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Archie, one of the requests I left on your desk was to switch Mr Milton Copulos from the Civilian Defense Experts list to the Retired Military Analyst list
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MILTON R. COPULOS
For more than three decades, Milton R. Copulas has been a prominent figure in national political circles. He served as aCabinet-level advisor in the Bush and Reagan Administrations, working closely with the Secretaries ofDefense, Energy, Interior and Commerce, as well as theDirector of Central Inteiligence.
While working for the Executive Office of the President in the Reagan White House, Cooulos authored a number of im~ortant studies inchdine theNational CriticalMinerals and , ~ e , b r t Advanced Materials i r o g r a m ~ l a nthe ~ e p a & m t of Energy's assessment of the fonncr Soviet Union's natural resource base as well as a number of classified documents. He was also aparticipam in the Defense Industrial Base Initiative and the principal consultant to the Department of Defense on the Defense EnvironmentInitiative. More recently, Copulas has authored anumber of important studies related to energy and national security. In October of 2003 two of thesc were issued: "America'sAchilles Heel, the Hidden Cost a/Imported Oil, A Strategyfor Energy Independence" and "Assuringthe Flow, Meeting Miiilary Needs During Oillmport Supply Disruptions," both published by the National Defense Council Foundation. He is currently working on an indepth analysis ofthe current situation in Saudi Arabia and how it could affect military access to critical Pxl supplies As a prominent expert on natural resources. national defense and international politics. Copulos is frequently called upon to lecture at universities and other academic institutions around the nation 11e has been a visiting lecturer at the Uassai-husetts InvlumeofTechnology, thc University ofManlane Graduate Schoo! of Nuclear Fngincmngand the University of Dallas Graduate School of Management
He wa3 also selected as faculty for the prestigious.%/zbw~Seminar in American Studies sponsored by Harvard University In Sazburg. Austria He is also the only individual to be asked todeliver the prestigious"Mana~ment Classics" lecture at the Univeraiiy of

Dallas. A prolific author. Copulos has published more tban 700 articles, books and monographs. His wiling has appeared in such prominent national news media as The Washington Post, The Los Aftgeles Times and The Chicago Tribune. He is also a frequent contributor to periodicals such as Insight Magazine, VFWMagmine and Regulation Magazine. His book "Energy Perspectives"was a Washington Post best seller, and for four years he wrote a nationally syndicated column distributed by the Heritage Femures Syndicate. He also has appeared on nattonally btoadosi news and information programs including such p r o m s % FOX News Network's"F0XandFnendv" CNNs Trosvfire", and ' W a r Room wth WolfRlitw" as well as local broadcasts for major network affimtes He
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Because of h:s internationally recognized expertise in foreign affairs. Copulos has often been asked tomeet with foreign leaders. Lncluaed among them arc individuals sucn as Pmiaent Fidel Ramos of the Republic of the Philippines and President RaufDenUashof the Turkish Republic of ~orthern Cyprus
A veteran of two tours of duty in Vietnam,Copulos was awarded the Bronze Star and Army Commendation Medals, as well as five battlestars. He was retired from the United Slates Army wilh the rank of Sergeant on February 1, 1970. He is a graduate ofThe American University in Washington. D,C. and lives in Crofton. Maryland.

KY TIMES

7926

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RETIRED MILITARY
Colonel Carl Kenneth Allard Mr. Jed Babbm Admiral Dennis C. Blair Cmdr Peter Brooks Lieutenant General Frank B. Campbcll Dr. J m s Jay Caiafano ae Lieutenam Colonel Bill Cowan Major Dana R Dillon General Wayne A. Downing Colonel (Tim) J. Eads General Ronald Fogelman Lieutenant Colonel Rick Francom Colonel John GarreR Liculenant General Buster Gloason Bngadicr General David LGrange Command Sergeant Major Steven Grcer Colonel Jack Jacobs Admiral David E. Jeremiah General George Jouiwan General William F. "Buck" Keman Colonel Glenn Lackey Admiral Thomas Joseph Lopez Lieutenant Colonel Robert L. Maginnis Colonel JelTMcCausland, Lieutenant General Thomas Mclnemey General Monlgomcly Meigs
Major F. Andy Messing Jr.

General Thomas S, Moonnan. Jr. Major General Michael 1. Naidoiti. Jr. Capiain Chuck Nash General William L. Nçs General Glen K. Oi ts Genera! Joseph Ralston Lieutenant General Erv Rokke Major General Robert H. Scales, Jr. General Hugh Shellon Major General Donald W.Shepperd Lieutenant Colonel Cariton Sherwood Wayne Simmons Major General Perry Smith Captain Martin L. Strong Lieutenant General Bernard Trainor Major General Paul E. Vallcly

(USA. Paired) (USAF, JAG) WSN. Reiired) (USN. Reiired) (USAF. Retired) (LTC. USA, Raired) WSMC. Reliredl (USA, Retired) . (USA, Rdiml) (USA. Retired) (USAF, Retired) (USAF, Retired) (USMC, Rnired) (USAF, Retired) (USA, Recited) (USA, Relired) (USA, Relired) (USN, Rcnred) (USA, Raired) (USA, Retirtd) (USA, Retired) (USN. Retired) (USA, Retired) (USA, Retired) (USAF, Retired) (USA, Retired) (USAR, Rflired) (USAF. R e l i d ) (USA, Raired) (Urn, Reined) (USA. Retired) (USA, R e l i d ) (USAF, Rslircd) USIF. Raired) (USA, Reiired) (USA, Retired) (USAF. Retired) (USMC, ReIired) <Urn. Retired) (USAF, Retired) (USN,Retired) (USMC, Retired) (USA. Rclired)
4

MY TIMES

7930

Colonel John Wmlm
General LÈr D.Welch

(USAF, Retire!)
W A F , Retired) (USMC, Retired) (USMC, Retired)

General Churlcs E.Willicim GeiierBl Tom Wilkeison

Full Name:

Last NamePint NameMobile: E-mail: E-mail Dbplay As:

Den Senor Senor

Dan

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BY TIMES

7932

From Sw11 To

Broohes Peter (Pew mrookefle7 Monday October 25,2004 7 06 AM
Broohes Peter

Subject

Brookes Weekly New York Post column Syna-STrouble Damascus Hartioring Insurgency
Planners

NEW YORK POST
SYRIA-S TROUBLE By PETER BROOKES October25, 2004 in Syria.

- ONE key to stabilizing Iraq isn't even in the country, but next door

It's notjust tnat innumerable Saddam loyalists, al Qaeda terrorists and foreign fighters have crossed the 370inlie Syrian border into Iraq over Hie past year. Syna a.so has become a safe haven for the~a'athist Bigs pulling the strings ofthe attacks in Iraq. These thugs operate with Impunity while Damascusturns a blind eye. The situation has gotten so bad -and so critical to busting the insurgency -that Washington has sent at least two senior State and Defense Department delegations (along with Iraqi officials) to Damascus in the last two months. Their blunt message to President Bashar al Assad: Address this festering problem with concrete action or pay the consequences.

-

After months of tough gong. Coalition forces are now making a dent in the Iraqi nsurgency oy pressing the offensive in places like Falluiah (The weekend arrest of a senior a Qaeda aide certainlv he1DS.l The death toll amono the bad auvs Is now as 1 Gen. John high as 15,000since the postwar fighting began, says central ~ornmand's Abizaid. (He estimates that 5,000 still remain.) But ending the flow of reinforcements,cash and weapons to the insurgentsis just as important as wiping out the active fighters. That's where Syria comes in. Under the protection of Syrian Ba'athist regime. 20 to 50 former senior Iraqi Ba'ath security-setvicegoons and Saddam aides and relatives are supervising the guerda war back home. Some analysts say these leadership cells are more dangerous to Iraq's long-termstability than even ai Qaeda's Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. Assad has promisedto cooperate with Coalition and Iraqi requests, especially on closing the border. But he has yet to produce results.
3

So how do we eliminate the ability of the Synan cells to plan. direct, organize and find (Saddam stashed at least $1 b.ll,on in Syna vefore the war) the oloody rebellion7

We have much more leverage with Syria h n most pe0p.e think. Damascus IS oolitically isolated (except lor its closest ally, Iran). And wth mernDIovment hovering at . . 20 percent. Syria's economy is faltering. If Syria fails to cooperate, Washington could ratchet up the pressure by implementing sanctions beyond those already taken under me Syria Accountability and Lebanese Sovereignty RestorationAct of 2003. Those laws already ban US. exports to Syria (essfow and medicine),but Washington could cut off financial oeaiinnswth Syrian banks. This would scare off much-needed foreign investment,furthercripp~in~the Syrian economy. America could also lean on the European Union (EU) to rescind its rewntly-inked trade and cooperationpact with Syria. To take effect, the agreement still needs the unanimous approval in the EU parliament. London and America's "New Europe" allies should be open to reason And, working with Paris (yes. Paris!), we could further saueeze Damascus by acting on the reg me'sintransigen& over J.N.Secunty Council ~esolution 1559. ~herecentkpassed resolution called for Syria l o wimoraw all 15,000-20.000 of its troops from Leoanon (Syran troops have been in Lebanon since the 1976 Leoanese civil war, and me government in Beirut is essent'ally a ?.)roan pJppet ) A second Franco-American resolution on Lebanon ISalready in the works Sec~rity Counci. punitive action, such as multdatera economic sanctions for non-compliance, Is certainly possible Damascus also risks:

" Creating a sworn enemy in the new Iraq
Losing U.S. help in reviving the stalled Syrian-Israelipeace talks (Damascus desperately wants the Golan Heights back). Drawing US. military strikes against insurgent targets in Syria -always an option. President Bcsh has called Syria "an unusual and extraordinarythreat" He's right. Syria'6 a dictatorship, has weapons of mass destructionand supports terrorism in Israel through the likes of Hezboliah and Hamas. If Syria doesnt couple words with deeds soon, Damascus should suffer appropriate

.

HY TIKES

7934

consequences We've played nicely long enough Assad has a fateful choice to make' Take advantage of a window of opportunity for better relations with the United States and its permanent and increasinglyangry - neighbor Iraq. Or follow the likes of Saddam Hussein and the Taliban directly into the dustbin of history

-

Peter Bmokes is a Heritage Foundationsenior Fellow E-mail peterbrookas

UY TIMES

7935

8: Advanced copy.. Pass on as you see fit. Will hit UP1tomorrow (Friday)

Outside View: Winning in Afghanistan
By Thomas Mcinemeyand Pa~1Valle.y Kew Commentalora O~tslde Published 10/22/20042.02 AM WASHINGTON, Ocl. 22 WPI) While Us no sumrtse mat Ownocrats John F. Kerry and John 0 Edwards hanhly cnticue Presdent Bush's Iraq policy, their new claim about the war on Islamlst ten-onem the campaign in Afghanistan. Operation Enounng Freedom, was a failure because it failed to kill or capture of Osama bin Laden - is baffling

-

. .

Calling the Afghan campaign a failure is puzzling because, by every meaningful measure, It was a resounding succass.A combined force of anti-TafibanAfghans, U.S. apecial operations forces, carrier- and land-basedU.S. airpower, and more conventionalArmy and Marina unts quickly liberated Afghanistan. On Oct. 7, 2001 when U S air strikes began, the Taliban and its ally al-Qalda controlled 90 percent of Afghanistan Two months later, they had been driven out of every major city and were fteelng for the AfghanistanPakistan border, relentlessly pursued by U.S. airpower, U,S, Marines, and US-assisted mujahedin. Most of the credit rightly belongs to the men and woman of the US. armed forces and the brave Afghan fighters who took the fight to the Taliban and ai-Qaida. Agood measure of it, however, belongs to Bush. The initial plan for the Afghan campaign called for a months-long build-upof a force offensive in the spring of 2002. Determinedto take of three Army divisions and Lhen a convent~onal immediate action, the president demanded a different course of action. The result was a campaign that produced a swift and decisive victory and refuted predictions of a quagmire in Afghanistan. To De sure Operation Eno~r.ng Freeaom had its p'-obkrns The air campaign's intia pace was desultory an0 if9 mit al direct on was against fixed target* rather than enemy forces n tne field Central Commano o'len refused to delegate oec s one aoout using airpower a sriipt ng the Air Force's'time-ct liw targeting' an0 leading to some m.ssao opponunhes inclua.ng a couph to kill the Tahban's ieaaer Mu lah Omar 6, exercising command from nis stateside heao~uattersGen Tommv Franks Denied himself thà "feet ' o r 6rentc on me around that K a nçcaefiar a h à § n of succeisful command But that said. It worked

As vexing as they were, these problems were not of Bush's making.
6

The air campaign's initially slow pace s t e m in large part from the fad that the United Stales had lano nas) too few aena ref~eling aircraft Most ofthe campaign's mner snortcomrgs can oe out down to me drastic sh ft from oeace to war that OCCLITCO .n SeDtember 2C01 a shift even more sudden and orofound than that which occurred in December 1941 -and one of war's irrefutable taws: nothing goes exactly as planned.

-.

Kerry correctly states that, in Tom Bora. CentralCommand did not use US. conventional forces to 'close the back door" on the remnants of the Taiiban and al-Qaida that might have included Osama bin Laden tryingto get into Pakistan. He is. however, quite wrong to claim that the fighting was "outsourced" to Afghan warlords.

-

-

Quite simply ana quite understandably. General Franks applied the formula that had been successfu daing the previous eight w o k s Afghan fightersoacxedoy L S special operations forces an0 sdpooned by U S airpower Despite tne fact mat bin Laden ana other "oig fisn" were not netted. ndndreos of Taliban and al-Qalda f'gnters were hhed

The Dartlea in To'a Bora chd not mane the end of the military campaign against the Taiban and al Qaida Ladnchm in Marcn 2302. Operat on Anaconda was a bod w nter offensive against enemy eiciavcs. condiictea by coalition units tnat incluoed the 1Gih Mo-.ntaIn Division and the 10Oist Aifbome Division.
Operation Enduring Freedom smashed the Taliban, routed a!-Qalda, and put their leaders on the run. It strengthenedthe hand of Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf whose domestic campaign against al-Qaida has killed or captured many of its leaders including the mastermind of the 6/11 attacks, Khalid Sheik Mohammed, It put other Islamist terrorists on noticeabout U.S. strength and resolve and the American military's enormous power and global reach Finally, it taught the US. military many lessons - lessons that. to his great credit. Franks applied with stunning results to the planning and execution of the Iraq campaign.

-

The recant presidential election in Afghanistan in which millions of people, includingwomen, voted demonstratesthat, while there is a lot of work to do, Afghanistan is a much better place now than It was three years ago and that freedom can put down roots anywhere in the world. Those who liberated Afghanistan from despots and terrorists. therefore, deserve praise not snide secondguessing almost three years after the fact

-

--

(Lt. Gen.Thomas Mclnemey and Maj, Gen, Paul Valbty. retired from the US. Air Force and Army, respectively, are militaryanalysts for Fox News and co-authors of "Endgame: The Blueprint for Victory In the War on Terror" (Regnery, ZOM).)

(United Press International's "Outside View" commentariesare written by outside contributors who Specialize In a variety of issues. The views expresseddo not necessarily reflectthose of United Press International. In the Interests of creating an open forum, onginai submissions am invited.)

Get Coomiaht Ckamnca v? am newCopyright 2004 United Press international

NY TIMES

7937

Copyright 2004 United Press International, inc. All Rights Reserved

Prbacv Pokv 1 Terms and Condtions 1 Contad Us
Make sure vou read "Endname" We Trust Fox News

u
Add me to vouraddressbook,
Want a sWafW9fie fhs7

Block Svam Emails Click here!

-

l

BY TIKES

7938

From.
SÈn

To Subfct:

RF DoD TPs 1 20-04 WashTimes Iraq amde 0

hi-tached please find an article from the Washington Times by Jed Babbin. who interviewed
U . S . troops who

have served

in

Iraq.

MY TIKES

7939

From: Sent
To

Brooke%Peter [

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l

e

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~

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~

Subject

Monday. 0 18 2004726AMA B r o o k s Peter Brookes' Weekly NV Post Column 'IraqLooking UP"

October 10, 2004 -- YOU wouldn't know it fron most of the pun dits or the evening news n broadcasts, but things are looking up i Iraq The high-stakes decision to go on the offeneive militarily and politically over the last couple of weeks*.h made. t1 .9 dzE€=renc

-

-

The airstrikee, around asaault~,local negotiations and international dipl-cy will ~ a y substantial dividends in esta0lishir.g security in the --up to next January's Iraqi natio"a1 e 1 e c t i m .
Sooe discouraging days are undoubtedly still ahead (like attacks in the Green Zone). But a number of dimparate, but r*lacçd event* indicate that the political and military mentuir
ia shifting to the Coalition and Iraqi side. Skeptical? Consider the following devel-em: victory last Wednesday, the NATO defense NATO forces: In a aigniCictnt dipl-tic miniatera, meeting in Romanitt, agreed to increase the group's military training contingent i Iran f m 40 to 300 bv vearsa end. The new militam advisers h o s t likelv initiallv

The NATO trainers will help boost the nunber of ~ r a q iforcç from thà current 1.00,000 eo a projected 145,000 by next January. (The NATO forwill xerve under American Gen. David t r a u s 1 Gqiilppxng these forces is also another challenge, and NATO may play a role

there as well. rhough France and Germany are still playing hard to get, there are cone subtle hints thac e n they may kick in eouc assistance later on. Moreover, ~ e f e n s eSecretary on B u M f e l d ' s HAT0 agreement is an iiraort=~~t ace* in helping .end cite traiiB-Atlmtic rift over Iraq.

e of 300,000 has been a snake pit since the m i n e s ended Fallujah: m central-Iraq t their siege in ~ p r i l .nut: in recant, weeks, precision U.S. airstrlkes have killed at least d six senior members of mu numb al-zarqawi'a terror network. ~ n the Pentagon claims to h i eliminated half the foreign fighter leadership in the last month.
he an-acri~eshave had the added beocfic of creating fault lines among ~allujih-a bad guys. m e pounding has inspired local ineurqenca to c u m against the foreign fighters and a1 one&. Pallujan vigilante justice resulted in the killing of at least, five foreign Arab fighters in recent weeks, including a ççni zxrqawi aide.

On the political aide. while Iraqia negotiated for raturn of the c i t y control to 1. ml forces, interim prime Miltiseer Ayaa Allawi put a political spine into the situation by demanding that Pallulabas c x t i ~ n s hand over Zarqawi - or face attack. "If they do not turn in a1 Zarqawi and hie group, we will carry out operatiome in ~ d l u j à § h , recently told the loo-member Interim Iraqi national council. & n t h he joint Iraqi-u.S. asamult on Samarra ma=li=r this month m y reminders of the ~ c c e a e f u l , give locals the needed incentive to fork over the terrorists.
Gndc

City: Stubborn supporters of rebel cleric Huctada -1-Sadr have agreed to turn in
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HY TIKES

7940

their i r t a m s in escchanoe for cold cash in cbà ~aghdadalumof Sadr city <SI.OOO for a heavy machine gun; $250 for a mortar; $170 for a g r a d e launcher; and even 25 cencs for a

hulled.
Early buy-back results are prcmiiminq, but i t ' s not: clear to what extent Sadr's Hahdi AnBy will really disarm. Cooperation, relative calm and a. fragile ceaae-fire prevai.1 for w . If the peace deal holds, aid t o rebuild chis dilapidated section of ~ a g h d a dia waiting i n
the winos.

The point: The ~ituationin Iraq is better leads" news reports.

~

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think frcrn the 'if it. blttde. it

roe seemingly intractable challenges in mllujah, ~ a j a f .samaxra, naghdad and ~amadi shouldn't be undeeeaeimaced by any mcana. BUC these problems confined predominantly to

-

Iraqis need co take control of the securitysituation aa moon aa possible ~ilieary victories, which should include Iraqi forces for confidence-bolacering purpoaea, must be qu~cklyfollowed up by economic a i d to the contested area 1 rurely continue to ace violence through the u S. elections next month and the Iraq1 elections next January But if we t i n collaborati.on with Iraqi counterparts) keep preaaing the political and military offensive aa we have of late, scabilicv and security is xn sight
Peter Brookce is a Heritage Foundation senior fellow

E-mail

petertirooxaaf

B r This Re-qe k e  ¥ i a t e files) ia intended only for the i e of

If w u are n-st Peter Sxmkes -2.4-.- .,"=4, -. >. or opiniona pr~cenccd in this email axe solely thorns of Peter B m k e e and do not e c e c e a n l y represent chose of he Heritage Foundation.
~ n views y

- -- -

HY TIMES

7941

w."wewmu
JVOhaMShckK

Our latest article for publication.?lenseKISS to Rummy and staff. Sent to the WSJ yesterday. Getting ready for big fundmiser tomorrow night for the Soldiers 6ift Program. Anyone can donate over the web site

...

www.sold~ersmemoriolfund orq
Sorry we missed. Went to the Block Tie dinner for Pete Pace on Wed niqht.

Paul E Valleiy

This was so good, thanks. How was your trip to DC? Sorry I didn't get a chance to have an adult beverage with ya. 1 left for CT for the long weekend.

Office afttie Secretary ofPubticAIfan llamfVlÑÃ

retotom

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From m friend Jed Bobbin y

MY TIMES

7943

NY TIMES

7944

hU~://www.~~ectator.ora/.J imaaes/ckaroix.aif

Top Brass hlt~://wwwspectator.ora/../ imaaBS/ckarPix.qif

EDITOR IN CHIEF R. Emmett Tyrrell. Jr PUBLISHER Alfred S. Regnery EDITORIALDIRECTOR, WEB EDITOR Wady Pteazczynski EXECUTIVEEDITOR George Neumayr MANAGING EDITOR
Amv K. Mitchell

Loose Canons Sharpies at the U.N. htt~:J/www.spectator.ora/imaoes/Printer.aif Print Frtondly Format htt~://www.s~ectaior.ora/irnaqes/Envelo~e.aif E-Mail this to a Friend By Jed Babbm Published 10/1172MM12;06:59 AM
No, not the people who helped Saddam loot Iraq and pocketed billions from the 011-for-Food-forBribes-for-Weaponsprogram. Sharpies: those wonderfully-handy felt-tlpped pens with permanent Ink that my wife continuesto swipe from my desk. The Afghan election an otherwise wonderful and historic event -- is now In dispute because the U.N. didn't have Sharpies handy.

-

1

NY TIMES

7945

Laugh If you must, but the humor of thls can only be appreciated by the overpaid bureaucrat? of Turtle Bay. The U.N. was supposed t o be monitoring and assuring the validity of the Afghan election in which Hamid Kana1 and about seventeen others were vvlnn for the nresldenru of thls war-ravaoed natlm. The U.fn failed. No1 Decause of v d e n c e n the p o l l l n g ' p ~ ~ . though thereku; y W A S some f'.ot because hunoreos of thodsanos of Afgnan s quailed a the terrorists' threats of murder if tney tnea to vote. because the" a a n t "he U h fa Ifa Because its infa.i~ole.i m ~ n . a i an0 ~rofessionae ectlon mon tors D anned to . mark the Cuticle of one thumb o f each voter with ink to show they'd voted and thus prevent them from voting again, and couldn't manage t o get even that nght. You'd think they'd have arranged for pens with Ink that wouldn't wash off Immediately, rendering the result In doubt of massive Chicago-like vote fraud. But they didn't. It's as If the U.N. election monitors had been trained by former Louisiana gov Edwln Edwards. I n truth, that would probably have been an Improvement I n the fall of 2001, Afonanlstan sat under the oppression of the Tallban, UBL and the Pakistan. Intelligence t Sew ce tnat ~ e p it in me sorry c o w tion i t nao o m since tIw Soviet? w.thdrew In defeat Alter Septemoer 11, the reign of tne Taliban çva m g h l to an abrupt end, al Q a d a w w J most destroyed, ana OBL was on the am. I n JJSIt n r w years, Afgnanistan went from a nation that had never i^* History ts l o w 3 its p e w e wif-deteminat on, to one n wnicn ..despite tne strictness of Islamic aw that st 11 dom nates m u m of ts people mllions votm The picture on me front page of St-naay's tfrasn!wron Post sa a it al a woman, Qaroefl n*ad to t m .n a Duma. only her hanas v sible, ~t-sn-no paver Da ot nto a her ballot box. Accordingio one report, pollsters weren't able to get good exitpolls becausethe Afghanis were reveling in their ability to keep their votes secret.
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I I

I

That the U.N. couldn't manage even this simple thing leaves me wonderingJust what rote i t can possibly play In the January elections in Iraq. Let's help. Every American (and everyone else interested in seeing democracy take root In Iraq) should send a Sharpie to Secretary Kof Annan (Hizzoner Kofi Annan, Secretary General, U.N. Headquarters, First Avenueat 46th Street, New York, NY 10017). Maybe by this little act of charity we can help prevent in Iraq the same buffoonery that just occurred In Afghanistan. Don? send nastv letters. Just a little note saving we're trying to help the U.N. do what i t obviously cant do on its own. THANK HEAVEN THAT the U.N. played no role I n the Australian election last week. Prime MinisterJohn Howard, who braved enormous political opposition to do It, joined Mr. Bush's Coalition of the Willing, and sent Aussie t r o o p t o Afghanistan and Irao. His survival was tong In doubt but the Aussles reelected him w i n a substantial margin of victory how, maybe Presioent Bush can mention his name again xiitn prom nçrc n tnà finas aeoate against Vicny John Kefry. AjSSie I1bera.s are snocried b\ tnçiloss Maybe they snodo thin* about i t more Thew messme didn't fail witn the voters Because ! was" t dear enough, or because they didn't articulate it well or loud enough. I t falled because Aussies are practical people. They don't want terrorism a t home, so they're willing to light I t at its source. So must we. Two out of the four elections that should affect the war on terrorists and the nations that support them have passed, and but for the U.N. screw-up, both would stand as a powerful message to the enemy. The effect of the January Iraqi election wilt depend on what happens here In November. I f Mr. Bush wins, terrorism will remain on the run. I f Kerry prevails, we will suffer an enormous setback.

Kerry's "plan" for Iraq Is I n tatters. He says and John Edwards reiterated on Meet the Press on Sunday that the Iraq war Is the wrong war, a t the wrong time and In the wrong place. Kerry's onncipk idea, to bnng in those nations that h a w so far refused Jom In the right, h a s i n y meant one thing In h s awesome egotism. Kerry oel eves that &st because he is who ne rs, France and Germany . and peitiaps even Russia wi'l send troops to re1eve tne ourden we have shouiaered It's fa se. line so m u m eise Kerry an0 Edwane's say Chirac and Smroeder nave already said toat tney won t send troops no matter who the P'eiilaem may be on 2 1 January 2005. Kerw says mat i f we a0 this right, we c a n beg n to wandraw our troops in s.x months, and be 0i.t of mere in four ye<rs.

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6

Mr Kerry objects to fighting thls war on the terms it must be fought .n order t o win. Wecan't fall to ouild the bases In Iraq we're now build ng, but n e d stop the corsifi-ction. I f we lack those Doses, then any agamst Iran and Syria win oa much harder to accomplish when f ~ r t h e action m the Middle East r Kerry's si-ccessor takes office He wants to stop the program that's develop ng tacrica nuclear penetrating

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oomb that can destroy Iran's Durlea nuclear weapons program Antouchable by conventional weapons Mr Kerry wonts to bring the trows nome from this war,Just as he old .n the Vietnam War Someoie should remino him that we lost that one thanks to him, Hanoi Jane. m a tnclr ilk.
TAS ContribUtffIg EdJed Babbfn b Ole a m of Imlde the Asylum; Why the U.N. and Old Europe Are Worse Than YOU Think (Regnery Publishing).

Home The Latest Kerw Taxes Splinters John Tabin

Spirited In St. Louis
George Neurnayr TrbmohardTown Hall Wlady Pleszczynski The U N. Inks UDAfahanistan Jed Babbin Austria's Red Ladv Christopher Orfef Soros Give it Away Ralph R. Reiland push Walks Reader Mailers Editor's Desk

The Amencen Spwfsfw's persona, copy of John Kerry's New S d d k r w u l d now be yours, assuming McCm Femgod say I s okay caretuliy

w,

htto://wi.ebav.cmAÈs/eBaÈISAPl.dll7ViewltemÈitern=6930094
The Prowler Roberts filed his report before ABC News blew the investgationwide open by reporting that at least two of the experts CBS used to verify the authenticity of the memos either could not or would not do so "In the end, it probably doesn? manef,'sayslheCBS News prcducer.We're sunk." [d Reader Mail Lawrence Henry and I share the same horror of selecting an OverTheCcnJnter drug tor a simple cold As a physician, i understand that I need to go to the fine pnrd of the "active ingredient" and Ido so.
18

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But my frustration turns to disgust after I tum overthe third box to read the "active ingredients- and find the same combinations. In the "good old days" we had fewer selections and Icould remember the box and the ingredients. If all of these manufacturerscan make a great label and box, then 1 want the "active ingredienl(s)" in large letters on the label. 1am SICK and tired of marketing euphemisms. I can't even tell my sick patients which box to pick, except by referring to the fine-print "active inaredienr [&

Block Spam Emails -Click he@

From'
Sent

To
Subject

Brookes Peter

Brwkes NY Post column -Afghans' Fateful Vote"

SSS W K K POST A F G W S ' FATEFUL TOTE

By PETER BROOKES October 8, 2004 IN momentous defiance of their former Taliban nastera, war-weary afohana will go to the polla tomorrow to participate in their country's first direct presidential elections. NO% too shabby for a nation rocked by a generation of violmt coaflict, going back to the winery Soviet invasion almost 25 years w o .

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was freed from the shackles of a1 Qaeda and the Taliban, tomorrow's voting is arguably one of the most significant evente of the post-9/ll world
m i n g just three years after the nation

Thought it won't be picture perfect, the election is a vital step in etftablifthiiq denocncy in ~fghanistan.~ n it's happening right in the heart of the Islamic world d ~fghanistanhaa nude tretnaodom progrcac toward democracy in very abort order. Three p a r a ago, the fundamentalist Taliban ruled the country with an iron fist and provided safe haye" to a1 Qa=*a. In contrast, tonor-row, 18 candidates, including one courageous woman, will ntand for a five-year cam as Afghan president - backed by. new denoct-aticccciatitutuon.

More than 10.6 million Afghans (of 25 million tocçl children included) have registered to v o t e . Remarkably, 42 percent of them are w e n an impossibility under the Taliban. And in all but t w o <violence-plagued)provinces of the countrys* 3 4 , voter registration exceeded £ percent.

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even refugees will be able to vote. I ~akistan. 650,000 refugee! registered, as did " 400,000 in Iran. All in all, the vote should represent a broad cross-sectson of Afghanistan's diverse ethnic and tribal populations. ~ t ' anot all good new though. security could be election day's biggest nightmare. ~ w o thousand ç ~ a e d . and ~alibanjibdiscs will c r y to drrupc the elections, especially near h i tongholds along che rural Pakistan border.

.

mjor cities nay be targeted as well. A coordinated vietnam ~et-styleoffensive in xabul (the capital) and Kandahar Ithe former Taliban baation1 on election day i s certainly a
possibility. The candidates aren't eife either. zntcri. ~reaident-mid mrzai. him vice presidential attempts in running mas= and one of hi-s deputies have all escaped separate çs~açainati e-nence and the last two months. securitv concerns lolua a lack of funds, ¥oolit~.ca roads) have l i m i t e d vigorous, western-style campaigning.

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Voter intinidation is alao a worry. Al Qaeda and Taliban threats will likely depress t u n in the pathtun-dominated eouth and w t . Elfrwhere. region*! warlords or tribal elder* have given many voters "friendly advice" about to cast their ballot.

The election will be monitored by the wtchfol eye* of 125.000 A f g h m election official^, i:luding 16,000 domestic observers and 227 international ntonitorn, at s.0Do polling enters in a country the size of Texas.

In addition, the forces of 41 nations, including the Afghan National A m y (IS.000 men1 and police ;2s,om),MATO'S rn~eniaeionalsecurity ~ a à § i s f n ~ o r c e(a.000). and U.S. forces c lB.00O1, are deploying to provide security.

N latter

who is elected president, he or she will find shortage of problens. m addition to the mg01ng insurgency, opium production the world's largest must: be mtrolled. Narco-trafficking fund- the inaurqency as well as terrorism in and beyond Afghanistan.

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And the government m u s t extend its i n f l u e m beyond the capital. {some joke of Kareai aa 'President of Kabul."l Provincial security m i s t be improved, and the warlords' power nust be further reduced.
n om or row's

presidential election and the rnrliaçentar and local races next spring i l l help the nation deal with these critical casks by conferring real legitimacy on the n w government. e

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Every election is important, but none -ore ¥ than the first. (Afghanistan actually last held i n in 9 6 9 for parliament.) T o a o r r w s polling will break the ground for future votes and the broader objective. of peace and Stability.
Without question, this in &n historic undertaking, the first step on a long journey to freedom and prospçrity Even if only inininally successful. the election will prove once again chat lela". and democracy are indeed compatible. nut more than chat. it will provide a beacon of hope t o others in the Muelin world yearning to be free. There is no doubt that . t happens in Afghanistan tomorrow will k reverfaerate far beyond the country's vast W n t a i n ~and deserts.
he election will alao have a salutary effect on dimantling regional insurgencies. ~ o to t mention die prospects for pr-ting democracy in places like Iran, Pakistan, and c. h ountriea of central Asia. nut. oerhaoa. ¥oa aionificantlv. the ~fahiielection will c2ve

Peter ~rookecis a Heritage ~ound~tzon senior f e u o w %-mail- pçterbrofke+-

Any viewe or opinions presented in this eçaiare solely chose of Peter Brookes and do not i r i l y represent those of =he Heritage Foundation.

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7950

from:
Sanf

To'
Subject:

~ l t e LÇW . CN. OSDOASWA Tuesday. October 05.2004 9.09 AM Whitman, Bryan, S E S OASO-PA RE b m r statement
recommendations of military

a

Thanks. our posture has to continue to be that the Secretary retied upon the judgment and

commandarsduring me pre-deployment, hostilities, and post-tiostlw phase; of OperationIraqi Freedom

Oct&io5,'mm 8 5 5 AM To: Di Rita. Larry, CN, 050-0450-PA Subject: FW: b m e r state-1
Sent:TucHy,

2&YK[rn,kU
Sent: Mondav. October 04.2004

Subject: Fwd- bremer m t m t

apparently the michael gordon story will report that bmer was callingfor more troops in iraq and this is his

statement.

spoke with scan mccnmuck who said that condo would be spakine wilh cordon on wednesday late p.m i told him I was not sure secdcfwould he speaking with him but thai lmh was and we mighi lq 10 get someone else

i do think we need someone dial can speak to this businessof lsi cav and the off-ramp. let's press tomorrow. perhaps i can speak with chairmanand see who he thinks.

ACT 5mor <daitseno

flP^^^al.wrote

Date Mon, 4 Oct 2004 18 32 44 -0700 (PDT) From Dan Senot

MY TIMES

7951

Statement by Ambassador L Paul h e r III . > > 0ctobcr4,2004 >>Contact: Dan Senor, "I have recenilv delivered addressesin which I explained that.following September 1 1,2001.tk Unned States and the West face a new kindof terror ~ h m t sad h t wmmc the w a m 1rm 8s m 1 ~ integral part of fightinc this war on tcrroi. 1 made clear that after spending 14 months in Irq I was even
rille convinced lhat removing the regime of Saddam Hussein i s the right thing 10 do md was central to winning the war on terrorism

"I also stated that I agree with the President's strategy for training Iraqi security forcesand his overall strategy in Iraq. This is one of themany reasons, as I explained inmy addresses as well, thai I strongly support his re-election.
"I believethat we currently have sufficient troop i levels in Iraq. The reference 10 troop levels h I s made referred explicitly to the situation a I found it on the ground, when I arrived in Baghdad in May 2003. and when I believed we needed either more Coalition troops OT Iraqi security forces to address the lootmg. We developed a plan to address this problem, which has been continued by Iraq's Interim Government."
###

D yai YltmO!? o

Read only themail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpomOuaid hnp://promotions..~oo.com/ncwmail

Do you Yahoo!? vole,vahoo.coni Register online to vote today!

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NY TIMES

To

cc
SUbJÈc

I OASD-PA Rhyndance Gaorga COL OASD-PA V -Mr. 0 s D . m wfiman ~ i v a n SES OASD-PA RE Mr DiRita summer study communications

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H e is how i t works with arranging outreach opportunities with the m i l i t a r y aiiilyat=. There are a t o t a l of 4 6 on the l i e t . with a t w - w e e k advance n o t i c e on an outreach meeting i n the ent tag on with t h e chairman and the secretary as participants a t the meeting, 15-20 analysts w i l l attend. With 4 8
hours prior notice on a conference c a l l Atehie Colonel Archie Pavia

Oeorg* I will work with W L Davis to a r r w e tor Monday er Tueadxy relay to M . D i R i f r Thank you Cheryl

--

--

--

--

could you i l c a n e

m
I know many of cheat fine people and there i n no problem m e z i n g with any cr a l l of them

six

-.r

e i a the liec you requested.

Har^a
As requested

Archie COl0"~l Archie hVi. Director

Public Liaison

Archie

--

Can you provide a H a t for me a

d

7

P?FEZl
you provide a list of 'retired m i l % t t r y 'talking trade' and subject matter axperts" who would be included in such a meting?
Can

I will expect co HOT from Brian re next stew, either with the Aforementioned opinion Leader. and ~ u b i e c tnrccer *)(perf of with ~ i ~ i t a
T h n k you for your continuing attention to chis topic

D

HY TIKES

7954

Fro#-"

p '6,

Sent
To

"lav O A S M A

su+t-

FW FOX REQUEST REgang I'M I C o ~ a n l

EW'

'-

Program Specialist Public Affairs (Room

-

-

9

<.

*

Hello. sir. I'll qa direct With the colonel, cmnk*

> My pleasure speaking with you and my appreciation to you
31

for taking

HY TIMES

7955

#W,- > I'm planning a trip to Iraq
3

-- -1

in

late September.

One of the things I ' d

> like CO do IS meet up w-th General Patreus and give h i m some GOOD

coverage With Pax

> Could you point me to the right > With hi"?

D m person to facilitate

my

meeting

Thanks much
?

ResP'y.

> Bill

HY TIKES

7956

My Russian counterpart and myself in Damascus....

To: 'Rck Francma
Sent Frtdav September 24 2004 10 07 AM Subject- RE: CONFERENCECALL Monday 9-27-04

OK on participation.
V e coo1 on the first air attache thing.
Do you have any hit times for next week. if so, send them. I'll tune in from here.

m
I will be at MSNBC that week, and will try to participate. FYI, Iwas the first air attache In Damascus (1992-1995)

WY TIMES

7951

Rick

See invite below. Please let me know if you will participate. Thank you.

Fax

I

MEMORANDUM To- Retired Military Analysts From Colond Archie Davis Director. Community Relations an0 Public Affairs Office of the Secretary of Defense Date: 09-24-04 Re. Conference Call with Senior DoD Officials
We invite you to participatein a conference call, Monday, September 27, 2004frorn 10:OOAM to 10:30AM est.

Topics to be discussed are: Update on Syria Participants in this conference call will be Mr Peter Roaman Assistant Secretary of Defense. Internahonai Security Affairs Your M s l 101this call will be ColonelArcnie Davis

w

ate in this conferencecall, pkasedial $ C d ask the werator to wnnect vou totheRetiredMilitary Analysts conference call.

m -..w.

a

n

-

+
m

We hope you are able to participate.
36

NY TIMES

How We Won in Afghanistan

By Thomas Melnerney and Paul Vallely
While it's no surprise that John Kerry and John Edwards harshly criticize President Bush's Iraq policy,their new claim about the war on Islamist terrorismÑth campaign in Afghanistan, Operation Enduring Freedom. was a failure because it failed to kill or caoture of Osama bin ade en-is baffling. Calling the Afghan campaign a failure is puzzling because, by every meaningful measure, it was a resounding success. A combined force of antiTaliban Afghans, US. special operations forces, carrier- and land-based U.S airpower, and more conventional Army and Marine units quickly liberated ~fghanistan. October 7,2001 when American air strikes began, the On Taliban and its dlv al-Oaeda controlled 90% of Afehanistan. Two months . . later, they had been driven out of every major city and were fleeing for the Afghanistan-Pakistanborder, relentlessly pursued by US. airpower, US. Marines, and US.-assisted mwahndeen. Most of the credit rightly belongs to the men and women of the US. armed forces and the brave~fghan fighterswho took the fight to the Taliban and al-Qaeda. A good measure of it. however, belongs to President Bush, The initial plan for the Afghan campaign called for a months-long build-up of a force of three Annv divisions and then a conventionaloffensive in the spring of 2002. Determined to take immediateaction, President Bush demanded a different course of action. The result was a campaign that produced a swift and decisive victory and refuted predictions of a quagmire in Afghanistan. To be sure, Operation Enduring Freedom had its problems. The air campaign's initial pace was desultory and its initial direction was against fixed targets ratheithart enemy forces in the field. Central command often refused to delegate decisions about wine airvower, disru~tine Air - . . - the Force's "lime-critical targeting" and leading TO some missed opportunities. including a couple to kill ihe Taliban's leaaer. Mullah Omar By exercising command fromhis stateside headquarters, General Tommy ~ r a & deniedhimself the "feel" for events on the ground that is a necessary element of successful command. But that said,; worked

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As vexing as they were. these nroblems were not of President Bush's making. The aircampaign's initially slow pace stemmed in large part from the fact that the United States had land has) too few aerial refieline aircraft. ~ , Most of the campaign's other shortcomings can be put down to the drastic shift from peace to war that occurred in September 2001-a shift even more sudden and profound than that which occurred in December 1941-and one of war's irrefutable laws: nothing goes exactly as planned. Senator Kerry correctly states that, in Tora Bora, Central Command did not use US. conventional forces to "close the back door" on the remnants of the Taliban and al-Qaeda-that might have included Osama bin Lade-trying to get into Pakistan. But he is wrong to claim that the fighting was "outsourced" to Afahan warlords. Quite simvlv and quite understandably, Gcnerai~ranks appliedthe formufa that had been successful during the previous eight weeks: Afghan fighters backed by U S . special operations forces and supported by U.S. airpowcr. Despite the fact thai Osama bin Laden and other "big fish" were not netted, hundreds of Taliban and al-Qaeda fighters were killed. Moreover, the battles in T o n Bora did not mark the end ofthe military campaign against the Taiiban and al-Qaeaa Launched .n March 2002. Operation Anaconda was a bold winter offensive agamst enem) enclaves, conducted by coalition units that included the 10"" t4o~nta.nDivision and the 101" Airborne Division Operation Enduring Freedom smashed the Taliban, routed al-Qaeda, and put their leaders on the run. It strengthened the hand of Pakistan's President Musharraf whose domestic campaign against al-Qacda has killed or captured many of its leaders-including the masiennind of the 911 l attacks. Khalid Sheik Mohammed. It DUI other Islamist terrorists on notice about American strength and resolveand the American military's enormous power and global reach. Finally, it taught the U.S. military many lessonslessons that, to his great credit, General Franks applied with stunning results to the planning and execution of the Iraq campaign. This past weekend's presidential election in Afghanistan in which millions of people, including women, voted demonstrates that, while there is a lot of work to do, Afghanistan is a much better place now than it was three years a gd that freedom can putdown roots anywhere in the world. Those who liberated Afghanistan from despots and terrorists, therefore, deserve praiseÑno snide second-guessing almost three years after the fact.

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7960

Lt Gen. Mdnerney and Mai. Gen. Yalleb, retired from the U.S. Air Force and Army. respectively, aremilitary analysisf r FOX News and co-omhors o ofEndgame: Pie Blueprint for Victory in the War on Terror (Repwry.

20041.

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Original Message Subject spam CSIS Highlights Public Opinion in Iraq JAN-JUN 04

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CSIS Highlights Public Opinion In Iraq Anthony Cordesman (via Paul Berenson) 18 Seotember 2004 The attached report by my colleagues Rick Barton and Sheba Crocker provides a new assessment of develoments in Iraa. and attemots to measure omamas in each critical area. It a'so summarizes the resultsof extensive& the scene interviews and some 16 ~ublicooinion 0011s. The assessment of progress is not reassuring, but the report also notes that Iraqis remain ootimistic and that the situation is an hin but h eless. From a military point ofview, two things are striking: Polls showing m a 0 1sc e: v t f&es z v e increasedin Do~uiarconfidence and succofl. in svite of then mixed performance in (he recent fighting, and the growing level of broad popular hostilityto US and Coalition forces Attitudes Towards Iraqi Security and Police Forces IiACSS: How much confidence do you have In the [new) Iraqi police] to improve the situation in Iraq? Apr.-May '04 May '04 Jan. "04 Great Deal 44.80% 47.90% 47.30% Fair Amount 35.00% 29.60% 28 70% Not Very Much 6.70% 8 60% 5.70% None at All 11 00% 11.20% 15 80% IIACSS. Departmentof Slate, CPA, 'National oh of Iraq." Iraqi Perception 34 See Saban Center for Middle East Poky, Brookings Institution, 'Iraq Index Tracking Reconstruction and Secunly in Post- Saddam Iraq," August 30,2004,Dam1 Cooney and Omar Sinan. 'Morgue Records Show 5,500 Iraqis Killed."Associated Press, May 24.2004. 2 Progressor 6 Peril? Measuring Iraq'sReconstruction CSIS Post-Conflict Reconstruction Project Oxford: How much confidence do you have in the [new Iraqi police]? Fab. '04 Mar.-Apr. '04 0ct.-Nov. '03 G r o t Deal 19.70%2 7.60% 33.00% Quite a Lot 30.60% 43.30% 39.20% Not Very Much 33.40% 20.60% 17.60% None at All 16.30% 8.50% 10.20% Oxford Research International. 'National Survey of Iraq Attidues Towards Iraal Armv Forces IIACSS: How much confidence do you have in the [new Iraqi army] to improve the situation in Iraq?
8

Jun. '04 35% 39% 20% 7%

Jan. -04 Great Deal Fair Amount Not Very Much None at All
34.70% 28.40% 9.70% 17.20%

Apr.-May -04
36.50% 25.00% 9.90% 17.80%

May '04
32.90% 28.50% 8.60% 20 10%

IIACSS, Derailment of State, CPA. "National Poll of Iraq

Oxford: How much confidence do you have in the [new Iraqi army]? Oct-Nov. '03 Feb. '04 Mar.-Apr. '04 Great Deal 16.00% 19.70% 24.40% Quite a Lot 30.10% 42.20% 46.70% Not Very Much 34.30% 27.50% 17.10% None at All 19.50% 10.70% 11.80%
Oxtom Research International. 'National Survey of Iraq."

Jun. '04
24% 50% 20% 6%

Attitudes Towards US and Coalition Forces Oxford: How much confidence do you have in the [US. and UK occupation forces]? Fob. '04 Mar.-Apr. '04 0%-Nov. '03 Great Deal 7.60% 8.70% 7.00% Quite a Lot 13.60% 19.00% 18.40% No! Very Much 22.20% 25.60% 22 30% None at All 56.60% 46.80% 52.30%
Oxford Research International.Â¥Nationa Survey of Iraq.'

Jun. '04
6% 14% 30% 51%

IIACSS: How much confidence do you hew in [Coalition forces] to Improve the situation In Iraq? Jan. '04 Apr.-May '04 May '04 Great Deal 11.60% 2.60% 1.50% Fair Amount 16.70% 4.40% 8.20% Not Very Much 13.70% 4.70% 6.10% M o m at All 53.30% 83.50% 80.60% IIACSS, CUpmmofSlab. CPA, 'Nitem1 Poll of Iraq "

HY TIMES

hank you for the feedback on the ~ a l k i n gPoints. I appreciate your insight
I a m not sure which o f the DepSec's speechwritera penned theme remarks, but 1 will forward your comments t o r them to review too

....Original
mom
~ n t ~ $

Message----Paul "allely l m . i l m p . * l v . 1 1 ~ 1 ~
P ~ ; 8 e
2004 2 9 56 PM ~ 1

To
Subject

OASD-PA'; 'Thomas McInarney' inq Points ~ e p s e cRAMD remarks on terrorian
CIV

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1  It 1. we need t o atop faying this . going t o be. long wr....... W! need a Blueprint foe Victory for a. shorter term effort. He do not need to drag chi* W r a on Terror out. a t is not fair to the American people and the w o r l d . ~ e t ' sgec a g g r ~ a i v e and deal with the nation state* that continue to aupport international terroia. See the book, wnegams" tor answers. Flawed p r i n c i p l e / / / ' war w be conducted awicc.ly, decistvely and with finality. That la w h a t the A m y çn DO0 need to articulçtà I have mentioned this to Sec Wolfcw>tz before,; Sends a message of weakness from the only superpower in the world. f
(t 2 ///Also, forget the "softer one," regarding the War on Terror", Again, soft reflects weakness. who ia writing thin nonaena. for the SÇ Wolfowics. Let's get cough and atay cough until we win. Soft sounds like Kerry on a more memitl.vt war, .

This talk must be revised to send the right message and a much stronger o m
~y

thoughts for what they are worth...,,,.

sent: Tuesday, septeçbà 14, 2004 13i08 pw To: MILITARY-ABALYSTS-LWTIC.MIL subject: DoD Talking Points DepSec RAND remarks on terrorism

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Attached please find today's Talking Points E r a the Department of Defense Office of Public AfEiira.

Deputy Seerefry of Defense Paul Wolfowitz addressed the RAKD Conference On TerxoriSm In s i n g la: week. The topic was .A strategic Approach to the challenge if Termrxam." ~ollowingare highlights of his remarks (full t e x t ) . ~http://www.defense1ink.mill3peeche8/2004/fiii300409oa-depflecdef0721.htnl~

mar h a & = principle~must guide t b united states i n it* #tratew to combat t e r r o n s t fanaticism: Recognize the struggle "ill be long. The Onxted states will I win, but the victory will probably not be nurked by an event an dramatic as the signing aboard the 055 Missouri or the collapse of the Berlin Hall. I m un-ited states must use all the insrrumcnta of national e power, including military force, but not solely or even primarily military force. i f f 1 of national power, including the "softer" ones, reinforce each other. 3 m acruqqle will be waged in multiple "theatera," including e the United States, Americans cannot ignore any of the CheaCere. Efforts must be sequenced 0 energies are focused in the right places at the right, times. I m e struggle is both physical and ideological. There must be a vision of life, hope and freedom to counter the terrorists' vision of tyranny, death and despair.
One lesson of september 11th is that the United states can no longer continue to live with terrorism as a n evil but inescapable fact of international life. While every individual terrorist threat cannot be r a t e d , the United States can hope to eliminate global terrorist networks and and stace ~ponsorshipof terrorism. Americans must be patient. A problem that grew up in 20 or 30 years is not going away in two or three. The sane values thç held the Allies together £0 four decades of often contentious debates have brought more than 80 countries into the larger coalition in the Global war on ~ e ~ r o x . A longing for freedom penetrated the Iron Curtain and brought about the peaceful end to the cold war. ~ o d a y ,the same universal demire for liberty is the atcongeat weapon to fight farcicism.

.

. . .

Combating terrorism involves many and varied fronts. Effertt must he sequenced in a m y that makea sense what happens in one theater impacts others. success I- one theater can provide a platform for succesm in others. Success in Afghanistan haa depzivcd -1 M e & of a sanctuary there, supported president ~ u s h a n a f ' aposition as a friend of the United States, and driven a1 caeda terrorists into Pakistan, where it has been wssible t o capture them. The capture of terrorist operatives in Pakistan has led to r e of key associates in places as distant as London and Chicago, and provided " information about terroristsa plan,. i a he saudis have killed or canturd more than 600 a1

.

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Afghanistan and Iraq are the cure central fronts in the Global war on terror for U . S . military forces. * Fifty nillion people in Afghanistan and Iraq have been freed from brutal tyranny. Afghanistan and Iraq are on their may to becoming America's newest allies in the fight for freedon. mth countries are moving toward self-government. m success of democracy in both countries will represent t e
12

NT TIMES

'

major defeat for tnrroriStS, including

Viccory in the Global War on Terror requires aowing seeds of hope and expandiw the appeal of freedom, particularly i n the Middle -st. Winning in Afghanistan and Iraq i s imperative, but these victories are only part of the larger ~ l o b a l a on ~errcr. Wr As democracy grows i n the Middle E a s t , i t will become easier f n a k e r s to succeed throughout the iq,.,n, As President Bush s a i d in a speech in November imo-kkng the 20th anniversary of i t s partners i n the 1 of 1 , : a h t all people can
the wational Endowment for ~e-racy, the united states muse work with greater Middle East and around the world to promote tolerance, the 1 and economic openness and the extension of greater opportunicie~ realize t h e i r f u l l p o t e m ~ a l .

.

È8BOCi*te

of a1 0Èeda

By

TIKES

7966

To: Subject:

'Tim Fads' R E Follow-up Meeting wllh SÈDe 019-504

-

she is responsible for n e m o t the navy this type of thing I did let them know you had a sun night appearance on FOX and taked them to reply to you prior to that
I nave forwarded your questions to o

Let me know if nothing ia forthcoming
1 you don't mind, I also asked them to copy me in on the answers ' with the FBBC of the participants

I'd like to share them

C^3
Telephone

, ,

~rogramspecialist Wl

Fax

1

1: When the tribunal finds that a permon i a not an enemy combatant what happens to h i m ? , I itill held in captivity? It so why? Where is he returned to-where he was picked up or his home country?
2:

Would Chat person be compensated by the USG for the time he w denied hie Creedon?

3:
4:

Does the Person have any cause of action against the

USG?

~oes the person have any cause of action against the individuals w h o captured him and caused him to be sent him t o Gitmo.

5:
6:

11 the USG going to formally apologize

to the person.

when the USG decide* that a person ha* been wrongly imprisoned, what is the internal process that happens to look and the mistakes that were made in putting the guy in jail.
7: Secretary England said yesterday that in this case there is a possibility that new information arrived of the 2 112 years enat proved the person was not an enemy combatant. How often will each prisoner be given a review? Surely not just once. what happens if new evidence cornea .in the day after the prisoner finishes his review? Does he have to wait another year for the USG to decide that he we innocent.
8: Finally, land this is the question I get asked the most often) why does the government have lawyra looking at these caaes and "helping" the tribunal but the prisoner are not allowed to have a lawyer? IS

I hope these are clear enough. ~ e t know if you need an-re me details. Right now it looks like I will be on Sunday niqht ac 10 t o discuss but that may change.
Thank*
Tin
Tim"= 3. Bad*

Hackbird Technologies Inc 13900 Lincoln Park Dr.
s 1. u ee
so0

Sent:

Thursday, September 03, 2 0 0 .

8:12 M

To: Tiin cads Subject: HE- Follow-up

- Meeting with SecDeE o 9-8-04 f
t i m e you took to write this.

in - I do appreciate the

m m e 1 1 briefing was added at the last minute (1 still don't know why: and bad to be e
squeezed in. others lost time off their presentation because of . This definitely creates a problem as IC relates to a & A t h e . I don't work with the briefers directly thus don't Have much input on their presentatioi but I rill pass along the comments as written.
Please paas along your questions for secretary ~ngland1n a separate mail.
1 i l l get chew to the right person £o you.

Have a great day.

o course, it is incurbent on us mili-taw arnlysia to get with our counterparts and iftake s u e we stay on point I will talk co Andy Hesming axd make sure that he understands that

1n reference to secretary s n g l a n d * ~ presentation, I have a number of rues~ions and was wondering i f there was someone- 1 can contact to gee soae more d e t a i l s . If you m l d prefer, I w i l l give you the questions and you can g e t back c o m e . I b e l i e v e that. Pox is going to t r y and run something thin weekend l a s a w i n g that it, is becomes a s t o r y ) .

Thank*
Tim

Tanur J . Eada Blackbird Technologies 1 ° ÂC 13900 Lincoln Pack Or.

OASD-PA;

Barber. Allison. C N , OASD-PA

tiny with SecDcf of 9 - 8 - 0 4

on behalf of ~ l l i ~ a r~ e~r .I - d l i k e to thank you f o r taking time out of your busy = b
schedule t o *ttend the meeting today with the Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld, Chairman Hyera and the other b r i e f e r ,
we are asking that you take

a nowent to answer the following questione f o r us so that can better plan i n the future for our outreach evasions.
11
Were the b r i e f i n g s inEori~ai.ional?

< i

KT TIMES

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H e indicates a t end of email t h a t he w i l l be on Fox sunday night t o discuss. Would i t be possible t o reply before h i s appearance?

i s e copy me on a l l responses, so I can share thein with the other Analyses that attended the meeting.

1: When the t r i b u n a l f i n d s that a person i s not an enemy combatant what happens to him?. 1 he i l l h a d i n ca.ptivicy? z t so why? mare IS he returned to-where he was picked w or h i s home country?
:

Mould that person be compensated by tbà crsg foe che time he w e denied hie freedom? DOthe person have any cause of a c t i o n against t h e USG7

3:
4:

Does the person have any cause of action againec t h e individuals utic captured him and caused him to be sent him Co Gitw.
5:

IS the "SG going t o formally tpo1ogne to the person.

6 - When the OSG decides Chat a person has been wrongly -imprieoned, what i s t h e internal process that bppena to look and t h e mistakes that were made i n putting the guy i n j a i l .

7 : secretary ~ n g l a n d a i d yesterday that i n t h i s case there is a p o s s i b i l i t y that new s i f o r , arrived of the 2 1/2 years t h a t proved t h e person uoc not an enemy conbatant, p r r o n w be given a r . v i . w f 5r, u.y noe jue: onca. Wlw= h a p p i n If new d e comfe* in the day after t h e prisoner f i n i s h e s his review? ~ o e s have to w a s he o c h e r year £o the OSG Co decide >bat he wae xumenc.
How often tri.11 .ad7

e:

Finally, land t h i s i a the queacion I get asked the moat often) why doe. have lawyers looking at these cases and ¥helping
18

the govecrwenfc

HY TIMES

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t h e t r i b u n a l but t h e p r i s o n e r are not allowed to have a lawyer? I hope these are c l e a r enough 1'et m know i f you need anymore d e t a i l * e now i t looks l i k e I m i l be en sunday night a t 1 0 t o discuss but that may change ~ight Thanks Till T i m r J . Ea& Blackbird Technologic. Inc 9 0 0 Lincoln P e r k D r .

rim

-

I do a p p r e c i a t e t h e time you took t o write t h i a .

The AbaU b r i e f i n q was added a t t h e laat minute ( I Â ¥ t i ldon't; know why) and had to be iqueetcd i n . Others l o s t time off their p r e s e n t a t i o n because of i t This d e f i n i t e l y cream8 a problem as I t r e l a t e s t o 0 L A time. I d o n ' t work with the b r i e f e r 0 d i r e c t l y thus don't have much input on t h e i r presentations b u t I w i l l pass along Lhe comments as w r i t t e n . Plaaee pass along your w e s t i o n s for Secretary England in a sapara:e email. I w i l l g a t thorn t o t h e l i g h t person for you.

-.-..r ~ g i n a lMessage" O
c
prom in ads iumiica md as Sent Wednesday September To W)
v
u " 7

08

~QOA 8

51 PM

h
RE

Subject

i LTC Follow-up

-

OASD PA

Barber. ~lliaon CIV, WD-PA Meeting with SecDef of 9-8-04

very goad s e s s i o n today If I had air c f l t i c i a m i n would be Charlie bell-a brief I am n o t sure what he MB eaying t h a t would be u s e f u l f o r u s AC we appear on TV I chink all. f us  t h à § COD (no nwtfr from w h a t i n h i i n i ~ C t i t i o n )dote tvaryc.hl.ng hunmn.1~

p o s s i b l e t o allow i c a personnel t o vote rrom my s t a n d point, I g a t t h e m e t out of t h e m s o h e t h e briefer leaves time for queaclon~at: the end A couple of t h e b r i e f e r a I do noc know what kind of guidance you give them befoca t h e s e sessions d i d not do t h i s but 1 recommend that they be t o l d Co allow at lease 1/3 of t h e tine for queafciorS of course i t i e incumbent o n ua m i l i c a t y a n a l y s i s t o gee w i t h our counterparts and make

BY TIMES

7971

w are =*king e

that you take a -"e t o ."swer the €0110~i westions can b t c e r plan in the futuze Ear our Cmcreacl, ..in. **os

for us so that

"e

Paul E VaUely

f :@Imr m
Sent: Tiiesoav. SepWmCe C7. 2034 10 44 AM TO. Pan vale v

-

SubJect:RE: Emaalng: vallelypaul

Yes, They are my agent for speaking engagements.

Paul, is this a speakers bureau and are you now a member of this?

Public Affairs ((too
Fax

'-

KeDoler Associates Sneakers Bureau KeDDler Main &~pIer on C m u ~ Search Keopler Contad Koppler About KeDDier Pau\LVa!!& ~opic Areas : Global Pers~ectives Speaker Bio Speech Clips andfor Speaker Demos coming soon Fee RmQe: Please-. "Please note that while this speaker's specificfee falls within the range posted above, speakerfees are subject to change without notice. For the most up to dale information, please contact your Keppierrepresentative." Select Another Speaker Abagnale. Frank Adams, Hunter "Patch" Adam8 Scott Search by Last Name... Adelman, Ken Afterburners Seminars Alessandra, Tony Alston, John Amos, Wally Anderson, Harry Anderson, Howard Anderson, MitchellAnderson, Toben Archer. Ron Amot, Dr. Bob Asmus, Barry Austin. Nancy Babbitt. Bruce Baktacci, David Ballad, Robert Bancrofl,Ann Barlow, Ed Barr, Bob Barry. Dave Bauer, Or Jeff Baxter, Meredith Bean,Alan Beckel, Bob Beckwrth, Harry Belasco, James Bench. Johnny Biafra, Jello Bias. Dr. Lonise Birch, Elizabeth Black. Michael Ian Blackwell. Roger Bianchard. Ken Bianchard, Marjorie Bleier, Rocky fllumenthal, Ira Booth. Nate Borysenko. Dr. Joan Bostwick, Barry Bouton, Jim Bradt, Gary Breashears, David Brennan, ChristineBridges. Steve Brdes, Dr. Judith Broder, David Brody, Jane Brokaw, Tom Broome, Michael Bmtt. Boris Brown, Les Bryant, Rev. Jamal-Harrison Brzezinskl, Zblgniew Buchanan, Pat Buchhote Todd Buckingham, Marcus Buffmgton, Perry Burrus, Dan Burton LeVar Butcher. Susan Butts, Rick Buxman, Karyn Calhmn, Joe Calloway. Joe Canheld, Jack Canton, James The Capitol Steps Cappiello. Frank Caflson, Richard Carney, Jay Carroll, Jim Carroll, John Carter. President Jimmy Carter. Rosaiynn Cassis, John Cathcart. James Cathcart, Jim Chavez, Fernando Chavez, Linda Chnnenne. Or LawrenceChuck D Clark. Dan Clarke, Jamie Clark. Joe Clark, Mary Higgins Clark-Diggs, Joetta Clement, Bill Clifford,Christine Clifl, Eleanor Coey, Nancy Coffee, Captain Gerald Cohen, Anthony Connellan, Tom Conner. Bart Conway, Kellyanne Cooper, Anderson Corcoran. Barbara Corddry. Rob Convin, Jeff Cousteau, Jean-Michei Craig, Jim Crawford, Roger Crier, Cathenne Crim, Mort Croce. Pat Cronin. John Csonka. Larry Cuomo, Andrew Currid, Cheryl Curry. Bill Dale, James Davis, Angela Davis, Michael Dawson, Len Dawson, Roger Dean, John Dees, Morris Deford, Frank DeGeneres, Ellende Klerk, F. W. Oem, Harry S. Diallo. Kadiatou Ditka, Mike Dole, Bob Donaldson, M I ~Donohue, Lynn Dove, Rita Downs, Hugh Dryden, Mack DuBowsUi. Sand1 Simcha Dychtwald, I Or Ken Dychtwald,Maddy Kent Eagles. Gil Earte. Sylvia Elchelberger. Chip Elkenberry & Tucker. Jill & Michael Eisen, Rich Eilerbee. Linda Enberg, Dick Eruzione, Mike Eubanks, Bob Eversmann, Sgt. Matt Ewing, Geoffrey Farber, Steve Feliciano. Jose Ferraro, Geraldine Fincher, D u m d Fineman. Howard Firestone. Roy Fitch. Captain Oenny Flagg, F a m e Flower, Joe Flying FishConsultingTeam Foco, Zonya Foley, MC Ford, Lisa Franken, Al Freedman, Harry Freiberg, IK JacKie Freiberg. Kevin Frey, James Frum, David Gandhi, Arun Gardner. Chris Garfield, Charles Geist, Sam Genetski, Robert George, Phyllis Gibson, Charies Giovanni, Hikki Gttomer. Jeffrey Gold, Tracey Goldberg, Jonah Goodman, Ellen Gordon, Ed Gore. Amanda Grace. Nancy Graves, Earl Jr.

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MY TIMES

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Gray John Grwnlaw, Linda Gregory. Bettina Gmhes, Warren Gulnaume, Robert Gumier. -an Girto. Larry G-rnoel. Greg G u m Mo'ra Habe. Fred Haley George Hall. Doug hammer. Michael hamm, M a Hanna, Jack nansen. Mark Vctor harari, Oren Harrell. Kehh rianis, Bev Harris, J m Hawnome Jennifer Heao Heaiy Bernad ne Hel er. Dick henry, Ed Herman Roger hestsn Charhon Hightower, Jim Htllary, Peter Hirschfeld. Bob Hitzges, Vicki Hotloway, Brian Hoist, Art Hoover, Gary h mpnreys, Suzie hutson, Don T, Ice Girls. Indgo ingranam, _aura Iwn, Da.e ives, Stephen IWS Mo y Jackson. Kwame Jacobs Char es Jarnieson,Alexanara Janke. Michael Anthony ~ a i s e nDan Jer. Richam Jenner. Bruce doh", O.ivia hewon ~onnsonEaw n 'Magic" Jones Dew.n .ones. Terry Joper-Kereee, "ac-ie JLOO.Naomi Karl. Jonatnai Kas cn ~ o h n Keane. Gen Jam Keil.of Garrison Kennedy Kerry Kennedy. Roben F . .ir Kenneay Tea Jr Kennedy'Townsena Kath sen Keyes Alan K ng Beriice King, Bi tie Jean Kmg, Martin A h e r . l h l King Yolanda K me, Pegoy Knight Robert K o c i Ed Kondracne. Mon Kozo. Jonathan Kranz Gene Kregel Dr. Q o x n Kruoshi John Kulner. Laurence LaDbke. W noia Lansky. Doag .app Dr Janet LaRoche, Lorem Lasoroa Tommy -ee. Sp-tie -e.and Karen ..emon, Peter Lencioni Patrick Levine Ka'ny -evy. Maw Lev..s. Jerry -iaoy G Goraon L nu eher An L.op, Dobg Little. Ricn ~ombam Virce " r Love. Boo -0ve ine Level.. J m -0Verde. Vary Macinms Joseph Macnay hawey Maguire FranK Manning Arc1.e Marsion. Cam Marine?. Tom McCann Jim McCartny Coiman McC anahan. Rue McOargh. E.eei McGowem Amb George Meese Ed# n Meltzer Brad Mern l Roger Me1ca.i. C W Miles, Franh MI er, Or Wii Mtchell Ano!ea Mtcnel George Mrtcneil W Mofaes, EsaiMorqan, Joan Mondaie. Waler Moore Angel0 Moore. GeoHrey Maose. Cnaries Morr s J.m M o m Jm'The RooNe"Morrison, Ian Mos Def fyotley. Byron Mi,m e . Co one' Miie Naber, Jonn hava Gregory Navarrene Ruben Neifen 3r. Marianne Neuhauser, Peg Noll, Chuck Noonan, Peggy Nowille, Deborah O'Bnen, Soledad Olmos, Edward James Olson, Kyle Orley. Flip Ornish, Dr. Dean Omstein, Norm Page. Alan Pagonis. Gus Palmer, n i n m Pancero ~ . Par-sse Alan Parrte John Dan. Jerry The sassing Zone P a ~ harry Peoersen. I I~ Captain 3 Laura Peppers Oon Pe'mns. Denn s Pfi_g JacK-e Pcciotto. Cn ef Riciaio PK~ P nsq. 5 Drew P scateila Joe Plana. %ny Pooesta C o m e Po% r John Poscente Vmce Powers. "ern Pntcheh LOJP^ h e w PJICH Jerry Piatnam Howard Quaye. Dan Quinn Jane I Bryant Raoanov C Anka Ratner, Dan Razeghf Ancrew Reaves Chucn Rees Dawo Reichnelc, FreoerIcK Qemnerat dwe Rccniut Peter R 'tan Jeremy R goy Cathy R. ey. Pat R.prfen B. I)' R wen Ca.. .r Q TZO. Steve Rooenson ~eaineRon.ison,Broom RODnson Ken RoDmon Peter Roge's Mama Roqers, Mcnae Rosç R o w 4 Runeper LOJS Saoato. Larry Saaat Jehan Safire. W am St dames. -yn Sa.go Or Peter Sa z, Jell Sammoi. B I Santiago Esrneralda Savage, Terry Scne~-aCnaries Scn app M he Scnm.dt Ken Schoeder Patncra Scni. z Dr W 11 am Scn_t.?.P e w Scmem Greo Sco~crof*Brent Scroas JBI Tne Second C lv Shafer Ross Shao ro Ron Snaw Jack Shellon Angela Shelton ~ener;%u~h Sheoard Judy hey Donna Shula Don Siege1 Dr Beime Simmons Richard Sirnuson Alan SlaD. Stan Slutskv Jeff Smllev Tavis Snvdennan Dr Nancy Somers, Suzanne ~pnngmann, Christopher Spurtoik, Morgan Stahl, ~ e s l e ~ ~ t a n a l aDr. , nd Genestaten. Bobbie Stein, Ben Stetne, Jim Stossei, John Straker, Wendy Stroup, Keith Strossen, Nadine Suarez, Ray Sullivan. Dr. Louis Summfl, Pat Sutherland. Buzz Swoopes, Sheryl Tale, Rick Telnami, Shibley Thicke, Alan Thleman, LeAnn Thredgold. Jeff Thurmon, Dan Tingle, Jimmy Tone, Joe Totenberg, Nina Tracy. Brian Treacy, Michael Treadway, Bob Triilin, Calvin Trudell, John Tunney. Jim Turock. Art Turow, Scott Tyson, Kelsey Underhill, Paco Vatleiy, PaulVan Leer. Darryl Varney. Stuart Ventura, JesseVidmar. Peter Viesturs, Ed Vitale, Paul Wahl, Erik Walker, Rebecca Walker, Rick "Doc" Wallace. Chris Wallace, Marcia Walsh, John Warner, Malcolm-Jamal Warner. Margaret The Water Coolers Weathers, Dr. Beck Weddington. Sarah Weinstein, Mall Wesiheimer, Dr. Ruth W i c o m b , Chns White-Ginder, Jeanne Whittaker, Tom Wild, David Wilder, L Oocglas Wilklns, Roger Williams, Armstrong Williams. Barry Williams, Gary Williams, Jody Williams, Lisa Williamson, Desi Williams, Pat Winget, Larry Winston, Michael Wood. Sharon Woodward, Bob Wrlght, Evan Wurtzel, Elizabeth Wyche. Sam Yoba, Malik Young, Steve Zach. David Zander. Benjamin Zia, Helen Ziglar, Zig Zinn, Howard Other Topic Areas Business Diversity Entertainment Global Search by Topic... -------Adventure
2B

MY TIKES

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PerepectlvesHealthcare InspirationSports Paul E Valiely The senior military analyst for FOX News Channel and guest on many nationally syndicated radio talk shows, Paul E. Vallely retired in 1991 from the US. Army as Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army, and Pacific in Honolulu, Hawaii. He.serveda distinguishing career in the Army, serving in many overseas theaters including Europe and the Pacific Rim Countries as well as two combat tours in Vietnam, He has served on U S security asslstance missions on civiiian-military relations to Europe, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Indonesia and Central America with in-countryexperience in Indonesia. Columbia. El Salvador. Panama. Honduras and Guatemala. Biography Paul E. Valtely was born in DuBois. Pa. He retiredin 1991from the US Army as Deputy Commanding Generai. US Armv. Pacific in Honolulu. Hawaii. General Valletv Graduated from the US Militaw Acaaemy at West Po nt and was wmmissioned n the Army 1961 serving a disnngushng career of 32 years fn lne Army He serve0 n many overseas theaters to ncluoP Europe and tne Pacific R m as Co-~ntr-es wcil as two combat t o m in Vietnam h e has s e m on US secuntv ass stance missons on civilian-military relations to Europe Japan Korea, Thailand, Indonesiaand central America with in-country experience in Indonesia, Columbia, El Salvador Panama Honduras and Guatemala

in

General Valleiy is a graduate of the InfantrySchool, Ranger and Airborne Schools. Jumpmaster School. the Command and General Staff School. The IndustrialCollene of the Armed Forces and the ~ r m War co ,696 H s cornoat service n Vietnam included positions as infantry company y commander, Intel !gene officer operations o'fcer. military advisor and amedfr-camo He nus over ifteen ( ' 5 ) years experience in Spec ai Operations Psychoog cal and C i n MilitaryOperations He was one of the first nominees for Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations under President Reagan. From 1982-1986, he commanded the 3514 Civil Affairs Command that included all Special Forces, Psychological Warfare and Cimi Military units in the Western United Slates and Hawaii, He was the first President of the National PsychologicalOperation$ Association. His units participated in worldwide missions in Europe, Africa, Central America, Japan, Solomon Islands, Guam. Belgium, Korea and Thailand. He has served as a consultant to the Commanding General of the Special Operations Command as well as the DOD Anti-Drug and Counter -Terrorist Task Forces. He also designed and developed the Host-Nation Support Program in the Pacific for DOD and the State Department Most recently, he has in-country security asslstance experience in El Salvador, Columbia and Indonesia in the development of civil-military relations interfacingwith senior level military and civilian leadership.

-

General Vaieiy is a mi itav anaiyst for FOX News Channel and is a guçs many nationally on syndicated -adlo la k snows h e .s also a guest lecturer on the War on Terror He is the Military Committee Chairman for lne Center for Security Pol cy in Washington. DC He hasjust w a d o r e d a book ent lei Enogame . Blueprint for Victory for tinning the War on Terror Back to Top

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Subnet

Outreach Mtiitary~nalysts

W e d m 0 0 4 11:15AM Wed 9/8/2004 12.00 PM

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%

-N 1G

NOTES

RECRWED BY THE ClAiN 157.3 RECRUITED WTHECIAWMLEINTHEUS N W A WAYNE S I M W W BECAME PAR1 OF ASPECIN O P E R 4 V O W G M W THAT WAS W T ONLV PRWAREDTO 1OJAI. DIE FORAMERW Wl W L E CONDUCTING IUaTEL W S WERE PRWAREDTO OE ARRESTW A M S.1 IN A1 UNTIL R E M M C BY 1dEIR CONTROLLERS

SIMMONS I S R I W I N G WllM HIS SIMPLE MESSAGE S l W RESlRlCTlNG THE A 0 U l Y O F W CIA AND OTHER U S INTELUGENCEAGENCIES TO OPEFATE INSUE AM2 OUlSIDE WE UNITE0 STATES,OR FACETHE CATSTROPHIC CONSEQUENCESOF TERRORISM

As Uvankfulaw am that Moqlada al.Seits feWlmn 4 d m e n d In a Moo@yandde3tmth Mhfmt k Imam ~h ~ r m ~ m q u e N4af. our gratiiude k tempered by the reamb~ I Smtelrin was not an bdated event Lrke al. c h I~ Sad, h m d , me mmque MS m a b d by lmn and w e m l y p n of lmn'8 latest eflofl to &stat4me Iraq and aehwe strategic damnam m 1 Mlddle East end Cmral Asm. M

LL Gan, Mclmrqamd Ma.h. ValMy, Me from W U S &r Fom a d Amy, m e lWam m l ~ k a r y m a ~fw ra e D ci , ts Fox W m d wumors ot'En4gam. The B l h x V~m in t W a r m Temf IRe3mIY. Wl w ~ ~

------ End of Forwarded Message

Bill, FYI !!!I I chopped up your email a bit andfowarded it along to my contact at Centcorn. Please let me know if you do not hear from someone within a reasonable amount of time,

My oleas-re sPeaklqQwith you and my appreciation l o YOJ taking tnis request. See for
below. Please keep me In tne loop as P liae to know the progress. a LTC Bi I C w a n (USMC Ret~rea) Fox News Retired M, itary Analyst h t t p : I / w loxnews corn1sto~~0.2Q33.60314,W.html

I'm planning atrip to Iraq in late September. One of #he~WIWS like to do Is meet up rd with General Patreus and giw him some GOOD mverage with Fox. Could you point me to the right DoD person to fadlitate my meeting with him? Thanks much,
Rq'Y.

BiU

.a""bsa,

Brookes' NY Post column:"Imagine Fidel Castro with W

r0,w

VwwwWs Sunday Referendum"

IMAGINE FIDEL CASTRO WITH OIL By Peter Brookes August 13, 2004 SUNDAY is a red-letter day for democracy and for the price of oil: Vene zuelans vote on a referendum on whether to recall President Hugo Chavez.

-

Long a friend of the United Stales and since 1958 one of Latin America's most stable democracies, Venezuela stands at a crossroads, headed for either democracy or Cuban-style socialism. Elected fair and square in 1998, Chavez took office with sky-high popularity on a reform platform. But he has since donned the cloak of political strongman, run the economy inta the ground and helped roil world oil markets. Plus, he's a good buddy of Cuba's Fidel Castro. 'Dictator" isn't used very often to describe Latin American leaders anymore beyond Castro, that is. But Chavez, a cashiered army colonel who was once jailed for his leading role in a 1992 military coup, could make it two. Though now highly unpopular (30 percent approval), Chavez may well survive the noconfidence vote. Polling is expected to be rife with voter intimidation, fraud and other voting irregularities. Certainly, his record to date makes that chicanery seem likely, He has already rewritten the Constitution to give himself more power, sucked up power over the slate oil company (PDVSA) and stacked lower and Supreme Courts).
He's also made a good start on purging the armed forces, misusing them for partisan political purposes and social programs. Threats to freedom of the press include physical attacks on journalists.

-

The fractious opposition has mostly been peaceful though a botched, bloodless coup nearly toppled Chavez two years ago. But his misrule has pushed political and class tensions to such a
IS

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fever pitch that some fear civil war. El Presidente has also made a shamblesof V e n e z ~ e lalready impoverished economy. Per~s capita income has dropped 25 percent since 1998, propelling the economy backward to the 1950s. Inflation is running at a household budget-busting 30 percent, unemployment hovers at 18 percent and 33 percent live in extreme poverty despite massive social programs.

..

.

And that's had worldwide repercussions, because Venezuela is a major oil-producing nation the world's fifth-largest, with one of the biggest energy reserves outside the Middle East. It provides 15 percent of US.oil needs, making it one ofour top four oil suppliers (after Canada, Saudi Arabiaand Mexico). Even now, the possibility ofanother Venezuelan oil strike continues t keep the oil market o skittish, helping keep prices at record $45-a-barrel levels. Adding insult to injury, Chavez has also encouraged OPEC to raise its prices, too. In one ofhis anti-American fits of rhetorical ram. El F'residcnte has even threaieiied to cut off oil sumlies to ht the United States. T a would certainly he a blow 10 theU.S. economy (even with this week's welcome Saudi announcement of increased oil supply.)

-

But then, Chavez is a big chum of Cuba's communist Cold War-holdover, Fidel Castro (He's also been friendly in the vast with Iraa's Saddam Hussein and Libya's Moammar Khaddafv.)In . . . exchange for getting Caracas oil on favorable terms, Havana is providing doctors and teachers . and military advisers. Venezuela is also kneedeep in Cuban intelligence(DG1) officers.

.

There's no telling what Castro's political plans for Venezuela might be. Chavez already has stated his desire to unite Latin America in a Castro-inspired campaign against US. policies And US, officials have expressed concern that Chavez's government is supporting the Colombian narcoierrorisl FARC rebels. Democracy is under assault. Chavez is a throwback to the military strongmen who once ruled Venezuela. What Chavezcalls his "Bolivanan Revolution" (after Latin American independence leader Simon Bolivar) is in fact fashioned in part on Castro's Cuban revolution. Washington has supported the referendum as a democratic solution to Venezuela's political turmoil - one that offers the ~ossibilitv oeaceful regime chanee. But with Chavez in charm. of -. it would be shocking if the voting were free and fair.Unfettered international election monitorine should be a orereauisite.but it's unlikelv. Chavez has insisted on stringent controls over any poll observers. The (Jimmy) Carter Center and Oruantzation of Amencan States will field teams. but the European Union declined to pa&ipaic under these restrictions. (In a hyster-cal effon to add "internationalcredibility" to the referendum,Chavez's election monitor invitee list does include Darbra Streisand and Michael Moore.)

. .

If the referendum turns out to be flawed -or if Chavez resorts to "extra-constitutional" actions 1 6

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the global community should withhold Venezuela's international privileges until the democratic process is honored. For instance, the United States should encourage the World Bank to suspend all loans to the Venezuelan government. And the OAS should consider suspending Venezuela's membership in the group.

.

Latin America has made great strides in embracing freedom and democracy. Today, 22 of 23 Latin American countries are considered to be democratic. (Cuba is the exception.) But some siaies. especially those with leftist-leaning leaders and economic problems (such as Ecuador and Areentlna). miaht folow Venezuela's oath. This would be a significant setback for the hemisphere and itspeople The US. and the international wmmumw should stand shoulder to shoulder in defense of Venezuela's proud democratic traditions and aspirations. With other Latin American democracies leading the way. the United States should help ensure that the term Latin .. American dictator is relegated to the dustbin of history once and for all.

-

Peter Brookes, a Heritage Foundation seniorfellow, served in Latin America while on active duly in the U.S.Navy.

HY TIMES

NKN YORK POST

TSRBOR TRADECRATT: Bin Laden Aided by Iran, Heibolleh.

BY PETER BROOKES

-

Auguftt 5, 2004 THE mother lode of intelligence recently plucked from a1 Qaeda coniputexs 1 Pakistan shows that we're not dealing only with lethal terrorists, but highly capable BpookS a m well.

--

he quality of a1 weds's infornation on cargoes in l e Vork City and Washington, D.C., iu indicates a covert intellzgetice-colleccioo capability on par with some of the world's best spy services.
he FBI estimates that there are aa many as #ever-1 hundred a1 ~aeda-associatedextremiszs in the m t e d states. 1t could be a deadly mistake not to take recent terrorist threat8 aerioualy.

a1 Qaeda's casing operations were certainly serious. I f operative* collected more than 5 d i g 1 photos, docwenta and drawings. They detailed building layouts, security and construct~onand pedestrian and vehicular traffic flow.
resp"dexa such hqi.S O,tl. many people . possible. a

They noted employee routines and watering hole@. And they mapped the location of the first p 1 X e am3 €l departmnts a11 With n eye to k i l l i ~ . as

-

Bottom line: It's top-notch intelligence work that would m k e mny clandestine service Bland up and take notice.

"oreover, the intrusive, coordinated. long-running caaings went undetected. working under o r ma couriers and delivery people, a1 Qaeda opccativea were able to observe and enter the buildings without a l a m n g security personnel. ~ecruited terrorist agents may h a w even been employees of the targeted facilities, making i t a real inside ¥job (Some of the casing notes were in ~nglish.1 ~lthoughthe information seem. to have been collected a sew years ago, it's unlikely it went only to t h e computers seized in ~akistan. he smart money w y a this intelligence was ihaied with others in Terror Land, too.

Beware: m i s surveillance information has likely been updated by other a1 meda cells it w a s first acquired. ~ n i t may be tied into the other streams of intclliwice d i w e i n on h e against U.S. targets this cunmier.
I s i n g the terror level to *hl,gh,. the mwrtment of Homeland Security was a p t - e . zt would be foolish to assume these plots have been canned.

But where did a1 me& learn to conduct such thorough sleuthing? ~ o c ~urprisingly,it had help from the usual suspects.

*caw.=,. .re

xran- he 9 / 1 1 coçitiiçifingers ran aa having trained and supported  ¥ card* as far back a 1992. The Iranian Rtvolucion*ry Guard Cores ar.d the Ministry of IntellLgenn and t h > ~ k :hl.Zve. w i t 9 .tr.,, . s ne"tt=x.orists, DrOvidI"" i"te:l,.?e"re. raining, funding and macena1 support.

Reannber the wcpulsion of rania an (faux) diplotats for intelligence-collection activities laat month in New York City? That was the third set of Iranian epics asked to leave the
1 8

V.S.

in-1

i n t h e l a s t two years f o r casing p o u i b l e t e r r o r i s t t a r g e t s . [see Hew York Post oped, "Spooks, Lies and Videotape," ~ u l y 2004.) me ~raniansmight we11 oe sharing t h i s 6. With a 1 oaed.

Heibollah: The conunraion a l s o mentioms chat a 1 axe& received t r a i n i n g from the backed t e r r o r i s t group ~ e z b o l l a hi n the e a r l y 1990s i n ~ e b a n o n ' s t e r r o r i s t snake Bekaa Valley. "Bin Laden showed p a r t i c u l a r .interest i n l e a r n i n g how to use truck iuch as the one lused by Hezbollahl th*t k i l l e d 2 4 1 Marines in Lebanon i n 1983.' report notes.
The truck bomb technique was l a t e r

Iranianpit. t h e

bombs
the

used a g t i n o t t h e World Trade Center 11993). t h e American barracks at Khobnr Towers, Saudi Arabia I19961 and t h e U S. efflbaasies i n Kenya
and Tanzania ,1998).

Htzbollah'a b m b t r a i n i n g for a 1 gaçd doubtlef included how to aucceaafully pick and ! c a t a r g e t to ensure t h e maximum carnage. Inoce: There are also Hezbollah operatives in t h e U S . who might be a s s i s t i n g a 1 Qaeda, coo.1

Both new and o l d e r (but s o l i d ) i n t e l l i g e n c e About  ¥ Qaeda p l o t s i n d i c a t e a perfect terrorist a t o m forming over the homeland t h i s mummer. UofortunAMly, a 1 meda has gotten and may be s t i l l g e t t i n g i n t e l l i g e n c e help from both ~ e z b o l l a hand =ran. AB we look at i n t e l l i g e n c e r e f o m here at hone, w must r e a l i z e t h a t the only way we can prevent another e a t 1s t o e n t h a t our i n t e l l i g e n c e i s b e t t e r than a1 Oaçda-s

-

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Peter Brookea, a Heritage Foundation senior fellow, is a C m veteran

E-mail

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Jim:

Not sure ifthis is possible, but Iam going to forward yow request to the Pentagon.
Thank you for your service-onevet to another. All the Beat, Pete ---Original Message-.. F: whal627~mallm:whal627~ Sent: Tuesday, August 03, 2004 253 PM To: New York Post Subject: A trip at sea

Iam and Old (76) veteran of WWII (Army) and have always dreamed of spending some time on a carrier whileat sea. Iknow several years ago civilians were invited abroad under special circumstances and Iwonder If this Is still possible. Ihave "newsoaoer" credentials. Would that aet me aboard. Whom should Iwrite to? jim whaien
Thu massage(and m y associatedUtes) 1 intendedonly fortheuse UwhçB2 s that Is confidential H you are not the nçnu addrms~ should not d i s w m l n f , distribute or copy t h enull you h Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of Peter Brookesand do not necessarilyrepresent thou of The Heritage Foundation,

From sent To

Brookes Peter [peterw!&

+=
Best,
Pete

Subject.

PT op-ea on 9/11 Commission Report "Bumpy Road mBetter - Post ; RE Brookes
Z'k-A
MY

Security-

To: Brookes, Peter

Sub*:

RE: Bnokfs' NY Post c p d on M Conimtslcn R e W : l

-Bmw Road ID Better Security'

Peter, I am very familiar with you and your work. I read your column's and watch your appearances on Fox News. It was nice to receive the email from you. 1 was surprised

-

FErZTT ProgramSpecialist
Public Affairs p] (, r n Telephone- tali
om- of the -eta
o f -

--Orqinal MessageÑ From: Brookes, Peter [maHto Peter.

on 9/11 CommissionReport "Bumpy Road to Better Security"

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I do Got your n o w from Jim Carafanohere at heritage Iw b a weekly columnon the NYP Served tn the Pm>aQm 2001-2002 asDASD for Aaa-PaMo working wift LCDR In

k t .

Pater T R Bmckes Senior FeBowfor NationalSecurityAffairs and Directorof the Asian S l u m Center The Heritage Foundation 214 Massachusetts Ave NE Washin Ion DC 20002

peter brook www heritage org

Subject; RE: Brooks' W Post oped on 9111QamrisstolKepoft: ¥Cu Road to BtttBf S e w

Thank you for this. This is the first time I've received anything like this from you, please keep me on the list.

To: rook^, pet& Subject; Brookes' W Post on-cd on 9/11 Commission Report: ¥Bump Road to Better Security"

New Yolk Post
21

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BUMPY ROADTO BETTER SECURITY

By PETER BROOKES
July 23,2004 NOW mat the hatma1 Canmistion on Temnat Attacks Upon tne Unitao States. the 911 1 Commission nas reportedits fimngs a m recanmenoatons ins dirty. roIl.~pyour. shirtsleeves work Begins
After 1,200 interviews, visits to 10 countries and almost 20 months of study and deliberation, the wmmlssion has offered us prescriptionsfor preventing the next terrorist attack. But implementingthe needed national-security reformswon't be a walk in the park Egos. cash and turf are on the line. Surprisingly, most of the commission's findings weren't earth-shattering. The nearly 60Gpage report (EM 1commteslon.g~) offers a broad criticism of boththe executive and legislativebranches of government Why didn't the federal government prevent 91117 The report cites failures of imagination, policy, management and capabilities. Â ¥ Wused Cold War mindsets and tactics to deal wilh a post-ColdWar enemy.

-

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' Dasplteas many as 10 identifiableopportunities, our well-lntentbnedefforts did little to disrupt the 9/11 lot.

'The 10 commissionersconcluded that neither the Clinton or Bush administrations nor Democratic and Republican-led Congresses understood the gravity of the threat. As evidence, the last National intelligence Estimate on Terrorism was done in 1995 (with a minor update in 1997). Trw report is a so heavy on remmmenoatrone. incltoing The establishment of a Cabinet-leveldlrector of Nat onal Into rgence ana onto igence reform, more vigorous congressional oversight of tne mte Iigencewmm~nity (the Into committees am some of tne sma lest cornminces in Congress), strer5tnen ng the FBIs countenerronsm capaorlh-es and ooosting homelano secmy Despite this smorgasbord of keen ideas, there are still real challenges to implementing any reform: Too Many Blueprinte: Between various blue-ribbon panels and Congress, we now have at least five different sets of recommendations for improving our national-securiiy establishment. These Include: The ScowcroftCommission on inteliiaenca reform: the Gilmore Commission on the terrorist WMD threat: the pending intelligence-rdfo& legislation the House of Representatives; the Senate Intelligence Committee's Iraqi WMD report, and now the 9/11 Cornmasion.

in

And, oh. by the way, not all of these agreeon the way forward. ,

.

For instance, the Gilmore Commission called for the establishment of a Britimh-style MI-5 domestic intelligence agency separate from the FBI, while the 9/11 Commission instead supports improving the bureau's counterintelligence/lerrorism apparatus.

Turf Battles; Any cnange to the current national security structure is sure to be filled with lots of Kicking an0 screamno by the agencies info ved. No one wants anyone else mess ng wrth his rice Down,especially fit means a loss of stature or reso-. For instance, seven cabinet secretariesnow have hfellmencefunctions within ttieir deoartments.And agencies and a fun 80 percent of the the Defense Department owns seven of 15 miellintellgence oJogel Don?expect anyone lo give in to reform withal a rea fight (Some stakeholden S J C ~ Actm Director of Central Inteilioence iionn Mc-auoh in. are alreaav . as bacn. . ~ushina on reform efforts )

-

Timing: The last time we reorganized national security was under the 1947 NationalSecurity Act, which birthed both the CIA (from the Office of Strategic Services) and Department of Defense (from the Navy and War Departments). It took place after WwM War II, while the nation was at peace. Today, we're at war. We have to make sum that any changes to our national security and Intelligencw establishment don't undermine our security in any way while the terrorist threat persists. l h i s may not be easy to do. but it's possible. We d it vilh the establishmentof the Department of i d Homeland Security in 2003, bringingtogether 180,000employees from 20 organizations. It also lsnt likely to happen this year Congress has as few as 18 working days toft before the elections an0 it's already way beh nd on next year's spending bills Unless both charnoen reconvene after E ection Day. they won't get much oone this year Its clear that we need change in how we do national security Rut we don? need change for change's sake Moving the lines and noxes on an organizational chart to give us a warm and fuzzy feeling wont enhance O J ~ ona security Reform must be we konsioered. substant ve an0 nmely nat 9/11 caused this nation unspeakable pain. But things that hurt can also instruct. Let's just make sure we're smart enough to team the right lessons from this tragedy to ensure it never happens again. Peter Bmokes. a Hentage Foundationsenior fellow, was on the taxway a1Dulfes Airport on a United flight to San Francisco on the morningof 9/11
E-mail peterbmokes

and do not necessarily reDresem mose of The Heritage Foundation

and may contain
thr mnall

represent those of The HeritageFoundation

A y -or n

opinm Dreseniad m this email aresotaly ttiose of Peter Broohes and do riot necessarily

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FW The Idea Ispoke to you about
n a r c i n strong m e t ~ i l i t a r y n a l y s e )e n d me c h i s email and tias asked that I cry 1.0 ~ m e r e is come r e a l l y good i n f o i n c h i s email an o f f e r to h e l p ,

move chin information up as fax as possible

plus

.

Pleawe l e t m e k n o w hou you make out b r i e f i n g meetings.

Marty h&8 attended several of our most recent

m [S,

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Program S p e c i a l i s t Public A f t a i r s 1Room
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One of my security c o n s u l t a n t s ( r e t i r e d FED force p r o t e c t i o n o f f i c e r l s e n t me t h e coinments b e l o w . The use of r e t i r e d n i i l i f r y aa "drafted talent" i n the i r 0" terror make *me s e e . There nay be PR value i n developing a volunteer "chink tank" of r e t i r e d m i l i t a r y that can review problems at a d i f f e r e n t l e v e l than EC thinkers.

Take car*

---

Marty

Over t h e weekend, I had occasion to s i t downwith a number of m i l i t a r y retireem a t the
local air base.

nSmene c a t MY r r i w wade -4 K have been teaching se~r-dstmse to. gxmp of A~ engineers who w i l l be heading t o ~ r a qthis -. r The sad thing i s that these Combat Engineers w i l l be tasked with M p d u t i e s . (???GoFigure???! Wade who i s a DOD police f i r informed me of the s i t u a t i o n and he asked we i f I would à § ~ a i à him i n giving Ehase guys an edge. Therefore, 'ire have been conducting c l a s s e s foe then foe t h e l a s t couple of month.. have been assigned to t h e ~ i saae s e c u r i t y police f o r r Apparently, these combat ~ n g i n e e r a c i i i n a e r r to prepare then f o r t h e future assigned d u t i e i . The p r i d e t i t of t h e l o c a l m i l i t a r y retiree's attended ft couple at t h e c l a s s e s i s an observer. After t h e l a s t c l a s s , he i n v i t e d ue t o t h e COM f o r coffee and a b u l l s h i t
sesn~o".

While we were there. a number of other r e t i r e . à § à over t o t h e t a b l e eventuallv w had e to start pulling tables t o g e t h e r as t h e group became lacgei. The major topic of discussion was the M a r i n Iraq. Many of the individuals involved i n t h e discussion were emotional. AB t h e day progressed, t h e group started discuaaing s p e c i f i c s . I brought up t h e face that t h e vehicles were vulnerable to the threat of b v i n g g*enadea etc. thrinto the paeeenger compartment. One of the group members WJS a former mechanic. H e s a i d that that would work i n some instances, however, m y t i m e s t h e doors of t h e num-V'S have t o be removed t o f a c i l i t a t e çxi from t h e vehicle. ~ p p a r e n t l y , t h e door configuration i s not conducive to a quick d i s n u n t .

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wade brought up t h e f a c t Chat he has not seen any claymores mounted on t h e vehicles. He s a i d that w h e n he w a s i n Vietnam SOP was CO mount clayaores on v e h i c l e s i n case of an ambueh or i n t h e event, i t w a s suspected Chore was a p o s s i b i l i t y of an ambush. wade d a d chat t h i s w a s a n e i t e c c i v e method of k i l l i n g Che enemy during an ambush or I* a" ambush was suspected, c l e a r i n g the jungle.

One of t h e o l d e r irembem w h o was a during WKII indicated that he could not understand why t h e troops do not have flamc~hrowers. ~e emore by t h e flamethrower. A l s o , o n e brought up the f a c t that it appeared t h a t we "ere not using napalm.
indicated t h a t during mi11 the government, t o the beat of N Bknowlcage, d r a f t e d personnel up to t h e age of 55-60. ~e indicated that i f t h e d r a f t e e ' s ware UP m age 1 had n l i t a r y experience, 1 . e . . WI, China, eec. They were u t i l i z e d t o t r a m the untrained and a s s i s t e d i n homeland meeurity by covering m i l i t a r y i n ~ t a l l a t i o n at h a t were placed i n c a r a t a k e r s h i p when t h e personnel were deployed.
m e NWII vet - . 10

I

I was mazed ¥ t h e t r e a s u r e trove o f knowledge and experience, t h a t surrounded me i s w l a s e d t h e war i n Iraq. The retiree's groups are a n uncapped resource. m a t i f not a l l of t h e group indicated t h a t given t h e chance they would help i n m y way tliat they could.

Over the weekend, 1 had heard

I atart-ed =hi-"kina about t h e d i u e n s ~ i a n a¥ t h e con and t h e news east reoomna t h e p o s s i b i l i t y of r e e s t a b l i s h i n g the d r a f t and came up with an idoa. e n i t the draft does not t r a n s p i r e , why not give t h e vast number of m i l i t a r y and i n government r e t i r e e s an opportunity to assist i n che current s i t u a t i o n . h t h e shortage of peraoiurl and apparent lack of c o n t i n u i t y of t r a i n i n g , the W D and OPN should consider givang t h e r e t i r e e community a chance to shine. There are m y combat v and former law enforcemenc/intelligence retirees that can make a difference. z h i 3 t h a e the "Over t h e H i l l gang- i s not so far over t h e h i l l . Just look a t Runsfeld, t h e guy r 7 2 .

à news cast t h a t indicated t h a t t h e government, me m i d e r i n q the p o s s i b i l i t y of bringing back t h e d r a f t on a l i m i t e d basis. 1 r e a l l y do not know i f t h i s i s an option.

.

-

DO you think t h i e is worthwhile?

Pleaae give me your thoughts

Hem am two mom recent articles. Feel free to distribute as you see fit The Front Sbht Focus newsletter is an apoliticaldiscussion of the role of US military power. strategic and tactical. Every month for the last two and a half years I've tried to pick security and defense issues that Ifeel am being distorted by themedia or politicalfilters to the detriment of the truth. Especiallywhere that distortion adversely impactsthe morale of active and retired service members. February's piece will focus 01 the clear attempt by tne opposition party" to declare the war in Iraq as iç9. mate" ala Veinam Consider tne impact on tne returning 100,000 plus troops as tney arrive home to hear tney were 'low to' by the Commander-.n-Chiefan0 participated in an "illegitimate war". This politics as usual message cannot go unchallenged
"

I'm not a poxhwl commentator nor nave I ever comrlbutwa tme or money to a politics cause or party. but in my humble opinion no DO itiodl obpcliv (even winning the Whte 4ouse) pst~res this distortion Iraq is not Vetnam and no one should taw me victory en0 value of faltnful and nonoraole service away from our troops, You xnow. General Elsenhower orowed that the popJlatons of German towns near the Nazi aeam camps be oarsdea tiT'ougn tne fac lities He was a'ram tne German oeople would oe able to disouto the horror olthe Hoiocaust if there were no witnesses to Mmbrs madness h e tnen ordered that as manu US tmcnc as o . s . do tne tame Eismnnuupr was.. , aJvare of the nnr^ W I I . - , . . . -. m - nk . . . -. .-. -. . .. . .. ifeenlu -..-. . . . . . . . . - .. . . . .. - . -. . . reoresented in treasure and American blood. He instinctwelv knew that the sacrifice was better justified by stopping the evil that was Nazi Germany vs the stenle concept of achieving mtlitary objectives like disarming a militant Germany I hope our troops in Iraq are made aware (out chop briefings etc ) of the horror Saddam represented If they know of the mass murders and other rampant atrocities their bravery and sacrifice has stopped no politicianwill be able to take the value of their service away from them (consider that a recommendation0

.

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Have a great week! Ma*

Marty, this is such a wonderfully written article. You are very articulate. send this out t o "regular f olks".
11

Do you mind ifI

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1 " " Fax:

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OSD-PA

ÑOrigina Messaoe"l : MARTIN STRONG [ m a l l b - h r d # @ @ @ Sene Fnda Janua 30 2004 6 47 PM
Sub

a& .
s monthy newsletter

Front Sight Focus January 2004

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The C s for PreenDtivc War ae With the 2004 presidentialelection fa* approaching Americans are being subjected to a cacophony of angry and contused voices from bothends of the politic* spectmro Thecntical nature of this discussiongoes tar b o n d the lradiliooal guns vs buncrdebate At this cmaal point in Amencan ustory then: 19 adcsperale a & analysis of Amends foreign pol cy requircnenis in !he post 9 11 world ; c d for a l o g i d reality h This issue of h n t Sight t o w addressesthe hjstoncai conten of the current war on terrorandexploresthe preemptive use of Apicncas power throuph the uniateial applicationof mi i t q force known as the Rush Doctrine I t examines the passionals views of AmericansandoUersin the world community whcrimlly opposed 10 un lateralismand the use of American mgnt 10 resolve conflict i t is my conclusion !ha we, as a free and democratic nation, can no longer apply 17* century E-impean concepts of(~n1lemen'swarsand corporatediplomicy toan enemy that doeyi't fly a flag, doesnt defenda capital aod duc'.nl employ u diplomatic corps I believe that our great nation cannot sand by and re.y on hope as adefense p o l i q Americaran no longer f i g h ~ rmcitfd by Marquisof0"censbu~ niles, whilean cnem) armed %nhdevastating weapons ofmass dc;ihrecruils dedicated and fanatical warnom in the back all.t~ofCairo in b a r n mountains of Afghanistan. and

In the aftcnnathof the fim Persian Gulf War. then Undcraecretq of Defense for Policy. Paul Wolfornu drafted a a n inlcma. set ofmilitary guidelinesdetailinga new approach to national security. His brief memorandum,Defense Planning Guidance,was a routine sirareac musing that received .itLe anention in t h e first Bush Administration I1 argued for a new military and political strategy. Containment, Wolfodtz u and noted, was anobsolete relic ofthe Cold b a r . America, he wrote, should use IIA super power m > leverage to preempt me proliferation o f weapons ofmass destruction. and i f America was, in the final hs analysis, theonly n a t m capaole of effectiveh dealing wrlh the issue. so be it T i minordocument
represented the genesisofa bold and nighly conirovm~al doctrineof unilateralsupel power preemptionnow

known as the Bush Doctrine, a dynamic national security doctrine that not only threatensour enemies. but may also serve to undermine the very fabricof international relations.
The shock ofthe terrorist attacks in Seotemtwrnf 2001 o a l v a n i d the resolve of the American neo~le and . . - . . r...-.. .. handed the new Bushnominismion anopportunity to present the strategy of preemptive warm a p i t and
~ ~

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7

proper response to the reality ofworld conflict in the new millennium. In the president's first address lo the nation on thai tcmbleday nc began what was to become a scries of small strps toward a fuilv fleshed out ar*J detailed policy He announced 10 ihc world thn theUnml States would not disting~ish between ihc terrorists and the nanons wno horbored them The Amcr ca? prop c reaxed this prc-iitientwouldm be sendmg cruise missiles as a slapon the wrist, a procedure that had become common pracucedunng thc C.inton ahinisIration. On September 13" 2001. in an even clearer insight into President Busn's nev^ robust approach 10 me tenonst threai. Paul Woltowiz stated, 'I think one has to say its not just s:mply a mailer ofcapturing people and holding them accountable, but removing their sanctuaries, removing thcb support systems, ending states who sponsor terrorism." Many astute observers of foreign policy believe thai with weapons of mass destruction spreading beyond the control ofestablished First World nations it is imperative that the US engage the proliferation issue through compromise and consensus building. They argue the Cold War was won without global conflagration in just this manner, In their opinion, strong alliances and diplomatic containment is the path to peace and security. But what do we do if thisapproach fails? Terrorist organizations do not operate within the conslmct of normal international organizations. They. in fad, operate similar to organized crime and the UN is ineffective aminst an cnemv that doesn't attend meetines and doesn't recocnize the basic moral undcrpifuiinis ofdiplomacy and foreign policy. Deferring to the good &ks of an international body when deahng with terrorism u o d d result in disaster fo'ihe United States Toe Bush Doctrine seems lo DCthe 0n.y pragma1.c answer in the face of'-n.s fai;ure and the near instantaneous threat of t e m i s t atlack.
On Scptcmber 20th, 2001, President George W. Bush formally addressed a joint session of Congress while a

provide, aid, or give safe haven to terrorism. Every nation. in every region, now has a decision lo make, Either vou are with us. or vou are with the terrorists. From this dav forward. anv nation that continues to haroor or support tenwism will be regarded by t k Unncd Statci as a tiostilcrcgimc Wnh those wordithe die was cast Over tne next twehe months the Bush acminntration continued to and elements to the new doctine In h s fim Stateof thc Union addms in January 2002. Prcs dent B ~ s h o c t a i l a S M M ofa n d m0 d I t I a n and North Korea as nanons hostile to America An a*is of Evil that alliance In June harkened back lothe dzvs of world War Two and the infamous German. Italian. Ja~anesc 2002. during a graduati& speech at West Point, President Bush called on all ~ m e r & n s be resolute and to prepare for preemptive American action when necessary to defend liberty and lives. On September I F , 2002, the formal national security strategy of the Bush administration was published. It confirmed the intentions ofthe new Bush Doctrine in great detail. America was finally taking off the gloves. The American public, sa might be expected in a nation politically split down the middle, wa* ambivalent about the basic nrcmisc of the Rush Doctrine. Few Americans arc soft on tetrorism and most a w e d with the president's objective to protect the nation. However, since thedeclaration of war on tenor in 2001, some Americans have vehemently rejected the new doctrine of preemptive war as mogant and dangerous. Many Congressional and European leaders went even further in their condemnation. In fact, only six days after the September 23,2002, publication ofthe Bosh Doctrine in the National Security Strategy ofthe United States, former Vice President Al Gore attacked the doctrine durinc a soeech in San Francisco. He oredicteddin u , consequences tor America tf L i power was abused If me Congress approves me Iraq rcsolnion y'it proposed by the administration it is simultaneous v cmting the precedent for preemptive action anywhere. anyi -nc this as an' future president so dec des. Gore said As the shock of 9-1 1 wore ON critics ofihe

shaken nalion watched and waited. He made it clear that Paul Wolfowitz had not misspokenduring his earlier Pentaeon statement. A new American foreicn mlicv was oresented: "We will oursue nations that ,

".

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new doctrine began to make themselves heard, carefully avoiding the appearanceof attacking the miliiar, while A m ~ i c a n wereti@htingin Afghaniam and forward deployet' in the Philippines and the P e n w Gulf s However, the Commander-in-Chief was fair w e , In his famous Axis of Evil speech, George W Bush made his views crystal clear "We'll be deliberate. yet lime is not on our side 1will not wait ondent.. while dangers gather 1 4 1 1 nm stand by, as penisdraw closer and closer The L'luted States of America will not pennit the world's most dangerous regimes to threaten us with the world's most destructive weapons " Thecase has been made by the president's chief political critic. Democrat Howard Dean. He believed that the time had not come to toss aside the international community in a headstrong rush to war. In a2003 online article the aspiring presidential candidate viscously attacked the Bush Doctrine and the Bush administration's handling of foreign policy: "The next president will need to undo the work of this band of radicals currently controlling our foreign policy - who view the Middle East as a laboratory for their experiments in democracy-building.' Governor Dean goes en to add, " ..onday one of a Dean Residency, I wili reverse this attitude. I will tear up the Bush Doctrine,and I will steer us back into the community of nations." Regardless of your political viewpoint . one thing isclear, the2004 race f o t h e WhiteHouse wili determine if America continues the policy of preemptive defense or returns to an inmaionalistapproach to fending off impending threau.

There are many arguments for and against the BushDocuine of precmplive war. The fierce intensity of these opposing positions is palatable fully two months before the real political combat of the presidential race begins. The Bush Doctrine is the national security policy of the United Stales. In support of that policy, in speech after speech, the Bush administrationhammers home America's inherent right of selfdefense. The administration n o i m to Article Sl ofthe United Nations charter as international sirooort of that r i g h t . ~ u t while the UN charter do& acknowledge nation's right to self-defense, the chart; clearly docs not sanction preemptive attacks even in self-defense. Especially when a nation only thinks it may be attacked at some undetermined time in thefuture. The conflict in the UN language is difficult to reconcile. The right of self-defense has historically been triwred by the clear massing of offensive enemy forceson a border or, a in the am& by Imperial Japan on Pearl Harbor, by an actual attack. The Bush Docirine argues s that new. un~arallelcddestructive tcchnoloev. in the hands of roeue states and terrorisis. defies historical referencesand definitions of early warmna Aoolicv of allowinc a firs smkeacamsl Amcnca in theace of ncanonscf mass destruction 1s out of the question N o Amenc-in President can 8 c i . q the conscquencci of such a pol cy a i a basis for a I h natmna security docinbe

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Once again the president's detractors and opponents fail 10 accept the adminisiration's comprehensive logic
I preemptive defense Madeleine Albnghl former Secretary of Stale in the Clinton dmmistration. has frc0uent.v voiced itraw concerns about h e ootcnnd neeanve cfTects of the o w l \ sim~listic Bush Doctnne In mlvzine the war in Iran and its connection to the war on terror she contended that the current efforts in . Iraq fnghlensand divides the world. Ins:& of ,imply asking others to oppose At Qaeda, [the president] nou asks tiemto oppose A1 Qaeda. SJppon the inmion of an Arab counm, and endorse thedocwine of memotion. all as Dan of a smele oackace Faced with this choicemanv who ~taunchl! oonose Al Oaeca have nevertheless decided that the" do not want to be "with"the United States " Will the ~ k ~ o c t r i n e h tear

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apart alliancesand diplomatic relationships, rendering the Middle Last a quag.inre of ~ a r a n d deathq Or w-ll lawr generations ?ail his bola new d o m n e a s a turn ng point in uorld histo< Will deurge W Bush be remembered asanwncr Winston Churchill, leaang America througl lne aark umes. or be roinpared to the worst aggressors of human history?

These academic arguments are important but the reality today is defined by results. The United States is o w actively -waging global preemptive war, and asa result terrorists and the rogue nations That play host to them fear for their very existence. Meanwhile,The world watches intently as the 2004 presidential election goes into full swine. There is little doubt which outcome our former European allies wish to see. Here at home in America die battle lines are being drawn. In Washington, D.C., young idealistic political staffers

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bum the midnieht oil. feverishlv ~reoarinci the enic bank ahead. Pa for m di c m il hnneful!; strive to tear . down the Bush presidencyone policy at a time, even as they struggle against iheir peers10 become the one Democrat wno faces G m p W. B ~ s in Noiembei. The national debate in 2004 over Ihe proper role of US h power and influencewill consume expensive aiflime and drive the agenda of talk radio. Newspaper editors n of every political persuasion will salivate i anticipation. The upcoming struggle between the two dominant American political partiti will not oe over the econom). toe cnvironmcni, or i3xes. It will not be about education or about nealthca-e. Instead. theutanicciash lining up in 2004 will be ahout one criccal issue. national security and the security of Americans at home at abroad Wnh the economic number; improing i every cay. it i s apparent President Flu+% politxal critics and opponcnls m ~ sshift focus to me 0r.l) issue left lo them.
When Americans tune into the final days ofthe presidential election they will be mesmerizedby the debate over the Bush Doctrine. They will have to make a choice, but a choice that reflects the reality of threats lo America in this century not the last. For i n 2004, we will not be threatened by nuclear annihilationat the hands of another super power, but will instead be threatened by an unseen enemy that defies the classic American defenses o f geographic isolation, deterrence, containment, and disarmament. I n 2004 the debate over national security will about yuur security and the security of your family, not the defeat of an ideology or a well-definedhostile nation-state. Since the anacks onUS soil i n 2001, national and homeland security have been a pan o f OUT daily lives. The public has becomeweary of readiness alerts and the never-ending casualty lists from conflicts they dont truly understand. In theend the Democratswill put forwardone candidate and one platform that will declare the Bush Doctrinecounter productiveand illegitimate. I n the end the Americanpeoplewill decide.

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I'vecome to the logical itritegic condudon that a new paradigm shift i n US Defensepolicy is occurring because i t must occur. In a world where 19 men o n bypass deterrent vyftem and ieeurlty devices, and turn our own plane;xgxlnit us,in a world where an open democratic society can nurture and educate those who mean to destroy us, I n a world where one man can pour deadly blotoxins from a vial into a public reservoir and k i l l thouiands,in this world America must stand ready to deliver the f i n 1 strike! America cannot defeat bar thugs and street fighters using rules of good conduct and etiquette. The United Slates cannot expect afanaticalglobal enemy armed with weapons capableof massive and terrible consequences.l o operate under the restraint of democratic checks and balances, public opinion polls, and outdated diplomatic methodology, We must not project our system o f civilized conflict resolution upon an encmy that only seeks a bloody and unholy victory over its enemies.

Study the Monroe Doctrine to understand that there is a precedent for America acting preemptively and i n clear violation of international constructs. Study t h e T m m n Doctrine to understand that democracy and the s p m d of representative government is a just and noble strategic goal. Study the history of human experience and know In your heart thatevil will ieck advantageand good can only triumph through vigilance and strenffth.

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Martin L. Strong

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Ian NtWite-.doc(~ ) Sure feel free to give to to official or "regular" readers Please use the cleaner version in the attachedfile The e-maii version wasa quickcut and paste

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Mamy, this is such a wonderfully written article. You ore very articulate. Do you mind if I send this out t o "regular folks".

office of the Secretary of Defence Public Affairs (~oorn'" Teieohone: 1

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From Wht ferns January 2004

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The Cue for Preemptive War

Withtiic 2004 presidential electionfisl approaching, Americans are being subjected to a cacophony of angry and confused voices from both ends of the political spectrum. The critical natureo f this discussiongoes far 1 7

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beyond the traditional guns vs. butter debate. At this crucial point in American history there is adespeme need for a logical, reality based analysis of America's foreign policy requirements in the post 9-1 I world. This issue of Front Sight Focus addresses the historical contort of the current war on terror and explores the preemptive use of America's power through the unilateral application of military force known as the Bush Doctrine. It examines the passionate views of Americans and others in the world communny vehemently opposed tounilateralism and the use of American might to resolve conflict It is my conclusion that w e a s a free and democratic nation, can no longer apply 17'*'century European concepts of gentlemen's wars and corporate diplomacy to an enemy that doesn't fly a flag, doesn't defend a capital and doesn't employ a diplomatic corps. I belicve that our great nation cannot sland by and rely on hope as a defense policy. America can no longer fight, restricted by Marquis of Qucensburyiulcs, while an enemy armed with devastating weapons of mass dteath recruits dedicated and fanatical warriors in the back illies of Cairo and in barren mountainsof Afghanisan.

In the aftermath of the first Persian Gulf W r then Undersecretary of Defense for Policy,Paul Wolfowitz, a, drafted a an internal sei of military guidelines detailing a new approach to national security. His brief memorandum. Defense Planning Guidance, was a routine strategic musing that received little attention in the first Bush Administration. It argued fora new military and political strategy. Containment. Wolfomtz noted, was an obsolete relic of the Cold War. America, he wrote, should use its super power status and leverage to preempt the proliferation of weapons ofmass destruction, and if America was, in the final analysis, the only nation capable of effectively dealing with the issue, so be it. This minor document represented the genesis of a bold and highly controversial doctrine of unilateral super power preemption now known as the Bush Doctrine. a dynamic national security doctrine that not only threatens our enemies, but may also serve 10 undermine the very fabric of international relations.
The shock of the terrorist attacks in September of2001 galvanized the resolve of the American people and handed the new Bush administrationan opportunity to present the strategy of preemptive war as a just and orooer resoonse to the reality ofworld conflict in the new millennium. In the nresldent'~first address to the &onon that terrible day he began what was to become a series of small slops toward a filly fleshed out and detailed policy. He announced to the world that theunited States would not distinguish between the terrorists and the nations who harbored them. The American people realized this president wouldn't be sending cruise missiles as a slap on the wrist, a procedure that had become common practice dunng the Ciinlon administration. On Scrttcmber 13"'. 2001. in an even clearer insicht into President Bush's new ronust approach tothe lemr à threat. Paul Wolfowitz stated. 'I thinkone hasto SB\ its not ust s mpty i matter orcaptming people and holdmg them accountahk. hut rcmonng their Èancti^rics rcmovini; heir support qsterns ending states ~ h sponsor tcrronsm " o Many astuteobservers of foreign policy believe that with weapons of mass destruction spreading beyondthe control ofestablished Fim World nations it is imperative thai the US engage the proliferation issue through compromise and consensus building. They argue the Cold War was won without global conflagration in jusl this manner. In their opinion. strong alliances and diplomatic containment is the path to peace and security. But what do we do if this approach fails? Terrorist organizations do not operate within the construct of normal international organizations. They, in fact, operate similarto organized crime and the UN is ineffective against an enemy that doesn't anend meetings and doesn't recognize the basic moral underpinnings of diplomacy and foreign policy. Deferring lo the good works ofan international body when dealing with terrorism would result in disaster for the United States, The Bush Doctrine seems to be the only pragmatic answer in the face ofthis failure and the near instantaneous threat of terrorist attack.

On September 20th. 2001, President George W. Bush f o n d l y addressed ajoint session of Congresswhile a shaken nation watched and waited. He made it clear that Paul Wolfowitz had not misspoken during his earlier Pentagon statement. A new American foreign policy was presented; "We will pursue nations that
18

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provide, aid, or give safe haven to terrorism. Every nation, in every regitin, now has a decision to make. Either you are with us. or you are with ihr terrorists. Fmm diic d m forward. anv luition that cnntinws to harbor&support t&& will be regarded by the United ~ & s a s a h o s t i l ~ r e ~ i m e . " With those words the die was cast. Over die next twelve months the Busfa administration continued to add elements to the new doctrine. In his first State of the Union address in January 2002, President Bush detailed his new of a dangerous world, listing Iraq, Iran, and N r h Korea as nations hostile to America. An axis of Evil that ot harkened back to the days of World War Two and the infamous German. Italian, Japanese alliance. In June 2002, during a graduation speech at West Point, President Bush called on all Americans to be resolute and nrenare for iirecmnlive American action when necessarv to defend lihertv and lives. On Sentemher IF1'. 200.'. the formal national security strategy of (he Bush administrationwas published It confined the wtenuom ofthe new Bush D c r n i n great dciail America va&finally taking offlhe glo'.fs otie

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The American public, as might be expected in a nation politically split down the middle, was ambivalent about the basic premise ofthe Bush Doctrine. Few Americans are soft on terrorism and most agreed with the president's objective to protect the nation. However,sinceAc declaration of war on terror in 2001, some Americans have vehemently rejected the new doctrine of preemptive war as arrogant and dangerous. Many Congressional and European leaders went even further in their condemnation In fact, only six days afterthe September 23,2002, publication of the Bush Doctrine in the National Secunty Strategy of the United States, fanner Vice President Al Gore attacked the doctrine duringaspeech in San Francisco. He predicted dire consequences for America ifUS power was abused. "If the Congress approves the Iraq resolution just proposed by the administration it is simultaneouslycreating the precedent for preemptive action anywhere, anytime, this as any fumre president so decides," Gore said. As the shock of 9-1 1 wore off, critics of the new doctrine began to make themselves heard, carefully avoiding the appearanceof attacking the militaty white Americans were fightmg m Afghanistanand forward deployed in the Philippines and thePersian Gulf. However, the Commander-in-Chief was fair w e

In his famousAxis of Evil speech, George W.Bush made hisviews crystal clean "We'll be deliberate, yet rime is not on our side. I will not wait on events. while dangers gather. I will not stand by, as perils draw closer and closer. The United Siates ofAmerica will not pennit the world's most dangerous regimes to threaten us with the world's most destructive weapons." The case has been made by the president's chief political critic. Democrat Howard Dean. He believed that the time had notcome to toss aside the international community in a headstrong rush to war. In a2003 online article the aspiring presidential candidate viscously attacked the Bush Doctrine and the Bush administration's handling of foreign policy: "The next president will need 10 undo the work of this band of radicals currently controlling our foreign at policy -who view the Middle E s as a laboratory for their experiments in democracy-building." Governor Dean goeson to add, "...on day one of a Dean Presidency, I will reverse thisanitude. 1 will learup the Bush Doctrine, and I will steer us hack into the community of nations." Regardless of your political viewpoint one thing is clear, the 2004 race for the White House will determine if America continues the policy of preemptive defense or returns to an internationalis1approach lo fending off impending threats.
There are many argumentsfor and against the BushDoctrineof preemptive war. The fierce inlensily of these opposing positions is palatable fully two months before the real political combat of the presidential race begins. T e Bush Doctrine is the national -'iypolicy h of the United States. In support of that policy, in speech after speech, the Bush administration hammershome America's inherent right of selfdefense. The administration points lo Article 5 1 ofthe United Nations charter as international support of that right. Bin while the UN charier does acknowledge a nation's right to self-defense. the charter clearly does not sanction preemptiveattacks -even in sclfdefensc. Especially when a nationonly thinks it may be anatked at some undetermined lime in the future. The conflict in the UN language is difficult to reconcile. The right of self-defense has historically been triggered by the clear massing of offensive enemy forces on a border or. as in theattack by Imperial Japan on Pearl Harbor, by an actual attack. The Bush Doctrine argues that new, unparalleled destructive technology, in the hands of rogue stales and terrorists, defies historical

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references and definitions of early warning. A policy of allowing a first strikeagainst Amenca in the age of weapons of mass destruction is out of the question. N o American President can accept the consequences of such a policyasa basis fora US national security doctrine.

Once again the president'sdctramrs and opponentsfail to accept the admin~suation? comprehensivelogic of precmplivedefense. Madeleine Alhright, former Secretary of Siatc inthe Clmion administration, has frequently voiced (rave concernsabout the potential negativecffccli ofthe overly sinpti'.nc Bush Docmne I n ma v z m *e war m lm and ~mcomectim to . . . . . . . . . sheconteded that the c m n t eNon3 tn . . . the war on tmm . . Iraq " . fnghtcns and divides the world instead of'arnpiy asking others to oppose A l Qaeda. [the prc'.Ktent] n asks them to oonasc,Al (la& suonon the invasion ofan Arab counirv and endorse the doctrine. of ~. . ~ r ~ = .. , . . ,,.. . p r m p n o n all a pan o f a 51ng.c package. Faced M-ithihischoice s many who siaonc9ly oppose Ai Qacda haw nevertheless decided that they do m i want I b "viith' the United States." Will the Buth Doctrine tear D e 1pan alliances and diplomatic relationships, rendering the Middle East a quagmire o f war and death? Or wili later generations hail his bold new doctrine as a turning point in world history? Will George W. Bush be remembered as another Winston Churchill, leading ~ m & a through the dark times. or becompared to the worst aggressors of human history?

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These academic arguments are important but the reality today is defined by results. The United States i f now actively waging global preemptivewar, and asa result terrorists and the rogue nations that play host to them fear for their veiy existence. Meanwhile, the world watches intently as the 2004 presidential election goes into full swing. There is little doubt which outcome our former European allies wish to see. Here at hone in America the battle lines are beins drawn. In Washinelon. D.C.. voune idealistic ooliticd slaffeis bum the midnight oil, feverishly preparing for theepic battle ahead. ~&idential hopefuls stnve to tear down the Bush presidency one policy at a :.me, even as t9ey struggle against their peers in hecome the one e x - r a t who l a c ~ G e o r a e Buih in November Ihc national debate in 2Od4 over the Dronerrole of L'S W powci and i n l u ~ c w i conoimr expensive ainime and dnve the agenda of talk radio Newspaper editors c of every pa meal persuasionwill salivate n articption The urcommg struggle between tnc two dominant American p o l n m parties w t i not be aver !he economy. me environment, ot taxes i t will not beabout educatmor aooiit ncalthcarc Insicad the manic clash lining up in 2004 wili k about one cntical issue naitonal sccuiny and the iecunly o f Americans at home m amoad With the econonic numbm improving every day, i t is apparent President Bush's political critics and opponents must shift focus to the only issue I d t o them.

..

When Americans tune into the final days of the presidential election they wili be mesmerizedby the debate
over the Bush Doctrine. They w i l l have to make a choice, but a choice that reflects the reality o f threats to America in this century not the last. For in 2004, we will not be threatenedby nuclear annihilationat the hands of another super power, but will instead be threatened by an unseen enemy that defies the classic American defenses of geographic isolation, deterrence, containment, and disarmament. In 2004 the debate over national security wili aboutyei/rsccurity and thcsecurity ofyour family, not thedefeat ofan ideology ora well-defined hostile nation-state. Since the attacks on US soil i n 2001, national and homeland security have been a pan o f our daily lives. The public has becomeweary o f readinessaims and the never-ending casualty lists from conflicts they don't truly understand. In the end the Democratswill put forward one candidate and one platform that will declare the Bush Doctrine counter productive and illegitimate. In the end the American people wili decide.

-

I've come to the login1 itrategk cmcliision that à new p a r a d i i shift in US Defense policy i s

occurringbecause it must occur. In fl world where 19 men can bypass deterrent systems and security devices, and torn our own planes against us, I n aworld where an open democratic society u n nurture and educate those who mean to destroy us, in a world where oneman can pour deadly biotoxini from
10

ff

vial into n publk reservoir and hill thousands,ln this world America Jaw itmid ready todeliver the first strike! America cannot defeat bar thugs rnd street fighten using rulei of good conduct and etiquette. The United States cannot expect a fanatical global enemy armed with weapons capableof massive and terrible consequences,to operate under the restraint of democratic check* and balances, publicopinion polls, and outdated diplomatic methodolog). We must not project our system of civilized conflict resolution upon an enemy that only seeks a bloody and unholy victory over its enemies.

Study tbe Monroe Dçctrim mndrrstad tbat there b m precedent for America ¥clin to preemptively xnd in clear violallom of iittçrnçtioi comtructi. Study the Truman Doctrine to understand that democracy and the spread of representative government Is a just and noble strategic goal, Study the history of human experience and know in your heart that evil will seek advantage and good can only triumph through vigilance and strength.

Martin L. Strong

www.sealstrike.com

MY TIMES

8009

From
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To Sllbjezl

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Tim Earn [ T E M ~ ' ~ ' ~ Wednesdav. January 28, 2004 9 27 AM
RE MEETING WITH SECRETARYArrival Into

I have a pentagon badge TO i t you can give me a room number r w i l l gee chore myself. i l l probably use the metro or wulk over fpentagon c i t y parking g i r a g e (depending
t h e weather). Tin Ti"ur J . Ea& Blackbird Technologies 1.3900 Lincoln Park D r . Suite 4 0 0

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Thanks

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To: Tim Eads Subject- RE, H E 2 T I f f i W I T H SECRETftHY Arrival Info Tim. Thanhe f o r your r e p l y ltd I d i d receive your email. yesterday so I un yuat g e t t i n g to t h e m .

i

I had a scheduled day off

I w i l l need t o know hw you w i l l a r r i v e a t the Pentagon,

(metro or v e h i c l e l ,
H e w i l l provide

we strongly recommend using t b e Metro system to the Pentagon stop. scorca t o t h e meeting trom t h i s point.

If you wish to &ivà i n , the second best option is to be dropped off at the River Entrance or the ~ e t r o Entrance. W e w i l l provide escorts from these l o c a t i o n s . The t h i r d optloi, which I diecouraga, i a to d r i v e i n and park In south Parking guest parking I cannot
" t e e you "ill Find a apoc;.

.

~f you w i l l be drivinq i n yourself or dropped o f f . I w i l l need vehicle i n f o r m t i o n . frm
You.

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color of your v e h i c l e ~ a q including state Ã

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I am LOC aure you goc the çiuiI sene you yesterday but I would l i k e co accept the invitation and attend the brief on 11 Feb.
Thanks
Til

MY TIMES

8011

Cell

Hi

Thanks tor your reply.
> 1 fill need to know ho* you will arrive at the pentagon,

Ixetro or vehicle)
we

we itrong1y reco~nendusing the Metro Byaten t o the Pentagon atop. will provide sscorte to t h e meeting from this poire.
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If you wish to drive i n , the second b e s t option Is to be dropped off the niver mtrance or the metro Entrance. We will provide escorts from these locaciona. he third option, which I dincourage. is to " 1 and park in South Parking guest p a r k m g . I cannot guarantee you will find a it you will be driving in yourself or dropped off.
1

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will need vehicle

> i"f0mntxm from yo,,.
> Year,

make, model & color of your vehicle

Tag

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including State

Driver ~nforroation l i f other than vourselfl Drivers license number

MY TIMES

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Daniel Goure [ d g o u r c ~ @ P Monday January 26 2004 12 15 PM
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'Re MEETING W l k SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (2-11-04)

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Do you Yahoo!? ~ a h o o !s i t e m i l d e r ~ree web site building tool. ~ r it! y hct~://webhostl~ig.~ahoo.cot~/pa/sb/

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1 U be arriving by Metro Iwffl probablycome eariy and do lunch beforethe meeting 111s a m touch wih you and Archie ty

Dave

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Clcnn G Lackey, Vice President

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Sent- Monday. January 26.2004 2 24 PN To- lackeyp1@) Subject RE SecDef Meeting, Arrival Info

Thanks for your reply [ will need lo know how you will amve a the Pentagon, (Metroor vehicle) We strongly recommendusingthe M t o system t thcPeniagon~top will provide escorts to the meeting er o We from this point If you wish t dnve in. the second best option is to be dropped off a1the River Entrance or ihe Metro Entrance o We will provide escorts from these locations The third oplion,which I discourage, i s O dnve m and park in I South Parking guest parking I cannot guaranteeyou will find a v t If you will be driving m yourself or dropped off. I will need vehicle mfonnanon from you Year, make, model & coli~" your vehicle of
Tag U including State Dnver Infomation (ifother than yoursclQ Drivers license number

O f h of t e r h + w m e PublicAffalrs Room Tekphone

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--original Message--From: Glenn Lackey [mallto lack

KY TIKES

8015

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2W4 2.20 PM

Ct"Arrtiie Davis Subject: SecDcf Meeting, 11 Feb

GlennG Lackey,VicePresident

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Flanaaan Consultinq LLC 1317 street. N.W.. 8th~loot

HY TIMES

8016

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Thanks tor your reply.

I will need to know how you will arrive at the Pentagon, (Metro or vehicle).
He strongly (¥¥commeusing the ~ e t r osystein to the ent tag on stop. Me trill provide escorts to the meeting from this point.

IE you wish to drive in. the wcond beet option is to be dropped a£ at the River Entrance or the Metro Entrance. we will provide escorts froà these locations. The third option, which I discourage, is ~o d r i v e in and park in south Parking guest parking I cannot guarantee you will find a spot.

.

If you will be driving in yourself or dropped o f f , I will need vehicle information fro* you.
Year

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----. Htssage----Original
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N Y TIMES

8017

Please gee attached.

MY TIMES

8018

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xe always, thank you for the invite. I d like co be there, but won't be able to make it. ' ~hac doesn't m e a n 1 ' m not interested!! I hope c h i you'll have eoaic recap m w o or documentation you can e-mail to ç
Again, thanha much

Please ace attached <Defense Analysts M t q Invite 2-13-04 doc=>

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of Defense

N TIMES Y

8020

Front Sight Focus - October 2003
The Power of Positive Patriotism
The presidential political season is in full swing, with the Democratic contenders eagerly
lininr un to imnress their loval base of sunnort. In-h after sneech these ~olitical , -~ warriors bark louder and bite deeper, eachsfriving tear down the legitimacy ofthe Bush administration in olain view nf an attentive world audience. The American mlitical -experiment is 227 years youne but the processof choosing our president is" t any eas er to watch Democracy is like making sausage -the oinco-ne is deliciois but the process leavesus a bit queasy.

-.

.

to

There is no doubt among sages and layman dike that there are several ways to approach every domestic issue, That is, in fact, why we havesuch a robust exchange and why we have organizations of galvanized and like-minded spirits called political parties. 1 applaud the process and accept the outcome of our socio-political discourse as do most Americans, but I have a growingproblem with the tactics being used when U.S. foreign policy is at stake.
I've exwessed mv minion on naiional television and in ~rior editions of this newsletter . *s to the !itanic n a m ofttie fight awns terrorism I believe we are now witnessing the clash of dimiietrioll) opposed phi osopho on globa. scale that i s equal& in history only b\ the 5ght between fascism and freedom in World War Two Unen this v-ai on tenor is over there can only be one phi.osophy left sanding. The war on tenor i s a war about truth, -usriceand freedom It 11 a wanhat n u t be fought lo a niccesstll cone mion. or w e u i 1 indeed succumb to tic new world vision ano greater senseof purpose ofnur enemies Put mother wav - I don't heai our enemies discussing or demanding an exit strategy
So it seems odd that during the present period of global war the current crop of Democratic hopefuls have felt comfonable as they gieciully anempl to outdo each other, wildly speaking out in condemnation of the Commander-in-Chief and the other national leaders of the war on terror. Some o f the Democratic contenders have served in the military and now make known that distinction, as if serving makes them spokespersons for "those in uniform who know the real truth". The politicians use scary words like "quagmire" and "body bags"10 raise the specter of Vietnam. The Democrats seek power by creating a falsecomparison between Iraq and Vietnam in order to scare and intimidate the American electorate. For if we become worried enough, we just might boot the Republicans and President Bush out ofthe White House,

.

The Democrats ofcourse forget one important flaw in this political i l n t q y . The one g e t difference that separates this war from our involvemem in Southeast Asia is this ra the Vier Cong did not come toNcw York City, Northern Virginia and Pennsylvania to kill our innocent citizens by the thousands The terrorists did.

-

RX TIMES

The Democratsforget that millionsuponmillions of Americanscan claim the distinctit of having once served in defense of our nation and these fellow veterans may see the issues of this war quite differently. In fact, Aey forget that approximately4 million Americans are in uniform right now and by regulation unable 10 express their v i m . Maybe they d s g e with weak-kneed disengagement and the clumsy comparisons to iare other conflicts. Now the presidential contenders unabashedly trot out former military officers and Defense Depament appointeeswho weredispiaced by this adminLstration present their disgruntled opinions and carefullycrafted political talking points as legitimate fact. Their modvations are transparent.

W h y is it acceptableto snack the strategy and the leadershipof our Commander-in-Ch in plain view of the enemy? Do these political leaders seeking ihc highest office in Ehe
land truly believe (tot demanding an "exit strategy" after only five months in Iraq help our fiehtine forces deolovcdaround the world? To attack the ournose of this doba! w , , underminesthe moral foundation that sustains the morale of out brave American cilize

- -

..

soldiers To loudly demand an "exit strategy" and "limelines for U S. withdrawal" underminesthe sense of determinationand resolve our warriors must have to steel themselvesagainst the rigors of combat and wartime deployment Patriotism can he expressedin many ways, but in today's world of mass media and 24hour news coverage, every negative utterance gives our foe comfortand hope for final victory over America. In many ways this warwas bornofourweakness and lackof national will. We were -watched closely for two decades and assessed by enemies who concludedwe were ripe for attack. We've all paid aprice for projecting a lack of national will and resolve. On September 1I", 2001,3,00OAmericans paid the uldmate
price.

I

1 I

There was once an unwritten code ofconduct in American politics that during time of armed conflict the partisan bickeringstopped at the water's edge. This patriotic app h served our great nation well over the years. 1call for a return to the power of patriotism and a return to common sense. I call on Democrats and Republicans, Indenendentsand all other nniitical m i e s to temner their rheinric arKi keen in mind other audiences watchma &d lisienini from b m n d our shores I sav to o h nolttical 1 candidatesand elected leaders, "~efore youstep up to a microphone,decide i what you f say can be used by our enemies to raise their morale- steady their resolve "
In the final cost-benefit analysis, we must win this war decisively in order to conlain anh dacr the future wars. We must make clear to our adversariesthat we will not falter and we will not quit These days I hear a different message coming from the Democratic presidential hopefuls. In my opinion, as a citizen, a father ofa serviceman a d as a

J

military analyst, these political powerseekers may takeus back to the decades of denial and in fact invite further conflict should oneofthem assume the mantle of Commander inChefin 2004.
The power of positive patriotism does not ignore either the mechanicsof problem sol&

or the process ofdefining foreign policy. Instead, it demandsthat thediscussion he taken

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out ofthe political guilds and into the institutionsof power, where people with differing views can fonnuJalc answers without giwngaid and cornfort to our enemies E\cry young Navy SF.AI. trainee knows you wind up on the rocks if you don'l row logdhet It's time for America's political leadership to point the bow forward and pull together.

Martin L Strong .
UnitedStates Navy SEAL, retired www.snlstrike.cam

NY TIMES

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Front Sight Focus
ThÃ

- august 2003

uç Cold

War

Nearly 24 months has passed since that tragic day in early September 2001. For many of us the sight of ¥en,.wome and children dying in one horrific act after another was almost too much to bear. we learned during the ensuing weeks that the architects of this cowardly attack were hiding in Afghanistan, a nationhighjacked from its people by the Caliban. we listened, glued to our televisions and we learned that we had been targeted for years by a group of fanatical murderers Paown as ~lcpieda.
Me learned as the Philippine government provided proof that the missions and the targets had been selected five years or more before that sad day 1 New York City. Five years before the plane buried itself into the proud Pentagon. Five years before the passengers attacked their enemy n the cockpit of a plane destined for the White House. we've learned much in the last 24 months, but have we learned the real lesson of 9-11?

The end of WWI saw the demiee of single-minded monarchies, ordained by God to rule lesser men. The victory over the German Kaiser and his allies in that war ushered in a new era of fresh political thought the rise of the three great "isms" of the twentieth century; Communism, Capitalism, and Fascism. However, the peace was short lived. within twenty years the world was once again plunged i n t o the bloody morals of total war. A global war fought to determine which doctrine vaa fit to rule mankind.

-

In the end, out of the smoldering ashes of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, rose the two great super powers, The United States and the Soviet Union. Unable and unwilling to directly engage each other in open and catastrophic nuclear war, these two great powers entered instead into a fifty-year period of "cold war-. m t h super powers using surrogate allies to fight each other on the great chessboard of the third world. Korea, the Berlin'Airlift, the Cuban Missile Crisis. Vietnam, Nicaragua were all great battles of the first Cold War. For and Afghanistan e fifty years w e buckled down and stayed in the fight. when at last w witnessed the destruction and dimancling of the infamous Iron Curtain, America and the world joined in a collective sigh of relief. we all looked forward to a bright and peaceful future - a New world Order.

-

But the human race seems doomed to repeat its folly. The events that led to the unprecedented strike on 9-11 appear clear in hindsight. As clear in retrospect as the actions by Japan that led to the atcack on Pearl Harbor. Me have been under attack by a dedicated and well-trained foe since the early 1980's. For far too long w e have been the target: of a worldwide conspiracy of death. The fight against us has been fought, not in the light of day. but in the shadows, using the surrogate warriors of impoverished nations. An army o warrior's fed a steady diet

. of

hatred toward America. on septerober 1lth,2001, after nearly twenty years of minor victories against the United states, these shadow warriors rejoiced in'our deaths. Around the planet, fanatical murders pointed to the television and said to their young charges - "See! See how the great Satan falls!" These killers believe the events of September 1' 1" 2001, marked the beginning of a new age.

America muse understand a fundamental truth they will not stop. They will not stop when we catch Saddam. They will not stop when we catch Osama Bin Laden. They will only stop when they have won or when they have died in the attempt. The brave soldiers, sailors and airmen of the armed forces are not fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq to liberate the oppressed. We must not belittle their sacrifice with candy coated, politically correct rationale. They are fighting and dying to preserve our liberty in the new Cold War. This war has been declared against ue without asking our approval. It is a war without boundaries, without enemy fonnatioiis, without flags to capture and generals to defeat. It is a war we did not want but it is a war that we must win! That is the lesson of 9-11. Are we ready to commit ourselves to the long years of v i g i l m e and sacrifice this new Cold War will demand? I for one believe we are.

-

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Hartin L. Strong

~.8ftalstrike.~i

Front Sight FOCUS . ~ ~ . ~ z o M -J
The Cue for Prttinmivc War
With the 2004 presidential election fast approaching, Americans are being subjected t m o cacoohonv of a n m and confused voices from both ends of the ~oliticalsoectnim. Ti cnncal nature o f this discussion goes far b o n d lie iradnional vs butter deoate At this crucia point n American history there is a desperate need for a logical rea ny based analysis of America's foreign policy r q u i r m o n s in the po<t 9-1 1 world. This issue of Front Sight Focusaddresses the historical context of the current war on terror and explores die preemptive use of America's power through the unilateral application of military force known as the Bush Doctrine. It examines the passionate views of Americans and others in the world community vehemently oppoiied to unilateralism and the use of American might toresolve conflict.

bns

It is mv conclusion that we. as a free and democraticnation, can no loneer awl" 17'~ century European concepts of gentlemen's wars and corporate diplomacy to an enemy that doesn't Ilv a flap. doesn't defend a caoital and doesn'tcm~lova dinlomatic corns. I believe thaio&grealcanon cannot stand band rely on hope as a defense policy ' Amencacanno longerfight. restricted by Marquisof Quecmhury ales. while anenemy armed with devastating weapons of mass death recruits dedicated and fanatical warriors in the back allies of Cairo and in barren mountains of Afghanistan.

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7

.,

In the aftermath of the first Persian Gulf War, then Underaecrctaiy of Defense for Policy, Paul Wolfowitz, drafted a an internal set of military guidelines detailing a new approach tinational security. His brief memorandum, Defense Planning Guidance,was a routine strategic musing thai received little attention in the first Bush Administration. It argued for a new military and political strategy. Containment, Wolfowitz noted, was an obsolete relic of the Cold War. America, he wrote, should use its super power status and leverage to preempt the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and if America was, in the final analysis, the only nationcapable ofeffectiveiy dealing with the issue, so be it. This minor document represented the genesis of a bold and highly controversial doctrine of unilateral super power preemption now known as the Bush Docinne, a dynamic national security doctrine that not only threatens our enemies, but may also serve to underminethe very fabric of international relations. The shock ofthe terrorist attacks in Septemberof 2001 galvanized the resolve of the American people and handed the new Bush administration an opportunity to present the strategy of preemptive war as a just and proper response to the reality of world conflict in thenew millennium. In the president's firstaddress tothenation on that terrible day he
began what was to become a series of small steps toward a fully fleshed out and detailed policy. He announced to the world that the United States would not distinguish between the terrorists and thenations who harbored them. The American neonle realized this presodent wouldn't be sending cruisemissiles a s a slapon the wnsi. a procedure that had become common practice dunng t h e 0 nonadministration On Sepremher 3'" 2001 in an even clearer insight into President Bush s ne* robust approach to h e terrorstthreat,

. .

Paul Wolfowitz stated, "I think one has to say it's not just simply a matter of capturing people and holding them accountable, but removing their sanctuaries, removing their support systems, ending stales who sponsor terrorism."
Many astute obseivers of foreign policy believe that with weapons of mass desmiction spreading beyondthecontrol ofestablishedFirst World nations it isimperative that the US engage the proliferation issue through compromise and consensus building. They argue the Cold War was won without global conflagration in just this manner. In their opinion, strong alliances and diolomatic containment is the . oath to mace and security. . But what do we do if this approach fails? Terrorist organizationsdo not operate within the consmict of normal international organizations. They, in fact. operate similar to organized crime and the UN is ineffective against anenemy that doesn't attend meetings and doesn't recognize the basic moral underpinnings of diplomacy and foreign policy. Iktcmng lo the rood works o f an inicmat~onabod! -hen dealing viih terrorism would mu.. in disaster lor (he Lniled S i m s Tnc 3usn Doctnnc seems to k the onlv piagmalic answer in the faceoftno Failure and the near mstantaneom threat of terrorist attack.

On September 20", 2001, President George W. Bush formally addressed a joint session of Congress while a shaken nation watched and waited. He made it clear that Paul Wolfowltz had not misspoken during his earlier Pentagon statement. A new American foreign policy was presented: "We will pursue nations that provide, aid, or give safe haven to terrorism. Every nation,in every @on, now hasa decision to make. Either you are with us. or you are with the terrorists. From thisday forward, any nation that continues to harbor or support terrorism will be regarded by the United States as a hostile reeime." With those words the die was casi. Over the next twelve months the Bush administration continued to add elements tothe nev docinne In his first Slate ofme L'nion addres in J a n u q 2002, President Bush dna, cd his VKW of aoangerou world, lisung irao. Iran, and Norh Koreaas nations host Ie to America. Art axis or Evil that harken& hack to the dabs of WOKd War Two a m in? infamous German, I t a h . Jap;.inci>c alliance. In June 2002. during a graduation spcecn ot Wcsl Poim, Presidem Bush called on all Americans to be resolute and orcpa~cfor preemptive Amcr:can action w e n neceswy todefend liberty and lives On Seplrmkr 17"', 2002, the formal national security strategy ofthc Dusk adminimalion was pub ishcd It confinned the intentions of thence Riish Docinnc in p t detail America was lmally taking off the cloves.
The American public, a; might be expected in anation politically split down themiddle. was ambivalent about the ba-sic premne of the Bush Docmnc. Few Americans are soft on terrorism and most agreed wth ihc president's ob:eciive to protect !he nation However, since the declaration of war on terror in 2001. some Americans have vehemently rejected the new doctrine of preemptive war as m g a n t and dangerous. M y Con~rcssionaand European leader:, went even further in thcir condemnaCon In fact, only six daysafter me Septemher23.2002. publicarionof Ihc Ruih Doctrine in the \attonal Sccurny Strategy of the L'nited Stales, former Vice President Al Go% attacked the doctrine during B speech in San Francisco. He predicted dire consequences for Amenca if US power was abused. "If the Congress approves the Iraq Tesolutionjusl

NY TIMES

proposed by the administration it is simultaneously creating the precedent for preemptive action anywhere, anytime, this as any future president so decides," Gore said. As the shock of 9-1 1 wore off critics ofthe new doctrine beran 10 make themselves heard. carefully avoiding the appearance ofattackmgthc military uhile Americans were fighting in Afghanistan and forward deployed in the Philippinesand the Persian Gulf However, the Comtnander'in-Chiefwas fair game

In his famous A m of Evil speech. George W. Bush made his views crystal clear: "We'll be deliberate, yet lime is not on our side I will not wan oo events, while dangers gather I will no1 stand by, çperilsdrau closer andc.oser. The Unned StatesofAmerica will not permit the world's most dangerousregimes to threaten us with the world's most destructive weapons." The case has been made by the president's chief political critic, Democrat Howard Dean. He believed that the lime had not come to toss aside the inlcmalional communitv in a headstrone rush to war. in a 2003 online article the astririne presiden:ia. candidate &cously attacked the Bush Docinne and me B u h admmistration's handing of tore.gnpo.icy. 'The next president wil. need In undo the work ofthis band ?f radica s cuncnii%controllins our foreinn oolicv - who view thc . , Middle East as a laboratory for their experiments in democracy-building," Governor Dean sont to add, "...onday oneof a Dean Presidency. 1 will reverse this attitude. I will tear up the Bush Doctrine, and 1will s t a r us back into the community of nations." Regardless of your poiitical viewpoint one thing is clear, the2004 race for the White House will determine if America continues the policy of preemptive defense or returns to an internationalist approach to fending off impending threats.

. -

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There are many arguments for and against the Bush Doctrine of preemptive war. The fierce intensity ofthese opposingpositions is palatableftilly iwo nmnths before the real political combat of the presidential race begins. The Bush Doctrine is the national security policy ofthe United Slates. in support of that policy, in speechafter speech the Bush administration hammers home America's inherent right ofselfdefense. The administration points to Article 51 of theUnited Nations charter as imemationai support of that right. But while the UN charter doesacknowledge anation's rich! 10 self-defense, the chanw clearly does not sanction preemptive attacks -even in selfdefense, Especially when a nation only thinks it may be attacked at some undetermined time in the future. The conflict in the UN language is difficult to reconcile. The right of selfdefense has historically been triggered by the clear massingof offensive enemy forces on a border or, as in the anack by imperial Japan on Pcaii Harbor, by an actual attack. The Bush Doctrine argues that new, unparalleled destructive technology, in the hands of rogue states and terrorists, defies historical references and definitions of early warning. A c noiicv of allowinn a first strike aminst America in the a.~ of wcanona of mass . destruction .s out of the question Vo American President can accept the ~~~~~~~~~~~~of such a policy as a basis for a US nationa. secumy doctnne

.

.

the president's detractors and opponents fail to accept the idminisiraiion'i comprehensive logic of preemptive defense Madeleine Albnght, fonner Secretary of t n theclirnoi adminiairation. has freouenllv voiced vrmeconcçm shout h ~- 7 - ~ , --~~~potential negative effects ofthe overly simplistic Bush Dochne. In analyzing the war in
Once =mn
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Iraq and its connection to the war on tenor, she contended that the cunent efforts in Iraq ' fnghlensmd divides the world Instead of simp., askingothers tooppose A Quda. [the president) now OSKS them 10 oppose Al Qaeda,suppon the invasion of an Arab country, and endorse the doctrine ofpreemption - all as pan of a single package. Faced with this choice many wtm staunchly oppose Al Qaeda have nevertheless decided that they do not want to be "wilh" the United States." Will theBush Doctnne tear apart alliances and diplomatic relationships, renderingthe Middle East a quagmire of war and deaih? Or will later generations hail his bold new doctrine as a turning point in world history? Will George W.Bush be remenberedasanother W i ~ t 0 n Churchill, leading America through [he dark times, or be compared to the worst aggressors of human history?
These academic arguments are imponant but the reality today is defined by results. The United Slates is now actively waging global preemptive war, and as a result terrorists and the rogue nations that play host to them fear for their very existence. Meanwhile, the world watches intently as the 2004 presidential election goes into full swing. There is little doubt which outcome our fonner European allies wish to see. Here at home in young idealistic political America the batik lines are being drawn. In Washington, D.C., staffers bum the midnight oil, feverishly preparing for the epic battle ahead. Presidential hopefuls strive to tear down the Bush presidency one policy at a time. evenas they smiggle against their peers to become the one Democrat who faces George W. Bush in November. The nauonal debate in 2004 over the proper role of US power and influence will consume expensive airtime anddrive the agenda of calk radio. Newspaper editorsof every political persuasion will salivate in anticipation. The upcoming struggle between the two dominant American political parties will not be over the economy, the Instead, the environment, or taxes It will not be about education or about health-, titanic clash lining up in 2004 will be about onecritical issue- national security and the security of Americans at home at abroad. With the economic numbers improving every day, 1 is apparent President Bush's political critics and opponents must shift focus to the 1 only issue left 10 them.

When Americans nine inlo the final days of the presidential election they will be mesmerized by the debate over the Bush Doctrine. They will have to make a choice, but a choice that reflects the reality of threats to America in this century - not [he last. For in 2004, we will not be threatened by nuclear annihilation at the hands ofanother super power, but will instead be threatened by an unseen enemy that defies the classic American defenses of geographic isolation, deterrence, containment, and disarmament. In 2004 the debate over national security will about p a r security and the security of your family. not the defeat of an ideology or a well-defined hostile natton-slate. Since the attacks on US soil in 2001. national and homeland securitv have been a nart of ourdailv lives. The nublic has become wearv nfreadirwyi a i m and the neverendinn cr~uallv lists fromconflicts they don t truly i-naerstand In the end the Democrats will pi.! forward one candidate and one platforn thai will declare the Bush Doctrinecounter productive and illcgi'imate In the ena the American people w I decide
0 ,

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I've come to the logical strategic conclusionthai a newparadigm shift in US Defense policy is occurring because ii must occur. In a world where 19 men can bypass deterrent systems and security devices, and turn our own planes against us, in a world where an open democratic society can nurture and edicate those who mean to destroy us, in a world where one man can pour deadly biotoxins froma vial into a public reservoir and kill thousands,in this world America must aand ready to deliver the first Strike! America cannot defeat bar thugs and street fighters uang rules of good conduct and etiquette. The United States cannot expect a fanatical global enemy armed with weapons capable of massive and terrible consequences, to operate under the restraint of democratic checks and balances, public opinion polls, and outdated diplomatic methodology. We must not project our system of civilized conflict resolution upon an enemy that only seeks a bloody and unholy victory over its enemies.
Study the MonroeDoctrineto understand that thereis a precedent for America acting preemptively and in clear violation of internationalconstructs. Study the Truman Doctrine lo understand that democracvand the spread of mresentative mvernment is a jusl and noble stratepic goal Studv the history of hunrn c x p ~ ~ c n c e know in your and bean that evil will seek advantageand good c à § om'. mump!' through w g i onceaid

strength.

Martin L Strong .
www.sealstrikc.com

From
Sent To
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Ballealeros Mark LTC, OASD-PA, VIcan Todd M LtCd OSD PA FW Cordeman responselor PA 6 LA IFOUO) Comesman responsefor PA (2Ldoc

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Measuring Stability

Here are talking points on à and Security in Iraq

Tony Cordesman story on the Section

9010 Report

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I1m sending the TPJs t o ASD Rodman for his review, out you m a c k - u p . probably could use these if soniethuq cornea up over the weekend

FOR OFFICIAL USE OKLY

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but it is obviously impossible t o deal with this thing aa a simply too fragmented

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8031

Subject

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we would appreciate it i f you could tak. a look a t these proposed t a l k i n g points for use
by LA and PA.

NY TIMES

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HY TIMES

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6 53 P LtCd O S b P A $ n ( I G S P O < 7 ) APT OSD CIO Whitman Bryan CIV OASD-PA Church Report

J u t spoke with M r whitman ~e believes you should set this opportunity up for M r Slackwell BTU M r Whitman has been in contact with Comer SECDEFlSchleainger Pawl ember Harold Brown He hopes to contact General Horner, as well Both are being p i e d copies of the EXSUM but it appears as if chore won't be a briefing of any sort e ~ n c ethey l ~ v e out of town So again Blaakwell (or Adnural Church sp.aklng with him on the phone1 makes sense. Thanks

br~ey

Sir.

Affirm on the daceltime. office?

what do you envision for location? Can he do it from his

1 - the Admiral mentioned that it desired by OSD PA, he could pre-brief ~ r ~. i m ~ l a c k w l lin lieu of ~ r schle~ingar. lor. lackw well . who i a a contractor W K B cha o of Dr. Schleainqer's Independent x i d ane!.~ i t ASD PA wanca chis done: we can mike contact with Dr. s directly to aec up a meeting.

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nut you should have the Retired Military ~ n a l y s tconference call down on the Admiral's schedule for Wednesday, 1500 ....CHINE0 said he - w e e d to do it. ~r waxman and a senior Army rep will also p ~ t i c t p a t e [they'll diacues refomel. This " a l l pays BIG dividends. You g o t my earlier email via HIFR giving all the background 0 it. Thankc.
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M r whitman indicated that ~r Sehlecinger doesn't appear t o have time to get a prebrief ...and net sure if the leadership here is pursuing the o p t u m af o f f e r i n g a brief f o r secretary ~ r o w nand General xorner,

to

Sir - any update on time/&tc Thmka,

for VADH Church pre-brief to Dr. Schlcaangeri

E v e h i g h the Church ~ e p o r tUnclaa ~xecutiveSummary will be posted on ~ e f e n s e ~ m k follwing congresszonal ~estimony, we'll be printing 100-200 copies of it, as well.. id you have a epeci.&l cover for this unclae ~xsm...rernember seeing the Admiral showing a pcofcotype of what he anticipated giving the fresa?

0

If you send un the cover, we can combine with the POP file of the EXSUW and get to work on the print job. These will be tightly eontrollad i.n the DoD Detainee Task Force oEfice 0 dittributio". T h n k . .

MY TIMES

8037

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