s roads and
bridges. The survey also indicated that
between 67% and 71% of voters believe
that putting more money into
infrastructure would make America a more
desirable place to live and work, create a
significant number of new jobs, build a
stronger economy for future generations
and help farmers and manufacturers get
their products to customers quicker and at
less cost.
Leslie Shalabi, spokeswoman for
Manitowoc Cranes, says that while as of
this summer more than 11,000 highway
and bridge economic stimulus projects
have moved to the construction phase,
only a small percentage of these projects—
a total of about $23bn in work—require the
purchase of new cranes.
And many of those purchases have
already been made, says AEM’s Cervero,
who observes the government has already
assigned 79% of all the contracts to
highway work, of which, 84% have been
started and 14% are complete. “With the
majority work contracted to be started by
the end of the year, there is no reason for
contractors and rental companies to buy
any new cranes.”
Dorsey says one of AASHTO’s concerns
is that the economic stimulus funds will
slowly trickle to a stop in 2011. “Projects
currently being built will continue to go on
for a while, but once they are completed
there might not be new projects to replace
them. We are concerned that if there isn’t
another six-year highway bill authorised
that the momentum will be lost.”
This could be exacerbated by the
continued credit crunch; “Banks aren’t
lending money so it is hard for people to
get money for new equipment,” observes
Link-Belt’s Snyder. “Financing is
beginning to be more available to our AA
customers, but for people of lesser credit it
is harder for them to get funding.”
And this problem is getting worse, not
better, he says. “A lot of our customers
are stretched because they have so many
cranes sitting idle. Until people get busy
again we won’t see many new sales either
by contractors or by rental companies.
They don’t have a lot of money to buy
new equipment so our business is very
low now.”
ARTBA’s Solsby says that the fact that
the most recent federal surface
transportation bill, nicknamed SAFETEA-
LU, while extended to the end of this year
from its original September 2009 expiration
date, has not been reauthorised with a
new, higher funded rendition of the
legislation. While SAFETEA-LU included
$286bn in funding over the six year life of
the bill, draft reauthorization legislation
supported by House Transportation
Committee Chairman James L. Oberstar
(D., Minn.), calls for almost double that:
about $500bn over six years.
DeFeo says that the North American
construction crane business has declined
by about 75% since the recession with
many rental companies going bankrupt
because much of their crane fleets have
been sitting idle. “The reauthorisation of
the highway bill would lead to a solid
recovery and a normalisation of our
business. There would be more demand
for cranes to be used to build bridges with
the certainty of a six-year highway bill. It
would give the rental companies the
confidence to refresh their fleets. Without
it, they are very reluctant to do so.”
“There is very little appetite for
Congress to spend more money,”
especially that amount of money, amid
current concerns about the bloated federal
deficit, observes Cervero. For that reason,
he says it isn’t likely that the highway bill
North America| Investment
48 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
will be reauthorised without a new
funding mechanism. “That isn’t to say
that it isn’t needed given the fact that the
nation’s infrastructure is crumbling.” He
believes that such a move will probably
involve some form of tax increase, is not
expected to occur until after the mid-term
Congressional elections in November, and
may not be realised until sometime next
year or beyond.
Dorsey notes that about 38% of US
bridges are 41–50 years old, “which is
disturbing given that most bridges are
meant to only last about 50 years.”
According to the US Department of
Transportation, one out of four bridges is
either structurally deficient (meaning that
it has a limited structural capacity that
may result in weight limitations which
restrict traffic or create lengthy detours) or
functionally obsolete (meaning that it has
outdated design features and geometrics
resulting in restrictions on traffic volumes,
vehicle sizes and weights). The American
Society of Civil Engineers in 2009 gave US
bridges a C grade and overall US
infrastructure a D grade.
In fact, in a recent House Subcommittee
on Highways and Transit hearing, the
subcommittee’s chairman, Rep. Peter
DeFazio (D-OR) said that the US
transportation system has gone from being
the envy of the world to one you would
expect to see in a Fourth World country
and one that remains “decrepit” three
years after the tragic collapse of the I-35
Bridge in Minneapolis which; “gave us a
concrete example of the negative
consequences of our lack of infrastructure
investment.”
“A number of Congressional
Commissions agree that there needs to be
a significant increase in aid to the highway
system,” says Dorsey. He observes that
the Transportation for Tomorrow report by
the National Surface Transportation and
Revenue Study Commission says that the
United States needs to invest $225bn
annually over the next 50 years “to
upgrade our existing transportation
network to a good state of repair and to
build the more advanced facilities we will
require to remain competitive.” It states
that the US government is currently
spending less than 40% of this “and the
current fuel tax-based revenue
mechanisms (referring to the Highway
Trust Fund, which relies on the federal
gasoline tax) probably cannot be relied
upon alone to raise the needed sums.”
Dorsey says that another commission
report, Paying Our Way, by the National
Surface Transportation Infrastructure
Financing Commission, (released in
February 2009), calls for an increase in the
federal gasoline tax and for the tax to be
indexed for inflation, stating that this was
one of the only ways for the government to
get out of the hole. The commission also
calls for a vehicle-mile-traveled user fee
and a few other new funding mechanisms
to pay for this investment.
“There is very little dispute about the
size of the proposed highway bill,” says
Solsby. “The only question is how to pay
for it.” Cervero agrees, explaining that
while the public overwhelmingly believe
that there is a need to invest in
infrastructure, “It is hard to get the public
to stomach paying for something that they
are currently getting for free.”
Dorsey says that AASHTO believes that
all options for funding, including raising
the gasoline tax, public-private
partnerships, bonding and tolling, be put
on the table and a decision made “sooner
rather than later.”
DeFeo says that the Highway Trust
Fund, which depends on the federal
gasoline tax for its funds, is one of the
federal government’s few dedicated
sources of revenue. Since its formation in
1956, it has been totally dedicated to
funding transportation projects. That
status recently came under threat. It had
been proposed by the proposed American
Power Act climate change bill proposed by
Sens. John Kerry (D-Mass.) and Joseph
Lieberman (I-Conn.) to allow a large
portion of the fund’s money—77% in the
first year and as much as 91% in later
years—to help fund that legislation.
However, it is expected that
comprehensive energy reform will
languish in the US Congress this year
creating concern over this moot.
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Investment | North America
51 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Solsby says that the current federal
gasoline tax will only get Congress about a
half to two thirds of the way to where
Congress needs to be without having the
reauthorized highway bill impact the
federal deficit. DeFeo observes that the
federal gasoline tax is currently 18.4 cents
a gallon, as it has been ever since 1993.
“In fact the value has eroded over the
years and it isn’t indexed to inflation and
the prices of construction raw materials,
including steel and concrete, have
skyrocketed.”
And while construction costs soar, the
money going into the Highway Trust Fund
has been shrinking, especially during the
“Great Recession,” a time when the
strapped-for-cash public were driving less.
“There has been less revenue going into
the Highway Trust fund than going out,”
Dorsey said. “Three times in the past two
years Congress had to rescue the Highway
Trust Fund with infusions of money from
the general fund. The trust fund will be
fine until early next year (assuming
current spending levels), but sometime
next year Congress will need to do
something again.”
Dorsey says that several transportation
industry and general industry associations
are on board to raise fuel taxes, including
the American Trucking Association and
the US Chamber of Commerce; “If they
can’t move goods, businesses can’t do
business.” However, according to Solsby,
Ray LaHood, the US Secretary of
Transportation, has said that he would not
consider raising the gasoline tax during
the recession. “It might, however, be
revisited later when we see further
positive economic data,” he says.
While maybe not that desirable during a
weak economy, Snyder says he’s not sure
where else the government could get the
money they need to reauthorize the
highway bill other than through raising the
federal gasoline tax. Dorsey says that
some state and local governments have
already put the issue before the voters and
some have approved increases in their
gasoline taxes – and in some cases to sales
taxes – to support transportation, which is
quite significant at a time when several
states’ financial solvency is in question.
Another funding option being
considered is an actual user fee – one
based on miles traveled as opposed to just
the gasoline being consumed to travel
those miles. There is, however, a lot of
reticence about this funding mechanism
and a lot of questions concerning the form
it would take. Cervero says that today just
about all user fees (other than the gasoline
tax) involve toll roads. “It is difficult to do
it any other way. Not all cars are equipped
with GPS devices to show how far they
have traveled,” he says.
Also public/private investment
partnerships could be part of the funding
equation, Cervero says. This is something
that has taken hold in certain areas of the
country over the past 20-30 years, but, at
least at this time, isn’t very widespread.
“Private industry needs to look to see if it
is worth the investment.”
“I’m not very optimistic that the
highway bill will be reauthorised this
year,” says DeFeo. “The only hope that
we have this year is that in the lame duck
session that saner minds will prevail,
especially given that this is a general area
that both parties support. Investment in
infrastructure is very stimulating. It puts a
lot of people to work. By just extending it
at current funding levels it will take the
construction crane industry, and the
general economy, longer to recover.”
Cervero concurs, but he says that even
without it being reauthorised transportation
funding levels do remain relatively high.
What is lacking, he says, is a guarantee of
the continued construction projects. DeFeo
agrees, stating, “If companies and
municipalities know what the bill will
include, then they can plan. States need to
know what they are working with. Once
the highway bill is reauthorised it will
provide some clarity and also allow people
to decide what they need to do as far as
public and private investment.”
With the dwindling hopes for a
comprehensive surface transportation bill,
SC&RA’s Dandrea says there has been a
renewed push for a public/private funded
National Infrastructure Bank, which would
be an independent institution that would
guide infrastructure spending based on
merit as opposed to politics, thus avoiding
the earmarks or “pork” spending often
associated with US legislation.
Senate Banking Committee Chairman
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) said in
mid-August that he would push legislation
to create a National Infrastructure Bank,
possibly as part of a jobs creation package
currently under consideration. A group of
House lawmakers led by Rep. Rosa DeLauro
(D-Conn.), is drafting similar legislation.
President Obama has endorsed the idea,
proposing in a budget plan released last
winter to provide $25bn over the next five
years for an infrastructure bank.
While not a bad start, Dandrea says this
National Infrastructure Bank would be just
a drop in the bucket compared with a
comprehensive bill and doesn’t address all
of the nation’s collective needs, but is “a
big step forward.” ■
52
North America | Project map
CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
British
Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Ont
Wiscon
Minnesota
North
Dakota
South
Dakota
Iowa
I
Arkansas
Texas
Oklahoma
New Mexico
Arizona
Kansas
Colorado
Nebraska
Wyoming
Utah
Nevada
Idaho
Oregon
Washington
Montana
California
Missouri
Manitoba
M E X I C O
C A N A D A
Iowa I
I
Arkansas
Texas
Oklahoma
New Mexico
Kansas
Colorado
Nebraska
Utah
Missouri
M E X I C O
Saskatchewan
Ont
Wiscon
Minnesota
North
Dakota
South
Dakota
Wyoming
Idaho
Oregon
Washington
Montana
Manitoba
Nevada
Alberta
British
Columbia
Arizona
N A D A C A NN
California
U S A
M
M
Alberta, Canada
Alberta’s oil sands provided 1.31m barrels of oil per day in 2008, and that is expected to
rise to 3m by 2018 as new projects increase production. The region’s crane market sees
much work for maintenance and new construction for the reserves. Devon Energy’s
Jackfish operations, comprising three projects so far, are using Steam Assisted Gravity
Drainage (SAGD) to extract bitumen. This process injects steam via a well and piping
system into the deep bitumen reservoir to heat the heavy oil. The mixture then flows by
gravity to a second piping system that carries the mixture to a surface well. Construction
on Jackfish 1 started in 2005, and the operation was in production by 2007. Jackfish 2
started construction in 2008 and Devon anticipates production to start in 2011. Both
projects are capable of 35,000 barrels per day. Northern Crane Services supplied crawler
cranes ranging in size from 250t to 350t, 100t all terrain cranes and 60t rough terrain
cranes for Jackfish 2. The third facility is still in the approval phase.
Las Vegas, Nevada
Following the
completion of the
Hoover Dam, Lake
Mead formed in the
1930s. It’s the
largest man-made
reservoir in the US,
and can store
approximately 26
million acre-feet of water. The Las Vegas Valley depends
on the lake for 90% of its water supply, but it is currently at
43% of its storage capacity. The Southern Nevada Water
Authority (SNWA) decided to construct a third intake to
protect the region’s water supply from significant loss of
system capacity, should the lake level continue to decline.
Vegas Tunnel Constructors, contractor for the Lake Mead
Intake No. 3, are using a 330USt crane barge on the lake to
set underwater explosives, and run the air lift and muck
bucket to clear the area. Other cranes being used on site
include a docking barge to help construct the intake
structure, which is being formed on the shoreline, and a
Bigge crane is holding the intake structure while it is
being built and lowered in the moon pool. A gantry crane
will lower pieces of the tunnel boring machine into the
assembly chamber 600ft below ground.
Project map | North America
53 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
tario
sin
Michigan
llinois
Ohio
Pennsylvania
New
York
South
Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Tennessee
Kentucky
Québec
N
e
w
f
o
u
n
d
l
a
n
d
N
e
w
f
o
u
n
d
l
a
n
d
N
Nova
Scotia
New
York
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania P l i
llinois
Ohio
South
Carolina
Georgia
Alabama
Tennessee
Kentucky
tario
sin
Michigan
Québec
New
Brunswick
Conn.
Mass.
N.H.
Verm.
Rhode I.
New
Jersey
Del.
Maryland
Virginia
West
Virginia
North Carolina
Mississippi
Indiana
Michigan
Florida
i
Kiln, Mississippi
For the first time since the 1960s, a new large testing facility is being built at the John
C. Stennis Space Center, a rocket propulsion testing ground. The A-3 Stand will be
used to perform simulated high-altitude testing of next-generation rocket engines,
particularly the new J-2X that will help take humans beyond low-Earth orbit.
Construction started in 2007, and about 4 million pounds of fabricated steel has been
used while erecting the 16 stand stages. A Liebherr LR 1600/2 lattice boom crawler
crane, from Buckner Companies of North Carolina, is being used for installation of the
stand’s test cell and diffuser, as well as large liquid oxygen tanks. Activation of the A-
3 is set for 2012. Once completed, the stand will allow operators to test engines at
simulated altitudes of up to 100,000 feet. They will be capable of conducting tests for the
full amount of time that the engines will have to fire during actual flights, and to rotate the
engines in the same way they move during a flight to assess an accurate trajectory.
Lehigh River, Pennsylvania
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission is replacing two 1950s-
era bridges on the Pennsylvania Turnpike/I-476, one over the
Lehigh River and one over the adjacent Pohopoco Creek. The
self-funded project is part of a 10 year capital improvement plan
addressing the needs of more than 600 miles of interstate
highway and mainline structures under the jurisdiction of the
commission. To pay for the work, more than $101m has been
generated by the users of the turnpike. The new structures—
two northbound, two southbound—are being built by general
contractor Walsh Construction Co. using a 600USt Manitowoc
18000 lattice boom crawler crane from All Crane. This summer
the crane has been setting 70 precast concrete bridge beams of
165ft each for the Pohopoco spans. These spans are on piers
more than 100ft above the creek. For the Lehigh River bridge,
105 beams will be set by the same crane in autumn 2010.
New Orleans, Lousiana
The West Closure Complex (WCC) will
consist of a 225ft navigable floodgate, a
pumping station, floodwalls, sluice gates,
foreshore protection and an earthen levee.
The project will significantly reduce the risk
to a large area of the west bank by removing
over 25 miles of levees, floodwalls, a
floodgate, and pumping stations along the Harvey and Algiers canals. Once complete it
will be the largest pump complex of its type in the nation. In the event of a storm, the
gate will close and a 19,140 cubic feet per second pump will be required to evacuate
rainwater that is pumped in from canals by nine pumping stations. There are currently 22
crawler cranes working on site to drive foundation piles and set formwork and rebar for
foundation work and wall placement. The biggest jobs on the site will be to install two
750USt sector gate leafs, and assemble 11 separate 135,000lb pumps. The crawler cranes
will be onsite for the remainder of construction, which is scheduled to finish in late 2012.
54 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
The Marketplace
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
KranAgentur Werner
GmbH & Co. KG
Hallplatz 7j
66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 6332 48 58 26
Fax: +49 (0) 6332 48 58 37
Mail: info@KranAgentur.de
You will find more than
just your used crane with
us ...
We offer all manufacturers, all types, in all ages –
and should we not have a suitable crane right on
hand, we can arrange it for you!
We provide complete management for buyers and
sellers, including letters of credit, transport arrange-
ments and customs – right up to your doorstep!
Trust our long experience.
Take a look and contact us. We will answer your
questions immediately and will consult you reliably,
competently and professionally.
For more information visit our website:
www.KranAgentur.de
For example:
Grove GMK 5170
Lifting capacity 170 to, 64 m boom,
Hydr. Jib 11-18 m; Hookblock 80 to,
3-sheave and 12 to single line,
Counterweight 53 to, year 2008,
10x8x10, ca. 2.150 working hours,
ca. 14.000 KM
Liebherr LTM 1095-5.1
Lifting capacity 95 to, 58 m boom,
Jib 10,5 - 19 m, Counterweight 23 to,
Trailer hitch, year 2006, 10x8x10,
ca. 3.000 working hours, ca. 29.000 KM
Area
Manager
A leading Crane Hire Company in the Middle East
requires an Area Manager for their Qatar operation.
Applicants will require extensive experience in the
areas of Sales, Technical knowledge and Management
functions.
The successful applicant will be results orientated and
will form part of an experienced management team
which will drive the Company forward.
An attractive tax-free salary will be paid in addition to
furnished accomadation and a Company vehicle.
Please email applications with photo to Cranes Today:
khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
The Marketplace
56 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
4 Elstree Way, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire. WD6 1RN
Tel +44 (0) 20 8327 4060 - Fax +44 (0) 20 8236 9391
sales@londontowercranes.co.uk - Web www.londontowercranes.co.uk
LIEBHERR LTM 1200, NEW LIEBHERR LR 1200, NEW
GOLDHOFER THP SL 4 + 5 NEW TADANO FAUN GR 700 EXL, NEW
SCHEUERLE SPMT-32-ACHSIG,
NEW
GOLDHOFER STZ-VH 8 THP/ET,
NEW
SCANIA R 620 8X4
WITH PALFINGER PK 85002 NEW
GOLDHOFER SPZ DL 6
NEW
MERCEDES BENZ 4160 SLT 8X6/4
NEW
GOLDHOFER STZ-DL 4-45/80 AAA,
EXTENDABLE TO 47,8 M NEW
MAN TGA 41.660 BBS 8X4/4,
GOLDHOFER THP/LTSO 2+3+3, 2000
SCHEUERLE INTER COMBI
HALS+2+4+4, NEW
GOLDHOFER STZ-VH 7 THP/UT
NEW
PLEASE LOOK ON OUR WEBSITE www.stuerzer.de WE HAVE ALWAYS OVER 200 UNITS IN STOCK!
Justus-von-Liebig Str. 37 | 86899 Landsberg | Germany
Tel: +49 (0) 8191 947253 | Fax: +49 (0) 8191 9472549
Website: www.stuerzer.de | Email: info@stuerzer.de
The Marketplace
57 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
Wo r l d wi d e s p e c i a l i s t s i n h e a v y l i f t i n g a n d t r a n s p o r t
More equipment available
www.mammoettrading.com
Crawler Cranes
REF NR. MANUFACTURER MODEL CAP. YOM Remarks
'020509 Demag CC 1800 300 1999
915 Demag CC 2800 600 1999
785 Demag CC 2800 600 2002
430 Demag CC 4800-3 800 1986 SL + Wagon
595 Liebherr LR 1250 250 1998
794 Liebherr LR 1400/2 450 2002 SL + Wagon
1051 Liebherr LR 1800 1250 1994 SL + Wagon
838 Manitowoc 4100 W S2 300 1980 Incl. Ringer
698 Manitowoc 888 209 1996
674 Manitowoc 21000 900 1999 SL + Wagon
664 Sennebogen 5500 HD-SL 180 2001
1711 Terex HC 80 80 2000
1727 Zoomlion QUY260 260 2008
Mobile Cranes
REF NR. MANUFACTURER MODEL CAP. YOM Remarks
554 Demag AC 40-1 40 1998
952 Demag AC 50-1 50 2004
1695 Demag AC 100 100 2001
1655 Demag AC 100 100 2006
1720 Demag AC 350 400 2002 SSL
1700 Demag AC 500-2 500 2004 SSL
1618 Faun RTF 40-3 40 1999
653 Faun ATF 60-4 60 2000
1395 Grove GMK 3050 50 2004
708 Grove GMK 5200 200 2001
1640 Liebherr MK 80 8 2002
734 Liebherr LTM 1055/1 55 2001
804 Liebherr LTM 1080/1 80 1999
807 Liebherr LTM 1160/2 160 1999
945 Liebherr LTM 1200/1 200 2004
1719 Liebherr LTM 1300 300 1996
1399 Liebherr LTM 1500 500 1999 TA
1071 Liebherr LTM 1500 500 2000 TY
761 PPM ATT 400/3 40 2002
Liebherr LTM 1500, Cap. 500 ton Demag AC 100, Cap. 100 ton
Liebherr LTM 1200/1, Cap. 200 ton
Demag CC 4800-3, Cap. 1250 ton
Liebherr LTM 1160/2, Cap.160 ton
Demag CC 1800, Cap. 300 ton
Liebherr MK 80, Cap.8 ton
Liebherr LR 1800, Cap. 1250 ton
Contact persons
Jan van Seumeren Jr. / Miranda Verhoef
Phone +31 (0)10 204 25 85 / 204 26 37
Fax +31 (0)10 204 24 42
E-mail mammoet.trading@mammoet.com
Others
Prime Movers
Conventional Modular Trailers
Self propelled Modular Transporters
Koch Crawler Transporter
Brought to you by Cranes Today, the world-leading
magazine for the cranes industry, Cranes Marketplace
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www.cranesmarketplace.com
Dedicated micro-site | Company prole | Detailed product listings | Up to 5 images per product
Upload brochures, technical specications & video | Direct links to your website & email address
m
The Marketplace
59 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
HINEMAN CRANE SALES LTD
LIEBHERR LTM 1500 ALLTERRAIN 500T 2002
GROVE GMK5200 ALLTERRAIN 200T 2003
DEMAG AC80/2 ALLTERRAIN 80T 2004
LIEBHERR LTM 1080 ALLTERRAIN 80T 2000
LIEBHERR LTM 1055 ALLTERRAIN 55T 2005
GROVE GMK 3055 ALLTERRAIN 55T 2006
DEMAG AC55 CITYCRANE 55T 2008
DEMAG AC40/1 CITYCRANE 40T 2000
DEMAG AC35L ALLTERRAIN 35T 2004
LIEBHERR LTM 1030/2 ALLTERRAIN 35T 2001
DEMAG AC25 CITYCRANE 25T 2000
SAMSUNG SC25H-2 TRUCKCRANE 25T 2000
VISIT OUR NEW WEBSITE: WWW.HINEMANCRANES.COM
t: +44 (0)1794 322777 f: +44 (0)1794 322070 m: +44 (0)7785 291922 e: sales@hinemancranes.com
Young Hitachi and Kobelco
crawler cranes in stock!
Immediate availability
of quality plant and
construction equipment
worldwide
Hitachi - Sumitomo SCX900-2 2007 90 T
Kobelco CKE 700 2006 70 T
Kobelco 7065 1991 75 T
Sumitomo LS 238 1992 100 T
Check our website:
www.borcherts.com
or contact us at: heiko.koop@borcherts.com
Tel: +31 - 653 652 522
Fax: +31 - 514 569 186
DIE KRANSPEZIALISTEN S.A.
USED CRANES & TRUCK LOADERS FOR SALE
CONTACT: Tel: +352 2610 8555 | Fax: +352 2610 2269
info@schuch.lu | www.schuch.lu
7A, Am Brill, L-3961 Ehlange
COMPLETE LIST OF CRANES AVAILABLE @ www.crane.lu
CRANE FINANCIAL SERVICE • LONG-TERM RENTAL
The Marketplace
61 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
HYDRAULIC CRAWLER
CRANE SPECIALISTS
CRANE REPAIR & OVERHAUL
SERVICE, SAFE LOAD TESTING, RECALIBRATION, FABRICATION
NRC PLANT LTD
Neagron House, Stanford Road, Orsett, Essex RM16 3BX
Tel: 01375 361616 Fax: 01375 361818
Email: sales@nrcplant.co.uk
Website: www.nrcplant.co.uk
LATTICE BOOM CRAWLER CRANES
SC350 35 Tonne
SC400 40 Tonne
SC500 50 Tonne
SC650 65 Tonne
SC700 70 Tonne
SC800 80 Tonne
SC900 90 Tonne
SC1000 100 Tonne
SC1500 150 Tonne
SC1500 S.L. 230T
TELESCOPIC BOOM CRAWLER CRANES
5T, 8T, 25T, 40T & 70T
TEST WEIGHT/CRADLES
1200 Ton of Test Weights
40/60/100/300 Ton Cradles
RENTAL

HITACHI-SUMITOMO NEWCRANE DISTRIBUTOR

Readily available new & used cranes
We offer a Vast Range of Spare Parts
Full technical support & service
available around the clock
Sole Agents of Potain cranes, GJJ/
ORBIT & Pega Hoists In the GCC &
Middle East
Tel: (+9712) 6730778 Fax: (+9712) 6730434
P.O. Box 28037 Abu Dhabi – U.A.E
Web: www.nftcrane.com
Email: nftuae@emirates.net.ae
Rentals
Sales
Spare Parts
Worldwide
delivery
Leader of Tower Cranes in the Middle East & Gulf
TOLL FREE 1-800-342-7575
- Fax 315-458-3169
www.empirecrane.com - E-mail: sales@empirecrane.com
LARGEST FULL LINE TEREX
CRANE DEALER IN NORTHEAST
7021 Performance Drive, North Syracuse, NY 13212
Phone: (315) 458-4101 Fax: (315) 458-3169
20 Industrial Road, Wrentham, MA 02093
Phone: (508) 868-7734
130 Allen Street, Netcong, NJ 07857
Phone: (315) 663-4043
The Marketplace
62 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
Head office:
41 El-nozha st.,
Heliopolis,
Cairo, Egypt.
Tel:
+(202) 2417-8257
+(202) 2417-8188
+(202) 2690-1978
Mobile
+2(010) 818- 1125
Tel & Fax:
+(202) 2414- 8809
+(202) 2417- 5419
We have a wide variety
of cranes FOR RENT:
crawler and telescopic.
Capacities Start From
20 ton to 500 ton.
www.egyptcranes.com
info@egyptcranes.com
Tel: +49-2595-38698-0 Fax: +49-2595-38698-88
Email: mail@kms-cranes.com Web: www.kms-cranes.com
Cranes currently in Stock
Manufacturer Type Year Cap
Liebherr LTF 1030/3 2000 30 t
Liebherr LTM 1030-1 1997 30 t
Liebherr LTM 1030-2 2002 35 t
Liebherr LTM 1040 1992 40 t
Grove GMK 3050-1 2006 50 t
Gottwald AMK 56-42 1985 50 t
Liebherr LTM 1055-3.1 2005 55 t
Liebherr LTM 1060-2 2002 60 t
Tadano Faun ATF 60-4 1999 60 t
Liebherr LTM 1060-2 2000 60 t
Tadano Faun ATF 70-4 1998 70 t
Grove GMK 4070-1 1999 70 t
Liebherr LTM 1080-1 1999 80 t
Terex Demag AC 100 2003 100 t
55 t Liebherr LTM 1055-3.1, 2005
60 t Tadano Faun ATF 60-4, 1999
130 t Grove GMK 5130-1, 2006
GMK 5130-1
KMK 5120 Dropboxes Counterweights,
Cylinders, A-frames
Cabins
Boom Sections
& Cylinders
Boom & Jib’s Kessler Diff’s
CC 1500
CRANE &
PART SALES
The Marketplace
63 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
New & Used Tower
Cranes of all sizes.
Service
Technical Assistance
Spare Parts
WWW.MPSTOWERCRANES.COM
USA: Pat@mpstowercranes.com
Europe: Mike@mpstowercranes.com
Asia: Richard@mpstowercranes.com
Hovago Cranes b.v.
Galvanistraat 35
NL-3316 GH Dordrecht
The Netherlands
Tel: +31 (0)10 8920475
Fax: +31 (0)10 8920485
Email: info@hovago.com
Web: www.hovago.com
All Terrain Cranes
70 t Liebherr LTM 1070-4.1 2008
80 t Grove GMK 4080-1 2008
95 t Grove GMK 5095 2008 NEW!
100 t Terex Demag AC 100 2007
100 t Grove GMK 5100 2006
100 t Grove GMK 4100L 2008 NEW!
200 t Terex-Demag AC 200-1 2008 NEW!
200 t Liebherr LTM 1200-5.1 2010
Rough Terrain Cranes
30 t Grove RT530E 2001
60 t Tadano GR600XL-1 NEW!
80 t Tadano GR800XL-1 NEW!
90 t Grove RT890E NEW!
130 t Grove RT9130E NEW!
Crawler Cranes
200 t Manitowoc 14000 2008
200t Liebherr LR 1200 2009
400 t Terex-Demag CC 2400-1 2009
600 t Terex-Demag CC 2800-1 2009
Miscellaneous
SPMT 32 axle lines with 2 x PPU Z350DC
Goldhofer 18 ton ballast trailer 2-axle 1998
FRM-2A 18 ton ballast trailer 2-axle 2000
ALL TERRAIN-CRANES
Make / Type y. o. m. Drive Boom / Fly Jib
20 t Krupp KMK 2020 1994 4x4x4 20,50m + 3,80m
25 t Demag AC 25 1998 4x4x4 25,00m + 1,20m
30 t PPM ATT 335 1997 4x4x4 27,40m + 15,00m
35 t PPM ATT 400 1998 4x4x4 30,40m + 15,00m
35 t PPM ATT 400/2 2000 4x4x4 30,40m + 8,00m
40 t Liebherr LTM 1040-1 1994 6x4x6 30,00m + 8,00m
40 t Liebherr LTM 1040-1 1999 6x6x6 30,00m + 14,50m
45 t Faun ATF 45-3 2004 6x6x6 34,00m + 15,20m
55 t Liebherr LTM 1055/1 2004 6x6x6 40,00m + 16,00m
55 t Grove GMK 3055 2005 6x4x6 43,00m + 15,00m
60 t Faun ATF 60-4 2001 8x6x8 40,00m + 16,00m
75 t Grove GMK 4075 2001 8x6x8 43,20m + 27,00m
75 t Grove GMK 4075 2001 8x6x8 43,20m + 17,00m
80 t Liebherr LTM 1080/1 2000 8x6x8 48,00m + 17,00m
80 t Faun ATF 80-4 2003 8x8x8 48,50m + 16,00m
90 t Liebherr LTM 1090-4.1 2004 8x6x8 52,00m + 19,00m
90 t Faun ATF 90G-4 2008 8x8x8 51,20m + 19,00m
100 t Grove GMK 5100 2001 10x8x10 51,00m + 18,00m
110 t Krupp KMK 5110 1991 10x6x8 50,50m + 16,00m
110 t Faun ATF 110G-5 2006 10x6x10 52,00m + 16,20m
130 t Grove GMK 5130 2005 10x8x10 60,00m + 18,00m
160 t Liebherr LTM 1160-2 1998 10x8x10 60,00m + 22,00m
160 t Faun ATF 160G-5 2005 10x8x8 60,00m + 13,20m
180 t Grove GMK 5180 2001 10x8x10 60,00m + 38,00m
220 t Faun ATF 220G-5 2009 10x8x8 68,00m + 37,20m
TELESCOPIC – TRUCK CRANES
30 t Liebherr LTF 1030 2003 6x4x2 26,00m + 8,20m
50 t Tadano Faun HK 40 2006 8x4x4 35,20m + 9,00m
ROUGH-TERRAIN CRANES
50 t Tadano TR 500 E 1989 4x4x4 34,10m + 17,10m
BOOMLIFTER
3,5 t JCB Telehändler 535-125 2007 4x4x4 12,50 m
YARD CRANE
14 t Demag V73 1983 4x2x2 13,50 m + 5,50 m
14 t Demag V73 1992 4x2x2 13,50 m
M. STEMICK GMBH,
Kran-u. Baumaschinenhandel Import - Export,
Annabergstr. 97, D-45721 Haltern/Germany
Tel: +49-2364-108203 Fax: +49-2364-15546 Mobile: +49-172-2332923
e-mail: info@stemick-krane.de Internet: http://www.stemick-krane.de
CRANES FOR SALE
The Marketplace
64 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
ALL TERRAIN CRANES:
Brand Type Year Capacity
LIEBHERR LTM1095 2007 95T
FAUN ATF70-4 1997 70T
LIEBHERR LTM1050-4 1990 50T
LIEBHERR LTM1040 1992 40T
LIEBHERR LTM1040 2007 40T
CRAWLER CRANES:
Brand Type Year Capacity
LIEBHERR LR1300 NEW 300T
SENNEBOGEN 5500SL 2007 180T
HITACHI KH300-3 1992 80T
ZOOMLION QUY70 2008 70T
KOBELCO 7045 1992 55T
WE ALSO CAN OFFER YOU CRAWLER CRANES
FOR BARE RENTAL PROJECTS WORLDWIDE!
PLEASE CALL FOR AN OFFER!
www.crane.fi
WE DELIVER USED CRANES WORLDWIDE
Tel: + 358 400 699469 Fax: + 358 420 166959
www.crane.fi
©Jussi Risto
J
Mini & Mobile Cranes Körner GmbH
Alte Kaserne 23, 47249 Duisburg, Germany
Tel: 0049(0) 203- 713 68 76-0
Fax: 0049(0) 203- 713 68 76-19
www.unic-mobilecranes.de
info@unic-mobilecranes.de
Mini & Mobile Cranes Körner
Used mobile cranes for sale
25t KRUPP KMK 2025, year 1991
23,0 + 13,0m, 4x4x4, Mercedes
35t GROVE GMK 2035, year 2003
29,0m, 4x4x4, Mercedes
50t GROVE GMK 3050, year 1998
38,1 + 15,0m, 6x6x6, Mercedes
60t LIEBHERR LTM 1060, year 1987
35,0 + 18,0m, 8x6x4, 2x Mercedes
90 ton LIEBHERR LTM 1090-4.1, year 2004
50,0 + 19,0 m, 8x8x8, Liebherr 2x
90t FAUN ATF 90G-4, year 2008
48,5 + 16,0m, 8x8x8, 2. Hoist
110t FAUN ATF 110G-5, year 2006
52,0 + 30,0m, 10x8x8, 2x Mercedes
200 ton KRUPP KMK 6200, year: 1991
53,0 + 63,0 + 38,0m, 12x, 2.hoist, Mercedes 2x
The Marketplace
65 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
Please contact Waterland Trading B.V. The Netherlands
P.O. Box 1171 - 1440 BD PURMEREND
Tel. +31 (0)299-39 00 55 Fax: +31 (0)299-39 00 60
Email: info@waterland-trading.nl
For more information and our complete stocklist
visit our website: www.waterland-trading.nl
40 ton FAUN RTF 40-3 2001
6x6, boom 30m, jib 15,45m
65 ton FAUN ATF 65G-4 2007
8x6, boom 44.0m, jib 16.0 m
60 ton FAUN ATF 60-4 2004
8x6, boom 40.2m, jib 16m
100 ton Liebherr LTM 1100/1
10x8, boom 45m, jib 20m
Contact:
JanHartog@Cranepart.nl
Gerardruhl@Cranepart.nl
Supply of spareparts for axles,
gearboxes and transmissions.
Repairs of above units in our
workshop equipped with
testing facility.
Nieuwenhuysen-Universeel B.V.
Nieuwenhuysen-Universeel B.V.
Giessenweg 28,
3044 AL Rotterdam
Phone : +31(0)10 415 98 22
Fax : +31(0)10 415 28 22
Internet : www.Cranepart.nl
The Marketplace
66 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
USED CRANES AND CRANE HIRE GUIDE T: +44 (0)20 8269 7743 E: khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
All Terrain Cranes
Atlantic Capital Companies, Inc.
T: (804) 798-8840
F: (804) 798-9505
E: info@acc-capital.com
W: www.acc-capital.com
BMS A/S
T: (+45) 44949048
F: (+45) 44943760
E: info@bms.dk
W: www.bms.dk
HAC Cranes GmbH & Co. KG
T: +49 4231 9821190
F: +49 4231 9821199
E: hac@hac-germany.com
W: www.hac-cranes.com
Hellmich Kranservice
T: 0049 6158 1001
F: 0049 6158 6929
E: info@hellmich-kranservice.de
W: www.hellmich-kranservice.de
KMS GmbH & Co. Handels-KG
T: 0049 2595 386980
F: 0049 2595 3869888
E: mail@kms-cranes.com
W: www.kms-cranes.com
TAT HONG HeavyEquipment
T: +65 6269 0022
F: +65 6367 1917
E: lewis@tathong.com.sg
W: www.tathong.com
Vema Cranes
T: 0031 162 68 1050
F: 0031 162 68 6262
E: sales@vemacrane.com
W: www.vemacrane.com
Automation & Control
Systems
JMF Cranes & Hoists Inc.
T: +1 450 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Bridge Cranes
JMF Cranes and Hoists Inc.
T: +1 866 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Crawler Cranes
Atlantic Capital Companies, Inc.
T: (804) 798-8840
F: (804) 798-9505
E: info@acc-capital.com
W: www.acc-capital.com
BET
T: 0031 514 569608
F: 0031 514 569186
E: f.kramer@borcherts.com
W: www.borcherts.com
BMS A/S
T: (+45) 44949048
F: (+45) 44943760
E: info@bms.dk
W: www.bms.dk
Hellmich Kranservice
T: 0049 6158 1001
F: 0049 6158 6929
E: info@hellmich-kranservice.de
W: www.hellmich-kranservice.de
Mammoet Trading
T: +31 10 204 25 85 / 204 2637
F: +31 10 204 24 42
E: mammoet.trading@mammoet.com
W: www.mammoettrading.com
Crawler Cranes (continued)
NRC Plant Ltd
T: 01375 361616
F: 01375 361818
E: sales@nrcplant.co.uk
W:www.nrcplant.co.uk
Promech Resources Co. Ltd
T: 00(662) 7171406-7
F: 00(662) 7171408
E: sales@promechresources.com
or mtwi@ksc.th.com
W: www.promechresources.com
PVE Cranes Middle East LLC
T: +971 4 271 9138
F: +971 4 271 9236
E: info@pvecranes.com
W: www.pvecranes.com
PVE Cranes & Services BV
T: +31 184 425 949
F: +31 184 424 820
E: info@pvecranes.com
W: www.pvecranes.com
PVE Cranes & Services, Lp
T: +1 904 354 1940
F: +1 904 354 1942
E: info@pvecranes.com
W: www.pvecranes.com
TAT HONG HeavyEquipment
T: +65 6269 0022
F: +65 6367 1917
E: lewis@tathong.com.sg
W: www.tathong.com
Vema Cranes
T: 0031 162 68 1050
F: 0031 162 68 6262
E: sales@vemacrane.com
W: www.vemacrane.com
Custom Built Control Systems
JMF Cranes & Hoists Inc.
T: +1 450 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Custom Built End-trucks
JMF Cranes & Hoists Inc.
T: +1 450 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Custom Built
Overhead Cranes
JMF Cranes and Hoists Inc.
T: +1 866 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Custom Built Trolleys
JMF Cranes & Hoists Inc.
T: +1 450 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Gantry Cranes
JMF Cranes & Hoists Inc.
T: +1 450 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Heavy Crawler Cranes
Sarens UK Limited
(Middlesbrough)
Cranes up to 1200 Tonne
T: +44 (0)1642 621621
F: +44 (0)1642 621620
E: info@sarens.co.uk
Heavy Strut Jib Cranes
Sarens UK Limited
(Middlesbrough)
Cranes up to 2000 Tonne
T: +44 (0)1642 621621
F: +44 (0)1642 621620
E: info@sarens.co.uk
Heavy Telescopic Cranes
Sarens UK Limited
(Middlesbrough)
Cranes up to 1000 Tonne
T: +44 (0)1642 621621
F: +44 (0)1642 621620
E: info@sarens.co.uk
Hooks and Slings
Gunnebo Industrier AB
T: 0046 220 384 00
F: 0046 220 384 98
E: export@gunnebolifting.com
W: www.gunnebolifting.com
Hydraulic Cranes
Mammoet Trading
T: +31 10 204 25 85 / 204 2637
F: +31 10 204 24 42
E: mammoet.trading@mammoet.com
W: www.mammoettrading.com
Hydraulic Lifting Gantries
Krah GmbH
T: 0049-7941-8325
F: 0049-7941-37994
E: krah@Lift-systems.de
W: www.Lift-systems.de
Inspection and Maintenance
JMF Cranes and Hoists Inc.
T: +1 866 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Jib Cranes
JMF Cranes & Hoists Inc.
T: +1 450 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Lifting Equipment
JMF Cranes and Hoists Inc.
T: +1 866 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Mobile Cranes
A Soulis Enterprises
T: +357 24 64 24 30
F: +357 24 64 24 42
E: asoulis@spidernet.com.cy
W: www.soulis-cranes.com.cy
Alfab Service AB
T: +46-(0)21-128140
F: +46-(0)21-134035
E: erik@alfab.se
W: www.alfab.se
Hineman Crane Sales Ltd
T: 01794 322777
M: 07785 291922
F: 01794 322070
E: sales@hinemancranes.com
TAT HONG HeavyEquipment
T: +65 6269 0022
F: +65 6367 1917
E: lewis@tathong.com.sg
W: www.tathong.com
Overhead Travelling Cranes
JMF Cranes and Hoists Inc.
T: +1 866 975 1300
F: +1 450 975 0838
E: jlmenghini@jmf.ca
W: www.jmf.ca
Rough Terrain
Atlantic Capital Companies, Inc.
T: (804) 798-8840
F: (804) 798-9505
E: info@acc-capital.com
W: www.acc-capital.com
TAT HONG HeavyEquipment
T: +65 6269 0022
F: +65 6367 1917
E: lewis@tathong.com.sg
W: www.tathong.com
Tower Cranes (Luffing Jib)
Machine Trading International
T: 00352 2674 5480
F: 00352 2674 5483
E: Mtilux@aol.com
W: www.mtilux.com
Tradehouse Int. A/S
T:+45 3966 1866
F: +45 3966 1065
E: info@tradehouse.dk
W: www.tradehouse.dk
Tower Cranes (Luffing Jib)
New and Used
Nouman Fouad Trading
T: 00 971-2-6730778
F: 00 971-2-6730434
E: nftuae@emirates.net.ae
W: www.nftcrane.com
Tower Cranes (Saddle Jib)
Machine Trading International
T: 00352 2674 5480
F: 00352 2674 5483
E: Mtilux@aol.com
W: www.mtilux.com
Multi-Crane International B.V.
T: +31 172 440481
F: +31 172 442340
E: info@multi-crane.com
W: www.multi-crane.com
Promech Resources Co. Ltd
T: 00(662) 7171406-7
F: 00(662) 7171408
E: sales@promechresources.com
or mtwi@ksc.th.com
W: www.promechresources.com
Tower Cranes (Saddle Jib)
New and Used
Nouman Fouad Trading
T: 00 971-2-6730778
F: 00 971-2-6730434
E: nftuae@emirates.net.ae
W: www.nftcrane.com
Tower Cranes (Self Erecting)
Machine Trading International
T: 00352 2674 5480
F: 00352 2674 5483
E: Mtilux@aol.com
W: www.mtilux.com
Multi-Crane International B.V.
T: +31 172 440481
F: +31 172 442340
E: info@multi-crane.com
W: www.multi-crane.com
Tradehouse Int. A/S
T:+45 3966 1866
F: +45 3966 1065
E: info@tradehouse.dk
W: www.tradehouse.dk
Tower Cranes (Self Erecting)
New and Used
Nouman Fouad Trading
T: 00 971-2-6730778
F: 00 971-2-6730434
E: nftuae@emirates.net.ae
W: www.nftcrane.com
Transport Equipment
Mammoet Trading
T: +31 10 204 25 85 / 204 2637
F: +31 10 204 24 42
E: mammoet.trading@mammoet.com
W: www.mammoettrading.com
Truck Cranes
Atlantic Capital Companies, Inc.
T: (804) 798-8840
F: (804) 798-9505
E: info@acc-capital.com
W: www.acc-capital.com
TAT HONG HeavyEquipment
T: +65 6269 0022
F: +65 6367 1917
E: lewis@tathong.com.sg
W: www.tathong.com
Truck Cranes (Lattice Boom)
Promech Resources Co. Ltd
T: 00(662) 7171406-7
F: 00(662) 7171408
E: sales@promechresources.com
or mtwi@ksc.th.com
W: www.promechresources.com
The Marketplace
67 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
van Marwijk Crane Hire
cranes from 35 to 1200 tons
ZOETERWOUDE – HOLLAND
TEL +31.71-5899344
www.vanmarwijkkraanverhuur.nl
info@vanmarwijkkraanverhuur.nl
SPARE PARTS and SECOND HAND CRANES FOR SALE
(POTAIN, BPR, RICHIER, PPM, Comedil, GROVE.)
✓ Only original European genuine spare parts
✓ Second hand cranes available for sale:
Potain MDT178, MD220, 744, E2/23B
Website: www.saudem.com
Email: cranes@saudem.com
Tel: +33 1 48 52 80 00 Fax: +33 1 48 92 02 01
GROENEKRUISWEG 2, 3237 KC VIERPOLDERS, THE NETHERLANDS, TEL +31(0)181 413722, FAX +31(0)181 418367, INFO@ADRIGHEM.COM, WWW.ADRIGHEM.COM
THE WORLD'S GREATEST DEALER IN CRANES AND MACHINERY
5ALE · RENTAL · BARE RENTAL · MOBlLE CRANE5 · CRAWLER CRANE5
LlEBHERR LTR 1100
2007 100T
TEREX DEMAG AC 120-1
2006 120T
RB CH 135
1999 135T
LlEBHERR LTM 1250
2008 250T
TEREX DEMAG AC 80-2
2006 80T
LlEBHERR LTM 1070-4-1
2005 70T
LlEBHERR LTM 1150-1
2003 150T
GROVE GMK 5130-1
2008 130T
MANlTOWOC 18000
2005 750T
LlEBHERR LR 1400-2
2006 400T
Main Office:
LIFT SYSTEMS
216 40th St (61265)
P.O. Box 906
Moline, IL 61266-0906 USA
Phone: +1 (309) 764-9842
Fax: +1 (309) 764-9848
E-Mail: lif tit@lif t-systems.com
Web: www.lif t-systems.com
International Sales:
INKRA GmbH / KRAH GmbH
Richard-Strauss-Str. 31
D-74629 Pfedelbach
Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 7941-8325
Fax: +49 (0) 7941-37994
E-Mail: krah@lif t-systems.de
Web: www.lif t-systems.de
Lift System
combination
Model 22 A and
Model 24 A off
loading a 95 ton
concrete dryer
INNOVATION IN LIFTING
INNOVATION IN LIFTING
W
e’ll
be
there!
O
UTSIDEAREA
F9
N
9
2
6
/6
w
w
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.baum
a.de
The Marketplace
69 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
COLES CRANES
GROVE CRANES
KRUPP CRANES PARTS
Cranepart caters for most makes and models of Crane, both
old and new, and specialises in obtaining those parts you find
difficult to locate.
CONTACT BRIAN REYNOLDS
Cranepart Limited T: +44 (0) 191 516 9881
Unit 7F M: +44 (0) 7713 061 888
Riverside Road Industrial Estate F: +44 (0) 191 516 9645
Southwick E: parts@cranepart.co.uk
Sunderland
Tyne & Wear SR5 3JG
www.cranepart.co.uk
Your first contact for
used tower cranes of
all brands.
Your reliable distributor for
new and used JOST luffers
and saddle jibs of all sizes.
MTI-LUX S.A.
Machine Trading International
Tel. +352 26 72 94 46
Fax +352 26 74 54 83
www.mti-lux.com
info@mti-lux.com
EXTRA WIDE RAIL BEAM
RAILBEAM for rail going cranes, which replaces concrete sleepers
- distributing the corner pressure to a larger area
- corner pressure 400 ton, wheel pressure 75 ton
- lengths of 6 and 12 M, painted or galvanized
- maintenance free
- lower cost for foundation of crane
- design: Eurocode 3
www.RAILBEAM.com info@railbeam.com
For further information contact Erik Lohmann +45 3966 1866
Railbeam Type TN400 800x200mm
The Marketplace
70 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
cRANe$ AVAILABLe
FUk SAL£ or FUk k£NT
A|| equ|pment ||sted |s owned exc|us|ve|v bv F&M Mafco, |nc. and |s |ocated |n C|nc|nnat|, Uh|o un|ess otherw|se noted.
www.FmmuFco.com
clyde Model $Y Revolver crune
19YY Amer¡cun 11200
19Y2 Mun¡towoc 4100 $II
19Y4 Amer¡cun 11Y$0
0rove Rough Yerru¡n crunes 1980 Amer¡cun 11$20
L¡ebherr B0$ 40/1$0
cRANe$ AVAILABLe
C|NC|NNAT|, UM · 8|kM|NUMAM, AL · CAkSUN C|TY, NV · CMAkLUTT£, NC · £VANSV|LL£, |N · MUuMA, LA · kANSAS C|TY, MU · uN|T£D k|NUDUM
Fax: 1.513.367.0363 Þhone: 1.513.367.2151 To||-Free: 1.800.333.2151
Contact: 8||| Mckenna or 8ob 8rooks
* * *
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19Z0 L|r|-8e|l lC138 1900115 ê5-Tor |TEXA3) P.0.R.
- C|vde Vode| 3Z Cw-3938 0arl(v Vourled Revo|ve( C(are W/NeW Corl(o|s |VARYLAN0) P.0.R.
- C|vde Vode| 28 Cw-3800 0arl(v Vourled Revo|ve( C(are W/NeW Corl(o|s |VARYLAN0) P.0.R.
- Are(|car 900 - ToWe(. 3|vro(se. 0uv 0e((|c| Allacrrerl |0ll0) P.0.R.
- Are(|car 11320 - ToWe(. 3|vro(se. 0uv 0e((|c| Allacrrerl |0ll0) P.0.R.
- Var|loWoc 1100 - ToWe( Allacrrerl |0ll0) P.0.R.
- Var|loWoc 3900T - ToWe( Allacrrerl |0ll0) P.0.R.
- Var|loWoc 1100 - 3lll R|rde( Allacrrerl |0ll0) P.0.R.
- Var|loWoc 1ê00 - ToWe( Allacrrerl |TEXA3) P.0.R.
YEAR HAKE H00EL 8ER|AL # 0E86R|PT|0N PR|6E
6RANE8, 6RAwLER
6RANE8, TRU6K H0UNTE0
6RANE8, REV0LVER
6RANE8, R0UCh-TERRA|N
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199ê 0(ove RT-8558 828Z1 115' 8oor. ê0' J|o |0ll0) S181.900
1991 0(ove RT-ê35C Z9825 35-Tor. 105' 8oor. 29' J|o |0ll0) S111.900
2000 0(ove RT-Z50 221311 110' 8oor. 32'/5ê' J|o |0ll0) S191.900
2000 0(ove RT-Z50 22131ê 110' 8oor. 32'/5ê' J|o |0ll0) S191.900
199Z 0(ove RT-8ê58 838êê 125' 8oor. ê0' J|o |0ll0) S2Z1.900
199ê 0(ove RT-8ê58 831ê1 125' 8oor. ê0' J|o |0ll0) S219.900
1998 0(ove RT-8ê58 8ê3ê1 125' 8oor. ê0' J|o |0ll0) S321.900
199Z 0(ove RT-8ê58 81Z0Z 125' 8oor. ê0' J|o |0ll0) S2Z1.900
1989 0(ove RT-Z15 Z2108 101' 8oor. 32' J|o |0ll0) S99.900
1995 0(ove RT-Z15 81121 101' 8oor. 32' J|o |0ll0) S119.900
cublewuy "R¡·L¡ne" crune
Call for more
information!
1980 Are(|car 11320 800Z-A0-2330F 150-Tor C(aW|e( C(are W/3|vro(se. Reou||l - S100.000 |r (epa|(s |0ll0) P.0.R.
19Z2 Var|loWoc 1100 3e(|es ll 11128 230-Tor Capac|lv. 200' ol #22 8oor ard 10' ol J|o. 3 0(urs |0ll0) P.0.R.
19Zê Var|loWoc 1100 3e(|es ll 11129 230-Tor Capac|lv. 200' ol #22 8oor ard 10' ol J|o |0ll0) P.0.R.
19Z1 Var|loWoc 1100 3e(|es ll 1108ê 230-Tor Capac|lv. C(aW|e( C(are |0ll0) P.0.R.
1980 Var|loWoc 1100 31 o( 32 11êê2 200/230-Tor C(aW|e( C(are. 110' ol #22 8oor. \|cor Corl(o|s |u.K.) P.0.R.
1991 Are(|car 9299 9102RV11312 1ê5-Tor C(aW|e( C(are |0ll0) P.0.R.
19Z1 L|r|-8e|l L3-518 1Ew111 150-Tor C(aW|e( C(are |0ll0) P.0.R.
19ê8 Var|loWoc 1000w 10220 150-Tor Capac|lv. C(aW|e( C(are |0ll0) P.0.R.
19Z9 L|r|-8e|l L3118A 1E\Z39 110-Tor C(aW|e( C(are W/ 110' Va|r 8oor |0ll0) P.0.R.
1982 L|r|-8e|l L3118A 1E\8ê9 110-Tor C(aW|e( C(are W/ 110' Va|r 8oor. C|arsre|| |0ll0) P.0.R.
1989 Var|loWoc 3900 391320 100-Tor Capac|lv. C(aW|e( C(are. E|ecl(|c o( 0|ese| |0ll0) P.0.R.
19Z1 Are(|car 11250 031Z208 3|vro(se. 200' ooor. 100' rasl |N0RwAY) P.0.R.
19ZZ Are(|car 112ê0 0319950 3|vro(se. 200' ooor. 100' rasl |N0RwAY) P.0.R.
19Z1 Are(|car 11Z50 '3eve(a|¨ 300-Tor Pedesla| C(are. Tola| Reou||d - |u.K) P.0.R.
1995 Var|loWoc 1100 33 11909 300-Tor. R|rde( or 8a(de - 0N RENT ll P.0.R.
19Z1 Var|loWoc 3C-135 395092 100-Tor Capac|lv. Pedesla| 3eac(are |0ll0) P.0.R.
1982 L|eore(( 803 10/130 12ê12Z 10-Tor Pedesla| C(are. ê2' Rad|us. 150' 8oor |u.K) P.0.R.
- Fu|usr|ra - - Pedesla| C(are. 3VT © 15VR |L0ul3lANA) P.0.R.
- Are(|car 1Z50 - Pedesla| C(are |u.K) P.0.R.
6RANE8, HAR|NE | R|C8, PE0E8TAL
1990 8(ode(sor lC80-20 1Z0ê12 8.5-Tor. 0|ese|. W/ 28' 8oor |0ll0) P.0.R.
1999 8(ode(sor lC80-2F 355293 8.5-Tor Ca((v 0ec| C(are |ALA) P.0.R.
1998 8(ode(sor lC80-3E 30025Z 8.5-Tor Ca((v 0ec| C(are |0ll0) P.0.R.
6RANE8, |N0U8TR|AL
The Marketplace
71 www.cranestodaymagazine.com | CRANES TODAY September 2010
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
LIFT-N-LOCK
Lift and move heavy loads safely and
conveniently with J&R Engineering hydraulic
boom gantries as detailed in this brochure.
The exclusive LIFT-N-LOCK feature holds up
the load in the event the lift cylinder loses
pressure. Other exclusive patented safety
features include Stabilizer bars, Octagon
booms, Load sensing, Digital height
indicating system and Oscillating header
plates. Field proven models up to 1800 ton
capacity and lift heights up to 100 feet.
Crawler mounted gantries up to 700 ton
capacity and other specialized lifting and
transportation equipment available.
Tel: +1 (262) 363-9660
Fax: +1 (262) 363-9620
E-mail: jreng@execpc.com
Web Site: www.jrengco.com
MICHIELSENS trading
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2100 katWerp [0e0rae) · 8eIgI0m
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Fax: 0032 3 888 42 22
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weh: WWW.craaes40.com
NEW XCMG CRANES
CE-tested + Belgian Homologation
Michielsens quality proofed
LIEBHERR LTM 1060/2
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www.cranes4u.com
GROVE
GROVE GMK 2035
GROVE GMK 3050
GROVE GMK 4080
GALION
GALION 150A
LIEBHERR
LIEBHERR LTM 1060/2
LIEBHERR LTM 1160/1
KRUPP
KRUPP KMK 3050
KRUPP KMK 4080
XCMG
QY25K5
QY50K
QUY50 CRAWLER CRANE
XCMG QY70K (with automatic
Allison transmission)
FAUN
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TADANO
TADANO TR250
MUNSTER
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XCMG QY70K
WE SELL AND BUY HIGH QUALITY SECOND-HAND TELESCOPIC
TRUCK AND CRAWLER CRANES OF ALL WELL KNOWN BRANDS
DEMAG AC 25 1998
LIEBHERR LTM 1030/2 1999
DEMAG AC 40-1 1999
LIEBHERR LTM 1050-4/38 1991
LIEBHERR LTM 1060/2 2000
LIEBHERR LTM 1080/1 1999
LIEBHERR LTM 1095-5.1 2007
LIEBHERR LTM 1160/2 2001
LIEBHERR LTM 1220-5.2 2006
LIEBHERR LTM 1500 1999
LIEBHERR LR 1750 2005
LIEBHERR LTM 11200-9.1 2008
GREINER GMBH & CO. KG
Phone: +49-711-346-2002 • Fax: +49-711-346-0605
greiner@greiner-cranes.de • www.greiner-cranes.de
72 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
The Marketplace
Contact Kate Hearn +44 (0)20 8269 7743 or khearn@worldmarketintelligence.com
WITH OUR OWN CRANES
Complete project
solutions - Havator Group
Whatever it takes! www.havator.com
Havator Group offers lifting services, special
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elements and harbour crane services from
the same house.
Havator Group operates in Finland, Sweden,
Norway, Russia and in the Baltic countries. \\\MF[FYTWHTR
THE BACK PAGE
74 CRANES TODAY | www.cranestodaymagazine.com September 2010
MPS celebrates its 21st birthday this year. The company was
set up in 1988 by the husband and wife team of Mark and
Debbie Hughes. Mark Hughes says, “At first we were involved
in recruiting both lorry drivers and general plant operators. In
1989, we ran a series of adverts and one of the respondents said
he could drive a “navvy”. After he explained exactly what a
navvy was, we soon managed to source some regular work for
him, following some rather intensive wage negotiations in the
initial few weeks. He became our first ever crane related hire.”
There are an abundance of High St agencies out there that have
no idea of what one end of a crane is from another. Also, they have
no concept of the problems that a crane operator can come across
and no idea of the crucial role that the crane operator plays on site. I
myself have many years of experience of operating cranes in the
“real world”. All our staff at our head office who deal with the
operators and clients have had crane appreciation course training
and are totally familiar with the functions and terminology of cranes.
MPS has built a global reputation. It has supplied crane and
lifting personnel for a range of high profile jobs. In the US, it
provided staff for the construction of ‘Son of the Beast’, a huge
rollercoaster in Cincinnati. MPS personnel worked on the recovery
of the Russian submarine Kursk, from the Barents Sea, and of the
Tricolor, a container vessel that sank in the English Channel in 2002.
In Doha, Qatar, MPS supplied luffing jib crane operators for the
construction of the 320m high Sports Tower for the Asian Games.
Clients of MPS have included Balfour-Beatty, Sarens, Select
Plant, Kier Plant, AGD Plant and Equipment, BPH Crane Hire,
NRC Crane Hire, and BAM Nuttall, amongst others. In some
instances MPS are selected as the sole supplier. The UK arm of
Arcomet Tower Cranes has used no other company to supply
operators for its cranes from 2005 onwards.
We specialise predominantly in tower and crawler crane
operators but also supply mobile crane operators, appointed
persons, crane supervisors, slinger/signallers and offshore
pedestal crane operators. Upon receiving an enquiry or order for
a placement of a crane operator we fine tune our operator search
by trying to source an operator who has a current CPCS card, has
ideally operated the model of crane, is as local to the job as
possible, and has worked for MPS before. We have a vast and
detailed database of crane operators in the UK, which has been
built up over the last 21 years, giving us unrivalled access to
skilled operatives the length and breadth of the country.
Many contractors now are setting extra parameters for crane
operators including regular medicals and random drug and
alcohol testing. Far from seeing these as obstacles we embrace
these requirements and co-perate fully in any other specific
contractor requirements.
We believe we are way ahead of any other agency in the
manner we approach the training of their crane operators. The
implementation of an ongoing assessment and training
programme is crucial to the continual success and safety of
operators on site. If an operator is delegated to a crane he has
had no previous operational experience on then we have several
fully-trained operator assessors who will visit site on the first day
of the hire. They will ensure through a structured schedule that
by the end of the day the operator is fully familiarised with all the
aspects of that particular crane. The appropriate documentation is
then placed on the MPS database operator’s record.
No other agency operates such a rigorous policy. There are of
course times when occasionally this is not particularly cost effective.
But we believe that safety comes before profit. The thought of an
operator having to work out the controls/computer/functions of a
crane by process of elimination doesn’t bear thinking about. On my
visits to site I am always pleased when a client thanks us for this
service. It gives them peace of mind and, to be honest, is actually
industry best practice in BS7121 Safe Use of Cranes”.
Mark Hughes says “We believe that in common with many
other industries; crane companies are looking at a more flexible
workforce. The current recession has been difficult for all
involved and many crane contractors have been involved in
honourable but costly trade union related agreements from years
gone by which have proved expensive. However despite the
recession no company would be happy to see safety, competence
and operational experience sacrificed in an attempt to save
money. This is why I hope and believe that if any crane
contractor is looking at changing the way it employs its crane
operators, they would hopefully look at the model we have in
place at MPS and how well it works with contractors and clients
who are already working with us.”
Nigel Howard, safety and training manager
In a break from our normal format of covering
crane rental companies, this month ‘In our fleet’
looks at a specialist crane operator recruiter.
In your fleet UK
MPS
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