Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.

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Summary

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The Big Debate summary
What is health? Project three: The Big Debate is designed to encourage students to explore aspects of exercise and health through a variety of cycling-based activities.
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

This module offers the flexibility to engage students in whole-class debates on issues such as the recent decline in physical activity in school-age children or the importance of maintaining a healthy body weight. Alternatively, the handouts and worksheets provided allow students to explore particular issues individually.

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Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within the Key Stage 3 (KS3) Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) scheme of work Subject Physical education 1.1 Competence Developing control of whole-body skills and fine manipulation skills. Responding with body and mind to the demands of an activity. Adapting to a widening range of familiar and unfamiliar contexts. 1.2 Performance Understanding how the components of competence combine, and applying them to produce effective outcomes. Appreciating how to make adjustments and adaptations when performing in different contexts and when working individually, in groups and teams. Understanding the nature of success in different types of activity. 1.3 Creativity Exploring and experimenting with techniques, tactics and compositional ideas to produce efficient and effective outcomes. Understanding that physical activity contributes to the healthy functioning of the body and mind and is an essential component of a healthy lifestyle. Recognising that regular physical activity that is fit for purpose, safe and enjoyable has the greatest impact on physical, mental and social well-being. Unit summary
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

1.4 Healthy, active lifestyles

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Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within the KS3 QCA scheme of work (continued) Subject Physical education 2.3 Developing physical and mental capacity Students should be able to: • Develop their physical strength, stamina, speed and flexibility to cope with the demands of different activities • Develop their mental determination to succeed Students should be able to: • Analyse performances, identifying strengths and weaknesses • Make decisions about what to do to improve their performance and the performance of others • Act on these decisions in future performances • Be clear about what they want to achieve in their own work and what they have actually achieved Students should be able to: • Identify the types of activity they are best suited to • Identify the types of role they would like to take on • Make choices about their involvement in healthy physical activity
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Unit summary

2.4 Evaluating and improving

2.5 Making informed choices about healthy, active lifestyles

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.4

Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within the KS3 QCA scheme of work (continued) Subject Mathematics 1.1 Competence Applying suitable mathematics accurately within the classroom and beyond. Communicating mathematics effectively. Selecting appropriate mathematical tools and methods, including information and communication technology (ICT). 1.3 Applications and implications of mathematics 2.1 Representing Engaging in mathematics as an interesting and worthwhile activity. Students should be able to: • Identify the mathematical aspects of a situation or problem • Select mathematical information, methods and tools to use Students should be able to: • Make connections within mathematics • Use knowledge of related problems • Make accurate mathematical diagrams, graphs and constructions on paper and on screen • Use accurate notation, including correct syntax when using ICT
• • •

Unit summary
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

2.2 Analysing

2.4 Communicating and reflecting

Students should be able to: Communicate findings effectively Engage in mathematical discussion of results Make connections between the current situation and outcomes, and situations and outcomes they have already encountered

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.5

Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within the KS3 QCA scheme of work (continued) Subject
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Unit summary

Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE): Economic well-being and financial capability 2.1 Self-development Students should be able to: • Develop and maintain their self-esteem and envisage a positive future for themselves in work • Review their experiences and achievements

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Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within a School Travel Plan (STP) Section of the STP Part 1 – Tell us about your school Part 2 – What are the issues at your school? Part 3 – How has everyone been involved? Part 4 – What exactly do you want the plan to achieve? Part 5 – How are you going to achieve it? Part 6 – Monitoring, reviewing and progress reporting How does the project link to the STP criteria?
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Develops the use of cycles as transport to and from the school. Students taking advantage of free bus journeys and not getting enough physical exercise. Planning of journeys to and from the school. Storage strategies for cycles. Increase the number of students using cycles to and from school. Increase general fitness of students. Facilitate and encourage cycling to and from school. Count the number of bikes being stored at the school during school hours.

Areas within Every Child Matters (ECM) Objective Be healthy Stay safe How does the project link to the ECM objective? Students will benefit from being physically healthy, especially sport avoiders. Be safe from accidental injury and death. Students will use pre-planned routes to school that can be safely monitored. Achieve personal and social development and enjoy recreation. Develop self-confidence and successfully deal with significant life changes and challenges. Be ready for employment through physical achievement.

Enjoy and achieve Make a positive contribution Achieve economic well-being

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.7

Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within Healthy Schools (HS) Core themes PSHE
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

In what way does the project link to the HS core theme? Assesses children and young people’s progress and achievement in line with QCA guidance. Students will recognise the benefits of improved fitness through increased participation. Students will be educated on the calories they need and a healthy eating plan. Students will be engaged in a physical activity twice a day. Students will enjoy the feeling of improved health.

Healthy eating Physical activity Emotional health and well-being Areas within Sustainable Schools (SS) The Travel and Traffic doorway Curriculum

In what way does the project link to the SS doorway? The project highlights the benefits of cycling to students and allows them to compare it with other forms of physical activity. Promotes healthier lifestyle and will have a positive impact on the lifestyles of students. Encourages use of local facilities to engage students in prescribed activities.

Campus Community

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.8

Teaching delivery map

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The Big Debate teaching delivery map
Areas within other central government initiatives/programmes Initiative/programme Extended Schools How does the project link to this initiative/programme?
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

A European Club Association (ECA) cycle club will be formed at the school and will use local cycle facilities to introduce students to competitive cycling. Makes provision for specialist facilities to give students opportunities to use the school for cycling-related activities (storage, play, maintenance, sport). Direct and focused learning opportunities for whole classes (during tutor time, across the curriculum and outside formal lessons) and as part of focus group work.

Building Schools for the Future (BSF) Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL)

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.9

Teaching notes and lesson plans

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The Big Debate lesson plans
The fitness test
Section 1 Benefits of cycling Section 2 Effects of exercise Section 3 Diet and cycling Section 4 Cycling vs rowing vs running challenge
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.10

Teaching notes and lesson plans

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The Big Debate section 1
Benefits of cycling
Activity outline
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Photocopy and distribute Handout 1: ‘Benefits of cycling’ and let the students read through the information, then ask them to decide which of the benefits shown on Worksheet 1: ‘Why cycle for transport?’ are physical, mental or social benefits. Discuss with the students the benefits of cycling for transport outlined in Handout 2: ‘Why cycle for transport?’, following which they should complete the second activity. Resources: Handout 1 Worksheet 1 Handout 2 Worksheet 2 Benefits of cycling Connect the benefit to the explanation Why cycle for transport? Why cycle for transport?

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.11

Teaching notes and lesson plans

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The Big Debate section 2
Effects of exercise
Teacher guidelines Muscles used in cycling: The main muscle groups used when cycling are the upper thigh muscles (quadriceps), the backside muscles (gluteus maximus), and, to a lesser extent, the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus). Activity outline Activity 1: Using the muscle chart on Worksheet 1, ask students to put a circle around the muscles that are used when cycling. Show the students the table on Handout 1: ‘The main health benefits of a cycling workout’, which shows the benefits in the first hour of cycling. Students will see that even after just 10 minutes their bodies will start to enjoy health benefits. Activity 2: The Observation test on Worksheet 2 is designed to show students how the body adjusts to the extra work it is doing when cycling. Resources: Worksheet 1 Handout 1 Worksheet 2 Muscle chart The main health benefits of a cycling workout Observation test
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.12

Teaching notes and lesson plans

Teachers only

The Big Debate section 3
Diet and cycling
Objective
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

To understand how many calories we burn in different activities. Teacher guidelines What is BMI?: Body Mass Index is a number calculated from an individual’s weight and height, which is used to determine whether a person is within or outside of a normal weight range. The normal range has been highlighted in the chart on Handout 2. Activity outline Students debate what their calorie intake is using Worksheet 1: ‘Calories chart’ for guidance. They can also discuss the number of calories burned in popular sports and pastimes featured in Handout 1: ‘Calories burned in 20 minutes’. Ask the students to use the BMI chart on Handout 2 to look up their own BMI number, and use the table below it to see what range they fall into. Resources: Worksheet 1 Handout 1 Handout 2 Calories chart Calories burned in 20 minutes Body mass index chart

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.13

Teaching notes and lesson plans

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The Big Debate section 4
Cycling vs rowing vs running challenge
Objective Students compare three modes of transport – cycling vs rowing vs running – and decide which is the best form of exercise. Additionally, students can debate the practicalities of each one, its cost and speed. Activity outline This activity uses a treadmill, rowing machine and an indoor bike. The aim is for students to record the distances they cover and compare and analyse the results with the other students. The test requires each participant to complete three minutes at maximum effort with a full recovery (minimum 10 minutes) before starting on the next machine. Data to record on Worksheet 1: ‘Exercise challenge’ Distance covered in three minutes (measure in miles) Average speed = distance divided by 3 x 60 = mph Effort 1-5 (5 being maximum effort) Cycling Distance Average speed Effort If heart rate monitors are available, students’ heart rates could be measured at the start of the three minutes, then after every 30 seconds during the activity, and then every 30 seconds for five minutes following the exercise. These results of the class can be set out in a graph and compared. Resources: Worksheet 1 Exercise challenge Rowing Running
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.14

Teaching notes and lesson plans

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The Big Debate further reading
1. Department for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR). National Travel Survey for Great Britain. Her Majesty’s Stationery Office (HMSO), London, 1999 2. Hillman M. Cycling towards health and safety. British Medical Association (BMA), London, 1994 3. Department of Health (DoH). Our Healthier Nation: A Contract for Health. HMSO, London, 1998 4. Anderson LB et al. All Cause Mortality Associated with Physical Activity During Leisure Time, Work and Sports and Cycling to Work. Arch Intern Med 2000, 160:1621-1628 5. Royal College of Physicians. Medical aspects of exercise: benefits and risks. Report of the Royal College of Physicians, London, 1991 6. Taylor D, Fergusson M. Road User Exposure to Air Pollution: A literature review. Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP)/ETA Trust, London, 1997 7. Luoto R, Latikka R, Pukkala E et al. The Effect of Physical Activity on Breast Cancer Risk: A cohort study of 30,548 women. European Journal of Epidemiology 2000, 16(10): 973-980
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

8. Stephens J. Physical Activity and Mental Health in the United States and Canada: Evidence from four population surveys. Preventive Medicine 1988, 17: 35-47 9. Leitzmann MF. Recreational Physical Activity and the Risk of Cholecystectomy in Women. New England Journal of Medicine 1999, 341(11): 777-784

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Teaching notes and lesson plans

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The Big Debate further reading
10. Boyd HN et al. Effects of Regular Cycling on a Sample of Previous Non-Exercisers. Allot & Lomax/Policy Studies Institute, 1998 11. Fagard RH. Prescription and Results of Physical Activity. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmocology 1995, 25: S20-27 12. National Audit Office. Health of the Nation: A Progress Report. NAO, London, 1996 13. Coats AJS et al. Effects of Physical Training in Chronic Heart Failure. The Lancet 1990, 335: 63-66 14. Russak R. Bicycling June 1988, 29: 5 15. Anderson HR et al. Air Pollution and Daily Mortality in London: 1987-1992. British Medical Journal 1996, 312: 665-669
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate

The Big Debate...
Handouts and worksheets for photocopying
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.19

Section 1 Handout 1 Page 1 of 1

Benefits of cycling
Physical – Increasing fitness Your strength, stamina, aerobic fitness and general muscle function will all be improved through cycling. Because cycling is a low-impact activity it is one of the safest ways to exercise without risk of over-exertion or strain to muscles and joints. Regular physical activity also facilitates other healthy behaviours and could help you maintain a healthy weight. You’ll find you can get through your daily life routines more easily with improved levels of fitness. Physical – Stronger heart Your heart muscles are strengthened, resting pulse is lowered and blood fat levels reduced by regular cycling. People taking regular physical activity suffer far less heart disease than people who don’t! Physical – Shedding excess weight By burning excess body fat and raising your metabolic rate you can lose weight and improve your body shape. If you undertake physical activity regularly you can enjoy a more varied diet without increasing body weight. Cycling is one of the more comfortable forms of physical activity for those who are new to exercise, allowing most people to get fit easily and safely without undue physical strain. Mental – Reducing stress Anxiety, stress and depression are all alleviated, partly due to the physical activity itself, but also due to the pleasure and satisfaction of riding a bike. Cycling is convenient for short journeys, and often faster across town than other forms of transport. It’s a stress-free means of taking physical activity because it can form part of a daily routine. So there’s no need to worry about fitting your new healthy lifestyle into an already overcrowded schedule. Social – Meeting new people There are lots of people out there who, like you, love to cycle. You’ll meet people who go to different schools or have different jobs from you. So go on, getting cycling!
Source: www.ctc.org.uk

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.20

Section 1 Worksheet 1 Page 1 of 1

Name Class

Date

Connect the benefit to the explanation

Improve your body shape

Relax from studies or work

Physical
Make new friends

Mental

Increase your body’s metabolism

Lose weight

Social
Take part in competition

Strengthen your lungs

Strengthen your heart

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Meet new people

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Section 1 Handout 2 Page 1 of 1

Why cycle for transport?

Here are just a few reasons:

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Cycling is the fastest mode of urban transport in all independent studies of the modern era – so wave goodbye to traffic jams and public transport problems Cycling delivers the fastest door-to-door journey in urban areas in every contemporary independent study, as average motor traffic speeds in our towns and cities drop to less than half the average cycle speed and the delays of walking to and from car parks, bus stops and train stations add non-productive time to your journey. Only walking is 100 per cent efficient, but cycling runs a close second as the mode where you spend well over 90 per cent of the journey time making progress from A to B. Cycling eliminates waiting at the stop for your connection, driving around looking for a parking space and queuing to get in – and out of – a big car park Combine essential travelling with getting 30 minutes a day of light exercise – as recommended by your doctor. Cycling improves your health and therefore your quality of life in all its aspects Cycling brings train and bus stations, up to two miles away, within easy reach There are no parking charges

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Section 1 Worksheet 2 Page 1 of 1

Name Class

Date

Why cycle for transport?
List the following forms of transport in order of their contribution to pollution, marking the least polluting as 1 and the most polluting as 6. Aircraft Train Walk
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Car

Cycle

Bus

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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Section 2 Worksheet 1 Page 1 of 1

Name Class

Date

Muscle chart
Using the muscle chart below, put a circle around the muscles that are used when cycling.
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

pectorals (pecs)

trapezius deltoids (delts) latissimus dorsi (lats) rectus abdominus (abs) obliques erector spinae

rhomboids

biceps

triceps

adductors quadriceps (quads) gastrocnemius soleus gluteals (glutes)

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Section 2 Handout 1 Page 1 of 1

Main health benefits of a cycling workout
Cycling (exercise period) 10 min 20 min 30 min 40 min 50 min 60 min >60 min Main effects Muscular system, circulation, joints Improved cardiac function Improved stamina / endurance capacity Lower metabolism (fat metabolism) Lower body weight Anti-stress, general well-being
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Strengthening immune system

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Section 2 Worksheet 2 Page 1 of 1

Name Class

Date

Observation test
Watch a friend cycling (on an exercise bike) and write down the changes that you notice to their: Breathing
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Body temperature

Skin (pigment colour, sweating, etc)

Write up why you think these changes happen:

Breakfast Main meals Fruit and veg

Drinks Fish Take-aways

Snacks

Class

Name

Page 3.26

100g cornflakes 370 kcal 350g lasagna 514 kcal 180g medium baked potato 245 kcal 200g sweetcorn 140 kcal 160g medium orange 59 kcal 112g medium apple 53 kcal 100g broccoli 30 kcal 100g grapes 17 kcal 85g tomatoes 15 kcal 100g cucumber 10 kcal 50g quorn burger 73 kcal 400g chicken tikka masala 440 kcal 400g spaghetti bolognese 380 kcal 125g single chicken kiev 373 kcal 245g ham and mushroom pizza 355 kcal 340g chilli con carne 275 kcal 75g 3 fish fingers 140 kcal 93g tuna in brine 105 kcal 100g haddock fillet 98 kcal 60g boiled prawns 59 kcal 45g crab sticks 45 kcal 255g breaded scampi 565 kcal 75g grilled sardines 146 kcal 100g salmon fillet 198 kcal 24g slice of garlic bread 101 kcal 52g slice of cheese and tomato pizza 127 kcal 67g 1 fried chicken drumstick 195 kcal 78g regular portion of fries 224 kcal 206g quarter pounder with cheese 515 kcal

330ml can of cola 140 kcal 90g battered cod 160 kcal 224g chicken sandwich 659 kcal

48g chocolate bar 215 kcal

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate

100g porridge oats 368 kcal

330ml bottle orange juice 141 kcal

40g nuts 275 kcal

Calories chart

100g weetabix 338 kcal

250ml energy drink 113 kcal

50g packet of crisps 240 kcal

100g boiled eggs 147 kcal

200ml tea with skim milk 14 kcal

25g mixed nuts and raisins 152 kcal

100ml semiskimmed milk 48 kcal

10g sachet hot chocolate 37 kcal

309g 6" sub chicken and bacon 489 kcal

100g yoghurt 70 kcal

250ml fruit drink 100g no added sugar cheddar cheese 429 kcal 8 kcal

250ml smoothie 143 kcal

100g cream cheese 170 kcal

Using the information about the calorie requirements for males and females, circle the foods you will eat to ensure you have enough energy to cycle!

250ml water 0 kcal

Date
Section 3 Worksheet 1 Page 1 of 1

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.27

Section 3 Handout 1 Page 1 of 2

Calories burned in 20 minutes
This page shows the number of calories burned during 20 minutes’ participation in different exercises. Most people should aim to take 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week. This can be a mixture of all types of physical activity – anything that makes you slightly out of breath and raises your heart rate slightly. The table below shows calorific values for popular sports and exercises, and also for pastimes that many of us enjoy doing, such as walking, dancing and gardening. Activity Aerobics Brisk walk Cycling Dancing Driving car Gardening Golf Housework Leisurely walk Rowing Running Skiing Swimming Tennis Watching TV Calories burned in 20 minutes 118 100-120 100 86 33 100-130 72 50-80 40-50 252 216 168 167 174 33

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

These figures are a rough guide only and will vary based on factors such as an individual’s age, body structure, heredity, lifestyle, and the amount of effort put into the activity.

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Section 3 Handout 1 Page 2 of 2

Calories burned in 20 minutes

Daily calorie requirements Age 11-14 15-18 Adults Males 2,220 kcal 2,755 kcal 2,550 kcal Females 1,845 kcal 2,110 kcal 1,940 kcal
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

It is interesting to note that a day’s resting requirement is 1,300 calories for women and 1,600 for men. This is the minimum calories we would need to maintain a healthy weight if we stayed in bed all day!

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.29

Section 3 Handout 2 Page 1 of 1

Body mass index chart
Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number calculated from an individual’s weight and height, that is used to determine whether a person is within, or outside of, a normal weight range. The normal range has been highlighted in the chart.
Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

147 cm 44 kg 48 kg 52 kg 56 kg 58 kg 62 kg 64 kg 68 kg 70 kg 74 kg 76 kg 80 kg 83 kg 87 kg 90 kg 94 kg 20.6 22.0 23.5 25.0 26.4 27.9 29.4 30.8 32.3 33.8 35.2 36.7 38.2 39.6 41.1 42.6

152 cm 19.2 20.6 22.0 23.3 24.7 26.1 27.4 28.8 30.2 31.6 32.9 34.3 35.7 37.0 38.4 39.8

157 cm 18.0 19.3 20.6 21.8 23.1 24.4 25.7 27.0 28.3 29.6 30.8 32.1 33.4 34.7 36.0 37.3

162 cm 16.9 18.1 19.3 20.5 21.7 22.9 24.1 25.3 26.5 27.7 28.9 30.1 31.4 32.6 33.8 35.0

167 cm 15.9 17.0 18.1 19.3 20.4 21.5 22.7 23.8 24.9 26.1 27.2 28.3 29.5 30.6 31.7 32.9

172 cm 15.0 16.0 17.1 18.2 19.2 20.3 21.4 22.4 23.5 24.6 25.6 26.7 27.8 28.8 29.9 31.0

177 cm 14.1 15.1 16.1 17.1 18.1 19.2 20.2 21.2 22.2 23.2 24.2 25.2 26.2 27.2 28.2 29.2

182 cm 13.3 14.3 15.2 16.2 17.2 18.1 19.1 20.0 21.0 21.9 22.9 23.8 24.8 25.7 26.7 27.6

187 cm 12.6 13.5 14.4 15.3 16.2 17.1 18.0 18.9 19.8 20.7 21.6 22.5 23.5 24.4 25.3 26.2

192 cm 12.0 12.8 13.7 14.5 15.4 16.2 17.1 18.0 18.8 19.7 20.5 21.4 22.2 23.1 23.9 24.8

BMI less than 20 BMI 20-25 BMI 25-30 BMI 30-40 BMI over 40

Underweight Normal weight Overweight Obese Severely obese

Physical education KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack Project three – The Big Debate Page 3.30

Section 4 Worksheet 1 Page 1 of 1

Name Class

Date

Exercise challenge

Are you ready? This activity uses a treadmill, rowing machine and an indoor bike. The aim is for you to record the distance you can cover on each piece of equipment and then compare and analyse your results with those of your fellow students. The test requires that you complete three minutes at maximum effort on each machine – with a full recovery (minimum 10 minutes) between your time on each one. If you work in groups you can rotate stopwatch and writing responsibilities allowing you to put your best effort in when its your turn to exercise! Cycling Distance Average speed Effort
Record the distance covered after three minutes of exercise (measure in miles) To work out average speed – divide distance by 3, then multiply by 60 = mph Effort – on a scale between 1 and 5 (5 being maximum effort)

Rowing

Running

Measure your heart rate If heart rate monitors are available, use them to measure your heart rate at regular intervals while exercising, and then during the recovery period. These results can also be compared with those of your fellow students. Heart rate at rest (beats per minute): Heart rate when exercising (at 30 second intervals over the full 3 minutes) 30s 60s 90s 120s 150s 180s 210s 240s 270s 300s

Heart rate in recovery (at 30 second intervals over the first 5 minutes)

Physical education. KS3 Cycle Curriculum Pack. Version 1. April 2009

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