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(JULY-AUGUST 2017)

PROJECT REPORT

On

“Process Mapping and Introduction to battery Shutoff-Torque controlled


Tools”
Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements

For the award of the Certificate

Of

Maruti Suzuki India Limited (Manesar)

Under the Guidance of Submitted by


Mr. Nirmal Singh Tarun Lakra
(Mentor) B.TECH. (Automobile Engineering)
Delhi Technological University
DECLARATION

I hereby declare that this project work is an authentic record of my own


work carried out at Maruti Suzuki India Limited, Manesar as a part of 60
days summer training as a student of MBA in MANAGEMENT EDUCATION
AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE (Affiliated to GGS Indraprastha university)

New Delhi-110058.

Under the guidance of Mr Sachin Garg during

1th June 2018 to 31st July 2018.

NEHA TRIPATHI

Roll No. - 41815103917

Date: ___/____/________

Mr Sachin Garg

(Mentor)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

First of all I would like to state that this project has been great learning
experience. Through this training at Maruti Suzuki India Limited, Manesar,
Haryana, I gained valuable insights into the production process followed at
a world class car factory, especially related to the “CFP FINANCE” and
various quality control measures and their management carried out in
automobile industry.

I feel immense pleasure in showing my gratitude to all people who have


made my training successful by offering help and guidance.

I am deeply indebted to Mr Sachin Garg (Manager in CFP Finance) for


providing me this opportunity and their valuable time in carrying out this
project whenever required.

Needless to say, without their support and active guidance, this training
and thus this report would have not been possible.
PREFACE

Industrial training is one of the best methods to make students familiar


with the modern techniques, latest equipment & methods used in various
industries. During industrial training, students visit various companies and
make themselves familiar with the practical aspect of the production
method.

This training has provided an unmatched experience and opportunity to


gain practical knowledge which has increased my level of thinking and
taught me art of dealing with different kinds of people in all walks of life.
The training has improved my theoretical and practical concepts of
automotive technology.

The well planned, properly executed and evaluated industrial training helps
a lot in inculcating good work ethics. It provides a medium between the
students and the industry in order to develop the awareness of industrial
approach to problem solving based on broad understanding of plant.
Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPANY


o COMPANY MISSION
o PLANT JARGONS AND PRINCIPLES
o FASCILITIES AT MSIL
o QUICK VIEW OF GURGAON ,MANESAR PLANT AND R&D PLANT IN
ROHTAK
o MORE ABOUT MANESAR PLANT
o MARUTI PRODUCTION PROCESS AND VARIOUS SHOPS
 BLANKING LINE
 PRESS SHOP
 WELD SHOP
 PAINT SHOP
 ASSEMBLY SHOP
 VEHICLE INSPECTION

ASSEMBLY PROCESS

 TRIM LINE
 CHASSIS LINE
 FINAL LINE
 VEHICLE INSPECTION
 FINAL TOUCHUP
SOME OF THE MODELS OF MARUTI SUZUKI

DZIRE SWIFT OMNI

BALENO CELERIO

GYPSY KING IGNIS VITARA BREZZA

S-CROSS CIAZ
MANESAR PLANT
INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPANY

Maruti started out in 1982 in Gurgaon, Haryana. Little did the then quiet
suburb of New Delhi know that it was going to become the epicentre of the
automobile revolution in India. The year marked the birth of the Maruti
Suzuki factory. India turned out 40,000 cars every year. The new Maruti
Suzuki 800 hit the streets to begin a whole new chapter in the Indian
automobile industry. Maruti set out with an obsession for customer delight,
one that was unheard in the corridors of automobile manufacturers then. It
was about a commitment to create value through innovation, quality,
creativity, partnerships, openness and learning. It created a road that was
going to lead the world into a whole new direction, laid out by Maruti
Suzuki. Today, Maruti Suzuki alone makes 1.5 million family cars every year.
That’s one car every 12 seconds. Maruti drove up head and shoulders
above every major global auto company. Yet, Maruti’s story was not just
about making a mark, it was about revolutionary cars that delivered great
performance, efficiency and environment friendliness with low cost of
ownership. That’s what call true value is. Maruti built its story with a belief
in small cars for a big future.

Maruti’s story encouraged millions of Indians to make driving a way of life.


India stepped up with Maruti’s vision to take on the fast lane. A
comradeship had begun. Something incredible had begun.So, what drives
Maruti? Millions of Indians who’ve put their faith in Maruti. A team of over
13,200 dedicated and passionate professionals that turned out 15 car
models with over 150 variants. The drive is backed up by a nationwide
service network spanning over 1,500 cities and towns and a sales network
that spreads across 1,471 cities, 2 state of art factories, which together turn
out 15 lakh cars annually and a commitment to make Indian roads safer
through a network of training infrastructure that imparts driving skills.
Finally, Maruti’s inspiration comes from one place – India’s hopes, dreams
and aspirations. The Maruti Suzuki journey has been nothing less than
spectacular.
Organization Culture

At Maruti, we see manpower as a unique resource, in the sense that


optimal productivity of other resources depends largely on the way human
resources are utilized.

The basic philosophy of management that underlies the Maruti culture is


that all employees of the company should be moulded into a team which
then strives as one, to achieve commonly shared company goals and
objectives.

There is a common uniform for all employees. Another measure is the


creation of a common canteen where all employees have lunch. Common
toilets, common transport and similar facilities for all levels of employees
are other measures that reinforce our emphasis on genuine equality.
Another focus area of the Maruti culture is the maintenance of a smoothly
functioning communication network. There is a thorough dissemination of
information at all levels, through newsletters or via a letter from the Chief
Executive to all employees.

The Sahyog Samiti, a collection of representatives of non-unionized


employees, training programs in Japan, Quality Circles, productivity-linked
incentive schemes, and an ethos of discipline and teamwork. Several
measures of performance have made amply clear that Maruti has
established a truly healthy work culture. Yet, the Maruti culture is one that
does not believe in resting on its laurels. We adhere to the spirit of Kaizen,
which states that constant improvement is always possible.

The most basic tenet of productivity that we hold dear is that

“Today should be better than Yesterday

And Tomorrow should be better than Today".


COMPANY MISSION

 The Leader in the Indian Automobile Industry.


o By market share & brand equity.
o By operational practices.
o By people strategy
 Creating Customer Delight and Share Holder’s wealth.
o Customer obsession
o Fast, flexible, first mover
o Innovation & creativity
o Networking & partnership.
 A Pride of India
o As a corporate citizen.
o Products.
o People.
o Practices

MSIL’s ACCOLADES

 2007 India customer satisfaction index Award


 2007 India Initial Quality Study
 2010 NHRDH Trailblazer Award for HRD Excellence
 2011 “Hall of Fame award” for single handily changing the face of Indian
automobile Industry by Car India.
 2012 Golden Peacock Award for ‘Occupational Health & Safety’
Performance in Automobile Sector.
 2013 Ranked 7th Most Trusted Brand In India, by Trust Research Advisory
 2016 Maruti Suzuki Baleno awarded Viewer’s choice car by CNBC-TV 18
Overdrive.
PLANT JARGONS AND PRINCIPLES

POKA-YOKE : MISTAKE-PROOFING THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS

KAIZEN : IMPROVEMENT

PIKA-PIKA : SYSTEM MSIL USES TO ENSURE NO COMPONENT IS MISSED OR WRONGLY


FITTED BY THE OPERATOR ON THE ASSEMBLY LINE

FUNDOSHI : A SHEET OF PAPER WITH ALL THE DETAILS OF THE PART ON


WHICH ITIS PASTED

MARU-A : PARTS OR JOINTS WHICH ARE EXTREMELY CRITICAL AND ANY


FAULTIN THEIR FITMENT CAN CAUSE LOSS OF LIFE

HINKAI : PROBLEMS DURING ASSEMBLY OF A MODEL

FUGAI : PROBLEMS DURING ASSEMBLY RELATED TO MACHINES

VIN : VEHICLE IDIENTIFICATION NUMBER

PSN : PRODUCTION SERIAL NUMBER

EXP : EXPORT

DOM : DOMESTIC

PET : PETROL

DSL : DIESEL

MT : MANUAL TRANSMISSION

CVT : CONTINOUS VARIABLE TRANSMISSION

LDI: BASE DIESEL VARIANT VDI: MIDDLE DIESEL VARIANT ZDI: TOP
DIESEL VARIANT LXI: BASE PETROL VARIANT VXI: MIDDLE PETROL
VARIANT ZXI: TOP PETROL VARIANT
BASIC PRINCIPLES OF THE COMPANY

5S

SEIRI : PROPER SELECTION

SEITON : ARRANGEMENT

SEISO : CLEANING

SEIKETSO : STANDARISATION

SHITSHUKE : DISCIPLINE

3G

GENCHI : GO TO ACTUAL PLACE

GENBUTSU : SEE THE ACTUAL THING OR PROBLEM

GENJITSU : TAKE APPROPRIATE ACTION

3M

MURI : INCONVENIENCE

MUDA : WASTAGE

MURA : INCONSISTENCY
3K

KIMERARA KAYOKA : WHAT HAS BEEN DECIDED

KICHINTO MAMORU KOTO : MUST BE FOLLOWED

KIMI RARETA TORI : EXACTLY AS PER STANDARD

4M

MAN

MACHINE

MATERIAL

METHOD

3R

REDUCE

REUSE

RECYCLE
Work Culture

The employees endeavour for treating the whole MSIL as a single team.
Work culture in a big organization means a philosophy, which guide’s
actions and behavioural patterns of the employees, thus determining the
extent of efficient Interaction between them. This leads to

Participative working
impartial participation of employees
Smooth interaction among the employees
Open minded approach
Stress on team building
Effective communication among the employees

Certain forums are established for the benefit of the employees namely
Maruti Sahyog Samiti, Suggestion Scheme, small group activity, Kaizen and
Quality Circles, which help in promoting team spirit and information sharing
among the employees.

Kaizen in Japanese loosely means continuous improvement. In Maruti


beautification of working place, reduction of waste, system and process
improvements are done through Kaizen.

In keeping with the world standards, the whole plant has been Industrially
Air Conditioned to improve the productivity of the employees.
Quality Policy

To increase consumer satisfaction through continuous improvement of


products and services, this is achieved by following PDCA functions and
levels of Maruti Organizations.

PLAN

DO
ACT

CHECK

Fig: 1.1
Division and Departments

1. Corporate Service Division

 Legal & Secretarial Department


 Corporate Communication Cell
 Protocol
 Strategic Initiative Group
 Recruitment & Management Compensation

2. Human Resource Division

 Employee Relations Department


 Establishment & Time Office
 Factory Administration Department
 Organizational Development Department

3. Production Division

 Production-1
 Production-2
 Production Planning & Control

4. Production Engineering

 Production Engineering Division


 Production Services Division
 Tool Room, Die Shop Division
5. Engineering Directorate

 QAIN Division
 Service Division
 Service-1 to 5
 MSS (D)
 Parts Inspection Division
 Engineering Division

6. Supply Chain Division

 Supply Chain - 1 to 3 Divisions


 Shipping & Transport Department
 Imports Department
 Consumable Department

7. Information Technology Division

 Application Group – 1 (AG1)


 Application Group – 2 (AG2)
 Application Group – 3 (AG3)
 System Management Department (SMD)

8. Marketing & Sales Secretariat

 Marketing Strategy & Development


 Marketing
 Sales
 Exports
 Web – IT, E – Commerce
9. Spare Parts Division

 Spare Parts Procurement


 Warehousing & Dispatch
 Spare Parts Sales
 Accessories

10.Vigilance Division

 Security Wing
 Vigilance Wing

11.Finance Division

 Budget, Cost & Accounts Department


 Income Accounting Department
 Excise Department
 Vendor Payments & Price Negotiations Department
 Corporate Finance
FACILITIES AT MSIL
There are two manufacturing facilities in India, one in Gurgaon and the
other in Manesar, North India.

MSIL Snap Shot


Equity Structure* 56.2% Suzuki, 43.8% with Public

Net Sales* Rs.77,266.2crore(March 2017)

Net Profit* Rs.7,337.7crore(March 2017)

Sales* 14,29,248 units(April2015-March 2016)

Market Share* 48%

Manpower* over 25,000 employees (2017)

Models* 17 models with over 150 variants (July 2017)

Joint Ventures* 20 joint venture for components

Total outlets* 2,043 across 1,676 cities in India (July 2017)

Service Stations* 3,242 across 1,583 cities in India (July 2017)

*subjected to change without any prior notice. T&C applied. All right reserved under MSIL.
GURGAON PLANT

Gurgaon plant has three fully integrated plants. While the three plants have
a total installed capacity 650,000 cars per year, several productivity
improvements or shop floor Kaizens over the years have enabled the
company to manufacture nearly 700,000 cars per year at the Gurgaon
facilities. The entire facility is equipped with more than 150 robots; out if
which 71 have been developed in-house. More than 50% of shop floor
employees have been trained in Japan.
MANESAR PLANT

Manesar facility has been made to suit Suzuki Motor Corporation (SMC) and Maruti
Suzuki India Limited (MSIL) global ambitions. Rated high among Suzuki best plant
worldwide the plant was inaugurated in February 2007.

The plant has several in-built systems and mechanisms to ensure that cars being
manufactured here are of good quality. There is a high degree of automation and
robotic control in the press shop, weld shop and paint shop to carry on
manufacturing work with acute precision and high quality. In particular, areas where
manual operations are hazardous or unsafe have been equipped with robots.

The plant is designed to be flexible; diverse car models can be made here
conveniently owing to automatic tool changers, centralized weld control system and
numerical control machines that ensure high quality and the use of network
integrated techniques so that no process is missed. The plant was started with an
initial capacity of 100,000 cars per year. This is now scaled up to 550,000 cars per
year.
DIESEL ENGINE PLANT

Suzuki Power Train India Limited, the diesel engine plant at Manesar is Suzuki’s first
and MSIL’s perhaps the only plant design to produce world class diesel engine and
transmission for cars. The plant is under a joint venture company, called Suzuki
Power Train India Limited (SPIL) in which SMC hold 70% equity with the rest held by
MSIL.
This facility has an initial capacity to manufacture 100,000 diesel engines a year. This
will be scaled up to 300,000 engines per year.
The diesel engines manufactured at this plant will also be exported to SMC
companies across the world. This facility too has a high level of automation. Final
inspection of components is done through automatic measuring and marking
machines, which leads to a uniform and error free production.

R&D Mission
To achieve full model development capability for global Suzuki models fully
operational by 2019, a fully-fledged R&D center is being developed at a total
investment of Rs.38000 crore at 700 acre site in Rohtak, Haryana.
MSIL (Manesar Plant)

MAIN UNITS AT MSIL-M:-


a. Press shop

b. Weld shop

c. Paint shop

d. Bumper paint & injection moulding shop

e. Assembly shop

f. Vehicle inspection

Unique Features of MSIL


 More than 1400 vehicles are being rolled out per day.

 After every 48 seconds a variant is being rolled out.

 SENDAI AREA (SEN + DAI) means (1000 + NOS.)

Quality Features

 Focus on offline area repair activities

 Statistical analysis of offline defects

 Usage of quality tools for defect repair.

 Quality meetings being held twice a day by all the managers of all the departments
MARUTI PRODUCTION PROCESS
BLANKING LINE

There are two blanking lines; ROSL (Rotary oscillatory shear line) for rectangular
sheets and the other employing die cutting for irregular shapes. The rectangular
sheets are obtained on ROSL while dies are employed to obtain the required shape
sheets. The sequence of operations on the blanking line is as follows:-

 Uncoiling
 Cleaning
 Levelling
 Measuring
 Shearing/cutting
 Piling/stacking
PRESS SHOP

Die spotting press M/C-200t


Tandem press line 2-200t
Transfer press line -30
Tandem press line -1200t
The press shop can be regarded as the starting point of a car manufacturing process.
The press shop has a batch production system whereas the plants have a line
production system. The press shop maintains an inventory of at least two days. The
weld shop as per their requirement picks the finished body parts. These may be
divided as A, B & C parts. ‘A’ components are large outer components, example-
Roof, door panels, front hood etc. These components are manufactured in the press
shop at Maruti due to design secrecy and huge investment requirements. ‘B’ and ‘C’
components are manufactured by joint ventures or brought from vendors. The press
shop can be divided into:

 Raw Material Procurement


 Blanking at Blanking Line
 Stamping at Stamping Line
WELD SHOP

 ROBOTS- 139
 AUTOMATION LEVEL- 76 %

The body panels produced in the press shop and other small components are joined
here to give the “white body” or “shell”. In a typical car body about 1400 different
components are welded together. The joining process is resistance spot welding
predominantly.

The weld shop has following facilities:


 Welding jigs
 Spot welding guns
 Hemming machine
 Punching machine

PROCESS OUTLINE
The shop has different lines for different models, each of which is further divided
into three parts:

THE UNDER BODY


Here different under body panels are welded together. These comprise of rear
under body, central under body and front engine room panels. These under body
panel are prepared on sub lines starting from singular components. The sub lines
have specific jigs for each. Finally these under bodies are put on the conveyor and
are welded together to give under body.

MAIN BODY
The chassis number is punched on the cowl top and it is welded to the front engine
room panel. As the body moves on the conveyor roof and side body panels are
welded to it to give the main body. The side body panels are prepared on the sub
lines.

WHITE BODY
The doors, hood and back door are attached on the main body with the help of bolts
and screw to the main body to make it a “white body”. The body is checked for
dents, burr and spatter and these defects are repaired.

After inspection and repairs the body is called WBOK that is white body OK. It is sent
to paint shop thereafter.
PAINT SHOP

In the Paint Shop, the car body is first coated with ED i.e. electro deposition to
prevent the body from corrosion. Then the sealer application takes place where all
the gaps are made water proof. After this the body is coated with 3 coats of paint,
the base coat, the intermediate coat, the clear coat. Finally the under body is coated
with PVC undercoating to prevent the base from any gravel on the road. Then the
body is transferred to the assembly shop.
 Fully automatic process
 18 Robots with 10 colours

In the paint shop following processes are carried out:-

 Pre-treatment: the body is thoroughly washed to remove dirt and oil scales.
 ED coat: this is done by electric deposition method. After applying the ED coat
body is baked in ovens.
 Final coat: for metallic coating, double coats are applied and aluminium flakes
provide the shine to metallic paint. This is also done by spray painting
method.

The PBOK i.e. Paint Body OK is sent to the assembly shop.


ASSEMBLY SHOP

There are three assembly shops at MSIL, Manesar, namely, Assembly Plant-Manesar
A (AS-MA), Assembly Plant-Manesar B (AS-MB) and Assembly Plant-Manesar C (AS-
MC).

 AS-MA: Production of Ciaz (YL1) and Dzire (YSD NB).


 AS-MB: Production of Swift (YP8 HB), and Baleno (YRA).
 AS-MC: Production of Celerio (YL7 HB), Alto800 (YE3F8D) and AltoK10
(YE3K10) Swift (YP8 HB).

Each Assembly Shop has following Sub-Assemblies:

 FDSA -Front Door Sub-Assembly


 RDSA -Rear Door Sub-Assembly
 IPSA -Instrument Panel Sub-Assembly
 EGTM -Engine Transmission Sub-Assembly
 EGSA -Engine Sub-Assembly
 RASA -Rear Axle Sub-Assembly
Apart from the Sub-Assemblies, the main assembly line is divided into following
parts:

 Trim Line 1
 Trim Line 2
 Chassis or Overhead Line
 Final Line 1
 Final Line 2
 Vehicle Inspection
 Assembly Touch-up

Each line is further divided into stations which are used to uniquely identify any part
of the line.

There are total 296 stations in AS-MC.

PROCESS OUTLINE
 FDSA-Front Door Sub-Assembly: Both left and right front doors are removed
from PBOK from paint shop and assembled on this line. Parts like out rear
view mirrors, speakers, locking mechanisms, window glasses, window
regulators and electrical connections are installed here.
 RDSA-Rear Door Sub-Assembly: Both left and right rear doors are removed
from PBOK from paint shop and assembled on this line. Window glasses,
window regulator switches, locking mechanisms, speakers etc. are installed
here.
 IPSA-Instrument Panel Sub-Assembly: At this line, various dashboard
instruments, driving console, steering column, air conditioning vents, glove
box, etc. are installed here.

 EGTM-Engine Transmission Sub-Assembly: Engine and transmission are


coupled together on this line. Some other engine components are also fitted
on this line.
 EGSA-Engine Sub-Assembly: Front suspension mounting, Half axles, Radiator,
Intercooler (only in diesel), Front suspension system, Stabilizer bar, Steering
rack, Torque rod, etc. are fitted on to the engine and engine and front
suspension mounting here and the engine is sent to the chassis line.

 RASA-Rear Axle Sub-Assembly: On the rear axle, Rear drum brakes, rear
wheel hub, rear and brake lines are fitted and sent to the chassis line where
the rear axle is fitted to the vehicle body.

 Trim line 1: PBOK (Paint Body OK) from the paint shop comes to the Assembly
plant with doors fitted. The doors are removed and the main vehicle body
comes to the Trim line 1 first. Various components like wire harness, Washer
tank, etc. are fitted here.

 Trim line 2: Instrument Panel, Relay box, Forward and Backward sensors, etc.
are fitted here.

 Chassis or overhead line: On this line, Engine, Front suspension, Rear axle,
Rear suspension, Fuel tank and other underbody components are fitted.
Wearing a helmet is Compulsory on this line.

 Final line 1: Seats, Wheels and tires, Bumpers, Headlights, taillights are fitted
and coolant and brake oil is filled on this line.

 Final line 2: Battery, Battery tray, Doors, etc. is fitted on this line and systems
are checked at further stations.
VEHICLE INSPECTION

Various tests are carried on the car to ensure optimum quality and customer
satisfaction. Tests carried out are:

i. Toe-in test
ii. Toe-out test
iii. Shower leakage test
iv. Acceleration test or Drum test
v. Headlamp focus test
vi. Brake test
vii. Turning radius test
viii. Final Drive test
Tightening of Nuts, Bolts and Screws
Torque and Tension are two distinct ways to achieve the same result and create the
appropriate clamping force for the joint or connection. To do this, the bolt has to
stretch, while a nut holds the load and thereby creating the desired clamp force.

TORQUE
With tensioners, the action is not directly on the nut; rather tension is applied
directly to the stud in order to produce stretch. Once the pre stretch is achieved, the
nut can be tightened. Once the pressure is released the nut holds the load on the
bolt. This produces the clamp force. Multiple tensioners can be used together to
provide even load when tightening. Hydraulic bolt tensioners have a footprint and
thread height requirement.
TENSION
Using torque tools, such as nutrunners or hydraulic torque wrenches, you turn the
nut. As the nut turns, it stretches the stud. The torque setting for the tool translates
into load on the connection. When the tools are used following the appropriate
specifications for lubrication, coating and other factors, a desired clamp force can be
produced.

THE TIGHTENING PROCESS


The tightening process also has a major influence on the quality of the screw joint. A
joint tightened by hand behaves completely differently from one tightened using a
power tool.

Also, different types of tools have a decisive influence on the result. Direct driven
tools such as screwdrivers and nut- runners have a maximum capacity that is
decided by the power output of the motor and gear ratio.
They can be of the stall type, where final torque is determined by the torque
produced when the tool has no more capacity to overcome the resistance to turn
the screw. Nowadays they are usually equipped with a device which stops the
tightening at a predetermined torque.

There are also other types of tightening tools common in industrial production
today, i.e. impact wrenches and pulse nutrunners where the motor power is
converted to torque output by charging and discharging the energy intermittently
during the process. This means that very powerful tools can be designed with a
limited weight and size and with almost no reaction torque to the operator.
However, from a torque monitoring point of view these types do not lend
themselves to dynamic measurement and are, consequently, not dis- cussed in this
context.

TIGHTENING TOOLS
Impact tools
Impact wrenches are based on the same principle as using a hammer to strike a
wrench when tightening a bolt or screw, building up torque impact by impact. In the
case of the power impact wrench run by an air motor, the hammer is the combined
mass of the rotor and the impact mechanism which delivers their kinetic energy,
once or twice per revolution, to the anvil and socket, which represent the wrench in
the comparison.
Pulse tools
The hydraulic pulse tool has all the advantages of the impact wrench, i.e. high speed
and power from a lightweight and handy tool without reaction forces, but none of
the disadvantages except the difficulty of dynamic monitoring of the applied torque.

Battery tools
Battery powered electric screwdrivers and nut runners have become common tools
among craftsmen, carpenters and do-it-yourself workers where mobility is essential.
Also, during the last few years the working methods on automotive assembly lines
have changed resulting in an increasing use of battery powered assembly tools. The
advantages are the freedom to move along the assembly line and to work inside
closed compartments without air hose interference or the risk of jammed electric
cables.
Tightening Tools in Assembly Shops

1. Atlas Copco
 BCP

A cordless screwdriver, the BCP is ideal for quality critical applications where
flexibility is essential. The slim, well-balanced design and ergonomic pistol grip on
the BCP screwdriver make it a pleasure to hold. Its compact size and Lithium-Ion
batteries put it among the lightest battery screwdrivers on the market.

Technical Specifications:
Length 200 mm

Min Torque 5.0 Nm

Max Torque 12.0 Nm

Style Pistol Grip

Clutch Type Auto Shut Off

Model No.

BL-12-I06

Manufacturer Atlas Copco

Weight 1.89 lbs

Max Free Speed 600 rpm


 BCV
A cordless nutrunner, the BCV is ideal for quality critical applications where
flexibility is essential. The slim, well-balanced design and ergonomic angle BCV
nutrunner make it a pleasure to hold. Its compact size and Lithium-Ion batteries put
it among the lightest battery nutrunners on the market

Technical Specifications:
Model No.

BL-45-10

Min Torque 20 Nm

Max Torque 45 Nm

Style Angle Head

Clutch Type Auto Shut Off

Manufacturer Atlas Copco

Weight 3.6 lbs

Max Free Speed 180 rpm


2. URYU Omega Shutoff Pulse Tool
 ULT-130

Technical Specifications:
Max Air Consumption 25.6

Length 8.5 In

Min Torque 110 Nm

Max Torque 150 Nm

Style Pistol Grip

Clutch Type Auto Shut Off

Trigger Type Trigger

Manufacturer AIMCO URYU

Weight 5.1 lbs

Max Free Speed 3700rpm


 ULT-100

Technical Specifications:
Max Air Consumption 19.3

Length 7.8 In

Min Torque 70 Nm

Max Torque 130 Nm

Clutch Type Auto Shut Off

Trigger Type Trigger

Manufacturer AIMCO URYU

Weight 3.7 lbs

Max Free Speed 5200 rpm

 ULT-90
Technical Specifications:
Length 7.5 In

Max Air Consumption 19.3

Min Torque 50 Nm

Max Torque 85 Nm

Style Pistol Grip

Clutch Type Auto Shut Off

Trigger Type Trigger

Manufacturer AIMCO URYU

Weight 3.2 lbs

Max Free Speed 5700 rpm

Other models of Uryu are also used like ULT-80, ULT-60 etc.

3. Panasonic
 EYFLA4A
Technical Specifications:
Min Torque 3 Nm

Max Torque 22 Nm

Power Source EYFB32B, EYFB30B

Dimensions 6-7/32 x 9-25/32 x 2-61/64

Manufacturer Panasonic

Drive Size (In) 1/4

Weight 2.8 lbs

Max Free Speed 2300 rpm

 EYFLA6J

Technical Specifications:
Min Torque 16 Nm

Max Torque 53 Nm

Power Source EYFB32B, EYFB30B

Dimensions 6-25/32 x 9-25/32 x 2-61/64

Manufacturer Panasonic

Weight 3.1 lbs

Max Free Speed 2300 rpm


4. Hitachi

 Wr14dl2

Technical Specifications:

Tightening Torque : Power mode 235Nm (2,080 in.-lbs.)

Tightening Torque : Save mode 130Nm (1,150 in.-lbs.)

Weight 1.6kg (3.5 lbs.)

Clutch Type Impact type

ERRORS IN TIGHTENING
The purpose of monitoring the tightening torque is to ensure that the proper
clamping force has been reached. However, tightening torque alone is not a 100%
guarantee that the clamping force is sufficient for the load for which the joint has
been designed. There are a number of errors that might occur and result in
inadequate pre-stress in the screw despite the correct tightening torque.
DAMAGED THREADS
Damage to the thread or insufficiently cut threads will result in increased resistance
to turning the screw and hence the predetermined torque will be reached before
the correct clamping force is achieved. Damaged threads can be detected by
monitoring the tightening angle.

MISSING JOINT COMPONENTS


A common problem in industrial production is that the operator forgets a washer or
packing in the assembly of a joint. Apart from having other purposes for the design,
missing components will change the torque rate of the joint and consequently also
the clamping force.
AUTOMATIC SHUTOFF TOOL MECHANISM AND ADVANTAGES

An Automatic Shut-off wrench (also known as an impactor, torque controlled gun,


air wrench, air gun, rattle gun, windy gun) is a socket wrench power tool designed
to deliver high torque output with minimal exertion by the user, by storing energy in
a rotating mass, then delivering it suddenly to the output shaft and switching off
automatically as the preset torque value for the process is achieved. Reducing any
chances of over tightening, thread damage and other critical errors which can result
in a fastening failure.

In operation, a rotating mass is accelerated by the motor, storing energy, then


suddenly connected to the output shaft (the anvil), creating a high-torque impact.
The hammer mechanism is designed such that after delivering the impact, the
hammer is again allowed to spin freely, and does not stay locked. With this design,
the only reaction force applied to the body of the tool is the motor accelerating the
hammer, and thus the operator feels very little torque, even though a very high
peak torque is delivered to the socket. (This is similar to a conventional hammer,
where the user applies a small, constant force to swing the hammer, which
generates a very large impulse when the hammer strikes an object.) The hammer
design requires a certain minimum torque before the hammer is allowed to spin
separately from the anvil, causing the tool to stop hammering and instead smoothly
drive the fastener if only low torque is needed, rapidly installing/removing the
fastener.

The hammer mechanism in an impact wrench needs to allow the hammer to spin
freely, impact the anvil, then release and spin freely again. Many designs are used to
accomplish this task, all with some drawbacks. Depending on the design, the
hammer may drive the anvil either once or twice per revolution (where a revolution
is the difference between the hammer and the anvil), with some designs delivering
faster, weaker blows twice per revolution, or slower, more powerful ones only once
per revolution.
A common hammer design has the hammer able to slide and rotate on a shaft, with
a spring holding it in the downwards position. Between the hammer and the driving
shaft is a steel ball on a ramp, such that if the input shaft rotates ahead of the
hammer with enough torque, the spring is compressed and the hammer is slid
backwards. On the bottom of the hammer, and the top of the anvil, are dog teeth,
designed for high impacts. When the tool is used, the hammer rotates until its dog
teeth contact the teeth on the anvil, stopping the hammer from rotating.

The input shaft continues to turn, causing the ramp to lift the steel ball, lifting the
hammer assembly until the dog teeth no longer engage the anvil, and the hammer is
free to spin again. The hammer then springs forward to the bottom of the ball ramp,
and is accelerated by the input shaft, until the dog teeth contact the anvil again,
delivering the impact. The process then repeats, delivering blows every time the
teeth meet, almost always twice per revolution. If the output has little load on it,
such as when spinning a loose nut on a bolt, the torque will never be high enough to
cause the ball to compress the spring, and the input will smoothly drive the output.
This design has the advantage of small size and simplicity, but energy is wasted
moving the entire hammer back and forth, and delivering multiple blows per
revolution gives less time for the hammer to accelerate. This design is often seen
after a gear reduction, compensating for the lack of acceleration time by delivering
more torque at a lower speed.
THANK YOU

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