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Thesis work
March J996 - June J999
Co||aboration
contract between
Phi|ps
Semiconductors Caen
&
INSA de Lyon
0DULQDGH4XHLUR]7DYDUHV
N
o
d’ordre: 99 ISAL 086 Année 1999
THESE
présentée
DEVANT L’INSTITUT NATIONAL DES SCIENCES APPLIQUEES DE LYON
pour obtenir
LE GRADE DE DOCTEUR
FORMATION DOCTORALE: Dispositifs de l’électronique intégrée
ECOLE DOCTORALE: Electronique, Electrotechnique, Automatique (EEA)
par
Marina, de Queiroz Tavares
SYNTHETISEUR DE FREQUENCE A BOUCLE DE VERROUILLAGE DE PHASE:
ETUDE DU BRUIT DE PHASE ET DE BOUCLES A LARGE BANDE
Soutenue le 09/Décembre/1999 devant la Commission d’Examen
Jury
Richard-GRISEL Professeur - Université Picardie rapporteur
Michiel-STEYAERT Professeur - K.U. Leuven rapporteur
Jean-Pierre-CHANTE Professeur - INSA de Lyon directeur
Bruno-ALLARD Maître de Conférences - INSA de Lyon examinateur
Philippe-KLAEYLE Ingénieur - Philips Semiconductors - Caen examinateur
Eduard-Stikvoort Chercheur - ingénieur – Philips Nat.Lab. – Eindhoven examinateur
Cette thèse a été préparée chez Philips Semiconductors – Caen, en collaboration avec le
Laboratoire CEGELY de l’INSA de Lyon
Title: PLL Frequency Synthesizers:
Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Keywords: frontend/ tuners / PLL / phase noise / stability / gm-C oscillators
Abstract:
PLL frequency synthesizers are widely used in telecommunication receivers and transmitters, as
part of the frequency conversion block. They consist of a tunable oscillator and a programmable
phase controlling loop.
Current tendencies in PLL development focus noise performance and a higher integration level.
The first is connected to the new digital modulation techniques, often demanding a higher CNR
in the signal chain. And the second concerns a global trend towards smaller and more compact
systems.
This thesis discusses and develops PLL system models to study stability and noise aspects. The
model results are employed in IC and application design, being confirmed via measurements.
The stability approach investigates the robustness of the PLL system, typically working with
very large gain variations. A top-down system to circuit approach, studies noise generation and
transmission. Finally testchip realizations of PLLs with fully gm-C integrated oscillators are
presented.
The thesis was conducted within the context of a collaboration between the CEGELY-INSA de
Lyon and Philips Semiconductors, more specifically in the production and development centre of
Caen.
PhD student:
Marina de Queiroz Tavares
Advisor:
Prof. Jean-Pierre Chante
Director of the CEGELY laboratory
ii PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Contents:
Index ii
List of figures v
List of Tables viii
List of symbols and abbreviations ix
Preface xiv
1. Introduction 1
1.1. The frontend in a telecommunication receiver 2
1.2. The frontend in TV broadcasting 3
1.3. Current tendencies: low noise and higher integration 9
1.4. PLL systems : different application contexts 14
1.5. PLL frequency synthesizers constituting blocks and nomenclature 15
1.5.1. VCO 16
1.5.2. Dividers 17
1.5.3. Phase Detector – Charge Pump 17
1.5.4. Loop Filter 19
2. PLL Phase Model and Loop Filter calculation 21
2.1. Phase Model for PLL synthesizers 22
2.1.1. Requirements in the Time and Frequency Domain 24
2.1.2. Second-Order Loop 26
2.1.3. Third and Fourth Order Loop 28
2.2. Algorithm for Loop Filter Calculation 34
2.2.1. Nominal Design 34
2.2.2. Robust design including Gain Variation and 3
rd
Pole compensation 36
2.2.3. Summary steps and numerical example 40
3. Application Related Constraints 43
3.1. Reference Breakthrough 44
3.2. VCO Noise Representation and Phase Noise Units 46
3.3. Optimum Closed Loop Bandwidth 50
3.4. PLL Closed Loop Bandwidth 52
3.4.1. w
3dB
derivation from B
RL
(s) 53
3.4.2. w
3dB
derivation from w
as
59
3.5. Maximum Phase Jitter 61
3.6. Gain Stability Boundary 65
Contents iii
4. Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 69
4.1. Non-ideal Filter Impedances 70
4.1.1. Fully 3
rd
order passive filter 71
4.1.2. Amplifier AC characteristics 72
4.1.3. Amplifier with single pole 74
4.1.4. Numerical example 76
4.1.5. Input impedance: Zin 79
4.1.6. Summary of AC boundaries for filter design 80
4.2. Disturbances and Noise Propagation 80
4.2.1. Random Electrical Noise 81
4.2.2. Supply Disturbances 82
4.2.3. Amplifier Noise 82
4.2.4. Filter Components Noise 83
4.2.5. Transfer functions table 84
4.2.6. Simulation Example 85
5. Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 89
5.1. Three-state comparator: frequency and phase detector 91
5.1.1. Minimum phase deviation range 92
5.2. DC range limitations 94
5.2.1. Loop filter time domain response 94
5.2.2. Numerical examples and design considerations 96
5.3. Lock convergency approaches 99
5.3.1. Frequency approach 100
5.3.2. Phase approach 103
5.3.3. Comparing the frequency and phase approaches: 105
5.4. Discrete trasfers for the PLL Phase Model 109
5.4.1. The sampler 109
5.4.2. The holder 111
5.4.3. Continuous equivalent with transmission delay 114
6. Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 119
6.1. Electrical Noise: random sources representation & measurements 120
6.1.1. Electrical noise as a random process 121
6.1.2. Measuring Phase Noise 123
6.2. Phase Noise Notations 125
6.2.1. Interchanging Modulation Types 125
6.2.1.1. Angular modulation 127
6.2.2. Phasors Notations 128
6.2.3. Slope approach 133
6.3. Large Signal Linearization 135
6.3.1. Time and Frequency representation 135
6.3.2. Linear Time Variable transfer 136
iv PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
7. Phase Noise in the PLL context 141
7.1. Translating the SNF into phase, time, voltage and current noise 143
7.2. Sampling effects: SNF x f
cp
147
7.2.1. Narrow bandwidth noise sources 149
7.2.2. Large bandwidth noise sources 151
7.3. Detailing noise sources in different PLL blocks 154
7.3.1. D-flip flop 154
7.3.2. Charge Pump 158
7.4. Behavioural Models 159
7.4.1. Frequency domain 159
7.4.2. Time domain 160
7.5. Implementation Loss due to Phase Deviations 162
7.5.1. Signal to noise ratio and implementation loss 163
7.5.2. Digital Demodulator: clock and carrier recovery loops 167
8. Testchips Realized 169
8.1. Gm-C oscillator 170
8.1.1. Structure 171
8.1.2. Results 172
8.2. TC2 : Mixer-Oscillator-PLL circuit for satellite direct conversion 173
8.2.1. Double Loop Synthesizer 173
8.2.2. TC2 structure 175
8.2.3. TC2: results 177
8.3. TC3 : single PLL plus QCCO circuit 180
8.4. Comparative analysis: phase jitter and implementation loss 183
8.4.1. Configurations compared 183
8.4.2. Conditions for the simulations 184
8.4.3. Results and conclusions 187
9. Conclusion 191
Bibliography 193
List of Figures v
List of figures
Chapter 1
Figure 1.1 Communication transceiver: TX and RX systems 2
Figure 1.2 Heterodyne Receiver _ Terrestrial TV Frontend 4
Figure 1.3 DVB Satellite transmission modes 6
Figure 1.4 Satellite Receiver Frontend: heterodyne and ZIF architectures 7
Figure 1.6 Local Oscillator Spectral Purity X SNR 9
Figure 1.7 Carrier Spectrum 10
Figure 1.8 QPSK constellation + phase deviation 11
Figure 1.9 Phase Noise requirements 12
Figure 1.10 PLL frequency synthesizer: block diagram 16
Figure 1.11 VCO and tunable resonator 16
Figure 1.12 Phase Detector & Charge Pump block diagram 18
Figure 1.13 Phase detector & Charge pump: transfer and state machine 19
Chapter 2
Figure 2.1 PLL linear Phase Model 23
Figure 2.2 V
tune
time response for a frequency step 25
Figure 2.3 Locked VCO output spectrum 25
Figure 2.4 3
rd
order Loop Filter Impedance 29
Figure 2.5 4
th
order PLL: Open and Closed Loop Bode Plots 31
Figure 2.6 4
th
order PLL: Root Locus diagram 31
Figure 2.7 Gain Variation X Stability in Bode Plots 33
Figure 2.8 The influence of r
21
in the gain-bandwidth variation 36
Figure 2.9 Numerical example of robust filter design 42
Chapter 3
Figure 3.1 BB noise representation of the VCO 47
Figure 3.2 Free running VCO power spectrum density 49
Figure 3.3 PSD of a VCO locked by a PLL 49
Figure 3.4 Peaking X Optimum Closed Loop bandwidth 50
Figure 3.5 Combined Spectrum: PLL + VCO noise contributions 52
Figure 3.6 Rootlocus for w
3dB
location 58
Figure 3.7 Rootlocus for was location 60
Figure 3.8 Optimizing Total Phase Deviation 63
Figure 3.9 Maximum SSB noise requirement 64
Chapter 4
Figure 4.1 Active Loop Filter 70
Figure 4.2 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter impedance 72
Figure 4.3 Active Filter AC model 73
Figure 4.4 Loop rootlocus with active filter 75
Figure 4.5 Active Filter example: Bode plots 77
Figure 4.6 Active filter: input impedance 79
vi PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 4.7 Supply disturbances 82
Figure 4.8 Amplifier noise 83
Figure 4.9 Filter components noise 83
Figure 4.10 Noise simulation schematic 85
Figure 4.11 Noise simualtion results 86
Chapter 5
Figure 5.1 Phase-detector & Charge Pump transfer 91
Figure 5.2 Maximum Phase Detection Range & Cycle slips 92
Figure 5.3 Condition for unlimited frequency tracking range 93
Figure 5.4 Loop Filter: time response for current pulses 94
Figure 5.5 Time response through normalized functions 96
Figure 5.6 Convergence towards lock: phase deviation sequence 99
Figure 5.7 Frequency approach convergence criterion 103
Figure 5.8 Phase approach convergence criterion 104
Figure 5.9 Comparing frequency and phase approaches 105
Figure 5.10 Convergence approaches X lead-lag spacing r
21
107
Figure 5.11 Convergence approaches X gain variation 108
Figure 5.12 Discrete model for digital blocks 110
Figure 5.13 Discrete phase detector input: ∆ϕ
n
111
Figure 5.14 Charge Pump DAC output 112
Figure 5.15 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay 114
Figure 5.16 Frequency and Time response for the continuous+delay model 115
Chapter 6
Figure 6.1 Spectrum Analyzer Output 124
Figure 6.2 FM & PM carriers 128
Figure 6.3 SSB superposed noise: AM + PM decomposition (phasor) 129
Figure 6.4 Superposed Noise: AM + PM decomposition (spectrum) 130
Figure 6.5 Phase modulated carrier by DSB superposed noise 131
Figure 6.6 Phase deviation from DSB sidebands 132
Figure 6.7 Slope approach: voltage & time deviations 133
Figure 6.8 Periodic transfer determined by a large signal 136
Figure 6.9 Large Signal Transfer: ideal and hyperbolic-tangent limitations 138
Chapter 7
Figure 7.1 PLL block diagram with signal+noise inputs 142
Figure 7.2 Noise Transfer Slopes 143
Figure 7.3 Synthesizer Noise Floor 144
Figure 7.4 Sampled Loop Model 148
Figure 7.5 Large bandwidth noise folding 152
Figure 7.6 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: time domain signals 155
Figure 7.7 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: frequency domain signals 155
List of Figures vii
Figure 7.8 Charge Pump current noise levels within one period 158
Figure 7.9 Behavioural model for AC and noise simulations 160
Figure 7.10 Behavioural model for transient simulations 161
Figure 7.11 Digital Demodulator and Decoder 162
Figure 7.12 Noise Power added by the LO sidebands 164
Figure 7.13 Behavioural Model of the Carrier Recovery loop 167
Chapter 8
Figure 8.1 Gm-C integrated oscillator 171
Figure 8.2 Double loop MOPLL: block diagram 174
Figure 8.3 Block diagram of TC2 176
Figure 8.4 Photo of a testchip TC2 177
Figure 8.5 TC2 _ in-loop spectrum for N1=7 and f
cp1
=300Mhz 179
Figure 8.6 TC2 _out-of-loop spectrum for N1=6 and f
cp1
=300MHz 179
Figure 8.7 TC3 _ single low noise PLL plus QCCO 181
Figure 8.8 Simulation result for the SSB phase noise _ linear scale 182
Figure 8.9 Spectra for ∆f
step
=125kHz and f
lo
=900MHz 186
Figure 8.10 Phase noise simulation for DL+QCCO with and without demodulator 186
viii PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
List of tables
Chapter 1
Table 1-1 DVB standards: bandwidth and modulation types 10
Chapter 2
Table 2-1 2
nd
order filter: Phase Margin Variation for w
ol
∈ [ w
z1
, w
p2
] 37
Table 2-2 3
rd
order filter: Phase Margin Variation for w
ol
∈ [ w
z1
, w
p2
] 38
Table 2-3 3
rd
order filter : Open Loop Bandwidth recentering 39
Chapter 3
Table 3-1 Comparing the denominators of B(s) and B
RL
(s) 54
Table 3-2 Rootlocus approach for w
cl
: parameters of B
RL
(s) 58
Table 3-3 Gain Stability Boundary 65
Table 3-4 Maximum Normalized Gain Variation 66
Chapter 4
Table 4-1 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter: ∆PhM and ∆GM 72
Table 4-2 Active Filter example: Phase Margin degradation 78
Table 4-3 Disturbances transfer functions 84
Table 4-4 Noise sources voltage spectrum density 87
Chapter 6
Table 6-1 Phase Modulated Carrier 126
Table 6-2 Phase Noise X CNR 132
Chapter 7
Table 7-1 Data sheet points from: TSA5059 - low noise PLL 145
Table 7-2 The influence of fcp change for narrow band noise 151
Table 7-3 The influence of fcp change for large band noise 153
Table 7-4 Implementation Loss X Phase deviations 166
Chapter 8
Table 8-1 Measurements of the frequency coverage of the QCCO 172
Table 8-2 Double Loop: minimum step and comparison frequencies. 175
Table 8-3 Parameters of the two zero-IF configurations being compared 183
Table 8-4 Parameters and outputs for comparative analysis 184
Table 8-5 Settings of the demodulator block 185
Table 8-6 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for r
s
=30Msps and f
LO
= 2,2GHz 188
Table 8-7 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for r
s
=3Msps and ∆f
step
= 125kHz 188
Table 8-8 Margin for degradations in the oscillators phase noise performance 189
List of Symbols and Abbreviations ix
List of Symbols and Abbreviations
Symbols
α: gain of the open loop transfer function [A.Hz/V]
α
n
: nominal gain value for loop filter calculation [A.Hz/V]
α
npf
: nominal gain value after the compensation wrt the post-filter [A.Hz/V]
δϕ
i
: phase noise density [rad/sqrt(Hz)]
δi
i
: current noise density [A/sqrt(Hz)]
δt
i
: time noise density [s/sqrt(Hz)]
δv
i
: voltage noise density [V/sqrt(Hz)]
∆ϕ: phase deviation or phase error [rad]
∆ϕ
n
(nT): phase deviation as a discrete variable [rad]
∆Ψ
n
(w): Fourier transform of ∆ϕ
n
(nT)
∆ϕ
p
: peak value of a phase deviation [rad]
∆f
step
: minimum tuning step of a synthesizer [Hz]
ϕ
div
: phase of the main divider output [rad]
ϕ
e
: phase error at the phase detector input [rad]
ϕ
m
: phase of the single tone modulating signal v
m
(t) [rad]
ϕ
n
: phase of the single tone noise component v
n
(t) [rad]
ϕ
osc
: phase of the controlled oscillator [rad]
ϕ
ref
: phase of the reference input [rad]
ξ: ksi, damping factor, dimensionless
σ
ϕ
: total phase deviation [rad or °]
τ: time delay [s]
τ
rst
: time delay for the reset of the phase detector [s]
θ
n
(t): phase modulating noise
A
c
: amplitude of the carrier signal [V]
A
m
: amplitude of the modulating signal [V]
a
n
(t): amplitude modulating noise
A
n
: amplitude of a single tone noise component, v
n
(t) [V]
A
s
: amplitude of the spurious sidebands wrt the carrier amplitude [dBc]
B(s): closed loop transfer function ϕ
osc

ref
, dimensionless
B
RL
(s): approximation of B(s) derived from the root locus
B
vco
(s): closed loop transfer function ϕ
osc
/v
nvco
[rad/V]
B
vco-BPF
(s): band-pass filter approximation for B
vco
(s) [rad/V]
B
3LPF
(s): 3
rd
order low-pass filter approximation for B(s)
D
B
(s): denominator of the closed loop transfer function B(s)
D
G
(s): denominator of the transconductance of the loop amplifier
D
s
(s): denominator of Z
s
(s)
F(s): loop filter transfer function in Laplace variable [Ω]
f
i
: intersection frequency for the PLL and VCO noise asymptotes [Hz]
f
c
: carrier frequency [Hz]
f
cl
: bandwidth of the closed loop transfer function B(s) [Hz]
x PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
f
cp
: comparison frequency at the phase detector [Hz]
f
j
, F
j
: frequency of j [Hz]
f
m
: frequency of the modulating signal [Hz]
f
n
: frequency of a single tone noise component, v
n
(t) [Hz]
f
no
: offset frequency of v
n
(t) wrt the carrier [Hz]
f
offset
: frequency increment with respect to the frequency of a reference signal [Hz]
f
ol
: zero-crossing frequency for the open loop transfer function H(s) [Hz]
f
oln
, f
olnpf
: frequencies related to w
oln
and w
olnpf
[Hz]
f
osc
: frequency of the controlled oscillator [Hz]
f
recover
: intersection between flicker and white noise contributions of a transistor [Hz]
f
p2
, f
p3
: frequencies of 2
nd
and 3
rd
poles of the loop filter [Hz]
f
z1
: frequency of the zero of the loop filter [Hz]
f
3dB
: 3dB attenuation frequency for the closed loop transfer function B(s) [Hz]
G
ChP-ZOH
(s): transfer function of the charge pump as a ZOH [A/rad]
G
ChP-pw
(s): transfer function of the charge pump as a holder with T
w
delay [A/rad]
g
frap
: function expressing the maximum f
cl
, derived from the frequency approach
g
phap
: function expressing the maximum f
cl
, derived from the phase approach
gm: transconductance [Ω
-1
]
Gmo: DC value of the transconductance of the loop amplifier
Gvo: DC value of the voltage gain of the loop amplifier
g(x,r
21
): function expressing the time response of v
tune
, dimensionless
h
PLS
(t), H
PLS
(f): transfer function related to a periodic large signal
H(s): open loop transfer function ϕ
div

e
, dimensionless
I
average
: average current at the output of the charge pump [A]
I
cp
: charge pump current [A]
I
leakage
: leakage current at the tuning input [A]
I
ZOH
(w), i
ZOH
(t): output of the charge pump for a ZOH approach [A]
I
pw
(w), i
pw
(t): output of the charge pump with a delay equals T
w
[A]
i
ni
, I
ni
: current noise density from component i [A/sqrt(Hz)]
K
ϕ
: sensitivity of the phase detector plus charge pump comparator [A/rad]
K
cco
: frequency sensitivity of a current-controlled oscillator [Hz/A]
K
o
: VCO frequency sensitivity [rad/(s.V)]
Kvco: VCO frequency sensitivity [Hz/V]
L(f), L
dB
(f): single-side band phase noise [1/Hz, dBc/Hz]
L
pll
(f): L(f) in the in-loop zone of a locked VCO spectrum [dBc/Hz]
L
vco
(f): L(f) of the free-running oscillator [dBc/Hz]
n
lim
: aliasing factor related to the sampling of large bandwidth noise, dimensionless
N: PLL main divider ratio, dimensionless
N
pll
: noise of the PLL as a phase noise density [rad/sqrt(Hz)]
N
s
(s): numerator of Z
s
(s)
PhM: phase margin for a open loop transfer function [°]
p: normalized time deviation T
d
/T
cp
Q: charges [C]
V
tune
: tuning voltage for the VCO [V]
List of Symbols and Abbreviations xi
R
J
(τ): autocorrelation function of the random process J
R
pu
: pull-up resistor in an active loop filter [Ω]
r
pf
: post-filter factor for the compensation of α
n
and w
oln
r
21
: 2
nd
-pole to zero ratio for loop filter
r
31
: 3
rd
-pole to zero ratio for loop filter
S
ϕ
(f), S
ϕdB
(f): mean square phase fluctuation power [rad
2
/Hz, dBc/Hz]
S
J
(f): power spectrum density of J
T
cp
: comparison period [s]
T
d
: delay or time interval between the two inputs of the phase detector [s]
T
p2
, T
p3
, T
z1
: time constants related to the zero and poles of the loop filter [s/rad]
V
d
(s), v
d
(t): voltage disturbance signal [V]
v
M
(t): tuning voltage for a 2
nd
order filter impedance [V]
v
ni
, V
ni
: voltage noise density from component i [V/sqrt(Hz)]
v
n
(t): single tone noise component [V]
v
nf
: voltage noise density from the loop filter at the input of the VCO [V/sqrt(Hz)]
v
nvco
: inherent noise of the VCO as a voltage noise source [V/sqrt(Hz)]
w: angular frequency [rad/s]
w
a
: pole of the loop amplifier [rad/s]
w
as
: intersection frequency for the asymptotes of the root locus [rad/s]
w
c
: angular frequency of the carrier signal [rad/s]
w
cl
: bandwidth of the closed loop transfer function B(s) [rad/s]
w
cp
: angular comparison frequency [rad/s]
w
n
: natural frequency [rad/s]
w
ol
: zero-crossing angular frequency for the open loop transfer function H(s) [rad/s]
w
oln
: nominal value of w
ol
for loop filter calculation [rad/s]
w
olnpf
: nominal value of w
ol
after the compensation wrt the post-filter [rad/s]
w
p2
, w
p3
, w
z1
: angular frequencies related to the zero and poles of the loop filter [rad/s]
w
s
: sample angular frequency [rad/s]
w
3dB
: angular frequency related to f
3dB
[rad/s]
x: bandwidth ratio f
oln
/f
cp
Z
F
(s), Z
filter
(s): impedance of the loop filter [Ω]
Z
Fa
(s): impedance of the active loop filter [Ω]
Z
Fai
(s): impedance of the active loop filter with a non-ideal input impedance [Ω]
Z
F3
(s): full 3
rd
order impedance of the loop filter [Ω]
Z
in
: input impedance [Ω]
Z
s
(s): series version for the lead-lag filter impedance [Ω]
Z
o
: output impedance [Ω]
Z
p
(s): parallel version for the lead-lag filter impedance [Ω]
Z
3
(s): post-filter impedance [Ω]
Z
3u
(s): impedance of the post-filter in parallel to the pull-up resistor [Ω]
xii PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Abbreviations
AC: alternate current, refers to small signal frequency domain models
(commonly named AC models in analog simulations)
ADC: analog to digital converter
AGC: automatic gain control
AM: amplitude modulation
BB: base band
BiCMOS: IC founding process with both BJT and CMOS devices
BPF: band-pass filter
bw: bandwidth
CMOS: complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors
CNR: carrier to noise ratio
DAB: digital audio broadcasting
DAC: digital to analog converter
DBS: direct broadcast satellite
DC: direct current, refers to the quiescent state of a circuit
DDS: direct digital synthesis
DFF: D-type flip flop
DSB: double-side band
DVB: digital video broadcasting
ft: frequency of unity current gain for a transistor
FM: frequency modulation
Gm-C: transconductance and capacitor integrator for a ring oscillator
IC: integrated circuit
IF: intermediate frequency
I/Q: in phase and quadrature signals
I
2
C: bidirectional 2-wire bus for inter-IC programming and control
LC: inductor and capacitor resonator
LHP: left hand plane in a s-space (Laplace transform)
LNA: low noise amplifier
LO: local oscillator
LPF: low pass filter
LTI: linear time invariable system
MCPC: multi-channel per carrier
MOPLL: mixer-oscillator plus phase-locked-loop circuit
NPN: n-type bipolar junction transistor
OFDM: orthogonal frequency division multiplexing, type of multicarrier modulation
PLL: phase locked loop
PM: phase modulation
PMOS: P-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor
PNP: p-type bipolar junction transistor
PSD: power spectrum density
PWM: pulse width modulation
QAM: quadrature amplitude modulation, type of digital modulation
QCCO: quadrature current controlled oscillator
List of Symbols and Abbreviations xiii
QPSK: quadrature phase-shift keying, type of digital phase modulation
RBW: resolution bandwidth in a spectrum analyzer
RF: radio frequency
RHP: right hand plane in a s-space (Laplace transform)
RX: receiver in a telecommunication system
SAW: surface acoustic wave filters
SCPC: single-channel per carrier
SDD: satellite demodulator and decoder
SNF: synthesizer noise floor
SNR: signal to noise ratio
SSB: single-side band
sqrt: square root
TC2, TC3: testchips #2 and #3
TDM: time division multiplexing
TR: transient analysis in analog simulation
TV: television
TX: transmitter in a telecommunication system
VHF: very high frequency, television broadcasting band
UHF: ultra high frequency, television broadcasting band
VCO: voltage controlled oscillator
V/I: voltage to current converter
VSB: vestigial side band, type of modulation
wrt: with respect to
WSS: wide sense stationary, property of some stochastic processes
Xosc: crystal oscillator
ZIF: zero-IF receiver, architecture of a frontend
ZOH: zero order holder
3W: unidirectional 3-wire bus for inter-IC programming
xiv PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Preface
The central issue of this thesis is the stability and noise performance of PLL frequency
synthesizers.
Frequency synthesizers are a common block of the frontend of RF telecommunication systems.
In particular, PLL synthesizers are extensively used for their programming flexibility, ease of
integration and low production cost.
We focus on the context of TV broadcasting tuners, where the new standards of digital
modulation broadcasting (DVB) which are appearing, and the continuous trend for higher
integration levels, are bringing new issues for IC design and application.
Most of the thesis dissertation is concerned with models: calculations and behavioural simulation
tools, which were developed to support the activities of design and engineering for the integrated
circuits in frequency synthesizers.
The design of a monolithic mixer-oscillator and PLL synthesizer is also presented and used as a
practical example to compare the simulations and calculation tools with measurement results.
Chapter one introduces the context of the TV tuner and the current tendencies in architecture
and IC requirements. These tendencies point to low phase noise synthesizers, implemented in
very monolithic architectures with integrated oscillators. The constituent blocks of the PLL
synthesizer are presented, describing their basic functionality.
Chapter two studies the stability and robustness of a phase-locked loop in a tuner application,
where the gain parameters vary within a large range. An algorithm for the loop filter calculation
is developed. It allows a systematic and consistent approach to combine the IC parameters and
the filtering requirements.
Application constraints related to phase deviations and reference breakthrough are discussed in
the light of this algorithm, in chapter three. This is the beginning of a top-down analysis about
the phase noise in the local oscillator (LO) signal. The noise performances of the PLL and the
VCO are adjusted by centering the closed loop bandwidth of the feedback. An example of phase
jitter optimization for a satellite synthesizer is discussed.
Chapter four examines the active loop filter configurations and continues the noise analysis, in
a first example that descends to a circuit implementation level. The AC characteristics of the
filter amplifier exemplify the first non-ideal aspects of the phase model of the PLL.
In chapter five we continue to discuss other limitations of the linear time invariable model of the
frequency synthesizer. They concern the maximum feedback bandwidth for a loop that is
partially discrete, and the maximum comparison frequency that still guarantees the frequency
tracking behaviour of the tri-state phase detector. A discrete time domain approach is compared
to a continuous frequency model with an equivalent delay.
Chapter six presents the theoretical basis of the generation of phase noise, and discusses
different possibilities of notation that are compared to measurement and simulation tools. The
relationships among the different notations are explored. The assumptions of a narrow band FM
modulation and a periodic steady behaviour are combined, in order to develop a linear time
variable transfer for the noise.
List of Symbols and Abbreviations xv
In chapter seven, the phase noise issue is detailed to the circuit level, by an analysis of the noise
performance of the different constituent blocks of the PLL. The parameters that can distinguish
the dominant noise sources in measurements are identified, and two simulation examples are
presented. Furthermore we discuss behavioural models to mix system and circuit descriptions in
simulations. We also present considerations about the implementation loss in the receiver due to
the phase deviations in the LO signal. Practical examples, simulations and measurements, are
presented in chapter eight, where these analytical tools are used to design and evaluate two
testchips. The testchip designs are briefly presented, they contain a PLL and a monolithic Gm-C
oscillator that covers the satellite band L (950MHz to 2150MHz). Testchip TC2 is part of a
double synthesizer with a comparison frequency that goes up to 330MHz, with an in-loop noise
in the order of –108dBc/Hz. Testchip TC3 explores the maximum bandwidth of a single loop
PLL and confirms the theoretical approach of chapter five. Finally we compare the spectra of
two synthesizers: a single loop PLL plus an LC oscillator and a double loop synthesizer plus a
Gm-C oscillator, both for a QPSK near zero-IF receiver. The comparison refers to the allocation
of implementation loss in a tuner, due to the phase deviations in the LO. Two examples of high
and low bit rate channels are discussed, and the margin for production for the most critical
parameters is calculated.
This thesis was developed in the industrial site of Philips Semiconductors in Caen, Normandie,
France. It was part of a collaboration contract between Philips Semiconductors and the INSA de
Lyon, or more specifically the electrical engineering laboratory CEGELY.
I would like to thank all of the colleagues within Philips Caen and Philips Eindhoven for their
help and support.
Caen, June 99,
Marina de Queiroz Tavares
Chapter 1 / Introduction 1
Contents:
1 Introduction 1
1.1 The frontend in a telecommunication receiver.........................................................................................2
1.2 The frontend in TV broadcasting .............................................................................................................3
1.3 Current tendencies: low noise and higher integration.............................................................................9
1.4 PLL systems : different application contexts .........................................................................................14
1.5 PLL frequency synthesizers constituting blocks and nomenclature.......................................................15
1.5.1 VCO...............................................................................................................................................16
1.5.2 Dividers..........................................................................................................................................17
1.5.3 Phase Detector – Charge Pump......................................................................................................17
1.5.4 Loop Filter .....................................................................................................................................19
Figures:
Figure 1.1 Example of a communication transceiver: TX and RX systems................................................2
Figure 1.2 Heterodyne Receiver _ Terrestrial TV Frontend.......................................................................4
Figure 1.3 DVB Satellite transmission modes...............................................................................................6
Figure 1.4 Satellite Receiver Frontend: heterodyne and ZIF architectures...............................................7
Figure 1.5 Local Oscillator Spectral Purity X SNR .....................................................................................9
Figure 1.6 Carrier Spectrum........................................................................................................................10
Figure 1.7 QPSK constellation + phase deviation........................................................................................11
Figure 1.8 Phase Noise requirements ..........................................................................................................12
Figure 1.9 PLL frequency synthesizer: block diagram..............................................................................16
Figure 1.10 VCO and tunable resonator.......................................................................................................16
Figure 1.11 Phase Detector & Charge Pump block diagram......................................................................18
Figure 1.12 Phase detector & Charge pump: transfer and state machine .................................................19
Tables:
Table 1-1 DVB standards: bandwidth and modulation types......................................................................10
1 Introduction
In this chapter we locate the context of this thesis by introducing basic aspects and innovation
tendencies for the frontends of TV broadcasting receivers.
This thesis focuses on the frequency synthesizer block, which is a constituent part of the
frontend.
PLL frequency synthesizers are a common element of different telecommunication receivers that
are produced on a large scale. This choice is connected to their compactness and low cost, both
of which are continuously improved by larger integration levels.
Furthermore, emerging digital modulation techniques are imposing new requirements on this
block, which carries out the frequency conversion of the input data.
Finally, we shortly describe the constituent elements of the PLL synthesizer, so as to present
their functionality and general structure.
2 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
1.1 The frontend in a telecommunication receiver
Communication and transport are probably the key technological fields that most changed daily
life in the 20th century. Our world became smaller, because it may be rapidly crossed by waves
and engines taking information and people worldwide.
The term communication system is employed here to include transceivers that convert data into
electromagnetic waves (transmitters_TXs) and the other way around (receivers_RXs), in order to
transmit this data through a fast moving media such as air, metallic cables, optical fibers and
others.
The TX and RX have two basic parts, namely:
• Backend: data processor and (de)modulator;
• Frontend: frequency translator and selectivity.
The first one is in charge of transforming data into a convenient manageable electrical signal
that is later transposed into a well defined frequency window (channel) by the second.
i
Figure 1.1 Example of a communication transceiver: TX and RX systems
The spread of communication systems relies on the advance of modulation techniques, digital
signal treatment and RF-frequency electronics. The first two greatly increased the amount and
quality of transmitted information, and the last one enabled the utilization of an increasing range
of the frequency spectrum.
However this spectrum range is limited by the physical properties of the conducting materials
and the maximum working frequencies of the electronic devices employed. So further
exploitation of this already crowded spectrum depends on a greater compaction of modulated
data, or capacity to share the same frequency range (spread spectrum modulations).
Occupying narrower frequency bands with higher information density decreases the margin for
signal degradation in the up and down conversion of the data in the TX and RX systems. In other
words, modulation types with increasing bandwidth efficiency require higher signal-to-noise
ratio (SNR) for a correct reception.

i
There are also communication systems that use base band transmissions, i.e. the data is directly transmitted after
modulation, without being frequency translated. However the applications are usually restricted by their maximum
data flow.
Frontend Backend
input
data
data processor
+
Modulator
Up
Conversion
output
data
Demodulator
+
data processor
Down
Conversion
+
Selectivity
Chapter 1 / Introduction 3
Up and down conversions are carried out by mixing data signals with carrier signals in TXs, or
by mixing channels with carrier signals in RXs. Therefore the loss of quality due to this
operation depends on the mixer and carrier qualities.
Mixer performance is usually specified in terms of conversion gain, noise figure and linearity
parameters, amongst others. There is a compromise between the parameters of gain on one side
and linearity and noise figure on the other. This compromise has to be solved in combination
with the specifications of the filtering and amplification stages, taking into account the
constraints of consumption and signal quality.
The carrier signal performance includes factors such as frequency tunability and spectrum purity.
The frequency tunability refers to the coverage of a frequency range, with a certain resolution or
minimum variation step. The carrier spectrum quality is often defined by a carrier-to-noise ratio
(CNR), specified in accordance to the modulation nature and SNR requirements of the data
signal.
Carrier signal generation can be split into three basic types:
- Direct digital synthesis (DDS), using sine look-up tables, accumulators and digital clocks.
They are often limited in speed and quality by the maximum clock frequency. Thus, they are
more frequently employed in band-base (BB), or intermediate-frequency (IF) stages; mainly
after analog-to-digital data conversion (ADC).
- Mixer-divider chains, combining an ensemble of reference oscillators, through frequency
conversion and filtering. Increasing the precision and the frequency range is a trade off with
size, integrability and power consumption. They are often bulky systems that become hardly
integrable as the number of reference sources increases. For non-integrated systems, the
advantage of keeping the spectral purity of the sources may be decisive.
- Feedback loops with a reference source and a programmable counter block to sweep the
frequency range of a tunable oscillator. Phase-locked loop types are the most widespread in
transceiver applications. Integrability and low cost are the main advantages, but settling times
are elevated compared to methods of direct synthesis.
A wide span of systems of hybrid generation combine the basic types above to explore the
advantages of each architecture. They may be generally called multi-loop architectures, as they
compose the carrier signal through two or more loops in different concatenated and/or interlaced
structures.
The scope of the present work is centered around PLL frequency synthesizers for terrestrial and
satellite TV receivers. Stability and noise issues are discussed and applied to single and double
loop architectures.
The models developed for stability and disturbance are certainly useful for other PLL
applications, but the issues and numerical examples are oriented by the primary context.
1.2 The frontend in TV broadcasting
The block schematic below represents a heterodyne receiver, detailing the elements of the
selectivity and frequency conversion stages.
ii

ii
The denomination heterodyne or superheterodyne, is given to receivers working with two distinct amplification
and filtering sections prior to demodulation.
4 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 1.2 Heterodyne Receiver _ Terrestrial TV Frontend
(1) 1
st
RF filter: large bandwidth filtering plus impedance adaptation between antenna and pre-amplifier;
(2) RF pre-amplifier: 1
st
amplification stage (keeping SNR), plus buffer avoiding f
osc
leakage towards the antenna input;
(3) double RF filter: middle bandwidth filtering, rejecting image channel and also blocking VCO signal ;
(4) Mixer: frequency conversion kernel: conversion gain, linearity and noise figure constraints;
(5) Local Oscillator (LO) + PLL tuning system: carrier generator for down-conversion, and frequency tuning for oscillator and input filters tracking;
(6) IF pre-amplifier: gain prior to selective filtering to keep minimum SNR;
(7) IF filter: fixed frequency very selective filtering (SAW filter);
(8) IF signal treatment: amplification, demodulation and signal level detector.
TUNE
(5)
(1) (2) (3) (4) (6) (7) (8)
BB
output
data
V
AGC
V
tune
VCO
or
LO
PLL
video
&
audio
demod.
Level
detector
RF stage IF stage
Chapter 1 / Introduction 5
In figure 1.2 the incoming signal is initially modulated at the channel or RF frequency, where a
primary rough selection is carried out by filters (1) and (3). After the first frequency down-
conversion, the input data appears around the IF, and passes a sharper selectivity stage
represented by filter (7). A convenient amplification level is assured by an automatic gain control
(AGC) loop, with an amplitude sensor at the BB stage.
The elements constituting the tuner are indicated by the dotted arrow. In a TV set the tuner is
easily recognized by its metallic screening box, used for RF isolation.
The sequence of filtering, mixing and amplification blocks reflects an important trade-off
between selectivity and frequency tunability. For elements with a frequency dependent
behaviour, these characteristics usually oppose each other. Therefore the RF stages covering the
whole input frequency range are necessarily less selective than the IF stage, working at a fixed
frequency.
RF filters and oscillator are constructed with similar resonant circuits, assuring the correlation of
their frequency variation, also named tracking characteristic or matched filter-oscillators.
The frequency tuning of the RF stages is made by the PLL block. It contains a feedback control
system, comparing the RF oscillator to a reference crystal oscillator. The frequency variability is
guaranteed by programmable counters interpolated in the control loop.
The work in this thesis deals with stability and noise aspects of the PLL plus RF oscillator
ensemble, correlating their specifications and design constraints to the tuner application
requirements. The tuner architectures and the issues studied are focused on the TV reception
context, for both terrestrial and satellite applications.
In fact figure 1.2 represents a terrestrial tuner architecture, with the following typical values of
RF and IF frequencies and bandwidths:
i
• RF input, channel frequency range divided in three bands:
- VHF I: 47 MHz ------- 140 MHz
- VHF III: 140 MHz ------ 400 MHz
- UHF: 400 MHz ------ 860 MHz
The input amplifier, filtering and mixing stages are often doubled, having one set specific
for the reception of the VHF bands, and the other for UHF.
• Most standards work with: F
vco
= F
RF
+ F
IF
and IF typically within the range : 39 MHz --- 55 MHz
The choice of F
vco
larger than F
RF
reduces the relative tuning range (f
max
/f
min
) of the local
oscillator. The highest possible IF value is chosen, to ease the filtering of the image channel,
but usually outside the reception bands, to avoid direct coupling between the RF input and the
IF output.
• Channel bandwidth: 6 MHz --- 8 MHz
Most of the channel bandwidth is occupied by the video information. The audio is
transmitted through a modulated subcarrier that is placed in the high end of the channel
bandwidth, between 4 and 6 MHz.
• The bandwidths of band-pass filters (1) and (3) vary significantly amongst the different
applications. For instance, filter (3) may present a bandwidth between 7 and 25 MHz. The
rejection of this same filter for the image channel is in the order of 60 dB.
Filter (7) presents a sharp selectivity for the neighbouring frequencies, and a bandwidth in
the order of 5MHz.
• The AGC dynamic for the amplifying blocks of the tuner is generally between 40 and 50 dB,
with another 60 dB controllable amplification capacity in the demodulator.

i
The frequency values indicated for the terrestrial and satellite applications are just a rough range, close to the most
common standards. There are several standards with different values for RF, IF and channel width.
6 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
For analog standards, the minimum SNR at the IF output is in the order of 55dB, to start
causing visible errors in the video reception.
Satellite tuners have a slightly different architecture, as shown in figure 1.4.
The RF transmission bandwidth, Ku-band, is rather elevated, which imposes a first frequency
conversion close to the antenna, in order to support the losses through the cable binding the
antenna and the RX frontend.
• 1
st
RF at the antenna input, Ku-band: 10.7 GHz -- 12.75 GHz ;
• Constant LO frequency down-converting block: LNA (low noise amplifier)
Due to the strong attenuation between the satellite and the RX antennas, this block has tight
noise figure requirements;
• 2
nd
RF at LNA output, band L : 950 MHz -- 2150 MHz .
The older analog standards, (DBS - Direct Broadcast Satellite), use FM modulated channels with
a bandwidth varying between 27 and 36 MHz.
The more recent digital norms, (satellite DVB – Digital Video Broadcasting), have different
channel compositions, using multiplexing in frequency and time domain (see figure 1.3). In this
case we prefer to refer to the frequency spacing as the transponder bandwidth, regarding the
ensemble of signals transmitted by a single amplifier in a determined frequency window.
• Transponder bandwidth: 33 MHz – 36MHz ;
• MCPC (multi-channel per carrier): single modulation package multiplexing in time
(TDM) up to 8 TV channels transmitted in a bit
flow with rates around 55 Mbps;
• SCPC (single-channel per carrier): several narrow bandwidth channels splitting the
transponder spacing;
• Multicast (analog+digital channels): a standard analog FM channel of 27 MHz
bandwidth multiplexed in frequency with a 9MHz
wide digital channel, transmitted with a power
level 13dB below the analog channel.
Figure 1.3 DVB Satellite transmission modes
The first RX systems for QPSK channels used a double IF heterodyne architecture, with the
following intermediate frequencies:
• 1
st
IF: 460 MHz – 480 MHz; with 1
st
LO: F
vco1
= F
RF
+ F
IF1
• 2
nd
IF: 70 MHz, and a down-mixing stage with a LO containing 2 outputs in quadrature.
The choice of the 2
nd
IF was connected to the availability of SAW filters with Nyquist slope at
this frequency. The demodulation and decoding are performed by a digital IC, whose ADC input
is connected to the band-base output of last mixing stage.
The last LO converting the data to the base band has quadrature outputs, splitting the output data
in I (in phase) and Q (quadrature) outputs.
36MH
MCPC SCPC Multicast
QPSK QPSK FM QPSK
13dB
Chapter 1 / Introduction 7
Figure 1.4 Satellite Receiver Frontend: heterodyne and ZIF architectures
V
AGC
V
tune
SAW
V
AGC
I
Q
BB
output
data
RF stages
V
tune
heterodyne receiver F
vco
= F
IF
+ F
RF
F
IF
~ 470 MHz
2
nd
1
st
RF
V
AGC
IF and/or BB
LNA
down
converter
Near-zero IF receiver F
vco
= F
RF
BB
output
data
Satellite demod. & decoder
(SDD)
V
tune
VCO
PLL
90°
Demo-
dulator
Level
detector
VCO
PLL
I
Q
90°
carrier
&
clock
recovery
forward
error
correction
ADC
&
filters
Level
detector
8 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In more recent systems the Nyquist filtering is integrated in the digital IC realizing the
demodulation and signal decoding. Thus an intermediate heterodyne architecture uses a single IF
(similar to the 1
st
IF above) and a quadrature LO at this IF frequency (see upper half of figure
1.4).
Finally the latest satellite tuner ICs are concentrating in a monodyne, near-zero IF architecture
(see lower half of figure 1.4). There is one single stage of frequency translation between the 2
nd
RF (band L) and the BB output.
It is certainly an architecture allowing greater compactness and economy in external
components, but also increasing the performance constraints for the integrated blocks and the
surrounding application.
The advantages are connected to the suppression of the IF stage and the replacement of the SAW
– BPF by a discrete and cheaper LPF. Besides, the rejection of the image channel (which is now
the selected channel but with a spectrum reversion) can be replaced by a proper output form,
containing the necessary information to distinguish the two superposed spectra. The I and Q
outputs have this convenient format, and furthermore they are adapted to the demodulation of the
QPSK modulated data.
The limitations are connected to the performance of several blocks such as:
- the quadrature LO, which now works in the band L, and needs to fulfill the conditions of
minimum mismatches in amplitude (<0.5dB) and quadrature (<3°);
- the matching of the I/Q stages in BB;
- the isolation and linearity of the RF amplifiers and mixers.
In fact the monodyne RX is especially sensitive to coupling between the RF and LO signals (in
this case at the same frequency) and to interference generated by intermodulation products of
even orders (appearing at low frequencies).
The nomenclature near-zero IF stress the fact that the LO signal is not locked to the RF input, but
is programmed to a frequency close to the RF carrier. The precision is also limited by the
minimum allowable tuning step in the LO controlling loop. The difference between the output
spectrum and a real BB signal are recovered by the digital demodulator in the so called, carrier
recovery loop.
Figure 1.4 illustrates block schematics of a heterodyne, single IF, and a near-zero IF (named ZIF
or zero-IF for short) receivers. In both configurations the AGC dynamic range, for the tuner, is to
the order of 50 dB. The bandwidths of the filters are greatly dependent on the application. The
minimum SNR at the base band output will depend on the maximum bit-error rate that can be
corrected by the signal decoder. A maximum bit-error rate (BER) of 10
-4
is usually acceptable
for most decoders, and it implies a minimum SNR of 11.4dB for QPSK modulated data
[Sinde98a].
We can note the large difference of the minimum SNR for the reception of analog terrestrial TV
signals and the satellite digitally modulated ones. However the latter suffers from much larger
attenuation in the transmission path, and it would not be feasible to work with such high SNR as
in the terrestrial systems.
Another important difference between the terrestrial and satellite applications, besides their
frequency ranges, is the constraint for the filtering of the neighbouring channels.
Satellite transmitted channels have the same power levels at the RX input, as they come from a
common TX source.
In terrestrial transmission, neighbouring channels may come from different TXs and
consequently their incoming power vary greatly according to the TX and RX “line of sight”.
Chapter 1 / Introduction 9
The “line of sight” concerns the distance and blocking obstacles, causing attenuation and
reflection of the transmitted signal.
i
Figure 1.5 illustrates the importance of the carrier spectral purity for the proper reception of
neighbouring channels with different input power.
Figure 1.5 Local Oscillator Spectral Purity X SNR
The channel with lower input power, centered around f
ch2
, is degenerated by an adjacent channel
down converted by a noisy local oscillator.
This example introduces the idea that the tuner requirements, with respect to selectivity and SNR
degradation, may be translated to corresponding specifications for the frequency synthesizer
block.
From now on, we concentrate our attention on the frequency synthesizer block, marked by a gray
rectangle in the frontend schematics (figures 1.2 and 1.4).
In the next section we discuss some current tendencies in the development of tuner ICs, relating
the new requirements to the emerging digital broadcasting systems.
1.3 Current tendencies: low noise and higher integration
Current trends in the tuner circuit developments are bound to the developing standards using
digitally modulated signals, and to the continuous demand for higher integration levels.
Nowadays, tuners often have one single integrated circuit (IC), a MOPLL, including the PLL,
mixer-oscillator and IF amplifier blocks. This level of integration is the result of a continuous
miniaturization that combines the functionality of several ICs and also integrates parts of
previously discrete circuitry.
Furthermore the more recent digital standards, based on phase modulation techniques and/or
using closely spaced multi-carriers, are imposing new constraints on the CNR of the local
oscillator. Therefore from the basic requirements of the frequency synthesizer concerning the
tuning range and the resolution, other more strict parameters of spectral purity are added.

i
Signal reflection causes multi-path reception, where different phase delayed versions of the input signal reach the
RX. Specially for strongly attenuated signals this is an important draw-back, decreasing the SNR and adding noise
which is correlated to the signal.
IF RF
LO
f
ch1
f
ch2
f
lo
f
lo
-f
ch1
f
lo
-f
ch2
10 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 1.5 sketches the pollution of the input RF signal by the spectral dispersion of the local
oscillator. The spectral purity is largely discussed during this work, and in the PLL synthesizer
context we will see that it is directly associated to the phase noise in the carrier signal. Therefore
the specifications of phase noise in the output of a local oscillator, are a translation of the CNR
required for the reception. These specifications also depend on the modulation type and on the
selectivity of the input filtering stages.
Analog terrestrial TV standards use vestigial side-band (VSB) modulation and FM for the video
information and either FM and AM signals for audio. In satellite applications the analog
standards use FM signals, needed for their robustness with respect to amplitude distortions.
When talking about SNR, we concentrate on the video signal because of its larger amount of
information compared to the audio signal. Besides the video signal needs higher signal quality
for an interference-free (or error-free) reception.
In particular for FM signals, the noise added by a local oscillator with 1/f
2
power sidebands (as
represented in figure 1.6) is demodulated at the output as a flat, white distributed noise
interfering in the output data. Therefore in the FM context, noise specifications are often bound
to the free running, or out-of-loop, carrier spectrum, transmitted by the VCO intrinsic noise.
Figure 1.6 Carrier Spectrum
Digital video broadcasting standards and services have undergone great expansion recently. In
Europe the DVB-S, DVB-C, DVB-T and DAB describe the norms of video and audio
transmissions through satellite, cable and terrestrial or off-air systems.
DVB-S DVB-T DVB-C DAB
Basic
modulation
principle
Single carrier
QPSK modulated
Multiple carrier OFDM
subcarriers modulation:
QAM16 or QAM64
Single carrier
M-QAM modulated
(M=16, …64, 256)
Multiple carrier OFDM
subcarriers modulation:
DQPSK
Number of
subcarriers
& frequency
spacing
_ 1705 / 6817
mode: 2k / 8k
∆f= 4.47kHz / 1.12kHz
_ 193/ 385/ 769 /1537
mode: 1 / 1.5 / 2 / 3
∆f= 8kHz /…/ 1kHz
Signal
bandwidth
Not fixed, e.g.:
33MHz – 36MHz 7.61MHz
Not fixed, e.g.:
7.9MHz 1.536MHz
Gross data
rates [Mbps]
Not fixed, e.g.:
51.60 10.80 – 39.27
Not fixed, e.g.:
34.37 2.304
Frequency
ranges
10.7 – 12.75GHz
2
nd
RF:
950 – 2150MHz
VHF I
VHF III
UHF
VHF I
VHF III
UHF
Slots within:
VHF III
Band L
Table 1-1 DVB standards: bandwidth and modulation types
Programmable
&
tunable range
N.f
cp
f [Hz]
|P(f)|
single
sideband
phase noise
f
osc
f [Hz]
Chapter 1 / Introduction 11
The DAB system, initially imagined for audio transmission only, has developed into a
multimedia standard (DMB), showing important advantages for mobile applications when
compared to the DVB-T.
All these standards have source coding algorithms based on MPEG-2. Table 1-1 [Roma97]
presents a short overlook of these standards.
The first digital broadcasting services available were the single carrier ones, requiring simpler
TX and RX. Nowadays there are also DAB radio and data transmission services, and the first
consumer DVB-T systems are currently being tested.
The minimum signal to noise ratios vary in accordance to the bandwidth efficiency of the
different types of modulation and coding. For example, for a maximum BER of 10
-4
, the SNR of
a DVB-C channel in QAM 64 is 24.3 dB, and in QAM 256 it equals 30.2 dB
[Sinde98a], which is considerably higher than the SNR for the QPSK channel.
The underlying modulation principles are either phase or phase and amplitude based. Thus with
respect to the sensitivity of the local oscillator to the CNR, we may expect that the phase
accuracy of the carrier becomes relevant.
Indeed, the specifications for the LO spectrum become very tight. For example, tuner
constructors ask for the following phase noise performances: for QPSK receivers a maximum
total phase deviation under 2°; or for OFDM receivers a single side-band (SSB) phase noise
lower than –80dBc/Hz at a frequency offset of 1kHz.
However, most of these specifications are empirically determined, and they strongly depend on
the application used for the measurements.
More formally, these specifications can be derived from the allocation of implementation losses
within the system. For DVB standards, the implementation losses due to the phase deviations of
the LO signal should be kept below 0.2 dB [Sinde98a]. This requirement can be translated into a
total phase deviation brought by the synthesized carrier. Nevertheless, the relationship between
the implementation loss and the LO phase deviation depend on the characteristics of the
demodulator used in the reception.
Therefore the specification for phase deviations, either as a total value in degrees or as a
maximum SSB level at a certain offset, reflects the sensitivity of the ensemble, frontend plus
demodulator, to a certain noise spectrum shape.
The optimization of the phase deviation in the LO signal is one of our central subjects that is
progressively discussed in the following chapters. At this point, we give a first glance of the
issue with figures 1.7 and 1.8.
In figure 1.7 we sketch the influence of
phase noise in a QPSK constellation,
showing that phase deviations directly
increase the occurrence of errors in bit
detection.
Figure 1.7 QPSK constellation + phase deviation
QPSK
constellation
∆ϕ
12 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The total phase deviation can be calculated integrating the sidebands of the LO spectrum, as
shown in figure 1.8.a. The lower and upper limits of the integral are determined by the
demodulator and channel bandwidth parameters.
Figure 1.8 continues the zoom around f
osc
started in figure 1.6. It shows noise specifications that
may concern the intrinsic behaviour of the oscillator (out of loop SSB phase noise) or the PLL
blocks (in loop SSB phase noise), used to tune the oscillator frequency.
Figure 1.8.a Figure 1.8.b
Figure 1.8 Phase Noise requirements
For multicarrier standards, the noise specifications are eventually determined by a maximum
threshold for the level of the sidebands, for offsets that are comparable to the frequency spacing
between subcarriers.
Figure 1.8.b shows two carrier spectra with different noise performances, and it also indicates a
SSB phase noise limit for two different frequency offsets(f
off-1
and f
off-2
).
The dotted line spectrum presents a better oscillator performance than the solid line spectrum.
However as the offset frequency of the noise specifications decreases, it becomes harder to fulfill
this requirement by relying only on the oscillator characteristics.
The solid line spectrum shows an option where the in-loop (PLL related) noise performance is
adapted to the CNR specification at both offsets: f
off-1
and f
off-2
. In practice this situation appears
in two contexts:
• very strict noise performances related to modulation types with compact data representation
in narrow bandwidths or using multi-carriers closely spaced to each other. In TV
broadcasting the OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) standard has the
most strict specifications concerning the local carrier spectral purity.
• oscillators with a poor intrinsic noise performance, but associated to low noise PLL. This
situation is often encountered when using completely integrated oscillators.
The second situation sends us back to the trend for higher integration levels.
Currently, most of the controllable LOs are based on a resonant amplifier with an external
resonator.
The large frequency range of the TV applications limits the possibility of integrating the resonant
circuit, as occurs in narrow band reception systems, like mobile telephones. Therefore other
oscillator structures, like ring or relaxation, have to be tried.
f
off-1
f
off-2
……
fmin fmax
f
osc
f [Hz]
f
offset
in loop
SSB
phase noise
out of loop
SSB
phase
∆ϕ
2
/2
Chapter 1 / Introduction 13
The drawbacks of these other structures are: their poorer phase noise performance as compared
to LC resonators with high quality factors, and the impossibility to track the LC matched filters
in the input stages of the tuner.
The advantages appear mostly in the zero-IF configurations, where a totally integrated oscillator,
with no LC resonator, increases the robustness to RF interference.
Therefore the integration tendency forces architectural modifications in the tuner. The absence of
external tracking filters can be more easily coped with in satellite receivers, where the uniform
input level enables a feasible compromise between selectivity and linearity requirements.
ii
Furthermore, it is also in satellite applications that we see more and more frontend receptors
using direct conversion, or ZIF receivers. Direct conversion schemes have new constraints
related to the suppression of the IF stage. The AGC dynamics in the RF and BB parts have to
replace the previous IF dynamics while preserving the linearity and noise figure properties.
Coupling interactions between the local oscillator and the RF input signal (now in the same
frequency), have to be controlled to reduce the signal degeneration by “self-reception” or “self-
demodulation”.
These constraints brought an additional interest to a completely integrated oscillator suffering
form less external coupling problems. The integrated oscillators may also be piloted by a second
oscillator with an external resonator but working at a different frequency; or in other words, a
multi-loop synthesizer.
The use of an integrated oscillator covering a large tuning range often brings an inherent
degradation of the oscillator spectral purity. Thus achieving strict phase noise requirements
becomes obligatory for the PLL circuitry.
In fact, figure 1.8 showed that the noise requirement imposes a compromise between the PLL
and the VCO noise performances. Furthermore the variable parameter adapting these
performances is the loop bandwidth, which unfortunately is not independent of other parameters
such as loop gain, comparison frequency, minimum tuning step and DC tuning range.
In summary the following topics, that are closely related to the evolution of an analog carrier
generation for RX frontends, are guiding the issues studied in this work:
ΠNoise and stability treatments for large bandwidth and low phase deviation PLL synthesizers in tuner
applications;
ΠLow Phase Deviation: the VCO spectrum has to be optimized for minimum phase deviations in
accordance to the new digital modulation standards (DVB standards: QPSK, QAM, OFDM).
A combination of PLL and VCO noise performances are the IC parameters that can be specified
to fullfil this specification. The PLL bandwidth is the compensation variable between the
performances of these two circuits.
As the improvement in coverage+selectivity of the VCOs attains a limit, the noise quality of the
PLLs starts to be an issue. Nevertheless, to rely on the PLL characteristics, we need to control
the closed loop bandwidth, and learn about the constraints that limit the PLL bandwidth.
Furthermore, for solutions with integrated oscillators, multi-loop schemes with large PLL
bandwidths are required.
ΠPLL synthesizers in tuners have to cope with large variations in gain parameters, in an application
context that is not very flexible. So the most natural and inexpensive point for optimization is a careful
fitting of the loop filter.
The three issues above are completely entangled with each other since the optimization of the
spectrum suggests bandwidth constraints that have to be guaranteed within the whole gain
interval.

ii
Another option to the input filtering is to integrated selectivity stages with structures that are matched to the
integrated oscillator. However this option is quite challenging for the aspects of power consumption and RF
isolation.
14 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
These issues are the conducting line through the sequence of practical and theoretical points
tackled in this work.
In the next sections a short listing of PLL applications precedes a description of the constituting
blocks of a PLL synthesizer.
1.4 PLL systems : different application contexts
Phase locked loops are feedback systems containing at least a controllable oscillator and a phase
detector. The phase detector is the comparing element between a variable or steady input and the
driven oscillator element. Frequently there is also a filter before the input of the oscillator,
determining the bandwidth of the feedback action.
The first PLL applications were synchronous receptors for coherent demodulation, and the first
industrial use on a large scale appears within the TV market (in the 50’s), for the synchronization
of horizontal and vertical scans. In particular for PLL synthesizers, the first patents appeared in
the 70’s.
The application contexts are widespread in areas such as: communications, radar, telemetry,
command, time and frequency control, ranging and instrumentation systems.
However with respect to their functionality there are mainly three areas:
• Carrier Tracking and Synchronization;
• Coherent Demodulation of Digital and Analog Signals;
• Frequency Synthesis.
In the first two, the phase detector receives a variable input, from which one tries to extract either
a carrier or the information that modulates the input signal. In the third, the oscillator is coupled
to a fixed reference, in order to transfer to this, frequency and phase properties of the reference
signal.
This division is also related to the PLL functioning modes: acquisition, tracking, and, locked or
synchronous mode.
The acquisition mode refers to the interval during which the loop wanders within its tuning
range, searching to follow the input, but still not locked to it. The tracking mode concerns the
function of the PLL when it follows a non constant input, whose variations have to be tracked
within the tuning range. Finally, the locked mode refers to synthesizers with a constant input.
Some different investigation issues are seen in association with the fields of application above:
• in coherent demodulators: cycle slips, limits of tracking,… .
These are phenomena described in the time domain with complicated non-linear
behaviour and modeling;
• in synthesizers: noise performances, locking time, stability, aided acquisition. Usually
described in linear, frequency domain representations.
• in general: aspects concerning the increasing integration level of the PLL blocks, with
lower power consumption, higher working frequencies, and in combination with
other analog and digital blocks. This last point concerns the generation and sensitivity
to interference in the supplies and in the substrate (for integrated blocks that share a
common substrate and/or common supplies).
The phase detector, such as the comparator block in the feedback system, specifies many
characteristics of the control loop. It is not unusual to classify a PLL with respect to the type of
Chapter 1 / Introduction 15
the phase detector. There are numerous references discussing the different types of phase
detectors. A general insight of different PLL applications can be found in [Wola91], and a more
specific description focused on the synthesizer context is made in [Craw94].
We would like to enumerate some phase detection principles relating their characteristics of
memory or tracking to their respective applications:
• Mixers: non-linear element outputting the sum and difference of the frequencies of
the input tones. A low pass filter is used to select the difference portion.
The output, which represents the phase error, may depend on the amplitude of the
input signals. The tracking range is limited by the sinus periodicity.
This structure is often reserved to applications with a critical phase noise
requirement, or with very high input frequencies.
• Samplers: non-linear element bringing a high frequency component to base band by
aliasing with a known input tone.
It has also a limited tracking range due to the ambiguity of the folded elements
coming from different harmonics of the input signals. Its advantage is related to the
possibility of extremely fast lock intervals.
• Exclusive-OR: very similar properties with the mixer type with a digital logical
implementation.
• Two-state detectors: logical implementation containing two memory nodes, or a flip-
flop, for set and reset states. The tracking zone is expanded with respect to the
previous memoryless types.
• Three-state phase and frequency detectors: two flip-flops and an asynchronous reset
return. The tracking zone is unlimited allowing frequency and phase error correction.
It is the common type used in PLL synthesizers. The three-state phase/frequency
detector and its tri-state implementation are discussed in the following section.
We close this section with the remark that the limited tracking solutions are mostly adapted to
low SNR loops, where the phase detector has to average a carrier or signal information mixed
with important noise levels, such as in carrier and clock recovery applications. In such
conditions, a memory phase detector would have difficulty to attain lock, due to the strong
deviations it would suffer in the presence of high noise levels; or in other words, due to its
absence of error averaging.
1.5 PLL frequency synthesizers constituting blocks and nomenclature
From now on we treat exclusively the frequency synthesizer PLL. The block schematic of figure
1.9 introduces the basic constituting elements and their nomenclature.
The input is a crystal oscillator with a very selective output, related to an external quartz
resonator. The input frequency may be changed by programming different ratios in the reference
divider; thereby choosing the frequency at the input of the phase detector: f
cp
(comparison
frequency).
The phase detector is a three-state type, with a current output block, named a charge pump. The
loop filter has an impedance magnitude, and it translates the current information into the tuning
voltage input for the VCO.
The programmable divider, that is interpolated between the VCO and the phase detector, fixes
the ratio between f
cp
and the LO frequency. Therefore the dividing ratios also determine the
coverage of the tuning range of the synthesizer.
16 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In addition, there are auxiliary service blocks, such as switches and analog-to-digital converters
(ADC), that are used to command the functioning of the filtering and amplifying elements within
the tuner.
Figure 1.9 PLL frequency synthesizer: block diagram
The following sections give further details about some central blocks of the frequency
synthesizer.
1.5.1 VCO
The VCO is often a resonant amplifier that contains a tunable band pass filter (BPF) and a gain
device. The active device amplifies the inherent noise sources that are filtered by the resonator,
before they are fed back to the amplifier input.
The selectivity is then determined by the resonator. Usually, the resonant circuit is a second
order LC structure with a tunable capacitance, composed by capacitors and varicaps.
Figure 1.10 VCO and tunable resonator
In figure 1.10, the ground signal just indicates the DC biasing of the varicap. Often, a large
resistor or inductor is added for this DC connection.
The series capacitance C
p
(padder) is chosen as a compromise between the diode capacitance
ratio (C
max
/C
min
) and the quality factor (Q) of the resonant circuit . A minimum C
max
/C
min
is
C
p
R
V
tune
L
p
C
t
C
d
f
cp
Programming
input
LO
output
Crystal
Oscillator
Reference
Divider
Phase
Detector
Charge
Pump
Loop
Filter
Voltage
Controlled
Oscillator
(VCO)
Main
Divider
BUS
Biasing
&
Service
Blocks
Chapter 1 / Introduction 17
required to cover the whole tuning frequency range, whereas the quality factor determines the
phase noise performance of oscillator.
C
p
values larger than C
max
tend to be transparent for the capacitance variation. However smaller
values may be needed to improve the quality factor. This improvement is achieved by the serial
association of the varicap, with a poorer Q, with a fixed capacitor that has a better Q.
The parallel capacitor C
t
assures a minimum capacitance value and it may be added to
compensate for the changes in temperature of the IC input impedance.
The structure described above corresponds to a resonance oscillator, which is the most common
type of VCO that is encountered in frequency synthesizers for TV tuners. For other PLL
applications working with smaller tuning ranges, it is not unusual to also find ring and relaxation
oscillators, that are tuned by a variable biasing current or voltage. In chapter 8, we discuss
another controllable oscillator structure based on cascaded integrator stages.
1.5.2 Dividers
The dividers, both reference and main, are cascaded structures composed of flip-flops and
combinatory logical ports. Basically we may distinguish two structures:
• prescaler structure: composed of divide-by-2 or swallow cells;
• shift counter.
The prescaler is normally at the input stage, and it works with the higher frequencies. It may be
fully programmable or not, depending on the limitations of frequency and sensitivity in the input
of the main divider.
The swallow cells are an extension of divide-by-2 cells, containing two extra latches and some
logic ports. This additional part receives a second data and a synchronizing input that commands
the “swallowing” of an extra clock pulse. Therefore the swallow cell can count 2+1, and the +1
pulse is commanded by the 2
nd
synchronizing input. Several swallow cells may be connected in
series, working with a common clock and a common 2
nd
synchronizing input which is shifted
forward between adjacent cells. In this manner the swallow cascade may count all the integers
within the interval: [ (2
n
) , (2
n+1
– 1) ] ; where n is the number of cascaded swallow cells.
The reference divider usually has a limited set of dividing ratios, and it is implemented with only
divide-by-2, or divide-by-2 plus swallow cells.
The main divider often combines the prescaler with a serial counter. This counter works with
lower frequencies, but it has no minimum count. The association of these two structures allows
for continuous counting between : [ (2
n
) , (2
n+m+1
– 1) ] ; with n defined above, and m the
number of flip-flops in the shift counter.
It is important to remark that the output of both main and reference dividers, is in fact the
transcription of one pulse from the input signal, enabled by a programmable counter. In low
noise synthesizers, this output is often resynchronized with the input signal in order to copy its
phase accuracy; or in other words, to eliminate the time jitter introduced by the divider cells.
1.5.3 Phase Detector – Charge Pump
The phase detector and charge pump comparator is a three state phase/frequency detector. This
means that it can recover both phase and frequency differences within the VCO + PLL tunable
and programmable range.
As mentioned in section 1.4 the three-state phase detector has 2 memory nodes, which separately
track the two input phases. Figure 1.11 shows a block diagram of the ensemble.
18 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 1.11 Phase Detector & Charge Pump block diagram
The Ref. (reference) input comes from the reference divider, and the Var. (variable) input from
the main divider. The rising edges of the input signals command the DFF outputs which in turn
command the switches of the sinking and sourcing current sources. When the two outputs are
equal to one, an asynchronous reset reinitializes the detector. In this manner phase differences of
up to t 2π are detected, with an average current output that is linearly proportional to the input
phase difference.
The sourcing and sinking sources have a programmable current value that is called charge pump
current, or I
cp
.
This phase detector with two DFFs, is not capable of distinguishing phase differences with a
module above 2π. So, when the module of the phase difference exceeds 2π, the phase detector
will slip one cycle and fall into a new linear zone around +2π or -2π.
Figure 1.12 represents the transfer, output average current for input phase deviation.
Note that the transfer is periodic over 2π, and that two shifted linear regions superpose each
other in every 2π interval.
The phase detector behaviour for phase deviations with a module smaller than 2π, is represented
by a single valued linear function with an input range: [-2π, 2π]. The thick central line in figure
1.12 represents this function, and the slope of the transfer is called K
ϕ
, the phase detector
sensitivity.
Reference [Wola91] makes an interesting representation of different phase detectors, explaining
their functioning through logical state machines. The state machine of our three-state phase
detector is pictured on the right side of figure 1.12.
The delay interval of the assynchronous reset causes the existence of an intermitent 4
th
state
(Off’), during which both current sources are active. This state is usually transparent for the
transfer function, since ideally the sum of both currents equals zero. Functionally this delay
avoids a change in K
ϕ
for small input phase differences.
iii

iii
Charge pump circuitry has often slower setting-up times than the asynchronous reset in the DFFs. Thus small
phase differences would be masked if the switching on interval was to small to guarantee that the current sources
attained their nominal output value. This phenomena is called dead-zone.
programmable
input for I
cp
output tuning
voltage
1
Ref
D Qref
CK
R
Var
loop filter
impedance
delay
τ
rst
1
R
CK
D Qvar
Chapter 1 / Introduction 19
]
]
]

·
rad
A
I
K
cp
π
ϕ
2
(1.1)
Figure 1.12 Phase detector & Charge pump: transfer and state machine
The Off state is also called high-impedance or tri-state, which explains the nomenclature tri-state
detector. Tri-state detectors can also be implemented with a voltage output. In this case the DFF
outputs command switches that short circuit the output to nodes with a fixed voltage value (low
impedance points such as vcc and gnd). However, the advantage of the current output becomes
clear with a capacitive loop impedance, because with the charge pump output a fixed current
value charges the filter capacitors with a constant dv/dt and K
ϕ .
1.5.4 Loop Filter
The loop filter is the main subject of chapters 2 and 4, while discussing stability and noise
concepts. It is a low pass filter (LPF) using either a passive (with no DC shift) or an active
solution. The active filters use a high gain amplifier with a large DC output range, in order to
increase the tuning range.
This chapter introduced the context of the present study, PLL frequency synthesizers, in a top-
down approach.
The frontend of terrestrial and satellite TV receivers was discussed, identifying the tendencies for
innovation, that are bound to the new broadcasting standards (DVB) and to the continuous
demand for higher integration levels.
The investigation issues that orient this work were presented and related to the changes in the
tuner architecture.
The constituent blocks of the PLL synthesizer were also presented.
-
I
I
average
[A]
I
cp
∆ϕ
[rad]
-4π -2π 0 2π 4π
τrst
Var
Ref
Ref
Sourcing
Qref =1
Qvar =0
Var
Sinking
Qref =0
Qvar =1
Off
Qref=Qvar=0
Off ’
Qref=Qvar=1
Var
Ref
20 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 21
Contents:
2. PLL Phase Model and Loop Filter calculation 21
2.1. Phase Model for PLL synthesizers.......................................................................................................... 22
2.1.1. Requirements in the Time and Frequency Domain ....................................................................... 24
2.1.2. Second-Order Loop ....................................................................................................................... 26
2.1.3. Third and Fourth Order Loops...................................................................................................... 28
2.2. Algorithm for the Loop Filter Calculation.............................................................................................. 34
2.2.1. Nominal Design............................................................................................................................. 34
2.2.2. Robust design including Gain Variation and 3
rd
Pole compensation............................................. 36
2.2.3. Summary of steps and numerical example .................................................................................... 40
Figures:
Figure 2.1 Linear Phase Model for a PLL ................................................................................................... 23
Figure 2.2 V
tune
time response for a frequency step...................................................................................... 25
Figure 2.3 Locked VCO output spectrum..................................................................................................... 25
Figure 2.4 3
rd
order Loop Filter Impedance................................................................................................. 29
Figure 2.5 4
th
order PLL: Open and Closed Loop Bode Plots ..................................................................... 31
Figure 2.6 4
th
order PLL: Root Locus diagram............................................................................................ 31
Figure 2.7 Gain Variation X Stability in Bode Plots .................................................................................... 33
Figure 2.8 The influence of r
21
in the gain-bandwidth variation................................................................ 36
Figure 2.9 Numerical example of robust filter design.................................................................................. 42
Tables:
Table 2-1 2
nd
order filter: Phase Margin Variation for w
ol
∈ [ w
z1
, w
p2
] ............................................... 37
Table 2-2 3
rd
order filter: Phase Margin Variation for w
ol
∈ [ w
z1
, w
p2
]................................................ 38
Table 2-3 3
rd
order filter : Open Loop Bandwidth recentering................................................................... 39
2 PLL Phase Model and Loop Filter calculation
A linear time invariant (LTI) model for the PLL synthesizer is used to study frequency and time
domain characteristics.
The 2
nd
order loop is analyzed through standard dynamic parameters ξ and w
n
.
A new notation is introduced to study the 3
rd
and 4
th
order loops, exploiting stability and
robustness aspects.
The study is constantly linked to the tuner application context, through qualitative discussions
and numerical examples.
22 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
We start our study of PLL synthesizers presenting a linear phase model that simply and
efficiently describes most of the system behaviour around a locked condition. The linear
description is related to specifications in the time and frequency domain by using a standard
notation for a 2
nd
order low-pass filter, in terms of its natural resonance frequency (w
n
) and
damping factor (ξ). The description is enlarged to treat systems of a higher order. We introduce a
new notation in terms of the spacing between the zeros and poles of the transfer function of the
loop filter. The new notation is used to develop an algorithm to calculate loop filters that respond
to stability constraints in a large range of gain variation. The robustness of the method is
exemplified by numerical examples.
2.1 Phase Model for PLL synthesizers
From this chapter on, we focus on the phase locked loops for frequency synthesis, with the
following constituent blocks: programmable dividers, phase detector based on flip-flops, and tri-
state charge pump. We abbreviate it to PLL. In this nomenclature, the VCO block is not included
in the PLL.
A top-down approach is proposed starting with behavioural models that give an insight into
frequency and time domain characteristics. These models are based on a phase representation of
a PLL.
The phase representation concerns all logic signals that are inputs of edge triggered blocks.
These signals carry phase information that is related to the time interval (T) between similar
edges. We may also define an average or initial time interval (T
c
) and frequency (f
c
= 1/ T
c
),
and, a phase variation with respect to these.
Using the phase variation as the model parameter amounts to a base-band equivalent
representation, with phase modulating inputs and carrier f
c
.
The charge pump is replaced by a constant, average current to a phase deviation slope, with the
same sensitivity as a pulse width modulation block (PWM). This linear average sensitivity is
valid for phase differences smaller than 2π, as seen in section 1.5.3 .
In fact we seek a simple model where continuous linear time invariant (LTI) tools may be
applied. Such a representation is equivalent to the small signal AC models used for circuit
simulation. In our case its main limitations are the absence of DC range boundaries and the
removal of the discrete nature of the digital blocks (phase detector and dividers). These
characteristics are assessed later with additional modeling in chapter 5 .
For the moment, we consider that the PLL bandwidth is small enough compared to the phase
detector comparison frequency, and we suppose that this AC description is valid within the
whole DC range that may be swept.
The base-band phase model in Laplace transform is shown in the block diagram of figure 2.1,
with:

[ ]
[ ]
V
Hz
K
V
Hz rad
K
K
V d
f d
V d
w d
K
vco
o
vco
tune
osc
tune
osc
o
·

·
⋅ · ⋅ · · K π π 2 2
and K
ϕ
defined in equation (1.1)
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 23
Figure 2.1 Linear Phase Model for a PLL
The phase detector is replaced by an adder that continuously evaluates the phase difference
between the reference input and the divider output. This phase difference is transformed in an
average charge pump current, represented by the block with a sensitivity K
ϕ
.
The loop filter impedance, F(s), converts this current in V
tune
and the oscillator is depicted by its
frequency slope associated with an integrator.
The VCO is a frequency modulator with a voltage input and frequency selectivity determined by
its resonant circuit. Our applications use a second order LC resonator that is equivalent to an
integrator in a base band representation.
The linear approximation that allows the calculation of FM components by their peak phase
deviation, is valid for phase deviations considerably smaller than π.
Therefore ϕ
osc
(VCO output phase) is a valid approximation of the ratio:
modulated sideband amplitude divided by carrier amplitude,
for frequency modulating components with A
m
/f
m
<< π
i
where A
m
and f
m
indicate the amplitude and frequency of the modulating tone.
We define H(s) and B(s), as the open and closed loop transfers respectively.
s
F
s
s F
N
Kvco Icp
N s
K
s F K s H
o
ref
div
(s) ) ( 1
) ( ) ( ⋅ · ⋅

· ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ · · α
ϕ
ϕ
ϕ
(2.1)
with α, the open loop gain:
N
Kvco Icp ⋅
· α
) (
) (
) ( 1
) (
) (
s F s
s F
N
s H
s H
N s B
ref
osc
⋅ +

⋅ ·
+
⋅ · ·
α
α
ϕ
ϕ
(2.2)
It is convenient to split the filter impedance into two polynomials representing its zeros and
poles.

i
More detailed discussions of the narrow band FM context are made in sections 3.1 and 6.2.
for open loop
VCO
ϕ
osc
[rad]
+
-
Phase Detector
Charge Pump
Loop
Filter
Iaver
[A]
ϕ
div
[rad]
V
tune
[V]
ϕ
e
[rad]
ϕ
ref
[rad]
K
ϕ
F(s) K
o
/s
1/ N
24 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

) ( ) (
) (
) (
) (
) (
) (
) (
) (
) (
s N s D s
s N
N s B
s D s
s N
s H
s D
s N
s F
F F
F
F
F
F
F
⋅ + ⋅

⋅ ·


·
⇒ ·
α
α
α
Then we may see that B(s) have the same zeros as H(s), and, their poles are equal to H(s) for
α=0 (no feedback gain), and gradually change as α increases. This idea is very clearly
represented by the rootlocus diagram discussed in 2.1.3.
2.1.1 Requirements in the Time and Frequency Domain
The PLL system performances: locking time, step response overshoot, spurious rejection,
stability, closed loop bandwidth and peaking, need to be translated into transfer function
characteristics to guide the design of the control function (loop filter). A summary of these
specifications can be represented by time and frequency response envelopes, as shown in figures
2.2 and 2.3.
Let us choose two measurable signals for these envelopes such as V
tune
and the oscillator
spectrum.
The time response (figure 2.2) corresponds to a frequency change, like a step input for f
ref
, or a
ramp input for ϕ
ref
. Most often however, the frequency change is made by reprogramming the
main divider ratio, N.
The following parameters are indicated in the time response:
• v
initial
/ v
final
: initial and final values corresponding to the step input;
• M
p
: overshoot, normalized difference between maximum value and final
value;
• t
rise
: rise time with respect to a “y” fraction of the transition step;
• t
settling
: settling time for error within an acceptable x% variation around v
final
.
The frequency response (figure 2.3) represents the output spectrum of a VCO in lock mode. The
parameters indicating the frequency domain specifications are:
• P
carrier
: carrier output power;
• A
S
: comparison frequency suppression with respect to P
carrier
;
• (P
carrier
-A
S
): spurious amplitude;
• f
o
: oscillator frequency;
• bw
cl
: closed loop bandwidth, or –3dB point with respect to the close in
spectrum;
• maximum peaking: maximum sideband value with respect to the close-in spectrum.
The specifications indicated in the time and frequency envelopes are the guiding issues discussed
in the following sections.
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 25
Figure 2.2 V
tune
time response for a frequency step
Figure 2.3 Locked VCO output spectrum
We start with the time requirements that may be directly related to a standard 2
nd
order
characteristic equation. Later, we introduce a convenient notation for the 3
rd
and 4
th
order
systems, and a loop filter design algorithm to guarantee a robust stable functioning.
The frequency envelope is a combination of the PLL and the VCO performances. In this chapter
we focus on the PLL characteristics. Later, in chapter 3, the complete frequency envelope is
discussed, taking into account the inherent noise performance of the VCO. All the following
chapters use the filter notation and design tools developed in the present chapter.
v
initial
t (s)
(y).(v
final
-v
initial
) + v
initial
(1+Mp).v
final
v
final
V
tune
(t) = f
o
(t)/K
vco
[V]
t
rise
t
settling
-3dB
Power Spectrum Density (PSD)
[dB]
maximum
peaking
P
carrier
-A
S
P
carrier
f
osc
+ bw
cl
f
osc
f
osc
+ f
cp
f (Hz)
26 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
2.1.2 Second-Order Loop
We start searching for the simplest filter that would present a time response with the form
indicated in figure 2.2.
As a matter of fact, an all-pass filter (simple resistor) combined with the oscillator pole would
already present a low-pass filter behaviour for the overall loop.
However for a PLL with a phase detector-charge pump comparator, it is useful to guarantee that
a frequency step is perfectly followed, having a final phase error that tends to zero.
ii
In our phase model the zero final error for a phase ramp input implies an H(s) with two pure
integrators.
One integrator is intrinsic to the VCO phase representation, and the other must be included in the
loop filter, F(s).
A feedback system with two integrators and no zero would be an oscillator, frequency controlled
by the loop gain, so we must also include a zero in F(s) for stability reasons. Therefore the
simplest form of F(s) is:

C s
T s
s F

⋅ +
·
1
) (
;
which corresponds to the impedance of a R-C series branch, with T=R.C s/rad.
The open and closed transfer functions for the resulting 2
nd
order PLL are:
( )
( )
.
) (
) (
1
1
) ( ) (
) (
) (
;
) (
) ( 1
) (
2
2
s D
s N
T s
C
s
T s N
s N s D s
s N
N s B
s D
s N
C s
T s
s H
B
B
F F
F
F
F
·
+ ⋅ + ⋅
⋅ + ⋅
·
⋅ + ⋅

⋅ ·

·

⋅ + ⋅
·
α
α
α
α α
Comparing D
B
(s) to a standard 2
nd
order equation, with w
n
,undamped natural frequency, and ξ,
damping factor, results in:
( ) ( )
C
w
R
w
C
w
s
w
s
T s N
T s
C
s
T s N
s B
n
n
n n ⋅

·
⋅ ⋅
·
·
+

,
`

.
| ⋅
⋅ +

,
`

.
|
⋅ + ⋅
÷→ ←
+ ⋅ + ⋅
⋅ + ⋅
·
α
ξ
α
ξ
α
ξ
α
2 2
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
L ) (
(2.3)

ii
Otherwise the error response stabilizes around ϕ
e-final
, which implies that even in lock, the charge pump is still
injecting an average current (K
ϕ
. ϕ
e-final
), which may increase significantly the reference spurious.
Iin
Vout
R
C
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 27
The advantage of this ξ, w
n
representation is its direct relation to frequency and time responses.
For instance the unitary step response of 1/D
B
(s) is:
( )
( ) ( )

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ − ÷→ ←
+ + ⋅
·

⋅ −
t w
w
t w e
w s w s s
w
s D s
d
d
d
t
n n
n
B
sin cos 1
2
) (
1
2 2
2
σ
ξ
σ
{ ¦
{ ¦

Im 1

1
2 , 1
2 , 1
2
2
2 , 1
s Re w
s w w
w j w j w s
n
n d
d n n
· ⋅ ·
· − ⋅ ·
⋅ t − · − ⋅ ⋅ t ⋅ − ·
ξ σ
ξ
σ ξ ξ
where overshoot and settling time can be derived as functions of w
n
and ξ.
Using the same variables, w
d
and σ, we find a similar step response for B(s):
( )
( )
( ) ( )
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹

,
`

.
|
⋅ − ⋅ − ⋅ · ÷→ ←
+ + ⋅
+
⋅ ·
⋅ −
t w
w
t w e N t y
w s w s s
s w w
N
s
s B
d
d
d
t
n n
n n
sin cos 1 ) (
2
2
2 2
2
σ
ξ
ξ
σ
(2.4)
The integration property of the Laplace transform can be applied to equation (2.4) to derive the
ramp response of B(s). We may also recognize that y(t) represents the derivative of ϕ
osc
(t) for the
ramp input, which is the oscillator instantaneous frequency: 2π.f
osc
(t), or V
tune
(t).K
o
.
Therefore the time response of the 2
nd
order loop is simply fitted in its envelope requirement
through a convenient choice of σ and w
d
, or ξ and w
n
.
Next, the values of the filter components are evaluated with expressions (2.3) using ξ, w
n
and the
open loop gain, α.
Let us now consider the frequency domain envelope.
Some aspects of the output spectrum may be obtained from the frequency response of the closed
loop, B(jw).
The oscillator output spectrum results from a combination of the PLL and VCO frequency
responses. The PLL response is given by B(jw), and the input is the overall phase disturbances
due to the PLL blocks, represented at the input of the phase detector.
The 1
st
order filter, with a single integrator-zero, has a B(jw) close to a low pass filter (LPF),
with a -20dB/dec attenuation for w>>w
n
, and a resonant peak inversely proportional to ξ.
Hence the choices of w
n
and ξ, are a compromise between the time and frequency domain
specifications.
Generally the resonant peak should be kept to its minimum, since it increases noise presence at
the output, and it indicates the system is approaching instability. Typically ξ is kept above 0.7.
The choice of the bandwidth, w
n
, depends on many parameters. We have already seen the rise
time and settling time in V
tune
time response, and through the following chapters we tackle other
parameters, such as:
: roots of D
B
(s)
: damped natural frequency
: exponential envelope factor
28 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
• comparison frequency (f
cp
), requirement of spurious suppression, VCO free-running noise
performance, maximum phase change for small frequency steps, and microphony and other
interference robustness.
These questions belongs to quite different contexts, from the VCO output spectrum to a broader
context including requirements from the application environment and from the demodulator
block.
At the moment we can state a 1
st
rule of thumb, common to synthesizer applications that use w
n
in the range:

10 30
cp
n
cp
w
w
w
≤ ≤
So far we have discussed ξ and w
n
choices for a unique, unchanging open loop gain (α) value.
However we need to keep in mind that α can vary a lot in certain synthesizer applications and
this variation needs to be accommodated by the filter dimensioning.
In these terms the 2
nd
order PLL is very convenient since it only imposes a minimum gain value
related to a minimum ξ, and elsewhere it is convergent.
Nevertheless, its attenuation for high frequency (w>>w
n
) is often not enough to suppress the
reference spurious to a satisfactory level. In addition the closed loop transfer B(s) for a 2
nd
order
loop leaves the phase noise contribution of the PLL visible within a -20dB/dec slope, which is
equal to the slope of the VCO intrinsic noise. This means that a poor noise performance of the
PLL would be visible even for frequencies above the closed loop bandwidth.
Indeed, most tuner synthesizers use 3
rd
order loop filters, resulting in a 4
th
order PLL.
As we evolve towards higher order loops, the closed loop transfers are not so easily perceived as
the second order B(s), because their characteristic function, D
B
(s), is not directly factorable in 2
nd
or 1
st
order polynomials.
Thus, before discussing further aspects of the frequency envelope requirements we introduce
some stability concerns in the 3
rd
and 4
th
order loops.
Since we treat fairly simple systems with no zeros or poles in the right hand plane (on a S-plane),
the stability may be unambiguously analyzed by the open loop frequency response parameters:
phase margin (PhM) and gain margin (GM).
2.1.3 Third and Fourth Order Loops
Before we may examine the stability conditions of a 3
rd
or 4
th
order PLL, we need to introduce
the corresponding loop filter impedance, and the resulting open and closed loop frequency
responses.
As mentioned in the previous section, most synthesizer applications use a 2
nd
or 3
rd
order loop
filter, in order to achieve the necessary out-of-loop rejection.
These filters are implemented with additional resistors and capacitors, introducing one or two
extra poles at frequencies higher than the zero frequency. The pole at the origin is preserved to
fulfill the steady error condition discussed in 2.1.2.
The following notation is adopted for the zeros and poles, frequencies and time constants:
π π 2 2
1
1
1
1
z
z
z
w
T
f ·

· : with f
z1
and T
z1
, zero frequency [Hz] and time constant [s/rad];
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 29
π π 2 2
1
2
2
2
p
p
p
w
T
f ·

· and
π π 2 2
1
3
3
3
p
p
P
w
T
f ·

·
for the 2
nd
and 3
rd
poles, remembering that the 1
st
pole is a pure integrator with f
p1
= 0 Hz.
The resulting 3
rd
order filter is:
( )
( ) ( )
3 2
1
1 1
1
) (
p p
z
T s T s s
T s k
s F
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅
⋅ + ⋅
· (2.5)
A second order filter is obtained if either f
p2
or f
p3
tend to infinity. By convention our 2
nd
order
filter has a finite f
p2
, and a T
p3
= 0.
The two RC filter configurations below have approximately this transfer function as impedance:
Figure 2.4 3
rd
order Loop Filter Impedance
The filter impedances, Z
s
and Z
p
, are calculated as independent 2
nd
order terms, supposing that
the approximations: Z
3
>> Z
p
, and Z
3
>> Z
s
are valid.
These approximations are made to keep a transfer with real factorable poles, which greatly
simplify the filter design. Its accuracy holds for f
p3
>> f
p2
.
iii
( )
( )
]
]
]

+

⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ + ⋅
⋅ ⋅ +
· ·
2 1
2 1
1 2 1
1 1
1
1
C C
C C
R s C C s
C R s
I
V
Z
in
M
p
;
( )
( )
2 1 1
2 1 1
1
1
C R s C s
C C R s
I
V
Z
in
M
s
⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅ ⋅ +
· · ; and,
3 3 3 3
1
1
1
Z C s C R s V
V
M
out
⋅ ⋅
·
⋅ ⋅ +
·
Z
p
and Z
s
are composed of an integrator plus a lead-lag, zero-pole, pair.
The single pole low pass filter (LPF), associated with Z
3
, is often called a post-filter.
A second approximation is made considering C
1
>> C
2
⇒ C
1
+ C
2
≈ C
1
, which simplifies Z
F
(s)
in both cases to:

iii
The complete 3
rd
order, non-factorable, transfer is discussed in section 4.1.
R
1
I
in
R
3
Z
3
Z
p
C
1
V
out
C
2
C
3
V
M
Z
3
R
3
Z
s
I
in
V
out
R
1
C
1
C
2
C
3
V
M
30 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

( ) ( )
3 3 2 1 1
1 1
1 1
1
) (
C R s C R s C s
C R s
I
V
s Z
in
out
F
⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅
⋅ ⋅ +
· ·
Z
F
(s) corresponds to F(s) for:
T
z1
=R
1
.C
1
; T
p2
=R
1
.C
2
; T
p3
=R
3
.C
3
;
K = 1/C
1
; and, f
p3
>> f
p2
>> f
z1
.
The spacing between f
z1
and f
p2
, is justifiable by the fact that the zero influence in pulling up the
phase from its initial value (for w << w
z
) of -180° , is only visible if:
f
z1
<< f
p2
⇒ T
z1
>> T
p2
; but since T
z1
/ T
p2
= C
1
/ C
2
⇒ C
1
>> C
2
the open and closed loop transfer functions of the PLL with this 3
rd
order filter become:
( )
( ) ( )
3 2 1
2
1
1 1
1
) (
p p
z
T s T s C s
T s
s H
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅
⋅ + ⋅
·
α
(2.6)
( )
( ) ( ) ( )
1 3 2 1
2
1
1 1 1
1
) (
z p p
z
T s T s T s C s
T s
N s B
⋅ + ⋅ + ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅
⋅ + ⋅
⋅ ·
α
α
(2.7)
Root locus and Bode diagram sketches showing PhM, GM, Mr, w
3dB
, and the closed loop root
asymptotes are plotted in figures 2.5 and 2.6.
The closed loop magnitude Bode plot suggests a PLL phase transfer resembling a 3
rd
order LPF.
This resemblance is confirmed by the root-locus that has for adequately high open loop gains, α,
one pole that tends to the zero (being “cancelled”), and three others that tend to the asymptotes:
-180° + k.360° / n ; with n=3 , and k = 0, 1, 2.
The 3
rd
order LPF approximation for B(s) would have a transfer function, B
3LPF
(s) , in the form:
( )
) (
1
2
1
) (
3
2
2
3
s B
w
s
w
s
T s
N
s B
LPF
n n
p
·

,
`

.
|
+
⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅ ⋅ +

ξ
(2.8)
where T
p3
is the post-filter equivalent pole, and the second order function in the ξ w
n
form
represents the two other roots. These last two may be complex or real, depending on the value
of α.
This simplified LPF form suggests a 1
st
stability boundary, analogous to a standard 2
nd
order
characteristic equation, expressed in terms of ξ and w
n
.
iv
The boundary imposes a minimum ξ
value that may be represented in the rootlocus diagram.

iv
Later, in 3.4.1 , the LPF approximation is also used to evaluate the 3 dB closed loop bandwidth, indicated as f
cl3dB
in figure 2.5.b.
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 31
Figure 2.5 4
th
order PLL: Open and Closed Loop Bode Plots
Figure 2.6 4
th
order PLL: Root Locus diagram
fig. 2.5.a
log( f ) [Hz]
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
PhM
max
∠H(jw)
[ ° ]
-90°
-180°
-270°
|H(jw)|
[ dB ]
-60dB/dec
-20dB/dec
-40dB/dec
log( f ) [Hz]
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
Open Loop : H(s)
f
cl3dB
f
cl3dB
log( f ) [Hz]
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
∠B(jw)
[ ° ]
-90°
-180°
-270°
|B(jw)|
[ dB ]
N
N-3dB
log( f ) [Hz]
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
-40dB/dec
-60dB/dec
Closed Loop : B(s)
fig. 2.5.b
Re{s}
Root Locus Im{s}
45°
ξ=1/√2
f
z1
f
p3 f
p2
32 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In figure 2.6, the dotted axes indicate a boundary of
2
1
· ξ .
We observe that the gain value, α, has a minimum and a maximum limit value to ensure that the
complex roots have a convenient damping, ξ. In fact for increasing α values, these two branches
will finally cross the imaginary axis indicating an unstable behaviour.
For a 2
nd
order filter, there are only three root branches. One is still directed towards the zero,
and the other two tend to asymptotes parallel to the imaginary axis. Therefore the loop does not
become unstable for increasing α values, but less and less damped as the equivalent ξ for the
complex roots tends to zero.
This same reasoning can be applied to the open loop Bode diagram, where a changing α value
corresponds to shift the magnitude curve vertically, without moving the phase plot.
This variation also shows a limitation for a minimum and a maximum value of α, in trying to
keep the phase margin above a suitable value.
A classical security limit for a system phase margin is about: PhM ≥ 30° .
Figure 2.7 shows open and closed loop Bode plots with three different gain values:
• a centered value, α
n
, corresponding to the maximum phase margin for a 2
nd
order filter (or a
3
rd
order loop);
• and two other gain values, geometrically equidistant to α
n
.
The curves plotted with dotted lines indicate the 3
rd
order loop transfer for the centered gain
value, α
n
. The curves with solid lines correspond to the 4
th
loop transfer with the 3 α values.
The gain variation chosen is proportional to the lead-lag, zero-pole spacing, since,

21
21
21
min
max
r
r
r
n
n
·

·
α
α
α
α
and r
21
is defined as

1
2
21
z
p
f
f
r · .
The filter calculation and the maximum supported gain variation are discussed in the following
sections. For the moment we observe some new parameters introduced in figure 2.7:
½ in the open loop diagrams:
• w
ol
: open loop zero crossing frequency or open loop bandwidth;
• w
oln
: central w
ol
corresponding to the centered gain α
n
;
½ in the closed loop diagrams:
• peak: resonant overshoot with respect to the close-in, low frequency, |B(jw)| value;
• w
peak
: frequency corresponding to the peak value;
• w
3dB
: 3dB closed loop bandwidth, as indicated in figure 2.5.b.
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 33
Figure 2.7 Gain Variation X Stability in Bode Plots
Remembering that α = (Icp . Kvco)/ N, and that its variation represents the system functioning
range, we must adapt F(s) parameters to fit α ∈ [α
min
, α
max
] and to meet the frequency and time
specifications.
In this example we observe that a gain variation of r
21
implies quite significant variations of
bandwidth and PhM.
Furthermore the centered gain value for the 3
rd
order loop, α
n
, is not really ideal for the 4
th
order
loop.
Thus in the next sections we define successively:
- a filter calculation algorithm for the 2
nd
order filter;
- a centering compensation for the 3
rd
order filter;
- and the relation between the zero-pole spacing and the maximum supportable gain variation.
fig. 2.7.a fig. 2.7.b
34 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
2.2 Algorithm for the Loop Filter Calculation
TV tuner applications very often work with quite large variations in the parameters:
K
vco
and N.
K
vco
variations are connected to the oscillator tank circuit sensitivity. In varicap based tank
circuits, the sensitivity is proportional to the varicap capacitance variation dC/dV
bias
.
Typically this capacitance variation decreases for high V
bias
values, i.e. for high values of V
tune
,
or at the high-end of the tuning range.
N variation is directly proportional to the frequency variation inside the tuning range, plus
eventually a multiplication factor to compensate changes in the reference divider ratio, R.
Taking into account these two variations and one fixed I
cp
value results in the maximum α range
demanded by the application.
Furthermore the minimum α value is found at the high end of the VCO frequency spectrum,
corresponding to the minimum K
vco
and maximum N values and vice-versa for the maximum α
value.
In terrestrial applications, with a fixed I
cp
value, it is not rare to find α variations (α
max

min
)
higher than 100. In satellite applications they are typically to the order of 50.
In the case of such large variations it is wise to use different I
cp
values to reduce the variation,
especially if the output spectrum needs to be optimized for noise performance.
However for stability reasons and user flexibility, the filter design should be centered, to ensure
the best application robustness, and as far as possible cope with all the gain variation range.
2.2.1 Nominal Design
Direct solving of the 4
th
order B(s) denominator with respect to f
ol
or w
3dB
would be onerous and
not very enlightening with respect to the stability aspect or for an intuitive and quick filter
calculation method.
Taking the phase margin aspect as a departure point and expressing it with respect to the ratios,
pole frequencies divided by zero frequency, leads to a simpler approach. Let us define r
31
and
recall r
21
:
1
3
31
1
2
21
;
z
p
z
p
f
f
r
f
f
r · · ;
and express phase margin as a function of f
ol
(w
ol
/2π ), and the zero and poles frequencies.

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|
· ° − − ∠ ·
·
3 2 1
) 180 ( ) (
p
ol
p
ol
z
ol
ol
w w
f
f
arctg
f
f
arctg
f
f
arctg jw H PhM
ol
(2.9)
The maximum PhM point is somewhere between f
z1
and f
p2
, and intuitively we may say that if
f
p3
is distant enough not to have much influence on H(jw
ol
), it should be equidistant to both f
z1
and f
p2
.
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 35
This idea can be confirmed solving:
[ ] 0 ) ( · f PhM
df
d
with the approximation w
ol
<< w
p3

which result in:
) ( ) ( ) (
2 1 p z
T w arctg T w arctg w PhM ⋅ − ⋅ ≈
and max{PhM} for
21
2
21 1 2 1
r
f
r f f f f
p
z p z
· ⋅ · ⋅ · .
Choosing this maximum PhM frequency as f
ol
, makes:
( )
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
+ ° − ⋅ ·
31
21
21
90 2 ) (
r
r
arctg r arctg w PhM
ol
(2.10)
The maximum phase margin point should be adjusted to correspond to the geometrical average
of the open loop gain range. So that gain variations towards minimum and maximum values
imply phase margin variations around the maximum point.
( ) 1
oln
·
·
·
n
w w jw H
α α
[ ]
α α α α α α ∈ ∧ · ⋅
min max min max
,
n
( )
( )
1
/ 1 1 1
1
21
1
2
oln
1
1
supposing
2
31 21 21
21
1
2
oln
oln
31
21
· ⋅

÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷
+ ⋅ +
+


·
>>
>>
·
r
C w
r r r
r
C w
jw H
n
r
r
n
n
α α
α α
(2.11)
. ;
;
1
;
oln 31
21
3 3 3
21
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
oln
1 1 1
1
1
oln 1
2
oln
21
1
w r
r
C R T
r
C
C
T
T
R
T
C
w
C w C
T
R
w w w
r
C
p
z
p p
n z
z
z
n n

· ⋅ · · ⋅ · ·
·

· ·

·

·

α
α α
(2.12)
The expressions above allow for the calculation of the filter components, following a maximum
phase margin approach. They are valid for both 2
nd
and 3
rd
order filters.
The positioning of f
z1
and f
p2
, the lead-lag controller, is made with respect to a 2
nd
order filter.
The influence of the post-filter is taken into account in expressions (2.9) and (2.10) for the total
PhM, but it was not considered in the choice of the center or nominal gain value α
n
.
A compensation for this gain centering, with respect to the PhM loss due to the post-filter, is
discussed in the following section.
36 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
2.2.2 Robust design including Gain Variation and 3
rd
Pole compensation
We wish to investigate the maximum gain variation that we are able to accommodate within
convenient PhM values.
In fact expression (2.9) shows that for fixed filter parameters, the phase margin depends uniquely
on the open loop zero cross frequency, f
ol
.
Thus, we need to translate the gain variation in an open loop bandwidth variation, in order to
associate gain values with PhM values.
Figure 2.8 gives an intuitive approach to the relation gain-bandwidth with respect to the filter
design parameter, r
21
, i.e., the influence of r
21
in the variation of w
ol
with respect to α.
The sketches show two extreme situations, for large and small r
21
values:
• for small r
21
(approximately r
21
< 10). The open loop slope stays practically unchanged
around the w
ol
frequency, with a -40 dB/dec value, and w
ol
changes are proportional to
sqrt(α).
• for large r
21
(approximately r
21
≥ 25), the slope around w
ol
decreases to -20 dB/dec and w
ol
changes are proportional to α.
Figure 2.8 The influence of r
21
in the gain-bandwidth variation
In other words, w
ol
variation with respect to α may be expressed as:

( )
21
ln
r f
n o
ol
w
w

,
`

.
|
·
α
α
(2.13)
with: ( ) 1 5 . 0
21
< < r f ; and,
( )
( ) 1 lim
5 . 0 lim
21
21
0
21
21
·
·
∞ →

r f
r f
r
r
log (f )
[Hz]
log (f )
[Hz]
w
1
w
2
w
3
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
|H(jw)|
[ dB ]
sqrt(r
21
) → 1
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
|H(jw)|
[ dB ]
w
1
w
2
w
3
sqrt(r
21
) >> 1
α
1
< α
2
< α
3

α
i
↔ w
i
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 37
A formal solution for f(r
21
) would require solving 3
rd
and 4
th
order polynomial equations.
Using polynomial interpolation in numerical examples, we find a simpler form for f(r21), which
is quite accurate around the central point, w
ol
/w
oln
= 1.

21
21
1
1
) (
r
r f
+

(2.14)
The interpolation error is evaluated for PhM variations with respect to the central PhM value.
For gain values implying a phase margin variation ≤ 20°, the bandwidth ratio is estimated with a
maximum 5% error.
We consider the error acceptable, and expression (2.14) is used to evaluate the following issues
concerning the maximum supported gain variation and the filter recentering with respect to the
post-filter.
We start evaluating the gain range corresponding to w
ol
variations between w
z1
and w
p2
, for the
2
nd
order filter.
Table 2.1 shows some PhM values for r
21
values commonly found in tuner applications.
v
The PhM values are calculated at:
- w = w
oln
;
- w = w
z1
, or w = w
p2
, (with no post-filter we find the same PhM for both points).
max{PhM} [°] PhM [°] (α
n
/ α
min
)
2
with w
ol
=w
oln
w
ol
=w
z1
or w
ol
=w
p2 α
n
=>w
ol
=w
oln
r
21
w/o post-filter w/o post filter α
min
=>w
ol
=w
z1
f (r
21
)
10 54.90 39.29 20.71 0.760
15 61.04 41.19 30.18 0.795
20 64.79 42.14 39.08 0.817
25 67.38 42.71 47.59 0.833
Table 2-1 2
nd
order filter: Phase Margin Variation for w
ol
∈ [ w
z1
, w
p2
]
The last column gives the gain range values corresponding to the open loop bandwidth variation:
( )
21
1
oln
2
min min
max
max 2
min 1
r f
ol n
p ol
z ol
w
w
w w
w w

,
`

.
|
·

,
`

.
|
·
⇔ ·
⇔ ·
α
α
α
α
α
α
The ratio α
n
/ α
min
is evaluated according to the f (r
21
) approximation ( equation (2.14) ).
In fact for this α variation corresponding to w
ol
=w
z1
or w
ol
=w
p2
, the bandwidth variation is a
function of a unique variable: r
21
. It follows that:

v
PhM values are calculated using expression (2.10) .
38 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

( )
21
21
1
1
21
1
z1
2
min
max
r
r f
p
r
w
w
+
·

,
`

.
|
·
α
α
(2.15)
For restricted domains of r
21
,we may use a linear estimation of equation (2.15), with a
normalized error smaller than 5%:

[ ]
[ ] 31 , 12 ; 95 . 1
25 , 4 ; 2
21
21
21
1
1
21
21
∈ ·
∈ ·
⋅ ≈
+
r K
r K
r K r
r
L L
(2.16)
The r
21
range between 4 and 25 covers quite well the values used in our tuner applications.
We consider that the minimum acceptable PhM value is 30°.
So, combining the results of table 2-1 and expressions (2.15) and (2.16), shows that normalized
gain variations of (2.r
21
) can be accommodated within suitable PhM values.
We are implying that r
21
is chosen in relation to: the maximum PhM required, and, the gain
variation ratio.
We continue our analysis including the post-filter for the 3
rd
order loop filter.
Table 2-2 brings some PhM values for sets of r
21
and r
31
parameters.
The PhM values are calculated at:
- w = w
oln
with and without post-filter;
- w = w
z1
, and w = w
p2
, with post-filter (different PhM values for the 2 points).
max {PhM} [°] {PhM} [°] PhM [°] PhM [°]
with w
ol
=w
oln
with w
ol
=w
oln
with w
ol
=w
z1
with w
ol
=w
p2
r
21
r
31
w/o post-filter w/ post-filter w/ post filter w/ post filter
r
31
/ r
21
15 25 61.04 52.24 38.90 10.22 ♣ 1.67
15 40 61.04 55.51 39.75 20.63 2.67
25 30 67.38 57.92 40.80 2.90 ♣ 1.20
25 50 67.38 61.67 41.56 16.14 ♣ 2.00
(♣) : unacceptably low PhM values.
Table 2-2 3
rd
order filter: Phase Margin Variation for w
ol
∈ [ w
z1
, w
p2
]
Phase margin differences for zero cross frequencies at w
z1
and w
p2
,with post-filter, show the
influence of w
p3
in the PhM for gain values α > α
n
.
A certain minimum r
31
/r
21
ratio is necessary to keep a PhM ≥ 30° for a α range with
α
max
/ α
min
≈ (2.r
21
) .
Actually, the effect of w
p3
is already visible in the PhM of the centered bandwidth, w
oln
, as
shown in figure 2.7 and table 2-2 .
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 39
So, we wish to find a correction factor to recenter the open loop bandwidth around the maximum
PhM for a given set of r
21
and r
31
parameters.
Using a 1
st
order limited development for equation (2.10), enables us to find a simple
polynomial correction factor, r
pf
(post-filter factor). The estimated centered bandwidth is named
w
olnpf
, and the related gain value α
npf
.
]
]
]


·
31
21 31
r
r r
r
pf
1 0 ≤ ≤
pf
r K K (2.17)
pf
r
w
w
olnpf
oln
·
olnpf oln
w w ≥ K K (2.18)
( )

,
`

.
|
+

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·
2
1
1
1 21
21
1 1
r
pf
npf
r f
pf
npf n
r
r
α α α
npf n
α α ≥ K K (2.19)
Table 2-3 shows numerical examples of the post-filter recentering. The same values for r
21
and
r
31
used in table 2-2 are recalculated after re-positioning the central open bandwidth around w
olnpf
.
PhM [°]
for α
npf
PhM [°]
for α
min
PhM [°]
for α
max
∆ (PhM)
r
21
r
31
(r
pf
)
0,5
w
ol
= w
olnpf
w
ol
=w
olnpf
/(r
21
)
0,5
w
ol
=w
olnpf
.(r
21
)
0,5
r
31
/r
21
PhM(wz1) - PhM(wp2)
15 25 0.632 52.92 28.45 30.89 1.67 -2.44
15 40 0.791 56.00 34.18 30.34 2.67 3.84
25 30 0.408 55.34 20.49 43.41 1.20 -22.92 ♣
25 50 0.707 62.11 32.83 32.03 2.00 0.81
(♣) : recentering approach fails.
Table 2-3 3
rd
order filter : Open Loop Bandwidth recentering
The recentering approximation is quite effective for (r
31
/ r
21
) > 1.6 ; but it cannot be used for
smaller ratios, since the accuracy is quickly degraded.
vi
The bandwidth ratio (w
olmax
/w
olmin
), used in table 2-3 , is also equal to r
21
; so, the corresponding
gain variation is approximately (2.r
21
) .
Hence, we observe that recentered 3
rd
order filters can also cope with the normalized gain
variation, equal to (2.r
21
) , as far as the minimum ratio, [(r
31
/ r
21
)>1,6 ], is respected.
In practice for (r
31
/ r
21
)< 1.6 , it is not possible to accommodate the normalized gain variation
with PhM ≥ 30° .
The limit (r
31
/ r
21
) ratio imposes a condition for the post-filter placement.

vi
As a matter of fact for small (r
31
/ r
21
) ratios we also loose the accuracy of the filter transfer function, as discussed
in section 2.1.2, and quantified in 4.1.1.
40 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In fact, placing the post-filter pole is a compromise between PhM loss and spurious suppression
requirement. The latter would ask to place it as close as possible to f
p2
, but a minimum PhM, in
a given α range, has to be preserved.
Once the post-filter pole position is chosen, R
3
and C
3
values may be directly calculated.
There is a limitation concerning the R
3
/R
1
ratio, that is discussed further in section 4.1. For the
moment let us keep in mind a practical boundary suggesting : R
3
≥ R
1
.
In some applications we can also see an influence of the C
3
value with respect to the resonant
tank circuit of the oscillator. In these cases C
3
, which appears as a parallel, parasitic capacitance,
should be chosen to be as small as possible.
So far so good, since these two practical boundaries tend to the same direction; for a given T
p3
,
we should choose a large R
3
and a small C
3
. However as usual, there is an additional factor
imposing a compromise.
C
3
and a series resistor connecting the loop filter to the tank resonator, form an LPF, whose
function is to block the VCO signal leaking towards V
tune
. Thus, we should keep a certain
minimum C
3
to assure the necessary RF attenuation.
2.2.3 Summary of steps and numerical example
The points discussed up to now suggest sequential steps for the loop filter calculation following
the maximum phase margin approach, and the recentering correction:
(a) Evaluate the system open loop gain range, corresponding to the functioning conditions.
Calculate the geometrical average (α
n
) and the variation ratio, α
max
/ α
min
.
: usually lower part of frequency range;
: higher part of frequency range.
If gain variations are too large, α
max
/ α
min
≥ 100 , look for possible compensations choosing a
specific Icp value for extreme cases.
(b) Choose parameters r
21
and r
31
taking into account PhM requirements and α ratio.
6 . 1 ;
2
1
21
31
min
max
21
≥ ⋅ ≥
r
r
r
α
α
(c) Choose w
olnpf
with respect to the following parameters: switching time, spurious attenuation
and adequacy to the noise performance of the VCO.
(d) Recenter α
n
with respect to (r
31
/ r
21
) ratio, for gain and cross frequency variation around α
npf
and w
olnpf
.
For
min max
α α α ⋅ ·
npf
and
]
]
]


·
31
21 31
r
r r
r
pf
α
α
α
·

·

·

Icp Kvco
Ndiv
Icp Kvco
Ndiv
Icp Kvco
Ndiv
max
max max
min
min
min min
max
Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 41

pf
r
w
w
olnpf
oln
·
and

,
`

.
|
+

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·
2
1
1
21
1
r
pf
npf n
r
α α
(e) Evaluate filter components using recentered w
oln
, α
n
and expressions (2.12) .
In the case of a 2
nd
order loop filter, the same algorithm can be used ignoring the recentering
correction. So after choosing the central open loop bandwidth , w
oln
in this case (item (c) ), we
skip item (d) and calculate the filter components directly with expressions (2.12) .
The open loop bandwidth choice is the remaining compromise that is not completely discussed.
As we mentioned in section 2.1.2. it depends on many parameters including circuit and system
requirements. In chapter 3 we discuss a significant parameter, the phase jitter, concerning the
total phase noise power in the carrier.
Finally we present a numerical example to illustrate the recentering plus the normalized gain
variation. In figure 2.9 the graphs use the same r
21
and r
31
values as in figure 2.7. :
r
21
=25 ; r
31
=50; and,
21
min
max
2 r ⋅ ·
α
α
.
Some other parameters are also indicated:
• w
z1
( o ) ; w
olnpf
( * ) ; w
oln
( ) ; w
p2
( x ) ; w
p3
( x ) ;
• w
peak
: frequency corresponding to the maximum value of closed loop
magnitude;
• w
3dB
: frequency corresponding to the DC value –3dB in closed loop
magnitude;
• peak: maximum value –DC value for the closed loop magnitude;
• dPhB(jw)/Foct :
( ) [ ]

w
jw B phase


with ∆w an octave frequency delta around w
peak
.
Analogous to the 2
nd
order example in annex II-A, a steep phase change
corresponds to a bigger overshoot.
42 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 2.9 Numerical example of robust filter design
We verify that the centering compensation is effective and that the normalized (2.r
21
) gain
variation is conveniently fitted.
Therefore the polynomial approximations used in the development are accurate enough for our
applications.
The filter algorithm and the associated notation, through frequency ratios, proved to be quite
adequate to design and compare loop applications in a systematic and simple manner.
They are continuously applied in the following chapters.
The numerical examples of figures 2.7 and 2.9 are calculated with a mathematical simulation
software, Matlab. The graphs are the output of executable files that are programmed with
parametric inputs, being a flexible calculation tool.
The tables are also an interesting design tool easily implemented in any spreadsheet software.
fig. 2.9.a Open Loop fig.2.9.b Closed Loop
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 43
Contents:
3. Application Related Constraints 43
3.1. Reference Breakthrough ......................................................................................................................... 44
3.2. VCO Noise Representation and Phase Noise Units ................................................................................ 46
3.3. Optimum Closed Loop Bandwidth .......................................................................................................... 50
3.4. PLL Closed Loop Bandwidth .................................................................................................................. 52
3.4.1. w
3dB
derivation from B
RL
(s)........................................................................................................... 53
3.4.2. w
3dB
derivation from w
as
................................................................................................................ 59
3.5. Maximum Phase Jitter ............................................................................................................................ 61
3.6. Gain Stability Boundary.......................................................................................................................... 65
Figures:
Figure 3.1 BB noise representation of the VCO........................................................................................... 47
Figure 3.2 Free running VCO power spectrum density ............................................................................... 49
Figure 3.3 PSD of a VCO locked by a PLL .................................................................................................. 49
Figure 3.4 Peaking X Optimum Closed Loop bandwidth............................................................................ 50
Figure 3.5 Combined Spectrum: PLL + VCO noise contributions ............................................................. 52
Figure 3.6 Rootlocus for w
3dB
location.......................................................................................................... 58
Figure 3.7 Rootlocus for w
as
location............................................................................................................ 60
Figure 3.8 Optimizing Total Phase Deviation .............................................................................................. 63
Figure 3.9 Maximum SSB noise requirement .............................................................................................. 64
Tables:
Table 3-1 Comparing the denominators of B(s) and B
RL
(s) ....................................................................... 54
Table 3-2 Rootlocus approach for w
cl
: parameters of B
RL
(s) ..................................................................... 58
Table 3-3 Gain Stability Boundary.............................................................................................................. 65
Table 3-4 Maximum Normalized Gain Variation...................................................................................... 67
3 Application Related Constraints
So far we discussed the PLL system quite separate from its application. In this chapter we study
parameters concerning the spectral purity of a VCO locked by a PLL. The parameters concern
the adequacy of the closed loop bandwidth to the noise performance of the VCO, and the
suppression of deterministic interference at f
cp
.
The filter calculation method is extended to discuss the maximum phase deviation in the
synthesized carrier, and an example of a satellite application is developed.
44 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
This chapter starts to analyze the phase noise contents of the carrier output of the PLL
synthesizer. At this point, it is a system level analysis, that considers two single noise
contributions: one for the VCO and another for the ensemble of the PLL blocks.
The sources of noise, that can be either deterministic or random, are progressively presented in
chapters 4 and 6. Later in chapter 7, these noise specifications are translated to a circuit level
description.
In order to minimize the phase noise in the spectrum of the synthesized carrier, we should be
able to choose the closed loop bandwidth with respect to the noise performances of the PLL and
the VCO. The calculation algorithm for the loop filter is then extended to take into account the
specification of a closed loop bandwidth.
The total phase deviation is introduced as a figure of merit for the noise contents in the carrier
spectrum. A numerical example for a satellite frontend exemplifies the calculation method. In
this example, we calculate a loop filter that guarantees a total phase deviation lower than 2° for
the entire range of normalized gain variation (2.r
21
).
3.1 Reference Breakthrough
Reference breakthrough, or spurious rays
i
, is a FM interference found in the VCO output at
frequency offsets of tf
cp
. The value of |H(jw)|
w = 2π.fcp
represents the rejection by the loop filter
of the fundamental component of the input current pulses. The f
cp
component of the loop filter
output generates the FM modulation of the VCO. The spurious requirement should be met by
providing the necessary attenuation of the f
cp
component.
A first cause of the reference breakthrough is leakage currents. The leakage currents cause
variations in the value of V
tune
. These variations are compensated by the feedback action of the
PLL, which provides every T
cp
the average lost charge. Practical examples of leakage currents
are:
Πthe reverse current of the varicap (from the oscillator resonant circuit);
Πin the case of active loop filters, the amplifier input current;
Πan unwanted current of the charge pump in the off state;
Πa discharge current in the loop filter impedance, proportional to the residual transient current.
This effect is relevant for large bandwidth (bw) filters.
ii
A second cause is the transient mismatch of the sinking and sourcing pulses of the charge pump.
When in lock both sources are switched on during the reset interval. This is done
in order to avoid dead-zone problems (see chapter 1). The sinking and sourcing pulses have
different rise and fall times so the combined current output is not null, and it presents
components at f
cp
and its harmonics.

i
Sometimes the name spurious rays is also used for other deterministic interference found in the VCO output. These
interferences are originated by the operation of different integrated blocks, and they contaminated V
tune
by parasitic
coupling.
ii
For a charge pump output and resonant circuit input with high impedance, the loop filter discharge is proportional
to the time constant T
p2
. In large bw filters this discharge causes significant changes in V
tune
during a T
cp
interval.
The time response of the filter is further discussed in chapter 5.
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 45
Once we evaluate the total leakage current and mismatch we can calculate the corresponding
spurious level. The spurious level is proportional to the current that compensates these effects.
For the calculation we do two approximations. First we assume that the frequency content of the
compensation current is concentrated at f
cp
. Second we use the narrow band FM approximation
as the phase deviations are small.
Let us suppose a single tone modulating signal m(t), and an FM modulated carrier s(t):
[ ]
]
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅ ⋅ · ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ ·
⋅ ⋅ ·

cp
cp m
c c c c
cp m
f
t w A Kvco
t w A dt t m Kvco t w A t s
t w A t m
) sin(
cos ) ( 2 cos ) (
) cos( ) (
π
We define the peak phase deviation β:
cp
m
f
A Kvco ⋅
· β
;
and apply the FM narrow band approximation for β << 1 rad , which gives:
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ]
¹
'
¹
¹
'
¹
+ − − ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ · t w w t w w t w A t s
cp c cp c c c
cos cos
2
cos
β
(3.1)
The leakage current component at f
cp
represents a voltage amplitude in the VCO input of:
cp
w w
filter leakage m
jw Z I A
·
⋅ · ) (
The resulting SSB spurious rays measured with respect to the carrier amplitude becomes:
]
]
]

⋅ ·
]
]
]

⋅ ·
2
log 20
amplitude carrier
component f modulated FM SSB
log 20
cp β
As
or
]
]
]
]


⋅ ⋅
⋅ ·
cp
vco cp filter leakage
f
K w Z I
As
2
) (
log 20
(3.2)
Equation (3.2) is a 1
st
order evaluation of the sidebands at the reference frequency. It is an
overestimation because we assumed all the power of the compensation current concentrated at f
cp
. In practice, the accuracy of the calculation of the spurious rays is limited by the evaluation of
the I
leakage
value.
The leakage currents that depend only on the V
tune
value are easier to evaluate, (in locked mode
V
tune
is practically constant). It is the case of the varicap reverse current (component
specification), the amplifier input current, and the charge pump off current.
The residual transient current depends on the circuit design, and it is easier and more accurate to
use a mixed circuit and behavioural simulation. For instance the mismatch between sinking and
sourcing may be evaluated with a PLL behavioural model including a circuit level description of
46 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
the charge pump.
iii
The resulting spurious rays may be calculated with the value of I
leakage
and
equation (3.2), or directly applying an FFT (fast Fourier transform) at the simulated V
tune
signal.
The PLL behavioural model for time domain simulations is discussed in chapter 7. In this model
we may add other causes of spurious rays, such as supply contamination and substrate coupling.
In chapter 4 we discuss the role of the loop amplifier in the transmission of supply perturbations.
The narrow band treatment used above is valid for any phase deviation that respects the
maximum peak deviation boundary, ∆ϕ
max
<< 1rad. For perturbations exceeding this modulation
index, or when a better accuracy is required, a more complete description should be used,
including other harmonic components.
For the moment we use the narrow band approach to discuss rather small phase disturbances,
such as random noise sources. We start with a global approach that considers the optimization of
the VCO spectrum for given VCO and PLL noise performances. Later in chapter 6, the
mechanisms of phase noise generation are described, and in chapter 7 the simulation tools that
relate noise and design are discussed.
The following section introduces the units used to characterize the oscillator phase noise, and we
proceed with the choice of the PLL bandwidth optimizing the phase deviation content.
3.2 VCO Noise Representation and Phase Noise Units
The spectrum of a VCO locked by a PLL is composed of two zones. One is called in-loop and
the other out-of-loop. These names refer to the zones of the VCO output which are dominated by
the PLL input noise or by the VCO intrinsic (free-running) noise.
Roughly the flat part of |B(jw)| corresponds to the PLL determined, in-loop zone. The
–60dB/dec region of |B(jw)| , where the intrinsic VCO noise (with –20dB/dec) takes over, is the
out-of-loop zone.
In reality all input signals, noise or deterministic, have finite power and have a band limited
power spectrum density (PSD). However, in a first approach let us consider two white noise
sources representing the VCO and PLL noise contributions. The total noise contribution from
the different PLL blocks is concentrated at the phase detector input, and we name it N
PLL
.
In the base-band (BB) phase representation adopted in chapter 2, the VCO is represented by an
integrator with sensitivity Kvco. The BB representation makes a frequency conversion of the
BPF behaviour of the VCO in an LPF behaviour. In this context the VCO spectrum may be
modeled by a white noise voltage source at the integrator input.

iii
Another method of direct evaluation is rather lengthy, since we need first to find the correct phase difference
between the phase detector inputs that corresponds to an average constant charge, at V
tune
. After that, the current
difference, T
cp
periodic signal, is compared to a square or triangular pulse, and the power fraction at f
cp
is calculated.
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 47
Figure 3.1 BB noise representation of the VCO
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
⋅ · ⋅

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·
Hz
Vrms
Kvco
f
f L
Kvco
f
bw
v offset
f
dB
L
offset
offset
offset
nvco
2
10
2 2
2
) (
10 2 ) ( 2 (3.3)
The part of the VCO spectrum with a –20dB/dec slope is correctly represented by a white
voltage noise source. Near the carrier, a free running oscillator presents a phase noise with higher
roll-off, due to the presence of 1/f (flicker) noise sources. In figure 3.1 this is indicated by the
corner frequency f
recover
, which points to the intersection of the white and flicker noise
contributions. So a more complete description, which would be valid for offset frequencies
below f
recover
, needs to include poles and zeros in the v
nvco
expression, to represent the different
slopes in the output spectrum.
In the case of a large bandwidth PLL, the voltage noise source, v
nvco
, does not need to be
frequency shaped. The part of the spectrum with the -30dB/dec roll-off is hidden by the PLL
noise.
In equation (3.3) the factor 2 relates this base band representation to a single-side band (SSB)
measurement, L(f). L(f) is SSB phase noise defined by:
curve under the area total
f at bw Hz 1 in area
power signal total
n fluctuatio phase to due power SSB
) (
offset
· ·
offset
f L
or
]
]
]

· ≈
+
·


Hz CNR P
f P
df f P P
f P
f L
carrier
offset noise
noise carrier
offset noise
offset
1 1
) (
) (
) (
) (
0
(3.4)
when expressed in dB it equals
[ ]
]
]
]

·
Hz
dBc
f L f L
dB
) ( log 10 ) ( ; dBc ⇒ dB with respect to carrier power.
ϕ
osc
VCO output spectrum
v
nvco
2
[Vrms
2
/Hz]
s
K
o
~ frecover
VCO
PSD
[W/Hz]
f
osc
log (foffset)
-20dB/dec
-30dB/dec
48 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
At this point we take a filtered portion of v
nvco
, and analyze it as a deterministic signal that
modulates the VCO. Using equation (3.1), and an ideal filter with a bandwidth of 1Hz around f
m
, we obtain:
( ) [ ] V t w v t m
m m nvco
ϕ + ⋅ ⋅ · cos 2 ) ( ;
with a peak phase deviation:
m
nvco vco
f
v K ⋅ ⋅
·
2
β ;
and an oscillator phase: ( ) [ ] rad t w t w t
m m c osc
ϕ β ϕ + ⋅ + · sin ) (
The base-band representation of the oscillator phase is given by:


⋅ ⋅ · ⋅ − dt t m K t w
vco c osc
) ( 2π ϕ
which corresponds directly to the block diagram in figure 3.1. We may represent the phase
deviation caused by m(t) as two sidebands at offset frequencies of tf
m
, with an amplitude value
equal to A
c
.β /2 , or:

,
`

.
|


⋅ ·
,
`

.
|
⋅ · ·

,
`

.
| ⋅
·
m
nvco vco
m dB
c
c
m
f
v K
f L
A
A
f L
2
log 20
2
log 20 ) (
4
2
2
1
2
) (
2
2
2
β β
β
K
S
ϕ
(f) is the double side band (DSB) phase noise, or the mean square phase fluctuations power. It
may be seen as the BB equivalent of L(f) :
[ ] dB f L
rad
S
f S
Hz
rad
f L f S
dB dB offset
3 ) (
1
log 10 ) ( ; ) ( 2 ) (
2
2
+ ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ · ⋅ ·
ϕ
ϕ ϕ
(3.5)
Expression (3.5) holds when the sideband amplitudes are evaluated by the narrow band
approach. Otherwise a significant amount of the BB power is scattered in higher harmonics of f
m
around the carrier.
For decreasing values of f
m
, the phase deviation increases and the narrow band approximation is
no longer valid. This condition indicates the minimum frequency offset for which the VCO can
be represented by a linear phase model. Once more, this limitation is hidden by the PLL in-loop
region, since the PLL noise contribution appears as a phase and not as a frequency modulating
signal of ϕ
osc
.
iv
Figure 3.2 illustrates the phase noise units in the side band and base band representations of the
free running VCO spectrum.

iv
A more detailed discussion of the spectrum differences between PM and FM appears in chapter 6 .
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 49
(
v
)
Figure 3.2 Free running VCO power spectrum density
The PLL noise contribution, N
PLL
, is a phase jitter in rad/sqrt(Hz). Figure (3.3) shows BB and
DSB representations of the spectrum of a VCO locked by a PLL. The noise contributions from
N
PLL
and v
nvco
are indicated separately. The level of the sidebands corresponds to a unitary
normalized carrier level, or to the phase deviation values.
The closed loop transfer function, B(s), analyzed in chapter 2, determines the transfer of N
PLL
to
the output spectrum. In a similar manner we may define B
vco
(s) as the closed loop transfer
function of ϕ
osc
/ v
nvco
. Since the feedback path is the same for B(s) and B
vco
(s), they have equal
denominators.
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
1 3 2 1
2
3 2 1
1 1 1
1 1
) (
) (
) (
z p p
p p o
vco
sT sT sT C s
sT sT C s K
s F K
s B
s B
+ ⋅ + + ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅
·

·
α
ϕ
(3.6)
Figure 3.3 PSD of a VCO locked by a PLL

v
The DSB graphs abscissas need to be split in two regions if we want to keep the logarithm scale with respect to
f
offset
.
4
2
β
1
|S
ϕ
(f)|
[rad
2
/Hz]
BB representation
2 . L(f
off1
) = S
ϕ
(f
off1
)
foff1
f
offset
log(f-fc)
L(f
offset
)
foffset
8
2
β ⋅
c
A
2
2
c
A
|P
osc
(f)|
[W/Hz]
f
osc
f
DSB representation
log(f-fc)
N
pll
+3dB
20log(N)
|S
ϕ
(f)|
[rad
2
/Hz]
BB representation
log(f)
free-running VCO_Sφ(f)
from Vnvco
from Npll
1
(Npll)
2
. |B(f)|
2
-60dB/dec
-20dB/dec
log(f-fc)
log(f-fc)
|P
osc
(f)|
[W/Hz]
f
osc
DSB representation
(vnvco)
2
/2.|Bvco(f)|
2
50 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
B
vco
(s) has an overall band pass filtering behaviour. This can be represented by an approximate
transfer function B
vco_BPF
. It is a simplified function resembling B
3LPF
(s) (equation (2.8) ), the
simplified LPF description of B(s).

α
ξ

,
`

.
|
+ ⋅ +
⋅ ⋅
·
1
2
) (
2
2
1
_
s
w w
s
C s K
s B
n n
o
BPF vco
(3.7)
Comparing B
vco_BPF
and B
3LPF
, we notice that they both have a second order polynomial in the
denominator, written in a standard ξ and w
n
form. We choose this common notation to indicate
similar roots in the two functions. In numerical examples, we verify that the w
n
in B
vco_BPF
is
slightly larger than the one in B
3LPF
.
The interest of these simplified forms appears when we are minimizing the noise content of the
output spectrum. Figure 3.3 shows an ideally smooth intersection between the two zones of the
spectrum, the in-loop one and the out-of-loop one. Nevertheless, the dominant noise in each of
these zones originates from independent noise sources, and in practice the feedback bandwidth
and gain determine whether the intersection is smooth or bumpy.
3.3 Optimum Closed Loop Bandwidth
In order to minimize the noise of the output spectrum, we need to match the PLL closed loop
bandwidth (f
cl
) with the intersection frequency, where the noise contributions from N
pll
and v
nvco
cross each other. Mismatches result in additional peaking or excessive PLL noise, as drafted in
figure 3.4.
We use again the term peaking to refer to the spectral overshoot. This mismatch peaking adds to
the low phase margin peaking seen in chapter 2. In the measurements, an overall peaking is
observed, and it is due to both causes.
Thus, we need to know the PLL and VCO noise performances in order to choose an adequate
feedback bandwidth, and afterwards center a stable filter around this bandwidth.
Figure 3.4 Peaking X Optimum Closed Loop bandwidth
additional
peaking
Ideal closed
loop bw
fosc
from Vnvco.
from Npll
excessive
PLL noise
Ideal closed
loop bw
fosc
from Vnvco.
from Npll
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 51
The ideal feedback bandwidth is indicated in the figure above. The spectrum has a minimum
jitter content when we center a loop filter around this bandwidth. Unfortunately this bandwidth
will correspond only to the central gain value, and we know that synthesizers work with a large
range of gain variation. The choice of the bandwidth should take into account the optimization of
the phase jitter over the entire range of gain.
We start with a numerical example showing the spectrum of a VCO locked by a PLL, and the
separated PLL and VCO noise contributions for a set of different gain values. The figure is
divided into four parts:
• fig. 3.5.a : shows the total output spectrum plus isolated PLL and VCO noise
contributions, for the centered gain value α
npf
. Three asymptotes are
added in dotted lines. They correspond to the VCO free-running
behaviour, the N
pll
DC transfer value (20.log[N]), and 3dB below the DC
value.
vi
• fig 3.5.b: total output spectrum for gain values varying within a range of (2.r
21
)
around α
npf
.
• fig 3.5.c and d: detailed contributions of PLL and VCO noise for the curves in part b.
The same symbols from figure 2.9 are used to indicate w
z1
( o ), w
olnpf
( * ), w
oln
( ). y
p2
( x),
w
p3
( x ). N
PLL
, also called synthesizer noise floor, is indicated in figure 3.5.d by a dotted line.
The numerical values used for these graphs correspond to the performance of low noise satellite
PLL and VCO:
Hz dBc KHz L
GHz F
N
MHz Hz dBc N
vco
vco
pll
/ 100 ) 100 (
5 . 1
1500
1 F for / 154
cp
− ·
·

,
`
·
· − · K
Let us define f
i
as being the intersection frequency for PLL and VCO noise asymptotes, as
indicated in figure 3.5.a:
) log( 20 log 20 ) ( N N
f
f
f L
pll
i
offset
offset vco
⋅ + ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ +
]
]
]

− ⋅ +

⋅ ·
20
) ( ) log( 20
10
offset vco pll
f L N N
offset i
f f (3.8)
In order to optimize the output spectrum we want to center the closed bandwidth f
cl
around f
i
.
But so far we only specified the open loop bandwidth f
ol
, used in the loop filter calculation.
Hence, we seek now a relationship between the open and closed loop bandwidths for a gain
range around the centered value α
npf
.

vi
The asymptotes are repeated in the other subplots (3.5.b/c/d) to simplify the comparison among the curves, which
are plotted in different scales.
52 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 3.5 Combined Spectrum: PLL + VCO noise contributions
3.4 PLL Closed Loop Bandwidth
The simplified transfer functions B
3LPF
and B
vco_BPF
, showed that the PLL and the VCO noise
contributions have a similar closed loop bandwidth, depending on w
n
and ξ . This bandwidth
corresponds to the LPF cut-off frequency for N
PLL
, and to the central frequency of a BPF for
v
nvco
.
Later on, we assume that both transfer functions have an identical closed loop bandwidth, which
is determined by the zero and poles of the loop filter, and by the loop gain α . Therefore, we need
to relate the open and closed loop PLL bandwidths. The closed bandwidth must approach f
i
, but
it is the open loop bandwidth that is used for the filter calculation.
Let us consider w
3dB
as the closed loop bandwidth. First we do a quantitative approach of the
ratio w
3dB
/w
ol
, with numerical evaluations. After that, two analytic methods are discussed.
a b c d e
fig. 3.5.a fig. 3.5.b
fig. 3.5.c
fig. 3.5.d
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 53
Numerical evaluations of the ratio w
3dB
/w
ol
, for a centered gain variation of (2.r
21
) around
w
olnpf
, show that this ratio is contained in a limited range, when we assume that the r
21
and r
31
values belong to the ranges indicated below. The limiting ranges include the typical values
encountered in synthesizer applications. The results and conditions are:
[ ]
[ ] 28 . 0 63 . 1
6 . 1
, 16
50 , 10
3
31
21
31
21
t · ⇒
≥ ∧
∞ ∈

ol
dB
w
w
r
r
r
r
In chapter 2 we saw that the open loop bandwidth w
ol
varies around w
olnpf
. Thus it is likely that
w
3dB
, which is proportional to w
ol
, and slightly larger, varies around a value close to w
oln
.
The difficulty to evaluate w
3dB
(more precisely) comes from the fact that the denominator of the
closed loop transfer function D
B
(s), has complex roots with a variable damping. This implies a
variable peaking and a variable w
3dB
/w
n
.
The rootlocus representation of B(s) may be used to derive two formal expressions for w
3dB
.
These expressions are derived in sections 3.4.1 and 3.4.2 using some algebra puzzles.
The overall result is already announced in the paragraph above.
Closed loop bandwidth varies as much as open loop bandwidth and we need some application
criteria to define how to accommodate this variation. An example of an application criterion for
digital phase modulations is presented in section 3.5 .
3.4.1 w
3dB
derivation from B
RL
(s)
This first method compares the closed loop transfer B(s), with a polynomial that arises from the
rootlocus representation. Subsequently, it deduces the minimum and maximum boundaries for
w
n
and ξ, and relates these parameters to w
3dB
. Numerical evaluations are used to validate the
method.
The polynomial B
RL
(s) is equivalent to B(s). B
RL
(s) has 4 roots agreeing with the branches of the
rootlocus presented in figure 2.6.
( )
( ) ( ) ( ) [ ]
1 3 2 1
2
1
1 1 1
1 ) (
z p p
z
sT sT sT C s
sT
N
s B
+ ⋅ + + ⋅ + ⋅
+ ⋅
·
α
α
(3.9)
( )
( ) ( ) α
ξ
α

,
`

.
|
+ + ⋅ + ⋅ +
+ ⋅
·
1
2
1 1
1 ) (
2
2

1

3
1
n n
z p
z RL
w
s
w
s
sT sT
sT
N
s B
By inspection we verify that B
3LPF
(eq. (2.8) ) is a simplified version of B
RL
, with the following
approximations: T
z1
’ → T
z1
and T
p3
’ → T
p3
.
N
s B
N
s B
RL
) ( ) (
·
54 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The transfer function B
RL
states that for any given α, at least two roots are real. The two others
are either real or complex depending on the value of ξ . The assumption of two real roots agrees
with the rootlocus diagram of figure 2.6.
Furthermore the diagram shows that the position of the real roots may be specified within limited
frequency ranges. In our notation, the real roots correspond to the time constants T
z1
’ and T
p3
’.
We define γ and β, as the ratios between the time constants, with:
1 0
3

3
≤ ≤ · β β K K
p
p
T
T
and
1 0
1

1
≤ ≤ · γ γ KK
z
z
T
T
.
We expand the denominators of B(s) and B
RL
(s), and compare the coefficients of the 4
th
and 1
st
order terms of s, finding the following equalities:
term
D
B
(s)/α D
BRL
(s)/α
4
th
s
4
2
oln
2
31
21
4
oln 31
21
w w r
r
w r
r
n
n
⋅ ⋅
⋅ ⋅
·


γ β
α
α
1
st
s
1
n
w w
r
w
r
ξ
γ
2
oln
21
oln
21
+

·
Table 3-1 Comparing the denominators of B(s) and B
RL
(s)
from 4
th
order terms:
2
1
21 oln

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ · r w w
n
n
γ β
α
α
(3.10)
from 1
st
order terms:
( ) γ
ξ
− ⋅
⋅ ·
1
2
21
oln
r
w w
n
(3.11)
We may use the last two expressions to derive the minimum and maximum boundaries of w
n
.
Expression (3.10) contains variables that belong to closed and known ranges. We use it to derive
the maximum limit of w
n
.
[ ]
[ ] [ ]
{ ¦
¹
¹
¹
'
¹




∈ ∧ ∈
·
]
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅


1
1 max with
1 , 0 1 , 0
, 2 ,
2
max
max min 21
21
γ
β
α α
γ β
α α α
α
α
n
npf
npf
w
r
r
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 55
so:
{ ¦ ( )
4
1
21
2
1
oln
2
1
21 oln
1
1
max
lim max r w r w w
n n
n

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ <



α
α
γ β
α
α
γ
β
α α
but since
21 max
2 r
n npf n
⋅ ⋅ < ⇒ ≥ α α α α
the maximum of w
n
becomes
vii
: { ¦ ( ) ( ) ( ) 19 , 1 2 max
2
4
1
2
1
21 oln
⋅ · ⋅ ⋅ <
p n
w r w w
(3.12)
In order to find the minimum of w
n
with expression (3.11) we need to find the minimum
occurring value of ξ.
viii
After the recentering procedure outlined in chapter 2, we observed that a gain variation of 2.r
21
can be covered with a minimum phase margin of 30°, for r
31
≥ 1.6 . r
21
.
So we may look for a relationship between ξ and the phase margin parameters to specify the
boundary of the variation of ξ.
Observing B
RL
(s) and the rootlocus, we may suppose that the phase margin is mostly influenced
by the pair of complex roots which are represented by the 2
nd
order polynomial in ξ and w
n
.
Therefore we may rely on the analysis of the 2
nd
order LPF to derive the relationship between the
damping factor ξ, and the open loop phase margin PhM. It holds that

,
`

.
|
+ + −
·
1 4 2
2
4 2
ξ ξ
ξ
arctg PhM
(3.13)
Using equation (3.13) we evaluate the minimum value of ξ corresponding to a 30° PhM.
( ) ° · · ⇒ ° · 6 . 15 sin 269 . 0 30 ξ PhM (3.14)
Finally the minimum boundary for w
n
is calculated substituting (3.14) in equation (3.11):
[ ]
[ ]
{ ¦
( )
1
21
oln
21
oln
269 , 0
0
54 . 0 54 . 0
1
2
lim min
1 , 0
1 , 269 . 0
z n
w
r
w
r
w w ⋅ · ⋅ ·
− ⋅
⋅ >

,
`




γ
ξ
γ
ξ
ξ
γ
(3.15)
The next step concerns the relationships between ξ, w
n
and w
3dB
. We continue to work with the
hypothesis that the two complex roots are largely determining B(jw) around w
n
. Hence, we may
use the following expression deduced from the standard 2
nd
LPF:

vii
A more rigorous treatment should take into account the ratio α
n

npf
, related to the recentering procedure, seen in
chapter 2. Later in this section a numerical example illustrates the difference.
viii
The maximum ξ value is 1, corresponding to α values with 4 real roots.
56 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

( ) [ ]
2
1
2 3
2 2 1 + − + − · ξ ξ ξ
n
dB
w
w
(3.16)
Combining (3.16) with our restricted domain of ξ , we find:

[ ] [ ] 1 , 404 . 1 1 , 269 . 0
3
∈ ⇒ ∈
n
dB
w
w
ξ
(3.17)
The extreme values of w
n
, occurring for α
max
and α
min
, both correspond to cases where the PhM
equals 30°, or ξ equals 0.269 , or:

404 . 1
3
·
n
dB
w
w
The combination of the minimum and maximum boundaries of w
n
and this ratio gives the desired
range of w
3dB
:
[ ]
2 3 1 2 1 max min
67 . 1 75 , 0 2 . 1 54 , 0 ,
p dB z p n z
w w w w w w ⋅ < < ⋅ ⋅ < < ⋅ ∈ K K α α α
The geometrical mean of the range of w
3dB
equals: ( )
oln 3
w 1.12 mean geom. ⋅ ·
dB
w
The maximum value of w
n
was overestimated in equation (3.12) because we neglected the ratio
α
n
/ α
npf

ix
. A numerical application correcting this maximum boundary for given values of r
21
and r
31
is presented below:
for:
[ ]
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
⋅ < < ⋅

⋅ < < ⋅

¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
⋅ · ∈
·

,
`

.
|

·
·
2 3 1
2 1
21
min
max
max min
2
1
npf 31
21
36 . 1 75 . 0
97 . 0 54 . 0

2 with ,
23 . 1
50
25
p dB z
p n z
n
w w w
w w w
r
r
r
α
α
α α α
α
α
Here, the geometrical mean of the range of w
3dB
is: ( )
oln 3
w 1.01 mean geom. ⋅ ·
dB
w
Thus the range of w
3dB
centers approximately around w
ol
. With this result we combine the open
and closed loop specifications for the spectrum optimization.
Another possibility to relate the close loop transfer with the values of ξ is found in phase Bode
plots. This relationship was presented numerically in figure 2.9, by dPhB, the phase variation for
a frequency delta of one octave around w
n
.
[ ] [ ] [ ]
2
)) ( (
2
2 )) ( ( )) ( ( ) (
n n
n octave
w
jw B ph
dw
d w
w jw B ph
dw
d
w jw B phase
dw
d
jw dPhB ⋅ ·
,
`

.
|
− ⋅ · ∆ ⋅ ·
(3.18)

ix
In order to introduce α
n
/ α
npf
factor, we need to know the ratio r
31
/r
21
. Expression (3.12) is a rougher boundary
estimation not depending on r
31
value.
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 57
For our faithful 2
nd
order LPF, dPhB becomes:
[ ] [ ]
{ ¦ octave / 149 ) ( max 269 . 0 for
40
rad
2
1
2
1
) (
min
° − · ⇒ · ·
°

·


· ⋅


·
jw dPhB
w
w
jw dPhB
n
n
ξ ξ
ξ
ξ
ξ
In this case, the analogy to the 2
nd
order LPF is accurate for 3
rd
order loops, but not for 4
th
order
loops, where the post-filter has a significant influence in the phase variation around w
n
.
Hence we stick to the rootlocus criterion to center the closed loop bandwidth .
Figure 3.6 illustrates the rootlocus for different values of r
21
and r
31
.
The grid indicates natural frequencies and damping arches (ϕ = arcsin ξ ). A set of gain values
within the usual (2.r
21
) interval is chosen, and the roots corresponding to these gain values are
indicated by delta signs (∆) .
The plot is magnified around the origin of the s-plane, so that the damping of the complex roots
can be easily visualized. We verify that all the roots signaled by a ∆, are effectively contained in
the area corresponding to arcsin(ξ)>15° , or ξ >0.26 .
Grid:
[ ]
[ ]
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
° ° ° ° ° ·
∗ ·
15 , 30 , 45 , 60 , 75 arcsin
8 , 4 , 2 , 1
olnpf
ξ
w w
n
Gain values signaled by a delta (∆): ( ) ( )
]
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ·
− 5 . 0
21
5 . 0
21
2 , , 1 , 2 r r
npf
n
npf
α
α
α α
.
In figure 3.6.b we observe that a small value of r
21
limits the maximum value of ξ . This result
agrees with expression (2.10), concerning the maximum phase margin.
The 4
th
branch follows the real axis from –w
p3
towards -∞ .
The values of β, γ, ξ, and w
n
, from the expression of B
RL
(s), are evaluated for the left rootlocus
diagram with: r
21
=25 and r
31
=50 .
In table 3-2 the columns coloured gray correspond to the α values indicated by a ∆ signal in
figure 3.15.a .
58 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 3.6 Rootlocus for w
3dB
location
α
( )
2
1
21
npf
2 r ⋅
α
( )
4
1
21
npf
2 r ⋅
α
α
npf
α
n
( )
4
1
21 npf
2 r ⋅ ⋅ α ( )
4
1
21 npf
2 r ⋅ ⋅ α

3
3
3

3
p
p
p
p
w
w
T
T
· · β
0.991 0.978 0.948 0.927 0.890 0.802

1
1
1

1
z
z
z
z
w
w
T
T
· · γ
0.0415 0.0442 0.0547 0.756 0.879 0.958
olnpf
w
w
n

x
0.196 0.328 0.585 2.65 3.71 5.99
min (ξ) 0.325 0.542 0.958 1.00 0.676 0.275
arcsin [min (ξ) ] 19.0° 32.8° 73.3° 90.0° 42.5° 15.9°
Table 3-2 Rootlocus approach for w
cl
: parameters of B
RL
(s)

x
w
n
for the pair of complex roots. For α values where all roots are real, we take an average of the two roots which
are the closest to the complex branches.
Figure 3.6.a Figure 3.6.b
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 59
3.4.2 w
3dB
derivation from w
as
This second method gives some further insight into the rootlocus representation. However it is
limited to a single gain value.
The asymptotes of the rootlocus for increasing gain values are given by radial lines, which have
a known phase and origin, φ
l
and w
as
.
0
1
1
1 ) (
) (
1 0
) (
) (
1 ) ( 1
lim
lim
·

,
`

.
|
+
+ ·

,
`

.
|
+ ⋅
⋅ + ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷ ·

⋅ + · +
− −
∞ →
∞ → m n
as
m n
as
F
F
w
and
F
F
w
s
w
s
s N
s N
s D s
s N
s H
α
α α
α
(3.19) (3.20)
where n : order of the denominator of H(s);
m : order of the numerator of H(s).
xi
Expressing the asymptotes in the polar form (
l
j
o
e R s
Φ
⋅ · ) and solving the phase condition for
(3.20), gives:
( )
( ) [ ] 1 , 0
;
360 180
360 180
1
− − ∈ ∧ ∈

° ⋅ + °
· Φ
Φ ⋅ − · ° ⋅ + ° ·

,
`

.
|

∞ →
·

m n l Z l
m n
l
m n l
w s
phase
l
l
w
s s
m n
as
o
For n > m+1 , we can apply the following expression, that is derived from(3.19) and (3.20),
comparing the coefficients of order s
n-1
. It follows that:
LHP in the zeros for z with _ H(s) of s z :

(LHP) plane - S the of side left in the
poles for p with _ H(s) of poles :

i
i
i i
i i
i i
as
z ero z
p p
m n
z p
w
·
·



·
∑ ∑
In our case (n-m) = 3 , φ
l
= 60° ; 180° ; 300° , and
[ ]

,
`

.
|
+
⋅ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷ − + ⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
− + ⋅
·
>>
>>
21
31 21
oln
1 r and
1 r for 31 21
21
oln
21 21
31
21 oln
r 3
1
r 3 3
1
31
21
r r
w r r
w
r r
r
r w
w
as

xi
There are (n-m) centrifugal asymptotes because m root branches tend to the m zeros of the open loop transfer
function. In fact for an increasing gain there are two possibilities of satisfying the closed loop characteristic equation
(3.19):
( )
−∞ →


s N
s D s
s N
F
F
F
) (
, 0 ) (
. The second case supposes n > m and w → ∞ .
60 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
We use w
as
to define a LPF transfer function, B
as
(s), with three real poles at w
as
.
A rough estimate of the closed loop bandwidth for α ≈ α
n
is the frequency of 3dB attenuation
for |B
as
(jw)|, named w
3dB-as
:
( ) ( )
( )
2 3
21
31
2 3
21
31
21
31 21
oln 3
2
3
2
3
3
3
4 . 0 6 , 1
r
5 . 0 2
r
for examples numerical
r 6
51 , 0
2
1
1
1
1
1
p as dB
p as dB
as as dB
as
as dB
as dB as
as
as
w w
r
w w
r
r r
w w w
w
w
N
jw B
w
s
N
s B
⋅ · ·
⋅ · ·

,
`

.
|

+
⋅ ≈ ⋅ ·
·

,
`

.
|
+

,
`

.
|
·

,
`

.
|
+
·





K
K
K K
The figure below shows a rootlocus in full scale, with the asymptotes for large gain and w
as
. The
roots corresponding to α
max
and α
min
are indicated with ∆ signals.
Figure 3.7 Rootlocus for w
as
location
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 61
We would like to compare the results of the two methods for the estimation of w
3dB
.
In the 2
nd
method w
3dB
was estimated for a gain of α
n
, and in the 1
st
method the centered value
corresponds to α
npf
. So before the comparison we need to choose values for r
21
and r
31
and
recenter w
3dB_as
with respect to α
n

npf
.
oln oln _ 3 oln 2 _ 3
31
21
8 , 1 5 , 2 5 , 2 5 , 0
50
25
npf
w w r w w w w
r
r
pf as dB p as dB
n
⋅ · ⋅ ⋅ · ⋅ · ⋅ · ⇒
·
·
α α
K
The 2
nd
method results in a larger value of w
3dB
than the 1
st
one. Using this larger value the
spectrum will present a smaller variation of the peaking value α
min
and α
max
.
xii
In practice we often choose w
3dB
in the range:
oln 3 oln
2 w w w
dB
⋅ ≤ ≤ ;
or inversely, when we have a given f
i
(intersection frequency), we choose :
i dB
f w ⋅ · π 2
3
and
3dB oln
3dB
2
w w
w
≤ ≤
In a larger scope, including the specifications of the demodulator block, the optimization of the
LO spectrum is bound to the type of data modulation. The following section discusses the total
phase deviation, which is a determinant parameter for phase modulated data.
3.5 Maximum Phase Jitter
The specification of the spectral purity of the local oscillator depends on the input signal that has
to be frequency-converted. For some types of digital phase modulation, such as BPSK, QPSK
and GMSK, the total phase deviation is a meaningful parameter.
The total phase deviation is defined as:
( )

·
max
min
f
f
df f S
ϕ ϕ
σ [rad] (3.21)
where f
min
and f
max
are related to the channel bandwidth , and/or to the symbol rate.
The characteristics of other blocks of the receiver, such as filter stages and the carrier recovery
loop are also relevant to the sensibility to phase noise. So the achievable BER performance may
not be directly derived from σ
ϕ
.
In chapter 7 we discuss a behavioural model including the carrier recovery loop of a QPSK
decoder. This model is used to evaluate the amount of phase deviation that appears in the
demodulator, and the implementation loss caused by this signal degradation.
The LO spectrum is a combination of the contributions of N
pll
and v
nvco
, transferred by B(s) and
B
vco
(s) respectively. We know that these two transfer functions have similar bandwidths, close to
w
n
in B
3LPF
(s) and B
VCO-BPF
(s), and that w
n
varies with α, in a range closely proportional to the
variation of w
ol
.

xii
Figure 3.5 is traced for a w
3dB
chosen by the 1
st
method (2π.f
i
= w
3dB
= w
oln
), and we see that small α values
present a quite higher peaking than large α values.
62 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Using σ
ϕ
as a spectral quality parameter, we search for the value of w
olnpf
with respect to (2π.f
i
), which optimizes σ
ϕ
over the gain range of (2.r
21
).
The plot below shows an example of the placement of w
olnpf
with respect to f
i
and r
pf

xiii
, so as
to obtain a minimum σ
ϕ
over the total gain range.
( )
oln olnpf
4
1
olnpf
2 2 w w f r f w
i pf i
⋅ · ⋅ ⇒ ⋅ ⋅ · π π (3.22)
The output spectrum is plotted with logarithmic and linear scales. The curves are calculated for
different gain values covering the normalized (2.r
21
) range.
The linear scale is presented as a visual recall of the spectrum analyzer output, usually with a
linear frequency scale around f
vco
. It also helps to visualize the idea of a similar integral (area
under the curve), or σ
ϕ
for the extreme gain cases.
The 3
rd
curve presents the total phase deviation observed in the plots of the spectrum. A large
bandwidth is assumed for the evaluation of σ
ϕ
.
For a −∞ → →
>> <<
p3 oln
) ( and ) (
f f f f
f S cst f S
ϕ ϕ
we may enlarge the integration limits of (3.21) without changing σ
ϕ
significantly.
∫ ∫ ∫

≈ ≈
+∞ 3
40
500
1
max
min
0
p
f
z
f
df S df S df S
f
f
ϕ ϕ ϕ
(3.23)
The integration boundaries of the right most term of (3.23), are used in the calculation of σ
ϕ
.
The integer values of the abscissa correspond to the geometrically distributed values of α .
These α values are the same used in the other plots of Fig. 3.8 :
xiv
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ]
5 . 0
21
25 . 0
21
25 . 0
21
5 . 0
21
2 , 2 , 1 , 2 , 2 r r r r
npf
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ·
− −
α α .
The characteristics of the PLL and the VCO are identical to the ones used in the Bode plot of
Fig. 3.5 . They are:
ΠN
pll
= -154 dBc/Hz @ F
cp
= 1 MHz ;
ΠN = 1500 ;
ΠL
vco
(100KHz)=-100dBc/Hz ;
Πr
21
= 25 ; r
31
= 50 .

xiii
Function of r
21
and r
31
, expression (2.17).
xiv
In figure 3.8 there is an approximation due to the constant divider ratio N. The factor 20.log(N) modulates the
height of the PLL noise contribution. So a changing value of N modifies σ
ϕ
. In our example, with a ratio
N
max
/N
min
=2, the change would not be significant. For other cases with a larger range of dividing ratios, we may
expect that:
• N → N
max
⇒ α → α
min
: an increase in σ
ϕ
with respect to the evaluation with a constant N;
• N → N
min
⇒ α → α
max
: a decrease in σ
ϕ
with respect to the evaluation with a constant N.
Therefore we may choose to center w
olnpf
in a frequency larger than the one indicated in equation (3.22), or in other
words closer to f
i
.
A numerical simulation tool is always indicated to verify the total phase deviation, with respect to N and α values.
We present two options of simulation tools. The graph below is calculated with a programmed Matlab routine. In
chapter 7 we discuss another simulation model easily implemented in software for analog circuitry simulation.
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 63
Figure 3.8 Optimizing Total Phase Deviation
Fig. 3.8 shows that this set of noise performances of the PLL and VCO can accommodate a gain
variation (α
max

min
) of factor 50, with a total phase deviation under 1.8° .
This optimum σ
ϕ
performance is an important practical result for synthesizers generating low-
noise carriers.
The curves from left
to right correspond to
the gain values:
a) α
npf
. (2.r
21
)
-0.5
b) α
npf
. (2.r
21
)
-0.25
c) α
npf
d) α
npf
. (2.r
21
)
+0.25
e) α
npf
. (2.r
21
)
+0.5
64 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Other applications will demand different spectral purity parameters, for example a maximum
peak or a minimum |L(f)| (absolute single side band phase noise) within a certain frequency
offset range.
In this case, we may use a very large
feedback bandwidth ,
w
olnpf
>> (2π.f
i
) in order to have the
PLL behaviour determining most of
the spectrum around w
n
in all the
gain range.
However, in the case of a large
bandwidth we must pay attention to
keep: w
n
/ w
cp
< 0.5 ; mainly with
α=α
max
.
Figure 3.9 Maximum SSB noise requirement
The limitation of a maximum bandwidth appears when the PLL model includes the sampling of
the phase detector. This issue is treated in chapter 5.
The boundary we propose for the moment, is a rough estimation, which is similar to a Nyquist
bandwidth for a discrete system with a sampling frequency f
cp
.
In the numerical example treated above, it would not be possible to increase w
olnpf
as much as
needed for an equilibrated minimum |L(f)| throughout the whole range of α, as the max{w
n
} is
already near to w
cp
. In other cases with a much worse PLL phase noise performance, it would be
possible to apply this minimum |L(f)| criterion.
The criterion of minimal |L(f)| is also called maximum flat spectrum optimization.
In the scope of the rootlocus representation, we may deduce this maximum flat condition as the
maximum ξ condition. Therefore maximum flat spectra are obtained for values of α
corresponding to 4 real roots (ξ=1), and a closed bandwidth well matched with f
i
.
The formal solution of the maximum flat point is found minimizing |B(jw)|. Reference
[Wong96] discusses this problem for 4
th
and 5
th
order PLLs, comparing the algorithms of
maximum PhM and maximum flat spectrum. But the discussion is limited to a single gain value,
and is not therefore very useful in our application, where we need to accommodate rather large
gain variations.
fosc
Locked VCO output Spectrum
min |L (f) |
α
min
α
max
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 65
3.6 Gain Stability Boundary
We end this chapter deriving one last practical feature that is emphasized by the rootlocus. It is
the limiting gain value that implies system instability.
In the rootlocus representation, we observe a pair of complex roots crossing the imaginary axis
for increasing gain values. Routh’s stability criterion may be used to evaluate this gain stability
boundary.
xv
B(s) is rewritten as a function of α
n,
, w
oln
, r
21
, r
31
:
( )
1 s s
1
s s
1
oln
21
2
oln
21 2
31
31 21
3
oln
3
31
4
oln
21 4
oln
21
+

,
`

.
|
⋅ +

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ +

,
`

.
| +
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ +

,
`

.
|

⋅ ⋅

,
`

.
|
⋅ +
·
w
r
w
r
r
r r
w r w
r
w
r
s
N
s B
n n n
α
α
α
α
α
α
For α , α
n,
, w
oln
, r
21
, r
31
∈ R
+
all the coefficients of the denominator are positive, but we need
also to check the first column of the Routh array, depicted in the table below:
s
4
1 1
s
3
oln
21
31 21
w
r
r r

+ a
1
s
2
( )
]
]
]
]

+
⋅ − ⋅ ⋅
31 21
21
31
2
oln
1
r r
r
r w
n
α
α
b
1
s
1
( )
( )
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
]
]
]

⋅ − + ⋅ ⋅
+
− ⋅ ⋅ ⋅
21 31 21 31 21
2
31 21
31
3
oln
1
r r r r r
r r
r w
n
n
α
α
α
α
c
1
s
0
= 1
n
r
r
w
α
α
⋅ ⋅
21
31 4
oln
d
1
Table 3-3 Gain Stability Boundary

xv
The criterion observes the coefficients of the system characteristics equation (expressed as a monic polynomial,
i.e. the coefficient of the higher order term equals 1) to compose two statements:
Πhaving all coefficients positive, it is a necessary condition for all the roots to have negative real parts;
Πhaving all elements of the 1
st
column of Routh array positive, it is a necessary and sufficient condition for all
roots to have negative real parts.
66 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Terms b
1
and c
1
may become negative for an increasing
n
α
α
factor.
lim 1 1lim
lim 1
31 21
31 21
21
31 21
1
lim 1
21
31 21
1
with
1 0
0
b c
c
r r
r r
r
r r
c
b
r
r r
b
n
n
<
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
·
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|

+
− ⋅
+
< ⇒ >
·
+
< ⇒ >
α
α
α
α
The difference between c
1lim
and b
1lim
is rather small when r
21
and r
31
are much larger than 1; so
we may work with b
1lim
for simplicity.
Thus for
lim 1
b
n
>
α
α
, we have two signal changes in the column vector indicating two roots in
the RHP.
Next we combine b
1lim
with the gain recentering expression (2.19), to determine the maximum
α/α
npf
ratio.
2
1
1
21 31
31
21
31 21
2
1
1
21
31 21
21
21
1
r
r
pf npf
n
n npf
r r
r
r
r r
r
r
r r
+
+

,
`

.
|


+
·

,
`

.
|

+
< ⋅ ·
α
α
α
α
α
α
We search to eliminate r
31
in the expression above, by using the minimum ratio r
31
/r
21
indicated
in chapter 2.

3
8 1
min 6 , 1 min
1
min
21
31
·

,
`

.
|
∴ ·

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|
pf pf
r r
r
r
In this manner the maximum gain boundary is a function of a single parameter r
21
, so that:
( )

,
`

.
|
· ⋅ ⋅ <
+
npf
r
npf
r
α
α
α
α
max 67 . 2 6 . 2 2
1
1
21
21
A couple of numerical examples for given r
21
values are listed in the table below.
r
21

,
`

.
|
npf
α
α
max
10
2 . 15 2 4 . 3
21
· ⋅ ⋅ r
25
3 . 23 2 3 . 3
21
· ⋅ ⋅ r
→ ∞
∞ → ⋅ ⋅
21
2 0 . 3 r
Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 67
Table 3-4 Maximum Normalized Gain Variation
In the table, the maximum stability values, max (α/α
npf
), are compared to the normalized
maximum value α
max
= ( )
npf
r α ⋅ ⋅
21
2 .
The comparison shows that the stability boundary is achieved for α approaching 3.α
max
, which
emphasizes the importance of choosing r
21
in adequacy to the gain variation.
In this chapter we developed practical tools to evaluate the spurious rays, and to optimize the
phase jitter in the ensemble VCO+PLL.
We introduced the units to quantify the phase noise, and examined the closed loop transfer of the
inherent noise of the VCO.
The closed and open loop bandwidths of the PLL were related to adjust the filter calculation to
the requirement of a minimum phase jitter.
The PLL analysis tools from chapter 2 were largely employed, and we continued to discuss
robust approaches taking in account the whole range of gain variation.
Finally, we calculated the theoretical limits of the gain variation to give a practical numerical
boundary for people facing the constraints of a synthesizer implementation.
68 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 69
Contents:
4. Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 69
4.1. Non-ideal Filter Impedance .................................................................................................................... 70
4.1.1. Fully 3
rd
order passive filter........................................................................................................... 71
4.1.2. Amplifier AC characteristics ......................................................................................................... 72
4.1.3. Amplifier with single dominant pole............................................................................................. 74
4.1.4. Numerical example........................................................................................................................ 76
4.1.5. Input impedance: Z
in
...................................................................................................................... 79
4.1.6. Summary of AC boundaries for filter design................................................................................. 80
4.2. Disturbances and Noise Propagation ..................................................................................................... 80
4.2.1. Random Electrical Noise............................................................................................................... 81
4.2.2. Supply Disturbances...................................................................................................................... 82
4.2.3. Amplifier Noise............................................................................................................................. 82
4.2.4. Filter Component Noises ............................................................................................................... 83
4.2.5. Transfer functions table................................................................................................................. 84
4.2.6. Simulation Example ...................................................................................................................... 85
Figures:
Figure 4.1 Active Loop Filter ........................................................................................................................ 70
Figure 4.2 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter impedance...................................................................................... 72
Figure 4.3 Active Filter AC model ................................................................................................................ 73
Figure 4.4 Loop rootlocus with active filter.................................................................................................. 75
Figure 4.5 gm Influence in Open Loop Transfers........................................................................................ 77
Figure 4.6 Amplifier Input Impedance X Filter Impedance ........................................................................ 79
Figure 4.7 Supply disturbances...................................................................................................................... 82
Figure 4.8 Amplifier noise.............................................................................................................................. 83
Figure 4.9 Filter components noise .............................................................................................................. 83
Figure 4.10 Noise simulation scheme............................................................................................................. 85
Figure 4.11 Noise simulation results .............................................................................................................. 86
Tables:
Table 4-1 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter: ∆PhM and ∆GM.......................................................................... 72
Table 4-2 Active Filter example: Phase Margin degradation..................................................................... 78
Table 4-3 Disturbances transfer functions.................................................................................................. 84
Table 4-4 Noise sources voltage spectrum density ...................................................................................... 87
4 Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues
Quite often PLL synthesizers drive VCOs with a tuning range higher than the PLL supply
voltage. In these cases the filter impedance is associated with a transconductance amplifier
supporting the desired DC range at its output.
In order to preserve the AC and noise specifications of the locked VCO, we must include the
amplifier AC characteristics in the loop transfer functions, and examine the propagation of its
intrinsic noise sources.
70 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
This chapter introduces the first non-ideal aspects of the AC model of the PLL, which was
presented in chapter 2.
Here, we look at the changes in the filtering function, that are caused by a non-ideal loop
amplifier. Later in chapter 5, we study the limitations of the linear model with respect to the
maximum feedback bandwidth and the maximum comparison frequency for the PLL.
In this chapter we also continue the analysis of the noise in the VCO spectrum, starting to
descend from the system approach to the level of circuit implementation.
The study of the active filter gives us an appropriate example to look at noise sources in the level
of circuit description. The example of deterministic sources (that are transmitted by parasitic
coupling) and the example of electrical random noise sources (shot, thermal and flicker) are
discussed in both theoretical and practical approaches.
4.1 Non-ideal Filter Impedance
Let us consider the active inverting loop filter represented in figure 4.1. The passive elements are
still responsible for the lead-lag and post-filter of Z
F
(s) , as represented in figure 2.4.
Figure 4.1 Active Loop Filter
The filter configuration above is quite classical in tuner applications. The amplifier is a
transconductor with a high input impedance and a current output transformed in voltage by the
pull-up resistor, R
pu
.
Ideally for a very high input impedance, transconductance gain (gm), and pull-up resistor, the
amplifier characteristics are invisible in the AC transfer: V
tune
/I
cp
, and the input node connected
to the charge pump output is held around the DC value V
ref
.
In a less ideal context, mainly for large bandwidth filters, the AC characteristics of the amplifier
are relevant, and need to be checked and included in the loop transfer.
Z
3
I
cp
V
ref
V
dc_high
V
tune
C
2
C
1
R
1
Z
s
R
pu
R
3
C
3
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 71
In addition, the input node voltage may vary significantly during acquisition intervals. So the
amplifier input should be sensitive within the whole DC functioning range of the charge pump
output, to assure loop stability.
Sometimes active filters are also used in loops with an equal tuning range and supply voltage.
i
In these cases the amplifier is implemented to reduce DC constraints on the charge pump output
(that can work in a reduced range, being optimized for matching and noise properties), while
keeping the tuning range close to the maximum: from ground to supply voltage. Nevertheless,
choosing an active or passive filter configuration is a compromise between the reduced DC
constraints and the AC issues related to the amplifier, such as modifications in the filter transfer
and transmission or addition of disturbances and noise sources.
In this chapter we study these AC issues, starting with non-ideal effects in the filter impedance.
In order to keep a comparative insight between the passive and active configurations, we start
with the non-ideal fully 3
rd
order transfer for the passive configuration, which was simplified in
chapter 2 by the approximation: f
p3
>> f
p2
.
Next we discuss the AC model of the amplifier, including first the transconductance and R
pu
effects, with a first order (single dominant pole for gm) analytical and numerical example.
Secondly the influence of the input impedance is analyzed and the suggested ensemble of
boundaries is summarized.
4.1.1 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter
Before we start introducing the parameters that are specific to the active filter, we re-examine the
transfer of the equivalent passive filter without the approximation: Z
3
>>Z
s
.
This fully 3
rd
order filter transfer has a denominator which is not completely factorable as
equation (2.5). So we may identify the necessary assumptions to approach the simplified
factorable denominator.
( )
( ) ( ) ( )
) (
1 1 1
1
) (
3 1
3 2 1
1 3 3 2 1
1
3
s Z
R R
C C C
T s C s T s T s C s
T s
I
V
s Z
F
z p p
z
cp
tune
F
≈ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷
<<
>> >>
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ ⋅
⋅ +
· ·
(4.1)
For r
21
>>1 and r
31
≥ (1,6).r
21
, the two conditional statements above may be resumed by:
R
3
>> R
1
.
A numerical example shows us the dependency of the non-zero poles position with respect to the
R
3
/R
1
ratio. Let us call w
p2n
and w
p3n
, the non-zero poles of the equation (4.1), and k the ratio
R
3
/R
1
. Generally, a decreasing k causes w
p2n
to approach w
z1
and w
p3n
to move away from w
p2
.

i
In the sketch above V
dc-high
would then be equal to Vcc for the PLL circuit biasing.
72 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 4.2 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter impedance
Looking at the open loop Bode plot, the magnitude plot is rather insensitive to k changes, but the
phase curve will change causing a decrease in PhM, and an increase in the frequency
corresponding to the gain margin, w
CG
. A larger w
CG
with an unchanged monotonously
decreasing |H(jw)| implies an increase in the gain margin, Gm. Some numerical values for r=25
and r31=50 are listed in the table below.
k = R
3
/R
1 ∆PhM (°) ∆Gm (dB) w
p2n
/ w
p2
w
p3n
/ w
p3
¼ -11,8 +7,36 0,32 3,34
1 -3,46 +2,50 0,60 1,70
4 -0,903 +0,70 0,83 1,21
Table 4-1 Fully 3
rd
order passive filter: ∆PhM and ∆GM
Bode plots of B(jw) show that only for high gain values, with α approaching α
max
, a slight
increase in peaking and decrease of w
peak
is noticed, as the ratio k decreases.
As a practical conclusion we can keep in mind that passive filters should work with
R
3
≥ R
1
, as a condition to correctly estimate the full 3
rd
order transfer by its factored version.
These considerations set us a 1
st
AC boundary to be taken into account during the calculation of
the loop filter components, discussed in chapter 2.
In the next sections the amplifier AC characteristics are included, setting additional boundaries
with respect to R
pu
, gm and the amplifier poles and input impedance (Z
in
).
4.1.2 Amplifier AC characteristics
The AC equivalent circuit for the active filter, with the amplifier represented by its input
impedance Z
in
, transconductance gm and output parallel impedance Z
o
, is pictured in figure 4.3.
We consider Z
o
>> R
pu
, which is usually true for our application context, but if needed we may
easily replace R
pu
by the parallel impedance Z
opu
in the expressions derived below.
ii

ii
The amplifier output as a current source may be seen as the Norton equivalent of a voltage gain amplifier, with
gain gv=-gm.R
pu
, and a series output impedance R
pu
. The representation as a voltage controlled amplifier may be
useful in certain simulation software containing amplifier models with Thevenin equivalent outputs.
log( f ) [Hz]
f
p3
f
p2
f
z1
∠H(jw)
[ ° ]
-90°
-180°
-270°
with Z
F3
(s)
with Z
F
(s)
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 73
Figure 4.3 Active Filter AC model
For the sake of clarity, we present first the transfer of an active filter with an ideal infinite Z
in
,
and look at the influence of gm and R
pu
. The active filter transfer, Z
Fa
(s), becomes:
( )
( ) ( )
]
]
]
]

+

,
`

.
|
+ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ +
]
]
]
]

+

,
`

.
|

·
⋅ +

⋅ +
⋅ −
⋅ ·
3
3
3
3 3
3
1
1
1
1
) (
1
1
1
) ( 1
) ( 1
) ( ) (
R
R
R
gm
C s
R gm
s Z
gm
T s s Z gm
s Z gm
s Z s Z
pu pu
s
p u
s
u Fa
(4.2)
( )
( )
( )
3

3

3
3 3

3
3
3 3 3

3
3
3u
and
1
1
;
1
1
Z with
p p
p
pu p
p
p
p
p pu
w w
w
R R C T
w
R C T

T s
T s R
<

· + ⋅ ·
· ⋅ ·
⋅ +
⋅ + ⋅
·
General conditions may be imposed over gm to approach Z
Fa
(s) to Z
F
(s).
) (
) ( Z
1
gm
with
1
) (
1
1
1
with
) (
s
3
3
s Z
s
T s
s Z
gm
R
R
gm
R gm
s Z
F
p
s
pu
pu
Fa
− ≈ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷
>>
⋅ +

,
`

.
|

≈ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷
>> ⋅
>> ⋅
The first conditions just affect the post-filter pole with respect to the amplifier voltage gain,
gv=R
pu
.gm . The second condition is more hermetic since the poles of gm and the zeros of Z
s
will be mixed in the numerator polynomial.
We will now include frequency dependent aspects in the amplifier transconductance.
Simple and usual loop amplifiers are composed of a high impedance voltage follower and DC-
level shifter, plus a transconductor amplifying stage. We suppose that the overall
transconductance has an LPF behaviour, with a low frequency value Gmo, and poles represented
by the polynomial D
G
(s) . The dominant poles are either from the follower or the
transconductance stage.
R
3
Z
s
I
cp
gm.v
in
V
tune
Z
in
C
3
Z
3u
R
pu
v
in
v
M
Z
o
74 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The lead-lag filter part is also split in numerator and denominator polynoms, N
s
(s) and D
s
(s).
Finally, Z
Fa
(s) can be rewritten using:
{ ¦
{ ¦
{ ¦
; with
) (
) (
) (
;
) (
) (
) ( ;
) (
s s
g G
s s
s s
s
s
s
G
m n
n s D order
n s D order
m s N order
s D
s N
s Z
s D
Gmo
gm >

·
·
·
· · L
( ) ( )
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
⋅ + + ⋅ + ⋅


]
]
]


− −
·
3

3
1 1
) (
) (
) ( ) (
) (
) (
p p
pu
G
s
s G
s
Fa
T s T s
R Gmo
s D
s D
Gmo
s D s D
s N
s Z
(4.3)
We can preview the order of the Z
Fa
(s) numerator and denominator with respect to m
s
, n
s
and n
g
, and compare to the passive filter Z
F
(s).
{ ¦
{ ¦ cst k
w
k
w Z jw s
n
m
s Z order
cst k
w
k
w Z jw s
n n
n n
s Z order
s s
m n
Fa
w
s
s
F
Fa
w
s g
s g
Fa
· · ⇒ · ∴
+
·
· · ⇒ · ∴
+ +
+
·
− +
∞ →
∞ →

1

for ) ( lim for
1
) (
for ) ( lim for
1
) (
Z
Fa
(s) order indicates that the gm poles are reducing the filter attenuation for high frequencies,
which affects for example, the suppression of the comparison frequency component.
Besides, equation (4.3) suggests that at least one zero will appear in the RHP. There will also be
additional poles in the LHP. Both the RHP zero and LHP poles will contribute to decrease
stability margins.
In order to have some qualitative understanding to better analyze the simulation results, we
develop a first order analytical case, for a gm with a single dominant pole.
4.1.3 Amplifier with single dominant pole
An example is presented below for a simple amplifier model with a single dominant pole at w
a
.
The transconductance and voltage gain become:

a a
pu
a
w
s
Gvo
w
s
R Gmo
gv
w
s
Gmo
gm
+
·
+

·
+
·
1 1
and
1
Replacing this 1
st
order gm in equation (4.3) for Z
Fa
, we verify the following changes in the
denominator:
Πan extra-pole is added at

,
`

.
|
+ ⋅ ⋅ ≈
pu
a
R
R
Gvo w w
3
1 ;
Πthe position of the post-filter pole is a bit changed.
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 75
For w
a
and Gvo kept within reasonable bounds (w
a
≥w
p3
and Gvo≥10) the influence in the
denominator is rather small.
On the other hand, the numerator receives two extra-zeros, one of which is in the RHP. In
addition, the zero from the lead-lag impedance (Z
s
) is quite sensitive to the product R
1
.Gmo.
The numerator of equation (4.3) is detailed below for the single pole gm. The corresponding
rootlocus is sketched in figure 4.4 .
iii
( )
( )
{ ¦ ( ) ( )
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
+ ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅

− ⋅ + ·

− ·

,
`

.
|
+ ·
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ ·
⋅ + ·
a
p z
s G
s Fa
a
G
p s
z s
w
s
T s
Gmo
C s
T s
Gmo
s D s D
s N s Z num
w
s
s D
T s C s s D
T s s N
1 1 1
) ( ) (
) ( ) (
1 ) (
1 ) (
1 ) (
2
1
1
2 1
1
(4.4)
Figure 4.4 Loop rootlocus with active filter
This rootlocus present an asymptotic branch running towards +∞, which is normally found in
positive feedback cases, with a characteristic equation like: 1-H(s) . In our example, this branch
appears because of the RHP zero, which causes an inversion in the H(s) signal for large gain
values.
As we commented previously, most of the changes in the frequency behaviour of the active
transfer are due to the additional zeros. In the rootlocus sketch we may verify that the two zeros
at low frequencies are specially relevant to system stability.

iii
The scale of this rootlocus is not linear. Distances are compacted as they run away from the origin, in order to
visualize both: close-in zeros and poles from the passive elements; and, farther ones introduced by the active device.
f
z2
High frequency
additional
zero and pole
f

z1
Re{s}
Root Locus Im{s}
f
z1
f
p3
f
p2
76 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In order to better understand the changes in the Z
Fa
numerator ( with respect to N
s
), we search
simplified expressions for the zeros indicated in the rootlocus.
We can consider two frequency intervals to derive approximate values for the two lowest
magnitude zeros: w

z1
and w
z2
. The first (w

z1
) is close to the lead-lag zero from N
s
, but its
position depends on the Gmo value. The second (w
z2
) is the zero added in the RHP.
{ ¦
{ ¦

,
`

.
|
− ⋅

⋅ ·
,
`

.
|
− ⋅ ⋅ + ·
,
`

.
|
+ ≈
⇒ << ∧ << << •
< < ∴

,
`

.
|
+ ⋅

,
`

.
|
− ⋅
,
`

.
|
+ ≈
1
and
1
1 1 ) (
10
for
; 1 1 1 ) (
1
1
1

1 1 1 ’
1
2
1
3 2

1
3 2

1
R Gmo
R Gmo
w w
Gmo
R C s
w
s
s Z num
w w w w
w
w w w
w
s
w
s
w
s
s Z num
z z
z
Fa
a p
z
z z z
z z
z
Fa
{ ¦
( ) 1 : for and

C
s - 1 1 1 ) (
10
for
1 2 2 2

1
2 1 2 1
1
2

1
2
2
− ⋅ ⋅ · <<

,
`

.
| ⋅

,
`

.
|
− ⋅ + ·

,
`

.
|
− ⋅
,
`

.
|
+ ≈
⇒ << ∧ << << •
R Gmo w w w w
Gmo
T
Gmo
C
T s
w
s
w
s
s Z num
w w w w
w
p z z z
p
z
z
z
Fa
a p a
p
(4.5)
We notice that the two zeros are related to the product Gmo.R
1
. However, we should remember
that R
1
is chosen with respect to the PLL bandwidth and gain (w
oln
and α
n
).
iv
Therefore keeping
a large enough Gmo.R
1
, may imply changing w
oln
.
However the choice of w
oln
is limited by many other criteria (spurious suppression, optimized
noise transfer, limitation with respect to discrete system nature,…), and it is better to keep some
design flexibility by assuring a high Gmo value.
4.1.4 Numerical example
We may visualize the influence of the new zeros of Z
Fa
(s) and the accuracy of the w

z1
and w
z2
estimates through a numerical example.
A reference case is calculated for an ideal amplifier (with Z
in
, Gmo and w
a
tending to infinite).
The reference case is equivalent to –Z
F
(s) .
A typical tuner application value is assumed for R
pu
, equal to 22 kΩ.
Figure 4.5 is calculated for a narrow band filter with the following parameters:
Πf
olnpf
=10 kHz; r
21
=25; r
31
=50;
for:
Œ Fcp=1 MHz; Icp=200 µA;
ΠFvco=1.5 GHz; Kvco=100 MHz/V.
The resulting R
1
value is 4.4 kΩ, and R
3
is chosen to be equal to R
pu
.

iv
Equation (2.12) repeated here for convenience:
n
oln
1
α
w
R ·
.
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 77
Curve a) corresponds to the ideal factorable transfer Z
F
(s) .
Curve b) and c) are Z
Fa
(s) with w
a
=w
p3
and two different values of Gmo.
Curve d) is an estimation of case c) using expressions (4.5) for w

z1
and w
z2
.
Figure 4.5 gm Influence in Open Loop Transfers
A phase margin loss and a decrease in reference suppression
v
is visible in cases b and c,
becoming quite restrictive in c) where we may no longer work with a (2.r
21
) gain variation.

v
Normally the reference suppression is calculated with the closed loop frequency response, B(s) , but since the open
loop magnitude is significantly smaller than 1 for f=f
cp
:
( )
( )
N
w B
w H
cp
cp

.
So we call reference attenuation
( )
cp
w H N ⋅
, which represents the transfer of a phase disturbance at f
cp
injected at
the reference input, or equivalently, the transfer of a charge pump current disturbance divided by K
ϕ
.
d
c
a
b
c
d
a
b
78 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
We can define

1
2 ’
21
z
p
w
w
r · , which compared to r
21
gives an overall idea of the PhM loss.
The estimation of Z
Fa
(s), which is represented by curve d), is calculated replacing w
z1
by w

z1
and
adding w
z2
over an ideal transfer Z
F
(s). The zero frequencies, w

z
and w
z2
are evaluated by
equations (4.5).
The approximation is fairly accurate up to w
p2
, but for higher frequencies the absence of the
additional zero-pole pair deviates the estimate from the real Z
Fa
(s) curve. Nevertheless, the w

z1
estimation is correct enough to evaluate the parameter r

21
.
The table below brings PhM and reference transfer values for the above curves. We remark that
in cases b) and c) the reference injection is no longer attenuated. The reference injection was
evaluated in terms of phase disturbance.
vi
case a) Z
F
(s) b) Z
Fa
(s)
with Gmo=25/R
pu
c) Z
Fa
(s)
with Gmo=10/R
pu
Gmo*R
1 → ∞ 5 2
[ ] dB
i
o
θ
θ -16.8 +8.05 +12.2
PhM(f
olnpf
)
[°]
62.2 55.6 39.5
PhM(f
olnpf
*r
21
)
[°]
33.4 17.9 -9.72
r
21
or r

21
25 20.4 13.8
Table 4-2 Active Filter example: Phase Margin degradation
In this narrow band filter example, we notice that low values for the product Gmo.R
1
, may
degrade significantly the filter transfer.
If we take the same parameters in the above example, but re-calculate it for a larger bandwidth
filter with f
olnpf
=50 kHz, we get a bigger R
1
value, equal to 22 kΩ. In this case, even for low gm
values, like in case c), the product Gmo.R
1
is still large, and no important degradation is
observed in the filter transimpedance. The parameter r

21
equals 23 for this large bandwidth
example, with Gmo=10/R
pu
.
Thus the requirements for the amplifier transconductance depend on the R
1
value, or in other
words, on the loop bandwidth and gain. Once more we repeat that a flexible amplifier design
should assure an important Gmo value, to avoid additional constraints on the bandwidth choice.
It is important to remember that the Gmo value varies along the output DC range. So we need to
identify the worst case situation and verify the stability boundaries for this case.
Since the PhM loss becomes worse for w
ol
close to w
p2
, we must avoid having the lowest Gmo
values for α tending to α
max
.
vii

vi

( )
( ) ( ) N w H w B
K w I w
dB
cp cp
cp ChP
o
cp i
o
log 20
) (
⋅ + ≈ · ·
ϕ
θ
θ
θ
vii
The high gain situation, α
max
, happens for large K
vco
, and small N, which corresponds to the beginning of the
frequency band, with low V
tune
values and high current output in the amplifier. For cases where the overall
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 79
Finally we may identify a practical boundary for the transconductance pole, w
a
.
The pole w
a
is very determining for the position of the additional high frequency zero and pole.
It also slightly affects the RHP zero, w
z2
, but it has almost no drift over w

z1
. Thus, for w
a
larger
than w
p3
, its position concerns mainly the spurious attenuation, having a minor role for the PhM
loss.
4.1.5 Input impedance: Z
in
We will mention one last AC characteristics of the amplifier: its input impedance, Z
in
.The filter
transfer including Z
in
is named Z
Fai
(s) and can be compared to the first form of Z
Fa
(s) in (4.2).
( )
( )
( )
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
) (
p
u
in
u s
s
u Fai
T s
Z gm
Z
Z Z
Z gm
Z s Z
⋅ +

⋅ + +

,
`

.
| +
⋅ −
⋅ ·
(4.6)
The indication of frequency dependency (F(s)=F) for Z
s
, Z
3u
, Z
in
and gm is implied.
In order to approach Z
Fai
to Z
Fa
we impose a boundary for Z
in
: Z
in
>> Z
s
+ Z
3u
.
Often we search for a Z
in
with an infinite DC-impedance, which may be approached by a MOS
gate input. In this case Z
in
can be represented as an equivalent input capacitor C
in
.
The sketch below represents the impedance magnitudes: Z
s
, Z
3u
and Z
in
.
In this figure we suppose
R
3
≈ R
pu
and
R
1
< R
pu
, but we may
analyze C
in
constraint for a
general unknown
R
3
, R
1
and R
pu
.
Let us define w
i1
and w
i2
as
the intersection frequencies
of R
pu
and Z
in
, and R
1
and
Z
in
respectively.
Figure 4.6 Amplifier Input Impedance X Filter Impedance
( )
3 3

3
3 3
1 1
for
1
if ;
1
p u in p
pu
i
in pu
i
w w Z Z w
R R C
w
C R
w ≤ > ⇒ ·
+ ⋅
>

·

transconductance is directly proportional to the output stage current, this α
max
situation corresponds to a high Gmo
value. Nevertheless, AC simulations are necessary to check the gm for the whole amplifier (with the input stage) in
different points of the DC working range.
w

p3
w
i1
w
i2
R
1
|Z
in
(w)|
|Z
3u
(w)|
R
pu
|Z
s
(w)|
|Z(jw)|
w
[rad/sec]
w
p3
w
p2
w
z1
80 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Hence keeping Z
in
>> Z
3u
for a maximum frequency higher than w
p3
, and for an unknown R
3
,
implies: C
in
<< C
3
w Z Z
C R
w w
C R
w
s in p i
in
i
∀ > ⇒

· >

· for
1
if ;
1
2 1
2 2
1
2
So for Z
in
>> Z
s
we must choose C
in
<< C
2
.
It was already suggested, during the calculation of Z
F3
(s) , to work with C
2
>>C
3
; which allows
us to reduce the Z
in
restriction to: C
in
<<C
3
.
4.1.6 Summary of AC boundaries for filter design
An outline of all the boundaries proposed in this section :
amplifier) filter active for impedance input negligible (
) ( ) ( for

and
ion) approximat factored with compared r denominato order 3 (full
) ( ) ( for
3
3 1
3 2 1
s Z s Z
s Z s Z
R R
C C C C
Fa Fai
rd
F F
in


]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
<<
>> >> >>

one) passive with compared nsfer filter tra (active
) ( ) ( for
5
10
1
3
s Z s Z
R Gmo
R Gmo
w w
F Fa
pu
p a

]
]
]
]
]
> ⋅
≥ ⋅

4.2 Disturbances and Noise Propagation
The amplifier noise is sometimes visible in the out-of-loop zone of the locked spectrum,
worsening the expected phase noise performance.
viii
Another degradation caused by active filters is the transmission of disturbances injected in the IC
internal supply nodes.
We may quantify these effects seeking the AC transfer of noise and disturbance sources present
in the active filter model.
The supply disturbance is shown as a deterministic AC signal source, v
d
(t), with an equivalent
Laplace form, V
d
(s) .
A simplified representation, analogue to an AC model, is applied for the noise sources. The noise
sources are replaced by independent AC sources, and uncorrelated noise sources are added in

viii
L(f
offset
) for frequencies out of the PLL bandwidth is ideally equivalent to the free-running VCO behaviour; but
in practice, filter passive elements are already bringing some extra base-band noise that is frequency modulated by
the VCO.
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 81
power magnitude. The statistical theory allowing such a treatment is shortly discussed in chapter
6.
The same notation used for AC sources is adopted for the noise sources, and we define small
signal sources i
ni
and v
ni
representing component i noise in a current or voltage form.
The frequency domain representations for (i
ni
)
2
and (v
ni
)
2
are the classical power densities for
electrical noise (thermal, shot, flicker,…).
We take the freedom to define the noise transfers in Laplace transform, but we must remember
that noise transfers are just defined for power magnitudes. Hence a transfer F(s) for a noise
source replaces the power transfer of the noise PSD, which is actually represented by |F(jw)|
2
.
A short revision on electrical noise sources and notations follows below.
4.2.1 Random Electrical Noise
We consider restrictively the most common types of electrical noise: thermal, shot and flicker
noise.
The notation adopted is in the form of unitary impedance power densities, expressed in current or
voltage terms:
f
jw V
f
jw I
∆ ∆
2 2
) (
,
) (
.
The thermal noise is associated to resistors, and has the following current or voltage
representation:
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
4 ;
4
R
V
I
Hz
V
R T k
f
V
Hz
A
R
T k
f
I
n
n
rms
n
rms
n
·
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ·

]
]
]

⋅ ⋅
·

K
T is the absolute temperature, in Kelvin, and k is the Boltzmann constant: 1.38.10
-23
V.C/K .
Shot noise is encountered in any conducting junction, and flicker noise is associated to active
devices.
The shot noise associated with I
D
, the current of a diode or bipolar transistor (base or collector),
is:
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ ·

Hz
A
I q
f
I
rms
D
n
2
2
2
with q the charge of the electron in coulombs: 1.60.10
-19
C .
The flicker noise associated with I
B
, base current in a bipolar transistor, is:
]
]
]

⋅ ·

Hz
A
f
I
K
f
I
rms
B
f
n
2
2
β
α
;
where, K
f
, α and β are process dependent parameters, commonly determined through
measurements. Typically, α and β have values around one. K
f
reflects the quality of the
interfaces between diffusion layers, and a low K
f
is associated with mature, and well controlled
processes.
82 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
4.2.2 Supply Disturbances
The voltage source v
d
represents the
disturbances found in the IC internal
supply and ground nodes.
Figure 4.7 Supply disturbances
These disturbances can be RF current pulses either injected in the substrate or simply drained
from the external supply causing a voltage drop difference (ddp) as they go through the
connection path impedance. The disturbance v
d
often arises as deterministic modulating tones at
the oscillator input.
Switching blocks working with very steep voltage slopes and clipped signals are a typical
example of v
d
generating circuitry, since they may inject quite some current in the substrate
through the collector-substrate capacitors. The crystal oscillator for low noise PLLs, working
with large and steep swings is a good example.
The source v
d
is almost directly transmitted to V
tune
, being only filtered by the first order
attenuation of the post-filter.
The transfer function shown in table 4-3 is calculated for Z
o
and Z
in
→ ∞. . An infinite Z
o
means
that the output current variation due to v
d
is neglected: v
d
/Z
o
<< gm.v
d
.
In passive filters, such disturbances are better attenuated. First v
d
is transformed into a current
error by the charge pump output impedance, which is typically high. Afterwards this current
error is filtered by the whole Z
F
(s), which roughly represents a 2
nd
order LPF with a lower cut
frequency than w
p3
.
Eventually in the active filter design we may interchange w
p2
and w
p3
, placing the lower pole
after the amplifier in order to improve v
d
rejection. This exchange should be checked in a
numerical application to verify gm influence in w
p2
placement, and the real PhM in Z
F3
(s)
compared to the factored Z
F
(s) .
4.2.3 Amplifier Noise
It is opportune to evaluate and represent the amplifier noise by a current noise source at its
output (i
na
in figure 4.8).
The usual noisy twoport representation with noise sources at the quadripole input is convenient
for settings with a well known source and input impedance, but it is not adapted to a variable
vM
Zo
Zs
vd
R3 Icp
gm.vin
Vtune
Zin
C3
Z3u
Rpu
vin
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 83
source impedance (charge pump on or off) and a very large input impedance (approaching
infinity, approximation of the amplifier input impedance). Furthermore the amplifier noise varies
with respect to its output current, and this is more clearly depicted by a noise source in parallel to
the output port.
The amplifier noise appears in V
tune
attenuated by the transconductance gm, and filtered by the
w
p3
pole. The gm poles also introduce an equal number of extra zeros and poles in the V
tune
/I
na
ratio . The transfer function in table 4-3 is detailed for a gm with a single dominant pole.
The post-filter components are not explicitly
drawn in figure 4.8 but as long as we
calculate V
M
with a load impedance equal to
Z
3u
, V
tune
it is easily derived as:
3
1
1
p M
tune
T s V
V
⋅ +
·
Figure 4.8 Amplifier noise
The thermal noise of the pull-up resistor, R
pu
, may be symbolized by a current source i
npu
,
placed in parallel to i
na
; thus the transfer V
tune
/I
npu
is identical to the function V
tune
/I
na.
.
4.2.4 Filter Component Noises
In figure 4.9 we add the noise sources from the filter resistors R
1
and R
3
. They are the only
noise sources common to both active and passive loop filters .
Figure 4.9 Filter components noise
Resistors thermal noise is depicted either in current or voltage form, following the convenience
of the transfer calculation.
R
1
noise (I
n1.
) is associated to the parallel R
1
//C
2
impedance and transformed in its Thevenin
equivalent, V
n12
, whose transfer to V
tune
is quite similar to V
tune
/V
d
.
R
3
noise in its voltage form (v
n3
) is only filtered by the post-filter before emerging directly in
V
tune
.
vin
Z3u
vM Zo
Zs
ina
Icp
gm.vin Zin
Zs
in1
C2
C1
Rpu
vM
R1 R3 vn3
Icp
gm.vin
Vtune
Zin
C3
vin
Zs vn12
2
1
1 12
1
) ( ) (
p
n n
T s
R
s I s V
⋅ +
·
84 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
4.2.5 Transfer functions table
The following transfer functions were evaluated for the AC models in figures 4.7 through 4.9,
with the approximation: Z
in
→ ∞ and Z
o
>> R
pu
.
The general expressions using variables gm and Z
3u
are further specified for the particular gm
case with a single dominant pole. These simplified expressions are also bounded by other
conditions that are indicated in table 4-3 . The expressions of Z
3u
and the 1
st
order gm are
recalled below.
( )
( )
3

3 ’
3
3
3
: with
1
1
;
1
p p
p
p pu
u
a
w w
T s
T s R
Z
w
s
Gmo
gm <
⋅ +
⋅ + ⋅
·

,
`

.
|
+
·
Signal Transfer to V
tune
Specific pratical approach
for a 1
st
order gm
Internal supply
disturbances:
v
d
(t) ↔ V
d
(s)
( ) ( )
3 3
3
1
1
1
p u
u
d
tune
T s Z gm
Z gm
V
V
⋅ +

⋅ +

·
3
3
1
1
for
p d
tune
u a
T s V
V
Z Gmo w w
⋅ +

⋅ ⋅ <<
Amplifier noise:
i
na
↔ I
na
(s)
Pull up resistor,
R
pu
noise:
i
npu
↔ I
npu
(s)
( ) ( )
npu
tune
na
tune
u p
u
na
tune
I
V
I
V
Z gm T s
Z
I
V
·
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ +
·
3 3
3
1 1
( )

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅
+

,
`

.
|
+

⋅ +

>> ⋅
a u
a
p na
tune
u
w Z Gmo
s
w
s
T s
Gmo
I
V
Z Gmo
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1 for
Filter components
noise (R
1
):
i
n1
↔ I
n1
(s)
( ) ( ) ( )
3 2
1
3
3
1
1 1 1
p p u
u
n
tune
T s T s
R
Z gm
Z gm
I
V
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ +

⋅ +

·
( ) ( )
3 2
1
1
3
1 1
for
p p n
tune
u a
T s T s
R
I
V
Z Gmo w w
⋅ + ⋅ ⋅ +

⋅ ⋅ <<
Filter components
noise (R
3
):
v
n3
↔ V
n3
(s)
( ) ( )
3
3
3 3 3
1
;
1
1
p n
t
p n
tune
T s
R
I
V
T s V
V
⋅ +
·
⋅ +
·
Table 4-3 Disturbances transfer functions
The above transfer functions are better illustrated by a simulation example developed in the
following section.
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 85
4.2.6 Simulation Example
Figures 4.10 and 4.11 present the scheme and results of an AC noise simulation for an active
filter, with an integrated amplifier and external passive components for R
pu
, Z
s
and the post-
filter.
R
d
thermal noise symbolizes an AC disturbance between the internal and external grounds. A
small resistor value was chosen to avoid significant DC disturbances. The transfer for the
thermal noise of R
d
is equivalent to the transfer of V
d
(a supply disturbance). However we should
remember that this thermal noise is a broadband source with a rather small amplitude in our
numerical application.
The DC-operating point is fixed by a voltage source with a high series impedance, R
bias-in
.
A large source impedance is necessary to avoid interfering in the filter AC transfer within the
frequency range containing the zeros and poles of interest. Besides, R
bias-in
noise contribution at
V
tune
appears as a current source filtered by Z
s
and Z
3u
; and the larger the resistor the smaller the
equivalent current noise generator. For a 10MΩ resistor, R
bias-in
has a negligible effect on the
total output noise for the plotted frequency range (10Hz to 1GHz).
The passive components are chosen for the following zero, poles and open gain values:
Πf
z1
= 1.9kHz; f
p2
= 48kHz; f
p3
= 106kHz ;
with: f
oln
= 9.5kHz; α
n
= 6; r
21
= 25 .
These numerical values are close to a satellite application, like the one shown in the Bode plots
of figure 3.5.
Figure 4.10 Noise simulation scheme
I
dc
1.24mA
gnd
vcc
R
d
1Ω
IC internal ground
30 V
V
dc_high
V
tune
330pF
8.2nF
10kΩ
R
bias-in
10MΩ
22kΩ
22kΩ
68pF
IC blocks
Input
Stage
Zin
Gm
Stage
gm.vin
Loop Amplifier
Bias
block
V
bias-in
1.7 V
5 V
86 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The analog simulator models thermal, shot and flicker noise sources, in the form of unitary
impedance power densities (
f
jw V
f
jw I
∆ ∆
2 2
) (
,
) (
).
The resistors have intrinsic thermal noise and the current in the transistors of the amplifier
contribute with shot and flicker noise components.
Figure 4.11 shows the voltage noise density at the V
tune
output, total Vn, and the separated
contributions of the noise sources whose transfer we identified in table 4-3 .
The notation Vni stands for the noise voltage contribution of element i, in dBV/Hz units.
Vna is for the amplifier noise, and Vnd, Vnpu, Vn1 and Vn3 for the resistors R
d
, R
pu
, R
1
and
R
3
respectively.
The amplifier noise in our example (Vna1_total) is dominated by the gm stage, which is quite
often a common-emiter, open collector output transistor. In the plot below this transistor base
current shot and flicker contributions are explained, (Vna1_ib and Vna1_fn respectively).
Figure 4.11 Noise simulation results
The simulation shows an overall filter noise dominated by the post-filter resistor, R
3
, except for
low frequencies, where the gm-transistor flicker noise becomes important.
V
nvco
[Hz]
Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 87
In section 3.2 we saw the representation of the oscillator free-running intrinsic behaviour as a
voltage noise source, v
nvco
, at the VCO input (eq. (3.3) ). The overall filter noise appears as well
at the VCO input, and is added (in power magnitude) to v
nvco
.
Let us call the overall filter noise contribution, v
nfilter
, and the total voltage noise at the oscillator
input, v
na
:
2 2 2
nfilter nvco na
v v v + ·
The closed loop transfer of v
nvco
to the output spectrum was named B
vco
(s) , and figure 3.12
sketched the output spectra for a flat (white) noise input. Basically, a voltage noise appearing at
the VCO input is band-pass filtered, with a central frequency close to the PLL closed loop
bandwidth.
After the addition of the filter noise contribution, we need to verify that the v
na
components are
still sufficiently supressed in the in-loop range, and how much or how far the out-of-loop
behaviour deteriorated.
ix
We may compare v
nfilter
of figure 4.11 with the v
nvco
of a satellite VCO, with:
( )
Hz
dBV
f
v
Hz
V
n
f
v
Hz
V
f
v
V MHz Kvco
Hz dBc kHz L
nvco
rms nvco rms nvco
157 log 10 or
14 ; 10 2
/ 100
/ 100 100
2
2
16
2
− ·

,
`

.
|


·

⋅ ·


·
− ·

The value of v
nvco
is indicated in figure 4.11 by a dashed line. We verify that the filter noise is
dominant for frequencies below 100kHz, or with respect to the filter poles, below f
p3
. Since the
PLL closed loop bandwidth will usually vary between f
z1
and f
p2
frequencies, it is most likely
that some extra out-of-loop noise will be visible up to an octave after f
p3
. Hence the value of R
3
may be changed to improve this out-of-loop performance, still keeping in mind the boundaries
discussed in section 4.1.6.
The marker trace, M1, highlights the f
p2
pole position, which is visible as a filtering corner on
the R
1
noise contribution.
In fact the different noise contributions correspond quite accurately to the simplified transfer
expressions in table 4-3. The numerical values below for the resistor noise sources help to verify
this result.
R
[ ]
Hz
V
nvco
rms
f v ∆ ( ) [ ]
Hz
dBV
nvco
f v ∆ ⋅
2
log 10
R
d
: 1Ω 0.129n -197
R
pu
, R
3
: 22kΩ 19.1n -154
R
1
: 10kΩ 12.9n -158
Table 4-4 Noise sources voltage spectrum density

ix
It is convenient to simulate such effects with a base band PLL model. In chapter 7 a system level model is
presented, including the filter noise effects, and also an empirical approach for the phase detector discrete behaviour
influence in the PLL noise.
88 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The thermal noise sources are evaluated for a 300K temperature, or a 4kT=1.66.10
-20
VC .
The difference in R
pu
and R
3
noise contributions at the V
tune
output, shows quite clearly the
amplifier feedback rejection of I
npu
and

I
na
(as discussed in 4.2.3). Actually, for low frequencies,
a R
pu
noise represented as a voltage source is attenuated by the amplifier gain:
Gvo=Gmo.R
pu
.
The amplifier design used in this simulation has effectively a capacitive input impedance, with
an equivalent C
in
much smaller than C
3
in the post-filter. This situation well suits the
approximation of Z
in
→ ∞ , as assumed in the expressions in table 4-3.
For cases with a lower Z
in
the transfers are modified and part of V
d
and V
n12
appear as current
disturbances filtered by Z
s
. A similar effect is observed for a decreasing source impedance (R
bias-
in
). In a complete PLL, this source impedance is the charge pump output impedance, which has a
variable value depending on whether it is conducting (on) or not (off). For a PLL in locked
mode, the charge pump is mostly off, and it does present a rather high impedance.
Thus the transfers from table 4-3 are a valuable reference to understand and explore simulation
results for the loop amplifier design.
This chapter developed analytical and practical approaches to deal with AC characteristics of
active loop filters. The practical boundaries and simplified transfer expressions provide the
means to evaluate and specify the design of the loop amplifier.
Furthermore for cases with an equal tuning and biasing range, these evaluations indicate the
tradeoff between passive and active filtering solutions.
In addition we introduced noise considerations that start to relate system specifications to a
circuit implementation. Specifically, the noise of the loop filter is mostly influent in the out-of-
loop zone of the VCO spectrum, thus its noise level is compared to the inherent noise sources of
the VCO.
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 89
Contents:
5. Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 89
5.1. Three-state comparator: frequency and phase detector ......................................................................... 91
5.1.1. Minimum phase deviation range ................................................................................................... 92
5.2. DC range limitations............................................................................................................................... 94
5.2.1. Loop filter time domain response.................................................................................................. 94
5.2.2. Numerical examples and design considerations ............................................................................ 96
5.3. Lock convergence approaches ................................................................................................................ 99
5.3.1. Frequency approach..................................................................................................................... 100
5.3.2. Phase approach............................................................................................................................ 103
5.3.3. Comparing the frequency and phase approaches......................................................................... 105
5.4. Discrete transfers for the PLL Phase Model......................................................................................... 109
5.4.1. The sampler ................................................................................................................................. 109
5.4.2. The holder.................................................................................................................................... 111
5.4.3. Continuous equivalent with transmission delay .......................................................................... 114
Figures:
Figure 5.1 Phase-detector & Charge Pump transfer.................................................................................... 91
Figure 5.2 Maximum Phase Detection Range & Cycle slips ....................................................................... 92
Figure 5.3 Condition for unlimited frequency tracking range..................................................................... 93
Figure 5.4 Loop Filter: time response for current pulses ............................................................................ 94
Figure 5.5 Time response through normalized functions ............................................................................ 96
Figure 5.6 Convergence towards lock: phase deviation sequence............................................................... 99
Figure 5.7 Frequency approach convergence criterion ............................................................................. 103
Figure 5.8 Phase approach convergence criterion..................................................................................... 104
Figure 5.9 Comparing frequency and phase approaches........................................................................... 105
Figure 5.10 Convergence approaches X lead-lag spacing r
21
.................................................................... 107
Figure 5.11 Convergence approaches X gain variation............................................................................. 108
Figure 5.12 Discrete model for digital blocks............................................................................................... 110
Figure 5.13 Discrete phase detector input: ∆ϕ
n
............................................................................................ 111
Figure 5.14 Charge Pump DAC output ......................................................................................................... 112
Figure 5.15 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay ....................................................................... 114
Figure 5.16 Frequency and Time response for the continuous + delay model ........................................... 115
5 Limitations of the LTI Phase Model
Phase noise constraints, and even more integrated oscillator architectures, demand increasing
bandwidths in PLL synthesizers. As the PLL bandwidth increases the comparison frequency
needs to increase as well to keep the system stable.
In fact, design and stability constraints will appear to limit the values of both f
ol
and f
cp
.
These limitations are not contained in the LTI model discussed so far, but they can be evaluated
and/or added with additional considerations.
90 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The limit for maximum feedback bandwidth, f
cl
/f
cp
, was already mentioned in chapter 3, making
an analogy to Nyquist bandwidths for sampled systems.
The sampled nature of the PLL is connected to the digital blocks, phase detector and dividers,
that we modeled so far, as linear continuous elements. Therefore the stability boundary, for
f
cl
/f
cp
, can only appear by including discrete characteristics in the loop model.
The threshold bandwidth determines a limit for single loop configurations, associated to poor
noise performance oscillators. We also saw (section 3.5) that spectrum optimization in the basis
of a minimum |L(f)| criteria may encounter limitations bound to the maximum feedback
bandwidth.
In this chapter we develop two approaches to evaluate maximum bandwidth stability conditions.
The first comes from a time domain model, examining the loop convergence from acquisition to
lock mode. The second introduces time delay compensations into the frequency domain phase
model.
The time domain expressions are also used to consider problems related to reduced DC tuning
ranges. They are mostly encountered for fully integrated oscillators working with large
bandwidth PLLs and a tuning range equal to the circuit supply voltage.
Multi-loop configurations are an architectural solution to the limitations of the feedback
bandwidth. However, multi-loop configurations tend to work with at least one wide band loop at
high comparison frequency; and in this case, we may see design constraints reducing the linear
portion of the phase detector/charge pump transfer.
In frequency synthesizers we are concerned about the minimum linear range necessary to
guarantee an unlimited frequency tracking behaviour. In other words, the limit for the three-state
comparator as a frequency and phase detector.
The ensemble of limitations above have non-linear characteristics that can either be included in
the LTI model, through compensations, or evaluated to mark its validity boundaries.
The first three sections deal with the PLL acquisition mode, which is not a steady mode where
the PLL can be used as a frequency synthesizer.
Nevertheless, after every change in the PLL programming the loop passes through an out-of-lock
interval, and we need to verify how the loop parameters influence the acquisition, i.e., the
convergence towards a locked mode.
The acquisition or tracking mode is formally treated in the de/modulators and in the clock/carrier
recovery contexts. A nice discussion of pulling time and pulling range may be found in reference
[Wola91] for different types of phase detectors.
Here we limit our scope to a qualitative understanding of the three-state phase detector in its
frequency detector range, and to two quantitative approaches for lock convergence in the phase
detection range.
A couple of characteristics of the acquisition mode, such as locking time and maximum phase
change for a certain step (closely related to the rising time), may be specified by constraints that
are related to the functioning of the demodulator, and to the timing for the programming of the
different circuits in a receiver. Nevertheless these characteristics may also be derived from the
linear model, as far as the validity bounds of this representation are known.
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 91
5.1 Three-state comparator: frequency and phase detector
As mentioned in section 1.5.3 the tri-state phase detector has an unlimited tracking range. This
behaviour is assured by a monotonously increasing or decreasing average charge injected in the
loop filter, for input signals with a positive or negative frequency difference.
The figure below helps us to understand the idea of this average charge.
Let us suppose a passive filter PLL, and a lagging oscillator. In this case, the divider is late with
respect to the reference and the charge pump is sourcing, i.e. injecting current in the loop filter
impedance.
If the two input signals are not at the same frequency, the phase difference will periodically
exceed 2π and the phase detector will slip to a new linear part of the transfer curve starting at
(n.2π), with n ∈ N.
The phase detector slips are periodical with a rate corresponding to the frequency difference. The
phase detector works as a frequency deviation detector.
Figure 5.1 Phase-detector & Charge Pump transfer
After some time, when the oscillator frequency approaches the programmed value, the phase
differences, minus (n.2π), will oscillate between positive and negative values.
The oscillator approaches lock, and we will call this functioning mode, with low frequency
difference: the phase detection trapping zone. In figure 5.1 this is represented by the grey
dotted line.
i
Hence, we realize that our transfer function, I
average
/∆ϕ, is representing the average current over
one comparison period; and, for input signals with different frequencies the average current over
several periods is proportional to the frequency difference.
However, in the PLL, the oscillator frequency is changing continuously with respect to V
tune
,
i.e., proportionally to the charges stored in the loop capacitors. Therefore it is difficult to talk
about a frequency difference, or an average current, over several periods, and it is easier to talk
about an accumulated charge over several periods.

i
The dotted curve is slightly shifted to the right of 2π just for a better visualisation.
-I
cp
I
average
[A]
I
cp
∆ϕ
[rad]
-4π -2π 0 2π 4π
92 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
For the phase detector transfer sketched above, as far as the oscillator frequency is not equal to
(N.f
cp
), the average charge derivative has the same sign as the frequency difference.
Thus, the loop is capable of tracking any frequency difference inside the oscillator tunable range.
Once we recognize that the frequency correction depends on the average charge, we may
consider which limitations occur in the transfer, I
average
/∆ϕ, that would still enable us to guarantee
a monotonously changing charge, with the same signal as the input frequency delta. These
limitations are related to the width of the reset interval, and they define a maximum comparison
frequency for our tri-state comparator.
5.1.1 Minimum phase deviation range
A subsequent question arises for loops working with high comparison frequencies, where the
charge pump reset delay (τ
rst
) becomes comparable to T
cp
, and significantly reduces the phase
deviation input range.
As discussed in section 1.5.3, the reset delay is introduced to avoid the dead-zone problem, and
its width is related to the charge pump, current sources, switching on time.
Figure 5.2 sketches possible inputs and outputs of a phase-detector/charge-pump block, for a
PLL in acquisition interval. In this example the reset delay (τ
rst
) is almost half of the comparison
period (T
cp
).
The drawing is simplified, showing only a limited slew rate for the charge pump outputs. The
reset command and the divider outputs are assumed as faster logic stages with a much higher
slew rate.
Figure 5.2 Maximum Phase Detection Range & Cycle slips
Ref.div.
output
Main div.
output
Charge
Pump
And
+
delay
T
cp In the
Ph.Detector
Ref. input
Var.input
Sourcing
&
Sinking
currents
asynchr.
reset
τ
rst
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 93
Figure 5.2 shows a VCO varying towards lock. The VCO is initially at a good frequency but it
has a phase advance of ∆ϕ
1
. The reset delay is large enough to hide the following front of the
variable input, and consequently the next phase deviation is measured with respect to the
reference input. The phase detector has slipped one cycle.
The current output after this cycle slip, increases V
tune
and further accelerates the VCO. After
some cycles the VCO is again in advance and the charge pump current starts sinking out charges
from the loop filter.
These cycle slips, due to the finite reset window, may be represented in the transfer function
I
average
/∆ϕ
in
. They appear as a decrease in the linear portion; in reality, the transfer is not linear
up to t 2π, but only up to t 2π.(1−τ
rst

cp
).
The resulting transfer is shown in figure 5.3 for
2
1
·
cp
rst
T
τ
.
Figure 5.3 Condition for unlimited frequency tracking range
We observe that τ
rst
equals T
cp
/2, is the limiting value for which the accumulated charge has the
same sign as the derivative of the phase difference.
Therefore to guarantee an unlimited frequency tracking range, f
cp
is limited to:
rst
cp
f
τ ⋅
<
2
1
(5.1)
Another way to derive the minimum range of the linear portion, is to seek a convergence
condition for the phase deviation values.
Let us consider a discrete variable ∆ϕ
n
, representing the phase deviation of the nth comparison
period. Close to lock the phase deviation sequence should decrease towards zero:
n n
ϕ ϕ ∆ < ∆
+1
(5.2)
This degressive sequence can only be obtained, over a cycle slip, if the linear portion of the
transfer covers the range [-π , +π ]. Otherwise the module of the phase deviation would increase
after each cycle slip, avoiding the convergence towards the lock condition.
Thus we confirm the boundary proposed by the average charge approach.
-3π -π
-I
cp
/2
-I
cp
I
average
[A]
I
cp
I
cp
/2
∆ϕ
[rad]
-4π -2π 0 2π 4π
∆Q = 0

π
0
∆Q > 0

∆ϕ > π
0
94 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Next, we continue to analyze other limitations of the linear model, related to the limited DC
tuning range.
The minimum phase deviation range stated above will be used in the convergence analysis to
limit the phase detection zone, and in the numerical examples of V
tune
deviations due to cycle
slips.
5.2 DC range limitations
In figure 5.2 we saw that reducing the linear portion of the phase detector transfer causes some
extra “frequency bouncing”, before the oscillators attain a locked condition. In fact the cycle slip
causes the inversion of the charge pump current with respect to the previous comparison interval.
This effect may be quantified as a V
tune
deviation, and compared to the VCO tunable range.
The comparison inform us about limiting bandwidth values to avoid bouncing up and down with
V
tune
deviations as big as the VCO tuning range.
A 2
nd
order filter is chosen, because it already contains the lead-lag characteristics of the 3
rd
order filter, but the resulting expressions are shorter and the physical meaning is more easily
understood. Comments about 1
st
and 3
rd
order filters are made to extend the present results to
these other cases.
5.2.1 Loop filter time domain response
We use the Laplace inverse transform to evaluate the loop filter response for a current pulse
input, with amplitude I
cp
and width T
d
.
Figure 5.4 Loop Filter: time response for current pulses
I
cp
0 T
d
T
cp
v
M
(0)
t (s)
i(t)
v
M
(t)
i(t)
Z
s
R
1
C
1
C
2
v
M
(t)
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 95
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
− + ⋅ ⋅ + ·
]
]
]

⋅ + · ≤ ≤
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
− + ⋅ ⋅ + · ≤ ≤
− − − − −

2 2 2
2
) (
1
1
) (
2 1
1
1
1 ) 0 ( ) ( ) ( ) ( :
1 ) 0 ( ) ( : 0
p
d
p
d
p
d
p
T
T t
T
T
z
d
cp M
T
T t
d C d C M cp d
T
t
z
cp M M d
e e
T
T
R I v e T v T v t v T t T
e
T
t
R I v t v T t
(5.3)
where
2 1 2 1 1 1
; C R T C R T
p z
⋅ · ⋅ ·
.
The expression for v
M
(t) in the discharging interval, [T
d
, T
cp
], is written in two forms. The
second form assumes a C
2
almost discharged at t=0:
⇒ ) 0 ( ) 0 (
1 M C
v v ≈ .
Roughly, when the charge pump is active, the filter impedance is charged or discharged in a rate
proportional to Icp, and when the charge pump is off a portion of V
tune
discharges through the
parallel R
1
-C
2
branch. The charge pump output impedance and the VCO input impedance are
considered very high, though C
1
discharge is not visible within T
cp
.
A 1
st
order filter (single R-C series branch) would present a stepwise variation in V
tune
when Icp
is turned off, with an amplitude equal to: (I
cp
. R) .
ii
A 3
rd
order filter (like in figure 2.4) would have an extra time constant appearing in the charge
and discharge intervals; for instance, C
1
discharge would have to be considered, and it would
depend on the ddp difference between v
M
and v
out
at t = T
d
.
The maximum V
tune
variation happens during tI
cp
injection. We choose T
d
= T
cp
/2 as the
injection interval, and equivalent V
tune
deviation, to be compared to the tunable range.
This interval of T
cp
/2 is equivalent to phase deviations of tπ. So for a loop working with a large
f
cp
, this interval is equivalent to the worst phase deviation that can occur after a cycle slip. On the
other hand, for a loop working with a low f
cp
, this interval equals an average deviation within the
phase trapping zone.
So V
tune
deviation is evaluated as ∆v
M
(T
cp
/2) :
[ ] ( )
( )
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
− +

⋅ ⋅ ·

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|
·

,
`

.
|
∆ · ∧ ∈


2
2
1
1
1
2 2
0
2 2
:
2
, 0
p
cp
T
T
z
cp
cp
cp
M
M
cp
M
cp
M
cp
d d
e
T
T
R I
T
v
v
T
v
T
v
T
T T t
Since we look for maximum bandwidth boundaries, ∆v
M
(T
cp
/2) should be expressed as a
function of f
oln
and f
cp
. Let us define the bandwidth ratio, x, and rewrite the V
tune
deviation as a
function of x and r
21
.

ii
This variation term, named phase detector ripple in reference [Gard80], has to be inferior to the VCO input range.
Reference [Gard80] discuss an approach of maximum PLL bandwidth, through the analysis of discrete transfer
functions.
96 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
[ ] ; 1 , 0 with
oln
∈ · x
f
f
x
cp
and remembering:
2 oln
z1 oln 21
1
T
p
T w
w r

· ⋅ ·
( ) [ ] ) , ( exp 1
2
21 1 21
21
1
r x g R I x r x
r
R I
T
v
cp cp
cp
M
⋅ ⋅ ·
]
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ − − + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
∆ π
π
(5.4)
or for a I
cp
value corresponding to α
n
, and K
vco
an average frequency sensitivity:
[ ] [ ] ) , ( 2 ) , (
2
2
21 21
r x g x
f
f
V r x g x
K
f
T
v
osc
osc
tune
vco
osc
cp
M
⋅ ⋅

⋅ ∆ ⋅ · ⋅ ⋅

·

,
`

.
|
∆ π
π
(5.5)
The functions g(x, r
21
) and x.g(x, r
21
) are plotted for a constant r
21
in figure 5.5.a and 5.5.b
respectively. For a given r
21
, g(x, r
21
) varies between two linear functions, and x.g(x, r
21
)
between two quadratic functions of x, corresponding to the limiting values, 0 and 1, of the
exponential term.
Expression (5.4) , with I
cp
and R
1
variables, is useful in the analysis of a given synthesizer with
fixed parameters and application components. Still, R
1
and I
cp
are related to the loop bandwidth
and gain, so for a system under definition (5.5) is better suited.
Figure 5.5 Time response through normalized functions
5.2.2 Numerical examples and design considerations
fig. 5.5.a fig. 5.5.b
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 97
Expressions (5.4) and (5.5) are better perceived through numerical examples. Let us consider
three different situations with common values for the following parameters:
These values are again comparable to a band-L, satellite synthesizer application. The comparison
frequency is not especially high, and our phase detector transfer should be linear up to t(1,996)π.
Therefore ∆v
M
(T
cp
/2) is an average V
tune
deviation.
• Example I: What are the values of the bandwidth ratio and ∆v
M
(T
cp
/2) for a loop filter with
R
1
= 10kΩ and r
21
=25 ?
( ) V g V
T
v
x
x kHz f
w
R
cp
M
47 , 1 25 ; 0398 , 0 3
2
1 , 25
1
; 0398 , 0 ; 8 , 39
oln
n
oln
1
· ⋅ ·

,
`

.
|

· · · → ·
α
This narrow band filter situation may be compared to two specific oscillator contexts with
different tuning ranges.
In both cases a PLL bandwidth is evaluated for an average V
tune
deviation equal to the tuning
range. The resulting f
oln
is named DC-threshold bandwidth.
• Example II: What is the DC-threshold bandwidth for a LC oscillator with 28 V of tuning
range?
[ ] kHz f
x
x x g x
K
f
V
vco
osc
312 ; 21 , 3
1
; 312 , 0 ) 25 , (
2
28
oln
· · · ⋅ ⋅

·
π
For a satellite band LC oscillator, a sensitivity of 125 MHz/V corresponds to a maximum K
vco
value, rather than an average one. Hence the ∆v
M
(T
cp
/2) value is somewhat exaggerated and the
DC-threshold bandwidth is a pessimistic estimation.
However practical experience shows that a bandwidth of 312 kHz for a loop with a 1MHz
comparison frequency is rather unfeasible. So for loops with a large DC range, we may expect
that another limiting characteristic will determine the maximum f
oln
.
Sections 5.3 and 5.4 discuss maximum bandwidth ratios through stability approaches.
α
n
= 25 A.Hz/V
(1−τ
rst

cp
) · 0,998
N = 1,5 k
• K
vco
= 125 MHz/V
• I
cp
= 300 µA
• f
vco
=1.5 GHz
• f
cp
= 1 MHz
• τ
rst
= 2 ns
• r
21
= 25
98 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
• Example III: What is the DC-threshold bandwidth for an RC fully integrated oscillator with
3.4 V of tuning range?
[ ] kHz f
x
x x g x
K
f
V
vco
osc
66 ; 2 . 15
1
; 066 . 0 ) 25 , (
2
4 . 3
oln
· · · ⋅ ⋅

·
π
In this example the resulting bandwidth is rather narrow, and it shows a drawback for enlarging
the PLL bandwidth under restrained tuning ranges.
Nevertheless, RC integrated oscillators often have a degraded phase noise performance and to
optimize the overall spectrum, it is necessary to work with low noise, large bandwidth PLLs.
The resulting behaviour of loops larger than the DC-threshold bandwidth is also a “bouncing
behaviour” during acquisition. It appears as a V
tune
transition that jumps up and down, and often
blocks some time in the limiting values, before it attains lock.
Thus the acquisition period may be longer than for a slower filter that would not block so often
in the tuning range limits.
So far we treated the DC tuning range only as a given interval related to the VCO frequency
range and sensibility. Once we recognize the need to work with “bouncing” loops, we should
verify the design limitations connected to the tuning range, and the behaviour of input and output
blocks around V
tune
, for the extreme values of the reachable range.
LC-oscillators are usually limited by the varicap sensitivity curve, presenting a degressive K
vco
for an increasing V
tune
. RC-oscillators will depend on the control parameter, and the interface
block between V
tune
and the control parameter.
In a passive filter, V
tune
is also the charge pump output voltage, thus restricting the DC
functioning range because of the output transistor saturation. In an active filter the charge pump
limitation is replaced by the loop amplifier limitation. Generally, for amplifiers with an open
collector output, there is only a minimum V
tune
, corresponding to the output transistor saturation.
The combination of the VCO and the charge pump (or the amplifier) DC functioning ranges
must be examined to avoid unstable situations.
For V
tune
values where the VCO input is no longer sensible (K
vco
=0), the oscillator will stay
clipped to the maximum or minimum achieved frequency, but its spectrum is no longer locked
by the PLL, since the open loop gain is null.
On the other hand, for V
tune
values where the charge pump may no longer deliver current but the
VCO is still sensitive, we may see an oscillating behaviour. For instance if V
tune
varies around
this charge pump limit value, the output current varies in consequence and we may produce a
sustainable oscillation. This problem should be avoided by defining suitable DC functioning
ranges for the charge pump output and the VCO input.
For the moment let us suppose that all V
tune
reachable values do not imply in an oscillating
behaviour, but for V
tune
out of the working range the oscillator stays clipped to a maximum or
minimum limit frequency.
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 99
So, with more or less “bouncing” the oscillator is dragged towards lock, and now we need to
verify the influence of the PLL bandwidth inside the phase detection trapping zone.
5.3 Lock convergence approaches
In the previous section, time domain expressions for V
tune
sweep were derived, and compared to
the tunable range. In this section we use these expressions to verify the convergence of the phase
deviation sequence as the VCO reaches the programmed frequency.
The phase deviation sequence, as introduced in equation (5.2), represents the discrete values of
the phase difference for each comparison period.
( ) [ ]
lim lim
, ; : 1 ϕ ϕ ϕ ϕ + − ∈ ∆ ∆ ⋅ + < ≤ ⋅
n n cp cp
T n t T n
(5.6)
with π ϕ π 2
lim
< <
Let us consider the time diagram below showing the phase detector inputs and the charge pump
outputs for a VCO in acquisition mode.
Figure 5.6 Convergence towards lock: phase deviation sequence
0 T
d1
T
cp
(T
cp
–T
d2
)
t (s)
I
cp
In the
Ph.Detector
Ref. input
Var.input
Charge Pump
output current
V
tune
∆ϕ
1
∆ϕ
2
v
M
(0)
100 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The oscillator initially with a phase lag, ∆ϕ
1
, is accelerated through the interval T
cp
, and in the
following interval presents an advance of ∆ϕ
2
.
The loop reaction is very abrupt; thus the situation concerns a fast, large bandwidth filter.
We fix an arbitrary time origin to simplify the time function expressions, and we represent only
the net current output for the charge pump.
The condition for a ∆ϕ
n
sequence converging to 0, or a PLL tending to lock, may be applied to
the phase deviations above, imposing:
1 2
ϕ ϕ ∆ < ∆
We define a stability limit for the PLL bandwidth as the maximum bandwidth for which this
condition is fulfilled.
The following subsections develop expressions for this maximum bandwidth in terms of the
VCO frequency and phase variations.
An initial condition is assumed for the VCO frequency in order to end up with an expression that
is an independent of this variable. The VCO is assumed at the programmed frequency, N.f
cp
at
t=0. Hence our phase deviation convergence is analyzed within a phase detector trapping zone.
Section 5.1 showed that phase detectors with a minimum linear range of tπ, are able to track any
frequency differences inside the tunable range. Furthermore, section 5.2 showed that fast filters
have a high V
tune
average deviation, which increases the probability of crossing the frequency
programmed value several times.
Therefore the initial condition proposed above is coherent with any synthesizer loop (with an
unlimited tracking range) close to lock or crossing the target frequency during V
tune
variations
around the target value.
5.3.1 Frequency approach
Referring to figure 5.6, the stability limit is reached for a PLL bandwidth that implies:
1 2
ϕ ϕ ∆ · ∆
which means that the main divider counted N cycles of the oscillator signal between T
d1
and (T
cp
–T
d2
).
Let us rename the limit delay, in phase and time, and relate it to the oscillator frequency, f
osc
:

,
`

.
|
⋅ · ∆
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
· ·
∆ · ∆ · ∆
cp
d
d d d
T
T
T T T
π ϕ
ϕ ϕ ϕ
2
2 1
1 2
and
( )
( )
d osc
d cp
T f
N
T T · ⋅ − 2 (5.7)
Expression (5.7) supposes that the oscillator frequency does not vary within the interval
( ) [ ]
d cp d
T T T − , , or in other words, that V
tune
is constant during the same interval.
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 101
We call this approximation the frequency stability approach. Its inaccuracy depends on the loop
filter discharge during the interval where the charge pump is off.
The discharge would decrease V
tune
, decrease f
osc
, and consequently increase the maximum
stable PLL bandwidth. Hence, the frequency approach is pessimistic about the maximum
bandwidth.
The amplitude of C
2
discharge increases accordingly to the PLL bandwidth, so a maximum
bandwidth boundary is quite concerned about the discharging influence.
It is easier to watch the oscillator changing frequency through its integral. So, a second approach
in phase cycles is discussed in section 5.3.2. The phase stability criteria is expressed in terms of
the oscillator phase, θ
osc
:
( ) ( ) π θ θ 2 ⋅ · − − N T T T
d osc d cp osc
(5.8)
Our initial condition for the VCO is expressed as: ( )
cp osc
f N f ⋅ · 0 (5.9)
It may be combined with expressions (5.3), for the filter pulse response, to obtain a time function
for the oscillator frequency:
( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) [ ]
( )
( )
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
− ≤ ≤
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
− + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅
≤ ≤
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
− + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅
·
∆ ⋅ + · − ⋅ + ·
− − −

d cp d
T
T t
T
T
z
d
cp vco cp
d
T
t
z
cp vco cp
osc
M vco osc M M vco osc osc
T T t T e e
T
T
R I K f N
T t e
T
t
R I K f N
t f
t v K f v t v K f t f
p
d
p
d
p
: 1
0 : 1
) ( 0 ) 0 ( ) ( 0
2 2
2
) (
1
1
1
1
(5.10)
iii
As a result the frequency stability criterion becomes:
( )
( )
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|
− + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ · ·
⋅ −

2
1
2
1
1
p
d
T
T
z
d
cp vco cp d osc
d cp
e
T
T
R I K f N T f
T T
N
It is convenient to define a time deviation, p, and make some substitutions to express the
criterion in terms of x, r
21
, α and p:

iii
Once again the expression of the discharging interval assumes a C
2
almost discharged at t=0; and in fact we
approach this condition in two cases:
• for fast filters with w
p2
comparable to 2π.f
cp
;
• and for close to lock condition, with T
d
tending to zero.
The phase deviation sequence towards lock is examined for large bandwidth filters, and for ∆ϕ
n
tending to zero, so
completely in accord with the supposition of a discharged C
2
.
102 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
5 . 0 0 ;
2
< <

· ⋅ · · p T f
T
T
p
d cp
cp
d
π
ϕ
( )
( )
]
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ − − +

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

,
`

.
|
+ ·
⋅ −
p x r p x
r
x
p
n
21
21
2 exp 1
2
2 1
2 1
1
π
π
π
α
α
or expressing this boundary as a function g
frap
, we find:
( ) 0 2 exp 1
2
2
1 2
2
g
21
21
frap
·
]
]
]
]

⋅ ⋅ − − +

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ⋅

,
`

.
|
+

· p x r p x
r
x
p
p
n
π
π
π
α
α
(5.11)
remembering:
[ ] 1 , 0 ;
f
) gain value (average R
gain) loop (open
I
;
1
T
cp
oln
n
n
oln
1
cp
2 oln
z1 oln 21
∈ ·
·

·

· ⋅ ·
x
f
x
w
N
K
T w
w r
vco
p
α
α
α
The value of x solving equation (5.11), is the limit bandwidth ratio for a given set of r
21
, p and α
values. We know that the loop is considered in lock for p close to 0. Hence we need to verify that
x tends to a finite, non-zero value for the limit p→0.
First we look for some physical understanding of g
frap
(limit function for the frequency
approach), reducing it to a two variable function, and plotting it in the space (p, x, z).
Figure 5.7 illustrates g
frap
for constant values of r
21
and α, and zooms around the valid ranges of
p and x:
[ ] [ ] 5 , 0 ; 0 ; 1 ; 0 ; ; 25
21
∈ ∈ · · p x r
n
α α
The surface g
frap
(p, x) is cut by the plane z=0, and we may observe that x tends to a finite value
(around 0.1) for p tending to 0. The influence of the other two variables, r
21
and α, is examined
in section 5.3.3, including a comparison of the frequency and phase approaches.
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 103
Figure 5.7 Frequency approach convergence criterion
5.3.2 Phase approach
The phase criterion as presented in equation (5.8) may also be expressed as a function of p, x, r
21
and α. The calculation steps for the phase approach limit function, g
phap
, are indicated below.
We obtain a time function for the oscillator phase, integrating equation (5.10), and evaluate the
phase change during the spotted interval: [ T
d
, (T
cp
–T
d
) ].
( ) ( ) ( )
( )
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
∆ ⋅ + ⋅ − ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ + · −


d cp
d
T T
T
M vco d cp cp d osc d cp osc
dt t v K T T f N T T T ) ( 2 2π θ θ (5.12)
Comparing (5.12) and (5.8) , gives the function below:
( ) ( )
( )
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
]
]
]
]
]

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|
− − − + − ·
− −

,
`

.
|

1 1 2 2 2 2
2 2
2
2
1
1
p
d cp
p
d
T
T T
T
T
p d cp
z
d
cp vco d cp cp
e e T T T
T
T
R I K T T f N N π π
104 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Dividing by 2π.N , and using the same substitutions as for g
frap
, g
phap
becomes:
( ) ( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) ( ) [ ] { ¦ 0 2 1 2 exp 1 2 exp 1 2 1 2
1
2 g
21 21
2
21
phap
· − ⋅ − − ⋅ ⋅ − − + − ⋅

,
`

.
|
+ − · x p r px r p p x
r
p
n
π π π
α
α
(5.13)
A general idea of g
phap
(p, x, r
21
, α) is given by figure 5.8, showing g
phap
for fixed values of r
21
and α, and restricted ranges of x and p:
[ ] [ ] 5 . 0 ; 0 ; 1 ; 0 ; ; 25
21
∈ ∈ · · p x r
n
α α
The intersection with the plane, z=0, shows a finite valued x (around 0.25) as p tends to 0.
Figure 5.8 Phase approach convergence criterion
As expected, the limit bandwidth ratio for the phase approach is higher than for the frequency
approach. The difference accounts for the filter discharge during the interval where the charge
pump is off.
Hence, effectively the frequency approach is pessimistic, but the phase approach is a final
stability boundary. And in order to guarantee loop stability, including several variable
parameters, it is necessary to have a safety margin.
The following section contains comparative graphs between the two approaches, and graphs
showing the influence of the two variables fixed in figures 5.7 and 5.8, r
21
and α .
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 105
5.3.3 Comparing the frequency and phase approaches
A better graphical insight of the stability boundary, shown in the tri-dimensional plots, is given
by figure 5.9. It illustrates the intersection lines between g
frap
, g
phap
and z=0.
We choose to inverse the bandwidth ratio and plot 1/x (f
cp
/f
oln
) values with respect to p
(normalized delay). Therefore the frequency approach indicates a maximum PLL open loop
bandwidth of approximately f
cp
/10 , and the phase approach of approximately f
cp
/4 .
Although the lock condition is achieved for p tending to zero, the limit of maximum bandwidth
has to satisfy all values of the p range to guarantee a converging phase deviation sequence. For
our case, this condition is naturally fulfilled since the stability curves present a minimum value
of x, or a maximum value of 1/x, as p tends to zero.
Figure 5.9 Comparing frequency and phase approaches
Before introducing the two missing variables, r
21
and α/α
n
, we may compare the expressions
g
frap
(p, x) and g
phap
(p, x) to get some insight into their differences.
We observe that g
phap
has a higher order than g
frap
, with respect to p, because of the time
integration. A reduced form, as a limited development, may be helpful to homogenize both
equations and simplify the comparison.
The first order limited developments with respect to p, around p=0 (lock point), is evaluated for
g
phap
and g
frap
.
106 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
( )
4 4 8 4 4 7 6
f
A
n
p
r
r
p x p
]
]
]
]

+ ⋅ ⋅

,
`

.
|
+ − ≈

21
21
2
0
frap
1
2 2 g π
α
α
(5.14)
( )
( ) [ ]
4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 1
p
A
n
p
x
r x
r
p x p
]
]
]
]

− −
+ ⋅ ⋅

,
`

.
|
+ − ≈

π
π
π
α
α
2
2 exp 1
1
2 2 g
21
21
2
0
phap
(5.15)
In this form we verify that both functions are very similar, and the only differing term would be
equivalent to an approximation, in g
phap
, of the exponential by its first order series around x=0.
However for large bandwidth filters, x is not close to 0, and the difference between the linear and
the exponential terms is representing the filter discharge, whose time constant depends on x and
r
21
.
The sum terms, A
f
and A
p
, correspond to the voltage variations of C
1
and C
2
for current injection
intervals (T
d
) tending to zero. Capacitor C
1
variation is equally considered in both approaches,
and capacitor C
2
discharge is neglected in g
frap
. It is important to notice in (5.14), that for the
usual r
21
values (r
21
>>1), C
2
voltage variation is the dominant effect in ∆v
M
.
5.3.3.1 Zero-Pole spacing ( r
21
)
Next we verify the influence of the filter zero-pole spacing parameter, r
21
.
Figure 5.10 plots the limit bandwidth values (1/x) for a variable zero-pole spacing and p equals
to and ε close to 0 (p=ε , ε = 10
-12
).
We notice that for decreasing values of r
21
, the two limiting values (g
frap
=0 and g
phap
=0)
approach each other. This result is in accordance with equations (5.14) and (5.15), since the
differing term decreases as r
21
is reduced.
The limiting bandwidth variation with respect to r
21
, may be intuitively understood for the
frequency approach. In fact, reducing r
21
implies nearing f
z1
and f
p2
to f
oln
,i.e., for the same
bandwidth (f
oln
) and the gain value (α) C
1
is reduced and C
2
is increased.
Hence, for the same charge injection (Icp.T
d
), the voltage variation in V
tune
is decreased,
iv
and
the bandwidth limit value (f
oln
) increased.
In the phase approach it is harder to foresee a general idea of the sensibility to r
21
. This happens
because ∆v
M
is a function of both r
21
and x.

iv
Remembering that C
2
variation is dominant as p tends to zero.
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 107
Figure 5.10 Convergence approaches X lead-lag spacing r
21
5.3.3.2 Gain variation
Finally the gain variation influence is shown in figure 5.11. It is a plot of the limit bandwidth
with respect to a normalized gain variation (α/α
n
), for fixed p and r
21
values.
The plot is reproduced on two scales, log-linear, and log-log. In the first we can easily read the
limit 1/x values for typical gain variations.
For instance, the satellite tuner example discussed in section 3.5, has a gain range, α
max

min
,
equal to 50 (normalized variation for r
21
= 25) ; centering this variation around α
n
in figure 5.11.a
implies a maximum bandwidth value around f
cp
/19 .
The plot on the log-log scale is superposed by two asymptotes in the form:
( )
1 2
10 log log
2 1
k k
x y k x k y ⋅ · + ⋅ · L
The asymptotes are indicated by the lines in ◊ and symbols.
The limit bandwidth for the frequency approach may be very accurately represented by such an
asymptote, with k
1
=0,5 . In fact k
1
and k
2
values could be directly estimated from equation
(5.14), making g
frap
equal to zero, and isolating 1/x as a function of α/α
n
and r
21
.
108 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In expression (5.15) it is not easy to isolate x. However figure 5.11.b, for the phase approach,
shows that the graph can be approximated by two asymptotes. One around α/α
n
equal to one,
with k
1
=0.75, and another for high gains, in parallel to the frequency approach asymptote.
v
Figure 5.11 Convergence approaches X gain variation
Summarizing, this section (5.3) describes a lock convergence analysis to evaluate stability
boundaries for the maximum bandwidth ratio (f
oln
/f
cp
). The influence of the zero-pole spacing,
and the gain variation are also examined.
The limiting bandwidth is discussed directly in terms of the center open loop bandwidth, f
oln
,
used in the loop filter calculations. Thus we should keep in mind that α variations are an implicit
manner of discussing open and closed loop variations around the center value.
In the case of oscillators that work with small tuning ranges (f
max
/ f
min
< 2), the oscillator
frequency can not vary as much as presented in figure 5.6.
In fact, the oscillator will mostly stay blocked at the limit V
tune
values, bouncing between the
low and high boundaries. It will only converge if there is a sequence of ∆ϕ
n
values small enough
to cause ∆v
M
inferior to the tuning range. So as the bandwidth approaches the limits discussed
above, such a small range oscillator will pass most of its acquisition period blocked in the low
and high V
tune
boundaries.

v
The second asymptote shows that very high gain ratios correspond to such a large ∆v
M
during injection, that the
discharge voltage delta is less and less significant.
fig. 5.11.a fig. 5.11.b
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 109
The convergence criterion is issued from the acquisition mode as a condition to attain the lock
mode. In the previous chapters we discussed filter centering algorithms to optimize the output
spectrum in lock mode.
In order to combine these two treatments we need to include the effects of the bandwidth
limitation in the small signal model that is described in the frequency domain.
5.4 Discrete transfers for the PLL Phase Model
The PLL synthesizer is typically a hybrid system containing both analog and digital blocks. So
far we have replaced the digital blocks by their average behaviour with respect to the phase of
the input and output signals.
The accuracy of average behaviour models hold for loops with a control bandwidth largely
inferior to the sample frequency, i.e., the filtering is effective enough for all passing components
in order to smooth out the input power and show an output with changing rates proportional to
the control bandwidth, and not to the sample frequency.
The average model for the digital blocks, is a linear time invariable approximation, of their
discrete, time variable, functioning.
The linear representation of the analog blocks is also approximate because of the limited linear
functioning range. These linear range limitations were discussed in section 5.1.
So, this section continues our analysis of the LTI model limitations, examining the discrete, time
variable nature of the digital blocks.
5.4.1 The sampler
As the system bandwidth increases it is necessary to consider the limitations associated with a
finite sampling frequency. A first approach, pseudo-continuous, includes extra poles or delays in
the continuous linear model, representing the stability constraints of the discrete system.
vi
A
direct discrete approach, developing discrete time equations and the associated z transform
transfers, is also conceivable, but mainly applied in the context of fully digital PLLs (see
reference [Berg95]).
As a general rule, the following boundaries are suggested for the model choice, concerning the
system with a closed loop bandwidth, w
cl
, and the sampling frequency, w
s
:
• w
cl
< 20*w
s
: continuous model
• 20*w
s
≤ w
cl
< 10*w
s
: between the continuous and the pseudo-continuous model
• 10*w
s
≤ w
cl
< 2*w
s
: between the pseudo-continuous and the discrete model
This section develops a pseudo-continuous approach for the PLL phase model and compares it to
the stability boundaries found in section 5.3.
The basic architecture of the frequency synthesizer, as shown in figure 1.9, contains three digital
blocks: main divider, reference divider and phase detector.

vi
Reference [Craw94] details the pseudo-continuous approach, developing compensated transfer function for
different phase detector types.
110 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The charge pump is certainly driven by a digital input, but its output is a continuous current,
better modeled as an analog signal.
The dividers are fully or partially programmable counters that transmit an overload signal every
counting cycle. The output of the dividers is in fact one input transition that is selected by the
count overload window and transmitted to the output. Therefore, the discrete model of the
counter is a sampler with a period equivalent to the output signal frequency.
The phase detector is another edge driven block, with two memory nodes registering two inputs,
and a delayed asynchronous reset. It drives two switchable current sources, transforming the time
difference, T
d
, of the two inputs, in a current injection T
d
wide.
The complete discrete representation of the phase detector should include the discontinuous
effects of both edge driven inputs. However, this would imply a non-constant sampling period
and a rather complex modeling. A simplified representation takes the reference input as the
sampling frequency, and the phase detector output becomes a sampled phase deviation sequence
as depicted in expression (5.6).
vii
Figure 5.12 Discrete model for digital blocks

vii
The accuracy of the assumption of a synchronous resampling is limited to conditions close to lock, where the
output of the main divider has a period approaching T
cp
.
A constant sensitivity, K
ϕ
, is also assumed for the phase detector, limiting our model to the phase detection zone.
θ
xtal
(t)
Xosc
%R
θ
ref
(t)
∆ϕ(t)
θ
div
(t) θ
osc
(t)
T
cp
T
cp
T
cp
+
-
%N
Charge
Pump
θ
div
(n.T
cp
)
∆ϕ (n.T
cp
)
θ
ref
(n.T
cp
)
∆ϕ (n.T
cp
)
θ
ref
(t)
∆ϕ(t)
θ
div
(t)
T
cp
+
-
Charge
Pump
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 111
The divider outputs are connected to the phase detector input, therefore, our discrete
representation would contain two samplers driving a third one, with all working at the same f
cp
frequency. In other words the reference and main divider outputs are coherently resampled by
the phase detector latches.
Coherent resampling does not modify a discrete variable, hence we may condense these three
samplers in the last one, within the phase detector block.
The discrete phase deviation ∆ϕ(n.T
cp
) is designated as ∆ϕ
n
, for short. The Laplace transform of
the discrete and continuous phase deviations are related by:
( ) ( )
∑ ∑

·

·
⋅ + ∆ ⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
+ ∆ ⋅ · ∆
0 0
1 2 1
n
cp
cp n cp cp
n
w n s
T T
n
s
T
s ϕ
π
ϕ ϕ (5.16)
for: ( ) ( ) { ¦ t L s ϕ ϕ ∆ · ∆
and ( ) ( ) ( )


·
⋅ − ⋅ ∆ · ⋅ ∆
0 n
cp cp n
T n t t T n δ ϕ ϕ (5.17)
The alias terms due to the sampling will be analyzed in chapter 7. For the moment we consider
the ∆ϕ portion due to the feedback signal, with the alias terms well outside the loop bandwidth.
In this case the sampled Laplace transform becomes:
( ) ( ) s
T
s
cp
n
ϕ ϕ ∆ ⋅ · ∆
1
5.4.2 The holder
The following step is to identify the DAC (digital to analog converter) nature of the charge
pump. In reality the output current, i(t), is a sequence of current pulses, with width, sign and
delay related to the phase deviation sequence.
Figure 5.13 Discrete phase detector input: ∆ϕ
n
i(t)
I
cp
n.T
cp
(n+1).T
cp
t (s)
I
cp
Charge Pump
output current
∆ϕ
n
.(T
cp
/2π) ∆ϕ
n+1
.(T
cp
/2π)
For:
∆ϕ
n
> 0
∆ϕ
n+1
< 0
112 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
For the frequency domain model we search I(s), the Laplace transform of i(t).
An exact representation of I(s) is quite difficult because the frequency content (amplitude, phase
and number of significant f
cp
harmonics needed to represent a period) depends on the pulse
width, i.e., the non-linearity is a function of |∆ϕ
n
| .
In section 3.1, during the analysis of spurious rays, in the lock condition, we made a first
approximation about the leakage current frequency content. We supposed that it was mostly
concentrated in the 1
st
or fundamental harmonic.
This supposition allows a worst case evaluation of the reference breakthrough. Furthermore,
ignoring the higher f
cp
harmonics is justified by the fact that they are strongly attenuated in the
loop filter.
However this approximation contains no DC component, and thus is not suited to represent the
band-base contents of i(t).
viii
Consequently, we looked for a second approximation that preserves the DC component and
simplifies the frequency content, to a fixed known envelope. In a periodic , locked context, this
envelope shapes a series of f
cp
harmonics.
Representing the charge pump as a ZOH (zero order holder) converter is equivalent to shaping
the pulse frequency content by a sinc envelope, with the first lobe node at f
cp
. Figure 5.14 shows
a truncated portion, over one period, of i(t), i
ZOH
(t), and the associated Fourier transform,
I
ZOH
(w).
Figure 5.14 Charge Pump DAC output
with:
( )
]
]
]

− ⋅

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ ∆ ⋅ ·
2
exp
2
sinc
cp cp
cp n ZOH
T
jw
wT
T K w I ϕ
ϕ
(5.18)

viii
The base-band contents are present for every ∆ϕ
n
different to zero.
t (s)
I
cp
.(∆ϕ
n
/2π) = K
ϕ
. ∆ϕ
n
I
cp
. (∆ϕ
n
.T
cp
/2π )
n.T
cp
(n+1).T
cp
Fourier
Transform
t (s)
∆ϕ
I
cp
I
cp
. (∆ϕ
n
.T
cp
/2π
)
n.T
cp

( 1) T
∆ϕ
I
cp
I
cp
. (∆ϕ
n
.T
cp
/2π )
n.T
cp
(n+1).T
cp
i(t)
i
ZOH
(t)
| I
ZOH
(w) |
K
ϕ
.∆ϕ
n
.T
cp
-3w
cp
-2.w
cp
-w
cp
w
cp
2w
cp
3w
cp
w
(rad/s)
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 113
The charge pump transfer, for the ZOH equivalent output, is deduced from equations (5.17) and
(5.18):
with u(t) a step function defined as:
¹
'
¹
< ·
≥ ·
0 ; 0 ) (
0 ; 1 ) (
t t u
t t u
and G
sh
(s), the sample and hold transfer in the Laplace transform.
ix
We notice that G
ChP-ZOH
is independent of ∆ϕ
n
, which is not the case for the transfer function of
the actual i(t), pulse width modulated by ∆ϕ
n
.
x
The pseudo-continuous model is an extension of the band-base, linear time invariable phase
model. It includes some characteristics of the loop discrete functioning, but it intends to stay as a
LTI system.
G
ChP-ZOH
is a linear transfer, but the only time invariable component is the DC one.
xi
In a periodic locked case, this reduction can be seen as the loop filter action, attenuating the
spectrum rays at f
cp
harmonics, and keeping only the DC ray.
Hence, the sinc shaped charge pump transfer is reduced to its DC term plus the delay:
( )
2
cp
T s
cp ZOH ChP
e T K s G
⋅ −

⋅ ⋅ ≅
ϕ
(5.19)
Equation (5.19) corresponds to a first order approximation of the ZOH. The delay term appears
in a Bode plot as a constant unitary magnitude, and a linear decreasing phase. Thus it mostly
affects the phase margin parameter. For example at f equals f
cp
/10 it reduces the phase margin of
π/10 radians, or 18° .

ix
We may verify the correspondence of G
ChP-ZOH
(s) and I
ZOH
(w), replacing s by jw in the G
sh
(s):
( )

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ·

,
`

.
|

⋅ ⋅ ÷ ÷ ÷ → ÷
·

⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ −

,
`

.
|
⋅ −

,
`

.
|
⋅ −

,
`

.
|
⋅ +

,
`

.
|
⋅ −
2
sinc
2
sin
2
2 2
2 2
2 cp
cp
T
jw
cp
T
jw
T
s
T
s
T
s
sh
T
w T e
w
T
w
e
jw s
s
e e
e s G
cp cp
cp cp
cp
x
For i(t) output in the form:
( )


· ]
]
]
]

,
`

.
| ⋅ ∆
− − − − ⋅ ·
0
2
) (
n
cp n
cp cp cp
T
T n t u nT t u I t i
π
ϕ
the associated transfer G
ChP
is:
( )
]
]
]
]
]




·
⋅ ∆
⋅ −
s
e
I
s G
cp n
T
s
n
cp
ChP
π
ϕ
ϕ
2
1
xi
Later on, in section 6.3, a more complete transfer, time variable, is discussed for small signal analysis.
( ) ( )


·
∆ ⋅ − · ∆
0 n
cp n
t nT t ϕ δ ϕ
( ) ( ) s G K
s
e
K s G
sh
T s
ZOH ChP
cp
⋅ ·
]
]
]
]


⋅ ·
⋅ −
− ϕ ϕ
1
Charge
Pump
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ]
cp cp n ZOH
T n t u nT t u K t i 1 + − − − ⋅ ⋅ ∆ ·
ϕ
ϕ
114 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
5.4.3 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay
We may recognize that other pulse approximations for i(t) would present similar LTI transfers.
In figure 5.15 we name i
pw
(t) a generic pulse function of width T
w
and same DC content as i(t).
The related Fourier transform, I
pw
(w), and charge pump transfer, G
ChP-pw
(s), are also indicated.
Figure 5.15 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay
( )
2
w
T s
w
w
cp
pw ChP
e T
T
T
K s G
⋅ −

⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ≅
ϕ
Among the possible pulse approximations, the ZOH presents the largest delay. And since the
time delay is the limiting stability constraint introduced by the pseudo-continuous model, we
continue this analysis with the ZOH approach.
Next we search convenient polynomial representations for the time delay. Two simple
possibilities are:
• real pole at f=f
cp
/2 (similar to first order filtering around the Nyquist frequency, f
c
/2):
easy implementation, but not accurate in magnitude and phase, mainly for frequencies
nearing f
cp
/2. At f
cp
/2 it represents a phase decrease of 45°, comparable to a time delay of
T
cp
/4. This time delay is associated to a charge pump transfer with width T
w
equals to T
cp
/2.
• Pade polynomials: composed of pairs of zero and poles, symmetrically placed around the
imaginary axis of the S-plane. The order, n, indicates the order of the numerator and
denominator polynomials. The magnitude frequency response is unitary everywhere, and the
phase decreases up to n*(-180°) .
The phase decreases almost linearly up to n*(-90°) . Therefore the order of the polynomial
must be chosen comparing the maximum loop bandwidth to(w*T
delay
) .
A numerical example is presented below. We examine the open and closed loop transfers for a
filter with r
21
equals to 25, and a normalized gain variation range (2.r
21
).
∆ϕ
n
. K
ϕ
. T
cp
/T
w1
Τ
w1
K
ϕ
.∆ϕ
n
.T
cp
-3w
cp
-2w
cp
-w
cp
w
cp
2w
cp
3w
cp
w
(rad/s)
i
pw
(t) | I
pw
(w) |
t (s)
Τ
w2
n.T
cp

( 1) T
n.T
cp
(n+1).T
cp
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 115
The zero-pole spacing parameter (r
21
) is equal to the evaluation of figure 5.11, so that we can
compare the results of the delay approach and the ∆ϕ
n
convergence approach.
Figure 5.16 shows the open loop phase plot, and the closed loop step response for a continuous
model with a transmission delay of T
cp
/2 , modeled by a 2
nd
order Pade polynomial.
The continuous nominal loop is a 3
rd
order one, with a 2
nd
order loop filter. The numerical
parameters used in the graphs, are listed below:
Πr
21
= 25; w
oln
= 10 rad/s (symbolical value, not related to applications)
Πw
cp
= 21.1 * w
oln
= 211 rad/s
Figure 5.16 Frequency and Time response for the continuous + delay model
The phase response pictures three curves corresponding to the pure time delay, the nominal
continuous transfer and the continuous plus delay model.
Dashed-dotted lines indicate the open loop crossing frequencies (f
ol
) for the normalized gain
variation. Over the -180° line there are symbols marking: w
z1
(o), w
oln
( ). y
p2
(x) and
w
cp
(◊).
The sample frequency, w
cp
, was chosen as the limit value for which the phase margin
corresponding to the maximum normalized gain (α
max
) equals zero. Therefore we may compare
the ratio w
cp
/w
oln
to the limit 1/x values in figure 5.11.
fig. 5.16.a fig. 5.16.b
nominal + delay
c
b
a
116 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
ln 2 21 max
5 07 , 7 2
max
o p ol n n
w PhM w PhM w PhM r ⋅ · · ⋅ · ⋅ ⋅ ·
·α α
α α α K
1 , 21
19 ~
1
ln ln
L
x f
f
w
w
o
cp
o
cp
· ·
So in spite of all reductive approximations made in the delay analysis, it is still comparable to the
time convergence methods.
The step response is calculated for a frequency change equal to w
osc
/N, and the signal plotted is
proportional to either the oscillator angular frequency or the filter voltage output.
( ) ( )
2
1
1
or
N
N
N
s B
f
N
s B
N
w
V
N
K
ref
osc
tune
o
⋅ ∆ ⋅ ↔ · ⋅
The three curves correspond to the following gain values:
Œ a: α·α
min
or w
ol
= w
z1
= 2 rad/s = 2π.(0.32 Hz)
Œ b: α·α
n
or w
ol
= w
oln
= 10 rad/s = 2π.(1.59 Hz)
Œ c: α≈α
max
/2 or w
ol
≈ 3.w
oln
= 30 rad/s = 2π.(4.7 Hz)
Curve c corresponds to the maximum gain value with a PhM≥30° for the continuous plus delay
model. In the phase plot, the corresponding f
ol
is also indicated through the dashed-dotted lines.
The continuous plus delay model is mostly an approximation for locked mode simulations, due
to its linear character. Nevertheless we should be aware of the limitations to know the tendency
of the inaccuracy present in the simulations results.
In fact, during the acquisition mode there is not really a constant sampling frequency, but f
cp
is
the slowest one possible, so the most critical.
The phase deviation is also not constant during each comparison interval, and this may interfere
in the width of the current injection for cases where the oscillator is lagging the reference. Again
when we use the maximum delay (T
cp
/2) we are taking the worst case.
Therefore the continuous plus delay model, with a T
cp
/2 delay, is a pessimistic estimate of the
lock and acquisition mode, and it may be used to evaluate stability boundaries due to enlarging
feedback bandwidths. The pessimistic error is not so large, as we see through the comparison
with the phase convergence method, and it constitutes a small addition to the safety margin.
Another application of this delayed model appears in spectrum optimizations, where the phase
margin loss may affect the peaking. For this typical locked mode simulations, the T
cp
/2 delay is
too pessimistic, and the results will not fit measured situations. A compromise fitting
measurements is found for a delayed model with a T
cp
/4 delay.
: for the phase convergence method
: for the continuous + worst delay method
Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 117
This chapter dealt with non-linear aspects of the PLL functioning. These aspects are bounded to
large bandwidth loops, and they impose maximum limits for f
cp
and f
ol
.
The first issue (f
cp
) appears in multi-loop contexts and it was analyzed through the minimum
phase detection range assuring an unlimited frequency tracking behaviour.
The second (f
ol
) appears in general loop structures containing discrete behavioural elements.
Most of the PLL discrete models are issued from pure digital loops analysis, where descriptions
in Z transform are easily determined.
In our mixed discrete-continuous context, two characteristics are especially difficult to include in
a Z-transform representation: a DAC not strictly linear and a varying sampling frequency.
Thus, we preferred to start with time domain models, and, later search for a simplified frequency
domain representation.
The simplified frequency model is in fact a continuous one, with an additional time delay.
Both time and frequency models were evaluated and discussed with respect to the loop
parameters presented in the previous chapters, (zero-pole spacing, gain variation, …)
118 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 119
Contents:
6. Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 119
6.1. Electrical Noise: random source representation & measurements....................................................... 120
6.1.1. Electrical noise as a random process ........................................................................................... 121
6.1.2. Measuring Phase Noise ............................................................................................................... 123
6.2. Phase Noise Notations .......................................................................................................................... 125
6.2.1. Interchanging Modulation Types................................................................................................. 125
6.2.1.1. Angular modulation................................................................................................................ 127
6.2.2. Phasor Notations.......................................................................................................................... 128
6.2.3. Slope approach ............................................................................................................................ 133
6.3. Large Signal Linearization ................................................................................................................... 135
6.3.1. Time and Frequency representation............................................................................................. 135
6.3.2. Linear Time Variable transfer ..................................................................................................... 136
Figures:
Figure 6.1 Spectrum Analyzer Output ........................................................................................................ 124
Figure 6.2 FM & PM carriers.................................................................................................................... 128
Figure 6.3 SSB superposed noise: AM + PM decomposition (phasor)...................................................... 129
Figure 6.4 Superposed Noise: AM + PM decomposition (spectrum)......................................................... 130
Figure 6.5 Phase modulated carrier by DSB superposed noise ................................................................. 131
Figure 6.6 Phase deviation from DSB sidebands ....................................................................................... 132
Figure 6.7 Slope approach: voltage & time deviations............................................................................... 133
Figure 6.8 Periodic transfer determined by a large signal ......................................................................... 136
Figure 6.9 Large Signal Transfer: ideal and hyperbolic-tangent limitations............................................ 138
Tables:
Table 6-1 Phase Modulated Carrier .......................................................................................................... 126
Table 6-2 L(f
offset
) from modulated and superposed noise ........................................................................ 132
6 Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach
Phase noise is an important parameter in the performance of frequency synthesizers. Low noise
design needs to consider the mechanisms originating phase deviations in the output carrier; and
relate them to the noise sources that are present in the circuit.
The analysis starts with basic aspects on random noise representation and measurement, and is
followed by a discussion on different notations for phase noise. Finally, we consider the transfer
function of stages that work in a periodic, non-linear mode.
120 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Phase Noise is a convenient parameter to quantify unwanted phase variation in a periodic signal.
Phase variation can be caused by a linear phenomenon such as signal addition and also by non-
linear phenomena such as angular modulation.
In the PLL synthesizer we consider two sources of periodic signals, which are disturbed by phase
noise: the reference oscillator and the voltage controlled oscillator. The disturbances are either
intrinsic to the periodic sources, or are accumulated as their outputs propagate through the PLL
blocks.
The power that generates phase variations can come from random or deterministic sources. The
representation of electrical random noise is shortly discussed, introducing the notation in the
frequency domain, for stationary and cyclostationary sources. The deterministic sources are also
described in the frequency domain, which allows us to develop a common treatment for both
types of disturbance.
Phase noise is represented in many different notations, which are chosen with respect to the
origin of the phase deviation, or to the measurement tools. We discuss some notations that are
based on: the equivalence amongst different types of modulation, the addition of signals
represented by phasors, and the time deviation in switching stages.
The last one is very significant to describe the noise added by the logical blocks of the PLL
(dividers and phase detector). This description is further developed to take into account the
non-linear and periodic behaviour of these blocks.
In chapter 7 we relate the notations for phase noise and the transfer functions of the preceding
chapters. The noise performance of the synthesizer is investigated in a top-down approach, from
behavioural to circuit level descriptions.
6.1 Electrical Noise: random source representation & measurements
The denomination noise is given to any power signal disturbing the data signal (which contains
the transmitted data or information). Noise sources can be internal to the integrated circuit, or
external, from the application environment.
We consider two types of noise: interference and stochastic electrical noise.
The first is associated to deterministic signals polluting the output carrier. They are generated by
the operation of different parts of the circuit and are transmitted by parasitic coupling.
The second refers to the random movement of electrons, implying fluctuations in voltage and
current signals. They are thermal, shot, flicker and other types of random noise.
We mentioned two sources of interference in chapters 3 and 4: the reference breakthrough and
the deterministic disturbances found in the supplies of the loop-amplifier.
On the other hand, N
PLL
and v
nvco
(defined in chapter 3), and the shot and thermal noise of the
amplifier and the loop-filter components (discussed in chapter 4), are random noise sources.
Furthermore we consider that they are stationary noise sources that can be described by their
power spectrum density.
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 121
6.1.1 Electrical noise as a random process
Electrical noise arises from current and voltage fluctuations in the circuit. The mechanisms
originating these fluctuations are related to thermal agitation, and to variations in the current
flow of electronic devices. These fluctuations vary randomly, and are described as stochastic or
random processes.
The random characteristic defines a variable or a process that is not predictable before its
occurrence, but presents defined statistical properties.
Random processes are defined as an ensemble of time functions whose statistical properties are
described by a common probability rule. Each time function is a sample of the random process
sample space. The statistical description of the process is contained in the probability density
function. This function describes the probabilistic distribution of the values of the sample
functions, when they are observed at a given time instant.
When the probability density function is independent of the observation instant, the random
process is said to be stationary. An important property is derived from the stationary condition:
ergodicity. This is attributed to processes where the statistical properties of the ensemble can be
estimated by time averages of individual sample functions of the process.
Ergodicity is a very important property for the measurement of stochastic processes, since these
measurements are based on the observation of a sample function during a time interval.
In practice, stochastic processes are not evaluated by a probability density function (which is not
directly measurable) but more frequently by their first and second moments: mean value and
autocorrelation, respectively. A stationary process X(t) presents the following mean and
autocorrelation:
mean: [ ] ) (t X m
X
Ε ·
autocorrelation: ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ] τ τ − ⋅ Ε · t X t X
X
R
where E is the expectation operator, and τ is a time delay. The mean-square value equals the
autocorrelation for a zero time delay:
mean-square: ( ) ( ) [ ] t X
X
2
0 R Ε ·
A process that presents: a constant average, an autocorrelation which is independent of shifts in
the time origin, and a finite value for the autocorrelation at the time origin, is said to be wide-
sense stationary (WSS). They do not present all the characteristics of a stationary process, but
include the most significant, as described by the 1
st
and 2
nd
moments.
Usually for the measurement intervals that we are interested in
i
, the electrical noise sources may
be modeled as WSS processes with a Gaussian distribution of amplitude.
The Gaussian distribution is nicely adapted to describe physical phenomena depending on many
independent random variables. This is related to the central limit theorem, which affirms that the
sum of many independent random variables with defined 1
st
and 2
nd
moments, tends to present a
Gaussian distribution as the number of variables increases without limit.
Consider that the movement of each electron is described by an average component plus a
random one.
ii
The sum of the different paths of the electrons in a conductor approaches a

i
Measurements in the time and frequency domain observe a signal during a time interval that is large enough to
average over several periods of the noise components being measured, but still small enough to consider the process
as stationary.
122 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Gaussian random variable. Thermal and shot noise present a Gaussian amplitude distribution and
a zero mean value. The thermal noise of a resistor of R ohms has the following mean square
value expressed in volts:
( ) [ ]
2 2 2
2 volts f R kT t V V
TN n
∆ ⋅ · Ε · (6.1)
where ∆f indicates the bandwidth over which the noise voltage is measured. In equation (6.1) the
multiplying factor 2 instead of 4 (as in equation (4.7) of chapter 4) refers to a double sided
frequency representation, for a spectrum with positive and negative frequencies.
The Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function describes the random process in the
frequency domain. It is the power spectral density (PSD) of the process, defined as:
( ) ( ) ( ) τ τ π τ d f j R f S
X X
2 exp − ⋅ ·


∞ −
or inversely
( ) ( ) ( ) df f j f S R
X X
τ π τ 2 exp


∞ −
⋅ ·
We observe that the integral of the power spectral density over the whole frequency range,
equals R
X
(0), which is the total power or the mean-square value. When considering a voltage or
current noise density, the integral equals the total power for a unitary impedance.
The power spectrum density of a WSS random process has similar properties to the PSD of
deterministic signals. The output of a block with a linear-time-invariable transfer function H(f)
for a noise input described by S
X
(f) becomes:
( ) ( ) ( ) f S f H f S
X Y
⋅ ·
2
A process that presents a constant power spectrum density for all frequencies is called white.
White noise is a practical representation for band limited systems where the noise spectrum is
constant over the relevant part of the frequency range. White noise with unlimited bandwidth
does not exist because it would represent an infinite power.
Ideal white noise corresponds to an autocorrelation function which is an impulse at τ=0 , and
equals zero everywhere else. It means that any two samples from different time instants are
completely uncorrelated. Band-limited white noise presents an autocorrelation function shaped
as a sinc curve. The width of the lobes of the sinc are inversely proportional to the filtering
bandwidth.
Shot and thermal noise are approximated by white Gaussian noise. These approximations hold
for limiting bandwidths to the order of 10
12
Hz, which is largely above the limit of our working
frequencies.
Flicker noise is commonly represented by a white Gaussian noise which is shaped by a 1/f filter.
This representation is limited to a minimum value of frequency, to avoid an infinite power
density as f approaches 0.
Electrical noise contributions whose amplitude varies with respect to a periodic deterministic
signal, are called cyclostationary. They are represented by the product of a normalized stationary

ii
In the case of thermal noise the average component equals zero, and in the case of shot noise the average
component equals the net current flowing in the device.
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 123
process with a periodic large signal; or in other words, by a random process which is amplitude
modulated. The shot noise of a transistor driven by a periodic input is a cyclostationary noise.
The time average of the noise power of a cyclostationary noise is proportional to the rms value of
the periodic signal which modulates the random process.
For example let us consider the shot noise of a transistor driven by a sinousoidal input at
frequency f
c
:
( ) ( ) ( ) t X t i q t I
shot
⋅ ⋅ · (6.2)
iii
where X(t) is the normalized random process, with a white unitary PSD which is limited by a
physical bandwidth defined by the circuit. i(t) is the deterministic current signal that results from
the sinusoidal input, for example:
( ) ( ) [ ] Θ + + ⋅ · t f
I
t i
c
t
π 2 cos 1
2
Θ is a random phase uniformly distributed in the range [0 , 2π]. It indicates that X(t) and i(t) are
not related to a common time origin.
Part of the power of this shot noise is frequency translated around tf
c
. Other examples of
frequency translation of noise appear as we investigate time variable transfer functions. These
transfers are discussed in section 6.3.
The representation of random noise by their PSD allows us to use a common small signal
treatment for both deterministic and random signals. The random signal is considered as the
superposition of uncorrelated portions of narrow band signals. This supposition was first
mentioned in chapter 3 when we considered a single tone contribution of v
nvco
.
We continue this introduction considering the measurement of noise in the time and frequency
domain.
6.1.2 Measuring Phase Noise
Phase noise is a magnitude measuring phase deviations in a carrier. Section 6.2 discusses
different mechanisms that convert noise power in amplitude and phase deviations. In the output
of the VCO we find mainly phase deviations. This is due to the frequency modulating
characteristic of the input of the VCO, and also due to amplitude limitations that occur in the
intermediate and output stages of the VCO.
Phase noise is measured by different methods which evaluate the performance of the carrier in
the time and frequency domains.
In our context the spectrum analysis is the most current method.
The spectrum analyzer measures the power present in a certain band of frequency, by sweeping
an analysis window through a specified range of frequency. It is basically composed of a
frequency conversion block, which is followed by a filter with a variable bandwidth and by a
power meter. The analysis window corresponds to the filter bandwidth and is called resolution
bandwidth (RBW). Figure 6.1 represents an LO spectrum measured with two different resolution
bandwidths, RBW
1
and RBW
2
.

iii
In equation (6.2) the amplitude of the shot noise also refers to a double sided spectrum with positive and negative
frequencies.
124 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 6.1 Spectrum Analyzer Output
In figure 6.1 the sideband rays at frequency offsets of tf
m
are caused by a deterministic noise
component. This noise has a spectrum component at frequency f
m
which modulates the carrier
output. The power of the modulated rays is concentrated in very narrow bandwidths around f
osc
t
f
m

iv
, which are considerably smaller than the values of the RBW. So the power of these
sidebands is not affected by the width of the RBW. The power ratio between these sidebands and
the carrier is expressed in dBc.
The parts of the sidebands that are caused by random noise (in-loop contribution from N
PLL
and
out-of-loop contribution from v
nvco
) have a power level that varies with the width of the RBW.
This is due to the spread-out characteristic of the power spectrum density of these noise
contributions.
Let us consider a white random noise in the output with a power spectral density N
o
in W/Hz.
The power due to this contribution as the analysis window sweeps the frequency range equals:
N
o
.RBW. The power ratio between the sidebands due to random noise and the carrier is often
expressed in dBc/Hz. This unit is used to normalize the power level to a 1Hz bandwidth. The
ratio SSB noise / carrier when expressed in dBc/Hz, corresponds to L
dB
(f
offset
) which was defined
in chapter 3 (equation (3.4) ).
The phase noise performance can also be measured by a time parameter: the time jitter. This
expresses the variations of the period of the carrier. There are two different methods. One
measures the variations of the period when compared to a reference oscillator. The result is
called time-deviation jitter. The second calculates the dispersion of the value of the period with
respect to its own average. The result is called time-interval jitter. In both types of measurement
there are several parameters that strongly influence the value of the jitter measured. For instance
the time step and the measurement interval determine the maximum and minimum frequencies of
the noise components that are taken into account.
Reference [Nord97] discusses the techniques of time jitter measurement and the parameters that
influence the results. It also shows that time-deviation jitter is related to the phase deviation in
the carrier, and that time-interval jitter is related to the frequency deviation.
The relationships amongst phase, frequency and time deviations are discussed in the following
section.

iv
Ideally the modulating rays are represented by impulses at f
osc
t f
m
. However the modulating signal is limited in
time and its spectrum has a finite width.
Spurious
deterministic signal
f
osc
-f
m
f
osc
f
osc
+f
m

,
`

.
|

2
1
log 10
RBW
RBW
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 125
6.2 Phase Noise Notations
The description of phase noise varies with respect to the functionality of the blocks to which it
refers. In oscillators the phase noise is often quantified by phase or frequency magnitudes, and in
logical blocks it is quantified by time magnitudes.
In every node of the circuit there is some noise power being added to the data signal. In
particular at the input node of the VCO, the voltage noise is converted into phase deviation by
frequency modulation. In other nodes of the circuit the added noise power causes both amplitude
and phase deviations of the signal. Phase noise can be caused by angular modulation of noise
power, or by addition of noise power to the signal.
In this section we detail these two mechanisms of the generation of phase noise, that we call
modulated and superposed noise. We start with the angular modulation, looking at the
relationships amongst phase, frequency and time modulations. We continue with the distinction
of phase and amplitude deviations caused by an added noise power. Finally we look at the effect
of amplitude limitation on the transmission of signals corrupted by noise.
6.2.1 Interchanging Modulation Types
The phase deviation of a carrier may also be expressed as frequency and time deviations (see
reference [Nord97]). Let us consider a sinousoidal carrier v
c
(t), and the time functions ∆ϕ(t),
∆f(t) and ∆t(t) which modulate the carrier. It follows that:
unmodulated carrier: ( ) v t A f t
c c c
( ) sin · ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ 2π
phase modulated carrier: ( ) v t A f t t
PMc c c
( ) sin ( ) · ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ + 2π ∆ϕ
frequency modulated carrier: ( )
[ ]
v t A f f t t
FMc c c
( ) sin ( ) · ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ + 2π µ ∆
∆ϕ
time modulated carrier: ( )
[ ]
v t A f t t t
TMc c c
( ) sin ( ) · ⋅ ⋅ + 2π ∆
The three modulated signals are equivalent to each other if:
∆ ∆ϕ ∆
∆ϕ
∆ϕ
f t
t
t
t
t
t
t t t
t
f
c
( )
( )
; ( )
( )
; ( )
( )
· ⋅ · − ⋅ ·
1
2 2 π
∂∆ϕ

µ
∂∆ϕ
∂ π
We may also express v
c
(t) and the modulating functions ∆ϕ(t), ∆f(t) and ∆t(t) with respect to
their power spectrum densities. They become:
carrier: v
c
(t) …….. ) ( f S
c
phase deviation: ∆ϕ(t) …….. ) ( f S
ϕ ∆
126 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
frequency deviation: ∆f(t) …….. ) ( ) (
2
2
) (
2
2
f S f f S
f j
f S
f ϕ ϕ
π
π
∆ ∆ ∆
⋅ − · ⋅
]
]
]

·
time deviation: ∆t(t) …….. ) (
2
1
) (
2
f S
f
f S
c
t ϕ
π
∆ ∆

]
]
]

·
Therefore the power of the total frequency or time deviations can be evaluated using the spectral
density of the phase deviation. The power of the deviations is the integral of the PSD over a
determined frequency interval.
Let us consider that ∆ϕ(t) is a random phase deviation, with a PSD which is a band-limited white
noise. The spectra of the carrier and the modulating noise are sketched in the table below, using
single and double sided representations of the frequency axis.
Spectra
Signal & PSD
Single Sided
(only positive frequencies)
Double Sided
(pos. and neg. frequencies)
carrier:
S
c
(f) [V
2
/Hz]
[ ] ) ( ) (
4
) (
2
c c
c
c
f f f f
A
f S + + − ⋅ · δ δ
phase deviation:
S
∆ϕ
(f) [rad
2
/Hz]
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
· ∧ >

·

0 ; 0
;
2
) (
f bw f
bw f
N
f S
O
ϕ
phase modulated carrier:
S
osc
(f) [V
2
/Hz]
( ) ( ) { ¦
c c
c
c osc
f f S f f S
A
f S f S
+ + − ⋅ +
+ ≈
∆ ∆ ϕ ϕ
4
...
... ) ( ) (
2
Table 6-1 Phase Modulated Carrier
The spectra of the phase modulated signal was drawn considering that the peak phase deviation
is small (max{∆ϕ(t)}<<1 rad). The following subsection details the expressions of the angular
modulation, and the FM narrow bandwidth approximation.
fc f
2
2
c
A
|Sc(f)|
-fc fc f
4
2
c
A
|Sc(f)|
No
bwn f
|S∆ϕ(f)
|
No/2
-bwn bwn f
|Pϕ(f)|
8
2
o c
N A ⋅
-fc-bwn -fc fc
4
2
c
A
|Sosc(f)|
4
2
o c
N A ⋅
2
2
c
A
fc-bwn fc
|Sosc(f)|
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 127
6.2.1.1 Angular modulation
The output spectrum of the PLL synthesizer presents an in-loop zone that is phase modulated by
the PLL noise (N
PLL
), and an out-of-loop zone that is frequency modulated by the intrinsic noise
of the VCO and by the loop filter noise.
PM and FM are two types of angular modulation. The example of a single tone modulation is
detailed below. Furthermore noise contributions that are represented by a power density, may be
seen as a superposition of single tone modulations.
Let us consider the same carrier v
c
(t) defined above, and a single modulating tone v
m
(t). The
phase modulated carrier is named v
PM
(t), and equals:
( ) [ ]
m m m p c c PM
t f A K t f A t v ϕ π π + ⋅ ⋅ + ⋅ · 2 sin 2 sin ) ( (6.3)
where
( )
m m m m
t f A t v ϕ π + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ · 2 sin ) (
and K
p
is the phase deviation sensibility in rad/V. We may also define ∆ϕ
p
the peak phase
deviation and rewrite v
PM
as:
( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) ( ) [ ] { ¦
m m p c m m p c c PM
t f t f t f t f A t v ϕ π ϕ π ϕ π ϕ π + ⋅ ∆ ⋅ + + ⋅ ∆ ⋅ ⋅ · 2 sin sin 2 cos 2 sin cos 2 sin ) (
and
m p p
A K ⋅ · ∆ϕ
or ( ) ( ) [ ]
m m c
n
p n c PM
t f n t f J A t v ϕ π ϕ + + ⋅ ∆ ⋅ ·

+∞
−∞ ·
2 sin ) (
where the coefficients J
n
(β) are the values of the Bessel function of the n
th
order with argument
β. The value of these coefficients for β << 1 rad , approach:
( ) ( ) ( ) J J J for n and n N
n 0 1
1
2
0 1 β β
β
β ≈ ≈ ≈ > ∈ ; ; ,
In this case of small phase deviations v
PM
is simplified to:
( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) [ ]
¹
'
¹
¹
'
¹
− − ⋅

− + + ⋅

+ ⋅ ·
m m c
p
m m c
p
c c PM
t f f t f f t f A t v ϕ π
ϕ
ϕ π
ϕ
π 2 sin
2
2 sin
2
2 sin ) (
(6.4)
where the SSB ratio noise/carrier equals:
( )
2
:
2
log 20
2
log 20
p
rms
rms
p
m dB
f L
ϕ
ϕ
ϕ
ϕ ∆
· ∆
,
`

.
| ∆
⋅ ·

,
`

.
| ∆
⋅ ·
Next we consider a single tone frequency modulated carrier v
FM
(t) , in the form:
[ ] ( )
]
]
]

+ ⋅

⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅ · + ⋅ ·

m m
m
m f
c c mf c c FM
t f
f
A K
t f A dt t v t f A t v ϕ π
π
π
π π π 2 sin
2
2
2 sin ) ( 2 2 sin ) (
(6.5)
128 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
where
v
( )
m m m mf
t f A (t) v ϕ + ⋅ ⋅ ⋅ · 2 cos
and K
f
is the frequency deviation sensibility in Hz/V. If we define the peak phase deviation as

m
p
m
mf f
p
f
f
f
A K ∆
·

· ∆ϕ
equation (6.5) becomes equivalent to equation (6.3) for the phase modulated carrier.
An important difference between frequency and phase modulation is that the phase deviation
caused by FM has an amplitude which depends on the frequency of the modulating signal. Figure
6.2 shows these differences in the spectrum of a carrier that is modulated by a band-limited white
noise.
Figure 6.2 FM & PM carriers
In the frequency modulated carrier the phase deviation is proportional to 1/f
m
. Therefore for f
m
tending to zero, the approximation of small phase deviations is no longer valid. In figure 6.2 this
limit is indicated by the dotted lines and by the reduction of the power at tf
c
( J
0
(∆ϕ
p
)<1).
6.2.2 Phasor Notations
In this section we consider the phase and amplitude deviations caused by a superposed noise. We
start looking at the deviations caused by a single tone noise at a certain frequency offset from the
carrier. This case is called the single side band superposed noise.
The combination of two SSB noise contributions at opposite frequency offsets (tf
offset
) is also
considered and compared to the sidebands produced by angular modulation.

v
In the FM example the modulating tone is assumed as a cosinus function just to end with the same form as in the
PM example.
4
2
c
c
A
P ≤
for bwn < fc/2
PM
FM
No/2
-bwn -fm +fm bwn
|Sn(f)|
Noise
-fc fc f
4
2
c
A
|Sc(f)|
Carrier
-fc-bwn -fc fc f
4
2
c
A
|Sosc(f)|
-fc-bwn -fc fc f
|Sosc(f)|
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 129
The concepts developed in this section are based on references [Robi91] and [Boon89].
Let us consider the addition of our sinousoidal carrier, v
c
(t), with some broadband noise.
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ] t t f t a A t n t f A t v
n c n c c c n c
θ π π + ⋅ + ⋅ · + ⋅ ·
+
2 sin ) ( 1 2 sin
(6.6)
For values of: v
c+n
(t) ∈ [-A
c
, A
c
]
we could model every deviation as a phase error, ϕ
n
(t). However it would not be possible to
include the values exceeding the envelope of the sinusoidal carrier. On the other hand an
amplitude error, a
n
(t), can model every value of:
v
c+n
(t) ∈ [-[A
c
+max{n(t)}] , [A
c
+max{n(t)}] ]
but it would not be able to represent the noise in the time instants that correspond to zero
crossings of the carrier. Therefore the added noise has to be decomposed into amplitude and
phase deviations.
Figure 6.3 shows the phasor diagram of v
c
(t) plus a single tone noise v
n
(t). The superposed noise
is a narrow band portion of n(t), and equals:
( ) ( ) ( ) [ ]
n no c n n n n n
t f f A t f A t v ϕ π ϕ π + + · + · 2 sin . 2 sin . (6.7)
where f
no
is the frequency offset between the noise contribution and the carrier. The phase of the
carrier is taken as a reference for the diagram.
Figure 6.3 SSB superposed noise: AM + PM decomposition (phasor)
The right side of Fig. 6.3 shows two pairs of sidebands that explain the amplitude and phase
deviations caused by the superposed noise.
We may also express the amplitude and phase deviation, by substituting n(t) by v
n
(t) in equation
(6.6), and developing the corresponding time functions a
n
(t) and θ
n
(t) that express the amplitude
and phase modulation. It follows:
ϕ
n
f
no
A
n
A
c
-A
n
/2
+f
no
A
n
/2
A
c
/2
-f
no
PM
A
n
/2
+f
no
A
n
/2
A
c
/2
-f
no
AM
130 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
( ) ( ) [ ]
( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) ( ) [ ]
n no n c n no n c c
n no c n c c n c n c
t f A t f t f A A t f
t f f A t f A t v t v t v
ϕ π π ϕ π π
ϕ π π
+ ⋅ ⋅ + + ⋅ + ⋅ ·
· + + ⋅ + ⋅ · + ·
+
2 sin 2 cos 2 cos 2 sin
2 sin 2 sin ) ( ) ( ) (
Then we compare it to the 2
nd
form of v
c+n
in equation (6.6):
( ) ( ) [ ]
( ) ( ) ( ) [ ] [ ] ( ) ( ) ( ) [ ] [ ] t t a A t f t t a A t f
t t f t a A t v
n n c c n n c c
n c n c n c
θ π θ π
θ π
sin ) ( 1 2 cos cos ) ( 1 2 sin
2 sin ) ( 1 ) (
⋅ + ⋅ + ⋅ + ⋅ ·
· + ⋅ + ⋅ ·
+
Finally assuming A
n
<<A
c
and A
n
/A
c
<< 1 rad, we find:
( ) ( )
n no
c
n
n
t f
A
A
t ϕ π θ + ⋅ ≈ 2 sin and ( )
n no
c
n
n
t f
A
A
t a ϕ π + ⋅ ≈ 2 cos ) (
(6.8) (6.9)
This result is represented in a spectrum diagram in figure 6.4. The plot showing the PM
contribution has sidebands with “negative” power. It is in fact a liberty of notation to indicate the
sign of the voltage signals that are associated with these sidebands.
Figure 6.4 Superposed Noise: AM + PM decomposition (spectrum)
We may now consider a 2
nd
SSB noise contribution. When a broadband noise is added to a signal
it is very likely that for certain offsets the noise density at both sides of the carrier has a similar
level. We take two single tone components at frequency offsets of ±f
no
, that are named v
nu
(t) and
v
nl
(t) for upper and lower sidebands respectively.
8
2
n
A
8
2
n
A
4
2
n
A
-fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f
4
2
c
A
|Sc(f)| + |Sn(f)|
PM AM
-fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f
8
2
c
A
-fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f
8
2
c
A
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 131
They represent DSB superposed noise: they have equal amplitudes, and opposite frequency
offsets with respect to the carrier frequency,
( ) ( ) [ ]
nu no c n nu
t f f A t v ϕ π + + · 2 sin . and ( ) ( ) [ ]
nl no c n nl
t f f A t v ϕ π + − · 2 sin .
(6.10)
The phases ϕ
nu
and ϕ
nl
are random variables uniformly distributed in the range: [0, 2π]
Therefore the phase difference between the two sidebands for t=0, is also a random phase with a
similar flat distribution.
Figure 6.3 shows us that sidebands that cause exclusively phase modulation, “cross” each other
in a phasor diagram in phases that are in quadrature to the carrier phase. Inversely the amplitude
modulating sidebands “cross” in positions that are in phase with the carrier.
The two superposed sidebands , v
nu
and v
nl
, have an equal probability of “crossing” either in
phase or in quadrature, because of the uniformly distributed phase difference ϕ
nu

nl
. Therefore
statistically, the combined power of these two sidebands is divided into two equal parts: one
causing phase modulation and the other causing amplitude modulation.
We can represent this statistical result by two sidebands that “cross” each other at positions with
a phase offset of ±(π/4 + π) with respect to the carrier. The peak phase deviation caused by these
two sidebands equals: ( ) { ¦
c
n
n
A
A
t ⋅ · 2 max θ (6.11)
which corresponds to an increase of 3dB in the phase deviation when compared to the SSB
superposed noise. We may also see this increase in 3dB as a power addition of the phase
disturbances caused by two independent or uncorrelated noise sidebands.
The superposed DSB sidebands are called uncorrelated in reference to their random distributed
phase difference; in opposition to the DSB sidebands caused by angular or phase modulation of a
base band noise contribution.
The modulated DSB sidebands have frequency offsets and phases that are equal in module and
with opposite signs. The type of modulation that causes the frequency translation of the noise
power determines whether this disturbance generates phase or amplitude deviations.
In the case of the PLL synthesizer, we are particularly interested in the phase deviations caused
by added noise and angular modulated noise. Actually, most of the added noise is propagated
through stages that work with strong amplitude limitation. This non-linear behaviour attenuates
much of the power of the sidebands that cause amplitude deviations. Therefore it is common to
refer to the total sideband noise power as a phase noise power.
Figure 6.5 Phase modulated carrier by DSB superposed noise
( ) 2 4
2
n
A
-fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f
4
2
c
A
|Sosc(f)|
Two sidebands
Superposed noise
+
ideal limiter ⇒
carrier only
phase modulated
132 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 6.5 shows the spectrum of a carrier plus a DSB superposed noise after it has been
transmitted by a stage that eliminates the amplitude modulating sidebands.
The SSB phase noise in this case equals:

,
`

.
|

⋅ ·

,
`

.
| ∆
⋅ ·
c
m
p
DSB
no
A
A
f L
2
log 20
2
log 20 ) (
- superposed
ϕ
where ∆ϕ
p
is the peak phase deviation, or as defined in equation (6.11):
( ) { ¦
c
n
n p
A
A
t ⋅ · · ∆ 2 max θ ϕ
Next we compare the phase deviations caused by two types of sideband: superposed and angular
modulated. In order to compare sidebands that have equal frequency offsets and amplitude, we
suppose that the angular modulated sidebands are due to a band base signal v
bb
(t) that equals:
( ) ( ) [ ]
n no c
c
n
p
bb
t f f
A
A
K
t v ϕ π + + ⋅ · 2 sin .
2
where K
p
is the phase deviation sensibility in rad/V.
Figure 6.6 Phase deviation from DSB sidebands
I) Superposed DSB sidebands II) Ang. modulated DSB sidebands
( ) ( )

,
`

.
|

⋅ · − ·

,
`

.
|

· ∆
c
n
no no
c
n
c
n
p
A
A
f L f L
A
A
A
A
arctg
2
log 20
2 2
ϕ
( ) ( )

,
`

.
|
⋅ · − ·

,
`

.
| ⋅
· ∆
c
n
no no
c
n
c
n
p
A
A
f L f L
A
A
A
A
arctg
log 20
2 2
ϕ
Table 6-2 L(f
offset
) from modulated and superposed noise
f
c
-f
no
f
c
+f
no
A
m
A
m
A
c
f
c
Maximum
Phase
deviation
∆ϕ
p
A
n
A
n
A
c
∆ϕ
p
A
n
A
c
A
n
Angular Modulated DSB Superposed DSB
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 133
The phase noise caused by two superposed sidebands is 3dB smaller than the one caused by
angular modulated sidebands with the same amplitude. It is important to notice that this
comparison has considered a DSB superposed noise with both AM and PM portions. In section
6.3 we discuss the transfer of stages that cause amplitude limitation, and their action over the
AM portion of the superposed noise.
6.2.3 Slope approach
The results of noise simulations in analog circuits is usually given as a voltage noise density at a
specific node. If this node is part of one of the PLL blocks this noise power may be propagated to
the VCO tuning input, and ultimately it will modulate the frequency of the VCO output.
The phase detector and charge pump transform phase deviations in current, and this current
charges the impedance of the loop filter, and determines the tuning voltage v
tune
. Therefore if we
are able to express voltage noise densities as phase deviations, we may calculate the phase noise
in the VCO output that is caused by a certain contribution of voltage noise.
Let us consider a logical or switching stage that has two output values, low and high. These
stages may work with differential or single ended inputs and outputs. In figure 6.7 we consider a
differential stage, whose output is represented by a single ended output (with an amplitude that is
twice the amplitude of each side of the differential output) and a threshold. The instants where
the signal crosses the threshold are called zero-crossings. The interval between two successive
zero-crossings is the period of the signal driving the stage. The variations of this period that are
due to additional voltage noise are called time jitter.
Figure 6.7 Slope approach: voltage & time deviations
The noise voltage V
n
(t) is calculated by a small signal noise simulation around a zero-crossing
instant. The result is usually presented as a voltage noise density δv
n-rms
(f) in
[ ]
V Hz
. The rms
amplitude equals the square root of the power spectral density for the unitary impedance. The
time deviation is represented by similar functions in the time and frequency domain: ∆t
n
(t) and
δt
n-rms
(f) in
[ ] Hz s
.
The relationship between the voltage and time deviations is given by the voltage slope of the
large signal driving the stage. We name v
s
(t) the output signal and t
c
the zero-crossing time
instant; and we start looking at a single tone portion of V
n
(t) that we call v
n
(t). This single tone
portion is equal to the SSB superposed noise defined by equation (6.7), and it may also be
written as a frequency function: ( ) ( )
n rms n n
f v t v

↔ δ .
Ts
dv
s
/dt
∆t
n
(t)
V
n
(t)
tc
2A
differential signal + treshold
134 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The error caused by this superposed sideband at the zero-crossing instants is necessarily a phase
error. Equation (6.8) shows us the value of the phase error caused by the SSB superposed noise,
and it specifies that the phase deviation is a sinus with frequency equals to the offset frequency
between the superposed sideband and the carrier.
Furthermore in section 6.2.1 we saw that phase deviations can be expressed as equivalent time
deviations. Thus the time deviation that is caused by the single tone component δv
n-rms
(f
n
)
becomes:

]
]
]

· −


Hz
s
dt
t dv
f v
f f t
c s
n rms n
c n rms n
) (
) (
) (
δ
δ
or remembering that
c no n
f f f + · ; it follows that:

dt
t dv
f f v
f t
c s
c no rms n
no rms n
) (
) (
) (
+
·


δ
δ (6.12)
This is the time deviation due to a SSB superposed noise at a frequency offset f
no
from the
carrier. If the voltage noise density δv
n-rms
(f) has the same amplitude for the frequencies f
c
+f
no
and f
c
-f
no
the time deviation due to a DSB superposed noise becomes:
dt
t dv
f f v
dt
t dv
f f v f f v
f t
c s
c no rms n
c s
c no rms n c no rms n
no rms n
) (
) ( 2
) (
) ( ) (
) (
2 2
+ ⋅
·
− + +
·
− − −

δ δ δ
δ (6.13)
Finally the phase deviation due to a time deviation is:

]
]
]

⋅ ·
− −
Hz
rad
f t
T
f
offset rms n
s
offset rms n
) (
2
) ( δ
π
δϕ (6.14)
where T
s
is the period of the signal, and we indicate the independent parameter as the frequency
offset to remember that the voltage noise that originates this time deviation is found at f
c
tf
offset
.
The phase deviation relates the time jitter to the SSB phase noise of the output signal. It follows
that:
( )
( ) ( )
2
:
2
log 20
2
log 20
p
rms
offset rms offset p
offset dB
f f
f L
ϕ
ϕ
ϕ ϕ ∆
· ∆

,
`

.
| ∆
⋅ ·

,
`

.
| ∆
⋅ ·
So for a rms phase deviation given by equation (6.14), it becomes:
( )
( ) ( )

,
`

.
|
⋅ ⋅
⋅ ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·
− −
s
offset rms n offset rms n
offset dB
T
f t f
f L
δ π δϕ 2
log 20
2
log 20
(6.15)
Equation (6.15) shows the degradation of a periodic signal due to a time deviation. It also shows
that the phase noise is inversely proportional to the period of the signal.
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 135
6.3 Large Signal Linearization
The term large signal linearization refers to a transfer function that is calculated around a
periodic steady state of a block with a large signal input. The previous section started discussing
the phase noise induced by a voltage noise that is sampled at the zero crossing moments.
Here we search the transfer function for a small signal that is transmitted by a block which is
driven by a large signal input. The large signal is considered as periodic, and the transfer causes
amplitude limitations of the output, which appears as a time variable transfer function.
vi
The resulting time variable transfer function may be used to explain the frequency translation of
the noise contributions that are found around the harmonics of the frequency of the signal.
6.3.1 Time and Frequency representation
Let us consider the transfer function of a voltage amplifier that has an ideal limiting output. It
presents a constant voltage gain for input voltages below a certain threshold and for amplitudes
above this threshold the voltage gain equals zero.
Figure 6.8 shows the transfer of a sinusoidal input signal v
si
(t) that overdrives the ideal limiting
amplifier. The output signal v
so
(t) has a fundamental harmonic at the same frequency as the
input, but it also has higher harmonics that are generated by the non-linear clipping of the limiter.
The transfer function v
so
(t) / v
si
(t) is time variable, and it may be represented in both time and
frequency domains. We call it the periodic large signal (PLS) transfer.
The transfer of a small signal that is added to v
si
(t) may be calculated making a 1
st
order
development of the periodic transfer around the steady-state that is driven by v
si
(t). If the small
signal is represented by a noise component v
n
(t), it becomes:
( ) ( ) [ ] ( ) [ ]
( )
( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) t v t h t v t v
dx
x dh
t v h t v t v h
n PLS so n
t v x
si n si
si
⋅ + · ⋅ + ≈ +
·
(6.16)
where h
PLS
(t) is the transfer function for a small signal that is added to the large input signal. The
Fourier transform of this time transfer is denoted as H
PLS
(f), and we use it to define the transfer
of the small signal when it is represented in the frequency domain;
for
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) f H f v t h t v
f H t h
f v t v
PLS n rms n PLS n
PLS PLS
n rms n n
⊗ ↔ ⋅




δ
δ
(6.17)
where the frequency domain transfer function is convoluted with the small signal input. The
periodic transfer for a small signal that is defined by equation (6.17) is linear; since the output of

vi
These ideas are based on the convolution transfer discussed in reference [Boon89]. A similar discussion focused
on oscillators noise can be found in [Haji98].
h[v
si
(t)+v
n
(t)]
v
si
(t)
v
n
(t)
h(x)
136 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
the sum of two small signals equals the sum of their separate outputs. The supposition of a linear
transfer holds for small signals whose amplitude does not disturb significantly the periodic large
signal transfer h
PLS
(t).
It is important to notice that the time variable characteristic of this transfer causes frequency
translation of the input signals. For broadband noise contributions the frequency translation also
causes aliasing or folding. These effects are further discussed in chapter 7.
Figure 6.8 Periodic transfer determined by a large signal
6.3.2 Linear Time Variable transfer
Figure 6.9 shows the periodic transfer functions h
PLS
(t) and H
PLS
(f) that are calculated for two
types of limiting amplifiers: an ideal limiter and a hyperbolic tangent (tanh) limiter. We choose
the hyperbolic tangent because it represents the transfer of a block that appears very often in ICs:
the differential stage composed of bipolar transistors.
The figure is divided in 6 parts:
A) The input and output signals have a unitary amplitude. The input signal v
si
(t) is a sinus curve
with a frequency equal to 0.5 Hz. The output of the ideal limiter is called v
so-ideal
and the
output of the hyperbolic tangent limiter is called v
so-tanh
. The gain at the zero crossing is
equal for both limiters, G
c
=2. The curves are indicated by the labels: si, ideal, tanh.
input large
signal:
v
si
(t)
( )
c
in
out
G
dV
dV
·
0
Τ
s
/2 =2.f
s
Τ
w
=1/f
w
t
V
in
V
out
t
G
c
t
G
c
.T
w
/T
s
-f
w
f
w f
(Hz)
Τ
s
=1/f
s
amplifier
+
ideal
amplitude
limiter
output large
signal:
v
so
(t)
Time
variable
transfer
function:
h
PLS
(s)
H
PLS
(f)
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 137
B) The time derivatives of the 3 signals are: dv
si
/dt , dv
so-ideal
/dt and dv
so-tanh
/dt . The labels are
the same as used in part A).
C) The periodic transfer functions h
PLS-ideal
(t) and h
PLS-tanh
(t) are plotted. The functions are
calculated using the approximation:
( )
( )
( )
( ) t dv
dt
dt
t dv
t dv
t dv
si
so
si
so
⋅ ≈
D) The periodic transfer functions H
PLS-ideal
(f) and H
PLS-tanh
(f) are presented. In this plot the
frequency axis is single sided (only positive frequencies).
E) The periodic transfer functions H
PLS-ideal
(f) and H
PLS-tanh
(f) are plotted in a larger range of
frequencies. The y-axis is in dB, the amplitude value equals: 20.log( H
PLS
(f) )
F) The curve in solid line shows the difference between the two transfers: H
PLS-ideal
(f) and H
PLS-
tanh
(f) . It can be seen that it is the low-pass filtering behaviour that differentiates the ideal and
the tanh limiters. The y-axis is also in dB. The dark gray dashed curve shows an
approximation of the black curve, it is a LPF to the order of 24; and it correctly fits the
difference curve for frequencies above 5Hz. The light gray dashed curve shows a first order
LPF that fits the difference curve for frequencies below 2Hz.
The amplitude limitation of the tanh transfer is smoother than the ideal limiter. The difference
may be represented as a LPF, that has a very steep attenuation slope.
The curves of figure 6.9 are calculated with a mathematical model. The actual transfer of a block
of a circuit may be calculated with software for analogic simulations. Particularly for circuits
working with high signal frequencies and/or very steep signals there is another low-pass-filtering
behaviour that appears to limit the slope of the output signals. This is the slew rate, which is
related to the biasing of the stage and to the load impedance. Together they determine the
maximum slope of the output signal.
Recently software implementations have appeared (see reference [Wiel97]) which allow one to
calculate a periodic transfer that is associated with a large driving signal. The periodic transfer
function is very useful to evaluate the noise at the output of strongly non-linear stages.
A simulation example is given in chapter 7, to compare practical and theoretical aspects of the
periodic transfer function.
Finally we can observe that for T
w
→0, the periodic transfer h
PLS
(t) approaches a comb sampler.
This ideal sampler would completely suppress the AM component of a superposed noise.
138 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 6.9 Large Signal Transfer: ideal and hyperbolic-tangent limitations
A) B)
C) D)
E) F)
si
ideal
tanh
si
ideal
ideal
ideal
tanh
tanh
tanh
tanh
ideal
Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 139
This chapter discussed the generation of phase noise due to noise power that is added to a signal,
or to noise that causes modulation of a signal. The representation of random electrical noise was
briefly commented. Different notations were presented and related to the mechanisms of phase
noise generation.
The periodic transfer of switching stages was modeled as a time variable transfer function, that
may be used to calculate the noise at the output of non-linear blocks.
140 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 141
Contents:
7. Phase Noise in the PLL context 141
7.1. Translating the SNF into phase, time, voltage and current noise ......................................................... 143
7.2. Sampling effects: SNF x fcp .................................................................................................................. 147
7.2.1. Narrow bandwidth noise sources................................................................................................. 149
7.2.2. Large bandwidth noise sources.................................................................................................... 151
7.3. Detailing noise sources in different PLL blocks ................................................................................... 154
7.3.1. D-flip flop.................................................................................................................................... 154
7.3.2. Charge Pump ............................................................................................................................... 158
7.4. Behavioural Models .............................................................................................................................. 159
7.4.1. Frequency domain ....................................................................................................................... 159
7.4.2. Time domain................................................................................................................................ 160
7.5. Implementation Loss due to Phase Deviations ..................................................................................... 162
7.5.1. Signal to noise ratio and implementation loss ............................................................................. 163
7.5.2. Digital Demodulator: clock and carrier recovery loops............................................................... 167
Figures:
Figure 7.1 PLL block diagram with signal+noise inputs........................................................................ 142
Figure 7.2 Noise Transfer Slopes................................................................................................................ 143
Figure 7.3 Synthesizer Noise Floor............................................................................................................ 144
Figure 7.4 Sampled Loop Model ............................................................................................................... 148
Figure 7.5 Large bandwidth noise folding................................................................................................ 152
Figure 7.6 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: time domain signals.................................... 155
Figure 7.7 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: frequency domain signals .......................... 155
Figure 7.8 Charge Pump current noise levels within one period............................................................ 158
Figure 7.9 Behavioural model of the PLL for AC and noise simulations .............................................. 160
Figure 7.10 Behavioural model of the PLL for transient simulations..................................................... 161
Figure 7.11 Digital Demodulator and Decoder .................................................................................... ...... 162
Figure 7.12 Noise Power added by the LO sidebands................................................................................ 164
Figure 7.13 Behavioural Model of the Carrier Recovery loop................................................................. 167
Tables:
Table 7-1 Data sheet points from: TSA5059 - low noise PLL................................................................ 145
Table 7-2 The influence of f
cp
change for narrow band noise................................................................ 151
Table 7-3 The influence of f
cp
change for large band noise.................................................................... 153
Table 7-4 Implementation Loss X Phase deviations ............................................................................... 166
7 Phase Noise in the PLL context
In this chapter we continue our top-down analysis of the PLL circuit. The results from the
preceding chapters, about the transfer functions of the phase model and about the mechanisms of
phase noise generation, are combined, to analyze the noise contribution of different blocks.
Simulations and measurement possibilities that are used to guide the design and the evaluation of
a PLL IC are also discussed.
142 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
This chapter combines the results of the previous chapters to develop a numerical analysis of the
phase noise of a PLL synthesizer. It starts with the translation of the SNF requirement for noise
densities in phase, time, current and voltage magnitudes. These densities can be compared with
the simulation of the different constituent blocks.
The noise densities are affected by the sampling effects of the edge triggered blocks. This
influence is examined, considering the bandwidth of the noise sources. The possibilities to
distinguish the dominant noise sources are also discussed. Two examples of simulation are
presented, for a D-flip fop and charge pump design, to illustrate the concept of the periodic
transfer.
Finally we present behavioural models that enable one to combine circuit and system level
descriptions in AC and TR simulations. The behavioural model of a digital demodulator is also
presented. These top level models can be used to examine the total implementation loss that is
caused by the phase deviations in the LO signal. The relationship between the phase deviations
and the implementation loss are presented with a short numerical evaluation. Later in chapter 8,
these tools are illustrated by simulations and comparison to measurements.
The following block diagram with signal and noise inputs is used in this chapter.
Figure 7.1 PLL block diagram with signal+noise inputs
The noise inputs are indicated by grey rectangles.
N
pll
is a phase degradation that was introduced in chapter 3 as the synthesizer noise floor (SNF).
It is measured in rad/sqrt(Hz), and it is composed of the noise contributions from: the reference
chain (crystal oscillator and reference divider), the main divider and the comparator (phase
detector and charge pump).
The input v
nvco
represents the intrinsic noise of the VCO, and, v
nf
accounts for the noise sources
of the loop filter. In chapter 4
i
, we saw that the noise contributions from a loop-filter (from the
filter impedance and the amplifier) are attenuated by the post-filter, and therefore it is practical to
split these two contributions. Both v
nvco
and v
nf
are voltage noise densities given in ( V/sqrt(Hz)
).
The sketches and expressions below summarize the results from chapters 2 and 3 that are used in
the following sections. In figure 7.2 the noise transfer slopes are indicated for inputs with a white
spectral density.

i
See table 4-3 : transfer functions of the disturbances that are related to the active loop filter.
X
osc

xosc
)
÷ R
N
pll
Ph. Det.
&
Ch. Pump
( Kϕ )
VCO
( Ko )
÷ N
ϕ
osc
v
nvco
Post-
Filter
Z
filter
v
nf
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 143
( )
( )

,
`

.
|
+
⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅ ⋅ +
· ≈ ·
1
2
1
) (
2
2
3
3
n n
p
LPF
pll
osc
w
s
w
s
T s
N
s B s B
N
ξ
ϕ
( ) ( )

,
`

.
|
+
⋅ ⋅
+ ⋅
⋅ ⋅
· ≈ ·
1
2
2
2
1
_
n n
o
BPF vco vco
nvco
osc
w
s
w
s
C s K
s B s B
v
ξ
α
ϕ
and
) 1 (
3 p
BPF vco
nf
osc
T s
B
v ⋅ +
·

ϕ
Figure 7.2 Noise Transfer Slopes
In chapter 6 we discussed the deviations that are caused by noise contributions which are
superposed to the signal or which modulate the signal. The superposed contributions cause both
amplitude and phase deviations. When the disturbed signal is propagated through stages that
have a periodic transfer with high gain around the zero-crossing instants and low gain elsewhere,
the amplitude deviations are strongly attenuated. Therefore the noise from switching blocks of
the PLL (N
pll
) is expressed as a phase deviation.
The sidebands that are found in the output of the VCO are mostly caused by the frequency
modulation of noise power at the input of the VCO. Part of the intrinsic noise of the VCO is not
frequency modulated, but just superposed or amplitude modulated. Nevertheless this part of the
noise is usually not significant. Hence we treat the sidebands of the output of the VCO as angular
modulated sidebands.
Our analysis starts with N
pll
, translating the phase deviation in voltage, time and current
deviations. These translations are used to reflect the requirement of phase noise into magnitudes
that are comparable to the outputs of the different PLL blocks.
7.1 Translating the SNF into phase, time, voltage and current noise
The requirement of phase noise for PLL synthesizers is often specified as a maximum phase
noise density at the input of the phase detector. It is a single sideband measurement in dBc/Hz,
referring to the noise performance of the in-loop zone of the output spectrum.
( ) { ¦ ( ) [ ]
Hz
dBc
loop in offset dB dB pll
N f L N log 20 min
_ _
⋅ − · (7.1)
The peaking that is indicated in figure 7.3 is the combination of two effects:
- the mismatch of the closed loop bandwidth with respect to f
i
(the intersection frequency for
the asymptotes of the noise performances of the PLL and the VCO);
- and the overshoot associated to the closed loop transfer function B(s). This resonant
overshoot is related to the stability of the loop, that is measured by the open loop phase
margin.
0 dB/dec
-60 dB/dec
+20 dB/dec
-40 dB/dec
ϕ
osc
/N
pll
ϕ
osc
/v
nf
-20 dB/dec
ϕ
osc
/v
nvco
144 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
It is important to notice that excessive peaking masks the measurement of the in-loop SSB noise
(L(f
offset
) ). Loop filters with a large bandwidth (that assures a closed bandwidth equal or greater
than f
i
) and an elevated phase margin are indicated to perform the measurements of N
pll
.
Figure 7.3 Synthesizer Noise Floor
The value of N
pll
is derived from the SSB phase noise, and the latter is related to the peak phase
deviation that is caused by the PLL noise.
We would like to express N
pll
as the equivalent phase and time deviations that would cause the
same L
dB
(f
offset
). The deviations are base band components that modulate the VCO output, as
presented in section 6.2.1. We calculate the deviations as noise densities that are denoted as δϕ
pll
and δt
pll
.
Later on, we relate δt
pll
to the slope and the period of a carrier signal, and we derive δv
pll
using
the slope approach (see section 6.2.3). Finally the sensitivity of the charge pump K
ϕ
is used to
transform δϕ
pll
into a current noise density δi
ChP
.
Let us picture these ideas through a numerical example. The values in the table below are taken
from the data sheet of the Low Phase Noise Frequency Synthesizer, TSA5059 for satellite
frontend applications.
ii

ii
A similar analysis for a GSM synthesizer can be found in [Gree95].
peaking
f
osc
20.log(N)
in-loop
L
dB
(f
offset
)
out-loop
L
dB
(f
foffset
)
f
offset
N
pll_dB
: Synthesizer Phase Noise floor
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 145
Symbol Parameter Conditions Typical value
N
pll-dB
Equivalent phase noise at
the phase detector input
measured with:
f
cp
= 250 KHz; I
cp
=1.2 mA
-157 dBc/Hz
I
cp
Charge pump current
(absolute value)
4 programmable values
(2 bits)
120 µA / 260 µA
555 µA / 1.2 mA
R
Reference divider ratio
16 programmable values
[indicated as series in the form:
(a+2
k1
).2
k2
]
2 / 4 / 8 / … / 128 / 256 ;
24;
5 / 10 / 20 / … / 160 / 320
N
Main divider ratio
17 programmable bits
+
optional prescaler (/2)
w/o presc.: 64 … (2
17
-1)=131071
or
w presc.: 128 … 262142
f
cp
Comparison frequency
for a 4MHz crystal
directly related
to R values
2MHz / 1MHz … / 15.625kHz ;
166.67kHz;
800kHz / 400kHz … / 12.5kHz
f
rf
RF input frequency
(main divider input ⇒
f
rf
= f
vco
)
Input sensibility
+
related to N and f
cp
values
64 MHz - 2700 MHz
Table 7-1 Data sheet points from: TSA5059 - low noise PLL
• The phase noise density at the phase detector input becomes:
Hz
rad
rms pll Hz
dBc
rms pll
dB pll
N
8
_
10 998 . 1 157
2
log 20



⋅ · ⇒ − ·

,
`

.
|
⋅ · δϕ
δϕ
In table 7-1 the value of the synthesizer noise floor is referenced to certain conditions of f
cp
and
I
cp
. The relationship between N
pll
and the comparison period appears as we look for the
equivalent time noise density at the phase detector input.
• Time noise density at the phase detector input equals:
iii
Hz
s
pll cp
cp
rms pll pll
f t
kHz
T
T
t 72 . 12 and s 4
250
1
for so
2
· · · ⋅ ·

δ µ
π
δϕ δ L
When we compare the same δϕ
pll
to the period of the crystal oscillator, we find a more strict
specification for the time density:
Hz
s
Xosc Xosc
Xosc
rms pll Xosc
f t n
MHz
T
T
t 795 . 0 and s 250
4
1
for
2
· · · ⋅ ·

δ
π
δϕ δ L
The values of the time noise densities that are calculated above do not take into account any
possible aliasing effects. Section 7.2 discusses the sampling effects for the noise transfer, taking

iii
From here on the notations δx
rms
are shortened to δx , but the noise density variables continue to be given in rms
values.
146 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
into account the noise bandwidth and the sampling frequency. For the moment we may consider
that our phase and time deviations are white band-limited noise densities, with a cut-off
frequency smaller than f
cp
/2 .
• The voltage noise density at the phase detector:
The time noise may be translated into a voltage noise for any logical or switching stage that is
driven by a large periodic signal with a defined voltage slope (dv/dt) at the zero crossings.
The output of the dividers and the phase detector itself are polarized with elevated biasing
currents in order to increase their voltage slopes and decrease their sensibility to voltage
disturbances. The maximum voltage slope of the output of a block is called slew rate. Usual
values of slew rate for PLL stages with strong biasing are to the order of 1V/ns, or 10
9
V/s.
Under these conditions the voltage noise becomes:
Hz V v
dt
dv
dt
dv
t v
rms pll
kHz
pll pll
/ 72 . 12 10 for
s
V
9
crossing zero
250 f for
cp
µ δ δ δ · ⇒ ≈ ⋅ ·

·
L
The voltage density is referenced to a time noise, and consequently it is related to the period of
the large signal driving the blocks under analysis.
• The current noise density at the charge pump output:
The specification of phase noise may be translated into a current noise value that is related to the
sensitivity of the charge pump K
ϕ
. Let us consider the minimum and maximum values of I
cp
in
table 7-1, then:
Hz pA i mA I
Hz pA i A I
rms ChP
rms ChP
pll ChP
K i
/ 82 . 3 1,2 for
/ 382 . 0 120 for
cp
cp

· ⇒ ·
· ⇒ ·
⋅ ·
δ
δ µ
ϕ
δϕ δ L
• Noise performance of the free-running oscillator:
Finally we may estimate the minimum noise performance of the VCO that enables us to assure a
smooth transition between the in-loop and the out-of-loop zones of the output spectrum. The
smooth transition is related to the optimization of the phase jitter σ
ϕ
in the output spectrum.
Let us consider the tuner of a satellite receiver, that down-converts the RF input signals from the
L-band (950 MHz to 2150MHz) to an IF stage. The intermediate frequency equals 470MHz, and
the frequency of the local oscillator equals f
RF
+ f
IF
. We suppose a comparison frequency of
250kHz. The range of the LO frequency and the counting ratios of the main divider follow:
[ ] [ ] 10480 ; 5680 250 for 2620 ; 1420 ∈ → · ∈ N kHz f MHz f
cp vco
K
Next we consider the level of the in-loop sidebands for the maximum closed loop bandwidth.
The maximum closed loop bandwidth occurs for the largest open loop gain: α = α
max
. This
situation corresponds to small values of N, and large values of I
cp
.
iv
The synthesizer noise floor
in table 7-1 is indicated for the maximum I
cp
value, so we combine this data with the minimum
value of N, to obtain the PLL in-loop contribution:

iv
Remembering
N
K I
vco cp

· α
.
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 147
( ) ( )
Hz
dBc
loop in pll
f L 82 5680 log 20 157 − ≅ ⋅ + − ·

Chapter 5 discussed the limitation of the maximum closed loop bandwidth for a given f
cp
value.
If we take some practical margin to cope with gain variations (up to α
max

n
=3 ), the following
boundary may be suggested:
10
cp
ol
f
f ≤
.
Earlier in chapter 3, we saw that the optimum closed loop bandwidth equals f
i
; and that the open
loop bandwidth, f
ol
, is related to the closed loop bandwidth, f
3dB
, by the following expression:
28 . 0 63 , 1
3
t ≈
ol
dB
f
f
.
Therefore we may estimate the maximum closed loop bandwidth and the corresponding noise
performance of the VCO in order to match f
3dB
with f
i
. It follows that:
( ) ( )
Hz
dBc
vco Hz
dBc
vco
cp
i
kHz L kHz L kHz
f
f 90 100 82 8 . 40 8 . 40 63 . 1
10
− < ↔ − < ⇒ · ⋅ <
where L
vco
is the SSB phase noise of the free-running oscillator.
The limit of L
vco
that is indicated above would be just enough to obtain a smooth spectrum for
α=α
max
. Nevertheless if we want to optimize the phase jitter over a range of gain, we should
consider using a VCO with a better noise performance. Otherwise if there is no restriction to
increase the minimum tuning step, we may increase f
cp
and work with higher closed loop
bandwidths.
The numerical examples developed in this section are a starting point for the analysis of the noise
performance of a PLL circuit. They are mostly useful in two circumstances: while translating the
specifications of phase noise of the LO to specific blocks within the PLL; or
when choosing adequate VCO and PLL circuits to compose a low-noise synthesizer.
We continue our analysis looking for parameters that allow us to differentiate the noise
contributions that compose N
pll
. We will also treat the folding effects due to sampling of the
switching stages.
7.2 Sampling effects: SNF x fcp
We start recalling the discrete model for the PLL that was discussed in chapter 5. It is a phase
model with an ideal sampler and a zero-order holder. The sampling rate equals the comparison
frequency of the phase detector, f
cp
. The sampling accounts for the discrete outputs of the
dividers and for the discrete input of the phase detector. The holder represents the charge pump,
with a continuous current output.
When we introduce the sampling operation in the phase model of the PLL, we obtain the
diagram in figure 7.4.
148 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 7.4 Sampled Loop Model
The discrete input of the phase detector ∆ϕ
n
is the same as defined in equation (5.17). It is the
output of an ideal sampler with a comb shaped spectrum. The Fourier transform of ∆ϕ
n
(n.T
cp
) is
named ∆ψ
n
(w) , and it is analogous to the Laplace transform of ∆ϕ
n
defined in equation (5.16).
( ) ( )

+∞
−∞ ·
⋅ + ∆Ψ ⋅ · ∆Ψ
n
cp
cp
n
w n w
T
w
1
with
cp
cp
T
w
π 2
·
The transfer of the ChP as a zero-order holder was defined in chapter 5, equation (5.18), as:

( )
( )

,
`

.
| ⋅
⋅ ⋅ ⋅ ·
∆Ψ

2
sinc
2
w
T
jw
cp
n
o
T w
e T K
w
w I
w
ϕ
where T
w
is the width of the current pulse, that outputs the charge pump for a given phase
deviation input.
In chapter 5 we used this discrete model to discuss the constraints of stability during an interval
of lock acquisition. For this analysis we used the worst case of the delay for the stability
constraint: T
w
= T
cp
.
Here we are interested in the transfer of the noise that appears in the output spectrum of a locked
LO. Therefore the output of the charge pump corresponds to the small pulses that are generated
to compensate the leakage currents and the residual transient currents. For an ideally matched
and leakless case we may consider that the signal output of the charge pump for a locked loop is
null. In what concerns the noise there is a difference. The instantaneous value of the phase noise
at the input of the phase detector is not null, and there is also the noise of the charge pump itself.
The noise of the charge pump is related to the reset interval, τ
rst
, during which both current
sources are activated in order to prevent dead-zone problems.
v
Thus we may consider a
minimum T
w

rst
for the locked condition.
Most of the synthesizers work with a reset interval much smaller than T
cp
, and consequently the
charge pump transfer can be simplified to:

( )
( )
cp
n
o
T K
w
w I
⋅ ≈
∆Ψ
ϕ
for
rst
w
τ
π
<

v
The noise contributions that come from the sinking and sourcing side are added in power, hence their sum does not
equal to zero during the reset interval.
θosc(t)
( ) w
osc
Θ
[ ] Hz V
io (t)
( ) w I
o
[ ] Hz rad
N
pll
v
nvco
Xosc
∆ϕn(n.Tcp)
( ) w
n
∆Ψ
∆ϕ(t)
( ) w ∆Ψ
Tcp
ZOH
ChP
1/R
ZF (w) Ko/jw
1/N
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 149
This simplified transfer holds for frequency values that are within the first lobe of the sinc term
in equation (5.18).
The combined transfer for the phase detector plus charge pump becomes:

( ) ( )

+∞
−∞ ·
⋅ + ∆Ψ ⋅ ·
n
cp o
w n w K w I
ϕ
(7.2)
Equation (7.2) is used to describe the transmission of large bandwidth noise sources, which are
eventually aliased by the sampling action of the dividers and the phase detector.
vi
In chapter 6, we saw that the transfer of the digital blocks approached this representation of an
ideal sampler as their gain and/or the slope of the input signals increased. We call the switching
blocks, which are driven by the edges of the input signals: edge driven stages. In fact, increasing
the slope of the edges for a fixed voltage disturbance, decreases the resulting time and phase
disturbances. Therefore in the context of low phase noise synthesizer, we find logical blocks with
rather steep edges, with transfers approaching the ideal Dirac comb sampler.
Next we examine the influence of the comparison frequency for the noise contributions that
compose N
pll
. We start considering narrow band noise contributions that are not aliased by
discretization, and we continue with large bandwidth noise in section 7.2.2.
7.2.1 Narrow bandwidth noise sources
In section 7.1, we translated the SNF in time, voltage and current noise densities. Here we take
the inverse path, and discuss the total phase deviation that is caused by the voltage and current
noises from the dividers, the phase detector and the charge pump. We also look for the
parameters that may influence the noise contributions of each block, so that comparative
measurements can be used to identify the dominant noise source in N
pll
.
The total phase deviation of the PLL blocks, δϕ
pll
, is composed of the following noise
contributions:

( )
2 2 2 2
2
2 2 2

,
`

.
|
+

,
`

.
|
⋅ +

,
`

.
|
⋅ +

,
`

.
|
⋅ ·
ϕ
δ
π
δ
π
δ
π
δ δϕ
K
i
T
t
T
t
T
t
chp
cp
phde
cp
div
cp
ref pll
(7.3)
where δt
ref
, δt
div
and δt
phse
represent the time noise densities from the reference chain, from the
main divider and from the phase detector respectively. The current noise from the charge pump
is denoted as δi
chp
. The noise densities are a function of frequency, and we simplify their
notation, from δϕ(f) to δϕ, by supposing that they have white band limited spectra, and that we
consider the same frequency f for all the noise contributions.
In equation (7.3) we see just one noise contribution that is independent of T
cp
: the charge pump
noise. However the time noise densities are a translation of voltage densities that are transmitted
by edge driven blocks; and the slope of the edges may be a function of T
cp
.
We may distinguish two extreme behaviours for the voltage slopes with respect to the input
signal frequency:
• Transition slope limited by the slew rate:

vi
We recall that in lock mode the output of the two dividers, and the phase detector work at the same frequency.
Therefore the sequence of coherent samplers can be replaced by a single discretization with period T
cp
.
150 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The slope of the output is fixed by the slew rate of the block transmitting the signal; dv/dt is
independent of the frequency of the input signal.

( ) ( )
max
t t
crossing zero
max
0
v
dt
t dv
cst
dt
t dv
′ ·
¹
'
¹
¹
'
¹
· ·
·

This situation happens for stages that are driven by signals with very steep slopes, (the input
slopes are already close to the slew rate), and/or for stages that have a very high gain around
the zero crossings.
• Transition slope proportional to the frequency of the driving signal:
The slope of the output signal is proportional to the frequency of the input signal.
( )
in
w A
dt
t dv
⋅ ·
·

0
t t
crossing zero
This case appears for stages that are driven by rather smooth inputs. Around the zero
crossings the slope of the input is amplified to an output slope which is not limited by the
slew rate. The output slope equals the input slope times the gain around the zero crossing.
vii
Table 7-2 examines the case of a voltage noise contribution that is transmitted by two edge
driven stages with the slope characteristics described above. The voltage noise δv
n
(f) is
independent of f
cp
, and it is band limited.
( ) [ ]
2
for ;
cp
Hz
V
no n
f
f V f v ≤ · δ (7.4)
Equation (7.4) describes a voltage noise density in a single sided frequency spectrum, with only
positive frequencies. It is a band base noise that modulates the phase of the signal that drives the
switching stage.
In the table we observe the influence of a change of f
cp
, for the phase deviation that is caused by
δv
n
. The phase deviation at the input of the phase detector and also at the output of the VCO are
indicated.
The change of the comparison frequency is compensated by changes in the divider ratios, R and
N, in order to keep a fixed oscillator frequency. The time and frequency noise densities are valid
for frequency offsets below f
cp
/2 .

vii
We may illustrate this case by a sinus input, or a series of harmonic sinus with the fundamental and the
harmonics nearly in phase, then:
( ) ( ) ( )

+∞
·
+ ⋅ + + ·
2
1 1
sin sin
n
n in n in in
t w n A t w A t v ϕ ϕ
and
1
ϕ ϕ ≈
n
so
( )
]
]
]

⋅ + ⋅ ≈

∞ +
·
·

2
1
t t
crossing zero
0
n
n in
in
A n A w
dt
t dv
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 151
Transition
type
( )
dt
t dv
o
[V/s]
w
cp
[rad/s]
| δt |
[s/sqrt(Hz)]
| δϕ
pll
|
[rad/sqrt(Hz)]
N
| δϕ
osc
|
(in - loop)
[rad/sqrt(Hz)]
L(f) x f
cp
[dB/fcp_octave]
w
cp1
max
1
v
V
t
no

· δ
δt
1
.w
cp1
N
1 Ν
1
.δt
1
.w
cp1
Slew rate
slope
max
v′
2.w
cp1
1
t δ
2.δt
1
.w
cp1
N
1
/2 Ν
1
.δt
1
.w
cp1
0dB/oct.
A.w
cp1
w
cp1
cp
no
w A
V
t

·
2
δ
A
V
no
·
2
δϕ
N
1 N
1
.δϕ
2
Proportional
slope
2.A.w
cp1
2.w
cp1
cp
no
w A
V t
⋅ ⋅
·
2 2
2
δ
2
δϕ N
1
/2 N
1
.δϕ
2
/2
6dB/oct.
Table 7-2 The influence of f
cp
change for narrow band noise
For the first type of transition with a slew rate slope, a change in f
cp
does not influence the time
noise, and the in-loop phase noise remains unchanged as the comparison frequency is doubled. It
corresponds to a constant time noise density with respect to f
cp
.
On the other hand, for the case of proportional slopes, we find a constant phase noise density
with respect to f
cp
. The contribution of this phase noise to the in-loop L(f) is directly scaled by
N.
We verify that besides the charge pump noise there is a second noise contribution that is
independent of T
cp
. Nevertheless these two sources can be differentiated by another parameter:
the charge pump sensitivity K
ϕ
, that is proportional to I
cp
.
The noise of the charge pump is added in the loop after the phase detector sampling; and it is
low-pass filtered by Z
F
before it attains an edge driven stage. We know that for stability reasons
the bandwidth of the loop-filter is well below f
cp
/2 ; thus we may consider that the charge pump
noise is a narrow band contribution suffering from no aliasing effect.
So in the next section, which treats large bandwidth noises, we will only look at the time noise
densities of the logical blocks (dividers and phase detector).
7.2.2 Large bandwidth noise sources
Particularly in low noise PLLs, it is common to resynchronize the output of the reference and the
main divider to their input signals. This resynchronization means that the output signal is in fact
a transition of the input signal that is copied to the output. Or in other words, the output of the
counter is triggered by a zero crossing of the input signal. This operation aims to conserve the
phase quality of the input and to transmit it directly to the output, avoiding the additional phase
deviations of the counting-cells. The output of a resynchronization stage has a constant slope
with respect to the dividing ratio, since it is determined by the slope of the input signal.
Furthermore these slopes are usually limited by the slew rate of the stage.
152 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
So next, as we consider the sampling effects for large bandwidth noises, we restrict our analysis
to the time noise densities that are related to stages with a constant output slope.
We take the case of a broad band white noise, δv
n
, at the input of the phase detector. The noise
bandwidth equals bw
n
, with bw
n
much larger than f
cp
. We call δv
n-cp
the voltage noise density
that is equivalent to a sampled version of δv
n
.
Figure 7.5 illustrates the aliasing of δv
n
as it passes the ideal sampler.
( ) [ ]
n Hz
V
no n
bw f V f v ≤ · for ; δ
Figure 7.5 Large bandwidth noise folding
The sampling is represented by a convolution product with a comb of rays that are spaced by f
cp
intervals. The power density of δv
n-cp
is increased by the aliasing effect. The multiplying factor
between the power levels of δv
n
and δv
n-cp
is named n
lim
. It is derived by observing the number
of frequency translated spectra that superpose each other. It follows that:
N n
f
bw
n bw bw f n
cp
n
n n cp


≥ ⇒ ≥ − ⋅
lim lim lim
with ;
2
(7.5)
Approximately, the power of δv
n-cp
equals
2
lim no
V n ⋅ for
2
cp
f
f ≤ . This frequency
boundary is related to a physical limitation. Mathematically the sampling is represented by a
convolution product. Physically, however, a signal that has been sampled at a ratio f
cp
, can not
contain power in frequencies above f
cp
/2. This limit equals half the sample frequency and it is
also called the Nyquist frequency.
Therefore δv
n-cp
becomes:

2
2
lim no
V n ⋅

-bwn -fcp/2 bwn f
-bwn bwn f
2
2
no
V
fcp

P
vn
(f)
[V
2
/Hz]
δv
n
(f )
bandlimited
white noise
δvn-cp(f )
δvn(f )
Tcp
1

P
vn-cp
(f)
[V
2
/Hz]
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 153
( ) [ ]
2
for ;
2

lim
cp
Hz
V
cp
n
no no cp n
f
f
f
bw
V n V f v ≤

⋅ · ⋅ ·

δ (7.6)
viii
Table 7-3 examines the influence of f
cp
for the phase deviation that is caused by δv
n-cp
.
Transition type
w
cp
[rad/s]
δv
n-cp
[V/sqrt(Hz)]
| δt |
[s/sqrt(Hz)]
| δϕ
pll
|
[rad/sqrt(Hz)]
N
| δϕ
osc
|
(in - loop)
[rad/sqrt(Hz)]
L(f) x f
cp
[dB/fcp_octave
]
w
cp1
=
2π.f
cp1
1
2
cp
n
n
f
bw
v


1 max
1
2
.
cp
n no
f
bw
v
V
t


· δ
1 1 cp
w t ⋅ δ
N
1
1 1 1 cp
w t N ⋅ ⋅ δ
Slew rate slope
( )
max
v
dt
t dv
o
′ ·
[V/s]
2.w
cp1
1 cp
n
n
f
bw
v ⋅
1 max
1
.
2
cp
n no
f
bw
v
V t

·
δ
1 1
2
cp
w t ⋅ ⋅δ
N
1
/2
2
1 1 1 cp
w t N ⋅ ⋅δ
3dB/oct.
Table 7-3 The influence of f
cp
change for large band noise
We observe that a broad band noise at the input of the phase detector causes a phase deviation
that depends on the sqrt(f
cp
). This behaviour results in a change of the synthesizer noise floor of
3dB/oct-of-f
cp
, remembering that the SNF or N
pll
is directly related to δϕ
pll
in the table 7-3.
The SNF change of 3dB/oct-of-f
cp
is commonly observed in low noise PLL synthesizers.
Let us now compare the transfer of the ideal sampler with the periodic large signal transfer
(H
PLS
(f)_equation (6.17) ) that was discussed in chapter 6:
• H
PLS
(f) tends to a comb as T
w
tends to zero. The comb transfer is a reasonable approximation
for noise bandwidths such as:
n
w
bw
T
⋅ > 2
1
.
Furthermore the output of the dividers often have a duty cycle that is smaller than 50%,
which relatively increases the width of the first lobe of the sinc envelope of H
PLS
(f) .
• The slew rate of the switching stages is usually determined by the loading of the output
impedance and the biasing level. It is represented as a low-pass-filter that follows H
PLS
(f) ,
and this post-filtering does not limit the folding effects.

viii
The voltage noise density refers to a spectrum representation with only positive frequencies, explaining the
factor 2 with respect to the double sided (positive and negative frequencies) power spectrum.
( )
2
f H
PLS

LPF
Slew rate
154 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
7.3 Detailing noise sources in different PLL blocks
The preceding sections discussed the noise contributions that compose the SNF, and the
relationships of these contributions to the parameters I
cp
and T
cp
. Here we will look at two
simulations of different PLL blocks to examples the issues discussed above.
We choose two blocks that have a different type of noise output: a D-flip flop (DFF) and a
charge pump. The first is a basic cell that appears in the three logical blocks: the reference
divider, the main divider and the phase detector. The second has a particular noise contribution
that is not quantified as a time deviation but as a current deviation. The two examples use circuit
blocks that are integrated in the testchips discussed in chapter 8.
7.3.1 D-flip flop
The simulation uses a DFF that is implemented in emitter-coupled logic (ECL). The D input is
hard set to a logical “1” and we add a small signal deviation at the periodic clock input. The DFF
also has an asynchronous reset input. In the example the reset input alternates with the clock, so
that we obtain a periodic output with the same frequency as the clock frequency. This sequence
of clock and reset signals represents the inputs of one DFF of the phase detector for a locked
loop. The time domain signals are shown in figure 7.6. They are differential signals that refer to
the following voltages and currents:
• (VT(“/ck”)- VT(“/ckn”)): differential clock input, with a fundamental frequency equals:
f
clk
=2MHz. It is a voltage signal. On one side of the input we add a series voltage source with
a small sinus output. It represents a superposed noise. The frequency of the superposed tone
equals: f
n
=11.4MHz .
• (VT(“/rst”)- VT(“/rstn”)): reset input. It is a periodic voltage pulse with no added
noise.
• (IT(“/Q10/C”)- IT(“/Q11/C”): differential current signal. It is the current at the collectors
of a pair of transistors that receive the clock input. The tail current in this differential pair is
deviated during the intervals where the reset impulse is high.
• (VT(“/cpon”)- VT(“/cponn”)): Q output of the DFF. It is also a voltage signal. The names
cpon and cponn refer to the destination of these outputs, which command the inputs of the
charge pump.
The superposed tone in the clock input causes phase deviations in the collector currents of the
transistors Q10 and Q11. These currents are converted into voltage signals that command the
rising edge of the output signal. The falling edge of the Q output is determined by the reset input.
In order to observe the sidebands that result from the phase deviations, we perform a discrete
Fourier transform (DFT) of the time domain signals. The spectra are shown in figure 7.7.
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 155
Figure 7.6 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: time domain signals
Figure 7.7 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: frequency domain signals
frequency
[Hz]
[seconds]
156 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The settings of the time simulation and of the DFT are carefully chosen to improve the accuracy
of the frequency domain plots.
The spectrum of the clock input is composed of a sequence of odd harmonics of the fundamental
frequency: 2, 6, 10, 14 …MHz. There is also a ray that corresponds to the added tone at
11.4MHz. We indicate this ray with an ellipse.
The differential current signal is the output of a transconductor (the differential pair) that samples
the input clock signal at every zero-crossing. So the sample frequency equals twice the clock
frequency, or 2.f
clk
= 4MHz.
If we recall the results of section 6.3, we can represent the transfer function of this
transconductor as a periodic large signal transfer: H
PLS
(f), with rays at 4MHz and its multiples.
The convolution product of the input with H
PLS
(f) should then present rays at the frequencies: tf
n
t n.2.f
clk
with n ∈ N; or numerically:
MHz MHz n
MHz MHz n
K K
K K
6 . 8 ; 6 . 4 ; 6 . 0 ; 4 . 3 ; 4 . 7 ; 4 . 11 4 4 . 11
6 . 8 ; 6 . 4 ; 6 . 0 ; 4 . 3 ; 4 . 7 ; 4 . 11 4 4 . 11
− − − + + + ⇒ ⋅ t +
+ + + − − − ⇒ ⋅ t −
This is indeed the result we observe in the spectrum of the current signal.
ix
The rays due to the
input noise tone may also be seen as time or phase modulated sidebands, as discussed in section
6.2.3. The sidebands appear at a frequency offset of t 1.4MHz around the odd harmonics of f
clk
.
There are also rays at the frequencies n.4MHz. These even rays of the fundamental appear
because of the pulses that are caused by the reset input.
The differential Q signal has rising edges that are determined by the current signal
(IT(“/Q10/C”)- IT(“/Q11/C”). Therefore the Q output samples this current signal every 1/f
clk
. So
the output will present rays at: tf
n
t n.f
clk
with n ∈ N, or in other words it will present
sidebands at t0.6MHz and t1.4MHz . This expectation is once more verified by the simulation.
Finally we can calculate the expected L(f) of these sidebands and compare it to the level found in
the simulation. We start with the sidebands of the current signal.
The peak amplitude of the added noise tone in the clock input equals 25mV. The slope of the
differential clock input equals:
( )
s
V
c
M
ns
mV
dt
t dv
16
25
200 2
·

·
, with t
c
a zero crossing
instant. If we suppose that H
PLS
(f) is close enough to a comb sampler, the rays that are frequency
translated at f
clk
t1.4MHz will present the same amplitude as the ray at 11.4MHz. Therefore we
make an analogy with equation (6.12), and we find the time deviation:

( ) ( ) s n
M
mV
MHz t f t
s
V
peak n offset peak n
5625 . 1
16
25
4 . 1 · · ∆ · ∆
− −
Next we use the relationships between time and phase deviations to find ∆ϕ
n-peak
:
( ) ( ) ( ) rad m f t f f
offset peak n clk offset peak n
63 . 19 2 · ∆ ⋅ ⋅ · ∆
− −
π ϕ
So the L(f) of the sidebands in the current signal are estimated as:
( )
( )
dBc
f
f L
offset peak n
offset dB
16 . 40
2
log 20 − ·
]
]
]


⋅ ·

ϕ
(7.7)

ix
We remark that figure 7.7 is a single sided frequency representation, so with respect to figure 7.5 the “negative”
frequencies are folded in the positive side of the frequency axis.
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 157
In the simulation result the sidebands at t1.4MHz around f
clk
, have an amplitude that is
40.51dB below the amplitude of the fundamental. So the estimation of L(f) in equation (7.7) is
quite accurate, which means that our periodic transfer H
PLS
(f) in this simulation is indeed close to
a comb sampler. This result is reconfirmed by the fact that the rays at f
n
t2.n.f
clk
all have similar
amplitudes within the frequency range that is plotted.
If we continue to suppose a comb transfer from the signal current to the Q output, we expect to
find sidebands with an equal amplitude at the frequency offsets of t0.6MHz and t1.4MHz. The
level of these sidebands should be reduced by 3dB with respect to the sidebands in the current
signal, because only the rising edges are transmitting the phase disturbances. So the expected
L(f) equals:
( ) ( ) dBc MHz L MHz L
dB dB
16 . 43 6 . 0 4 . 1 − · t · t
The output of the simulations shows a L(f) of –44.4dBc, which is still reasonably accurate.
This example shows that the periodic transfer of added noise sources can be accurately estimated
by the large signal linearization (transfer represented by H
PLS
(f)). The numerical application
holds even for rather large perturbations such as the superposed tone used in this simulation.
In a PLL that has resynchronized dividers, we may concentrate our attention on a few nodes to
determine the total time noise density that is transmitted to the phase detector input by the logical
blocks. Once more the logical blocks are the phase detector, the reference and the main divider.
If the resynchronization stages and the phase detector are composed of DFFs that have similar
biasing levels, we can try to find the one that represents the critical path with respect to the noise
performance. It is often the reference chain, due to the broad band noise floor that outputs the
crystal oscillator (Xosc). If we consider that the output of the Xosc has a buffering stage that is
rather non-linear, with steep edges and T
w
tending to zero; the broadband noise is then sampled
to a Nyquist bandwidth equal to f
xosc
. Later on it is down-sampled by the resynchronization
stage, which causes a new folding to a Nyquist bandwidth of f
cp
/2 . Equation (7.5) can be used to
define a folding factor n
lim
for the noise coming from the Xosc. It equals:
R
f
f
f
bw
f
bw
n
cp
xosc
cp sample
Xosc n
cp Nyquist
Xosc n
⋅ ·

·

· ·




2
2 2
lim
(7.8)
where R is the dividing ratio of the reference divider.
The noise of the Xosc that is transmitted to the phase detector input is then estimated using
equation (7.6). It becomes:
( ) [ ]
2
for ; 2
lim
input detector
phase at the
cp
Hz
V
no no Xosc n
f
f R V n V f v ≤ ⋅ ⋅ · ⋅ ·

δ
(7.9)
The noise contribution of this broad band noise has a 3dB/oct-of-f
cp
behaviour as discussed in
table 7-3. The value of V
no
can be obtained by noise simulations using software that calculate a
periodic transfer for the noise.
158 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
7.3.2 Charge Pump
The simulation concerns a phase detector and a charge pump blocks that were designed to work
with very high comparison frequencies, to the order of 310MHz. It is part of a multi-loop PLL
structure that is discussed in chapter 8.
The inputs of the phase detector are adjusted to correspond to a locked loop situation with an
average current output equal to zero. Due to the elevated comparison frequency the charge pump
that has slow pnp current sources, acts like a low-pass filter. The output currents sinking and
sourcing are a filtered copy of the input impulses of the phase detector. We know that the
minimum width of these impulses equals τ
rst
. Here the ratio τ
rst
/T
cp
approaches 1/3 and
consequently the current sources are never completely switched off. Therefore the noise
contribution of the charge pump block can become very significant for the total phase noise
performance.
A series of noise simulations is realized around different points of a time domain simulation. The
points are chosen within an interval of one period, and, after the transient signals have attained a
periodic steady state, this corresponds to the locked-loop condition.
The current noise densities that were calculated for the different transient points had roughly a
white band-limited shape with a cut-off frequency around 30MHz. The level of the current noise
density at a frequency of 1MHz is sketched in figure 7.8. It corresponds to an instantaneous
value calculated for a given time instant in a period. We indicated it as:
δi
ChP-instant
(1MHz) .
Figure 7.8 Charge Pump current noise levels within one period
In figure 7.8 the peak of noise level occurs during the zero crossing of the inputs that command
the charge pumps. The total noise contribution of the charge pump is a time average of the
instantaneous noise power levels. Here it becomes:
( )
( ) ( )
Hz
A
n
n
p
n
n
p
T
T
i
T
T
i MHz i
cp
inst ChP
cp
inst ChP total ChP
2
22 2 2
2 2
2 .
1 2
1 .
2
10 . 768 . 9
2 . 3 2
150 . 0
140
2 . 3
9 . 2
8
... 1

− − −
·

⋅ + ⋅ ≈
+ ⋅ + ⋅ · δ δ δ
The current density is transformed into a phase density using K
ϕ
, and finally expressed as a SSB
phase noise, as follows:
300ps
t
[s]
140p
8p
δi
ChP-instant
(1MHz)
A/sqrt(Hz)
n.T
cp
(n+1).T
cp
δiChP-instant(f)
8p A/sqrt(Hz)
f
[Hz]
30M
T
cp
=3.2ns
I
cp
=182uA
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 159
( )
Hz
rad
p
K
i
MHz
total ChP
total ChP
µ π
µ
δ
δϕ
ϕ
079 . 1 2
182
25 . 31
1 · ⋅ · ·


( )
( )
Hz
dBc
MHz
MHz L
total ChP
total ChP dB
35 . 122
2
1
log 20 1
_
− ·
,
`

.
|
·


δϕ
This calculation is useful to estimate the limitation of the noise performance that is imposed by
such a charge pump working with a high f
cp
. The calculation is compared to measurement
results in chapter 8.
7.4 Behavioural Models
The behavioural model is a synthetic form to represent different blocks of a circuit. It is used to
simulate an ensemble of blocks that interact among each other. Often they become interesting
when a simulation using the full circuit description would demand too much memory and/or time
. We may model all the circuit blocks in behavioural descriptions or combine behavioural and
circuit level descriptions. The following sections present briefly some points about a behavioural
representation of the PLL synthesizer, for simulations in the time and in the frequency domains.
Numerical examples are presented in chapter 8 while discussing the results of the testchips.
7.4.1 Frequency domain
A behavioural description of the PLL may represent the output of the VCO and the Xosc by
their respective phases. This phase model greatly simplifies the representation of the dividers that
may directly divide the phase values instead of identifying and counting zero-crossing moments.
The PLL phase model that was presented in figure 2.1, is very close to a behavioural model that
may be used for AC and noise simulations. In an analog simulator the phase signals have to be
transformed in either voltage or current magnitudes. We choose to represent the phase signals as
voltages. The dividers are replaced by voltage controlled sources that have an output equal to
1/N or 1/R times their input.
The integration of the phase model of the VCO is represented by measuring the ddp of a
capacitor that integrates a current. For a noise simulation we introduce two noise sources that
represent N
pll
and v
nvco
. In figure 7.9 the noise input of N
pll
is replaced by a source that
represents the noise of the crystal oscillator. The aliasing factor sqrt(2.R) is also included through
the gain block that follows the noise source. The loop filter is an active one. The amplifier is
represented by a transconductor with a capacitive input impedance, and the output impedance
equals the pull-up resistor.
This model may also be used for AC simulations that verify the open and closed loop transfers.
160 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 7.9 Behavioural model of the PLL for AC and noise simulations
The output PHIvco (ϕ
vco
) in this behavioural model may be used to calculate the total phase jitter
of the LO signal. In fact ϕ
vco
equals the mean square phase fluctuation S
ϕ
(f) (equation (3.5) ).
The total phase deviation or phase jitter, σ
ϕ
, is then derived by integrating S
ϕ
(equation (3.21) ).
The boundaries of the integral are related to the bandwidth of the channel that is being down-
converted.
In section 7.5 we continue to discuss these integration boundaries as we consider the
implementation losses that are caused by σ
ϕ
.
7.4.2 Time domain
The behavioural representation in the time domain also uses phase models for the dividers.
However it is interesting to represent the phase detector and charge pump in a form that is
compatible with their circuit description, so that we may combine behavioural and circuit blocks.
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 161
Figure 7.10 shows a combined model that contain behavioural descriptions for the dividers and
phase detector, and a circuit level charge pump and loop-filter amplifier. This schematic is used
to observe the transient residual currents that are due to mismatches between the sourcing and
sinking sides.
Figure 7.10 Behavioural model of the PLL for transient simulations
The accuracy of simulations in the time domain is closely related to the ratio time-step/signal-
period. The time step is the space between two consecutive points that are calculated in the
transient simulation. In an ensemble of blocks that work with different frequencies, we should
consider the smallest period.
The difficulty to simulate the full PLL circuit is connected to the large difference between the
period of the signals at different points of the loop. In this transient model we reduce this
difference of periods changing the parameters K
vco
and N. In fact the VCO is represented by its
phase and this phase is divided before it is re-transformed into a sinusoidal signal. Therefore we
may simply divide K
vco
and N by a common factor, and reduce significantly the difference
between the comparison frequency and the frequency of the VCO.
162 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
7.5 Implementation Loss due to Phase Deviations
Implementation loss is the difference between the theoretical limits that are calculated for the
correct functioning of a system and the limits that are measured in a physical implementation.
Here, we discuss the implementation loss that is caused by the phase deviations in the LO signal.
The numerical values are related to the reception of a QPSK modulated channel in a satellite
receiver.
In the frontend or more specifically in the frequency conversion stage, the phase jitter of the LO
adds noise to the RF data being down-converted.
The circuit that receives the BB output from the frontend is a digital demodulator and decoder
(see figure 7.11). The first part, demodulator, is composed of the following blocks: ADC, clock
recovery loop and carrier recovery loop. The decoder is the second part, and it contains the
stages of forward error correction.
Figure 7.11 Digital Demodulator and Decoder
For digital modulations, the final consequence of phase jitter is measured as a bit-error rate
(BER)
x
. In the case of QPSK signals the bit error rate reflects the probability that the additional
phase noise exceeds a value of π/4 .
xi
Thus, for phase noise contributions that present a Gaussian distribution and a mean square value
or variance of σ
ϕ
, we can calculate the BER using the distribution curves of a Gaussian variable.
Usually these results are presented in graphs of SNR versus BER. They show the theoretical and
minimum signal quality that is required to
decode the input signal with a certain amount of bit-errors. The SNR is often indicated as a
power density ratio: energy per bit over noise, E
b
/N
o
, that normalizes the signal power with
respect to the bit rate.
The decoder can correct a certain number of bit errors depending on the redundancy and the
robustness of the coding. MPEG standards for video coding impose BER to the order of 10
-11
at
the output of the decoder. For the satellite DVB-S that has an inner Reed-Solomon coding and an
outer Viterbi coding; this implies a BER to the order of 2.10
-4
at the input of the Reed Solomon

x
The BER is a common unit used in the context of digital decoders. It measures the amount of errors encountered in
the reception of a bit stream.
xi
Referring to a constellation diagram, as represented in figure 1.7 .
SDD: satellite demodulator and decoder
Frontend
Forward Error Correction
Viterbi
Decoder
Reed-Solomon
Decoder
Demodulator
ADC Clock & Carrier
Recovery Loops
RF
input
LO
PLL
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 163
decoder, and a BER to the order of 6.10
-3
at the input of the Viterbi decoder. The BER in the
input of the decoder is also called raw BER.
Using the theoretical curves of SNR x BER for QPSK signals we find that the raw BER of 6.10
-3
is equivalent to a theoretical E
b
/N
o
of 5dB. We may also express the SNR as an energy per
symbol instead of an energy per bit, which gives us a E
s
/N
o
of 8dB. The implementation loss is
measured as the increase in the ratio E
s
/N
o
which is required to obtain a raw BER of 6.10
-3
.
7.5.1 Signal to noise ratio and implementation loss
The following treatment of the implementation loss and phase noise power is based on the
reference [Sinde98b].
Let us consider the signal and noise powers indicated in the schematic below:
where
P
s
: signal power measured within the bandwidth bw
ch
;
P
Nin
: noise power before the mixing stage, also measured within bw
ch
;
P

: noise power added by the phase noise of the LO, measured within bw
ch
.
For an ideal receiver working with a noiseless local oscillator, SNR
in
and SNR
min
are equal, and
they become:

1
1 min
Nin
s
in
P
P
SNR SNR · ·
where P
Nin1
is the maximum noise power that can be handled by the receiver.
When we consider a noisy LO the SNR
min
equals:

ϕ
ϕ
ϕ
SNR SNR
P
P
P
P P P
P
SNR
in
s s
Nin N Nin
s
1 1
1 1
2
2 2
min
+
·
+
·
+
·
where P
Nin2
is the maximum noise power at the input, in the presence of the phase noise P

; and
SNR
ϕ
is the signal to noise ratio for the phase noise contribution.
The implementation loss (IL) due to P

is defined by the ratio of the input SNR for the noisy
and noiseless cases:

ϕ
SNR
SNR
P
P
SNR
SNR
IL
Nin
Nin
in
in
min
2
1
1
2
1
1

· · ·
It may also be expressed in dB as:

]
]
]
]

− ⋅ − ·

,
`

.
| −
− −
10
min
10 1 log 10
dB dB
SNR SNR
dB
IL
ϕ
(7.10)
where SNR
min-dB
and SNR
ϕ-dB
are the same ratios defined above, but expressed in dB.
We can also calculate the SNR
ϕ
which corresponds to a given IL and SNR
min
. It equals:
S
SNR
min
P
s
P
Nin
P

164 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

1
min

⋅ ·
IL
IL
SNR SNR
ϕ
or expressed in dB:

]
]
]
]

− ⋅ − + ·

,
`

.
|
− −
1 10 log 10
10
min
dB
IL
dB dB dB
IL SNR SNR
ϕ
(7.11)
Let us now consider the relationship between SNR
ϕ
and the phase noise parameter S
ϕ
(f) which
was introduced in chapter 3. The latter is a noise to signal ratio, that considers the noise
contribution of a 1 Hz bandwidth in a certain offset from the carrier. The first one is a signal to
noise ratio that considers the noise within the bandwidth of the selected channel (bw
ch
). So, we
expect the integral of S
ϕ
(f) to be related to SNR
ϕ
-1
.
Indeed, if we consider the phase noise sidebands as narrow band noise contributions that are also
down-converting the input channel, we find that:
( ) ( )
offset
bw
f
bw
f
bw
f
bw
ch s
N
df df f S df f S
bw P
P
SNR
ch
offset
ch
offset
ch
offset
ch
∫ ∫ ∫
]
]
]
]
]

⋅ + ⋅ · ·

,
`

.
|
+

,
`

.
|

,
`

.
|


2
0
2
2
2
0
1
2
1 2
ϕ ϕ
ϕ
ϕ
(7.12)

1 −
− foffset
SNR
ϕ
where the noise being added corresponds to the frequency-shifted copies of the input channel.
We should remember that S
ϕ
(f) is the double side band phase noise, which explains that the
boundaries of the integral are limited to positive offsets.
Figure 7.12 gives a physical idea of the integral above. It shows the noise contribution that is
brought by two narrow sidebands around the oscillator frequency.
Figure 7.12 Noise Power added by the LO sidebands
∆f
1
f
offset

,
`

.
|
∆ −
1
2
f
bw
ch
∆f
1
S
s
(f)
[W/Hz]
f [Hz]
bw
ch
S
osc
(f)
[W/Hz]
f [Hz]

,
`

.
|
∆ +
1
2
f
bw
ch
f [Hz]
f [Hz]
S
BBoutput
(f)
[W/Hz]
S
BBoutput
(f)
[W/Hz]
f
offset
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 165
The outermost integral in expression (7.12) sweeps the channel bandwidth from its center to one
of the extremities. The inner integral evaluates the noise power that is projected over each
narrow bandwidth portion of the channel spectrum. The noise amount that is projected on two
sidebands that are equally spaced with respect to the center of the channel bandwidth, is equal.
Therefore the outermost integral just needs to sweep a range of one half channel.
However, depending on the position of the narrow bandwidth within the channel spectrum, it is a
different range of the DSB phase noise, S
ϕ
(f), that down-converts or projects noise. For offsets
close to the center of the channel, or for f
offset
<< bw
ch
, it is basically S
ϕ
(f) in the range [0,
bw
ch
/2], where the DSB phase noise accounts for the left and right sided offsets from the center
of the channel. For offsets close to the extremities of the channel, or for f
offset
~ bw
ch
/2 , it is
S
ϕ
(f)/2 in the range [0, bw
ch
].
In expression (7.12), the total noise, P

, is the sum of the noise contributions that are down
converted by the sidebands around the LO. In the present case, where we consider a single
channel at the RF input, the maximum frequency offset for these sidebands equals bw
ch
.
Next, two particular cases, concerning random and spurious sidebands, are discussed.
7.5.1.1 Spurious Sidebands
Discrete spurious sidebands are also contributing to P

. If we consider a pair of sidebands at a
frequency offset f
1
, the DSB phase noise can be expressed as:
( ) ( ) [ ]
2
1 1 1
rad f f P f S
s
− ⋅ · δ
ϕ
for
ch
bw f < <
1
0
where P
s1
is the DSB spurious amplitude. It may also be expressed in dB, P
s1-dB
, and compared
to A
s
, the SSB spurious amplitude defined in equation (3.2).
[ ] dBc dB A P
s dB s
3
1
+ ·

(7.13)
Then, replacing S
ϕ1
in expression (7.12) results in:
[ ]
2 1
1
1
1
1 rad
bw
f
P SNR
ch
s

,
`

.
|
− ⋅ ·

ϕ
for
ch
bw f < <
1
0
{ ¦ [ ]
2
1
1
1
max rad P SNR
s
<

ϕ
(7.14)
Therefore P
s1
is an overestimation of the SNR related to these single tone sidebands.
7.5.1.2 Random Phase Noise
The random noise sources that modulate the tunable oscillator cause sidebands that are measured
by a phase noise density, S
ϕ
(f). These sidebands may be divided into two zones. The first, in-
loop, is mostly flat with some peaking close to the intersection of the out-of-loop zone. In the
second one, the power of the sidebands decreases with a 1/f slope. The PLL closed bandwidth
(f
cl
) determines the size of the in-loop zone.
Most of the phase deviation power is due to the sidebands that are found in frequency offsets in
the range [0 , f
cl
] .
166 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In most of the tuner applications, the PLL bandwidth is considerably smaller than the channel
bandwidth (bw
ch
) . Thus the parameter
1 −
− foffset
SNR
ϕ
in expression (7.12) is bounded by:
( ) [ ]
2
2
0
1
0 _
1
_
rad df f S SNR SNR
ch
bw
foffset

· ≤
− −
ϕ ϕ ϕ
Furthermore the value of
1 −
− foffset
SNR
ϕ
is rather close to
1
0

− ϕ
SNR for all the frequency offsets that
are in the range: [0 , bw
ch
-f
cl
] .
If we replace
1 −
− foffset
SNR
ϕ
by
1
0

− ϕ
SNR in equation (7.12), we obtain a simplified form of
1 −
ϕ
SNR
that equals:
( )
∫ ∫
· · · ⋅ ≈
− − −
2
0
2 1
0 _
2
0
1
0 _
1
2
ch ch
bw
offset
bw
ch
df f S SNR df SNR
bw
SNR
ϕ ϕ ϕ ϕ ϕ
σ (7.15)
Expression (7.15) is an overestimation of
1 −
ϕ
SNR for the random noise sidebands; and it equals
the square of the phase jitter, for an integration within half of the channel bandwidth.
7.5.1.3 Numerical Example
The specifications of a receiver system define allocations of implementation losses for the
different parameters causing signal degradations. In TV and satellite tuners the implementation
loss due to phase deviation of the LO are specified by a maximum value of 0.2dB.
We can use expressions (7.10) and (7.11) to calculate some numerical examples for the satellite
QPSK receiver. Table 7-4 relates SNR
ϕ
and IL for a E
s
/N
o
of 8dB, corresponding to the raw BER
of 6.10
-3
.
IL
dB SNR
ϕ-dB
1 −
ϕ
SNR
1 −
ϕ
SNR
[dB] [dB] [rad] [°]
1.6 13.112 2.210E-01 12.662
0.8 15.741 1.633E-01 9.356
0.4 18.556 1.181E-01 6.766
0.2 21.467 8.446E-02 4.839
0.1 24.428 6.006E-02 3.441
0.05 27.413 4.259E-02 2.440
0.025 30.411 3.016E-02 1.728
Table 7-4 Implementation Loss X Phase deviations
We may also use expressions (7.13), (7.14) and (7.15) to relate the values of SNR
ϕ
with the
spurious level (A
s
) and the phase jitter (σ
ϕ
) .
For instance the implementation loss of 0.2 dB is equivalent to a phase jitter of 4.84°, or to a
single pair of spurious sidebands at – 24.5 dBc.
Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 167
In practise the maximum
1 −
ϕ
SNR has to take into account both the phase jitter and the spurious
power. Hence we should seek a practical boundary that compromises the phase deviation of the
random and spurious noises and also preserves a margin for variations in the parameters that
determine A
s
and σ
ϕ
.
xii
A phase jitter of 2° and a spurious level below –36dBc is a compromise that implies a total
SNR
ϕ-dB
of 28.2 dB,with a margin of 6.7 dB for the variation of the total phase deviation.
7.5.2 Digital Demodulator: clock and carrier recovery loops
Finally we need to consider the action of the demodulator blocks (carrier and clock recovery
loops) for the phase deviations that come from the frontend.
There are different configurations of carrier and clock recovery loops, our model is based on the
architecture of the circuit TDA8043, a satellite demodulator and decoder for BPSK and QPSK
signals.
The behavioural model for the phase transfer of the clock and carrier recovery loops is shown in
figure 7.13.
Figure 7.13 Behavioural Model of the Carrier Recovery loop
The two loops are based on PLLs of the 2
nd
order. The clock recovery loop is the external, slow
loop, which works with the smaller closed loop bandwidth. There are three stages that are
contained in the clock recovery loop: the anti-alias filtering, the Nyquist filtering and the
interpolator. These stages are only represented by the delays that they cause in the signal path
(block delay_2). The length of this delay depends on the symbol rate.

xii
The spurious level, A
s
, depends on the amplitude of the modulating signal, on the frequency sensitivity of the
oscillator (K
vco
), and on the suppression of the loop filter. The phase jitter, σ
ϕ
, depends on the noise performance of
the PLL and the VCO ( N
pll
, v
nvco
), on the peaking of the closed loop transfer and on the closed loop bandwidth.
Clock recovery loop Carrier Recovery loop
168 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
There are other delay elements that account for the phase detectors functioning. These delays are
independent of the symbol rate.
The carrier recovery loop is the internal, fast loop. The bandwidth and damping parameters of
each loop are programmable. In the behavioural model these settings are translated to the loop
filter parameters that correspond to a 2
nd
order closed loop transfer with a natural oscillating
frequency w
n
and a damping ξ .
The ensemble of the demodulator blocks is synchronous, and it works with a clock at 65MHz.
Therefore the delays may be normalized as an entier number of periods of the reference clock.
The TDA8043 can decode channels with variable symbol rates. The maximum symbol rate that
can be decoded is 32Msps. For symbol rates below 10Msps, the loops should be interlaced (an
external clock loop containing the carrier loop) as represented in figure 7.13. For symbol rates
above 10Msps, the two loops should be connected in series. For the phase model, the series
connection just changes the feedback return for the clock recovery loop, which would be taken
from the node at the input of the carrier loop.
The overall transfer of the demodulator is very close to a high pass filter of 2
nd
order, with a
cutting frequency that equals the natural frequency of the fast loop. As we increase the
bandwidth of either loop, the effect of the delays will become visible, causing some overshoot in
the transfer.
The phase model of the demodulator is used in noise simulations in combination with the PLL
phase model. The demodulator input (PHIdemin) receives the phase noise density that outputs
the PLL. The output of the demodulator is a high-pass filtered portion of ϕ
osc
.
The combined PLL+demodulator model is used to calculate the phase jitter that appears at the
input of the digital signal decoder. In this manner, the IL that is measured at the input of the
decoder, can be correctly compared to a phase jitter value. Simulation examples are presented in
chapter 8.
In this chapter we applied the results of the preceding parts, about the PLL model and the related
transfer functions, and, about the generation of phase noise.
The analysis of a PLL design, in a top-down approach, was discussed with numerical examples
related to existing ICs.
A systematic approach to investigate the dominant noise sources was presented, with suggestions
for simulations and measurements.
Finally, behavioural models for transient and AC simulations were briefly described. A model
for a QPSK demodulator, used in the analysis of chapter 8, was also introduced.
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 169
Contents:
8. Testchips Realized 169
8.1. Gm-C oscillator..................................................................................................................................... 170
8.1.1. Structure ...................................................................................................................................... 170
8.1.2. Results ......................................................................................................................................... 172
8.2. TC2 : Mixer-Oscillator-PLL circuit for satellite direct conversion..................................................... 173
8.2.1. Double Loop Synthesizer ............................................................................................................ 173
8.2.2. TC2 structure............................................................................................................................... 175
8.2.3. TC2: results ................................................................................................................................. 177
8.3. TC3 : single PLL plus QCCO circuit .................................................................................................... 180
8.4. Comparative analysis: phase jitter and implementation loss................................................................ 183
8.4.1. Configurations compared ............................................................................................................ 183
8.4.2. Conditions for the simulations..................................................................................................... 184
8.4.3. Results and conclusions............................................................................................................... 187
Figures:
Figure 8.1 Gm-C integrated oscillator .......................................................................................... ............ 171
Figure 8.2 Double loop MOPLL: block diagram..................................................................................... 174
Figure 8.3 Block diagram of TC2 .............................................................................................................. 176
Figure 8.4 Photo of a testchip TC2............................................................................................................ 177
Figure 8.5 TC2 _ in-loop spectrum for N1=7 and f
cp1
=300Mhz............................................................. 179
Figure 8.6 TC2 _out-of-loop spectrum for N1=6 and f
cp1
=300MHz ...................................................... 179
Figure 8.7 TC3 _ single low noise PLL plus QCCO................................................................................ 181
Figure 8.8 Simulation result for the SSB phase noise _ linear scale....................................................... 182
Figure 8.9 Spectra for ∆f
step
=125kHz and f
lo
=900MHz .......................................................................... 186
Figure 8.10 Phase noise simulation for DL+QCCO with and without demodulator .............................. 186
Tables:
Table 8-1 Measurements of the frequency coverage of the QCCO....................................................... 172
Table 8-2 Double Loop: minimum step and comparison frequencies................................................... 175
Table 8-3 Parameters of the two zero-IF configurations being compared ........................................... 183
Table 8-4 Parameters and outputs for comparative analysis ................................................................ 184
Table 8-5 Settings of the demodulator block........................................................................................... 185
Table 8-6 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for r
s
=30Msps and f
LO
= 2,2GHz.............................. 188
Table 8-7 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for r
s
=3Msps and ∆f
step
= 125kHz............................. 188
Table 8-8 Margin for degradations in the oscillators phase noise performance .................................. 189
8 Testchips Realized
This chapter presents two synthesizer testchips which contain a fully integrated Gm-C oscillator
covering the satellite band-L. The synthesizers are designed for a monodyne or zero-IF receiver,
and they present a multi-loop architecture.
The structures of the Gm-C oscillator and a double loop PLL synthesizer are exposed in tables
and block diagrams. The performance of the double loop synthesizer, with an integrated satellite
band oscillator, is compared to a classical single loop and external LC oscillator. Finally
measurement results of phase noise and implementation losses are compared to simulations.
170 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
A fully integrated oscillator becomes quite interesting in monodyne receivers where the radiation
of the input RF signal may significantly deviate a LC externally-coupled oscillator.
In terrestrial and satellite tuners the usual range of the tuning voltage is 30V. This high voltage
supply can be suppressed if the LO can be tuned under a 5V range.
The integrated Gm-C oscillator has a range divided into 4 bands that are tuned in a 5V range. Its
phase noise is on average 20dB worse than a LC oscillator covering the same range with a 30V
tuning range. The solution, to cope with the degradation of the phase noise, is to increase the
closed loop bandwidth. In order to respond to both the specifications of a maximum tuning step
and a minimum closed loop bandwidth, a multi-loop structure is needed.
The first testchip that is discussed, TC2, is an implementation developed in collaboration with
Nat.Lab. the research laboratory of Philips. It is a double-loop PLL synthesizer. The first loop
drives an oscillator in the VHF band, which is used as the input reference for the second loop
which drives the Gm-C oscillator. The two oscillators are tuned in a 5V range.
The second testchip, TC3, exploits the possibility of a single loop, with a wide closed bandwidth,
to drive the same Gm-C oscillator. The input reference in this case is a crystal oscillator.
The testchips were realized in a bipolar process that is derived from a BiCMOS process. The
stripped bipolar process kept the gate oxide of the CMOS components for the capacitors. This
enables us to compose a native PMOS, which gives us a bipolar+PMOS process. The peak value
of the ft of the NPN transistors equals 13GHz. The maximum ft of the lateral PNP equals
200MHz. There are three levels of metallization, with a pitch of 2.4µm.
We start describing the results of the Gm-C oscillator, which is a common block in the two
testchips. A fuller description of the double loop structure and the Gm-C oscillator can be found
in references [Vauc98] , [Tang97] and [Kokk92].
8.1 Gm-C oscillator
The Gm-C oscillator is a ring structure with two integrator stages and an inverting feedback. The
two stages have outputs with an equal frequency, and phases that are shifted by 90° with respect
to each other.
i
The oscillating frequency depends on the value of the capacitors and on the
transconductance Gm. The frequency tuning is made by varying the biasing current of the
transconductance stages. Hence the oscillator is also called a QCCO: quadrature current
controlled oscillator.
8.1.1 Structure
Let us consider the block schematic of figure 8.1. It shows the basic parts of the QCCO. Part
8.1.a presents a single ended integrator stage. The transconductance gm
a
compensates the current

i
These quadrature outputs are very convenient for a receiver with a monodyne structure. A monodyne receiver
needs to provide two outputs, in quadrature to each other, so that the demodulator can distinguish the channel from
its mirror image. In a zero-IF architecture the mirror image is a flipped version of the selected channel, which is also
converted to base band.
Basically there are two possibilities to provide the two outputs in quadrature: either phase shifting the input RF
channel, or having a LO oscillator with quadrature outputs. The second solution is often chosen because it demands
a phase shifter for a single tone signal, instead of a large bandwidth shifter.
Furthermore the digital standards of satellite broadcasting use QPSK modulation. Therefore the quadrature outputs
may be directly sampled and demodulated to retrieve the I and Q streams of data.
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 171
losses in the resistor R, keeping the quadrature between the input and output voltages v
in
and
v
out
. Implementation in the testchips uses differential transconductances gm
t
and gm
a
as drafted
in figure 8.1.b.
Fig.8.1.a Single ended Gm-C integrator Fig.8.1.b Differential cascaded integrators
Figure 8.1 Gm-C integrated oscillator
The condition of oscillation, a unitary feedback with a phase shift of 360° , is met by cascading
two integrator stages and an inversion. In the differential scheme the inversion is simply a
crossover between the feedback signals.
If the transconductance gm
a
compensates exactly the losses of each integrator stage
( )
R
gm
a
1
− ·
, the closed loop transfer function for a voltage input becomes:

( )
2
1
1

,
`

.
| ⋅
+
·
t
QCCO
gm
C s
s B
(8.1)
where the transfer of a single integrator is :
( )
( )
n
t
in
out
w
C s
gm
s V
s V
·

· ;
which is also equal to the natural oscillating frequency w
n
.
This situation is identified as the linear mode of the QCCO. In practice an amplitude control, that
acts on gm
a
, is needed to assure a minimum negative impedance during the start up of the
oscillator and later on to fix the value of the amplitude.
The phase noise performance of the QCCO depends: on the inherent noise sources, on the
frequency sensitivity of the oscillator and on the amplitude of the signals V
I
and V
Q
.
We can define a frequency sensitivity K
cco
in Hz/A .
If we decrease K
cco
by increasing the capacitors C, we will need a higher I
gmt
to cover the
frequency range, which implies an increase in some noise sources that are proportional to the
biasing currents.
On the other hand, as we increase the amplitude of the oscillating signal the transconductors gm
t
will no longer work in a linear mode, and the losses due to this non-linear function have to be
compensated by the negative resistance, or in other words by increasing I
gma
.
C R
I
gmt
gm
t
v
out
v
in
I
gma
gm
a
vQ vI
gmt (tune)
gma (amp)
gmt (tune)
gma (amp)
I
gmt
I
gma
I
gmt
I
gma
172 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
In fact I
gma
is already the parameter that controls the amplitude, and, for oscillators working in a
non-linear mode the amplitude control is also influencing the frequency. Therefore the design of
the QCCO is a tricky compromise between the requirements of phase noise, tunable range and
consumption budget.
8.1.2 Results
The QCCO implemented in TC2 and TC3 has a frequency range divided into 4 bands. The bands
are selected by programmable inputs. The frequency range covers the entire band-L from
950MHz to 2150MHz, with some overlap in the extremities and in between each band. The
outputs V
I
and V
Q
have a peak value to the order of 200mV to 300mV. This amplitude represents
the result of the compromise between consumption and phase noise performance. The ensemble
of the biasing and transconductance blocks consume 26mA under a 5V bias.
The first design was reworked to improve the band coverage and the uniformity of the K
cco
and
the L(f) throughout the 4 bands.
ii
The measurement results are presented in table 8-1, in
comparison to the ideal band partition shown below. The overlap for the limits of each band is
chosen as 100MHz.
Ideal band partition:
MHz MHz f 425
4
300 850 2250
band
·
+ −
· ∆
Measurements:
Band 1 Band 2 Band 3 Band 4 measurement conditions:
Frequency
Ranges
[MHz]
815
|
1230
1190
|
1640
1520
|
1950
1850
|
2310
∆f
band
[MHz] 415 450 430 460
K
v-cco
[MHz/V]
119 129 123 131
constant V
amp
=2.6V
V
tune
∈ [0.1 ; 3.6]
Table 8-1 Measurements of the frequency coverage of the QCCO
The frequency sensibility K
v-cco
is equivalent to the K
vco
of the LC tuned oscillator. The tuning
input of the QCCO is a voltage/current (V/I) converter that receives V
tune
as input, and output I
gmt

ii
The bands have an equal frequency range, that enables a simple programming mode for the QCCO, and assures a
low K
cco
variation throughout the band.
1175M
1600M
1825M 2250M
1500M
950M 1275M
850M
1925M
2150M
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 173
. The parameter K
v-cco
is the overall sensitivity that includes the gain of the V/I converter plus
the K
cco
of the Gm-C oscillator. The input range for V
tune
is limited by the working range of the
V/I converter.
A second V/I input is used for the amplitude control, and its input is called V
amp
. The present
design was improved to work with a fixed V
amp
value, so that this input can be used to
compensate the process spread.
The same uniformity was also aimed at for the SSB phase noise performance, and the following
values are measured in the two extremes of the tunable range:
( ) ( )
Hz
dBc
Hz
dBc
QCCO
KHz L KHz L GHz f 8 . 76 100 4 . 92 600 2 . 1 − · ↔ − · ⇒ ·
( ) ( )
Hz
dBc
Hz
dBc
QCCO
KHz L KHz L GHz f 9 . 75 100 5 . 91 600 1 . 2 − · ↔ − · ⇒ ·
At the beginning of the band the main noise source is the thermal noise of the resistors loading
the transconductors; and at the end of the band the L(f) is limited by the shot noise of the
transistor of gm
t
. The noise from the biasing stages is minimized by using a large voltage
interval for the degeneration of the current sources.
8.2 TC2 : Mixer-Oscillator-PLL circuit for satellite direct conversion
The testchip TC2 contains several blocks of a double loop PLL synthesizer. The synthesizer chip
is combined with mixer-oscillator blocks to compose a MOPLL circuit. The circuit is
dimensioned for a monodyne receiver, which means that the input RF channels are directly
down-converted to band base.
8.2.1 Double Loop Synthesizer
Figure 8.2 is a block schematic of the double loop architecture.
The tuning system is composed of two cascaded PLLs. The first one (loop #1) locks the QCCO
to the reference delivered by the second loop. Loop #1 works with small divider ratios (N1)
which allows one to obtain a quite low phase noise for part of the in-loop spectrum (to the order
of -108 dBc/Hz).
Loop #2 drives an oscillator that works in the VHF range. This VHF-oscillator has a strict
requirement for phase noise, since its spectrum is “copied” to the LO output.
The reference of loop#2 is a traditional 4MHz quartz oscillator (Xosc). The reference divider is
composed of two counters, one is programmed with the same count (N1) as the divider of loop
#1, and the other (R2) determines the minimum tuning step.
Table 8-2 shows the relationships among the comparison frequencies and the oscillator
frequencies.
174 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 8.2 Double loop MOPLL: block diagram
Parameters:
∆f
step
: minimum tuning step;
f
cco1
: QCCO frequency, output frequency of loop #1;
N1: main divider ratio in loop #1;
f
cp1
: comparison frequency in phase detector #1;
f
vco2
: VCO-VHF frequency, output frequency of loop #2;
N2: main divider ratio in loop #2;
R2: reference divider ratio in loop #2;
f
cp2
: comparison frequency in phase detector #2;
f
Xosc
: Xosc frequency.
RF
input
I
Q
RF
AGC-Loop
BB output - I
QCCO - LO
Ph. Det. + Ch.P.
#1
V/I
converter
/ N1
Ph.Det.+Ch.P.
#2
Z
filter
#2
VCO2
VHF band
/N2
/N1 /R2
Xosc
(4 MHz)
double-loop MOPLL circuit
Loop #1
Loop #2
BB output - Q
Z
filter
#1
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 175
It is important to notice that the
comparison frequency of loop #2
becomes:

1
2
N
f
f
step
cp

·
Table 8-2 Double Loop: minimum step and comparison frequencies.
The main divider of loop#1 is composed of two swallow counters and N1 belongs to the set: [4, 5, 6, 7]. The
frequency range of VCO2 is then determined with respect to the limits of the QCCO band. It follows that:

{ ¦ MHZ
M
f
vco
5 . 237
4
950
max
2
· ·

{ ¦ MHz
M
f
vco
1 . 307
7
2150
min
2
· ·
Actually the range of VCO2 should also include some margin at the extremities. If we consider a
margin of 20MHz and a tuning range of 4 V, the average K
vco
of VCO2 equals 27.4MHz/V.
Thus VCO2 works in the range of a VHF-III oscillator, with a frequency sensitivity that is close
to the K
vco
of UHF oscillators. These parameters serve as references for the design and the
application of loop #2.
The comparison frequency of loop #1 equals the VCO2 frequency, which means a maximum f
cp1
to the order of 330MHz. The design of the charge pump and the phase detector are mostly
determined by this constraint, since the transfer characteristics I
average
/ ∆ϕ
in
should cover a
minimum input range of t180° . This condition assures that the comparator can retrieve
frequency and phase differences (see chapter 5).
8.2.2 TC2 structure
The blocks that are colored in grey in figure 8.2 were implemented in the testchip TC2. A more
detailed schematic diagram is included in figure 8.3.
The testchip is basically divided into two parts, analog and digital, that interact through interface
blocks. The analog part has symmetrical inputs for the RF signal and asymmetrical outputs for
the BB signals: I and Q. There are external control inputs for the amplitude and frequency of the
QCCO. The frequency input is bound to the charge pump output and to an external LPF
impedance. The LO signal can be monitored through a test output. The ensemble of blocks is
programmed by a 3-wire bus. The bus has an additional acknowledge block that indicates the
oscillators
frequency
f
vco2
= f
cp1
f
cco1
wrt f
cp f
cp2
*N2 f
cp1
*N1
wrt N and R
1 * 2
2 *
N R
N f
Xosc
2
2 *
R
N f
Xosc
wrt ∆f
step
with:
∆f
step
=
2 R
f
Xosc
1
2 *
N
N f
step

2 * N f
step

176 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
reception of a full programming word. The output of the acknowledge block is equivalent to an
I
2
C bus output. In reality this block is included to test the sensibility to bus cross-talk.
iii
The charge pump has 2 programmable values of I
cp
( 20µA and 190µA) and it can also be set to
test modes with sinking, sourcing and high-impedance outputs.
Figure 8.3 Block diagram of TC2
There are 4 supply pins, a pair for the analog part and another for the digital one. The total
consumption is 60mA under 5V, and the active layout area equals 1.2mm
2
. The total layout area
is 2.1mm
2
, which includes the 20 input/output pins.
The symmetry of the layout of the analog part is stressed to guarantee the quadrature
characteristics of the I and Q branches. Figure 8.4 shows a photo of a testchip TC2. On the left
side there are the digital blocks (bus, main divider and phase-detector /charge pump, from the
higher to the lower corner); and on the right side, the analog part (QCCO, mixer, regulator, input
and output buffers).

iii
Bus cross-talk denotes the interference of the bus activity in the others blocks of the synthesizer. It is measured as
perturbations in the output spectrum when the synthesizer is continuously receiving a repetitive programming word.
Vreg
2
2 2
2
2
4
44
2
Dual Mixer
Phase Det.
+
Ch. Pump #1
V/I
Div.1
(4.5.6.7)
Sym--> Assym Output stage
BBQ
BBI
4
Q
I
QCCO
Vamp Rf
in
Bus data load
synchronization
Plus block
combine I &Q
CCOout
output for
Z=50Ω
Test
Bus
SDA
SCL
ENB
ACK
3
QCCO
2
DIV456
4
PhDetChP
Biasref
VCCO
GNDO
ANALOG
PART
BN--ISOLATION
Pin for external
Loop Filter
Ref
VCC
GND DIGITAL
PART
INTERFACE LAYER
Bandgap
regulator
V/I
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 177
Figure 8.4 Photo of a testchip TC2
TC2 was measured in a separate board using a signal generator as input and also in combination
with a terrestrial synthesizer whose application was adapted to cover the frequency range of loop
#2. The results are discussed in the following section.
8.2.3 TC2: results
The blocks are all functional and the loop locks correctly. Some particular points of the
measurements of the different blocks are summarized below:
• 3W + acknowledge bus:
there is no visible interference in the LO spectrum for a continuous programming
sequence.
• Phase detector and Charge Pump:
The comparator is able to retrieve frequency differences for a maximum f
cp
equal
to 450MHz, with no loss in its sensibility K
ϕ
(no dead zone).
The SNF for a f
cp
of 300MHz is measured as –124dBc/Hz. This result is very
close to the estimation of the charge pump noise presented in section 7.3.2. Thus
the SNF of this wide band loop is set by the charge pump noise performance.
178 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
• Mixer and BB buffers:
The conversion gain of the mixer plus BB stages equals 5dB.
iv
The IP3 referenced
to the input is measured as 17dBm. These two values agree with the simulation
results.
The leakage of the LO signal at the RF inputs is measured as –64dBm, which
indicates that there is no major pollution of LO signals in the supplies that are
shared with the mixer. The noise performance of the mixer is good enough to keep
the same L(f) of the LO in the BB outputs.
• QCCO:
The frequency coverage is the same presented in section 8.1.2. The quadrature of
the I and Q outputs is measured in the 4 bands. The measurement was made
comparing I and Q single tones around 10MHz in the base band outputs. The
phase deviations are kept under 2° as long as the amplitude control assures a
minimum level around 200mVpeak

for the oscillator signal. In the worst case for
low v
agc
input and in the highest band the maximum deviation is 3.5° .
The spurious rays at tf
cp1
are lower than –62 dBc , for a loop filter with a closed
bandwidth around 2MHz.
• Pulling:
The interference of the RF input on the LO signal was evaluated by a method
which is used in the characterization of terrestrial MOPLL circuits. A strong RF
carrier, 100% AM modulated by a signal at 100kHz, is injected into the mixer.
The sidebands that appear around the LO carrier at the same 100kHz frequency
offset are measured.
RF input power Interference at t100 kHz
offset from LO
0 dBm -45 dBc
-5 dBm -55 dBc
-10 dBm -64 dBc
These levels are roughly 10dB better than the requirements for terrestrial MOPLL.
In ZIF satellite receivers the pulling is also evaluated as the deviation of the LO
frequency for a given RF power. However this method is mostly adapted to the
LC oscillator where the radiation of the RF input disturbs the resonator. In the
QCCO, as expected, there is no frequency deviation of the carrier for RF input
powers exceeding 10dBm.
Two plots of the LO spectrum are shown in figures 8.5 and 8.6. The first is measured with a
small span of 250kHz, for an f
cco1
of 2.1GHz. It shows the in-loop zone of loop #1, when the
reference input is a signal generator. The L(f) is indicated in the plot.
( ) ( ) ( )
Hz
dBc
N
loop Hz
dBc
MHz f
N MHz SNF kHz L
cp
9 . 123 1 log 20 107 300 107 25
7 1
1 #
300
1
− · − − · ⇒ − ·
· ·

iv
We should remember that the current testchip does not contain the pre-amplifier block that should significantly
increase the range of dynamic gain.
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 179
Figure 8.5 TC2 _ in-loop spectrum for N1=7 and f
cp1
=300Mhz
Figure 8.6 TC2 _out-of-loop spectrum for N1=6 and f
cp1
=300MHz
180 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The second plot shows a larger span where the out-of-loop zone can be observed. The charge
pump current was set to 20µA to decrease the closed loop bandwidth. There is a supply
interference at 2.3MHz that causes visible sidebands. It is an external disturbance from the
laboratory environment that unfortunately could not be suppressed.
( ) ( )
Hz
dBc
GHz f
Hz
dBc
GHz f
cco cco
kHz L MHz L 24 . 76 100 28 . 108 4
8 . 1 8 . 1
− · ⇒ − ·
· ·
The noise measurements with great dBc dynamics are very sensitive to the surrounding
environment. For the plots presented above the output spectra were averaged over several sweeps
in order to keep the static signals and filter the sporadic interference. In figure 8.6 this average is
particularly difficult, because of the large span combined with a narrow resolution bandwidth.
The consequence is that the central carrier frequency changes slightly during the averages (due to
the finite precision of the spectrum analyzer) and the marker indicating this reference is no
longer fixed at the reference value. This problem is already previewed by the measurement tool
that provides a steady reference for the noise measurement, which is fixed in the first sweep.
An application board of a terrestrial mixer-oscillator, the TDA5732, was adapted to use its UHF
oscillator as the reference VCO2 oscillator. The phase noise performance of this reference
oscillator was measured as –114 dBc/Hz at a 100kHz offset.
The ensemble of the two boards (loop#2 plus loop#1) was evaluated in a bit-error-rate (BER)
measurement.
v
This measurement is used to quantify the implementation loss that is due to the
frequency synthesizer.
Different QPSK channels with symbol rates from 3Msps up to 30Msps were tested. The
performance of the double loop synthesizer was compared to a single loop synthesizer with a LC
oscillator that has an L(100kHz)=-98dBc/Hz. The implementation losses of both systems are
practically identical. The influence of the L(f) of VCO2 appears mainly when we are decoding
narrow channels, for instance with the symbol rate of 3Msps. In this case the phase noise of
VCO2 has to be kept better than L(100kHz)=-112dBc/Hz. Otherwise the implementation loss of
the double loop is worse than the LC oscillator plus a single loop.
8.3 TC3 : single PLL plus QCCO circuit
The testchip TC3 contains a low noise satellite PLL plus a QCCO. The low noise PLL was
designed by the PLL-tuner development group at Philips Semiconductors in Caen. The objective
of this testchip is to verify the maximum closed loop bandwidth that can be achieved in a single
loop configuration.
Figure 8.7 shows a plot of the output spectrum of this single loop. The comparison frequency
equals 1MHz and the loop filter is calculated for an open loop bandwidth around 165kHz. The
closed loop bandwidth or the 3dB bandwidth for the PLL is: f
3dB
= 279kHz.
If we refer to the results of chapter 5 we see that this closed loop bandwidth comes close to the
maximum stable value. Indeed a 50% increase of the open loop bandwidth would already cause
the instability of the system.

v
The BER is a common unit used in the context of digital decoders. It measures the amount of errors encountered in
the reception of a test sequence.
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 181
Figure 8.7 TC3 _ single low noise PLL plus QCCO
Figure 8.8.a Linear scale
1
182 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 8.8.b Logarithmic scale
Figure 8.8 Simulation result for the SSB phase noise _ linear scale
The measurement may be compared with the simulation results presented in figures 8.8.a and
8.8.b. They show the result of a noise simulation with the AC behavioural model of the PLL (see
section 7.4.1). Figure a uses a linear scale for the abscissa so that it can be better compared with
the spectrum output. Figure b uses a logarithmic scale to emphasize the LPF transfer of N
pll
and
the BPF transfer of v
nvco
.
The noise simulations used the parameters L
vco
and N
pll
that were found in the measurements,
and the results agree very closely with the output of the spectrum analyzer.
The comparison between the plots 8.8.a and 8.8.b evidences the influence of the peaking in
masking the noise performance of the PLL in the in-loop zone. Actually in order to measure N
pll
it is necessary to use a very small span around the carrier.
We measured L
pll
and calculated N
pll
, measuring the spectrum in a span of 10kHz. They were
found to be:
L
pll
(2kHz) = -86.7 dBc/Hz ;
with: N = 900 ; f
cp
= 1MHz ⇒ SNF(1MHz) = -145.7 dBc/Hz
The noise performance of the VCO is the same encountered in TC2, which is:
L
vco
(100kHz) = -76 dBc/Hz .
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 183
The intersection frequency for the two noise asymptotes equals: 343kHz ; which indicates that
the open loop frequency of the filter should be increased to have a smaller peaking in the
spectrum. However, we know that we already reached the maximum values of f
ol
with respect to
the stability constraints.
The phase jitter of the present output spectrum exceeds the limit value of 4.84° that would be
necessary to keep the implementation loss below 0.2 dB (see section 7.5.1.3). Therefore this
single loop plus QCCO configuration would need to incorporate a fractional divider, in order to
have two different values for the minimum frequency step and the comparison frequency.
8.4 Comparative analysis: phase jitter and implementation loss
In this section we compare the spectra of two synthesizer configurations for a zero-IF satellite
receiver: the double loop plus QCCO and the single loop plus LC oscillator.
Currently the satellite tuner has separated ICs for the MO and PLL functions. This analysis
intends to orient the next steps of the IC development of a single chip MOPLL for satellite
reception.
8.4.1 Configurations compared
The configuration, double loop plus QCCO (DL+QCCO), corresponds to the architecture of
TC2, and its present status of development was discussed in section 8.2.
The configuration, single loop plus LC oscillator (SL+LC-osc), is based on the Philips IC: the
TDA8060, a mixer-oscillator for zero-IF satellite reception.
The values used in the simulations, for the noise performance of the PLL and the VCO,
correspond to the measurements of the parameters L
vco
and SNF in TC2 , TC3 and in the
TDA8060. The table below summarizes these parameters:
Double Loop + QCCO Single Loop + LC oscillator
Loop #1:
SNF
loop#1
(f
cp
= 300MHz) = -124 dBc/Hz
L
QCCO
(f
offset
= 100kHz) = -76 dBc/Hz
K
v-cco
= 125 MHz/V ; I
cp1
= 190 µA
Loop #2:
SNF
loop#2
(f
cp
= 125kHz) = -154.7 dBc/Hz
L
VCO2
(f
offset
= 100kHz) = -114 dBc/Hz
K
vco2
= 27.4 MHz/V ; I
cp2
= 1.2 mA
Single loop parameters:
SNF(f
cp
= 125kHz) = -154.7 dBc/Hz
L
VCO
(f
offset
= 100kHz) = -100 dBc/Hz
K
vco
= 100 MHz/V ; I
cp
= 550 µA
Table 8-3 Parameters of the two zero-IF configurations being compared
184 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
The current of loop #2 in the DL+QCCO is chosen as the largest value for which we have
already tested low noise charge pump designs. The need for this high I
cp2
value appears when we
are minimizing the phase jitter in loop#2. In fact, VCO2 has a very tight phase noise
performance and the noise from the resistors of the loop filter becomes significant for values
above 2kΩ. High I
cp2
values enable us to decrease the loop filter impedance.
The synthesizer noise floor of loop #2 in the DL+QCCO, and in the SL+LC-osc are derived from
the measurements of TC3.
There are already some stand-alone PLL ICs that present a better SNF (see data about the
TSA5059 in section 7.1). However when combining the PLL and the MO in the same IC, it is
probable that the crystal-oscillator design should work with smaller amplitudes and currents, and
closer to a linear mode; in order to avoid excessive interference in the common substrate, and
under-sampling phenomena with respect to strong RF and BB signals.
The calculations use the SNF of TC3 that contains a more linear design for the crystal oscillator.
When the simulations are made with comparison frequencies that are different from the value
indicated in table 8-3 (125kHz); the changes in SNF are assumed to respect the variation rate of
3dB/octave-of-f
cp
. This variation rate is discussed in chapter 7, and it is confirmed by
measurement results.
8.4.2 Conditions for the simulations
The comparative analysis is based on simulation results for the phase jitter in the LO signal. The
settings of the simulations are the same used during the BER measurements of TC2. So that we
can evaluate the accuracy of the behavioural model used in the simulations.
Table 8-4 lists the variable parameters and the outputs that were calculated:
Variable Parameters: Simulated Outputs:
• LO frequency [Hz]:
f
lo
= 900M ; 2.2G ;
changes the dividing ratios (N1, N2);
• Tuning step [Hz]:
∆f
step
= 125k ; 1M ;
changes the comparison frequencies and the
loop filters;
• Symbol rate for QPSK modulation [sps]:
r
s
= 3M ; 30M ;
changes the settings of the demodulator and
the integration boundaries for the phase jitter;
• Phase Jitter at the PLL output:
σ
ϕ-pll
(f
min
, f
max
) [°] ;
where f
min
and f
max
are the integration
boundaries.
• Phase Jitter at the demodulator output:
σ
ϕ-dem
(f
min
, f
max
) [°] ;
σ
ϕ-dB-dem
(f
min
, f
max
) [dΒ] ;
• Implementation loss due to the phase jitter at the
demodulator output:
IL
dB
[dB]
Table 8-4 Parameters and outputs for comparative analysis
Let us examine these outputs and parameters.
The phase jitter is evaluated at two points of the reception chain, at the PLL output, and at the
demodulator output. The second one is also expressed in dB and translated in an implementation
loss. The implementation loss is calculated for a SNR
min
of 8dB, which corresponds to the raw
BER of 6.10
-3
.
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 185
The value of IL
dB
accounts for the losses due to the phase jitter, and it can be compared to the
0.2dB threshold discussed in section 7.5.
The power of the spurious rays is not included in this IL
dB
. However we can easily derive a
specification for the acceptable spurious level looking at the value of σ
ϕ-dB-dem
, and
remembering expressions (7.13) and (7.14). In general a pair of spurious rays with a SSB level of

ϕ-dB-dem
– 6dB) in dBc, should be the maximum discrete disturbance allowed. If there are more
pairs of spurious rays, the maximum power level should be divided by the number of rays that
are found within the range of phase jitter integration.
The phase jitters are integrated in the bandwidth: [f
min
; f
max
] = [0 ; bw
ch
]. The higher boundary
is chosen as bw
ch
instead of bw
ch
/2, as indicated in expression (7.15). In fact the earlier
expression takes into account a single channel, with no disturbance from adjacent channels.
When we enlarge the integration boundary to bw
ch
we are also taking into account the effect of
the two closest adjacent channels, considering that they have the same power density as the
selected channel.
The LO frequency range covers the band-L with a small margin. We simulate the two extremities
to test the cases of the largest and the narrowest loop bandwidths, with the lowest and the highest
in-loop noise contribution from the PLL.
The settings of the demodulator block are derived from the satellite demodulator and decoder
TDA8043. The phase model of the demodulator part was discussed in section 7.5.2.
The frequency and phase detection range of the carrier recovery loop equals r
s
/8 , where r
s
is the
input symbol rate. Therefore, with respect to the demodulator, the maximum tuning step for a
given symbol rate would be r
s
/4. Nevertheless the circuit specifications often demand much
lower tuning steps. For satellite applications the typical value is 125kHz, and more recently
higher steps like 1MHz are discussed to tune high symbol rate channels.
In a QPSK modulated channel the symbol rate is equal to the channel bandwidth in Hz. The
simulations test two symbol rates or channel bandwidths: 3Msps (bw
ch
=3MHz) and 30Msps
(bw
ch
=30MHz).
The bandwidth and damping parameters for both clock and carrier recovery loops are derived
from the application note of the demodulator, and they are the same as those used in the
measurements of TC2. Table 8-5 lists the inputs of the behavioural model of the demodulator for
the two symbol rates:
r
s
[sps] Nd1 WNslow/2π [Hz] ξslow WNfast/2π [Hz] ξfast
1.56k 0.68
3M
74
722 1.16
4.95k 0.83
30M 20 7.91k 1.13 15.2k 0.81
Table 8-5 Settings of the demodulator block
Nd1 is the number of delays within the clock recovery loop, WN and ξ determine the loop filter
parameters, and the subscript fast and slow refer to the carrier and clock recovery loops
respectively.
The tightest situation for the LO requirement appears for the narrowest channels, where the
demodulator loops are narrower, and they filter less of the LO phase jitter. We test two values for
the bandwidth of the fast loop to verify the influence of this parameter.
186 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Figure 8.9 Spectra for ∆f
step
=125kHz and f
lo
=900MHz
Figure 8.10 Phase noise simulation for DL+QCCO with and without demodulator
f
cp2
= 31,25k
3k 5k 320k 5M
-71,6
-77,6
-112
L(f)
(dBc/Hz)
log (f
offset
)
[Hz]
L(f
offset
=10kHz) ~ -80 dBc/Hz
f
cp
= 125k
SL+LC-osc
DL+QCCO
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 187
Figure 8.9 is a sketch of the spectra found at the output of the two configurations for a tuning
step of 125kHz, and an LO frequency of 900MHz. The levels indicated correspond to the SSB
phase noise at the output of the PLL. The spurious rays due to the reference breakthrough are
also indicated.
The level of the L(f) for the inner part of the double loop configuration (determined by loop #2)
is generally higher than the L(f) of the single loop configuration. In the outer part, for f
offset
above
320kHz), the double loop is also worse because it adds some noise with respect to the single
loop.
Nevertheless we know that the double loop, with an integrated oscillator, presents advantages of
compactness and robustness with respect to strong RF inputs. Therefore, our analysis evaluates if
the losses of the double loop, when compared to a single loop, are really influencing the IL
dB
that is measured at the input of the decoder.
Figure 8.10 shows the output of a noise simulation for the DL+QCCO configuration. The noise
density is plotted for the phase at the output of the PLL, and also at the output of the
demodulator.
The curves of figure 8.10 are also calculated for f
LO
=900MHz and ∆f
step
=125kHz. The
parameters of the demodulator are the ones listed in table 8-5 for a r
s
= 3Msps and a
WNfast=4.95kHz. We observe that most of the phase jitter below WNfast is filtered by the
carrier recovery loop, which may significantly change the value of the total phase jitter before
and after the demodulator.
The loop filters of the two configurations were set to minimize the phase jitter at the output of
the PLL ( σ
ϕ-pll
(0, bw
ch
) ). The values used in the simulations were:
• filters for DL+QCCO (foln: C1/C2/R1/C3/R3):
loop#1: 8MHz: 10pF/0.39pF/10kohms ;
(no post-filter, and equal values for the 2 cases of ∆f
step
)
loop#2:
for ∆f
step
1MHz: 5.5kHz: 100nF/3.9nF/1.2kohms/3.9nF/1kohms;
for ∆f
step
125kHz: 2.5kHz: 68nF/2.7nF/4.7kohms/2.2nF/3.9kohms;
• filters for SL+LC-osc (foln: C1/C2/R1/C3/R3):
for ∆f
step
1MHz: 46kHz: 2.2nF/82pF/8.2kohms/27pF/15kohms
for ∆f
step
125kHz: 3kHz: 68nF/2.7nF/3.9kohms/820pF/8.2kohms
8.4.3 Results and conclusions
The largest differences in σ
ϕ-pll
(0, bw
ch
) appear for f
LO
= 2.2GHz, and N1=7. Therefore we start
comparing these situations for a high symbol rate channel with r
s
=30Msps. The simulation
outputs are shown in table 8-6.
188 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
∆f
step
= 1MHz ∆f
step
= 125kHz
Configuration
σ
ϕ-pll
[°]
σ
ϕ-dem
[°]
σ
ϕ-dB-dem
[dΒ]
IL
dB
[dB]
σ
ϕ-pll
[°]
σ
ϕ-dem
[°]
σ
ϕ-dB-dem
[dΒ]
IL
dB
[dB]
DL+QCCO 4.38 1.65 -30.8 0.023 7.76 1.63 -30.9 0.022
SL+LC-osc 2.72 2.19 -28.4 0.040 4.02 0.67 -38.7 0.004
Table 8-6 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for r
s
=30Msps and f
LO
= 2,2GHz
The results above verify that both configurations have quite some margin with respect to the 0.2
dB threshold for the IL
dB
due to phase deviations. The phase jitter of the DL+QCCO after the
demodulator, for a large carrier recovery loop is very close to the SL+LC-osc.
The filter of the SL+LC-osc for ∆f
step
of 1MHz could probably be made narrower to improve the
σ
ϕ-dem
with some loss in σ
ϕ-pll
.
The next table shows the outputs for a low symbol rate channel of 3Msps. In this case only the
smaller frequency step of 125kHz is presented. The phase jitter at the output of the demodulator
is calculated for two values of carrier recovery loop bandwidth.
WNfast=1,56kHz WNfast=4,95kHz
Config.
f
LO
[Hz]
σ
ϕ-pll
[°]
σ
ϕ-dem
[°]
σ
ϕ-dB-dem
[dΒ]
IL
dB
[dB]
σ
ϕ-dem
[°]
σ
ϕ-dB-dem
[dΒ]
IL
dB
[dB]
900M 3.19 2.24 -28.1 0.042 1.38 -32.4 0.016 DL
+
QCCO
2.2G 7.68 3.88 -23.4 0.127 2.16 -28.5 0.039
900M 2.81 2.29 -28.0 0.044 1.61 -31.0 0.022 SL
+
LC-osc
2.2G 4.01 2.52 -27.1 0.053 1.50 -31.6 0.019
Table 8-7 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for r
s
=3Msps and ∆f
step
= 125kHz
In the reception of low symbol rate channels, and in particular with small carrier recovery loops,
we start to notice the influence of the LO phase jitter.
The results for low and high symbol rates are coherent with the comparative measurements of
TC2 and the zero-IF mixer-oscillator TDA8060.
The measurement set that was used enables a precision of 0.05dB in the readings of
implementation loss. Therefore a quantitative analysis needs to identify the most significant
parameters for the performance of each configuration and vary them as much as to cause
differences in the IL
dB
above the measurable limit.
The most sensible parameters in the configuration DL+QCCO are L
vco2
and SNF
loop#1
. The
experience of the testchips implemented show that SNF
loop#1
is quite stable among different
samples and different diffusion lots. However the L
vco
of LC oscillators tends to vary within a 3
to 6 dB range amongst different samples and application layouts. Therefore this last parameter is
considered as the most critical.
Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 189
In the SL+LC-osc configuration, it is again the L
vco
that is the most influencing parameter. Table
8-8 shows the margin for degradations in the L
vco
of the two configurations for the low symbol
rate reception. The minimum values of L
vco
should be compared with the nominal values that
were presented in table 8-3 (DL+QCCO: L
VCO2
(f
offset
= 100kHz)=-114 dBc/Hz; and SL+LC-
osc: L
VCO
(f
offset
= 100kHz) = -100 dBc/Hz).
In particular for the double loop system we also test the margin of acceptable degradation of the
QCCO phase performance (nominal value: L
QCCO
(f
offset
=100kHz)=-76 dBc/Hz). The margins are
measured as the maximum L
vco
value that would cause an IL
dB
of 0.2dB for the reception of a
3Msps channel.
Margin for L
vco
(100kHz) degradation to achieve IL
dB
= 0.2 dB
Config.
WNfast=1.56kHz WNfast=4.95kHz observations
max{L
vco2
}=-110 dBc/Hz max {L
vco2
}=-104.5 dBc/Hz only varying L
vco2
(f) DL
+
QCCO max {L
vco2
}=-110 dBc/Hz
max {L
QCCO
}=-65 dBc/Hz
max {L
vco2
}=-105 dBc/Hz
max {L
QCCO
}=-64 dBc/Hz
Varying both
L
vco2
(f) and L
QCCO
(f)
SL
+
LC-osc
max {L
vco
}=-92 dBc/Hz max {L
vco
}=-88 dBc/Hz
Table 8-8 Margin for degradations in the oscillators phase noise performance
The margins of L
vco
degradation in both configurations show that these system specifications are
practicable for production on an industrial scale. We notice that the bandwidth of the carrier
recovery loop, when increased to 4.95kHz, can improve the margins of 4 to 5dB.
The margins of the L
vco
have to be respected within the entire frequency range, which means a
range of 1.3GHz for the SL+LC-osc , and a range of 110MHz for the VHF oscillator of
DL+QCCO. Therefore the larger margin in the performance of the L
vco
for the SL+LC-osc is not
necessarily easier to be held than the margin of the VHF oscillator.
Besides, for values of carrier recovery bandwidth that are close to or larger than the PLL
bandwidth, the SNF has no major influence. This effect can be verified for the SL+LC-osc where
a variation of 10dB in the SNF is barely visible for a WNfast of 4.95kHz. In the double loop only
the SNF
loop#2
can be relaxed; in fact variations of 7dB can also be tolerated for the large carrier
recovery loop.
This analysis and the conclusions are valid for the context of a QPSK receiver where the
neighbouring channels have power density levels that are close to the level of the selected
channel. Other extended models can be derived to analyze the implementation losses for FM,
QAM and OFDM receivers. Furthermore the behaviour of the decoder, for the final output signal
quality should also be examined, in particular the sensitivity to the shape of the random phase
noise sidebands (white or 1/f
2
).
This chapter presented physical results from testchips and comparative measurements for a
double loop synthesizer with a completely integrated Gm-C oscillator, that covers the satellite
band-L.
190 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
Chapter 9 / Conclusions 191
9 Conclusion
New communication standards are very demanding for tuner specifications. Therefore
behavioural system analysis becomes a more and more relevant step, in evaluating and
dimensioning circuit and block requirements.
In this work we analyzed the PLL frequency synthesizer for its stability and noise aspects. The
application context was the frontend of TV tuners, with special focus on satellite receivers.
The PLL was presented as a control system, in order to study the influence of different
parameters using a simple and flexible model. This representation was used to examine some
issues around the application and specification of the PLL: controlling the feedback bandwidth,
working with larger comparison frequencies, dealing with phase noise, stability and spurious
requirements, etc.
We continued pushing the noise issue farther away in the PLL system, and looked for a
theoretical basis that could be linked to the measurement and simulation contexts.
Next, we treated an example of a new frontend architecture: the near-zero IF receiver for a
satellite tuner, using an integrated oscillator. The concept and the implementation of two
testchips was discussed and the measurements were compared to calculations and simulations
results.
Finally, the loss of signal quality, which is due to the phase deviations of the LO, was studied
and a numerical example was calculated for the case of a QPSK receiver.
In summary, there were three basic parts in our study: control theory applied to PLL, treating
phase noise in the PLL system, examining new architectures and system specifications.
192 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
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198 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops
FOLIO ADMINISTRATIF
THESE SOUTENUE DEVANT L’INSTITUT NATIONAL DES SCIENCES APPLIQUEES DE LYON
NOM: de Queiroz Tavares DATE DE SOUTENANCE: 09 /12 / 1999
PRÉNOMS: Marina
TITRE:
SYNTHETISEUR DE FREQUENCE A BOUCLE DE VERROUILLAGE DE PHASE:
ETUDE DU BRUIT DE PHASE ET DE BOUCLES A LARGE BANDE
NATURE: Doctorat Numéro d’ordre: 99 ISAL 0086
FORMATION DOCTORALE: Dispositifs de l’électronique intégrée
ECOLE DOCTORALE: Electronique, Electrotechnique, Automatique (EEA)
Cote B.I.U. – Lyon : T 50 / 210 / 19 / et bis CLASSE:
RESUME:
Les synthétiseurs de fréquences à boucle de verrouillage de phase sont largement utilisés dans les récepteurs et les transmetteurs
pour les télécommunications, comme partie du bloc de conversion de fréquence. Ils sont constitués d’un oscillateur accordable et
d’une boucle à contrôle de phase programmable. Les tendances actuelles dans le développement des PLL concernent les
performances en bruit et un plus haut degré d’intégration. Le premier est en relation direct avec les nouvelles techniques de
modulation numériques, nécessitant souvent un plus fort rapport porteuse/bruit dans la chaîne de traitement du signal. Les secondes
répondent à l’orientation générale vers des systèmes plus petits et plus compacts.
La thèse développe et discute les modèles d’un système PLL pour étudier les aspects stabilité et bruit. Les résultats du modèle sont
utilisés pour la conception des circuits intégrés et de leur applications. Ces résultats sont confirmés par les mesures.
L’approche «stabilité» étudie la robustesse du système PLL, travaillant typiquement avec des très grandes variations de gain. Une
approche du système au circuit (top-down), étudie la génération et la transmission du bruit. Finalement, des réalisations de circuits-
tests du PLL avec des oscillateurs intégrés sont présentés.
La thèse s’est déroulée dans le cadre d’une collaboration entre le CEGELY - INSA de Lyon et Philips Semiconductors et plus
particulièrement au sein du centre de production et développement de Caen.
MOTS-CLES:
‘‘Tuner’’, Partie Entrée Récepteur RF, Boucle Phase Asservie, Bruit de Phase, Stabilité, Oscillateurs OTA-C
Laboratoire de recherche: CEGELY – INSA de Lyon
Directeur de thèse: Jean Pierre Chante
Président de jury: ……..
Composition du jury:
Richard-GRISEL Professeur - Université Picardie rapporteur
Michiel-STEYAERT Professeur - K.U. Leuven rapporteur
Jean-Pierre-CHANTE Professeur - INSA de Lyon directeur
Bruno-ALLARD Maître de Conférences - INSA de Lyon examinateur
Philippe-KLAEYLE Ingénieur - Philips Semiconductors - Caen examinateur
Eduard-Stikvoort Chercheur - ingénieur – Philips Nat.Lab. – Eindhoven examinateur
200 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

No d’ordre: 99 ISAL 086

Année 1999

THESE présentée
DEVANT L’INSTITUT NATIONAL DES SCIENCES APPLIQUEES DE LYON

pour obtenir

LE GRADE DE DOCTEUR

FORMATION DOCTORALE: ECOLE DOCTORALE:

Dispositifs de l’électronique intégrée Electronique, Electrotechnique, Automatique (EEA)

par Marina, de Queiroz Tavares

SYNTHETISEUR DE FREQUENCE A BOUCLE DE VERROUILLAGE DE PHASE: ETUDE DU BRUIT DE PHASE ET DE BOUCLES A LARGE BANDE

Soutenue le 09/Décembre/1999 devant la Commission d’Examen Jury

Richard-GRISEL Michiel-STEYAERT Jean-Pierre-CHANTE Bruno-ALLARD Philippe-KLAEYLE Eduard-Stikvoort

Professeur - Université Picardie Professeur - K.U. Leuven Professeur - INSA de Lyon Maître de Conférences - INSA de Lyon Ingénieur - Philips Semiconductors - Caen Chercheur - ingénieur – Philips Nat.Lab. – Eindhoven

rapporteur rapporteur directeur examinateur examinateur examinateur

Cette thèse a été préparée chez Philips Semiconductors – Caen, en collaboration avec le Laboratoire CEGELY de l’INSA de Lyon

typically working with very large gain variations. This thesis discusses and develops PLL system models to study stability and noise aspects. And the second concerns a global trend towards smaller and more compact systems. studies noise generation and transmission.Title: PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops frontend/ tuners / PLL / phase noise / stability / gm-C oscillators Keywords: Abstract: PLL frequency synthesizers are widely used in telecommunication receivers and transmitters. The first is connected to the new digital modulation techniques. being confirmed via measurements. The stability approach investigates the robustness of the PLL system. as part of the frequency conversion block. Current tendencies in PLL development focus noise performance and a higher integration level. A top-down system to circuit approach. Jean-Pierre Chante Director of the CEGELY laboratory . The model results are employed in IC and application design. more specifically in the production and development centre of Caen. often demanding a higher CNR in the signal chain. Finally testchip realizations of PLLs with fully gm-C integrated oscillators are presented. The thesis was conducted within the context of a collaboration between the CEGELY-INSA de Lyon and Philips Semiconductors. PhD student: Marina de Queiroz Tavares Advisor: Prof. They consist of a tunable oscillator and a programmable phase controlling loop.

1.1.1.2.3. Nominal Design 34 2. The frontend in a telecommunication receiver The frontend in TV broadcasting Current tendencies: low noise and higher integration PLL systems : different application contexts PLL frequency synthesizers constituting blocks and nomenclature 1.5.1. Application Related Constraints 3.2.5.5.1.4.3. Phase Detector – Charge Pump 1. Summary steps and numerical example 40 3. Dividers 1. Requirements in the Time and Frequency Domain 24 2.1. Reference Breakthrough 3. Introduction 1.2. VCO Noise Representation and Phase Noise Units 3. 1.1. 21 2.3. Optimum Closed Loop Bandwidth 3.1.5.2.5.2.5.2. 1. Robust design including Gain Variation and 3rd Pole compensation 36 2.1. 1. Gain Stability Boundary 43 44 46 50 52 53 59 61 65 . w3dB derivation from was 3. PLL Closed Loop Bandwidth 3. Third and Fourth Order Loop 28 Algorithm for Loop Filter Calculation 34 2.4. PLL Phase Model and Loop Filter calculation 2.4. Phase Model for PLL synthesizers 22 2. VCO 1.3.2.4.ii PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Contents: Index List of figures List of Tables List of symbols and abbreviations Preface ii v viii ix xiv 1.3.2. w3dB derivation from BRL(s) 3.6. Loop Filter 1 2 3 9 14 15 16 17 17 19 2.2.4.2.1. Second-Order Loop 26 2. Maximum Phase Jitter 3.1.

Contents iii 4. The sampler 5.1.2.2.4.2.1.2. Summary of AC boundaries for filter design 4. Minimum phase deviation range 5.3.2.3. Electrical noise as a random process 6.5.2.6. Amplifier with single pole 4. Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 6.1.4. Time and Frequency representation 6. Frequency approach 5. Phase approach 5.1.1. Interchanging Modulation Types 6.1. Lock convergency approaches 5.2.4.1. Phasors Notations 6.2.3.2.2.1.4.2. Comparing the frequency and phase approaches: 5. Three-state comparator: frequency and phase detector 5.3. Filter Components Noise 4. Slope approach 6.1.2.3. Fully 3rd order passive filter 4.1.3.1. Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 4. Angular modulation 6.2. Non-ideal Filter Impedances 4. Numerical example 4.2. Amplifier AC characteristics 4.3.2.4.2.3. Discrete trasfers for the PLL Phase Model 5.2. Amplifier Noise 4.3.1.1.1.1. DC range limitations 5. Large Signal Linearization 6.2.5. Continuous equivalent with transmission delay 89 91 92 94 94 96 99 100 103 105 109 109 111 114 6.6.2. Electrical Noise: random sources representation & measurements 6. Input impedance: Zin 4.2.1. Supply Disturbances 4. Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 5. Linear Time Variable transfer 119 120 121 123 125 125 127 128 133 135 135 136 .3. Phase Noise Notations 6.1. Numerical examples and design considerations 5.1.2.3.1. Measuring Phase Noise 6. The holder 5.2.1. Random Electrical Noise 4.1. Disturbances and Noise Propagation 4.2. Loop filter time domain response 5.4.3.1. Transfer functions table 4.1. Simulation Example 69 70 71 72 74 76 79 80 80 81 82 82 83 84 85 5.

Configurations compared 8. Digital Demodulator: clock and carrier recovery loops 141 143 147 149 151 154 154 158 159 159 160 162 163 167 8.5. Results and conclusions 169 170 171 172 173 173 175 177 180 183 183 184 187 9.5. Testchips Realized 8.4.2.4.1. Gm-C oscillator 8. Conditions for the simulations 8.4.1.iv PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 7. TC2 : Mixer-Oscillator-PLL circuit for satellite direct conversion 8.3.1.1.2.1. Narrow bandwidth noise sources 7.4. Detailing noise sources in different PLL blocks 7. D-flip flop 7.2. Frequency domain 7.3.4.3. Translating the SNF into phase.1.1. Large bandwidth noise sources 7. voltage and current noise 7.4.2.1.2.3.2.2. TC2 structure 8.1. Behavioural Models 7.4.2. Charge Pump 7.3.2. Comparative analysis: phase jitter and implementation loss 8. Time domain 7. Sampling effects: SNF x fcp 7. TC3 : single PLL plus QCCO circuit 8.2. Double Loop Synthesizer 8. Phase Noise in the PLL context 7.1.2. Structure 8. Implementation Loss due to Phase Deviations 7. time. Results 8.1.5.2.2.3.2. TC2: results 8. Conclusion 191 Bibliography 193 . Signal to noise ratio and implementation loss 7.

2 Figure 1.3 Figure 3.8 Figure 1.2 Figure 4.5 Figure 2.8 Figure 2.1 Figure 4.9 Figure 1.6 Figure 1.13 Chapter 2 Figure 2.6 Figure 2.4 Figure 2.5 Figure 4.4 Figure 3.6 Figure 3.1 Figure 2.10 Figure 1.2 Figure 3.11 Figure 1.2 Figure 2.1 Figure 1.8 Figure 3.12 Figure 1.3 Figure 2.5 Figure 3.3 Figure 4.9 Chapter 3 Figure 3.7 Figure 1.4 Figure 4.6 Communication transceiver: TX and RX systems Heterodyne Receiver _ Terrestrial TV Frontend DVB Satellite transmission modes Satellite Receiver Frontend: heterodyne and ZIF architectures Local Oscillator Spectral Purity X SNR Carrier Spectrum QPSK constellation + phase deviation Phase Noise requirements PLL frequency synthesizer: block diagram VCO and tunable resonator Phase Detector & Charge Pump block diagram Phase detector & Charge pump: transfer and state machine 2 4 6 7 9 10 11 12 16 16 18 19 PLL linear Phase Model Vtune time response for a frequency step Locked VCO output spectrum 3rd order Loop Filter Impedance 4th order PLL: Open and Closed Loop Bode Plots 4th order PLL: Root Locus diagram Gain Variation X Stability in Bode Plots The influence of r21 in the gain-bandwidth variation Numerical example of robust filter design 23 25 25 29 31 31 33 36 42 BB noise representation of the VCO Free running VCO power spectrum density PSD of a VCO locked by a PLL Peaking X Optimum Closed Loop bandwidth Combined Spectrum: PLL + VCO noise contributions Rootlocus for w3dB location Rootlocus for was location Optimizing Total Phase Deviation Maximum SSB noise requirement 47 49 49 50 52 58 60 63 64 Active Loop Filter Fully 3rd order passive filter impedance Active Filter AC model Loop rootlocus with active filter Active Filter example: Bode plots Active filter: input impedance 70 72 73 75 77 79 .3 Figure 1.1 Figure 3.List of Figures v List of figures Chapter 1 Figure 1.9 Chapter 4 Figure 4.4 Figure 1.7 Figure 2.7 Figure 3.

7 Supply disturbances Amplifier noise Filter components noise Noise simulation schematic Noise simualtion results 82 83 83 85 86 Phase-detector & Charge Pump transfer Maximum Phase Detection Range & Cycle slips Condition for unlimited frequency tracking range Loop Filter: time response for current pulses Time response through normalized functions Convergence towards lock: phase deviation sequence Frequency approach convergence criterion Phase approach convergence criterion Comparing frequency and phase approaches Convergence approaches X lead-lag spacing r21 Convergence approaches X gain variation Discrete model for digital blocks Discrete phase detector input: ∆ϕn Charge Pump DAC output Continuous equivalent with transmission delay Frequency and Time response for the continuous+delay model 91 92 93 94 96 99 103 104 105 107 108 110 111 112 114 115 Spectrum Analyzer Output FM & PM carriers SSB superposed noise: AM + PM decomposition (phasor) Superposed Noise: AM + PM decomposition (spectrum) Phase modulated carrier by DSB superposed noise Phase deviation from DSB sidebands Slope approach: voltage & time deviations Periodic transfer determined by a large signal Large Signal Transfer: ideal and hyperbolic-tangent limitations 124 128 129 130 131 132 133 136 138 PLL block diagram with signal+noise inputs Noise Transfer Slopes Synthesizer Noise Floor Sampled Loop Model Large bandwidth noise folding DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: time domain signals DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: frequency domain signals 142 143 144 148 152 155 155 .3 Figure 5.3 Figure 6.6 Figure 6.3 Figure 7.8 Figure 6.4 Figure 6.11 Figure 5.7 Figure 6.vi PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Figure 4.14 Figure 5.5 Figure 6.2 Figure 7.13 Figure 5.1 Figure 7.10 Figure 4.5 Figure 7.11 Chapter 5 Figure 5.7 Figure 4.9 Chapter 7 Figure 7.8 Figure 4.10 Figure 5.2 Figure 6.1 Figure 6.15 Figure 5.6 Figure 5.5 Figure 5.1 Figure 5.12 Figure 5.4 Figure 7.9 Figure 5.4 Figure 5.9 Figure 4.2 Figure 5.16 Chapter 6 Figure 6.6 Figure 7.7 Figure 5.8 Figure 5.

6 Figure 8.13 Chapter 8 Figure 8.10 Figure 7.7 Figure 8.4 Figure 8.1 Figure 8.11 Figure 7.8 Figure 7.9 Figure 8.12 Figure 7.8 Figure 8.9 Figure 7.10 Charge Pump current noise levels within one period Behavioural model for AC and noise simulations Behavioural model for transient simulations Digital Demodulator and Decoder Noise Power added by the LO sidebands Behavioural Model of the Carrier Recovery loop 158 160 161 162 164 167 Gm-C integrated oscillator Double loop MOPLL: block diagram Block diagram of TC2 Photo of a testchip TC2 TC2 _ in-loop spectrum for N1=7 and fcp1=300Mhz TC2 _out-of-loop spectrum for N1=6 and fcp1=300MHz TC3 _ single low noise PLL plus QCCO Simulation result for the SSB phase noise _ linear scale Spectra for ∆fstep =125kHz and flo =900MHz Phase noise simulation for DL+QCCO with and without demodulator 171 174 176 177 179 179 181 182 186 186 .List of Figures vii Figure 7.3 Figure 8.2 Figure 8.5 Figure 8.

wp2 ] 3rd order filter : Open Loop Bandwidth recentering 10 37 38 39 Comparing the denominators of B(s) and BRL(s) Rootlocus approach for wcl : parameters of BRL(s) Gain Stability Boundary Maximum Normalized Gain Variation Fully 3rd order passive filter: ∆PhM and ∆GM Active Filter example: Phase Margin degradation Disturbances transfer functions Noise sources voltage spectrum density 54 58 65 66 72 78 84 87 Phase Modulated Carrier Phase Noise X CNR 126 132 Data sheet points from: TSA5059 .viii PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops List of tables Chapter 1 Table 1-1 Chapter 2 Table 2-1 Table 2-2 Table 2-3 Chapter 3 Table 3-1 Table 3-2 Table 3-3 Table 3-4 Chapter 4 Table 4-1 Table 4-2 Table 4-3 Table 4-4 Chapter 6 Table 6-1 Table 6-2 Chapter 7 Table 7-1 Table 7-2 Table 7-3 Table 7-4 Chapter 8 Table 8-1 Table 8-2 Table 8-3 Table 8-4 Table 8-5 Table 8-6 Table 8-7 Table 8-8 DVB standards: bandwidth and modulation types 2nd order filter: Phase Margin Variation for wol ∈ [ wz1 . wp2 ] 3rd order filter: Phase Margin Variation for wol ∈ [ wz1 . Parameters of the two zero-IF configurations being compared Parameters and outputs for comparative analysis Settings of the demodulator block Phase Jitter and implementation loss for rs=30Msps and fLO = 2.low noise PLL The influence of fcp change for narrow band noise The influence of fcp change for large band noise Implementation Loss X Phase deviations 145 151 153 166 Measurements of the frequency coverage of the QCCO Double Loop: minimum step and comparison frequencies.2GHz Phase Jitter and implementation loss for rs=3Msps and ∆fstep = 125kHz Margin for degradations in the oscillators phase noise performance 172 175 183 184 185 188 188 189 .

Hz/V] nominal gain value after the compensation wrt the post-filter [A.List of Symbols and Abbreviations ix List of Symbols and Abbreviations Symbols α: αn: αnpf: δϕi: δii: δti: δvi: ∆ϕ: ∆ϕn(nT): ∆Ψn(w): ∆ϕp: ∆fstep: ϕdiv: ϕe: ϕm: ϕn: ϕosc: ϕref: ξ: σϕ: τ: τrst: θn(t): Ac: Am: an(t): An: As: B(s): BRL(s): Bvco(s): Bvco-BPF(s): B3LPF(s): DB(s): DG(s): Ds(s): F(s): fi: fc: fcl: gain of the open loop transfer function [A.Hz/V] nominal gain value for loop filter calculation [A. dimensionless approximation of B(s) derived from the root locus closed loop transfer function ϕosc/vnvco [rad/V] band-pass filter approximation for Bvco(s) [rad/V] 3rd order low-pass filter approximation for B(s) denominator of the closed loop transfer function B(s) denominator of the transconductance of the loop amplifier denominator of Zs(s) loop filter transfer function in Laplace variable [Ω] intersection frequency for the PLL and VCO noise asymptotes [Hz] carrier frequency [Hz] bandwidth of the closed loop transfer function B(s) [Hz] . dimensionless total phase deviation [rad or °] time delay [s] time delay for the reset of the phase detector [s] phase modulating noise amplitude of the carrier signal [V] amplitude of the modulating signal [V] amplitude modulating noise amplitude of a single tone noise component. vn(t) [V] amplitude of the spurious sidebands wrt the carrier amplitude [dBc] closed loop transfer function ϕosc/ϕref.Hz/V] phase noise density [rad/sqrt(Hz)] current noise density [A/sqrt(Hz)] time noise density [s/sqrt(Hz)] voltage noise density [V/sqrt(Hz)] phase deviation or phase error [rad] phase deviation as a discrete variable [rad] Fourier transform of ∆ϕn(nT) peak value of a phase deviation [rad] minimum tuning step of a synthesizer [Hz] phase of the main divider output [rad] phase error at the phase detector input [rad] phase of the single tone modulating signal vm(t) [rad] phase of the single tone noise component vn(t) [rad] phase of the controlled oscillator [rad] phase of the reference input [rad] ksi. damping factor.

dBc/Hz] Lpll(f): L(f) in the in-loop zone of a locked VCO spectrum [dBc/Hz] L(f) of the free-running oscillator [dBc/Hz] Lvco(f): nlim: aliasing factor related to the sampling of large bandwidth noise. Ini: current noise density from component i [A/sqrt(Hz)] Kϕ: sensitivity of the phase detector plus charge pump comparator [A/rad] Kcco: frequency sensitivity of a current-controlled oscillator [Hz/A] Ko: VCO frequency sensitivity [rad/(s. ipw(t): output of the charge pump with a delay equals Tw [A] ini.V)] Kvco: VCO frequency sensitivity [Hz/V] L(f). dimensionless N: PLL main divider ratio. dimensionless hPLS(t). dimensionless Iaverage: average current at the output of the charge pump [A] Icp: charge pump current [A] leakage current at the tuning input [A] Ileakage: IZOH(w). HPLS(f): transfer function related to a periodic large signal H(s): open loop transfer function ϕdiv/ϕe. derived from the frequency approach function expressing the maximum fcl. fp3: frequencies of 2nd and 3rd poles of the loop filter [Hz] fz1: frequency of the zero of the loop filter [Hz] f3dB: 3dB attenuation frequency for the closed loop transfer function B(s) [Hz] GChP-ZOH(s): transfer function of the charge pump as a ZOH [A/rad] GChP-pw(s): transfer function of the charge pump as a holder with Tw delay [A/rad] gfrap: function expressing the maximum fcl. dimensionless Npll: noise of the PLL as a phase noise density [rad/sqrt(Hz)] Ns(s): numerator of Zs(s) PhM: phase margin for a open loop transfer function [°] p: normalized time deviation Td/Tcp Q: charges [C] Vtune: tuning voltage for the VCO [V] .x PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops fcp: comparison frequency at the phase detector [Hz] fj . vn(t) [Hz] fno: offset frequency of vn(t) wrt the carrier [Hz] foffset: frequency increment with respect to the frequency of a reference signal [Hz] fol: zero-crossing frequency for the open loop transfer function H(s) [Hz] foln.r21): function expressing the time response of vtune . LdB(f): single-side band phase noise [1/Hz. Fj: frequency of j [Hz] fm: frequency of the modulating signal [Hz] fn: frequency of a single tone noise component. derived from the phase approach gphap: gm: transconductance [Ω-1] Gmo: DC value of the transconductance of the loop amplifier Gvo: DC value of the voltage gain of the loop amplifier g(x. folnpf: frequencies related to woln and wolnpf [Hz] fosc: frequency of the controlled oscillator [Hz] frecover: intersection between flicker and white noise contributions of a transistor [Hz] fp2. iZOH(t): output of the charge pump for a ZOH approach [A] Ipw(w).

Zfilter(s): impedance of the loop filter [Ω] ZFa(s): impedance of the active loop filter [Ω] ZFai(s): impedance of the active loop filter with a non-ideal input impedance [Ω] ZF3(s): full 3rd order impedance of the loop filter [Ω] Zin: input impedance [Ω] Zs(s): series version for the lead-lag filter impedance [Ω] Zo: output impedance [Ω] Zp(s): parallel version for the lead-lag filter impedance [Ω] Z3(s): post-filter impedance [Ω] Z3u(s): impedance of the post-filter in parallel to the pull-up resistor [Ω] . Tp3. wz1: angular frequencies related to the zero and poles of the loop filter [rad/s] ws: sample angular frequency [rad/s] w3dB: angular frequency related to f3dB [rad/s] x: bandwidth ratio foln/fcp ZF(s). dBc/Hz] SJ(f): power spectrum density of J Tcp: comparison period [s] Td: delay or time interval between the two inputs of the phase detector [s] Tp2.List of Symbols and Abbreviations xi RJ(τ): autocorrelation function of the random process J Rpu: pull-up resistor in an active loop filter [Ω] rpf: post-filter factor for the compensation of αn and woln r21: 2nd-pole to zero ratio for loop filter r31: 3rd-pole to zero ratio for loop filter Sϕ(f). wp3. vd(t): voltage disturbance signal [V] vM(t): tuning voltage for a 2nd order filter impedance [V] vni. Tz1: time constants related to the zero and poles of the loop filter [s/rad] Vd(s). Vni: voltage noise density from component i [V/sqrt(Hz)] vn(t): single tone noise component [V] voltage noise density from the loop filter at the input of the VCO [V/sqrt(Hz)] vnf: vnvco: inherent noise of the VCO as a voltage noise source [V/sqrt(Hz)] w: angular frequency [rad/s] wa: pole of the loop amplifier [rad/s] was: intersection frequency for the asymptotes of the root locus [rad/s] angular frequency of the carrier signal [rad/s] wc: wcl: bandwidth of the closed loop transfer function B(s) [rad/s] wcp: angular comparison frequency [rad/s] wn: natural frequency [rad/s] wol: zero-crossing angular frequency for the open loop transfer function H(s) [rad/s] nominal value of wol for loop filter calculation [rad/s] woln: wolnpf: nominal value of wol after the compensation wrt the post-filter [rad/s] wp2. SϕdB(f): mean square phase fluctuation power [rad2/Hz.

type of multicarrier modulation phase locked loop phase modulation P-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor p-type bipolar junction transistor power spectrum density pulse width modulation quadrature amplitude modulation. type of digital modulation quadrature current controlled oscillator .xii PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Abbreviations AC: ADC: AGC: AM: BB: BiCMOS: BPF: bw: CMOS: CNR: DAB: DAC: DBS: DC: DDS: DFF: DSB: DVB: ft: FM: Gm-C: IC: IF: I/Q: I2C: LC: LHP: LNA: LO: LPF: LTI: MCPC: MOPLL: NPN: OFDM: PLL: PM: PMOS: PNP: PSD: PWM: QAM: QCCO: alternate current. refers to small signal frequency domain models (commonly named AC models in analog simulations) analog to digital converter automatic gain control amplitude modulation base band IC founding process with both BJT and CMOS devices band-pass filter bandwidth complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors carrier to noise ratio digital audio broadcasting digital to analog converter direct broadcast satellite direct current. refers to the quiescent state of a circuit direct digital synthesis D-type flip flop double-side band digital video broadcasting frequency of unity current gain for a transistor frequency modulation transconductance and capacitor integrator for a ring oscillator integrated circuit intermediate frequency in phase and quadrature signals bidirectional 2-wire bus for inter-IC programming and control inductor and capacitor resonator left hand plane in a s-space (Laplace transform) low noise amplifier local oscillator low pass filter linear time invariable system multi-channel per carrier mixer-oscillator plus phase-locked-loop circuit n-type bipolar junction transistor orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.

type of digital phase modulation resolution bandwidth in a spectrum analyzer radio frequency right hand plane in a s-space (Laplace transform) receiver in a telecommunication system surface acoustic wave filters single-channel per carrier satellite demodulator and decoder synthesizer noise floor signal to noise ratio single-side band square root testchips #2 and #3 time division multiplexing transient analysis in analog simulation television transmitter in a telecommunication system very high frequency. television broadcasting band ultra high frequency. type of modulation with respect to wide sense stationary.List of Symbols and Abbreviations xiii QPSK: RBW: RF: RHP: RX: SAW: SCPC: SDD: SNF: SNR: SSB: sqrt: TC2. TC3: TDM: TR: TV: TX: VHF: UHF: VCO: V/I: VSB: wrt: WSS: Xosc: ZIF: ZOH: 3W: quadrature phase-shift keying. television broadcasting band voltage controlled oscillator voltage to current converter vestigial side band. architecture of a frontend zero order holder unidirectional 3-wire bus for inter-IC programming . property of some stochastic processes crystal oscillator zero-IF receiver.

This is the beginning of a top-down analysis about the phase noise in the local oscillator (LO) signal. An algorithm for the loop filter calculation is developed. which were developed to support the activities of design and engineering for the integrated circuits in frequency synthesizers. The design of a monolithic mixer-oscillator and PLL synthesizer is also presented and used as a practical example to compare the simulations and calculation tools with measurement results. Application constraints related to phase deviations and reference breakthrough are discussed in the light of this algorithm. It allows a systematic and consistent approach to combine the IC parameters and the filtering requirements. These tendencies point to low phase noise synthesizers. where the new standards of digital modulation broadcasting (DVB) which are appearing. Most of the thesis dissertation is concerned with models: calculations and behavioural simulation tools.xiv PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Preface The central issue of this thesis is the stability and noise performance of PLL frequency synthesizers. in chapter three. are bringing new issues for IC design and application. and discusses different possibilities of notation that are compared to measurement and simulation tools. describing their basic functionality. PLL synthesizers are extensively used for their programming flexibility. They concern the maximum feedback bandwidth for a loop that is partially discrete. where the gain parameters vary within a large range. . Chapter six presents the theoretical basis of the generation of phase noise. in order to develop a linear time variable transfer for the noise. implemented in very monolithic architectures with integrated oscillators. and the continuous trend for higher integration levels. The constituent blocks of the PLL synthesizer are presented. The assumptions of a narrow band FM modulation and a periodic steady behaviour are combined. We focus on the context of TV broadcasting tuners. Frequency synthesizers are a common block of the frontend of RF telecommunication systems. Chapter two studies the stability and robustness of a phase-locked loop in a tuner application. Chapter one introduces the context of the TV tuner and the current tendencies in architecture and IC requirements. A discrete time domain approach is compared to a continuous frequency model with an equivalent delay. ease of integration and low production cost. The AC characteristics of the filter amplifier exemplify the first non-ideal aspects of the phase model of the PLL. The noise performances of the PLL and the VCO are adjusted by centering the closed loop bandwidth of the feedback. in a first example that descends to a circuit implementation level. Chapter four examines the active loop filter configurations and continues the noise analysis. In chapter five we continue to discuss other limitations of the linear time invariable model of the frequency synthesizer. and the maximum comparison frequency that still guarantees the frequency tracking behaviour of the tri-state phase detector. In particular. The relationships among the different notations are explored. An example of phase jitter optimization for a satellite synthesizer is discussed.

both for a QPSK near zero-IF receiver. The comparison refers to the allocation of implementation loss in a tuner. Testchip TC2 is part of a double synthesizer with a comparison frequency that goes up to 330MHz. Normandie. Caen. This thesis was developed in the industrial site of Philips Semiconductors in Caen. We also present considerations about the implementation loss in the receiver due to the phase deviations in the LO signal. are presented in chapter eight. where these analytical tools are used to design and evaluate two testchips. by an analysis of the noise performance of the different constituent blocks of the PLL. Finally we compare the spectra of two synthesizers: a single loop PLL plus an LC oscillator and a double loop synthesizer plus a Gm-C oscillator. due to the phase deviations in the LO. June 99. I would like to thank all of the colleagues within Philips Caen and Philips Eindhoven for their help and support. with an in-loop noise in the order of –108dBc/Hz. the phase noise issue is detailed to the circuit level. Furthermore we discuss behavioural models to mix system and circuit descriptions in simulations. Two examples of high and low bit rate channels are discussed. and the margin for production for the most critical parameters is calculated. The testchip designs are briefly presented. and two simulation examples are presented. It was part of a collaboration contract between Philips Semiconductors and the INSA de Lyon.List of Symbols and Abbreviations xv In chapter seven. Marina de Queiroz Tavares . France. they contain a PLL and a monolithic Gm-C oscillator that covers the satellite band L (950MHz to 2150MHz). Practical examples. or more specifically the electrical engineering laboratory CEGELY. simulations and measurements. Testchip TC3 explores the maximum bandwidth of a single loop PLL and confirms the theoretical approach of chapter five. The parameters that can distinguish the dominant noise sources in measurements are identified.

Chapter 1 / Introduction

1

Contents:
1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Introduction 1

The frontend in a telecommunication receiver.........................................................................................2 The frontend in TV broadcasting .............................................................................................................3 Current tendencies: low noise and higher integration.............................................................................9 PLL systems : different application contexts .........................................................................................14

1.5 PLL frequency synthesizers constituting blocks and nomenclature .......................................................15 1.5.1 VCO ...............................................................................................................................................16 1.5.2 Dividers..........................................................................................................................................17 1.5.3 Phase Detector – Charge Pump......................................................................................................17 1.5.4 Loop Filter .....................................................................................................................................19

Figures:
Figure 1.1 Figure 1.2 Figure 1.3 Figure 1.4 Figure 1.5 Figure 1.6 Figure 1.7 Figure 1.8 Figure 1.9 Figure 1.10 Figure 1.11 Figure 1.12 Example of a communication transceiver: TX and RX systems ................................................2 Heterodyne Receiver _ Terrestrial TV Frontend.......................................................................4 DVB Satellite transmission modes...............................................................................................6 Satellite Receiver Frontend: heterodyne and ZIF architectures...............................................7 Local Oscillator Spectral Purity X SNR .....................................................................................9 Carrier Spectrum........................................................................................................................10 QPSK constellation + phase deviation........................................................................................11 Phase Noise requirements ..........................................................................................................12 PLL frequency synthesizer: block diagram..............................................................................16 VCO and tunable resonator .......................................................................................................16 Phase Detector & Charge Pump block diagram ......................................................................18 Phase detector & Charge pump: transfer and state machine .................................................19

Tables:
Table 1-1 DVB standards: bandwidth and modulation types......................................................................10

1 Introduction
In this chapter we locate the context of this thesis by introducing basic aspects and innovation tendencies for the frontends of TV broadcasting receivers. This thesis focuses on the frequency synthesizer block, which is a constituent part of the frontend. PLL frequency synthesizers are a common element of different telecommunication receivers that are produced on a large scale. This choice is connected to their compactness and low cost, both of which are continuously improved by larger integration levels. Furthermore, emerging digital modulation techniques are imposing new requirements on this block, which carries out the frequency conversion of the input data. Finally, we shortly describe the constituent elements of the PLL synthesizer, so as to present their functionality and general structure.

2

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

1.1 The frontend in a telecommunication receiver

Communication and transport are probably the key technological fields that most changed daily life in the 20th century. Our world became smaller, because it may be rapidly crossed by waves and engines taking information and people worldwide. The term communication system is employed here to include transceivers that convert data into electromagnetic waves (transmitters_TXs) and the other way around (receivers_RXs), in order to transmit this data through a fast moving media such as air, metallic cables, optical fibers and others. The TX and RX have two basic parts, namely: • Backend: data processor and (de)modulator; • Frontend: frequency translator and selectivity. The first one is in charge of transforming data into a convenient manageable electrical signal i that is later transposed into a well defined frequency window (channel) by the second.

input data

data processor + Modulator

Up Conversion

output data
Down Conversion + Selectivity Demodulator + data processor

Frontend

Backend

Figure 1.1

Example of a communication transceiver: TX and RX systems

The spread of communication systems relies on the advance of modulation techniques, digital signal treatment and RF-frequency electronics. The first two greatly increased the amount and quality of transmitted information, and the last one enabled the utilization of an increasing range of the frequency spectrum. However this spectrum range is limited by the physical properties of the conducting materials and the maximum working frequencies of the electronic devices employed. So further exploitation of this already crowded spectrum depends on a greater compaction of modulated data, or capacity to share the same frequency range (spread spectrum modulations). Occupying narrower frequency bands with higher information density decreases the margin for signal degradation in the up and down conversion of the data in the TX and RX systems. In other words, modulation types with increasing bandwidth efficiency require higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a correct reception.
i

There are also communication systems that use base band transmissions, i.e. the data is directly transmitted after modulation, without being frequency translated. However the applications are usually restricted by their maximum data flow.

Chapter 1 / Introduction

3

Up and down conversions are carried out by mixing data signals with carrier signals in TXs, or by mixing channels with carrier signals in RXs. Therefore the loss of quality due to this operation depends on the mixer and carrier qualities. Mixer performance is usually specified in terms of conversion gain, noise figure and linearity parameters, amongst others. There is a compromise between the parameters of gain on one side and linearity and noise figure on the other. This compromise has to be solved in combination with the specifications of the filtering and amplification stages, taking into account the constraints of consumption and signal quality. The carrier signal performance includes factors such as frequency tunability and spectrum purity. The frequency tunability refers to the coverage of a frequency range, with a certain resolution or minimum variation step. The carrier spectrum quality is often defined by a carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), specified in accordance to the modulation nature and SNR requirements of the data signal. Carrier signal generation can be split into three basic types: - Direct digital synthesis (DDS), using sine look-up tables, accumulators and digital clocks. They are often limited in speed and quality by the maximum clock frequency. Thus, they are more frequently employed in band-base (BB), or intermediate-frequency (IF) stages; mainly after analog-to-digital data conversion (ADC). Mixer-divider chains, combining an ensemble of reference oscillators, through frequency conversion and filtering. Increasing the precision and the frequency range is a trade off with size, integrability and power consumption. They are often bulky systems that become hardly integrable as the number of reference sources increases. For non-integrated systems, the advantage of keeping the spectral purity of the sources may be decisive.

-

Feedback loops with a reference source and a programmable counter block to sweep the frequency range of a tunable oscillator. Phase-locked loop types are the most widespread in transceiver applications. Integrability and low cost are the main advantages, but settling times are elevated compared to methods of direct synthesis. A wide span of systems of hybrid generation combine the basic types above to explore the advantages of each architecture. They may be generally called multi-loop architectures, as they compose the carrier signal through two or more loops in different concatenated and/or interlaced structures. The scope of the present work is centered around PLL frequency synthesizers for terrestrial and satellite TV receivers. Stability and noise issues are discussed and applied to single and double loop architectures. The models developed for stability and disturbance are certainly useful for other PLL applications, but the issues and numerical examples are oriented by the primary context.

1.2 The frontend in TV broadcasting

The block schematic below represents a heterodyne receiver, detailing the elements of the ii selectivity and frequency conversion stages.
ii

The denomination heterodyne or superheterodyne, is given to receivers working with two distinct amplification and filtering sections prior to demodulation.

(4) Mixer: frequency conversion kernel: conversion gain. . (5) Level detector BB output data VCO or LO Vtune PLL TUNE VAGC Figure 1.4 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops RF stage IF stage (1) (2) (3) (4) (6) (7) (8) video & audio demod. and frequency tuning for oscillator and input filters tracking. rejecting image channel and also blocking VCO signal . plus buffer avoiding fosc leakage towards the antenna input. (6) IF pre-amplifier: gain prior to selective filtering to keep minimum SNR.2 Heterodyne Receiver _ Terrestrial TV Frontend (1) 1st RF filter: large bandwidth filtering plus impedance adaptation between antenna and pre-amplifier. linearity and noise figure constraints. (8) IF signal treatment: amplification. (7) IF filter: fixed frequency very selective filtering (SAW filter). (2) RF pre-amplifier: 1st amplification stage (keeping SNR). demodulation and signal level detector. (5) Local Oscillator (LO) + PLL tuning system: carrier generator for down-conversion. (3) double RF filter: middle bandwidth filtering.

comparing the RF oscillator to a reference crystal oscillator. the input data appears around the IF. • The AGC dynamic for the amplifying blocks of the tuner is generally between 40 and 50 dB. and passes a sharper selectivity stage represented by filter (7). The highest possible IF value is chosen. working at a fixed frequency. The sequence of filtering. Filter (7) presents a sharp selectivity for the neighbouring frequencies. to avoid direct coupling between the RF input and the IF output. The tuner architectures and the issues studied are focused on the TV reception context. used for RF isolation. IF and channel width. to ease the filtering of the image channel. also named tracking characteristic or matched filter-oscillators. these characteristics usually oppose each other. There are several standards with different values for RF. between 4 and 6 MHz. In a TV set the tuner is easily recognized by its metallic screening box. where a primary rough selection is carried out by filters (1) and (3). RF filters and oscillator are constructed with similar resonant circuits.8 MHz Most of the channel bandwidth is occupied by the video information.UHF: 400 MHz -----. The audio is transmitted through a modulated subcarrier that is placed in the high end of the channel bandwidth. for both terrestrial and satellite applications. The rejection of this same filter for the image channel is in the order of 60 dB. mixing and amplification blocks reflects an important trade-off between selectivity and frequency tunability. but usually outside the reception bands. For elements with a frequency dependent behaviour. having one set specific for the reception of the VHF bands.400 MHz . The frequency variability is guaranteed by programmable counters interpolated in the control loop. and the other for UHF. After the first frequency downconversion. with another 60 dB controllable amplification capacity in the demodulator. assuring the correlation of their frequency variation. For instance. channel frequency range divided in three bands: .55 MHz The choice of Fvco larger than FRF reduces the relative tuning range (fmax/fmin) of the local oscillator. • Most standards work with: Fvco = FRF + FIF and IF typically within the range : 39 MHz --.Chapter 1 / Introduction 5 In figure 1. and a bandwidth in the order of 5MHz.VHF III: 140 MHz -----. In fact figure 1.VHF I: 47 MHz ------. • Channel bandwidth: 6 MHz --.860 MHz The input amplifier.140 MHz . filtering and mixing stages are often doubled. The elements constituting the tuner are indicated by the dotted arrow. • The bandwidths of band-pass filters (1) and (3) vary significantly amongst the different applications. Therefore the RF stages covering the whole input frequency range are necessarily less selective than the IF stage. . close to the most common standards. The work in this thesis deals with stability and noise aspects of the PLL plus RF oscillator ensemble.2 the incoming signal is initially modulated at the channel or RF frequency. correlating their specifications and design constraints to the tuner application requirements. i The frequency values indicated for the terrestrial and satellite applications are just a rough range.2 represents a terrestrial tuner architecture. It contains a feedback control system. The frequency tuning of the RF stages is made by the PLL block. with the following typical values of i RF and IF frequencies and bandwidths: • RF input. filter (3) may present a bandwidth between 7 and 25 MHz. with an amplitude sensor at the BB stage. A convenient amplification level is assured by an automatic gain control (AGC) loop.

75 GHz . Satellite tuners have a slightly different architecture. in order to support the losses through the cable binding the antenna and the RX frontend. whose ADC input is connected to the band-base output of last mixing stage. (satellite DVB – Digital Video Broadcasting). • 1st RF at the antenna input. the minimum SNR at the IF output is in the order of 55dB. using multiplexing in frequency and time domain (see figure 1. is rather elevated. to start causing visible errors in the video reception.7 GHz -. The demodulation and decoding are performed by a digital IC. • Transponder bandwidth: 33 MHz – 36MHz . this block has tight noise figure requirements. as shown in figure 1. • Constant LO frequency down-converting block: LNA (low noise amplifier) Due to the strong attenuation between the satellite and the RX antennas.3 DVB Satellite transmission modes The first RX systems for QPSK channels used a double IF heterodyne architecture. with the following intermediate frequencies: • 1st IF: 460 MHz – 480 MHz.4. (DBS . The choice of the 2nd IF was connected to the availability of SAW filters with Nyquist slope at this frequency. have different channel compositions. regarding the ensemble of signals transmitted by a single amplifier in a determined frequency window.2150 MHz . . Ku-band: 10. MCPC QPSK SCPC QPSK FM Multicast QPSK 13dB 36MH Figure 1. The last LO converting the data to the base band has quadrature outputs. • 2nd RF at LNA output. and a down-mixing stage with a LO containing 2 outputs in quadrature. In this case we prefer to refer to the frequency spacing as the transponder bandwidth. with 1st LO: Fvco1 = FRF + FIF1 nd • 2 IF: 70 MHz. transmitted with a power level 13dB below the analog channel. which imposes a first frequency conversion close to the antenna. The RF transmission bandwidth.3). use FM modulated channels with a bandwidth varying between 27 and 36 MHz. The more recent digital norms. Ku-band. • Multicast (analog+digital channels): a standard analog FM channel of 27 MHz bandwidth multiplexed in frequency with a 9MHz wide digital channel. • SCPC (single-channel per carrier): several narrow bandwidth channels splitting the transponder spacing. splitting the output data in I (in phase) and Q (quadrature) outputs.12. • MCPC (multi-channel per carrier): single modulation package multiplexing in time (TDM) up to 8 TV channels transmitted in a bit flow with rates around 55 Mbps. band L : 950 MHz -.6 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops For analog standards. The older analog standards.Direct Broadcast Satellite).

& decoder BB output data VAGC VCO Level detector Vtune PLL VAGC Near-zero IF receiver Fvco = FRF Figure 1.Chapter 1 / Introduction 7 RF stages 1st RF VCO IF and/or BB I Q SAW 90° Level detector Demodulator BB output data LNA down converter Vtune PLL VAGC 2 nd heterodyne receiver Fvco = FIF + FRF FIF ~ 470 MHz I Q Vtune 90° ADC & filters carrier & clock recovery forward error correction Satellite (SDD) demod.4 Satellite Receiver Frontend: heterodyne and ZIF architectures .

. neighbouring channels may come from different TXs and consequently their incoming power vary greatly according to the TX and RX “line of sight”. near-zero IF architecture (see lower half of figure 1. In both configurations the AGC dynamic range. The precision is also limited by the minimum allowable tuning step in the LO controlling loop. for the tuner. However the latter suffers from much larger attenuation in the transmission path. single IF. but also increasing the performance constraints for the integrated blocks and the surrounding application. is the constraint for the filtering of the neighbouring channels.the quadrature LO. The difference between the output spectrum and a real BB signal are recovered by the digital demodulator in the so called. It is certainly an architecture allowing greater compactness and economy in external components. A maximum bit-error rate (BER) of 10-4 is usually acceptable for most decoders. as they come from a common TX source. and needs to fulfill the conditions of minimum mismatches in amplitude (<0. Thus an intermediate heterodyne architecture uses a single IF (similar to the 1st IF above) and a quadrature LO at this IF frequency (see upper half of figure 1.5dB) and quadrature (<3°). but is programmed to a frequency close to the RF carrier. The limitations are connected to the performance of several blocks such as: . besides their frequency ranges. which now works in the band L.4 illustrates block schematics of a heterodyne. and furthermore they are adapted to the demodulation of the QPSK modulated data.4). Satellite transmitted channels have the same power levels at the RX input. The advantages are connected to the suppression of the IF stage and the replacement of the SAW – BPF by a discrete and cheaper LPF. and it implies a minimum SNR of 11. the rejection of the image channel (which is now the selected channel but with a spectrum reversion) can be replaced by a proper output form.the isolation and linearity of the RF amplifiers and mixers. The nomenclature near-zero IF stress the fact that the LO signal is not locked to the RF input.8 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In more recent systems the Nyquist filtering is integrated in the digital IC realizing the demodulation and signal decoding. Besides. The bandwidths of the filters are greatly dependent on the application. Another important difference between the terrestrial and satellite applications. Finally the latest satellite tuner ICs are concentrating in a monodyne. The I and Q outputs have this convenient format.the matching of the I/Q stages in BB. is to the order of 50 dB. containing the necessary information to distinguish the two superposed spectra. In fact the monodyne RX is especially sensitive to coupling between the RF and LO signals (in this case at the same frequency) and to interference generated by intermodulation products of even orders (appearing at low frequencies). We can note the large difference of the minimum SNR for the reception of analog terrestrial TV signals and the satellite digitally modulated ones. The minimum SNR at the base band output will depend on the maximum bit-error rate that can be corrected by the signal decoder. . In terrestrial transmission. and it would not be feasible to work with such high SNR as in the terrestrial systems.4dB for QPSK modulated data [Sinde98a].4). and a near-zero IF (named ZIF or zero-IF for short) receivers. . There is one single stage of frequency translation between the 2nd RF (band L) and the BB output. carrier recovery loop. Figure 1.

5 Local Oscillator Spectral Purity X SNR flo-fch2 The channel with lower input power. centered around fch2 .2 and 1. with respect to selectivity and SNR degradation. In the next section we discuss some current tendencies in the development of tuner ICs. relating the new requirements to the emerging digital broadcasting systems. tuners often have one single integrated circuit (IC). a MOPLL.Chapter 1 / Introduction 9 The “line of sight” concerns the distance and blocking obstacles. i Signal reflection causes multi-path reception. Nowadays. From now on. Specially for strongly attenuated signals this is an important draw-back. other more strict parameters of spectral purity are added. where different phase delayed versions of the input signal reach the RX. including the PLL. 1. Furthermore the more recent digital standards.4). This level of integration is the result of a continuous miniaturization that combines the functionality of several ICs and also integrates parts of previously discrete circuitry. mixer-oscillator and IF amplifier blocks. we concentrate our attention on the frequency synthesizer block.3 Current tendencies: low noise and higher integration Current trends in the tuner circuit developments are bound to the developing standards using digitally modulated signals. decreasing the SNR and adding noise which is correlated to the signal. causing attenuation and i reflection of the transmitted signal. based on phase modulation techniques and/or using closely spaced multi-carriers. This example introduces the idea that the tuner requirements. and to the continuous demand for higher integration levels. RF fch1 fch2 IF flo-fch1 LO flo Figure 1. . Figure 1. Therefore from the basic requirements of the frequency synthesizer concerning the tuning range and the resolution.5 illustrates the importance of the carrier spectral purity for the proper reception of neighbouring channels with different input power. marked by a gray rectangle in the frontend schematics (figures 1. may be translated to corresponding specifications for the frequency synthesizer block. are imposing new constraints on the CNR of the local oscillator. is degenerated by an adjacent channel down converted by a noisy local oscillator.

5 sketches the pollution of the input RF signal by the spectral dispersion of the local oscillator.536MHz 2. carrier spectrum. In particular for FM signals.: 33MHz – 36MHz Not fixed.60 10. DVB-C. In Europe the DVB-S.61MHz 10.75GHz 2nd RF: 950 – 2150MHz Not fixed. DVB-S Basic modulation principle Number of subcarriers & frequency spacing Signal bandwidth Gross data rates [Mbps] Frequency ranges Single carrier QPSK modulated DVB-T Multiple carrier OFDM subcarriers modulation: QAM16 or QAM64 1705 / 6817 mode: 2k / 8k ∆f= 4. e.10 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Figure 1. cable and terrestrial or off-air systems. Besides the video signal needs higher signal quality for an interference-free (or error-free) reception.g. e.: 51.6) is demodulated at the output as a flat. These specifications also depend on the modulation type and on the selectivity of the input filtering stages.: 34. When talking about SNR. e.37 VHF I VHF III UHF Table 1-1 DVB standards: bandwidth and modulation types .fcp f [Hz] fosc f [Hz] Figure 1. Analog terrestrial TV standards use vestigial side-band (VSB) modulation and FM for the video information and either FM and AM signals for audio.304 Slots within: VHF III Band L _ Not fixed. …64. DVB-T and DAB describe the norms of video and audio transmissions through satellite.12kHz 7. Therefore the specifications of phase noise in the output of a local oscillator. transmitted by the VCO intrinsic noise.6 Carrier Spectrum Digital video broadcasting standards and services have undergone great expansion recently. noise specifications are often bound to the free running.27 VHF I VHF III UHF DVB-C Single carrier M-QAM modulated (M=16. 256) _ DAB Multiple carrier OFDM subcarriers modulation: DQPSK 193/ 385/ 769 /1537 mode: 1 / 1. The spectral purity is largely discussed during this work. |P(f)| Programmable & tunable range single sideband phase noise N.g. white distributed noise interfering in the output data. Therefore in the FM context.47kHz / 1. we concentrate on the video signal because of its larger amount of information compared to the audio signal. needed for their robustness with respect to amplitude distortions.80 – 39.: 7.g.9MHz Not fixed.g. e. and in the PLL synthesizer context we will see that it is directly associated to the phase noise in the carrier signal. In satellite applications the analog standards use FM signals. or out-of-loop. the noise added by a local oscillator with 1/f2 power sidebands (as represented in figure 1. are a translation of the CNR required for the reception.5 / 2 / 3 ∆f= 8kHz /…/ 1kHz 1.7 – 12.

7 and 1. initially imagined for audio transmission only.3 dB. tuner constructors ask for the following phase noise performances: for QPSK receivers a maximum total phase deviation under 2°. Table 1-1 [Roma97] presents a short overlook of these standards. the specifications for the LO spectrum become very tight.7 QPSK constellation + phase deviation . the relationship between the implementation loss and the LO phase deviation depend on the characteristics of the demodulator used in the reception. frontend plus demodulator. reflects the sensitivity of the ensemble. to a certain noise spectrum shape.8. showing important advantages for mobile applications when compared to the DVB-T. we give a first glance of the issue with figures 1.2 dB [Sinde98a]. and in QAM 256 it equals 30. All these standards have source coding algorithms based on MPEG-2. either as a total value in degrees or as a maximum SSB level at a certain offset. For example. for a maximum BER of 10-4 . which is considerably higher than the SNR for the QPSK channel. For example. showing that phase deviations directly increase the occurrence of errors in bit detection.2 dB [Sinde98a]. QPSK constellation In figure 1. and the first consumer DVB-T systems are currently being tested. most of these specifications are empirically determined. has developed into a multimedia standard (DMB). these specifications can be derived from the allocation of implementation losses within the system. The minimum signal to noise ratios vary in accordance to the bandwidth efficiency of the different types of modulation and coding. we may expect that the phase accuracy of the carrier becomes relevant. Therefore the specification for phase deviations. Thus with respect to the sensitivity of the local oscillator to the CNR. the SNR of a DVB-C channel in QAM 64 is 24. More formally. The first digital broadcasting services available were the single carrier ones. Nowadays there are also DAB radio and data transmission services. ∆ϕ Figure 1.Chapter 1 / Introduction 11 The DAB system. Indeed. The underlying modulation principles are either phase or phase and amplitude based.7 we sketch the influence of phase noise in a QPSK constellation. For DVB standards. At this point. This requirement can be translated into a total phase deviation brought by the synthesized carrier. requiring simpler TX and RX. and they strongly depend on the application used for the measurements. Nevertheless. the implementation losses due to the phase deviations of the LO signal should be kept below 0. The optimization of the phase deviation in the LO signal is one of our central subjects that is progressively discussed in the following chapters. or for OFDM receivers a single side-band (SSB) phase noise lower than –80dBc/Hz at a frequency offset of 1kHz. However.

have to be tried. out of loop SSB phase in loop SSB phase noise …… ∆ϕ2/2 foff-1 fosc foffset fmin fmax f [Hz] foff-2 Figure 1. The second situation sends us back to the trend for higher integration levels.8.b For multicarrier standards. This situation is often encountered when using completely integrated oscillators. Figure 1. In practice this situation appears in two contexts: • very strict noise performances related to modulation types with compact data representation in narrow bandwidths or using multi-carriers closely spaced to each other. In TV broadcasting the OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) standard has the most strict specifications concerning the local carrier spectral purity. Currently.12 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The total phase deviation can be calculated integrating the sidebands of the LO spectrum. The large frequency range of the TV applications limits the possibility of integrating the resonant circuit. It shows noise specifications that may concern the intrinsic behaviour of the oscillator (out of loop SSB phase noise) or the PLL blocks (in loop SSB phase noise). most of the controllable LOs are based on a resonant amplifier with an external resonator.8.a. However as the offset frequency of the noise specifications decreases. The solid line spectrum shows an option where the in-loop (PLL related) noise performance is adapted to the CNR specification at both offsets: foff-1 and foff-2 .b shows two carrier spectra with different noise performances. and it also indicates a SSB phase noise limit for two different frequency offsets(foff-1 and foff-2). as occurs in narrow band reception systems. . as shown in figure 1. like mobile telephones. the noise specifications are eventually determined by a maximum threshold for the level of the sidebands. for offsets that are comparable to the frequency spacing between subcarriers. used to tune the oscillator frequency.8. Therefore other oscillator structures. but associated to low noise PLL. The lower and upper limits of the integral are determined by the demodulator and channel bandwidth parameters.a Figure 1. like ring or relaxation. it becomes harder to fulfill this requirement by relying only on the oscillator characteristics.8 Phase Noise requirements Figure 1. Figure 1.8.6.8 continues the zoom around fosc started in figure 1. The dotted line spectrum presents a better oscillator performance than the solid line spectrum. • oscillators with a poor intrinsic noise performance.

PLL synthesizers in tuners have to cope with large variations in gain parameters. or in other words. have to be controlled to reduce the signal degeneration by “self-reception” or “selfdemodulation”. that are closely related to the evolution of an analog carrier generation for RX frontends. The absence of external tracking filters can be more easily coped with in satellite receivers. in an application context that is not very flexible. a multi-loop synthesizer. Direct conversion schemes have new constraints related to the suppression of the IF stage. and the impossibility to track the LC matched filters in the input stages of the tuner. So the most natural and inexpensive point for optimization is a careful fitting of the loop filter. The integrated oscillators may also be piloted by a second oscillator with an external resonator but working at a different frequency. minimum tuning step and DC tuning range. The AGC dynamics in the RF and BB parts have to replace the previous IF dynamics while preserving the linearity and noise figure properties. OFDM). where the uniform ii input level enables a feasible compromise between selectivity and linearity requirements. In summary the following topics. Œ The three issues above are completely entangled with each other since the optimization of the spectrum suggests bandwidth constraints that have to be guaranteed within the whole gain interval. Nevertheless. for solutions with integrated oscillators. Furthermore. In fact. where a totally integrated oscillator. which unfortunately is not independent of other parameters such as loop gain. to rely on the PLL characteristics. . Furthermore the variable parameter adapting these performances is the loop bandwidth. increases the robustness to RF interference. it is also in satellite applications that we see more and more frontend receptors using direct conversion.8 showed that the noise requirement imposes a compromise between the PLL and the VCO noise performances. Coupling interactions between the local oscillator and the RF input signal (now in the same frequency). comparison frequency. multi-loop schemes with large PLL bandwidths are required.Chapter 1 / Introduction 13 The drawbacks of these other structures are: their poorer phase noise performance as compared to LC resonators with high quality factors. The use of an integrated oscillator covering a large tuning range often brings an inherent degradation of the oscillator spectral purity. These constraints brought an additional interest to a completely integrated oscillator suffering form less external coupling problems. The advantages appear mostly in the zero-IF configurations. the noise quality of the PLLs starts to be an issue. we need to control the closed loop bandwidth. The PLL bandwidth is the compensation variable between the performances of these two circuits. figure 1. Therefore the integration tendency forces architectural modifications in the tuner. or ZIF receivers. However this option is quite challenging for the aspects of power consumption and RF isolation. As the improvement in coverage+selectivity of the VCOs attains a limit. QAM. ii Another option to the input filtering is to integrated selectivity stages with structures that are matched to the integrated oscillator. Thus achieving strict phase noise requirements becomes obligatory for the PLL circuitry. are guiding the issues studied in this work: Œ Œ Noise and stability treatments for large bandwidth and low phase deviation PLL synthesizers in tuner applications. A combination of PLL and VCO noise performances are the IC parameters that can be specified to fullfil this specification. Furthermore. and learn about the constraints that limit the PLL bandwidth. with no LC resonator. Low Phase Deviation: the VCO spectrum has to be optimized for minimum phase deviations in accordance to the new digital modulation standards (DVB standards: QPSK.

• Frequency Synthesis. stability. ranging and instrumentation systems. whose variations have to be tracked within the tuning range. aided acquisition. This last point concerns the generation and sensitivity to interference in the supplies and in the substrate (for integrated blocks that share a common substrate and/or common supplies). specifies many characteristics of the control loop. Some different investigation issues are seen in association with the fields of application above: • in coherent demodulators: cycle slips. telemetry. This division is also related to the PLL functioning modes: acquisition. In the third. It is not unusual to classify a PLL with respect to the type of . and in combination with other analog and digital blocks. time and frequency control. such as the comparator block in the feedback system. with lower power consumption. The first PLL applications were synchronous receptors for coherent demodulation. radar. limits of tracking. and. Frequently there is also a filter before the input of the oscillator. • in general: aspects concerning the increasing integration level of the PLL blocks. The phase detector. frequency domain representations. Finally. but still not locked to it. the oscillator is coupled to a fixed reference. searching to follow the input. for the synchronization of horizontal and vertical scans. In particular for PLL synthesizers. In the first two.14 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops These issues are the conducting line through the sequence of practical and theoretical points tackled in this work. tracking. 1. The tracking mode concerns the function of the PLL when it follows a non constant input. the first patents appeared in the 70’s. locked or synchronous mode. determining the bandwidth of the feedback action. the locked mode refers to synthesizers with a constant input. • in synthesizers: noise performances. The acquisition mode refers to the interval during which the loop wanders within its tuning range. Usually described in linear. These are phenomena described in the time domain with complicated non-linear behaviour and modeling.4 PLL systems : different application contexts Phase locked loops are feedback systems containing at least a controllable oscillator and a phase detector.… . the phase detector receives a variable input. In the next sections a short listing of PLL applications precedes a description of the constituting blocks of a PLL synthesizer. higher working frequencies. locking time. frequency and phase properties of the reference signal. and the first industrial use on a large scale appears within the TV market (in the 50’s). • Coherent Demodulation of Digital and Analog Signals. from which one tries to extract either a carrier or the information that modulates the input signal. The phase detector is the comparing element between a variable or steady input and the driven oscillator element. command. However with respect to their functionality there are mainly three areas: • Carrier Tracking and Synchronization. The application contexts are widespread in areas such as: communications. in order to transfer to this.

and it translates the current information into the tuning voltage input for the VCO. . 1. with a current output block. Therefore the dividing ratios also determine the coverage of the tuning range of the synthesizer. • Two-state detectors: logical implementation containing two memory nodes.5 PLL frequency synthesizers constituting blocks and nomenclature From now on we treat exclusively the frequency synthesizer PLL. due to its absence of error averaging. Its advantage is related to the possibility of extremely fast lock intervals. or in other words. The three-state phase/frequency detector and its tri-state implementation are discussed in the following section. which represents the phase error. or a flipflop. thereby choosing the frequency at the input of the phase detector: fcp (comparison frequency). related to an external quartz resonator. A low pass filter is used to select the difference portion. that is interpolated between the VCO and the phase detector.Chapter 1 / Introduction 15 the phase detector. The programmable divider. A general insight of different PLL applications can be found in [Wola91]. for set and reset states. This structure is often reserved to applications with a critical phase noise requirement. It has also a limited tracking range due to the ambiguity of the folded elements coming from different harmonics of the input signals. or with very high input frequencies. The tracking zone is unlimited allowing frequency and phase error correction. The tracking zone is expanded with respect to the previous memoryless types. The phase detector is a three-state type. We would like to enumerate some phase detection principles relating their characteristics of memory or tracking to their respective applications: • Mixers: non-linear element outputting the sum and difference of the frequencies of the input tones. and a more specific description focused on the synthesizer context is made in [Craw94]. • Three-state phase and frequency detectors: two flip-flops and an asynchronous reset return. It is the common type used in PLL synthesizers. a memory phase detector would have difficulty to attain lock. may depend on the amplitude of the input signals. The output. The loop filter has an impedance magnitude. due to the strong deviations it would suffer in the presence of high noise levels. The tracking range is limited by the sinus periodicity. The input is a crystal oscillator with a very selective output. such as in carrier and clock recovery applications. fixes the ratio between fcp and the LO frequency. • Exclusive-OR: very similar properties with the mixer type with a digital logical implementation. We close this section with the remark that the limited tracking solutions are mostly adapted to low SNR loops. In such conditions. There are numerous references discussing the different types of phase detectors. The input frequency may be changed by programming different ratios in the reference divider. named a charge pump. • Samplers: non-linear element bringing a high frequency component to base band by aliasing with a known input tone.9 introduces the basic constituting elements and their nomenclature. The block schematic of figure 1. where the phase detector has to average a carrier or signal information mixed with important noise levels.

before they are fed back to the amplifier input. composed by capacitors and varicaps. there are auxiliary service blocks. 1.1 VCO The VCO is often a resonant amplifier that contains a tunable band pass filter (BPF) and a gain device. a large resistor or inductor is added for this DC connection. Vtune Ct Lp Cp R Cd Figure 1. A minimum Cmax/Cmin is . Usually. Crystal Oscillator Reference Divider BUS Programming input fcp Biasing & Service Blocks Phase Detector Charge Pump Loop Filter Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) LO output Main Divider Figure 1.10. The series capacitance Cp (padder) is chosen as a compromise between the diode capacitance ratio (Cmax/Cmin) and the quality factor (Q) of the resonant circuit . that are used to command the functioning of the filtering and amplifying elements within the tuner.16 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In addition. the resonant circuit is a second order LC structure with a tunable capacitance.9 PLL frequency synthesizer: block diagram The following sections give further details about some central blocks of the frequency synthesizer. such as switches and analog-to-digital converters (ADC). The active device amplifies the inherent noise sources that are filtered by the resonator. Often.10 VCO and tunable resonator In figure 1. The selectivity is then determined by the resonator.5. the ground signal just indicates the DC biasing of the varicap.

but it has no minimum count. it is not unusual to also find ring and relaxation oscillators. The structure described above corresponds to a resonance oscillator. The swallow cells are an extension of divide-by-2 cells. Cp values larger than Cmax tend to be transparent for the capacitance variation. working with a common clock and a common 2nd synchronizing input which is shifted forward between adjacent cells. In chapter 8. with n defined above.2 Dividers The dividers. and it is implemented with only divide-by-2. that are tuned by a variable biasing current or voltage. .4 the three-state phase detector has 2 memory nodes.Chapter 1 / Introduction 17 required to cover the whole tuning frequency range. As mentioned in section 1.5. This means that it can recover both phase and frequency differences within the VCO + PLL tunable and programmable range. and it works with the higher frequencies. Several swallow cells may be connected in series. In low noise synthesizers. The main divider often combines the prescaler with a serial counter. This counter works with lower frequencies. both reference and main. In this manner the swallow cascade may count all the integers within the interval: [ (2n ) . 1. The prescaler is normally at the input stage. enabled by a programmable counter. It is important to remark that the output of both main and reference dividers. The parallel capacitor Ct assures a minimum capacitance value and it may be added to compensate for the changes in temperature of the IC input impedance. • shift counter. (2n+1 – 1) ] . This improvement is achieved by the serial association of the varicap. depending on the limitations of frequency and sensitivity in the input of the main divider. are cascaded structures composed of flip-flops and combinatory logical ports. or divide-by-2 plus swallow cells. which separately track the two input phases.5. For other PLL applications working with smaller tuning ranges. containing two extra latches and some logic ports. is in fact the transcription of one pulse from the input signal. whereas the quality factor determines the phase noise performance of oscillator. (2n+m+1 – 1) ] . This additional part receives a second data and a synchronizing input that commands the “swallowing” of an extra clock pulse. we discuss another controllable oscillator structure based on cascaded integrator stages. or in other words. and the +1 pulse is commanded by the 2nd synchronizing input. 1. which is the most common type of VCO that is encountered in frequency synthesizers for TV tuners. Therefore the swallow cell can count 2+1. where n is the number of cascaded swallow cells. this output is often resynchronized with the input signal in order to copy its phase accuracy. The association of these two structures allows for continuous counting between : [ (2n ) . The reference divider usually has a limited set of dividing ratios. and m the number of flip-flops in the shift counter. Figure 1. to eliminate the time jitter introduced by the divider cells. It may be fully programmable or not. with a fixed capacitor that has a better Q. However smaller values may be needed to improve the quality factor. with a poorer Q.11 shows a block diagram of the ensemble. Basically we may distinguish two structures: • prescaler structure: composed of divide-by-2 or swallow cells.3 Phase Detector – Charge Pump The phase detector and charge pump comparator is a three state phase/frequency detector.

the phase detector sensitivity. This state is usually transparent for the transfer function. iii Charge pump circuitry has often slower setting-up times than the asynchronous reset in the DFFs. during which both current sources are active. So. Note that the transfer is periodic over 2π. explaining their functioning through logical state machines. . This phenomena is called dead-zone. In this manner phase differences of up to ± 2π are detected. output average current for input phase deviation. is represented by a single valued linear function with an input range: [-2π. (variable) input from the main divider. The sourcing and sinking sources have a programmable current value that is called charge pump current.12 represents the transfer.11 Phase Detector & Charge Pump block diagram The Ref. Thus small phase differences would be masked if the switching on interval was to small to guarantee that the current sources attained their nominal output value. the phase detector will slip one cycle and fall into a new linear zone around +2π or -2π. with an average current output that is linearly proportional to the input phase difference. and the Var. The thick central line in figure 1. and that two shifted linear regions superpose each other in every 2π interval. since ideally the sum of both currents equals zero. The phase detector behaviour for phase deviations with a module smaller than 2π. The delay interval of the assynchronous reset causes the existence of an intermitent 4th state (Off’). The state machine of our three-state phase detector is pictured on the right side of figure 1. or Icp . Figure 1. Functionally this delay iii avoids a change in Kϕ for small input phase differences. is not capable of distinguishing phase differences with a module above 2π.12. and the slope of the transfer is called Kϕ . When the two outputs are equal to one. (reference) input comes from the reference divider. 2π]. The rising edges of the input signals command the DFF outputs which in turn command the switches of the sinking and sourcing current sources. Reference [Wola91] makes an interesting representation of different phase detectors.18 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 1 Ref D CK R Qref programmable input for Icp delay τrst output tuning voltage loop filter impedance R Var CK 1 D Qvar Figure 1. an asynchronous reset reinitializes the detector. This phase detector with two DFFs.12 represents this function. when the module of the phase difference exceeds 2π.

. PLL frequency synthesizers. In this case the DFF outputs command switches that short circuit the output to nodes with a fixed voltage value (low impedance points such as vcc and gnd).1) Ref Sourcing Qref =1 Qvar =0 Var Iaverage [A] Ref Off Qref=Qvar=0 Var Off ’ Qref=Qvar=1 Icp τrst -4π -2π 0 2π 4π ∆ϕ [rad] Sinking Qref =0 Qvar =1 Var Ref I Figure 1. This chapter introduced the context of the present study. in order to increase the tuning range. The investigation issues that orient this work were presented and related to the changes in the tuner architecture.4 Loop Filter The loop filter is the main subject of chapters 2 and 4. It is a low pass filter (LPF) using either a passive (with no DC shift) or an active solution. identifying the tendencies for innovation. that are bound to the new broadcasting standards (DVB) and to the continuous demand for higher integration levels. while discussing stability and noise concepts. 1. in a topdown approach. which explains the nomenclature tri-state detector.Chapter 1 / Introduction 19 Kϕ = I cp 2π  A   rad    (1. the advantage of the current output becomes clear with a capacitive loop impedance. The active filters use a high gain amplifier with a large DC output range. However.12 Phase detector & Charge pump: transfer and state machine The Off state is also called high-impedance or tri-state. because with the charge pump output a fixed current value charges the filter capacitors with a constant dv/dt and Kϕ .5. Tri-state detectors can also be implemented with a voltage output. The constituent blocks of the PLL synthesizer were also presented. The frontend of terrestrial and satellite TV receivers was discussed.

20 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops .

................... Second-Order Loop ...................... wp2 ]... Third and Fourth Order Loops........................... A new notation is introduced to study the 3rd and 4th order loops.. The study is constantly linked to the tuner application context..........1.............................. 40 Figures: Figure 2..................................................... 25 3rd order Loop Filter Impedance .................................... The 2nd order loop is analyzed through standard dynamic parameters ξ and wn .........................7 Figure 2......... Phase Model for PLL synthesizers .................1............................................... PLL Phase Model and Loop Filter calculation 21 2............... 34 2.......1...........................4 Figure 2....9 Linear Phase Model for a PLL ........................................3..................... Requirements in the Time and Frequency Domain ....................5 Figure 2.........................................1.........2.................... 31 Gain Variation X Stability in Bode Plots ........1...................................................2.................................................. 37 3rd order filter: Phase Margin Variation for wol ∈ [ wz1 ..................... exploiting stability and robustness aspects........................ Summary of steps and numerical example ............. 36 2...............................2 Figure 2..................................Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 21 Contents: 2.................. through qualitative discussions and numerical examples.............................................2.................................................................................................. 42 Tables: Table 2-1 Table 2-2 Table 2-3 2nd order filter: Phase Margin Variation for wol ∈ [ wz1 ........................................................................................................................................................................................6 Figure 2......................................2..........................................................................8 Figure 2.................2................ 29 4th order PLL: Open and Closed Loop Bode Plots .......... 26 2................................................................................ Algorithm for the Loop Filter Calculation............. 23 Vtune time response for a frequency step......................................... 39 2 PLL Phase Model and Loop Filter calculation A linear time invariant (LTI) model for the PLL synthesizer is used to study frequency and time domain characteristics....... Robust design including Gain Variation and 3rd Pole compensation................. 25 Locked VCO output spectrum .... 24 2............. 22 2............3 Figure 2.... Nominal Design.. 34 2.................................................. 31 4th order PLL: Root Locus diagram ...............2................................................................. .......1. 38 3rd order filter : Open Loop Bandwidth recentering...... 33 The influence of r21 in the gain-bandwidth variation......... wp2 ] ............................. 28 2....3...........................1 Figure 2.......................................... 36 Numerical example of robust filter design.......................................

The description is enlarged to treat systems of a higher order. A top-down approach is proposed starting with behavioural models that give an insight into frequency and time domain characteristics. This linear average sensitivity is valid for phase differences smaller than 2π.22 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops We start our study of PLL synthesizers presenting a linear phase model that simply and efficiently describes most of the system behaviour around a locked condition. The new notation is used to develop an algorithm to calculate loop filters that respond to stability constraints in a large range of gain variation. with phase modulating inputs and carrier fc . For the moment. and tristate charge pump. with the following constituent blocks: programmable dividers. We may also define an average or initial time interval (Tc) and frequency (fc = 1/ Tc ).5. We abbreviate it to PLL. The charge pump is replaced by a constant. and we suppose that this AC description is valid within the whole DC range that may be swept. average current to a phase deviation slope.1) . as seen in section 1. The base-band phase model in Laplace transform is shown in the block diagram of figure 2.3 .1. The linear description is related to specifications in the time and frequency domain by using a standard notation for a 2nd order low-pass filter. These models are based on a phase representation of a PLL. Using the phase variation as the model parameter amounts to a base-band equivalent representation. We introduce a new notation in terms of the spacing between the zeros and poles of the transfer function of the loop filter. Such a representation is equivalent to the small signal AC models used for circuit simulation.1 Phase Model for PLL synthesizers From this chapter on. with: [K o ] = rad ⋅ Hz Ko = d w osc d f osc = 2π ⋅ = 2π ⋅ K vco d V tune d V tune V K [K vco ] = Hz V and Kϕ defined in equation (1. The phase representation concerns all logic signals that are inputs of edge triggered blocks. with the same sensitivity as a pulse width modulation block (PWM). In our case its main limitations are the absence of DC range boundaries and the removal of the discrete nature of the digital blocks (phase detector and dividers). the VCO block is not included in the PLL. These characteristics are assessed later with additional modeling in chapter 5 . phase detector based on flip-flops. These signals carry phase information that is related to the time interval (T) between similar edges. In this nomenclature. we focus on the phase locked loops for frequency synthesis. and. 2. we consider that the PLL bandwidth is small enough compared to the phase detector comparison frequency. In fact we seek a simple model where continuous linear time invariant (LTI) tools may be applied. a phase variation with respect to these. in terms of its natural resonance frequency (wn) and damping factor (ξ). The robustness of the method is exemplified by numerical examples.

converts this current in Vtune and the oscillator is depicted by its frequency slope associated with an integrator. The VCO is a frequency modulator with a voltage input and frequency selectivity determined by its resonant circuit. H (s) = K ϕ div Icp ⋅ Kvco F ( s ) F (s) 1 = K ϕ ⋅ F (s) ⋅ o ⋅ = ⋅ =α ⋅ s N N s s ϕ ref (2.1 Linear Phase Model for a PLL The phase detector is replaced by an adder that continuously evaluates the phase difference between the reference input and the divider output.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 23 Phase Detector Charge Pump Loop Filter Iaver [A] VCO ϕref [rad] + - ϕe [rad] Kϕ F(s) Vtune [V] Ko/s ϕosc [rad] for open loop ϕdiv [rad] 1/ N Figure 2. i More detailed discussions of the narrow band FM context are made in sections 3.2. Therefore ϕosc (VCO output phase) is a valid approximation of the ratio: modulated sideband amplitude divided by carrier amplitude. the open loop gain: B(s) = α = Icp ⋅ Kvco N ϕ osc α ⋅ F (s) H ( s) =N⋅ =N⋅ ϕ ref 1 + H (s) s + α ⋅ F (s) (2. We define H(s) and B(s). represented by the block with a sensitivity Kϕ. is valid for phase deviations considerably smaller than π. . F(s). The linear approximation that allows the calculation of FM components by their peak phase deviation.1) with α.2) It is convenient to split the filter impedance into two polynomials representing its zeros and poles.1 and 6. as the open and closed loop transfers respectively. This phase difference is transformed in an average charge pump current. Our applications use a second order LC resonator that is equivalent to an integrator in a base band representation. i for frequency modulating components with Am/fm << π where Am and fm indicate the amplitude and frequency of the modulating tone. The loop filter impedance.

and gradually change as α increases.3) represents the output spectrum of a VCO in lock mode. spurious rejection. The time response (figure 2. closed loop bandwidth and peaking. maximum peaking: maximum sideband value with respect to the close-in spectrum. The parameters indicating the frequency domain specifications are: • • • • • • Pcarrier: AS : (Pcarrier-AS): fo : bwcl : carrier output power. stability. The specifications indicated in the time and frequency envelopes are the guiding issues discussed in the following sections. Let us choose two measurable signals for these envelopes such as Vtune and the oscillator spectrum. spurious amplitude. . or –3dB point with respect to the close in spectrum.1. This idea is very clearly represented by the rootlocus diagram discussed in 2.1. step response overshoot. like a step input for fref . and.1 Requirements in the Time and Frequency Domain The PLL system performances: locking time. overshoot. closed loop bandwidth. their poles are equal to H(s) for α=0 (no feedback gain).3. oscillator frequency. Most often however. A summary of these specifications can be represented by time and frequency response envelopes. the frequency change is made by reprogramming the main divider ratio. as shown in figures 2. N. rise time with respect to a “y” fraction of the transition step. comparison frequency suppression with respect to Pcarrier.2) corresponds to a frequency change.3. settling time for error within an acceptable x% variation around vfinal . or a ramp input for ϕref . need to be translated into transfer function characteristics to guide the design of the control function (loop filter). The frequency response (figure 2. normalized difference between maximum value and final value. 2.2 and 2. The following parameters are indicated in the time response: • • • • vinitial / vfinal : Mp : trise : tsettling : initial and final values corresponding to the step input.24 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops H (s) = F (s) = N F (s) D F (s) ⇒ B (s) = N ⋅ α ⋅ N F (s) s ⋅ D F (s) α ⋅ N F (s) s ⋅ D F (s) + α ⋅ N F (s) Then we may see that B(s) have the same zeros as H(s).

The frequency envelope is a combination of the PLL and the VCO performances. and a loop filter design algorithm to guarantee a robust stable functioning. taking into account the inherent noise performance of the VCO. in chapter 3. Later. the complete frequency envelope is discussed. .2 Vtune time response for a frequency step Power Spectrum Density (PSD) [dB] Pcarrier Pcarrier-AS maximum peaking -3dB fosc fosc+ fcp fosc+ bwcl f (Hz) Figure 2. Later. we introduce a convenient notation for the 3rd and 4th order systems.vfinal vfinal (y). All the following chapters use the filter notation and design tools developed in the present chapter.(vfinal-vinitial) + vinitial vinitial trise tsettling t (s) Figure 2. In this chapter we focus on the PLL characteristics.3 Locked VCO output spectrum We start with the time requirements that may be directly related to a standard 2nd order characteristic equation.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 25 Vtune(t) = fo(t)/Kvco [V] (1+Mp).

and the other must be included in the loop filter. R Vout C which corresponds to the impedance of a R-C series branch. Therefore the simplest form of F(s) is: Iin F (s) = 1 + s ⋅T s ⋅C . damping factor. . In our phase model the zero final error for a phase ramp input implies an H(s) with two pure integrators. which may increase significantly the reference spurious.C s/rad.2 Second-Order Loop We start searching for the simplest filter that would present a time response with the form indicated in figure 2. B(s) = N ⋅ α ⋅ N F (s) N ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T ) N (s) = B = C s ⋅ DF ( s ) + α ⋅ N F ( s) s 2 ⋅ + s ⋅ T + 1 DB ( s) α .undamped natural frequency. The open and closed transfer functions for the resulting 2nd order PLL are: H (s) = α ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T ) α ⋅ N F ( s ) = s2 ⋅ C DF ( s) . However for a PLL with a phase detector-charge pump comparator.26 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 2. One integrator is intrinsic to the VCO phase representation. results in: B(s) = N ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T ) C s2 ⋅ + s ⋅T + 1 α ← → N ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T )  s  w  n   2 ⋅ξ   + s ⋅ w    n 2 C=   +1   L R= α 2 wn 2 ⋅ξ 2 ⋅ ξ ⋅ wn = α α ⋅C (2. so we must also include a zero in F(s) for stability reasons. F(s). A feedback system with two integrators and no zero would be an oscillator. with T=R. which implies that even in lock. an all-pass filter (simple resistor) combined with the oscillator pole would already present a low-pass filter behaviour for the overall loop. and ξ.1.2. it is useful to guarantee that ii a frequency step is perfectly followed.3) ii Otherwise the error response stabilizes around ϕe-final . frequency controlled by the loop gain. Comparing DB(s) to a standard 2nd order equation. ϕe-final ). As a matter of fact. with wn . the charge pump is still injecting an average current (Kϕ . having a final phase error that tends to zero.

2 } where overshoot and settling time can be derived as functions of wn and ξ.7. We may also recognize that y(t) represents the derivative of ϕosc(t) for the ramp input. the values of the filter components are evaluated with expressions (2. The choice of the bandwidth. such as: . 2 } : roots of DB(s) : damped natural frequency : exponential envelope factor σ = ξ ⋅ w n = Re {s1. or ξ and wn . with a single integrator-zero. We have already seen the rise time and settling time in Vtune time response. For instance the unitary step response of 1/DB(s) is: wn 1 = 2 s ⋅ DB ( s) s ⋅ s + 2ξ wn s + wn 2 2 ( )   σ ← → 1 − e −σ ⋅t ⋅  cos (wd ⋅ t ) + ⋅ sin (wd ⋅ t )   wd   s1.fosc(t). which is the oscillator instantaneous frequency: 2π. Generally the resonant peak should be kept to its minimum. and through the following chapters we tackle other parameters. The PLL response is given by B(jw). α.4) to derive the ramp response of B(s). Typically ξ is kept above 0. depends on many parameters.4) The integration property of the Laplace transform can be applied to equation (2. The oscillator output spectrum results from a combination of the PLL and VCO frequency responses.3) using ξ. has a B(jw) close to a low pass filter (LPF). Using the same variables. wd and σ. we find a similar step response for B(s): wn + 2ξ wn s B (s ) =N⋅ 2 s s ⋅ s 2 + 2ξ wn s + w n 2 ( ) ← →   y (t ) = N ⋅ 1 − e −σ ⋅t     σ  ⋅  cos (wd t ) − ⋅ sin (wd t )   wd   (2. and a resonant peak inversely proportional to ξ. B(jw). wn and the open loop gain. or Vtune(t). wn representation is its direct relation to frequency and time responses. Hence the choices of wn and ξ. 2 = −ξ ⋅ w n ± j ⋅ w n ⋅ 1 − ξ 2 = −σ ± j ⋅ w d w d = w n ⋅ 1 − ξ 2 = Im {s1.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 27 The advantage of this ξ. Therefore the time response of the 2nd order loop is simply fitted in its envelope requirement through a convenient choice of σ and wd. since it increases noise presence at the output. Let us now consider the frequency domain envelope. Some aspects of the output spectrum may be obtained from the frequency response of the closed loop. are a compromise between the time and frequency domain specifications. with a -20dB/dec attenuation for w>>wn . and the input is the overall phase disturbances due to the PLL blocks. The 1st order filter. and it indicates the system is approaching instability. represented at the input of the phase detector. wn .Ko. Next.

resulting in a 4th order PLL. Indeed. Since we treat fairly simple systems with no zeros or poles in the right hand plane (on a S-plane). In these terms the 2nd order PLL is very convenient since it only imposes a minimum gain value related to a minimum ξ. Nevertheless. from the VCO output spectrum to a broader context including requirements from the application environment and from the demodulator block. These questions belongs to quite different contexts. . and microphony and other interference robustness. However we need to keep in mind that α can vary a lot in certain synthesizer applications and this variation needs to be accommodated by the filter dimensioning. This means that a poor noise performance of the PLL would be visible even for frequencies above the closed loop bandwidth. frequencies and time constants: f z1 = w 1 = z1 2π ⋅ Tz1 2π : with fz1 and Tz1 . because their characteristic function. its attenuation for high frequency (w>>wn) is often not enough to suppress the reference spurious to a satisfactory level. in order to achieve the necessary out-of-loop rejection.1. Thus. At the moment we can state a 1st rule of thumb. is not directly factorable in 2nd or 1st order polynomials. maximum phase change for small frequency steps. we need to introduce the corresponding loop filter impedance. The following notation is adopted for the zeros and poles. VCO free-running noise performance.1. DB(s). requirement of spurious suppression. most tuner synthesizers use 3rd order loop filters.28 • PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops comparison frequency (fcp). which is equal to the slope of the VCO intrinsic noise. the stability may be unambiguously analyzed by the open loop frequency response parameters: phase margin (PhM) and gain margin (GM). zero frequency [Hz] and time constant [s/rad]. introducing one or two extra poles at frequencies higher than the zero frequency. and the resulting open and closed loop frequency responses. In addition the closed loop transfer B(s) for a 2nd order loop leaves the phase noise contribution of the PLL visible within a -20dB/dec slope. unchanging open loop gain (α) value. As mentioned in the previous section. common to synthesizer applications that use wn in the range: wcp wcp ≤ wn ≤ 30 10 So far we have discussed ξ and wn choices for a unique. before discussing further aspects of the frequency envelope requirements we introduce some stability concerns in the 3rd and 4th order loops. As we evolve towards higher order loops.2. and elsewhere it is convergent. most synthesizer applications use a 2nd or 3rd order loop filter. 2. the closed loop transfers are not so easily perceived as the second order B(s). These filters are implemented with additional resistors and capacitors. The pole at the origin is preserved to fulfill the steady error condition discussed in 2.3 Third and Fourth Order Loops Before we may examine the stability conditions of a 3rd or 4th order PLL.

remembering that the 1st pole is a pure integrator with fp1= 0 Hz. A second approximation is made considering C1 >> C2 ⇒ C1 + C2 ≈ C1 .1. associated with Z3 . V out 1 1 = = VM 1 + s ⋅ R3 ⋅ C 3 s ⋅ C3 ⋅ Z 3 Zp and Zs are composed of an integrator plus a lead-lag. are calculated as independent 2nd order terms. and a Tp3 = 0. Zp = VM = I in 1 + s ⋅ R1 ⋅ C1  C ⋅C  s ⋅ (C 1 + C 2 ) ⋅ 1 + s ⋅ R1 ⋅ 1 2  (C1 + C 2 )   . which simplifies ZF(s) in both cases to: iii The complete 3rd order. Zs = VM 1 + s ⋅ R 1 ⋅ (C 1 + C 2 ) = I in s ⋅ C 1 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ R 1 ⋅ C 2 ) . The resulting 3rd order filter is: F (s) = k ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ Tz1 ) s ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) (2.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 29 f p2 = w 1 = p2 2π ⋅ Tp 2 2π and f P3 = w 1 = p3 2π ⋅ Tp 3 2π for the 2nd and 3rd poles.5) A second order filter is obtained if either fp2 or fp3 tend to infinity. Its accuracy holds for fp3 >> fp2 . and Z3 >> Zs are valid. and. The two RC filter configurations below have approximately this transfer function as impedance: Z3 Iin Zp R1 C1 C2 VM C3 Vout R1 C2 R3 Iin C1 Zs VM C3 Vout Z3 R3 Figure 2. These approximations are made to keep a transfer with real factorable poles. pair. By convention our 2nd order filter has a finite fp2. supposing that the approximations: Z3 >> Zp .4 3rd order Loop Filter Impedance The filter impedances. zero-pole. is often called a post-filter. Zs and Zp . which greatly iii simplify the filter design. . The single pole low pass filter (LPF). non-factorable. transfer is discussed in section 4.

the LPF approximation is also used to evaluate the 3 dB closed loop bandwidth. 2. B3LPF(s) . 1. The boundary imposes a minimum ξ value that may be represented in the rootlocus diagram. . and the second order function in the ξ wn form represents the two other roots. depending on the value of α.C2 .6) B(s) = N ⋅ α ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ Tz1 ) s ⋅ C1 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) + α ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T z1 ) 2 (2. but since Tz1 / Tp2 = C1 / C2 ⇒ C1 >> C2 the open and closed loop transfer functions of the PLL with this 3rd order filter become: H (s) = α ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T z1 ) s ⋅ C1 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) 2 (2. with n=3 .6.1 . The closed loop magnitude Bode plot suggests a PLL phase transfer resembling a 3rd order LPF. in the form: B(s) ≈ N 2   (1 + s ⋅ Tp3 ) ⋅  s 2 + 2 ⋅ ξ ⋅ s + 1 w  wn n   = B3 LPF ( s ) (2. and k = 0. Mr.C3 .30 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Z F ( s) = Vout 1 + s ⋅ R1 ⋅ C1 = I in s ⋅ C1 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ R1 ⋅ C2 ) ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ R3 ⋅ C3 ) ZF(s) corresponds to F(s) for: Tz1 =R1 . and. iv Later.5. is only visible if: fz1 << fp2 ⇒ Tz1 >> Tp2 . α. w3dB . is justifiable by the fact that the zero influence in pulling up the phase from its initial value (for w << wz) of -180° . expressed in terms of ξ and wn. This resemblance is confirmed by the root-locus that has for adequately high open loop gains. and the closed loop root asymptotes are plotted in figures 2. Tp2 =R1 .7) Root locus and Bode diagram sketches showing PhM. fp3 >> fp2 >> fz1 . The spacing between fz1 and fp2 . in 3. These last two may be complex or real. one pole that tends to the zero (being “cancelled”). indicated as fcl3dB in figure 2. K = 1/C1 . The 3rd order LPF approximation for B(s) would have a transfer function.5 and 2. analogous to a standard 2nd order iv characteristic equation. This simplified LPF form suggests a 1st stability boundary.360° / n .C1 . GM.8) where Tp3 is the post-filter equivalent pole. Tp3 =R3 .4. and three others that tend to the asymptotes: -180° + k.b.

5.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 31 Open Loop : H(s) |B(jw)| |H(jw)| [ dB ] Closed Loop : B(s) -40dB/dec -20dB/dec [ dB ] N N-3dB -40dB/dec fp2 fz1 fp3 log( f ) [Hz] fz1 fcl3dB fp2 fp3 log( f ) [Hz] -60dB/dec -60dB/dec ∠H(jw) [°] fp2 fz1 fp3 log( f ) [Hz] ∠B(jw) [°] fz1 fcl3dB fp2 fp3 log( f ) [Hz] -90° -180° PhMmax -270° fig.6 .5. 2.5 4th order PLL: Open and Closed Loop Bode Plots Root Locus Im{s} ξ=1/√2 fz1 fp3 fp2 Re{s} 45° 4th order PLL: Root Locus diagram Figure 2. 2.a -90° -180° -270° fig.b Figure 2.

αn. w3dB: 3dB closed loop bandwidth. but less and less damped as the equivalent ξ for the complex roots tends to zero. these two branches will finally cross the imaginary axis indicating an unstable behaviour. the dotted axes indicate a boundary of ξ = 1 2 . α. This same reasoning can be applied to the open loop Bode diagram. α max α n ⋅ r21 = = r21 α min α n r21 and r21 is defined as r21 = f p2 f z1 . ½ • • • in the closed loop diagrams: peak: resonant overshoot with respect to the close-in. has a minimum and a maximum limit value to ensure that the complex roots have a convenient damping. in trying to keep the phase margin above a suitable value. The gain variation chosen is proportional to the lead-lag. . The filter calculation and the maximum supported gain variation are discussed in the following sections. Figure 2. there are only three root branches. and the other two tend to asymptotes parallel to the imaginary axis. geometrically equidistant to αn . as indicated in figure 2. zero-pole spacing.b. The curves plotted with dotted lines indicate the 3rd order loop transfer for the centered gain value. |B(jw)| value. since. • woln: central wol corresponding to the centered gain αn.32 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In figure 2. where a changing α value corresponds to shift the magnitude curve vertically. We observe that the gain value. For the moment we observe some new parameters introduced in figure 2. Therefore the loop does not become unstable for increasing α values.7: ½ in the open loop diagrams: • wol: open loop zero crossing frequency or open loop bandwidth. low frequency. corresponding to the maximum phase margin for a 2nd order filter (or a 3rd order loop). The curves with solid lines correspond to the 4th loop transfer with the 3 α values. A classical security limit for a system phase margin is about: PhM ≥ 30° . In fact for increasing α values. ξ. One is still directed towards the zero.5. This variation also shows a limitation for a minimum and a maximum value of α. without moving the phase plot.6. αn . wpeak: frequency corresponding to the peak value. For a 2nd order filter. and two other gain values.7 shows open and closed loop Bode plots with three different gain values: • • a centered value.

.7.and the relation between the zero-pole spacing and the maximum supportable gain variation. we must adapt F(s) parameters to fit α ∈ [αmin . . 2. and that its variation represents the system functioning range.b Figure 2. Furthermore the centered gain value for the 3rd order loop. αmax] and to meet the frequency and time specifications.a filter calculation algorithm for the 2nd order filter.a centering compensation for the 3rd order filter. 2. Thus in the next sections we define successively: . .Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 33 fig. In this example we observe that a gain variation of r21 implies quite significant variations of bandwidth and PhM. Kvco)/ N.7. αn .7 Gain Variation X Stability in Bode Plots Remembering that α = (Icp . is not really ideal for the 4th order loop.a fig.

plus eventually a multiplication factor to compensate changes in the reference divider ratio. it should be equidistant to both fz1 and fp2 . to ensure the best application robustness.1 Nominal Design Direct solving of the 4th order B(s) denominator with respect to fol or w3dB would be onerous and not very enlightening with respect to the stability aspect or for an intuitive and quick filter calculation method. Kvco variations are connected to the oscillator tank circuit sensitivity. 2. and intuitively we may say that if fp3 is distant enough not to have much influence on H(jwol). it is not rare to find α variations (αmax/αmin) higher than 100. Furthermore the minimum α value is found at the high end of the VCO frequency spectrum.2 Algorithm for the Loop Filter Calculation TV tuner applications very often work with quite large variations in the parameters: Kvco and N. corresponding to the minimum Kvco and maximum N values and vice-versa for the maximum α value. and the zero and poles frequencies. However for stability reasons and user flexibility. i. leads to a simpler approach. In varicap based tank circuits. In satellite applications they are typically to the order of 50. In terrestrial applications. or at the high-end of the tuning range. with a fixed Icp value.2. N variation is directly proportional to the frequency variation inside the tuning range. Let us define r31 and recall r21 : r21 = f p2 f z1 .9) The maximum PhM point is somewhere between fz1 and fp2 . Taking into account these two variations and one fixed Icp value results in the maximum α range demanded by the application. especially if the output spectrum needs to be optimized for noise performance. PhM  f   f   f  = ∠ H ( jw ol ) − ( − 180 °) = arctg  ol  − arctg  ol  − arctg  ol   f   f   f   z1   p2   p3  w = w ol (2. the sensitivity is proportional to the varicap capacitance variation dC/dVbias.34 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 2. r31 = f p3 f z1 .e. the filter design should be centered. R. Typically this capacitance variation decreases for high Vbias values. pole frequencies divided by zero frequency. . In the case of such large variations it is wise to use different Icp values to reduce the variation. and express phase margin as a function of fol (wol /2π ). and as far as possible cope with all the gain variation range. for high values of Vtune. Taking the phase margin aspect as a departure point and expressing it with respect to the ratios.

with respect to the PhM loss due to the post-filter.9) and (2. H ( jw) w = woln α =α n =1 α ∈[α min . They are valid for both 2nd and 3rd order filters. is discussed in the following section.10) The maximum phase margin point should be adjusted to correspond to the geometrical average of the open loop gain range.11) C1 = ⇒ C2 = α n ⋅ r21 αn = 2 wz1 ⋅ woln woln Tp 2 R1 = Tp 2 Tz1 ⋅ C1 = C1 r21 .10) for the total PhM. . The positioning of fz1 and fp2 . but it was not considered in the choice of the center or nominal gain value αn . R1 = 1 Tz1 w = = oln C1 wz1 ⋅ C1 α n r21 r31 ⋅ woln . is made with respect to a 2nd order filter.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 35 This idea can be confirmed solving: with the approximation which result in: d df [PhM ( f )]= 0 wol << wp3 PhM ( w) ≈ arctg ( w ⋅ T z1 ) − arctg ( w ⋅ T p 2 ) and max{PhM} for f = f z1 ⋅ f p 2 = f z1 ⋅ r21 = f p2 r21 . . Choosing this maximum PhM frequency as fol . So that gain variations towards minimum and maximum values imply phase margin variations around the maximum point.12) The expressions above allow for the calculation of the filter components. A compensation for this gain centering. α max ] ∧ α n = α min ⋅ α max H ( jwoln ) α =α n = 1 + r21 αn ⋅ 2 woln ⋅ C1 1 + 1 r21 ⋅ 1 + r21 / (r31 )2 supposing →   r21 >>1 r31 >>1 αn ⋅ r21 = 1 2 woln ⋅ C1 (2. Tp 3 = R3 ⋅ C3 = . the lead-lag controller. makes: PhM ( w ol ) = 2 ⋅ arctg (   r  r21 − 90 ° + arctg  21    r31       ) (2. The influence of the post-filter is taken into account in expressions (2. (2. following a maximum phase margin approach.

2. r21. i. we need to translate the gain variation in an open loop bandwidth variation. for large r21 (approximately r21 ≥ 25). Figure 2. in order to associate gain values with PhM values.5 lim f (r21 ) = 1 with: .8 The influence of r21 in the gain-bandwidth variation In other words.2 Robust design including Gain Variation and 3rd Pole compensation We wish to investigate the maximum gain variation that we are able to accommodate within convenient PhM values. r21 → 0 r21 → ∞ . wol variation with respect to α may be expressed as: wol  α  =  wo ln  α n    0. the influence of r21 in the variation of wol with respect to α. |H(jw)| [ dB ] sqrt(r21) >> 1 α1 < α2 < α3 αi ↔ wi fp2 fz1 fp3 log (f ) [Hz] |H(jw)| [ dB ] sqrt(r21) → 1 fp2 fz1 fp3 log (f ) [Hz] w1 w2 w3 w1 w2 w3 Figure 2.8 gives an intuitive approach to the relation gain-bandwidth with respect to the filter design parameter..5 < f (r21 ) < 1 f ( r21 ) (2. the slope around wol decreases to -20 dB/dec and wol changes are proportional to α. and wol changes are proportional to sqrt(α). with a -40 dB/dec value. the phase margin depends uniquely on the open loop zero cross frequency. fol . In fact expression (2. for large and small r21 values: • • for small r21 (approximately r21 < 10). and.13) lim f (r21 ) = 0. Thus.36 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 2.9) shows that for fixed filter parameters.e. The open loop slope stays practically unchanged around the wol frequency. The sketches show two extreme situations.

795 0.18 39. . The PhM values are calculated at: . We consider the error acceptable.w = wz1 .71 30. .10) .08 47. and expression (2. wol/woln = 1.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 37 A formal solution for f(r21) would require solving 3rd and 4th order polynomial equations. we find a simpler form for f(r21). which is quite accurate around the central point.14) The interpolation error is evaluated for PhM variations with respect to the central PhM value. or w = wp2 . In fact for this α variation corresponding to wol=wz1 or wol=wp2. (αn/ αmin)2 αn =>wol=woln αmin =>wol=wz1 max{PhM} [°] PhM [°] wol=wz1 or wol=wp2 w/o post filter r21 10 15 20 25 with wol=woln w/o post-filter f (r21) 54. f ( r21 ) ≅ 1 1+ r21 (2.14 42.817 0. the bandwidth variation is a function of a unique variable: r21 .04 64.14) is used to evaluate the following issues concerning the maximum supported gain variation and the filter recentering with respect to the post-filter.71 20.19 42.1 shows some PhM values for r21 values commonly found in tuner applications.38 39.59 0. It follows that: v PhM values are calculated using expression (2. wp2 ] The last column gives the gain range values corresponding to the open loop bandwidth variation: wol = wz1 ⇔ α min wol = w p 2 ⇔ α max α max α min α  w  =  n  =  ol  α   w   min   oln  2 1 f ( r21 ) The ratio αn / αmin is evaluated according to the f (r21) approximation ( equation (2.w = woln . for the 2nd order filter.760 0.29 41. We start evaluating the gain range corresponding to wol variations between wz1 and wp2 .14) ). the bandwidth ratio is estimated with a maximum 5% error.90 61.833 Table 2-1 2nd order filter: Phase Margin Variation for wol ∈ [ wz1 .79 67. (with no post-filter we find the same PhM for both points). For gain values implying a phase margin variation ≤ 20°. v Table 2. Using polynomial interpolation in numerical examples.

we may use a linear estimation of equation (2.16). Actually. Table 2-2 brings some PhM values for sets of r21 and r31 parameters. and w = wp2 .w = wz1 .r21) . and. 31 ] ≈ K ⋅ r21 LL K = 1 .90 39.38 52. So. 25 ] .67 1. the effect of wp3 is already visible in the PhM of the centered bandwidth. the gain variation ratio. r21 ∈ [12 . wp2 ] Phase margin differences for zero cross frequencies at wz1 and wp2 .63 2. We are implying that r21 is chosen in relation to: the maximum PhM required. max {PhM} [°] {PhM} [°] with wol=woln w/ post-filter PhM [°] with wol=wz1 w/ post filter PhM [°] with wol=wp2 w/ post filter r21 r31 with wol=woln w/o post-filter r31 / r21 15 15 25 25 25 40 30 50 61.90 ♣ 16.15) and (2. combining the results of table 2-1 and expressions (2. .38 67.22 ♣ 20.00 (♣) : unacceptably low PhM values.38 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops  w p2 α max =  w α min  z1     1 f ( r21 ) = r21 1+ 1 r21 (2.80 41. with a normalized error smaller than 5%: K =2 r 1+ 21 1 r21 .04 61. with post-filter (different PhM values for the 2 points). 95 (2.75 40.w = woln with and without post-filter. as shown in figure 2.51 57.15). show the influence of wp3 in the PhM for gain values α > αn .7 and table 2-2 . The PhM values are calculated at: .67 38.16) The r21 range between 4 and 25 covers quite well the values used in our tuner applications. A certain minimum r31/r21 ratio is necessary to keep a PhM ≥ 30° for a α range with αmax / αmin ≈ (2. r21 ∈ [4 . We consider that the minimum acceptable PhM value is 30°.with post-filter.r21) can be accommodated within suitable PhM values.24 55. Table 2-2 3rd order filter: Phase Margin Variation for wol ∈ [ wz1 . woln.92 61. shows that normalized gain variations of (2. .04 67.15) For restricted domains of r21 .67 2.56 10.14 ♣ 1.20 2. We continue our analysis including the post-filter for the 3rd order loop filter.

6 .17) KK woln ≥ wolnpf (2. Using a 1st order limited development for equation (2.2.19) Table 2-3 shows numerical examples of the post-filter recentering. vi As a matter of fact for small (r31 / r21) ratios we also loose the accuracy of the filter transfer function. In practice for (r31 / r21)< 1. but it cannot be used for vi smaller ratios.(r21)0.6 . we observe that recentered 3 rd order filters can also cope with the normalized gain variation. ∆ (PhM) PhM [°] PhM [°] for αmin wol=wolnpf /(r21)0.45 34. The estimated centered bandwidth is named wolnpf .41 32.10).18 20.1.1. so. and quantified in 4.34 62. the corresponding gain variation is approximately (2. Hence.83 PhM [°] for αmax wol=wolnpf .20 2. .44 3.81 (♣) : recentering approach fails.r21) . it is not possible to accommodate the normalized gain variation with PhM ≥ 30° .6 ]. we wish to find a correction factor to recenter the open loop bandwidth around the maximum PhM for a given set of r21 and r31 parameters.49 32.408 0.707 52. used in table 2-3 .84 -22. rpf (post-filter factor). equal to (2.03 1.5 30.89 30.34 43.92 56.00 55.  r − r21  r pf =  31   r31  w oln = w olnpf r pf    1 f (r )   21   1+ 1  r21  2          KK 0 ≤ r pf ≤ 1 (2. [(r31 / r21)>1. enables us to find a simple polynomial correction factor.r21) . as far as the minimum ratio.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 39 So.PhM(wp2) 15 15 25 25 25 40 30 50 0. since the accuracy is quickly degraded. and the related gain value αnpf .92 ♣ 0.18)  1   α n = α npf ⋅   r   pf   1 = α npf ⋅  r  pf     KK α n ≥ α npf (2. The bandwidth ratio (wolmax /wolmin). Table 2-3 3rd order filter : Open Loop Bandwidth recentering The recentering approximation is quite effective for (r31 / r21 ) > 1. is respected. as discussed in section 2.00 r21 r31 (rpf) 0.791 0.5 28. The same values for r21 and r31 used in table 2-2 are recalculated after re-positioning the central open bandwidth around wolnpf .11 -2. is also equal to r21 .67 2. The limit (r31 / r21) ratio imposes a condition for the post-filter placement.5 for αnpf wol = wolnpf r31/r21 PhM(wz1) .632 0.67 1.1.

Once the post-filter pole position is chosen. corresponding to the functioning conditions. The latter would ask to place it as close as possible to fp2 . αmax / αmin ≥ 100 . which appears as a parallel. Calculate the geometrical average (αn ) and the variation ratio. C3 and a series resistor connecting the loop filter to the tank resonator. αmax / αmin . 2. (b) Choose parameters r21 and r31 taking into account PhM requirements and α ratio. In these cases C3 . should be chosen to be as small as possible. form an LPF. in a given α range. There is a limitation concerning the R3 /R1 ratio. but a minimum PhM. placing the post-filter pole is a compromise between PhM loss and spurious suppression requirement. R3 and C3 values may be directly calculated. For α npf = α max ⋅ α min and  r − r21  r pf =  31   r31  . there is an additional factor imposing a compromise. : higher part of frequency range. for a given Tp3. For the moment let us keep in mind a practical boundary suggesting : R3 ≥ R1 . α m ax = α = Icp ⋅ K vco N div α m in = Icp m ax ⋅ K vco m ax N div m in Icp m in ⋅ K vco m in N div m ax : usually lower part of frequency range. Thus. and the recentering correction: (a) Evaluate the system open loop gain range. look for possible compensations choosing a specific Icp value for extreme cases. In some applications we can also see an influence of the C3 value with respect to the resonant tank circuit of the oscillator. we should keep a certain minimum C3 to assure the necessary RF attenuation. whose function is to block the VCO signal leaking towards Vtune .6 r21 (c) Choose wolnpf with respect to the following parameters: switching time. has to be preserved. spurious attenuation and adequacy to the noise performance of the VCO. r21 ≥ 1 α max ⋅ 2 α min . If gain variations are too large. for gain and cross frequency variation around αnpf and wolnpf .2. So far so good. r31 ≥ 1 . that is discussed further in section 4. (d) Recenter αn with respect to (r31/ r21) ratio.3 Summary of steps and numerical example The points discussed up to now suggest sequential steps for the loop filter calculation following the maximum phase margin approach.1.40 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In fact. However as usual. we should choose a large R3 and a small C3. parasitic capacitance. since these two practical boundaries tend to the same direction.

αn and expressions (2. As we mentioned in section 2. α min Some other parameters are also indicated: • • • • • wz1 ( o ) . . In chapter 3 we discuss a significant parameter.12) . and. ∆phase [B( jw)] ∆w with ∆w an octave frequency delta around wpeak .2. wp3 ( x ) .9 the graphs use the same r21 and r31 values as in figure 2. a steep phase change corresponds to a bigger overshoot. maximum value –DC value for the closed loop magnitude. the same algorithm can be used ignoring the recentering correction. we skip item (d) and calculate the filter components directly with expressions (2. = 2 ⋅ r21 . Analogous to the 2nd order example in annex II-A. r31 =50. frequency corresponding to the maximum value of closed loop magnitude. So after choosing the central open loop bandwidth .12) . : α max r21 =25 . In the case of a 2nd order loop filter. wpeak: w3dB: peak: dPhB(jw)/Foct : woln ( ). woln in this case (item (c) ).7. Finally we present a numerical example to illustrate the recentering plus the normalized gain variation.Chapter 2 / Phase Model for PLL Synthesizers 41 w oln = w olnpf r pf and  1  α n = α npf ⋅   r   pf   1+ 1  r21  2          (e) Evaluate filter components using recentered woln . wp2 ( x ) . In figure 2. the phase jitter. frequency corresponding to the DC value –3dB in closed loop magnitude. concerning the total phase noise power in the carrier. wolnpf ( * ) . it depends on many parameters including circuit and system requirements. The open loop bandwidth choice is the remaining compromise that is not completely discussed.1.

a Open Loop fig.9. 2.r21) gain variation is conveniently fitted. Therefore the polynomial approximations used in the development are accurate enough for our applications. Matlab.9 Numerical example of robust filter design We verify that the centering compensation is effective and that the normalized (2. The numerical examples of figures 2. proved to be quite adequate to design and compare loop applications in a systematic and simple manner. .b Closed Loop Figure 2. The filter algorithm and the associated notation.42 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops fig.9. They are continuously applied in the following chapters.7 and 2. The graphs are the output of executable files that are programmed with parametric inputs.2. being a flexible calculation tool.9 are calculated with a mathematical simulation software. The tables are also an interesting design tool easily implemented in any spreadsheet software. through frequency ratios.

...................................1... 3...... ...............3..........2 Figure 3..................3 Figure 3.............1 Figure 3..... 3................ 3.................. 65 Maximum Normalized Gain Variation ........... The filter calculation method is extended to discuss the maximum phase deviation in the synthesized carrier..........................Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 43 Contents: 3...............................................................5 Figure 3....... 50 3........4 Figure 3..................8 Figure 3................................................................................................ and an example of a satellite application is developed....................................................................... 61 Gain Stability Boundary.............................. 65 Figures: Figure 3................................................ 59 3.................. 44 VCO Noise Representation and Phase Noise Units .......................................................................................... Maximum Phase Jitter .... 64 Tables: Table 3-1 Table 3-2 Table 3-3 Table 3-4 Comparing the denominators of B(s) and BRL(s) .........................................................4........................... 47 Free running VCO power spectrum density ...................................................................... 58 Rootlocus for was location............................................... 49 PSD of a VCO locked by a PLL . 46 Optimum Closed Loop Bandwidth ....................................... 63 Maximum SSB noise requirement ............ 3........................................................................................................... w3dB derivation from was ..................... w3dB derivation from BRL(s)............................... 54 Rootlocus approach for wcl : parameters of BRL(s) ............ 67 3 Application Related Constraints So far we discussed the PLL system quite separate from its application...................................... and the suppression of deterministic interference at fcp ....9 BB noise representation of the VCO... 60 Optimizing Total Phase Deviation .... 58 Gain Stability Boundary ........4................................................................................6.................................2.......................................... PLL Closed Loop Bandwidth ............................................................................................... 50 Combined Spectrum: PLL + VCO noise contributions .......... 52 3............................................................................................................................. The parameters concern the adequacy of the closed loop bandwidth to the noise performance of the VCO............................5........................................................... 53 3..........................................6 Figure 3..................................4.................................................... Application Related Constraints 43 Reference Breakthrough ........... 52 Rootlocus for w3dB location................................................................................................7 Figure 3............................................................2........................................................................................... 49 Peaking X Optimum Closed Loop bandwidth................... In this chapter we study parameters concerning the spectral purity of a VCO locked by a PLL....1.........................................................................

3. A numerical example for a satellite frontend exemplifies the calculation method. A second cause is the transient mismatch of the sinking and sourcing pulses of the charge pump. The total phase deviation is introduced as a figure of merit for the noise contents in the carrier spectrum. The time response of the filter is further discussed in chapter 5. These interferences are originated by the operation of different integrated blocks. which provides every Tcp the average lost charge. The sources of noise. is a FM interference found in the VCO output at frequency offsets of ±fcp. that considers two single noise contributions: one for the VCO and another for the ensemble of the PLL blocks. The sinking and sourcing pulses have different rise and fall times so the combined current output is not null. When in lock both sources are switched on during the reset interval. The spurious requirement should be met by providing the necessary attenuation of the fcp component. Later in chapter 7. proportional to the residual transient current. are progressively presented in chapters 4 and 6.44 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops This chapter starts to analyze the phase noise contents of the carrier output of the PLL synthesizer. Œ in the case of active loop filters. and they contaminated Vtune by parasitic coupling. These variations are compensated by the feedback action of the PLL. In large bw filters this discharge causes significant changes in Vtune during a Tcp interval. or spurious rays . Œ an unwanted current of the charge pump in the off state. The value of H(jw)w = 2π. and it presents components at fcp and its harmonics. we calculate a loop filter that guarantees a total phase deviation lower than 2° for the entire range of normalized gain variation (2. The leakage currents cause variations in the value of Vtune . ii This effect is relevant for large bandwidth (bw) filters. The calculation algorithm for the loop filter is then extended to take into account the specification of a closed loop bandwidth.fcp represents the rejection by the loop filter of the fundamental component of the input current pulses. This is done in order to avoid dead-zone problems (see chapter 1).r21). i Sometimes the name spurious rays is also used for other deterministic interference found in the VCO output. In this example. we should be able to choose the closed loop bandwidth with respect to the noise performances of the PLL and the VCO.1 Reference Breakthrough Reference breakthrough. In order to minimize the phase noise in the spectrum of the synthesized carrier. it is a system level analysis. . the loop filter discharge is proportional to the time constant Tp2 . ii i For a charge pump output and resonant circuit input with high impedance. the amplifier input current. At this point. these noise specifications are translated to a circuit level description. that can be either deterministic or random. The fcp component of the loop filter output generates the FM modulation of the VCO. Practical examples of leakage currents are: Œ the reverse current of the varicap (from the oscillator resonant circuit). Œ a discharge current in the loop filter impedance. A first cause of the reference breakthrough is leakage currents.

The residual transient current depends on the circuit design. and it is easier and more accurate to use a mixed circuit and behavioural simulation.2) is a 1st order evaluation of the sidebands at the reference frequency. the accuracy of the calculation of the spurious rays is limited by the evaluation of the Ileakage value. the amplifier input current. which gives: β   s(t ) = Ac ⋅ cos(wc ⋅ t ) + ⋅ cos(wc − wcp ) t − cos(wc + wcp ) t  2   [ ] (3. It is an overestimation because we assumed all the power of the compensation current concentrated at fcp . Let us suppose a single tone modulating signal m(t).1) The leakage current component at fcp represents a voltage amplitude in the VCO input of: Am = I leakage ⋅ Z filter ( jw ) w = wcp The resulting SSB spurious rays measured with respect to the carrier amplitude becomes:  SSB FM modulated f cp component As = 20 ⋅ log  carrier amplitude   β   = 20 ⋅ log   2  or  I leakage ⋅ Z filter ( w cp ) ⋅ K vco As = 20 ⋅ log  2 ⋅ f cp       (3.2) Equation (3. In practice.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 45 Once we evaluate the total leakage current and mismatch we can calculate the corresponding spurious level. It is the case of the varicap reverse current (component specification). For instance the mismatch between sinking and sourcing may be evaluated with a PLL behavioural model including a circuit level description of . and apply the FM narrow band approximation for β << 1 rad . The leakage currents that depend only on the Vtune value are easier to evaluate. and an FM modulated carrier s(t): m(t ) = Am ⋅ cos( wcp ⋅ t )  Kvco ⋅ Am ⋅ sin( wcp ⋅ t )  s(t ) = Ac ⋅ cos wc ⋅ t + 2π ⋅ Kvco ∫ m(t ) dt = Ac ⋅ cos  wc ⋅ t +  f cp     [ ] We define the peak phase deviation β: β= Kvco ⋅ Am f cp . First we assume that the frequency content of the compensation current is concentrated at fcp. and the charge pump off current. (in locked mode Vtune is practically constant). The spurious level is proportional to the current that compensates these effects. For the calculation we do two approximations. Second we use the narrow band FM approximation as the phase deviations are small.

iii 3. at Vtune. or directly applying an FFT (fast Fourier transform) at the simulated Vtune signal. where the intrinsic VCO noise (with –20dB/dec) takes over. the mechanisms of phase noise generation are described. since we need first to find the correct phase difference between the phase detector inputs that corresponds to an average constant charge. the VCO is represented by an integrator with sensitivity Kvco. the current difference. is the out-of-loop zone.2). In the base-band (BB) phase representation adopted in chapter 2. and in chapter 7 the simulation tools that relate noise and design are discussed. However. and the power fraction at fcp is calculated. For the moment we use the narrow band approach to discuss rather small phase disturbances. and we name it NPLL . The narrow band treatment used above is valid for any phase deviation that respects the maximum peak deviation boundary. such as random noise sources. The –60dB/dec region of |B(jw)| . a more complete description should be used. In chapter 4 we discuss the role of the loop amplifier in the transmission of supply perturbations. The BB representation makes a frequency conversion of the BPF behaviour of the VCO in an LPF behaviour. The following section introduces the units used to characterize the oscillator phase noise. In reality all input signals.2 VCO Noise Representation and Phase Noise Units The spectrum of a VCO locked by a PLL is composed of two zones. have finite power and have a band limited power spectrum density (PSD). Roughly the flat part of |B(jw)| corresponds to the PLL determined. The total noise contribution from the different PLL blocks is concentrated at the phase detector input. One is called in-loop and the other out-of-loop. The PLL behavioural model for time domain simulations is discussed in chapter 7. We start with a global approach that considers the optimization of the VCO spectrum for given VCO and PLL noise performances. Tcp periodic signal. is compared to a square or triangular pulse. in-loop zone. such as supply contamination and substrate coupling. The resulting spurious rays may be calculated with the value of Ileakage and equation (3. In this context the VCO spectrum may be modeled by a white noise voltage source at the integrator input. ∆ϕmax << 1rad. After that. and we proceed with the choice of the PLL bandwidth optimizing the phase deviation content. In this model we may add other causes of spurious rays. These names refer to the zones of the VCO output which are dominated by the PLL input noise or by the VCO intrinsic (free-running) noise. iii Another method of direct evaluation is rather lengthy. . For perturbations exceeding this modulation index. in a first approach let us consider two white noise sources representing the VCO and PLL noise contributions. including other harmonic components. noise or deterministic. or when a better accuracy is required. Later in chapter 6.46 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops the charge pump.

In the case of a large bandwidth PLL. to represent the different slopes in the output spectrum.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 47 Ko s [Vrms2/Hz] ϕosc VCO output spectrum VCO PSD [W/Hz] -30dB/dec vnvco2 -20dB/dec ~ frecover log (foffset) fosc Figure 3. vnvco. So a more complete description. a free running oscillator presents a phase noise with higher roll-off. due to the presence of 1/f (flicker) noise sources. which would be valid for offset frequencies below frecover . L(f) is SSB phase noise defined by: L( f offset ) = area in 1 Hz bw at f offset SSB power due to phase fluctuation = total signal power total area under the curve or L ( f offset ) = Pnoise ( f offset ) Pcarrier + ∫ Pnoise ( f ) df 0 ∞ ≈ Pnoise ( f offset ) Pcarrier = 1 CNR  1   Hz    (3. The part of the spectrum with the -30dB/dec roll-off is hidden by the PLL noise. In equation (3.3) the factor 2 relates this base band representation to a single-side band (SSB) measurement. Near the carrier. In figure 3.4) when expressed in dB it equals LdB ( f ) = 10 log [L ( f ) ]  dBc   Hz    . .3) The part of the VCO spectrum with a –20dB/dec slope is correctly represented by a white voltage noise source.1 this is indicated by the corner frequency frecover . L(f). the voltage noise source. dBc ⇒ dB with respect to carrier power. does not need to be frequency shaped. which points to the intersection of the white and flicker noise contributions.1 BB noise representation of the VCO 2 L dB ( f offset )   f  f offset  vnvco 10   ⋅ L ( f offset ) = 2 ⋅  offset  ⋅ 10 = 2 ⋅  Kvco  Kvco  bw     2 2  Vrms 2     Hz  (3. needs to include poles and zeros in the vnvco expression.

We may represent the phase deviation caused by m(t) as two sidebands at offset frequencies of ±fm . Once more. For decreasing values of fm . and analyze it as a deterministic signal that modulates the VCO.5) holds when the sideband amplitudes are evaluated by the narrow band approach. and an ideal filter with a bandwidth of 1Hz around fm . since the PLL noise contribution appears as a phase and not as a frequency modulating iv signal of ϕosc. Figure 3.5) Expression (3. It may be seen as the BB equivalent of L(f) : S ϕ ( f ) = 2 ⋅ L ( f offset ) [rad 2 Hz ] . or:  Ac ⋅ β  ⋅ 1  2  2 β 2   L( fm ) = = 2 4 Ac 2 2 K β  L dB ( f m ) = 20 ⋅ log   = 20 ⋅ log  2   K vco ⋅ v nvco   2 ⋅ fm      Sϕ(f) is the double side band (DSB) phase noise. Using equation (3.1).2 illustrates the phase noise units in the side band and base band representations of the free running VCO spectrum. or the mean square phase fluctuations power. This condition indicates the minimum frequency offset for which the VCO can be represented by a linear phase model.β /2 . iv A more detailed discussion of the spectrum differences between PM and FM appears in chapter 6 . this limitation is hidden by the PLL in-loop region. ϕ osc (t ) = wc t + β ⋅ sin (w m t + ϕ m ) [rad ] The base-band representation of the oscillator phase is given by: ϕ osc − wc ⋅ t = 2π ⋅ K vco ⋅ ∫ m(t ) dt which corresponds directly to the block diagram in figure 3. with an amplitude value equal to Ac.48 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops At this point we take a filtered portion of vnvco .1.  Sϕ S ϕ dB ( f ) = 10 ⋅ log   1rad  2   = L dB ( f ) + 3 dB   (3. . the phase deviation increases and the narrow band approximation is no longer valid. we obtain: m (t ) = 2 ⋅ v nvco ⋅ cos (w m t + ϕ m ) [V ] β = . K vco ⋅ 2 ⋅ v nvco fm with a peak phase deviation: and an oscillator phase: . Otherwise a significant amount of the BB power is scattered in higher harmonics of fm around the carrier.

Since the feedback path is the same for B(s) and Bvco(s). The noise contributions from NPLL and vnvco are indicated separately. they have equal denominators.6) |Posc(f)| [W/Hz] 1 DSB representation |Sϕ(f)| BB representation [rad2/Hz] free-running VCO_Sφ(f) (Npll)2 . is a phase jitter in rad/sqrt(Hz). analyzed in chapter 2. K o ⋅ s ⋅ C 1 ⋅ (1 + sT p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + sT p 3 ) B (s) = 2 K ϕ ⋅ F (s) s ⋅ C 1 ⋅ (1 + sT p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + sT p 3 ) + α ⋅ (1 + sT z 1 ) B vco ( s ) = (3. B(s). |B(f)|2 (vnvco)2/2.|Bvco(f)|2 from Vnvco from Npll -20dB/dec 20log(N) log(f) log(f-fc) log(f-fc) fosc -60dB/dec Npll+3dB Figure 3.3 v PSD of a VCO locked by a PLL The DSB graphs abscissas need to be split in two regions if we want to keep the logarithm scale with respect to foffset . L(foff1) = Sϕ(foff1) β2 4 fosc log(f-fc) foffset f log(f-fc) foff1 foffset ( ) Figure 3.2 Free running VCO power spectrum density v The PLL noise contribution. or to the phase deviation values.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 49 |Posc(f)| [W/Hz] Ac 2 2 DSB representation 1 [rad2/Hz] |Sϕ(f)| BB representation L(foffset) Ac ⋅ β 8 2 2 . determines the transfer of NPLL to the output spectrum.3) shows BB and DSB representations of the spectrum of a VCO locked by a PLL. The closed loop transfer function. In a similar manner we may define Bvco(s) as the closed loop transfer function of ϕosc / vnvco . Figure (3. . The level of the sidebands corresponds to a unitary normalized carrier level. NPLL .

we need to match the PLL closed loop bandwidth (fcl) with the intersection frequency. Figure 3. and afterwards center a stable filter around this bandwidth. and in practice the feedback bandwidth and gain determine whether the intersection is smooth or bumpy. Figure 3. as drafted in figure 3.4. 3. Mismatches result in additional peaking or excessive PLL noise. the in-loop one and the out-of-loop one. we need to know the PLL and VCO noise performances in order to choose an adequate feedback bandwidth. Thus. This can be represented by an approximate transfer function Bvco_BPF . and it is due to both causes. The interest of these simplified forms appears when we are minimizing the noise content of the output spectrum. from Npll additional peaking from Npll Ideal closed loop bw Ideal closed loop bw excessive PLL noise from Vnvco. In numerical examples. the simplified LPF description of B(s). we verify that the wn in Bvco_BPF is slightly larger than the one in B3LPF .7) Comparing Bvco_BPF and B3LPF . an overall peaking is observed.3 shows an ideally smooth intersection between the two zones of the spectrum. written in a standard ξ and wn form. In the measurements. where the noise contributions from Npll and vnvco cross each other. This mismatch peaking adds to the low phase margin peaking seen in chapter 2. We choose this common notation to indicate similar roots in the two functions.4 Peaking X Optimum Closed Loop bandwidth . We use again the term peaking to refer to the spectral overshoot. fosc fosc from Vnvco. Nevertheless. It is a simplified function resembling B3LPF(s) (equation (2. the dominant noise in each of these zones originates from independent noise sources.50 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Bvco(s) has an overall band pass filtering behaviour.3 Optimum Closed Loop Bandwidth In order to minimize the noise of the output spectrum.8) ). we notice that they both have a second order polynomial in the denominator. K o ⋅ s ⋅ C1 s  2ξ  2 + ⋅ s + 1 ⋅ α w   n wn  2 B vco _ BPF ( s ) = (3.

5. Three asymptotes are added in dotted lines. 3.a : shows the total output spectrum plus isolated PLL and VCO noise contributions. for the centered gain value αnpf . • fig 3. and 3dB below the DC vi value.5. The same symbols from figure 2.r21) around αnpf .Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 51 The ideal feedback bandwidth is indicated in the figure above. The spectrum has a minimum jitter content when we center a loop filter around this bandwidth.5.9 are used to indicate wz1 ( o ). They correspond to the VCO free-running behaviour.c and d: detailed contributions of PLL and VCO noise for the curves in part b. The figure is divided into four parts: • fig. The choice of the bandwidth should take into account the optimization of the phase jitter over the entire range of gain. We start with a numerical example showing the spectrum of a VCO locked by a PLL. wolnpf ( * ).b: total output spectrum for gain values varying within a range of (2. the Npll DC transfer value (20. woln ( . • fig 3. and the separated PLL and VCO noise contributions for a set of different gain values. Unfortunately this bandwidth will correspond only to the central gain value. and we know that synthesizers work with a large range of gain variation.log[N]).

NPLL .b/c/d) to simplify the comparison among the curves. also called synthesizer noise floor. used in the loop filter calculation. The asymptotes are repeated in the other subplots (3. which are plotted in different scales. as indicated in figure 3.5.5.8) In order to optimize the output spectrum we want to center the closed bandwidth fcl around fi .5.d by a dotted line. is indicated in figure 3. Hence. vi . But so far we only specified the open loop bandwidth fol. Zp2 ( x). The numerical values used for these graphs correspond to the performance of low noise satellite PLL and VCO: K for Fcp = 1 MHz    N = 1500  Lvco (100 KHz ) = − 100 dBc / Hz dBc / Hz N pll = − 154 Fvco = 1 .5 GHz Let us define fi as being the intersection frequency for PLL and VCO noise asymptotes. wp3 ( x ). we seek now a relationship between the open and closed loop bandwidths for a gain range around the centered value αnpf .a:  f offset Lvco ( f offset ) + 20 ⋅ log  f  i f i = f offset ⋅ 10   = N pll + 20 ⋅ log( N )    N pll + 20⋅log( N ) − Lvco ( f offset )  −  20   (3.

. 3. This bandwidth corresponds to the LPF cut-off frequency for NPLL. 3. we need to relate the open and closed loop PLL bandwidths. 3.5. showed that the PLL and the VCO noise contributions have a similar closed loop bandwidth. but it is the open loop bandwidth that is used for the filter calculation. 3.5. After that.4 PLL Closed Loop Bandwidth The simplified transfer functions B3LPF and Bvco_BPF .5. First we do a quantitative approach of the ratio w3dB/wol . The closed bandwidth must approach fi . and by the loop gain α . which is determined by the zero and poles of the loop filter.5. Therefore. and to the central frequency of a BPF for vnvco.c fig.a fig.b fig.d Figure 3. Let us consider w3dB as the closed loop bandwidth. with numerical evaluations. Later on. two analytic methods are discussed.5 Combined Spectrum: PLL + VCO noise contributions 3. we assume that both transfer functions have an identical closed loop bandwidth. depending on wn and ξ .52 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops a b c d e fig.

for a centered gain variation of (2. This implies a variable peaking and a variable w3dB/wn . . 63 ± 0 . and relates these parameters to w3dB . The limiting ranges include the typical values encountered in synthesizer applications. The results and conditions are: r21 r31 ∧ ∈ ∈ [10 [16 . Subsequently.r21) around wolnpf. Numerical evaluations are used to validate the method. α ⋅ (1 + sT z 1 ) B(s) = 2 N s ⋅ C 1 (1 + sT p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + sT p 3 ) + α ⋅ (1 + sT z 1 ) [ ] B ( s ) B RL ( s ) = N N B RL ( s ) = N α ⋅ (1 + sT z 1 ) 2 ξ   (1 + sT p’ 3 ) ⋅ (1 + sT z’1 ) ⋅  s 2 + 2w s + 1  ⋅ α w  n  n  (3. varies around a value close to woln .2 using some algebra puzzles. The difficulty to evaluate w3dB (more precisely) comes from the fact that the denominator of the closed loop transfer function DB(s).1 w3dB derivation from BRL(s) This first method compares the closed loop transfer B(s). Thus it is likely that w3dB. 50 ] ∞] ⇒ r21 ≥ 1 . These expressions are derived in sections 3. with a polynomial that arises from the rootlocus representation. The rootlocus representation of B(s) may be used to derive two formal expressions for w3dB . The polynomial BRL(s) is equivalent to B(s). An example of an application criterion for digital phase modulations is presented in section 3.8) ) is a simplified version of BRL . BRL(s) has 4 roots agreeing with the branches of the rootlocus presented in figure 2. 28 w ol In chapter 2 we saw that the open loop bandwidth wol varies around wolnpf . 3. which is proportional to wol .4. it deduces the minimum and maximum boundaries for wn and ξ.6 r31 w 3 dB = 1 . and slightly larger.4.9) By inspection we verify that B3LPF (eq. The overall result is already announced in the paragraph above. (2.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 53 Numerical evaluations of the ratio w3dB/wol . show that this ratio is contained in a limited range.4. . when we assume that the r21 and r31 values belong to the ranges indicated below.6. with the following approximations: Tz1’ → Tz1 and Tp3’ → Tp3 .5 . has complex roots with a variable damping. Closed loop bandwidth varies as much as open loop bandwidth and we need some application criteria to define how to accommodate this variation.1 and 3.

In our notation. Expression (3. The assumption of two real roots agrees with the rootlocus diagram of figure 2.10) contains variables that belong to closed and known ranges. We use it to derive the maximum limit of wn. and compare the coefficients of the 4th and 1st order terms of s. as the ratios between the time constants. with: β = T p’ 3 T p3 KK 0 ≤ β ≤1 and γ = T z’1 T z1 KK 0 ≤γ ≤1 . finding the following equalities: term DB(s)/α r21 αn ⋅ 4 α r31 ⋅ w oln r21 w oln = DBRL(s)/α β ⋅ γ ⋅r21 2 2 r31 ⋅ w n ⋅ w oln γ ⋅ r21 2ξ + w oln wn 4th s4 1st s1 Table 3-1 = Comparing the denominators of B(s) and BRL(s) from 4 order terms: th w n = w oln  α  ⋅  α ⋅ β ⋅ γ ⋅ r21    n  1 2 (3. 1] with β ∈ [0 .6. α max ] .10) from 1st order terms: w n = w oln ⋅ r21 ⋅ (1 − γ 2ξ ) (3.54 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The transfer function BRL states that for any given α. at least two roots are real. α npf ⋅ 2 ⋅ r21  = [α min   ∧ .11) We may use the last two expressions to derive the minimum and maximum boundaries of wn . The two others are either real or complex depending on the value of ξ . We define γ and β. the real roots correspond to the time constants Tz1’ and Tp3’. Furthermore the diagram shows that the position of the real roots may be specified within limited frequency ranges. 1] γ ∈ [0 α → α max  max{wn } ↔ β → 1 γ → 1  . We expand the denominators of B(s) and BRL(s).  α α ∈  npf  2 ⋅ r21   .

Observing BRL(s) and the rootlocus. 54 ⋅ w oln r21 = 0 . related to the recentering procedure. we observed that a gain variation of 2.11) we need to find the minimum viii occurring value of ξ. for r31 ≥ 1.13) we evaluate the minimum value of ξ corresponding to a 30° PhM. PhM = 30 ° ⇒ ξ = 0 .11): ξ γ ∈ ∈ [0 . 1] 1]      min {w n } > lim γ →0 ξ → 0 .6 .12) In order to find the minimum of wn with expression (3. seen in chapter 2. we may suppose that the phase margin is mostly influenced by the pair of complex roots which are represented by the 2nd order polynomial in ξ and wn.13) Using equation (3. We continue to work with the hypothesis that the two complex roots are largely determining B(jw) around wn . The maximum ξ value is 1. 54 ⋅ w z 1 (3.15) The next step concerns the relationships between ξ. . Later in this section a numerical example illustrates the difference. we may use the following expression deduced from the standard 2nd LPF: vii A more rigorous treatment should take into account the ratio αn/αnpf . After the recentering procedure outlined in chapter 2. Hence. So we may look for a relationship between ξ and the phase margin parameters to specify the boundary of the variation of ξ.19 ) (3. It holds that   PhM = arctg    2ξ − 2ξ 2 +    4ξ 4 + 1   (3. corresponding to α values with 4 real roots. 269 [0 . and the open loop phase margin PhM.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 55 so: α  max {wn } < lim woln ⋅   α ⋅ β ⋅ γ ⋅ r21   α →α max  n  β →1 γ →1 1 2 α  = woln ⋅   α   n 1 2 (r21 )14 but since the maximum of wn becomes : vii α n ≥ α npf ⇒ α max < α n ⋅ 2 ⋅ r21 1 2 max {w n } < w oln ⋅ (r21 ) ⋅ (2 ) 1 4 = w p 2 ⋅ (1. wn and w3dB . Therefore we may rely on the analysis of the 2nd order LPF to derive the relationship between the damping factor ξ. 6 ° ) (3.r21 can be covered with a minimum phase margin of 30°.269 = sin (15 . r21 . viii .14) Finally the minimum boundary for wn is calculated substituting (3.14) in equation (3. 269 w oln ⋅ 2ξ r21 ⋅ (1 − γ ) = 0 .

dPhB ( jw ) = d [ phase ( B ( jw )) ]⋅ ∆ woctave = d [ ph ( B ( jw )) ]⋅  2 wn − wn  = d [ ph ( B ( jw )) ]⋅ wn   dw dw 2  dw 2  (3. α max ] K 0.16) Combining (3. 404 wn The combination of the minimum and maximum boundaries of wn and this ratio gives the desired range of w3dB: α ∈ [α min . we need to know the ratio r31/r21 .17) The extreme values of wn .16) with our restricted domain of ξ .12) is a rougher boundary estimation not depending on r31 value. mean (w3 dB ) = 1. A numerical application correcting this maximum boundary for given values of r21 and r31 is presented below: r21 = 25 r31 = 50 for: ⇒  αn    α npf 2  = 1. we find: ξ ∈ [0 .12) because we neglected the ratio ix αn / αnpf .75 ⋅ w z1 < w3 dB < 1. This relationship was presented numerically in figure 2. Expression (3. the geometrical mean of the range of w3dB is: geom.56 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops w 3 dB = (1 − ξ ) + ξ 2 − 2ξ + 2 wn [ ] 1 2 (3.9. occurring for αmax and αmin .54 ⋅ w z1 < wn < 0. mean (w3 dB ) = 1. or: w 3 dB = 1 .α max ] with α max = 2 ⋅ r21 α min            ⇒  0.36 ⋅ w p 2  Here. 1] (3. by dPhB.2 ⋅ w p 2 K 0. the phase variation for a frequency delta of one octave around wn .269 .97 ⋅ w p 2    ↓    0.01 ⋅ w oln Thus the range of w3dB centers approximately around wol .404 . With this result we combine the open and closed loop specifications for the spectrum optimization.269 . or ξ equals 0.12 ⋅ w oln The maximum value of wn was overestimated in equation (3.67 ⋅ w p 2 The geometrical mean of the range of w3dB equals: geom.54 ⋅ w z1 < w n < 1.18) ix In order to introduce αn / αnpf factor.23   1 α ∈ [α min . . 1] ⇒ w 3 dB wn ∈ [1 .75 ⋅ w z1 < w3dB < 1. Another possibility to relate the close loop transfer with the values of ξ is found in phase Bode plots. both correspond to cases where the PhM equals 30°.

30 ° . Figure 3. where the post-filter has a significant influence in the phase variation around wn . Hence we stick to the rootlocus criterion to center the closed loop bandwidth .6 illustrates the rootlocus for different values of r21 and r31. and wn . γ. concerning the maximum phase margin.6. the analogy to the 2nd order LPF is accurate for 3rd order loops.  w n = w olnpf ∗ [ 1 . or ξ >0. from the expression of BRL(s). but not for 4th order loops. 1 . 45 ° . are evaluated for the left rootlocus diagram with: r21=25 and r31=50 . 4 . The 4th branch follows the real axis from –wp3 towards -∞ . (2 ⋅ r21 )  α = α npf ⋅ (2 ⋅ r21 ) α npf     . ξ. dPhB becomes: dPhB ( jw ) = − 1 wn ⋅ = ξ ⋅ wn 2 ⇒ −1 2 ⋅ξ [rad ] = − 40 ξ [°] for ξ = ξ min = 0 . The values of β. 15 ° ]  Grid: Gain values signaled by a delta (∆):   α − 0. n .269 max {dPhB ( jw )} = −149 ° / octave In this case.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 57 For our faithful 2nd order LPF.a . A set of gain values within the usual (2.r21) interval is chosen. In figure 3.10). 2 . and the roots corresponding to these gain values are indicated by delta signs (∆) . . so that the damping of the complex roots can be easily visualized. This result agrees with expression (2. 8 ]    arcsin ξ = [75 °.b we observe that a small value of r21 limits the maximum value of ξ . The plot is magnified around the origin of the s-plane.60 ° . The grid indicates natural frequencies and damping arches (ϕ = arcsin ξ ). are effectively contained in the area corresponding to arcsin(ξ)>15° . We verify that all the roots signaled by a ∆. In table 3-2 the columns coloured gray correspond to the α values indicated by a ∆ signal in figure 3.26 .5 0.5 .15.

948 0.756 2.5° 1 4 α npf ⋅ (2 ⋅ r21 ) 1 4 T p3 0.71 0.6.0415 0.676 42.325 19.0547 0.00 90.8° wn w olnpf min (ξ) arcsin [min (ξ) ] Table 3-2 Rootlocus approach for wcl : parameters of BRL(s) wn for the pair of complex roots.a Figure 3.196 0.958 5.275 15.991 0.9° γ = T z’1 w = z1 ’ T z1 w z1 x 0.3° 0.328 0.6 Rootlocus for w3dB location α β = T ’ p3 α npf α npf 1 2 (2 ⋅ r21 ) = w p3 w ’p 3 (2 ⋅ r21 ) 0.978 αnpf 1 4 αn α npf ⋅ (2 ⋅ r21 ) 0. we take an average of the two roots which are the closest to the complex branches.65 1.585 0.542 32.958 73.879 3.0° 0.58 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Figure 3.6. x .0442 0.890 0.927 0. For α values where all roots are real.b Figure 3.0° 0.99 0.802 0.

gives:  1  phase  s − w as      n−m = 180 ° + l ⋅ 360 ° = (n − m ) ⋅ Φ s = so w→ ∞ Φ l l = 180 ° + l ⋅ 360 ° n−m ∧ . and   r  − 1 woln ⋅  r21 + 31  r21 r21    = woln ⋅ [r + r − 1]    → w =  oln 21 31 for r 21 >> 1 3 3 r21 and r31 >> 1 was  r + r31   ⋅  21  3 r  21   There are (n-m) centrifugal asymptotes because m root branches tend to the m zeros of the open loop transfer function. φl and was . l∈Z l ∈ [0 . comparing the coefficients of order sn-1 . which have a known phase and origin.4.2 w3dB derivation from was This second method gives some further insight into the rootlocus representation. The asymptotes of the rootlocus for increasing gain values are given by radial lines. (n − m − 1 )] For n > m+1 .20) Expressing the asymptotes in the polar form ( s o = R ⋅ e jΦ l ) and solving the phase condition for (3. φl = 60° . (3. However it is limited to a single gain value.19): s ⋅ DF (s) . that is derived from(3. xi m : order of the numerator of H(s).20). we can apply the following expression. The second case supposes n > m and w → ∞ . 300° .19) and (3.plane (LHP) n−m ∴ zi : zero s of H(s) _ with z i = z i for zeros in the LHP In our case (n-m) = 3 .Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 59 3. In fact for an increasing gain there are two possibilities of satisfying the closed loop characteristic equation (3. N F (s) → 0 .19) where n : order of the denominator of H(s).20). It follows that: w as = ∑ p −∑z i pi i : poles of H(s) _ with p i = p i for poles in the left side of the S . 180° . → −∞ N F (s ) xi . N F (s) =0 s ⋅ DF ( s ) N F (s)  s  N F (s) ⋅   w + 1   as  1 + H (s) = 1 + α ⋅ lim →  α →∞ and lim w → ∞ 1+α ⋅ n−m = 1+ α  s    w + 1   as  n−m =0 (3.

5 ⋅ w p 2 r21 numerical examples for r31 = 1. A rough estimate of the closed loop bandwidth for α ≈ αn is the frequency of 3dB attenuation for |Bas(jw)|. Figure 3. with three real poles at was . with the asymptotes for large gain and was . The roots corresponding to αmax and αmin are indicated with ∆ signals.4 ⋅ w p 2 r21 The figure below shows a rootlocus in full scale. named w3dB-as : B as (s ) 1 = 3 N  s  + 1   was  B as ( jw3dB − as ) 1 1 = = 3 N 2 2 2   w3dB − as     + 1   w as    K K r +r  w3dB − as = w as ⋅ (0.60 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops We use was to define a LPF transfer function. Bas(s).6 K w3dB − as = 0.51) ≈ woln ⋅  21 31   6⋅ r  21   r31 = 2 K w3dB − as = 0.7 Rootlocus for was location .

We know that these two transfer functions have similar bandwidths. ⇒ w3dB _ as α = 0. including the specifications of the demodulator block. and we see that small α values present a quite higher peaking than large α values. and/or to the symbol rate. when we have a given fi (intersection frequency). In chapter 7 we discuss a behavioural model including the carrier recovery loop of a QPSK decoder. Using this larger value the xii spectrum will present a smaller variation of the peaking value αmin and αmax . the optimization of the LO spectrum is bound to the type of data modulation. The characteristics of other blocks of the receiver.fi = w3dB = woln). So before the comparison we need to choose values for r21 and r31 and recenter w3dB_as with respect to αn/αnpf . This model is used to evaluate the amount of phase deviation that appears in the demodulator. which is a determinant parameter for phase modulated data.5 ⋅ woln K w3dB _ as α = rpf ⋅ 2. such as BPSK. and the implementation loss caused by this signal degradation.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 61 We would like to compare the results of the two methods for the estimation of w 3dB . The total phase deviation is defined as: σϕ = ∫ f max f min S ϕ ( f ) df [rad] (3. The LO spectrum is a combination of the contributions of Npll and vnvco. close to wn in B3LPF(s) and BVCO-BPF(s).5 Maximum Phase Jitter The specification of the spectral purity of the local oscillator depends on the input signal that has to be frequency-converted. such as filter stages and the carrier recovery loop are also relevant to the sensibility to phase noise. transferred by B(s) and Bvco(s) respectively. and that wn varies with α. in a range closely proportional to the variation of wol. xii . So the achievable BER performance may not be directly derived from σϕ . and in the 1st method the centered value corresponds to αnpf . the total phase deviation is a meaningful parameter.21) where fmin and fmax are related to the channel bandwidth . QPSK and GMSK.5 ⋅ w p 2 = 2. In practice we often choose w3dB in the range: woln ≤ w3dB ≤ 2 ⋅ woln . The following section discusses the total phase deviation. r21 = 25 or inversely. we choose : w 3 dB = 2π ⋅ f i and w 3dB ≤ w oln ≤ w 3dB 2 In a larger scope. In the 2nd method w3dB was estimated for a gain of αn .8 ⋅ woln n npf r31 = 50 nd st The 2 method results in a larger value of w3dB than the 1 one.5 ⋅ woln = 1. Figure 3. 3. For some types of digital phase modulation.5 is traced for a w3dB chosen by the 1st method (2π.

log(N) modulates the height of the PLL noise contribution. xiv These α values are the same used in the other plots of Fig. usually with a linear frequency scale around fvco . The 3rd curve presents the total phase deviation observed in the plots of the spectrum. Œ N = 1500 . For other cases with a larger range of dividing ratios. It also helps to visualize the idea of a similar integral (area under the curve). or in other words closer to fi . we may expect that: • N → Nmax ⇒ α → αmin : an increase in σϕ with respect to the evaluation with a constant N. The curves are calculated for different gain values covering the normalized (2. 3. A large bandwidth is assumed for the evaluation of σϕ . Therefore we may choose to center wolnpf in a frequency larger than the one indicated in equation (3. we search for the value of wolnpf with respect to (2π. We present two options of simulation tools.17). wolnpf = 2π ⋅ f i ⋅ (rpf ) 1 4 ⇒ 2π ⋅ f i = wolnpf ⋅ woln (3. (2 ⋅ r21)−0. Œ Lvco(100KHz)=-100dBc/Hz . The linear scale is presented as a visual recall of the spectrum analyzer output.23) The integration boundaries of the right most term of (3. Œ r21 = 25 .8 : α = αnpf ⋅ (2 ⋅ r21)−0. or σϕ for the extreme gain cases. with a ratio Nmax/Nmin =2. xiii xiv Function of r21 and r31 . The factor 20.fi ). (2 ⋅ r21)0.8 there is an approximation due to the constant divider ratio N.25 . the change would not be significant. so as to obtain a minimum σϕ over the total gain range.r21). 1 . They are: Œ Npll = -154 dBc/Hz @ Fcp = 1 MHz . The integer values of the abscissa correspond to the geometrically distributed values of α . .22) The output spectrum is plotted with logarithmic and linear scales.21) without changing σϕ significantly.62 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Using σϕ as a spectral quality parameter. f max f min ∫ Sϕ df ≈ +∞ ∫ Sϕ 0 40 ⋅ f p 3 df ≈ f z1 ∫ Sϕ df 500 (3. r31 = 50 . In our example.5 [ ] . (2 ⋅ r21)0.5 .r21) range. are used in the calculation of σϕ . expression (2. The graph below is calculated with a programmed Matlab routine.23). • N → Nmin ⇒ α → αmax : a decrease in σϕ with respect to the evaluation with a constant N. In figure 3. In chapter 7 we discuss another simulation model easily implemented in software for analog circuitry simulation. with respect to N and α values. The characteristics of the PLL and the VCO are identical to the ones used in the Bode plot of Fig. A numerical simulation tool is always indicated to verify the total phase deviation.22).25 . xiii The plot below shows an example of the placement of wolnpf with respect to fi and rpf . So a changing value of N modifies σϕ . For a Sϕ ( f ) f << f oln → cst and Sϕ ( f ) f >> f p3 → −∞ we may enlarge the integration limits of (3. 3. which optimizes σϕ over the gain range of (2.5 .

(2.r21)+0. (2.r21)-0.25 αnpf αnpf . (2. (2. .5 Figure 3. with a total phase deviation under 1.5 αnpf .8 shows that this set of noise performances of the PLL and VCO can accommodate a gain variation (αmax/αmin) of factor 50.25 αnpf .r21)+0. 3. This optimum σϕ performance is an important practical result for synthesizers generating lownoise carriers.8° .r21)-0.8 Optimizing Total Phase Deviation Fig.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 63 The curves from left to right correspond to the gain values: a) b) c) d) e) αnpf .

in the case of a large bandwidth we must pay attention to keep: wn / wcp < 0. for example a maximum peak or a minimum |L(f)| (absolute single side band phase noise) within a certain frequency offset range. mainly with α=αmax . But the discussion is limited to a single gain value. Locked VCO output Spectrum min |L (f) | fosc In this case. which is similar to a Nyquist bandwidth for a discrete system with a sampling frequency fcp . The boundary we propose for the moment. αmin αmax Figure 3. In the scope of the rootlocus representation. . it would not be possible to increase wolnpf as much as needed for an equilibrated minimum |L(f)| throughout the whole range of α. This issue is treated in chapter 5. The criterion of minimal |L(f)| is also called maximum flat spectrum optimization. However. it would be possible to apply this minimum |L(f)| criterion. is a rough estimation. In other cases with a much worse PLL phase noise performance. comparing the algorithms of maximum PhM and maximum flat spectrum.9 Maximum SSB noise requirement The limitation of a maximum bandwidth appears when the PLL model includes the sampling of the phase detector. we may use a very large feedback bandwidth . In the numerical example treated above. as the max{wn} is already near to wcp .fi) in order to have the PLL behaviour determining most of the spectrum around wn in all the gain range. where we need to accommodate rather large gain variations.5 . Therefore maximum flat spectra are obtained for values of α corresponding to 4 real roots (ξ=1). and a closed bandwidth well matched with fi . Reference [Wong96] discusses this problem for 4th and 5th order PLLs. and is not therefore very useful in our application. wolnpf >> (2π. The formal solution of the maximum flat point is found minimizing |B(jw)|. we may deduce this maximum flat condition as the maximum ξ condition.64 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Other applications will demand different spectral purity parameters.

r21 . In the rootlocus representation. it is a necessary and sufficient condition for all roots to have negative real parts. It is the limiting gain value that implies system instability. but we need also to check the first column of the Routh array. depicted in the table below: s4 s3 s2 s1 1 r21 + r31 ⋅ woln r21  α r21  2 ⋅ woln ⋅ r31 ⋅ 1 −   α n (r21 + r31 )      2   α  (r21 + r31 )  3 woln ⋅ r31 ⋅ ⋅ 1 −  α n  r ⋅ r ⋅ (r + r ) − α ⋅ r   21 31  21 31 21  αn      α r 4 woln ⋅ 31 ⋅ r21 α n Gain Stability Boundary 1 a1 b1 c1 s0 = 1 d1 Table 3-3 The criterion observes the coefficients of the system characteristics equation (expressed as a monic polynomial. we observe a pair of complex roots crossing the imaginary axis for increasing gain values. i.e. . . αn. Œ having all elements of the 1st column of Routh array positive. xv . r31 :  r   1 + s ⋅ 21   woln  B (s )   = α α  N r α r 1 r +r  s 4 ⋅  n ⋅ 4 21  + s 3 ⋅  n ⋅ 3 ⋅ 21 31  + s 2 ⋅  n ⋅ 221  α w  α woln   r31  oln    α woln ⋅ r31    r   + s ⋅  21  + 1   woln     For α . woln .Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 65 3. woln . the coefficient of the higher order term equals 1) to compose two statements: Œ having all coefficients positive.6 Gain Stability Boundary We end this chapter deriving one last practical feature that is emphasized by the rootlocus. it is a necessary condition for all the roots to have negative real parts. r31 ∈ R+ all the coefficients of the denominator are positive. Routh’s stability criterion may be used to evaluate this gain stability xv boundary. B(s) is rewritten as a function of αn. r21 .

b1 > 0 ⇒ with c1lim < b1 lim c1 > 0 ⇒ The difference between c1lim and b1lim is rather small when r21 and r31 are much larger than 1.  1 min    r pf     ⇒ min  r31  = 1.4 ⋅ r21 10 25 → ∞     2 ⋅ r21 = 15 . to determine the maximum α/αnpf ratio.67 ) α npf 1+ 1 2 r21  α = max  α  npf     A couple of numerical examples for given r21 values are listed in the table below. 2 3 . 3 2 ⋅ r21 → ∞ .6 ⋅ r21 ⋅ (2. we have two signal changes in the column vector indicating two roots in the RHP.19). 1+ 1 2 r +r α α αn = ⋅ < 21 31 α npf α n α npf r21  1 ⋅ r  pf     r21 1+ 1 2 r + r  r31   = 21 31 ⋅  r21  r31 − r21    r21 We search to eliminate r31 in the expression above.  α max α  npf 3 . so that: α < 2.3 ⋅ 3 . by using the minimum ratio r31/r21 indicated in chapter 2. so we may work with b1lim for simplicity.66 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Terms b1 and c1 may become negative for an increasing α α r +r < 21 31 = b1 lim αn r21       α r + r   r + r  < 21 31 ⋅ 1 −  21 31   = c1 lim     αn r21   r21 ⋅ r31      α n factor.6 r    21    1 ∴ min  r  pf  8 =  3  In this manner the maximum gain boundary is a function of a single parameter r21 . Thus for α α n > b1 lim . Next we combine b1lim with the gain recentering expression (2.0 ⋅ 2 ⋅ r21 = 23 .

The PLL analysis tools from chapter 2 were largely employed. we calculated the theoretical limits of the gain variation to give a practical numerical boundary for people facing the constraints of a synthesizer implementation. are compared to the normalized maximum value αmax = 2 ⋅ r21 ⋅ α npf . and examined the closed loop transfer of the inherent noise of the VCO. Finally. and to optimize the phase jitter in the ensemble VCO+PLL.αmax . which emphasizes the importance of choosing r21 in adequacy to the gain variation. ( ) The comparison shows that the stability boundary is achieved for α approaching 3. In this chapter we developed practical tools to evaluate the spurious rays. The closed and open loop bandwidths of the PLL were related to adjust the filter calculation to the requirement of a minimum phase jitter. the maximum stability values.Chapter 3 / Application Related Constraints 67 Table 3-4 Maximum Normalized Gain Variation In the table. and we continued to discuss robust approaches taking in account the whole range of gain variation. . max (α/αnpf ). We introduced the units to quantify the phase noise.

68 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops .

.................................................................... 70 Fully 3rd order passive filter impedance........ 81 4................................1.......................................................... Amplifier with single dominant pole. 75 gm Influence in Open Loop Transfers....................................................................................................................................3.......................................................1................................ 84 4........10 Figure 4..............1............................. Input impedance: Zin .1........................................................................................... 84 Noise sources voltage spectrum density ..... Non-ideal Filter Impedance ......................................................... Filter Component Noises ..................................................................................................................................... 82 4................................ 79 Supply disturbances............... 83 Noise simulation scheme .............2........................ 83 4............................... 83 Filter components noise ....3 Figure 4.................Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 69 Contents: 4...6.........................9 Figure 4............................................. Summary of AC boundaries for filter design. 74 4.........1... 71 4......................................................................2.........5............ ................................................................................3........................................................................ 82 Amplifier noise......... 72 Active Filter example: Phase Margin degradation... 73 Loop rootlocus with active filter................................................................................................................................... 87 4 Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues Quite often PLL synthesizers drive VCOs with a tuning range higher than the PLL supply voltage.......................8 Figure 4........... 80 4......................2...............................................................................11 Active Loop Filter .................................................................. 77 Amplifier Input Impedance X Filter Impedance .................................................. 86 Tables: Table 4-1 Table 4-2 Table 4-3 Table 4-4 Fully 3rd order passive filter: ∆PhM and ∆GM ............................................................................................................................ 76 4............................. Amplifier AC characteristics .................4..7 Figure 4......5 Figure 4................................ In these cases the filter impedance is associated with a transconductance amplifier supporting the desired DC range at its output.....2.......................6 Figure 4...... Fully 3rd order passive filter............4 Figure 4............................... Supply Disturbances ....................... Transfer functions table ........................ 79 4.................... 72 4....................1.......................1....................................6..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 85 Noise simulation results .............................................................2.......................................... Amplifier Noise ................... 72 Active Filter AC model ........................................................ 80 4........... 85 Figures: Figure 4........................................ and examine the propagation of its intrinsic noise sources............................................................................................................... 78 Disturbances transfer functions...... Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 69 4...........4..........1. we must include the amplifier AC characteristics in the loop transfer functions.....2...............................................................................2........................................ In order to preserve the AC and noise specifications of the locked VCO... 70 4.1.....................................2. Simulation Example ....................................................................................... Random Electrical Noise ..............5.......................... 82 4......................................1 Figure 4........................2..... Numerical example............................... Disturbances and Noise Propagation ......2 Figure 4.............................................................

In a less ideal context. Rpu . Vdc_high Zs R1 Rpu C1 C2 Icp Z3 R3 C3 Vref Vtune Figure 4. The amplifier is a transconductor with a high input impedance and a current output transformed in voltage by the pull-up resistor. that are caused by a non-ideal loop amplifier. as represented in figure 2. starting to descend from the system approach to the level of circuit implementation. we study the limitations of the linear model with respect to the maximum feedback bandwidth and the maximum comparison frequency for the PLL. The example of deterministic sources (that are transmitted by parasitic coupling) and the example of electrical random noise sources (shot. which was presented in chapter 2. transconductance gain (gm). we look at the changes in the filtering function. Here. The study of the active filter gives us an appropriate example to look at noise sources in the level of circuit description.4. The passive elements are still responsible for the lead-lag and post-filter of ZF(s) . 4. Ideally for a very high input impedance. and need to be checked and included in the loop transfer.1. and the input node connected to the charge pump output is held around the DC value Vref . In this chapter we also continue the analysis of the noise in the VCO spectrum. and pull-up resistor.1 Active Loop Filter The filter configuration above is quite classical in tuner applications. Later in chapter 5. mainly for large bandwidth filters. the amplifier characteristics are invisible in the AC transfer: Vtune/Icp .70 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops This chapter introduces the first non-ideal aspects of the AC model of the PLL. the AC characteristics of the amplifier are relevant. thermal and flicker) are discussed in both theoretical and practical approaches. .1 Non-ideal Filter Impedance Let us consider the active inverting loop filter represented in figure 4.

being optimized for matching and noise properties). the non-zero poles of the equation (4. Generally.r21 . we re-examine the transfer of the equivalent passive filter without the approximation: Z3>>Zs. Nevertheless. to assure loop stability. and k the ratio R3/R1 . In order to keep a comparative insight between the passive and active configurations.1. choosing an active or passive filter configuration is a compromise between the reduced DC constraints and the AC issues related to the amplifier. So the amplifier input should be sensitive within the whole DC functioning range of the charge pump output. Secondly the influence of the input impedance is analyzed and the suggested ensemble of boundaries is summarized. Z F 3 (s) = (1 + s ⋅ T z 1 ) V tune = I cp s ⋅ C 1 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) + s ⋅ C 3 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T z 1 ) (4. i In the sketch above Vdc-high would then be equal to Vcc for the PLL circuit biasing. Sometimes active filters are also used in loops with an equal tuning range and supply voltage. . In this chapter we study these AC issues. while keeping the tuning range close to the maximum: from ground to supply voltage. A numerical example shows us the dependency of the non-zero poles position with respect to the R3/R1 ratio.1 Fully 3rd order passive filter i Before we start introducing the parameters that are specific to the active filter. Next we discuss the AC model of the amplifier.5).1). In these cases the amplifier is implemented to reduce DC constraints on the charge pump output (that can work in a reduced range. This fully 3rd order filter transfer has a denominator which is not completely factorable as equation (2. 4. the two conditional statements above may be resumed by: R3 >> R1 . So we may identify the necessary assumptions to approach the simplified factorable denominator. Let us call wp2n and wp3n . including first the transconductance and Rpu effects.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 71 In addition. such as modifications in the filter transfer and transmission or addition of disturbances and noise sources. a decreasing k causes wp2n to approach wz1 and wp3n to move away from wp2 .1)      →  C1 >> C 2 >> C 3 R1 << R 3 ≈ Z F (s) For r21>>1 and r31 ≥ (1. with a first order (single dominant pole for gm) analytical and numerical example. the input node voltage may vary significantly during acquisition intervals. which was simplified in chapter 2 by the approximation: fp3 >> fp2 . starting with non-ideal effects in the filter impedance. we start with the non-ideal fully 3rd order transfer for the passive configuration.6).

a slight increase in peaking and decrease of wpeak is noticed.Rpu .50 +0. transconductance gm and output parallel impedance Zo .1.21 Table 4-1 Fully 3rd order passive filter: ∆PhM and ∆GM Bode plots of B(jw) show that only for high gain values. discussed in chapter 2.8 -3. but if needed we may ii easily replace Rpu by the parallel impedance Zopu in the expressions derived below. as the ratio k decreases. gm and the amplifier poles and input impedance (Zin). ∆PhM (°) -11. with the amplifier represented by its input impedance Zin .46 -0. A larger wCG with an unchanged monotonously decreasing |H(jw)| implies an increase in the gain margin. wCG . As a practical conclusion we can keep in mind that passive filters should work with R3 ≥ R1 .34 1. with α approaching αmax .2 Fully 3rd order passive filter impedance Looking at the open loop Bode plot. The amplifier output as a current source may be seen as the Norton equivalent of a voltage gain amplifier. Gm. Some numerical values for r=25 and r31=50 are listed in the table below. 4. the magnitude plot is rather insensitive to k changes. ii .3. is pictured in figure 4. These considerations set us a 1st AC boundary to be taken into account during the calculation of the loop filter components. which is usually true for our application context.72 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops ∠H(jw) [°] fp2 fz1 fp3 log( f ) [Hz] with ZF(s) with ZF3(s) -90° -180° -270° Figure 4.36 +2. setting additional boundaries with respect to Rpu .903 ∆Gm (dB) +7.2 Amplifier AC characteristics The AC equivalent circuit for the active filter. In the next sections the amplifier AC characteristics are included.60 0.83 wp3n / wp3 3.70 1. and a series output impedance Rpu . but the phase curve will change causing a decrease in PhM.70 k = R3/R1 ¼ 1 4 wp2n / wp2 0. as a condition to correctly estimate the full 3rd order transfer by its factored version. The representation as a voltage controlled amplifier may be useful in certain simulation software containing amplifier models with Thevenin equivalent outputs. We consider Zo >> Rpu . with gain gv=-gm.32 0. and an increase in the frequency corresponding to the gain margin.

becomes:  1    gm − Z s ( s )      1  R   + s ⋅ C3 ⋅  ⋅  3 + 1 + R3    gm  R pu      Z Fa ( s ) = 1 (1 − gm ⋅ Z s ( s ) ) ⋅ = Z 3u ( s ) ⋅ (1 + gm ⋅ Z 3 u ( s ) ) (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 )   1 + 1   gm ⋅ R pu    (4. and look at the influence of gm and Rpu . We suppose that the overall transconductance has an LPF behaviour. and w ’p 3 < w p 3 General conditions may be imposed over gm to approach ZFa(s) to ZF(s). we present first the transfer of an active filter with an ideal infinite Zin . . Simple and usual loop amplifiers are composed of a high impedance voltage follower and DClevel shifter. and poles represented by the polynomial DG(s) . ZFa(s). We will now include frequency dependent aspects in the amplifier transconductance.   1    gm − Z s ( s )   ≈  1 + s ⋅ Tp3 Z Fa ( s )      →  with gm ⋅ R pu >> 1 gm ⋅ R pu R3 >> 1       → ≈ − Z F (s)  with gm >> 1 Zs (s) The first conditions just affect the post-filter pole with respect to the amplifier voltage gain. plus a transconductor amplifying stage.2) R pu ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) 1  T p 3 = C 3 ⋅ R3 =  w p3   1  ’ T p 3 = C 3 ⋅ (R 3 + R pu ) = w ’ p3  with Z 3u = (1 + s ⋅ T ) ’ p3 . with a low frequency value Gmo. The active filter transfer.3 Active Filter AC model For the sake of clarity. The dominant poles are either from the follower or the transconductance stage. The second condition is more hermetic since the poles of gm and the zeros of Zs will be mixed in the numerator polynomial.vin Zo vM Z3u R3 C3 Vtune Rpu Figure 4.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 73 Zs Icp vin Zin gm.gm . gv=Rpu.

The transconductance and voltage gain become: gm = Gmo 1+ s wa and gv = Gmo ⋅ R pu Gvo = s 1+ 1+ s wa wa Replacing this 1st order gm in equation (4. In order to have some qualitative understanding to better analyze the simulation results.1. L order {Ds ( s )} = ns order {DG ( s )} = n g  Gmo gm = DG ( s ) . for a gm with a single dominant pole. Ns(s) and Ds(s).  R pu    Œ the position of the post-filter pole is a bit changed.3) for ZFa .74 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The lead-lag filter part is also split in numerator and denominator polynoms. ns and ng . order {Z Fa ( s )} = ng + ns n g + ns + 1 ∴ for s = jw ⇒ lim Z Fa ( w) = w→ ∞ k for k = cst w order {Z F ( s )} = ms k’ ∴ for s = jw ⇒ lim Z Fa ( w) = n +1− m w→ ∞ ns + 1 ws s for k ’ = cst ZFa(s) order indicates that the gm poles are reducing the filter attenuation for high frequencies. There will also be additional poles in the LHP.3) suggests that at least one zero will appear in the RHP. we develop a first order analytical case. Besides. 4. Finally. which affects for example. equation (4. Both the RHP zero and LHP poles will contribute to decrease stability margins. the suppression of the comparison frequency component. ZFa(s) can be rewritten using: order {N s ( s )} = ms  .3 Amplifier with single dominant pole An example is presented below for a simple amplifier model with a single dominant pole at wa. and compare to the passive filter ZF(s). . N (s) Z s (s) = s Ds ( s ) with ns > ms . we verify the following changes in the denominator:  R  Œ an extra-pole is added at w ≈ wa ⋅ Gvo ⋅ 1 + 3  .3) We can preview the order of the ZFa(s) numerator and denominator with respect to ms . D ( s ) ⋅ Ds ( s )   −  N s (s) − G  Gmo   Z Fa ( s ) =  DG ( s )    ⋅ 1 + s ⋅ T p’3 + (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) Ds ( s ) ⋅   Gmo ⋅ R pu    ( ) (4.

Gmo. the numerator receives two extra-zeros. one of which is in the RHP. N s ( s ) = (1 + s ⋅ Tz1 ) Ds ( s ) = s ⋅ C1 ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 )  DG ( s ) =  1 + s  wa    num {Z Fa ( s )} = N s ( s ) − DG ( s ) ⋅ Ds ( s ) s ⋅ C1 = (1 + s ⋅ Tz1 ) − Gmo Gmo   ⋅  (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 ) ⋅  1 + s    wa      (4. As we commented previously. most of the changes in the frequency behaviour of the active transfer are due to the additional zeros. . with a characteristic equation like: 1-H(s) . which is normally found in positive feedback cases. On the other hand. and.4 . this branch appears because of the RHP zero. iii The scale of this rootlocus is not linear. The numerator of equation (4. In addition. farther ones introduced by the active device. The corresponding iii rootlocus is sketched in figure 4. the zero from the lead-lag impedance (Zs) is quite sensitive to the product R1.4 Loop rootlocus with active filter This rootlocus present an asymptotic branch running towards +∞. in order to visualize both: close-in zeros and poles from the passive elements.3) is detailed below for the single pole gm. In our example.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 75 For wa and Gvo kept within reasonable bounds (wa≥wp3 and Gvo≥10) the influence in the denominator is rather small. In the rootlocus sketch we may verify that the two zeros at low frequencies are specially relevant to system stability. Distances are compacted as they run away from the origin. which causes an inversion in the H(s) signal for large gain values.4) Root Locus fz1 f’z1 Im{s} fp3 fp2 fz2 Re{s} High frequency additional zero and pole Figure 4.

However. A typical tuner application value is assumed for Rpu . Gmo and wa tending to infinite). The reference case is equivalent to –ZF(s) . and it is better to keep some design flexibility by assuring a high Gmo value. but its position depends on the Gmo value. r21=25.R1 . for: Œ Fcp=1 MHz. optimized noise transfer.5 is calculated for a narrow band filter with the following parameters: Œ folnpf=10 kHz. Therefore keeping a large enough Gmo.4 kΩ. The resulting R1 value is 4. we should remember iv that R1 is chosen with respect to the PLL bandwidth and gain (woln and αn ). 4. we search simplified expressions for the zeros indicated in the rootlocus. r31=50. The first (w’z1) is close to the lead-lag zero from Ns .5 GHz.     ⋅ 1 + s num {Z Fa ( s )} ≈  1 + s ’  ⋅  1 − s  wz 2   wz3  w z1       • for w z1 << w << w p 2 10 ∧ w << w a ⇒ and  Gmo ⋅ R1  ’ w z 1 = w z1 ⋅   Gmo ⋅ R − 1   1   ∴ ’ w z1 < w z 2 < w z 3 .5) We notice that the two zeros are related to the product Gmo. The second (wz2) is the zero added in the RHP.12) repeated here for convenience: R = w oln 1 αn .1. equal to 22 kΩ. and R3 is chosen to be equal to Rpu . .4 Numerical example We may visualize the influence of the new zeros of ZFa(s) and the accuracy of the w’z1 and wz2 estimates through a numerical example. Icp=200 µA. However the choice of woln is limited by many other criteria (spurious suppression. limitation with respect to discrete system nature.76 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In order to better understand the changes in the ZFa numerator ( with respect to Ns ). A reference case is calculated for an ideal amplifier (with Zin . iv Equation (2. Œ Fvco=1.R1 . may imply changing woln . Kvco=100 MHz/V. Figure 4. We can consider two frequency intervals to derive approximate values for the two lowest magnitude zeros: w’z1 and wz2 . 1     num {Z Fa ( s )} ≈  1 + s ’  = 1 + s ⋅ C 1 ⋅  R1 −  w z1  Gmo    • for wp2 10 << w << wa ∧ w p 2 << wa ⇒  2  C1 ⋅ T p 2   -s ⋅  Gmo         = 1 + s ⋅  T − C1 num {Z Fa ( s )} ≈  1 + s ’  ⋅  1 − s  z1  wz 2  wz1    Gmo   and for ’ w z1 << w z 2 : w z 2 = w p 2 ⋅ (Gmo ⋅ R1 − 1) (4.…).

5 gm Influence in Open Loop Transfers v A phase margin loss and a decrease in reference suppression is visible in cases b and c. c b d a a b c d Figure 4. v . the transfer of a charge pump current disturbance divided by Kϕ . loop magnitude is significantly smaller than 1 for f=fcp : H (w cp ) ≈ N So we call reference attenuation N ⋅ H (w cp ) . which represents the transfer of a phase disturbance at fcp injected at the reference input. B(s) . becoming quite restrictive in c) where we may no longer work with a (2.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 77 Curve a) corresponds to the ideal factorable transfer ZF(s) . but since the open B (w cp ) . Curve b) and c) are ZFa(s) with wa=wp3 and two different values of Gmo. Curve d) is an estimation of case c) using expressions (4.5) for w’z1 and wz2 . Normally the reference suppression is calculated with the closed loop frequency response. or equivalently.r21) gain variation.

Thus the requirements for the amplifier transconductance depend on the R1 value. even for low gm values.2 39. may degrade significantly the filter transfer. but for higher frequencies the absence of the additional zero-pole pair deviates the estimate from the real ZFa(s) curve. Nevertheless. we notice that low values for the product Gmo. w’z and wz2 are evaluated by equations (4. with Gmo=10/Rpu . the product Gmo. The table below brings PhM and reference transfer values for the above curves.5 -9.78 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops ’ We can define r21 = wp2 ’ w z1 . Once more we repeat that a flexible amplifier design should assure an important Gmo value. with low Vtune values and high current output in the amplifier. the w’z1 estimation is correct enough to evaluate the parameter r’21 .6 17. on the loop bandwidth and gain. which compared to r21 gives an overall idea of the PhM loss.9 c) ZFa(s) with Gmo=10/Rpu 2 +12. but re-calculate it for a larger bandwidth filter with folnpf=50 kHz. we get a bigger R1 value.8 Active Filter example: Phase Margin degradation In this narrow band filter example.72 [dB ] PhM(folnpf) [°] PhM(folnpf*r21) [°] r21 or r’21 Table 4-2 25 20. case Gmo*R1 θo θi a) ZF(s) →∞ -16. The zero frequencies. The reference injection was vi evaluated in terms of phase disturbance.05 55. Since the PhM loss becomes worse for wol close to wp2 . So we need to identify the worst case situation and verify the stability boundaries for this case. we must avoid having the lowest Gmo vii values for α tending to αmax . which corresponds to the beginning of the frequency band. In this case. The parameter r’21 equals 23 for this large bandwidth example. The approximation is fairly accurate up to wp2 .8 62. which is represented by curve d).5). is calculated replacing wz1 by w’z1 and adding wz2 over an ideal transfer ZF(s). and small N. It is important to remember that the Gmo value varies along the output DC range.R 1.2 33. We remark that in cases b) and c) the reference injection is no longer attenuated. equal to 22 kΩ. or in other words. like in case c). αmax .4 b) ZFa(s) with Gmo=25/Rpu 5 +8. happens for large Kvco . The estimation of ZFa(s). to avoid additional constraints on the bandwidth choice.4 13. vi θo θo = θ i ( w cp ) I ChP (w cp ) Kϕ = B (w cp )≈ H (w cp ) dB + 20 ⋅ log N The high gain situation. If we take the same parameters in the above example.R1 is still large. For cases where the overall vii . and no important degradation is observed in the filter transimpedance.

|Z(jw)| |Zin(w)| Rpu |Z3u(w)| |Zs(w)| R1 wz1 wp2 w p3 ’ In this figure we suppose R3≈ Rpu and R1 < Rpu . but it has almost no drift over w’z1 . Z Fai ( s ) = Z 3 u ⋅ (1 − gm ⋅ Z s )  Z s + Z 3u   Z in     + (1 + gm ⋅ Z 3 u )  ⋅ 1 (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) (4. having a minor role for the PhM loss. if w i1 > 1 = w ’p 3 C 3 ⋅ (R 3 + R pu ) ⇒ Z in > Z 3 u for w ≤ w p3 transconductance is directly proportional to the output stage current.6) The indication of frequency dependency (F(s)=F) for Zs . which may be approached by a MOS gate input. Zin . Z3u and Zin . this αmax situation corresponds to a high Gmo value. Often we search for a Zin with an infinite DC-impedance. In order to approach ZFai to ZFa we impose a boundary for Zin : Zin >> Zs + Z3u . w [rad/sec] wp3 wi1 wi2 Let us define wi1 and wi2 as the intersection frequencies of Rpu and Zin . AC simulations are necessary to check the gm for the whole amplifier (with the input stage) in different points of the DC working range. Nevertheless. Zin and gm is implied. for wa larger than wp3 .Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 79 Finally we may identify a practical boundary for the transconductance pole.5 Input impedance: Zin We will mention one last AC characteristics of the amplifier: its input impedance.2). Thus.6 Amplifier Input Impedance X Filter Impedance wi1 = 1 R pu ⋅ C in . Figure 4. wa . its position concerns mainly the spurious attenuation. . It also slightly affects the RHP zero. The sketch below represents the impedance magnitudes: Zs .1. 4. and R1 and Zin respectively. R1 and Rpu .The filter transfer including Zin is named ZFai(s) and can be compared to the first form of ZFa(s) in (4. In this case Zin can be represented as an equivalent input capacitor Cin . The pole wa is very determining for the position of the additional high frequency zero and pole. wz2 . but we may analyze Cin constraint for a general unknown R3 . Z3u .

implies: Cin << C3 wi2 = 1 R 1 ⋅ C in . filter passive elements are already bringing some extra base-band noise that is frequency modulated by the VCO. during the calculation of ZF3(s) .80 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Hence keeping Zin >> Z3u for a maximum frequency higher than wp3 . The noise sources are replaced by independent AC sources. which allows us to reduce the Zin restriction to: Cin<<C3 . Another degradation caused by active filters is the transmission of disturbances injected in the IC internal supply nodes. It was already suggested. with an equivalent Laplace form. vd(t). We may quantify these effects seeking the AC transfer of noise and disturbance sources present in the active filter model. to work with C2>>C3 . and uncorrelated noise sources are added in viii L(foffset ) for frequencies out of the PLL bandwidth is ideally equivalent to the free-running VCO behaviour. but in practice.2 Disturbances and Noise Propagation The amplifier noise is sometimes visible in the out-of-loop zone of the locked spectrum. viii worsening the expected phase noise performance. The supply disturbance is shown as a deterministic AC signal source. is applied for the noise sources. . 4. analogue to an AC model. if wi2 > w p2 = 1 R1 ⋅ C 2 ⇒ Z in > Z s for ∀ w So for Zin >> Zs we must choose Cin << C2 .1.6 Summary of AC boundaries for filter design An outline of all the boundaries proposed in this section :  C1 >> C 2 >> C 3 >> C in     R1 << R3    for Z F 3 ( s) → Z F ( s) (full 3 rd order denominator compared with factored approximation) and for Z Fai ( s ) → Z Fa ( s ) ( negligible input impedance for active filter amplifier) wa ≥ w p3 Gmo ⋅ R pu ≥ 10 Gmo ⋅ R1 > 5      for Z Fa ( s ) → Z F ( s) (active filter transfer compared with passive one) 4. Vd(s) . and for an unknown R3. A simplified representation.

and has the following current or voltage representation: I n2 4 ⋅ k ⋅T = R ∆f 2  A rms   Hz    . α and β have values around one. The same notation used for AC sources is adopted for the noise sources. shot. and well controlled processes. V ( jw ) ∆f ∆f The thermal noise is associated to resistors.38. is: I n2 = 2 ⋅q ⋅ ID ∆f 2  A rms   Hz    with q the charge of the electron in coulombs: 1.…).2. A short revision on electrical noise sources and notations follows below. The shot noise associated with ID . Kf reflects the quality of the interfaces between diffusion layers. is: I n2 = K ∆f f ⋅ α IB f β 2  A rms   Hz    . Typically.1 Random Electrical Noise We consider restrictively the most common types of electrical noise: thermal. Shot noise is encountered in any conducting junction. base current in a bipolar transistor. The flicker noise associated with IB .10-19 C . flicker. . the current of a diode or bipolar transistor (base or collector). The frequency domain representations for (ini )2 and (vni )2 are the classical power densities for electrical noise (thermal. Hence a transfer F(s) for a noise source replaces the power transfer of the noise PSD. . but we must remember that noise transfers are just defined for power magnitudes.60. shot and flicker noise. and a low Kf is associated with mature.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 81 power magnitude. V n2 = 4 ⋅ k ⋅ T ⋅R ∆f 2 V rms   Hz    K I n2 = V n2 R2 T is the absolute temperature.C/K . which is actually represented by |F(jw)|2 . where. The statistical theory allowing such a treatment is shortly discussed in chapter 6. commonly determined through measurements. The notation adopted is in the form of unitary impedance power densities. and we define small signal sources ini and vni representing component i noise in a current or voltage form. We take the freedom to define the noise transfers in Laplace transform. Kf . and k is the Boltzmann constant: 1. in Kelvin. α and β are process dependent parameters. and flicker noise is associated to active devices.10-23 V. 4. expressed in current or 2 voltage terms: I ( jw ) 2 .

Switching blocks working with very steep voltage slopes and clipped signals are a typical example of vd generating circuitry.7 Supply disturbances These disturbances can be RF current pulses either injected in the substrate or simply drained from the external supply causing a voltage drop difference (ddp) as they go through the connection path impedance. such disturbances are better attenuated. First vd is transformed into a current error by the charge pump output impedance. since they may inject quite some current in the substrate through the collector-substrate capacitors.2. The disturbance vd often arises as deterministic modulating tones at the oscillator input. . which is typically high. working with large and steep swings is a good example. being only filtered by the first order attenuation of the post-filter. Eventually in the active filter design we may interchange wp2 and wp3. Figure 4.8).vin Zo vM vd Z3u R3 Vtune Rpu C3 The voltage source vd represents the disturbances found in the IC internal supply and ground nodes.vd . and the real PhM in ZF3(s) compared to the factored ZF(s) . An infinite Zo means that the output current variation due to vd is neglected: vd/Zo<< gm. The source vd is almost directly transmitted to Vtune . This exchange should be checked in a numerical application to verify gm influence in wp2 placement. but it is not adapted to a variable . The crystal oscillator for low noise PLLs. Afterwards this current error is filtered by the whole ZF(s).82 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 4. which roughly represents a 2nd order LPF with a lower cut frequency than wp3 . 4. The transfer function shown in table 4-3 is calculated for Zo and Zin→ ∞. The usual noisy twoport representation with noise sources at the quadripole input is convenient for settings with a well known source and input impedance. placing the lower pole after the amplifier in order to improve vd rejection.3 Amplifier Noise It is opportune to evaluate and represent the amplifier noise by a current noise source at its output (ina in figure 4. In passive filters.2.2 Supply Disturbances Zs Icp vin Zin gm.

Vtune it is easily derived as: V tune 1 = VM 1 + s ⋅ Tp3 Figure 4.) is associated to the parallel R1//C2 impedance and transformed in its Thevenin equivalent. . Zs Icp Zin gm. following the convenience of the transfer calculation.4 Filter Component Noises In figure 4.8 but as long as we calculate VM with a load impedance equal to Z3u . thus the transfer Vtune /Inpu is identical to the function Vtune /Ina. The amplifier noise appears in Vtune attenuated by the transconductance gm. Vn12 . may be symbolized by a current source inpu . Zs C1 C2 Zs in1 R1 gm. whose transfer to Vtune is quite similar to Vtune /Vd . and this is more clearly depicted by a noise source in parallel to the output port. Furthermore the amplifier noise varies with respect to its output current..vin R3 vn3 vn12 Icp vin Zin Vtune Rpu vM V n 12 ( s ) = I n 1 ( s ) C3 R1 1 + s ⋅Tp2 Figure 4.9 we add the noise sources from the filter resistors R1 and R3 . approximation of the amplifier input impedance). The transfer function in table 4-3 is detailed for a gm with a single dominant pole.9 Filter components noise Resistors thermal noise is depicted either in current or voltage form. Rpu . They are the only noise sources common to both active and passive loop filters . 4.8 Amplifier noise The thermal noise of the pull-up resistor. placed in parallel to ina .Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 83 source impedance (charge pump on or off) and a very large input impedance (approaching infinity. R1 noise (In1. and filtered by the wp3 pole.vin ina Zo vM vin Z3u The post-filter components are not explicitly drawn in figure 4.2. R3 noise in its voltage form (vn3 ) is only filtered by the post-filter before emerging directly in Vtune . The gm poles also introduce an equal number of extra zeros and poles in the Vtune /Ina ratio .

2. . The expressions of Z3u and the 1st order gm are recalled below.5 Transfer functions table The following transfer functions were evaluated for the AC models in figures 4. The general expressions using variables gm and Z3u are further specified for the particular gm case with a single dominant pole. with the approximation: Zin → ∞ and Zo >> Rpu . These simplified expressions are also bounded by other conditions that are indicated in table 4-3 . Z 3u = R pu ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) (1 + s ⋅ T ) ’ p3 with : w ’p 3 < w p 3 Signal Internal supply disturbances: vd(t) ↔ Vd(s) Transfer to Vtune V tune gm ⋅ Z 3u 1 = ⋅ (1 + gm ⋅ Z 3u ) (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) Vd V tune Z 3u = (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) ⋅ (1 + gm ⋅ Z 3 u ) I na V tune V = tune I na I npu Specific pratical approach for a 1st order gm for w << w a ⋅ Gmo ⋅ Z 3 u V tune 1 ≈ Vd 1 + s ⋅ T p3 for Gmo ⋅ Z 3 u >> 1  s  1 +   wa    s Gmo ⋅ Z 3 u ⋅ w a Amplifier noise: ina ↔ Ina(s) Pull up resistor. I n 3 = (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) Vn 3 Table 4-3 Disturbances transfer functions The above transfer functions are better illustrated by a simulation example developed in the following section.7 through 4.84 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 4.9. gm = Gmo 1 + s   wa    . Rpu noise: inpu ↔ Inpu(s) Filter components noise (R1): in1 ↔ In1(s) Filter components noise (R3): vn3 ↔ Vn3(s) 1 V tune Gmo ≈ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) ⋅  1 + I na        Vtune gm ⋅ Z 3 u R1 = ⋅ (1 + gm ⋅ Z 3u ) (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 ) ⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) I n1 for w << w a ⋅ Gmo ⋅ Z 3 u V tune R1 ≈ (1 + s ⋅ T p 2 )⋅ (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) I n1 Vtune Vt R3 1 = (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) .

11 present the scheme and results of an AC noise simulation for an active filter. Rbias-in noise contribution at Vtune appears as a current source filtered by Zs and Z3u . The transfer for the thermal noise of Rd is equivalent to the transfer of Vd (a supply disturbance).5. However we should remember that this thermal noise is a broadband source with a rather small amplitude in our numerical application. Vdc_high 30 V 10kΩ 22kΩ Rbias-in 10MΩ 8. fp2 = 48kHz. These numerical values are close to a satellite application.7 V Idc 1. Besides.2.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 85 4. and the larger the resistor the smaller the equivalent current noise generator. with: foln = 9.2nF Vtune 330pF 22kΩ Vbias-in 1.6 Simulation Example Figures 4. A small resistor value was chosen to avoid significant DC disturbances.10 and 4. fp3 = 106kHz .24mA 68pF IC blocks vcc Loop Amplifier Input Stage Bias block Zin Gm Stage gm. A large source impedance is necessary to avoid interfering in the filter AC transfer within the frequency range containing the zeros and poles of interest. αn = 6. Rbias-in has a negligible effect on the total output noise for the plotted frequency range (10Hz to 1GHz).10 Noise simulation scheme . like the one shown in the Bode plots of figure 3. The DC-operating point is fixed by a voltage source with a high series impedance.9kHz. r21 = 25 . Rd thermal noise symbolizes an AC disturbance between the internal and external grounds. Zs and the postfilter. For a 10MΩ resistor. with an integrated amplifier and external passive components for R pu .5kHz. Rbias-in . poles and open gain values: Œ fz1 = 1.vin 5V gnd IC internal ground Rd 1Ω Figure 4. The passive components are chosen for the following zero.

and Vnd. Vn1 and Vn3 for the resistors Rd . Vnpu. in the form of unitary 2 2 impedance power densities ( I ( jw ) ).86 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The analog simulator models thermal. Vna is for the amplifier noise. Figure 4. shot and flicker noise sources. where the gm-transistor flicker noise becomes important. Vnvco [Hz] Figure 4. R1 and R3 respectively. total Vn. . Rpu . The notation Vni stands for the noise voltage contribution of element i. and the separated contributions of the noise sources whose transfer we identified in table 4-3 . The amplifier noise in our example (Vna1_total) is dominated by the gm stage. except for low frequencies. In the plot below this transistor base current shot and flicker contributions are explained. R3 . in dBV/Hz units. . (Vna1_ib and Vna1_fn respectively). which is quite often a common-emiter.11 shows the voltage noise density at the Vtune output.11 Noise simulation results The simulation shows an overall filter noise dominated by the post-filter resistor. V ( jw ) ∆f ∆f The resistors have intrinsic thermal noise and the current in the transistors of the amplifier contribute with shot and flicker noise components. open collector output transistor.

vna : 2 2 2 vna = vnvco + vnfilter The closed loop transfer of vnvco to the output spectrum was named Bvco(s) .1. we need to verify that the v na components are still sufficiently supressed in the in-loop range. at the VCO input (eq.12 sketched the output spectra for a flat (white) noise input. The marker trace. In chapter 7 a system level model is presented. a voltage noise appearing at the VCO input is band-pass filtered. with a central frequency close to the PLL closed loop bandwidth.129n 19. R3 : 22kΩ R1 : 10kΩ v nvco ∆f 0. highlights the fp2 pole position. still keeping in mind the boundaries discussed in section 4. and figure 3.11 with the vnvco of a satellite VCO. In fact the different noise contributions correspond quite accurately to the simplified transfer expressions in table 4-3.2 we saw the representation of the oscillator free-running intrinsic behaviour as a voltage noise source.11 by a dashed line.Chapter 4 / Active Loop Filters: AC & disturbances issues 87 In section 3. including the filter noise effects. Since the PLL closed loop bandwidth will usually vary between fz1 and fp2 frequencies. vnvco = 14 n ∆f Vrms Hz or  v2 10 ⋅ log  nvco  ∆f   dBV  = − 157  Hz  The value of vnvco is indicated in figure 4. The numerical values below for the resistor noise sources help to verify this result. vnvco . Let us call the overall filter noise contribution. which is visible as a filtering corner on the R1 noise contribution. or with respect to the filter poles.1n 12. and also an empirical approach for the phase detector discrete behaviour influence in the PLL noise. and is added (in power magnitude) to vnvco . We may compare vnfilter of figure 4.9n [ ] Vrms Hz 2 10 ⋅ log v nvco ∆f ( ) [ ] dBV Hz -197 -154 -158 Table 4-4 ix Noise sources voltage spectrum density It is convenient to simulate such effects with a base band PLL model. R Rd : 1Ω Rpu .6. M1. (3. below f p3 . and the total voltage noise at the oscillator input. We verify that the filter noise is dominant for frequencies below 100kHz. The overall filter noise appears as well at the VCO input. Basically. with: 2 vnvco = 2 ⋅ 10 −16 ∆f 2 Vrms Hz L (100 kHz ) = − 100 dBc / Hz Kvco = 100 MHz / V ⇒ . it is most likely that some extra out-of-loop noise will be visible up to an octave after fp3.3) ). vnfilter . and how much or how far the out-of-loop ix behaviour deteriorated. After the addition of the filter noise contribution. Hence the value of R3 may be changed to improve this out-of-loop performance. .

which has a variable value depending on whether it is conducting (on) or not (off). these evaluations indicate the tradeoff between passive and active filtering solutions. with an equivalent Cin much smaller than C3 in the post-filter. thus its noise level is compared to the inherent noise sources of the VCO. In addition we introduced noise considerations that start to relate system specifications to a circuit implementation. The practical boundaries and simplified transfer expressions provide the means to evaluate and specify the design of the loop amplifier. Specifically. a Rpu noise represented as a voltage source is attenuated by the amplifier gain: Gvo=Gmo. the noise of the loop filter is mostly influent in the out-ofloop zone of the VCO spectrum. or a 4kT=1. For cases with a lower Zin the transfers are modified and part of Vd and Vn12 appear as current disturbances filtered by Zs . The difference in Rpu and R3 noise contributions at the Vtune output. . Thus the transfers from table 4-3 are a valuable reference to understand and explore simulation results for the loop amplifier design.Rpu . A similar effect is observed for a decreasing source impedance (Rbiasin). The amplifier design used in this simulation has effectively a capacitive input impedance.3). shows quite clearly the amplifier feedback rejection of Inpu and Ina (as discussed in 4. and it does present a rather high impedance. Furthermore for cases with an equal tuning and biasing range. this source impedance is the charge pump output impedance. the charge pump is mostly off. This chapter developed analytical and practical approaches to deal with AC characteristics of active loop filters.10-20 VC . For a PLL in locked mode. for low frequencies. as assumed in the expressions in table 4-3. Actually. In a complete PLL. This situation well suits the approximation of Zin → ∞ .66.88 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The thermal noise sources are evaluated for a 300K temperature.2.

demand increasing bandwidths in PLL synthesizers......... 114 Figures: Figure 5.......................... 96 Convergence towards lock: phase deviation sequence..................................................................................6 Figure 5.. DC range limitations....8 Figure 5..............1..................7 Figure 5......................5 Figure 5.......... 110 Discrete phase detector input: ∆ϕn .. 100 5......................Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 89 Contents: 5................................................................... 112 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay ........... 94 5................................ 91 Maximum Phase Detection Range & Cycle slips ................ 93 Loop Filter: time response for current pulses ... but they can be evaluated and/or added with additional considerations...................................................................................... As the PLL bandwidth increases the comparison frequency needs to increase as well to keep the system stable............2.... 94 5. 99 Frequency approach convergence criterion ....................4...........................1... 115 5 Limitations of the LTI Phase Model Phase noise constraints......3 Figure 5...................3................ 111 5.............................................. 104 Comparing frequency and phase approaches.............. 114 Frequency and Time response for the continuous + delay model .................................................. 103 Phase approach convergence criterion ..........4............... Numerical examples and design considerations .....................................................13 Figure 5...1 Figure 5........ The holder. Discrete transfers for the PLL Phase Model............................. 111 Charge Pump DAC output ................3.3........ Minimum phase deviation range .................................................................................................... 91 5.......... These limitations are not contained in the LTI model discussed so far.............................2 Figure 5........................................................................ 99 5............................................................................................3..............................................................................................................................................10 Figure 5............................... Frequency approach............................ 109 5............................4 Figure 5............................2........... Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 89 5................................................2............. Lock convergence approaches ................... Phase approach ................................................... 96 5.....1.........................................11 Figure 5............................................................................... In fact............. design and stability constraints will appear to limit the values of both fol and fcp .......14 Figure 5.............3... 107 Convergence approaches X gain variation .........1........................................................................ 105 Convergence approaches X lead-lag spacing r21 ...............1............................................................................2......................... 94 Time response through normalized functions .......................................................... Loop filter time domain response .................................................................................... The sampler .............1.....................15 Figure 5............................................................................................................................................... 105 5. Continuous equivalent with transmission delay ................................... 92 Condition for unlimited frequency tracking range............ and even more integrated oscillator architectures..........9 Figure 5......................4........4.16 Phase-detector & Charge Pump transfer............ Comparing the frequency and phase approaches..... 108 Discrete model for digital blocks .......12 Figure 5.2...................................... 103 5............................................................................. Three-state comparator: frequency and phase detector ..................................... 92 5......................................................... 109 5...........................................3.. ..............2..............................................................

We also saw (section 3. and to two quantitative approaches for lock convergence in the phase detection range. phase detector and dividers.90 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The limit for maximum feedback bandwidth.5) that spectrum optimization in the basis of a minimum |L(f)| criteria may encounter limitations bound to the maximum feedback bandwidth. which is not a steady mode where the PLL can be used as a frequency synthesizer. The first three sections deal with the PLL acquisition mode. In this chapter we develop two approaches to evaluate maximum bandwidth stability conditions. . was already mentioned in chapter 3. The acquisition or tracking mode is formally treated in the de/modulators and in the clock/carrier recovery contexts. and to the timing for the programming of the different circuits in a receiver. A nice discussion of pulling time and pulling range may be found in reference [Wola91] for different types of phase detectors.e. However. or evaluated to mark its validity boundaries. The ensemble of limitations above have non-linear characteristics that can either be included in the LTI model. and we need to verify how the loop parameters influence the acquisition. In frequency synthesizers we are concerned about the minimum linear range necessary to guarantee an unlimited frequency tracking behaviour. i. Nevertheless. fcl/fcp . as linear continuous elements. as far as the validity bounds of this representation are known. The threshold bandwidth determines a limit for single loop configurations. Multi-loop configurations are an architectural solution to the limitations of the feedback bandwidth. The second introduces time delay compensations into the frequency domain phase model. we may see design constraints reducing the linear portion of the phase detector/charge pump transfer. associated to poor noise performance oscillators. The time domain expressions are also used to consider problems related to reduced DC tuning ranges. that we modeled so far. In other words. may be specified by constraints that are related to the functioning of the demodulator. The sampled nature of the PLL is connected to the digital blocks.. and in this case. such as locking time and maximum phase change for a certain step (closely related to the rising time). the limit for the three-state comparator as a frequency and phase detector. Therefore the stability boundary. for fcl/fcp. examining the loop convergence from acquisition to lock mode. can only appear by including discrete characteristics in the loop model. through compensations. the convergence towards a locked mode. Nevertheless these characteristics may also be derived from the linear model. multi-loop configurations tend to work with at least one wide band loop at high comparison frequency. Here we limit our scope to a qualitative understanding of the three-state phase detector in its frequency detector range. making an analogy to Nyquist bandwidths for sampled systems. A couple of characteristics of the acquisition mode. The first comes from a time domain model. after every change in the PLL programming the loop passes through an out-of-lock interval. They are mostly encountered for fully integrated oscillators working with large bandwidth PLLs and a tuning range equal to the circuit supply voltage.

Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 91 5.2π). In this case. The oscillator approaches lock. and a lagging oscillator. Therefore it is difficult to talk about a frequency difference. i. the phase difference will periodically exceed 2π and the phase detector will slip to a new linear part of the transfer curve starting at (n. If the two input signals are not at the same frequency. Iaverage [A] Icp -4π -2π 0 2π 4π ∆ϕ [rad] -Icp Figure 5..2π). we realize that our transfer function. when the oscillator frequency approaches the programmed value.e.e.1 Three-state comparator: frequency and phase detector As mentioned in section 1. for input signals with different frequencies the average current over several periods is proportional to the frequency difference. the phase differences. The phase detector works as a frequency deviation detector. the oscillator frequency is changing continuously with respect to V tune . and. Iaverage/∆ϕ. Let us suppose a passive filter PLL. with low frequency difference: the phase detection trapping zone. . will oscillate between positive and negative values. over several periods. The phase detector slips are periodical with a rate corresponding to the frequency difference. and we will call this functioning mode. Hence.5. with n ∈ N. for input signals with a positive or negative frequency difference. the divider is late with respect to the reference and the charge pump is sourcing. In figure 5. injecting current in the loop filter impedance. The figure below helps us to understand the idea of this average charge.1 Phase-detector & Charge Pump transfer After some time. is representing the average current over one comparison period. i The dotted curve is slightly shifted to the right of 2π just for a better visualisation. However. This behaviour is assured by a monotonously increasing or decreasing average charge injected in the loop filter. proportionally to the charges stored in the loop capacitors.1 this is represented by the grey i dotted line. and it is easier to talk about an accumulated charge over several periods.3 the tri-state phase detector has an unlimited tracking range. i. or an average current. in the PLL. minus (n.

showing only a limited slew rate for the charge pump outputs. reset τrst Figure 5. the loop is capable of tracking any frequency difference inside the oscillator tunable range. Once we recognize that the frequency correction depends on the average charge. output Ref.2 Maximum Phase Detection Range & Cycle slips . as far as the oscillator frequency is not equal to (N.fcp).1. that would still enable us to guarantee a monotonously changing charge.div. The drawing is simplified. The reset command and the divider outputs are assumed as faster logic stages with a much higher slew rate.2 sketches possible inputs and outputs of a phase-detector/charge-pump block. These limitations are related to the width of the reset interval.3. where the charge pump reset delay (τrst) becomes comparable to Tcp.5.Detector Ref. Figure 5. input Main div. the average charge derivative has the same sign as the frequency difference. As discussed in section 1.1 Minimum phase deviation range A subsequent question arises for loops working with high comparison frequencies. In this example the reset delay (τrst) is almost half of the comparison period (Tcp). Iaverage/∆ϕ. and significantly reduces the phase deviation input range. and they define a maximum comparison frequency for our tri-state comparator. switching on time. Thus. output Var. and its width is related to the charge pump.92 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops For the phase detector transfer sketched above. we may consider which limitations occur in the transfer.input Charge Pump Sourcing & Sinking currents And + delay asynchr. with the same signal as the input frequency delta. for a PLL in acquisition interval. 5. the reset delay is introduced to avoid the dead-zone problem. current sources. Tcp In the Ph.

avoiding the convergence towards the lock condition. over a cycle slip.(1−τrst/Τcp). increases Vtune and further accelerates the VCO.3 for rst = Tcp 2 Iaverage [A] ∆Q = 0 Icp Icp/2 -4π -3π -2π -π 0 2π 4π 0 π 2π ∆ϕ [rad] ∆Q > 0 0 2π -Icp/2 -Icp ∆ϕ > π Figure 5.3 Condition for unlimited frequency tracking range We observe that τrst equals Tcp/2. They appear as a decrease in the linear portion. +π ]. Thus we confirm the boundary proposed by the average charge approach. fcp is limited to: 1 f cp < (5. if the linear portion of the transfer covers the range [-π . may be represented in the transfer function Iaverage/∆ϕin . The VCO is initially at a good frequency but it has a phase advance of ∆ϕ1 .1) 2 ⋅ τ rst Another way to derive the minimum range of the linear portion. The resulting transfer is shown in figure 5. Close to lock the phase deviation sequence should decrease towards zero: ∆ϕ n +1 < ∆ϕ n (5.2) This degressive sequence can only be obtained. These cycle slips. Otherwise the module of the phase deviation would increase after each cycle slip. 1 τ . Let us consider a discrete variable ∆ϕn . the transfer is not linear up to ± 2π. The current output after this cycle slip. in reality. is the limiting value for which the accumulated charge has the same sign as the derivative of the phase difference. and consequently the next phase deviation is measured with respect to the reference input. due to the finite reset window. representing the phase deviation of the nth comparison period. . After some cycles the VCO is again in advance and the charge pump current starts sinking out charges from the loop filter.2 shows a VCO varying towards lock. The phase detector has slipped one cycle. The reset delay is large enough to hide the following front of the variable input.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 93 Figure 5. is to seek a convergence condition for the phase deviation values. Therefore to guarantee an unlimited frequency tracking range. but only up to ± 2π.

before the oscillators attain a locked condition. and compared to the VCO tunable range. with amplitude Icp and width Td . Comments about 1st and 3rd order filters are made to extend the present results to these other cases. we continue to analyze other limitations of the linear model. In fact the cycle slip causes the inversion of the charge pump current with respect to the previous comparison interval.4 Loop Filter: time response for current pulses .2.2 we saw that reducing the linear portion of the phase detector transfer causes some extra “frequency bouncing”. related to the limited DC tuning range.1 Loop filter time domain response We use the Laplace inverse transform to evaluate the loop filter response for a current pulse input. This effect may be quantified as a Vtune deviation. but the resulting expressions are shorter and the physical meaning is more easily understood. because it already contains the lead-lag characteristics of the 3rd order filter. 5.94 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Next. 5. The comparison inform us about limiting bandwidth values to avoid bouncing up and down with Vtune deviations as big as the VCO tuning range. A 2nd order filter is chosen. Icp i(t) C1 R1 Zs vM(t) C2 vM(0) 0 Td Tcp i(t) vM(t) t (s) Figure 5. and in the numerical examples of Vtune deviations due to cycle slips.2 DC range limitations In figure 5. The minimum phase deviation range stated above will be used in the convergence analysis to limit the phase detection zone.

R) . this interval is equivalent to the worst phase deviation that can occur after a cycle slip.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 95  − t  t  T  0 ≤ t ≤ Td : v M (t ) = v M (0) + I cp ⋅ R1 ⋅  + 1 − e p 2      T z1     −Td  Td   −(t −Td ) T p 2  T T ≤ t ≤ T : v M (t ) = v C1 (Td ) + v C 2 (Td ) ⋅ e + 1 − e p 2  = v M (0) + I cp ⋅ R1 ⋅  cp   d  T z1       −( t −Td ) T p 2  ⋅e      (5. though C1 discharge is not visible within Tcp . and when the charge pump is off a portion of Vtune discharges through the parallel R1-C2 branch. A 3rd order filter (like in figure 2. v C 1 ( 0) ≈ v M (0) Roughly. and equivalent Vtune deviation. ii This variation term. So for a loop working with a large fcp. Reference [Gard80] discuss an approach of maximum PLL bandwidth.3) where . [Td . T d ] ∧ Td = T cp 2 :  T cp ∆v M   2   T   = v M  cp  − v M (0 )   2      T cp ∆v M   2    = I cp ⋅ R1   − Tcp  T cp  (2 ⋅T p 2 )    ⋅ + 1 − e   2 ⋅ T z1     Since we look for maximum bandwidth boundaries. the filter impedance is charged or discharged in a rate proportional to Icp. The charge pump output impedance and the VCO input impedance are considered very high. The second form assumes a C2 almost discharged at t=0: ⇒ . The maximum Vtune variation happens during ±Icp injection. ∆vM(Tcp/2) should be expressed as a function of foln and fcp . with an amplitude equal to: (Icp . T p 2 = R1 ⋅ C 2 The expression for vM(t) in the discharging interval. and it would depend on the ddp difference between vM and vout at t = Td . Let us define the bandwidth ratio. So Vtune deviation is evaluated as ∆vM(Tcp/2) : t ∈ [0 . for a loop working with a low fcp. named phase detector ripple in reference [Gard80]. A 1st order filter (single R-C series branch) would present a stepwise variation in Vtune when Icp ii is turned off. this interval equals an average deviation within the phase trapping zone. On the other hand. C1 discharge would have to be considered. through the analysis of discrete transfer functions. T z1 = R 1 ⋅ C 1 . Tcp].4) would have an extra time constant appearing in the charge and discharge intervals. has to be inferior to the VCO input range. We choose Td = Tcp/2 as the injection interval. This interval of Tcp/2 is equivalent to phase deviations of ±π. x. and rewrite the Vtune deviation as a function of x and r21. for instance. when the charge pump is active. is written in two forms. to be compared to the tunable range. .

of the exponential term.5. 0 and 1.g(x.5 Time response through normalized functions 5. and x.5.96 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops x= f oln f cp with x ∈ [0. r21 ) ]  ∆ f osc K vco  (5. so for a system under definition (5. r21) varies between two linear functions.5) is better suited.2. Expression (5. r21 ) ] = 2π ⋅ ∆ Vtune ⋅ osc ⋅ [x ⋅ g ( x . For a given r21 . R1 and Icp are related to the loop bandwidth and gain. 1] . g(x.5) The functions g(x. r21) between two quadratic functions of x. and Kvco an average frequency sensitivity:  Tcp ∆vM    2  2π ⋅ f osc f = ⋅ [x ⋅ g ( x . corresponding to the limiting values. 5. with Icp and R1 variables. and remembering: r21 = woln ⋅ Tz1 = 1 woln ⋅ T p 2  Tcp ∆v M   2   π    = I cp ⋅ R1 ⋅  ⋅ x + 1 − exp − π ⋅ r21 ⋅ x  = I cp ⋅ R1 ⋅ [g ( x.a and 5.2 Numerical examples and design considerations .4) . fig.a fig.b Figure 5. Still. is useful in the analysis of a given synthesizer with fixed parameters and application components.5. r21) and x.b respectively. r21 ) ]   r21     ( ) (5.g(x.5.4) or for a Icp value corresponding to αn . 5. r21) are plotted for a constant r21 in figure 5.

and our phase detector transfer should be linear up to ±(1. • Example I: What are the values of the bandwidth ratio and ∆vM(Tcp/2) for a loop filter with R1 = 10kΩ and r21 =25 ? woln αn → f oln = 39. In both cases a PLL bandwidth is evaluated for an average Vtune deviation equal to the tuning range. • Example II: What is the DC-threshold bandwidth for a LC oscillator with 28 V of tuning range? 2π ⋅ f osc ⋅ [x ⋅ g ( x . Therefore ∆vM(Tcp/2) is an average Vtune deviation. Let us consider three different situations with common values for the following parameters: • • • • • • Kvco = 125 MHz/V Icp = 300 µA fvco =1. we may expect that another limiting characteristic will determine the maximum foln . Sections 5.5) are better perceived through numerical examples.998 N = 1. Hence the ∆vM(Tcp/2) value is somewhat exaggerated and the DC-threshold bandwidth is a pessimistic estimation. f oln = 312 kHz 28 V = For a satellite band LC oscillator.3 and 5.8 kHz . x = 0. rather than an average one.0398 . satellite synthesizer application.47 V   This narrow band filter situation may be compared to two specific oscillator contexts with different tuning ranges.0398 .1 x R1 =  Tcp ∆v M   2    = 3V ⋅ g (0.996)π. a sensitivity of 125 MHz/V corresponds to a maximum Kvco value. So for loops with a large DC range. 21 x .Hz/V These values are again comparable to a band-L. .4 discuss maximum bandwidth ratios through stability approaches. 1 = 3.5 GHz fcp = 1 MHz τrst = 2 ns r21 = 25 (1−τrst/Τcp) = 0.312 .5 k αn = 25 A. 1 = 25.4) and (5. The resulting foln is named DC-threshold bandwidth. However practical experience shows that a bandwidth of 312 kHz for a loop with a 1MHz comparison frequency is rather unfeasible. 25) = 1.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 97 Expressions (5. The comparison frequency is not especially high. 25 ) ] K vco x = 0 .

we should verify the design limitations connected to the tuning range. thus restricting the DC functioning range because of the output transistor saturation. since the open loop gain is null. So far we treated the DC tuning range only as a given interval related to the VCO frequency range and sensibility. for Vtune values where the charge pump may no longer deliver current but the VCO is still sensitive. Thus the acquisition period may be longer than for a slower filter that would not block so often in the tuning range limits. For Vtune values where the VCO input is no longer sensible (Kvco =0). and the behaviour of input and output blocks around Vtune . and often blocks some time in the limiting values. LC-oscillators are usually limited by the varicap sensitivity curve. The combination of the VCO and the charge pump (or the amplifier) DC functioning ranges must be examined to avoid unstable situations. Vtune is also the charge pump output voltage. For the moment let us suppose that all Vtune reachable values do not imply in an oscillating behaviour. but its spectrum is no longer locked by the PLL.4 V of tuning range? 2π ⋅ f osc ⋅ [x ⋅ g ( x . for the extreme values of the reachable range. it is necessary to work with low noise. RC-oscillators will depend on the control parameter. and the interface block between Vtune and the control parameter. On the other hand. presenting a degressive Kvco for an increasing Vtune. there is only a minimum Vtune . 066 . and it shows a drawback for enlarging the PLL bandwidth under restrained tuning ranges. f oln = 66 kHz 3 . the oscillator will stay clipped to the maximum or minimum achieved frequency. RC integrated oscillators often have a degraded phase noise performance and to optimize the overall spectrum. Generally. the output current varies in consequence and we may produce a sustainable oscillation. Nevertheless. It appears as a Vtune transition that jumps up and down. In a passive filter. This problem should be avoided by defining suitable DC functioning ranges for the charge pump output and the VCO input. before it attains lock. . For instance if Vtune varies around this charge pump limit value. we may see an oscillating behaviour. corresponding to the output transistor saturation. The resulting behaviour of loops larger than the DC-threshold bandwidth is also a “bouncing behaviour” during acquisition. large bandwidth PLLs. In an active filter the charge pump limitation is replaced by the loop amplifier limitation.4 V = In this example the resulting bandwidth is rather narrow. 25 ) ] K vco x = 0 . 2 x .98 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops • Example III: What is the DC-threshold bandwidth for an RC fully integrated oscillator with 3. 1 = 15 . but for Vtune out of the working range the oscillator stays clipped to a maximum or minimum limit frequency. for amplifiers with an open collector output. Once we recognize the need to work with “bouncing” loops.

Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model

99

So, with more or less “bouncing” the oscillator is dragged towards lock, and now we need to verify the influence of the PLL bandwidth inside the phase detection trapping zone.

5.3 Lock convergence approaches

In the previous section, time domain expressions for Vtune sweep were derived, and compared to the tunable range. In this section we use these expressions to verify the convergence of the phase deviation sequence as the VCO reaches the programmed frequency. The phase deviation sequence, as introduced in equation (5.2), represents the discrete values of the phase difference for each comparison period.
n ⋅ Tcp ≤ t < (n + 1) ⋅ Tcp ∆ϕ n ∆ϕ n ∈

:

;

[− ϕ lim

, + ϕ lim ]

(5.6) with
π < ϕ lim < 2π

Let us consider the time diagram below showing the phase detector inputs and the charge pump outputs for a VCO in acquisition mode.
In the Ph.Detector

Ref. input ∆ϕ1 ∆ϕ2

Var.input

Charge Pump output current

Icp

Vtune

vM(0)

0

Td1

Tcp (Tcp–Td2)

t (s)

Figure 5.6

Convergence towards lock: phase deviation sequence

100

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

The oscillator initially with a phase lag, ∆ϕ1, is accelerated through the interval Tcp , and in the following interval presents an advance of ∆ϕ2 . The loop reaction is very abrupt; thus the situation concerns a fast, large bandwidth filter. We fix an arbitrary time origin to simplify the time function expressions, and we represent only the net current output for the charge pump. The condition for a ∆ϕn sequence converging to 0, or a PLL tending to lock, may be applied to the phase deviations above, imposing: ∆ϕ 2 < ∆ϕ1 We define a stability limit for the PLL bandwidth as the maximum bandwidth for which this condition is fulfilled. The following subsections develop expressions for this maximum bandwidth in terms of the VCO frequency and phase variations. An initial condition is assumed for the VCO frequency in order to end up with an expression that is an independent of this variable. The VCO is assumed at the programmed frequency, N.fcp at t=0. Hence our phase deviation convergence is analyzed within a phase detector trapping zone. Section 5.1 showed that phase detectors with a minimum linear range of ±π, are able to track any frequency differences inside the tunable range. Furthermore, section 5.2 showed that fast filters have a high Vtune average deviation, which increases the probability of crossing the frequency programmed value several times. Therefore the initial condition proposed above is coherent with any synthesizer loop (with an unlimited tracking range) close to lock or crossing the target frequency during Vtune variations around the target value. 5.3.1 Frequency approach

Referring to figure 5.6, the stability limit is reached for a PLL bandwidth that implies: ∆ϕ 2 = ∆ϕ1 which means that the main divider counted N cycles of the oscillator signal between T d1 and (Tcp –Td2). Let us rename the limit delay, in phase and time, and relate it to the oscillator frequency, fosc : ∆ϕ 2 = ∆ϕ1 = ∆ϕ Td 1 = Td 2 = Td and    ∆ϕ = 2π   T  ⋅ d  T   cp 

(T

cp

− 2 ⋅ Td ) =

N f osc (Td )

(5.7)

Expression (5.7) supposes that the oscillator frequency does not vary within the interval Td , (Tcp − Td ) , or in other words, that Vtune is constant during the same interval.

[

]

Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model

101

We call this approximation the frequency stability approach. Its inaccuracy depends on the loop filter discharge during the interval where the charge pump is off. The discharge would decrease Vtune , decrease fosc , and consequently increase the maximum stable PLL bandwidth. Hence, the frequency approach is pessimistic about the maximum bandwidth. The amplitude of C2 discharge increases accordingly to the PLL bandwidth, so a maximum bandwidth boundary is quite concerned about the discharging influence. It is easier to watch the oscillator changing frequency through its integral. So, a second approach in phase cycles is discussed in section 5.3.2. The phase stability criteria is expressed in terms of the oscillator phase, θosc :

θ osc (Tcp − Td ) − θ osc (Td ) = N ⋅ 2π
Our initial condition for the VCO is expressed as:
f osc (0 ) = N ⋅ f cp

(5.8) (5.9)

It may be combined with expressions (5.3), for the filter pulse response, to obtain a time function for the oscillator frequency:
f osc (t ) = f osc (0 ) + K vco ⋅ [vM (t ) − vM (0)] = f osc (0 ) + K vco ⋅ [∆vM (t )]  − t  t    N ⋅ f cp + K vco ⋅ I cp ⋅ R1 ⋅  + 1 − e T p 2     Tz1   f osc (t ) =   − Td − ( t − Td ) Tp 2   N ⋅ f + K ⋅ I ⋅ R ⋅  Td + 1 − e T p 2  ⋅ e    cp vco cp 1      Tz1      

: 0 ≤ t ≤ Td

: Td ≤ t ≤ (Tcp − Td )
iii

(5.10) As a result the frequency stability criterion becomes:
−Td T  N T  = f osc (Td ) = N ⋅ f cp + K vco ⋅ I cp ⋅ R1 ⋅  d + 1 − e p 2    (Tcp − 2 ⋅ Td )  T z1    

It is convenient to define a time deviation, p, and make some substitutions to express the criterion in terms of x, r21 , α and p:

Once again the expression of the discharging interval assumes a C2 almost discharged at t=0; and in fact we approach this condition in two cases: • for fast filters with wp2 comparable to 2π.fcp ; • and for close to lock condition, with Td tending to zero. The phase deviation sequence towards lock is examined for large bandwidth filters, and for ∆ϕn tending to zero, so completely in accord with the supposition of a discharged C2.

iii

102 p=

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

Td ∆ϕ = f cp ⋅ Td = Tcp 2π

;

0 < p < 0.5

 α  1 = 1 +   ⋅ 2π ⋅ x ⋅  α  (1 − 2 ⋅ p )   n 

 2π   ⋅ x ⋅ p  + 1 − exp − 2π r21 ⋅ x ⋅ p    r21 

(

)
 

or expressing this boundary as a function gfrap , we find:

g frap =

2p + 2 p −1

 α    ⋅ 2π ⋅ x ⋅  α    n 

 2π   ⋅ x ⋅ p  + 1 − exp − 2π r21 ⋅ x ⋅ p  r   21 

(

) =0
 

(5.11)

remembering:

r21 = woln ⋅ Tz1 = R1 = x= woln αn ;

1 woln ⋅ Tp 2

;

α=

Icp ⋅ K vco N

(open loop gain)

α n (average gain value)
x ∈

f oln f cp

[0 , 1]

The value of x solving equation (5.11), is the limit bandwidth ratio for a given set of r 21 , p and α values. We know that the loop is considered in lock for p close to 0. Hence we need to verify that x tends to a finite, non-zero value for the limit p→0. First we look for some physical understanding of gfrap (limit function for the frequency approach), reducing it to a two variable function, and plotting it in the space (p, x, z). Figure 5.7 illustrates gfrap for constant values of r21 and α, and zooms around the valid ranges of p and x: r21 = 25 ; α = α n ; x ∈ [0 ; 1] ; p ∈ [0 ; 0,5 ] The surface gfrap(p, x) is cut by the plane z=0, and we may observe that x tends to a finite value (around 0.1) for p tending to 0. The influence of the other two variables, r21 and α, is examined in section 5.3.3, including a comparison of the frequency and phase approaches.

12) and (5. r21 and α.7 Frequency approach convergence criterion 5. and evaluate the phase change during the spotted interval: [ Td . gives the function below:  T  − (Tcp − 2Td )      −  d     Td (T − 2T ) − T 1 − e  T p 2   e Tp 2 − 1    N 2π = 2π  N f cp (Tcp − 2Td ) + K vco I cp R1 d p2      Tz1 cp            .8) may also be expressed as a function of p. are indicated below. The calculation steps for the phase approach limit function. x.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 103 Figure 5.12) Comparing (5. (Tcp −Td )     θ osc (Tcp − Td ) = θ osc (Td ) + 2π ⋅  N ⋅ f cp ⋅ (Tcp − 2 ⋅ Td ) + K vco ⋅ ∫ ∆v M (t ) dt    Td   (5. (Tcp –Td) ].8) .3.10). integrating equation (5. We obtain a time function for the oscillator phase. gphap .2 Phase approach The phase criterion as presented in equation (5.

104

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

Dividing by 2π.N , and using the same substitutions as for gfrap , gphap becomes: g phap = −2 p + 1 α  2    α  ⋅ (2πx ) p (1 − 2 p ) + 1 − exp − 2π r21 ⋅ px ⋅ 1 − exp − 2π r21 ⋅ (1 − 2 p )x r21  n  (5.13) A general idea of gphap(p, x, r21, α) is given by figure 5.8, showing gphap for fixed values of r21 and α, and restricted ranges of x and p: r21 = 25 ; α = α n ; x ∈ [0 ; 1] ; p ∈ [0 ; 0.5 ]

{

[

(

)] [

(

)] } = 0

The intersection with the plane, z=0, shows a finite valued x (around 0.25) as p tends to 0.

Figure 5.8

Phase approach convergence criterion

As expected, the limit bandwidth ratio for the phase approach is higher than for the frequency approach. The difference accounts for the filter discharge during the interval where the charge pump is off. Hence, effectively the frequency approach is pessimistic, but the phase approach is a final stability boundary. And in order to guarantee loop stability, including several variable parameters, it is necessary to have a safety margin. The following section contains comparative graphs between the two approaches, and graphs showing the influence of the two variables fixed in figures 5.7 and 5.8, r21 and α .

Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model

105

5.3.3

Comparing the frequency and phase approaches

A better graphical insight of the stability boundary, shown in the tri-dimensional plots, is given by figure 5.9. It illustrates the intersection lines between gfrap , gphap and z=0. We choose to inverse the bandwidth ratio and plot 1/x (fcp/foln) values with respect to p (normalized delay). Therefore the frequency approach indicates a maximum PLL open loop bandwidth of approximately fcp/10 , and the phase approach of approximately fcp/4 . Although the lock condition is achieved for p tending to zero, the limit of maximum bandwidth has to satisfy all values of the p range to guarantee a converging phase deviation sequence. For our case, this condition is naturally fulfilled since the stability curves present a minimum value of x, or a maximum value of 1/x, as p tends to zero.

Figure 5.9

Comparing frequency and phase approaches

Before introducing the two missing variables, r21 and α/αn , we may compare the expressions gfrap(p, x) and gphap(p, x) to get some insight into their differences. We observe that gphap has a higher order than gfrap , with respect to p, because of the time integration. A reduced form, as a limited development, may be helpful to homogenize both equations and simplify the comparison. The first order limited developments with respect to p, around p=0 (lock point), is evaluated for gphap and gfrap .

106

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

g frap

p →0

64 744 4f 8  1  α  2 + r21  ≈ −2 p +   ⋅ (2π x) ⋅ p  α   r21   n  
 1 1 − exp − 2π x r21  α  2 ≈ −2 p +   ⋅ (2π x ) ⋅ p  +  α  2π x  n  r21   444442444443 1 4 4
Ap

A

(5.14)

g phap

[

(

)]

p →0

(5.15)

In this form we verify that both functions are very similar, and the only differing term would be equivalent to an approximation, in gphap , of the exponential by its first order series around x=0. However for large bandwidth filters, x is not close to 0, and the difference between the linear and the exponential terms is representing the filter discharge, whose time constant depends on x and r21 . The sum terms, Af and Ap, correspond to the voltage variations of C1 and C2 for current injection intervals (Td) tending to zero. Capacitor C1 variation is equally considered in both approaches, and capacitor C2 discharge is neglected in gfrap. It is important to notice in (5.14), that for the usual r21 values (r21>>1), C2 voltage variation is the dominant effect in ∆vM. 5.3.3.1 Zero-Pole spacing ( r21 ) Next we verify the influence of the filter zero-pole spacing parameter, r21 . Figure 5.10 plots the limit bandwidth values (1/x) for a variable zero-pole spacing and p equals to and ε close to 0 (p=ε , ε = 10-12). We notice that for decreasing values of r21 , the two limiting values (gfrap =0 and gphap =0) approach each other. This result is in accordance with equations (5.14) and (5.15), since the differing term decreases as r21 is reduced. The limiting bandwidth variation with respect to r21 , may be intuitively understood for the frequency approach. In fact, reducing r21 implies nearing fz1 and fp2 to foln ,i.e., for the same bandwidth (foln) and the gain value (α) C1 is reduced and C2 is increased. iv Hence, for the same charge injection (Icp.Td), the voltage variation in Vtune is decreased, and the bandwidth limit value (foln ) increased. In the phase approach it is harder to foresee a general idea of the sensibility to r21 . This happens because ∆vM is a function of both r21 and x.

iv

Remembering that C2 variation is dominant as p tends to zero.

Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model

107

Figure 5.10

Convergence approaches X lead-lag spacing r21

5.3.3.2 Gain variation Finally the gain variation influence is shown in figure 5.11. It is a plot of the limit bandwidth with respect to a normalized gain variation (α/αn ), for fixed p and r21 values. The plot is reproduced on two scales, log-linear, and log-log. In the first we can easily read the limit 1/x values for typical gain variations. For instance, the satellite tuner example discussed in section 3.5, has a gain range, αmax/αmin, equal to 50 (normalized variation for r21 = 25) ; centering this variation around αn in figure 5.11.a implies a maximum bandwidth value around fcp/19 . The plot on the log-log scale is superposed by two asymptotes in the form: log y = k1 ⋅ log x + k 2 L y = 10 k 2 ⋅ x k1 V\PEROV

(

)

The asymptotes are indicated by the lines in ◊ and

The limit bandwidth for the frequency approach may be very accurately represented by such an asymptote, with k1=0,5 . In fact k1 and k2 values could be directly estimated from equation (5.14), making gfrap equal to zero, and isolating 1/x as a function of α/αn and r21 .

In fact. for the phase approach. such a small range oscillator will pass most of its acquisition period blocked in the low and high Vtune boundaries.11. that the discharge voltage delta is less and less significant. used in the loop filter calculations. However figure 5.6.b. . the oscillator frequency can not vary as much as presented in figure 5. Thus we should keep in mind that α variations are an implicit manner of discussing open and closed loop variations around the center value. and the gain variation are also examined. So as the bandwidth approaches the limits discussed above.b Figure 5. the oscillator will mostly stay blocked at the limit Vtune values. in parallel to the frequency approach asymptote.11 Convergence approaches X gain variation Summarizing. this section (5. The limiting bandwidth is discussed directly in terms of the center open loop bandwidth.15) it is not easy to isolate x.11. It will only converge if there is a sequence of ∆ϕn values small enough to cause ∆vM inferior to the tuning range. v with k1=0. The influence of the zero-pole spacing.3) describes a lock convergence analysis to evaluate stability boundaries for the maximum bandwidth ratio (foln/fcp ).108 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In expression (5. shows that the graph can be approximated by two asymptotes. fig. foln . v The second asymptote shows that very high gain ratios correspond to such a large ∆vM during injection. In the case of oscillators that work with small tuning ranges (fmax / fmin < 2). 5. 5. and another for high gains.75.11.a fig. One around α/αn equal to one. bouncing between the low and high boundaries.

time variable. is also conceivable.e. 5. The average model for the digital blocks.1 The sampler As the system bandwidth increases it is necessary to consider the limitations associated with a finite sampling frequency. wcl . but mainly applied in the context of fully digital PLLs (see reference [Berg95]). time variable nature of the digital blocks. includes extra poles or delays in vi the continuous linear model. A direct discrete approach. ws : • wcl < 20*ws : continuous model • 20*ws ≤ wcl < 10*ws : between the continuous and the pseudo-continuous model • 10*ws ≤ wcl < 2*ws : between the pseudo-continuous and the discrete model This section develops a pseudo-continuous approach for the PLL phase model and compares it to the stability boundaries found in section 5. Reference [Craw94] details the pseudo-continuous approach. These linear range limitations were discussed in section 5. of their discrete.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 109 The convergence criterion is issued from the acquisition mode as a condition to attain the lock mode. i.3. The accuracy of average behaviour models hold for loops with a control bandwidth largely inferior to the sample frequency.. is a linear time invariable approximation. A first approach. In the previous chapters we discussed filter centering algorithms to optimize the output spectrum in lock mode. So far we have replaced the digital blocks by their average behaviour with respect to the phase of the input and output signals. pseudo-continuous.9. As a general rule. concerning the system with a closed loop bandwidth. contains three digital blocks: main divider. vi . So. 5. In order to combine these two treatments we need to include the effects of the bandwidth limitation in the small signal model that is described in the frequency domain.4.4 Discrete transfers for the PLL Phase Model The PLL synthesizer is typically a hybrid system containing both analog and digital blocks. developing discrete time equations and the associated z transform transfers. this section continues our analysis of the LTI model limitations. reference divider and phase detector. The basic architecture of the frequency synthesizer.1. representing the stability constraints of the discrete system. The linear representation of the analog blocks is also approximate because of the limited linear functioning range. the following boundaries are suggested for the model choice. and the sampling frequency. as shown in figure 1. functioning. and not to the sample frequency. examining the discrete. the filtering is effective enough for all passing components in order to smooth out the input power and show an output with changing rates proportional to the control bandwidth. developing compensated transfer function for different phase detector types.

transforming the time difference.Tcp) θdiv (t) %N θosc (t) θref (t) + - Tcp ∆ϕ(t) ∆ϕ (n.12 Discrete model for digital blocks vii The accuracy of the assumption of a synchronous resampling is limited to conditions close to lock. where the output of the main divider has a period approaching Tcp . of the two inputs.110 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The charge pump is certainly driven by a digital input. this would imply a non-constant sampling period and a rather complex modeling. but its output is a continuous current. The dividers are fully or partially programmable counters that transmit an overload signal every counting cycle. It drives two switchable current sources. Td .6). and the phase detector output becomes a sampled phase deviation sequence vii as depicted in expression (5. in a current injection Td wide. However. Tcp Xosc θxtal (t) %R θref (t) θref (n. The output of the dividers is in fact one input transition that is selected by the count overload window and transmitted to the output. . is also assumed for the phase detector. better modeled as an analog signal.Tcp) Tcp + - ∆ϕ(t) Charge Pump Tcp θdiv (n. Kϕ . A simplified representation takes the reference input as the sampling frequency. The complete discrete representation of the phase detector should include the discontinuous effects of both edge driven inputs. A constant sensitivity. limiting our model to the phase detection zone. The phase detector is another edge driven block.Tcp) Charge Pump θdiv (t) Figure 5. with two memory nodes registering two inputs. the discrete model of the counter is a sampler with a period equivalent to the output signal frequency.Tcp) ∆ϕ (n. Therefore. and a delayed asynchronous reset.

is a sequence of current pulses. In reality the output current.17) The alias terms due to the sampling will be analyzed in chapter 7. with all working at the same fcp frequency.(Tcp/2π) For: Charge Pump output current Icp Icp i(t) ∆ϕn > 0 ∆ϕn+1 < 0 t (s) n.Tcp) is designated as ∆ϕn .(Tcp/2π) ∆ϕn+1 . In other words the reference and main divider outputs are coherently resampled by the phase detector latches.13 Discrete phase detector input: ∆ϕn . within the phase detector block. For the moment we consider the ∆ϕ portion due to the feedback signal. sign and delay related to the phase deviation sequence.16) for: and ∆ϕ (s ) = L{∆ϕ (t )} ∆ϕ n (n ⋅ Tcp ) = ∑ ∆ϕ (t ) ⋅ δ (t − n ⋅ Tcp ) n =0 ∞ (5. Coherent resampling does not modify a discrete variable.2 The holder The following step is to identify the DAC (digital to analog converter) nature of the charge pump.4. In this case the sampled Laplace transform becomes: 1 ∆ϕ n (s ) = ⋅ ∆ϕ (s ) Tcp 5. therefore. The discrete phase deviation ∆ϕ(n. The Laplace transform of the discrete and continuous phase deviations are related by: ∆ϕ n (s ) =  2π n  1 ∞ 1 ∞ = ⋅ ∑ ∆ϕ (s + n ⋅ wcp ) ⋅ ∑ ∆ϕ  s +  Tcp n =0 Tcp  Tcp n = 0   (5. ∆ϕn . i(t). with the alias terms well outside the loop bandwidth. for short.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 111 The divider outputs are connected to the phase detector input. hence we may condense these three samplers in the last one. with width.Tcp (n+1). our discrete representation would contain two samplers driving a third one.Tcp Figure 5.

18) The base-band contents are present for every ∆ϕn different to zero. (∆ϕn . and the associated Fourier transform.14 Charge Pump DAC output wcp 2wcp 3wcp with: Tcp   wTcp   I ZOH (w) = K ϕ ⋅ ∆ϕ n ⋅ Tcp ⋅ sinc  2  ⋅ exp − jw 2       viii (5.e. This supposition allows a worst case evaluation of the reference breakthrough. Representing the charge pump as a ZOH (zero order holder) converter is equivalent to shaping the pulse frequency content by a sinc envelope. i. In section 3.. iZOH(t).∆ϕn . An exact representation of I(s) is quite difficult because the frequency content (amplitude. However this approximation contains no DC component. we looked for a second approximation that preserves the DC component and simplifies the frequency content. locked context. the non-linearity is a function of |∆ϕn| .(∆ϕn /2π) = Kϕ . ∆ϕ IIcp cp t (s) t (s) Icp .Tcp/2π ) ) Icp. we made a first approximation about the leakage current frequency content. In a periodic .Tcp/2π ) n. to a fixed known envelope. We supposed that it was mostly concentrated in the 1st or fundamental harmonic.Tcp (n+1). Figure 5. the Laplace transform of i(t).112 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops For the frequency domain model we search I(s). this envelope shapes a series of fcp harmonics. over one period. during the analysis of spurious rays. Consequently.Tcp ( 1) T (n+1). IZOH(w). Furthermore. (∆ϕn .1. with the first lobe node at fcp . .Tcp i(t) i ZOH(t) Fourier Transform | I ZOH(w) | Kϕ . phase and number of significant fcp harmonics needed to represent a period) depends on the pulse width. of i(t).Tcp n. and thus is not suited to represent the viii band-base contents of i(t). ∆ϕn Icp.wcp -wcp Figure 5.Tcp w (rad/s) -3wcp -2. in the lock condition. ignoring the higher fcp harmonics is justified by the fact that they are strongly attenuated in the loop filter.14 shows a truncated portion.

Hence. is discussed for small signal analysis. For example at f equals fcp/10 it reduces the phase margin of π/10 radians. ix We notice that GChP-ZOH is independent of ∆ϕn . linear time invariable phase model. t < 0 with u(t) a step function defined as: and Gsh(s). this reduction can be seen as the loop filter action. pulse width modulated by ∆ϕn . and keeping only the DC ray. Thus it mostly affects the phase margin parameter. In a periodic locked case. replacing s by jw in the Gsh(s): T   + s ⋅ cp  2      T cp    − s⋅ 2      G sh (s ) = e x T cp    − s⋅ 2      ⋅ e −e s   → e  s = jw T    − jw ⋅ cp   2     T cp sin  w ⋅  2  ⋅2⋅ w     For i(t) output in the form: the associated transfer GChP is: xi ∞  i (t ) = ∑ I cp ⋅u (t − nT cp ) n=0   ∆ ϕ n ⋅Tcp  − s⋅ 2π I cp  1 − e G ChP (s ) = ⋅ s ∆ϕ n   T cp  ⋅ T cp ⋅ sinc  w ⋅  2  ∆ϕ n ⋅ Tcp     − u  t − n Tcp −   2π    = e T    − jw ⋅ cp   2            Later on. The pseudo-continuous model is an extension of the band-base. attenuating the spectrum rays at fcp harmonics. the sample and hold transfer in the Laplace transform. .17) and (5. a more complete transfer. and a linear decreasing phase. for the ZOH equivalent output. in section 6.18): Charge Pump ∆ϕ n = ∑ δ (t − nT ) ⋅ ∆ϕ (t ) n =0 cp ∞ iZOH (t ) = ∆ϕn ⋅ Kϕ ⋅ u (t − nTcp ) − u (t − (n + 1)Tcp ) [ ] 1 − e − s⋅Tcp  G ChP − ZOH (s ) = K ϕ ⋅   = K ϕ ⋅ G sh (s ) s     u (t ) = 1 . The delay term appears in a Bode plot as a constant unitary magnitude.3. which is not the case for the transfer function of x the actual i(t). t ≥ 0  u (t ) = 0 .19) corresponds to a first order approximation of the ZOH. the sinc shaped charge pump transfer is reduced to its DC term plus the delay: G ChP − ZOH (s ) ≅ K ϕ ⋅ Tcp ⋅ e − s ⋅Tcp 2 (5.19) Equation (5.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 113 The charge pump transfer. or 18° . ix We may verify the correspondence of GChP-ZOH (s) and IZOH(w). but it intends to stay as a LTI system. xi GChP-ZOH is a linear transfer. time variable. but the only time invariable component is the DC one. It includes some characteristics of the loop discrete functioning. is deduced from equations (5.

∆ϕn . and charge pump transfer. We examine the open and closed loop transfers for a filter with r21 equals to 25. comparable to a time delay of Tcp/4. n.3 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay We may recognize that other pulse approximations for i(t) would present similar LTI transfers.r21). Two simple possibilities are: • real pole at f=fcp/2 (similar to first order filtering around the Nyquist frequency. Τw2 Τw1 Kϕ . Therefore the order of the polynomial must be chosen comparing the maximum loop bandwidth to(w*Tdelay) . are also indicated. fc/2): easy implementation. The related Fourier transform.114 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 5. • A numerical example is presented below.Tcp ( 1) T (n+1). mainly for frequencies nearing fcp/2. Kϕ . In figure 5. indicates the order of the numerator and denominator polynomials. and the phase decreases up to n*(-180°) . Next we search convenient polynomial representations for the time delay. symmetrically placed around the imaginary axis of the S-plane.15 we name ipw(t) a generic pulse function of width Tw and same DC content as i(t). . the ZOH presents the largest delay. The phase decreases almost linearly up to n*(-90°) . and a normalized gain variation range (2.Tcp -3wcp -2wcp -wcp wcp 2wcp 3wcp w (rad/s) ∆ϕn .Tcp t (s) n.15 Continuous equivalent with transmission delay G ChP − pw (s ) ≅ K ϕ ⋅ Tcp Tw ⋅ Tw ⋅ e − s ⋅Tw 2 Among the possible pulse approximations. And since the time delay is the limiting stability constraint introduced by the pseudo-continuous model. GChP-pw(s). Pade polynomials: composed of pairs of zero and poles. The order. At fcp/2 it represents a phase decrease of 45°. This time delay is associated to a charge pump transfer with width Tw equals to Tcp/2. Tcp/Tw1 i pw(t) | I pw(w) | Figure 5. Ipw(w). but not accurate in magnitude and phase. we continue this analysis with the ZOH approach. The magnitude frequency response is unitary everywhere.4.

a fig.b Figure 5. 5. and the closed loop step response for a continuous model with a transmission delay of Tcp/2 . Over the -180° line there are symbols marking: wz1 (o). modeled by a 2nd order Pade polynomial. Figure 5. Dashed-dotted lines indicate the open loop crossing frequencies (fol) for the normalized gain variation. woln ( .1 * woln = 211 rad/s c b a nominal + delay fig. with a 2nd order loop filter.16. 5. not related to applications) wcp = 21.16. are listed below: Œ Œ r21 = 25.16 shows the open loop phase plot.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 115 The zero-pole spacing parameter (r21) is equal to the evaluation of figure 5. the nominal continuous transfer and the continuous plus delay model. woln = 10 rad/s (symbolical value.16 Frequency and Time response for the continuous + delay model The phase response pictures three curves corresponding to the pure time delay.11. so that we can compare the results of the delay approach and the ∆ϕn convergence approach. The numerical parameters used in the graphs. The continuous nominal loop is a 3rd order one.

wcp . was chosen as the limit value for which the phase margin corresponding to the maximum normalized gain (αmax ) equals zero. Therefore we may compare the ratio wcp /woln to the limit 1/x values in figure 5. Zp2 (x) and wcp (◊). The sample frequency. .11.

1 max = PhM (wp 2 ) = PhM (5 ⋅ wo ln ) : for the phase convergence method : for the continuous + worst delay method = So in spite of all reductive approximations made in the delay analysis.woln = 30 rad/s = 2π. For this typical locked mode simulations. The step response is calculated for a frequency change equal to wosc/N.(1. and it may be used to evaluate stability boundaries due to enlarging feedback bandwidths. and this may interfere in the width of the current injection for cases where the oscillator is lagging the reference. and it constitutes a small addition to the safety margin. In fact. The continuous plus delay model is mostly an approximation for locked mode simulations.7 Hz) Curve c corresponds to the maximum gain value with a PhM≥30° for the continuous plus delay model. as we see through the comparison with the phase convergence method. it is still comparable to the time convergence methods. and the results will not fit measured situations. during the acquisition mode there is not really a constant sampling frequency. The phase deviation is also not constant during each comparison interval. Again when we use the maximum delay (Tcp/2) we are taking the worst case. In the phase plot. The pessimistic error is not so large.59 Hz) Œ c: α≈αmax/2 or wol ≈ 3. w Ko ⋅ Vtune = osc N N ↔ B (s ) ⋅ ∆f ref N or B(s ) N1 ⋅ N1 N 2 The three curves correspond to the following gain values: or wol = wz1 = 2 rad/s = 2π. with a Tcp/2 delay. and the signal plotted is proportional to either the oscillator angular frequency or the filter voltage output. the Tcp/2 delay is too pessimistic. is a pessimistic estimate of the lock and acquisition mode. due to its linear character. so the most critical. but fcp is the slowest one possible. A compromise fitting measurements is found for a delayed model with a Tcp/4 delay. . Another application of this delayed model appears in spectrum optimizations.07 ) K PhM (wol ) α =α wcp wo ln f cp f o ln 1 = L x ~ 19 21. Therefore the continuous plus delay model.(4. where the phase margin loss may affect the peaking.116 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops α max = α n ⋅ 2 ⋅ r21 = α n ⋅ (7.(0. Nevertheless we should be aware of the limitations to know the tendency of the inaccuracy present in the simulations results. the corresponding fol is also indicated through the dashed-dotted lines.32 Hz) Œ a: α=αmin Œ b: α=αn or wol = woln = 10 rad/s = 2π.

The second (fol) appears in general loop structures containing discrete behavioural elements. two characteristics are especially difficult to include in a Z-transform representation: a DAC not strictly linear and a varying sampling frequency. gain variation. Both time and frequency models were evaluated and discussed with respect to the loop parameters presented in the previous chapters. Most of the PLL discrete models are issued from pure digital loops analysis. The simplified frequency model is in fact a continuous one. In our mixed discrete-continuous context. later search for a simplified frequency domain representation. These aspects are bounded to large bandwidth loops. The first issue (fcp) appears in multi-loop contexts and it was analyzed through the minimum phase detection range assuring an unlimited frequency tracking behaviour. we preferred to start with time domain models. and.Chapter 5 / Limitations of the LTI Phase Model 117 This chapter dealt with non-linear aspects of the PLL functioning. where descriptions in Z transform are easily determined. and they impose maximum limits for fcp and fol . Thus. …) . with an additional time delay. (zero-pole spacing.

118 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops .

..................................2................................... we consider the transfer function of stages that work in a periodic................................... 123 6..................8 Figure 6......... 133 Periodic transfer determined by a large signal........ Phase Noise Notations .. 121 6.1............................................................................ 124 FM & PM carriers ....5 Figure 6.........2 Figure 6............. 131 Phase deviation from DSB sidebands ..................1................ and relate them to the noise sources that are present in the circuit.......2....................................................................................................... Electrical Noise: random source representation & measurements........... Electrical noise as a random process ...... Angular modulation ................... ......... 135 6........................................ 128 6......... 132 6 Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach Phase noise is an important parameter in the performance of frequency synthesizers...2..4 Figure 6.............2................ 129 Superposed Noise: AM + PM decomposition (spectrum).. 135 6.................................................................. 132 Slope approach: voltage & time deviations................................................ 125 6............ 126 L(foffset) from modulated and superposed noise ............................................. The analysis starts with basic aspects on random noise representation and measurement............................................................................ Time and Frequency representation............ Phasor Notations.................................................................3............1............................................................................................................................. 136 Large Signal Transfer: ideal and hyperbolic-tangent limitations..................................... Finally............ Slope approach .............. Measuring Phase Noise .........................................................3...............................................................Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 119 Contents: 6........................................... Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 119 6...... non-linear mode..................2................ Low noise design needs to consider the mechanisms originating phase deviations in the output carrier........ 130 Phase modulated carrier by DSB superposed noise .................. Linear Time Variable transfer ................................2......3........................... and is followed by a discussion on different notations for phase noise..... 133 6............. 138 Tables: Table 6-1 Table 6-2 Phase Modulated Carrier .3................................................................ 120 6........................ 128 SSB superposed noise: AM + PM decomposition (phasor)............1........7 Figure 6............................1........................ 136 Figures: Figure 6................................................................................................1 Figure 6............ Large Signal Linearization ......................................................6 Figure 6..................................................................9 Spectrum Analyzer Output ....................................................................................3 Figure 6....................1.....2...... 127 6..... Interchanging Modulation Types................................................................1...............1.2........................................................................................................ 125 6...

. In chapter 7 we relate the notations for phase noise and the transfer functions of the preceding chapters. The noise performance of the synthesizer is investigated in a top-down approach. The disturbances are either intrinsic to the periodic sources. and the time deviation in switching stages. In the PLL synthesizer we consider two sources of periodic signals. The second refers to the random movement of electrons. which are chosen with respect to the origin of the phase deviation. The first is associated to deterministic signals polluting the output carrier. which are disturbed by phase noise: the reference oscillator and the voltage controlled oscillator. Furthermore we consider that they are stationary noise sources that can be described by their power spectrum density. the addition of signals represented by phasors. Phase variation can be caused by a linear phenomenon such as signal addition and also by nonlinear phenomena such as angular modulation. They are thermal. from the application environment. Phase noise is represented in many different notations.1 Electrical Noise: random source representation & measurements The denomination noise is given to any power signal disturbing the data signal (which contains the transmitted data or information). or external. We discuss some notations that are based on: the equivalence amongst different types of modulation. The last one is very significant to describe the noise added by the logical blocks of the PLL (dividers and phase detector). On the other hand. for stationary and cyclostationary sources. introducing the notation in the frequency domain. 6. This description is further developed to take into account the non-linear and periodic behaviour of these blocks. They are generated by the operation of different parts of the circuit and are transmitted by parasitic coupling. implying fluctuations in voltage and current signals. Noise sources can be internal to the integrated circuit. are random noise sources. shot. which allows us to develop a common treatment for both types of disturbance. The representation of electrical random noise is shortly discussed. flicker and other types of random noise. We consider two types of noise: interference and stochastic electrical noise. The power that generates phase variations can come from random or deterministic sources. or are accumulated as their outputs propagate through the PLL blocks. and the shot and thermal noise of the amplifier and the loop-filter components (discussed in chapter 4). or to the measurement tools. We mentioned two sources of interference in chapters 3 and 4: the reference breakthrough and the deterministic disturbances found in the supplies of the loop-amplifier. The deterministic sources are also described in the frequency domain. from behavioural to circuit level descriptions. NPLL and vnvco (defined in chapter 3).120 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Phase Noise is a convenient parameter to quantify unwanted phase variation in a periodic signal.

the random process is said to be stationary. the electrical noise sources may be modeled as WSS processes with a Gaussian distribution of amplitude. and to variations in the current flow of electronic devices. The sum of the different paths of the electrons in a conductor approaches a i Measurements in the time and frequency domain observe a signal during a time interval that is large enough to average over several periods of the noise components being measured. but presents defined statistical properties. The random characteristic defines a variable or a process that is not predictable before its occurrence. and a finite value for the autocorrelation at the time origin. and are described as stochastic or random processes. In practice. They do not present all the characteristics of a stationary process. which affirms that the sum of many independent random variables with defined 1st and 2nd moments. . Ergodicity is a very important property for the measurement of stochastic processes. These fluctuations vary randomly. Random processes are defined as an ensemble of time functions whose statistical properties are described by a common probability rule. and τ is a time delay. A stationary process X(t) presents the following mean and autocorrelation: mean: m X = Ε[ X (t )] autocorrelation: R X (τ ) = Ε[ X (t ) ⋅ X (t − τ )] where E is the expectation operator. an autocorrelation which is independent of shifts in the time origin. respectively. is said to be widesense stationary (WSS). tends to present a Gaussian distribution as the number of variables increases without limit. since these measurements are based on the observation of a sample function during a time interval. but include the most significant. This is related to the central limit theorem.1. This function describes the probabilistic distribution of the values of the sample functions. When the probability density function is independent of the observation instant. Consider that the movement of each electron is described by an average component plus a ii random one. The statistical description of the process is contained in the probability density function. stochastic processes are not evaluated by a probability density function (which is not directly measurable) but more frequently by their first and second moments: mean value and autocorrelation. The mechanisms originating these fluctuations are related to thermal agitation. when they are observed at a given time instant. Each time function is a sample of the random process sample space. This is attributed to processes where the statistical properties of the ensemble can be estimated by time averages of individual sample functions of the process. An important property is derived from the stationary condition: ergodicity. as described by the 1st and 2nd moments. The mean-square value equals the autocorrelation for a zero time delay: mean-square: R X (0) = Ε X 2 (t ) [ ] A process that presents: a constant average.1 Electrical noise as a random process Electrical noise arises from current and voltage fluctuations in the circuit. i Usually for the measurement intervals that we are interested in . but still small enough to consider the process as stationary.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 121 6. The Gaussian distribution is nicely adapted to describe physical phenomena depending on many independent random variables.

It is the power spectral density (PSD) of the process.122 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Gaussian random variable. This representation is limited to a minimum value of frequency. which is largely above the limit of our working frequencies. The thermal noise of a resistor of R ohms has the following mean square value expressed in volts: 2 Vn2 = Ε VTN (t ) = 2kT R ⋅ ∆f volts 2 (6. for a spectrum with positive and negative frequencies. White noise is a practical representation for band limited systems where the noise spectrum is constant over the relevant part of the frequency range. It means that any two samples from different time instants are completely uncorrelated. which is the total power or the mean-square value. The output of a block with a linear-time-invariable transfer function H(f) for a noise input described by SX(f) becomes: SY ( f ) = H ( f ) ⋅ S X ( f ) 2 A process that presents a constant power spectrum density for all frequencies is called white.1) the multiplying factor 2 instead of 4 (as in equation (4. and in the case of shot noise the average component equals the net current flowing in the device. . Band-limited white noise presents an autocorrelation function shaped as a sinc curve. Shot and thermal noise are approximated by white Gaussian noise. They are represented by the product of a normalized stationary ii In the case of thermal noise the average component equals zero. to avoid an infinite power density as f approaches 0. are called cyclostationary. Flicker noise is commonly represented by a white Gaussian noise which is shaped by a 1/f filter. The width of the lobes of the sinc are inversely proportional to the filtering bandwidth. equals RX(0). Ideal white noise corresponds to an autocorrelation function which is an impulse at τ=0 . Thermal and shot noise present a Gaussian amplitude distribution and a zero mean value.7) of chapter 4) refers to a double sided frequency representation. White noise with unlimited bandwidth does not exist because it would represent an infinite power. and equals zero everywhere else. These approximations hold for limiting bandwidths to the order of 1012 Hz. The power spectrum density of a WSS random process has similar properties to the PSD of deterministic signals. Electrical noise contributions whose amplitude varies with respect to a periodic deterministic signal. defined as: SX ( f ) = ∞ −∞ ∫ R (τ ) ⋅ exp(− j 2πfτ ) X X dτ or inversely R X (τ ) = ∞ −∞ ∫ S ( f ) ⋅ exp( j 2πfτ ) df We observe that the integral of the power spectral density over the whole frequency range.1) where ∆f indicates the bandwidth over which the noise voltage is measured. the integral equals the total power for a unitary impedance. [ ] The Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function describes the random process in the frequency domain. In equation (6. When considering a voltage or current noise density.

In the output of the VCO we find mainly phase deviations. We continue this introduction considering the measurement of noise in the time and frequency domain. It is basically composed of a frequency conversion block. The random signal is considered as the superposition of uncorrelated portions of narrow band signals. . by sweeping an analysis window through a specified range of frequency. i (t ) = 6. and also due to amplitude limitations that occur in the intermediate and output stages of the VCO. It indicates that X(t) and i(t) are not related to a common time origin. with a white unitary PSD which is limited by a physical bandwidth defined by the circuit.2) where X(t) is the normalized random process. 2π]. Phase noise is measured by different methods which evaluate the performance of the carrier in the time and frequency domains.3. iii In equation (6.1. The time average of the noise power of a cyclostationary noise is proportional to the rms value of the periodic signal which modulates the random process.2) the amplitude of the shot noise also refers to a double sided spectrum with positive and negative frequencies. Part of the power of this shot noise is frequency translated around ±fc . This is due to the frequency modulating characteristic of the input of the VCO. i(t) is the deterministic current signal that results from the sinusoidal input. The shot noise of a transistor driven by a periodic input is a cyclostationary noise. These transfers are discussed in section 6.2 discusses different mechanisms that convert noise power in amplitude and phase deviations. Other examples of frequency translation of noise appear as we investigate time variable transfer functions.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 123 process with a periodic large signal.1 represents an LO spectrum measured with two different resolution bandwidths. This supposition was first mentioned in chapter 3 when we considered a single tone contribution of vnvco . RBW1 and RBW2.2 Measuring Phase Noise Phase noise is a magnitude measuring phase deviations in a carrier. The analysis window corresponds to the filter bandwidth and is called resolution bandwidth (RBW). For example let us consider the shot noise of a transistor driven by a sinousoidal input at frequency fc : iii I shot (t ) = q ⋅ i (t ) ⋅ X (t ) (6. for example: It ⋅ [1 + cos(2πf ct + Θ )] 2 Θ is a random phase uniformly distributed in the range [0 . or in other words. In our context the spectrum analysis is the most current method. which is followed by a filter with a variable bandwidth and by a power meter. by a random process which is amplitude modulated. The spectrum analyzer measures the power present in a certain band of frequency. The representation of random noise by their PSD allows us to use a common small signal treatment for both deterministic and random signals. Section 6. Figure 6.

Ideally the modulating rays are represented by impulses at fosc ± fm . The phase noise performance can also be measured by a time parameter: the time jitter.4) ). This is due to the spread-out characteristic of the power spectrum density of these noise contributions. It also shows that time-deviation jitter is related to the phase deviation in the carrier. The power of the modulated rays is concentrated in very narrow bandwidths around fosc± iv fm . The power due to this contribution as the analysis window sweeps the frequency range equals: No. The second calculates the dispersion of the value of the period with respect to its own average. iv . The parts of the sidebands that are caused by random noise (in-loop contribution from N PLL and out-of-loop contribution from vnvco) have a power level that varies with the width of the RBW. frequency and time deviations are discussed in the following section. In both types of measurement there are several parameters that strongly influence the value of the jitter measured. Let us consider a white random noise in the output with a power spectral density N o in W/Hz. So the power of these sidebands is not affected by the width of the RBW.1 the sideband rays at frequency offsets of ±fm are caused by a deterministic noise component. This expresses the variations of the period of the carrier. Reference [Nord97] discusses the techniques of time jitter measurement and the parameters that influence the results.1 fosc fosc+fm Spectrum Analyzer Output In figure 6. The power ratio between these sidebands and the carrier is expressed in dBc. However the modulating signal is limited in time and its spectrum has a finite width. and that time-interval jitter is related to the frequency deviation. The ratio SSB noise / carrier when expressed in dBc/Hz. The result is called time-interval jitter. which are considerably smaller than the values of the RBW. corresponds to LdB(foffset) which was defined in chapter 3 (equation (3.RBW.124 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Spurious deterministic signal  RBW1  10 ⋅ log   RBW    2  fosc-fm Figure 6. The result is called time-deviation jitter. The power ratio between the sidebands due to random noise and the carrier is often expressed in dBc/Hz. The relationships amongst phase. This unit is used to normalize the power level to a 1Hz bandwidth. There are two different methods. This noise has a spectrum component at frequency fm which modulates the carrier output. For instance the time step and the measurement interval determine the maximum and minimum frequencies of the noise components that are taken into account. One measures the variations of the period when compared to a reference oscillator.

2 Phase Noise Notations The description of phase noise varies with respect to the functionality of the blocks to which it refers. µ ∆ϕ = ∆ϕ ( t ) − ∂∆ϕ ( t ) ⋅t ∂t .. ∆f(t) and ∆t(t) with respect to their power spectrum densities. frequency and time modulations. In oscillators the phase noise is often quantified by phase or frequency magnitudes.. and in logical blocks it is quantified by time magnitudes. 6.2. We continue with the distinction of phase and amplitude deviations caused by an added noise power. S ∆ϕ ( f ) . Let us consider a sinousoidal carrier vc(t). In every node of the circuit there is some noise power being added to the data signal. the voltage noise is converted into phase deviation by frequency modulation. S c ( f ) ∆ϕ(t) ……. It follows that: unmodulated carrier: phase modulated carrier: frequency modulated carrier: time modulated carrier: v c ( t ) = A c ⋅ sin( 2π ⋅ fc ⋅ t ) v PMc ( t ) = A c ⋅ sin( 2π ⋅ fc ⋅ t + ∆ϕ ( t )) vFMc ( t ) = A c ⋅ sin 2π ⋅ ( fc + ∆f ( t )) ⋅ t + µ ∆ϕ [ ] v TMc ( t ) = A c ⋅ sin[ 2π ⋅ f c ( t + ∆t ( t ))] The three modulated signals are equivalent to each other if: ∆f ( t ) = 1 ∂∆ϕ ( t ) ⋅ 2π ∂t . or by addition of noise power to the signal. Finally we look at the effect of amplitude limitation on the transmission of signals corrupted by noise. that we call modulated and superposed noise. In particular at the input node of the VCO. We start with the angular modulation.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 125 6. Phase noise can be caused by angular modulation of noise power. ∆f(t) and ∆t(t) which modulate the carrier. They become: carrier: phase deviation: vc(t) …….1 Interchanging Modulation Types The phase deviation of a carrier may also be expressed as frequency and time deviations (see reference [Nord97]). In other nodes of the circuit the added noise power causes both amplitude and phase deviations of the signal. and the time functions ∆ϕ(t). looking at the relationships amongst phase. ∆t ( t ) = ∆ϕ ( t ) 2πfc We may also express vc(t) and the modulating functions ∆ϕ(t). In this section we detail these two mechanisms of the generation of phase noise.

f > bw ∧ f = 0   No/2 bwn f phase modulated carrier: Sosc(f) [V /Hz] 2 |Sosc(f)| 2 Ac 2 |Sosc(f)| Sosc ( f ) ≈ Sc ( f ) + . Let us consider that ∆ϕ(t) is a random phase deviation. The spectra of the carrier and the modulating noise are sketched in the table below.. S ∆f ( f ) =  ⋅ S ∆ϕ ( f ) = − f 2 ⋅ S ∆ϕ ( f ) 2π    2  1  ……. The power of the deviations is the integral of the PSD over a determined frequency interval. and the FM narrow bandwidth approximation.. using single and double sided representations of the frequency axis. + c ⋅ {S ∆ϕ ( f − f c ) + S∆ϕ ( f + f c )} 4 2 Ac 4 fc-bwn Ac2 ⋅ N o 4 fc -fc-bwn -fc 2 Ac ⋅ N o 8 fc Table 6-1 Phase Modulated Carrier The spectra of the phase modulated signal was drawn considering that the peak phase deviation is small (max{∆ϕ(t)}<<1 rad). and neg.. S ∆t ( f ) =   ⋅ S ∆ϕ ( f ) 2πf c   2 Therefore the power of the total frequency or time deviations can be evaluated using the spectral density of the phase deviation. The following subsection details the expressions of the angular modulation.. frequencies) |Sc(f)| [V2/Hz] 2 2 Ac A ⋅ [δ ( f − fc ) + δ ( f + fc )] 4 4 fc f -fc fc f phase deviation: S∆ϕ(f) [rad2/Hz] No bwn f -bwn |S∆ϕ(f) | |Pϕ(f)|  NO . A2 . Spectra Signal & PSD carrier: Sc(f) Sc ( f ) = 2 c Single Sided (only positive frequencies) |Sc(f)| 2 Ac Double Sided (pos. .126 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops frequency deviation: time deviation: ∆f(t) ∆t(t)  j 2πf  ……... f ≤ bw  2  S ∆ϕ ( f ) =   0 . with a PSD which is a band-limited white noise.

1 Angular modulation The output spectrum of the PLL synthesizer presents an in-loop zone that is phase modulated by the PLL noise (NPLL).2. may be seen as a superposition of single tone modulations.5) . Let us consider the same carrier vc(t) defined above. The value of these coefficients for β << 1 rad .4) where the SSB ratio noise/carrier equals:  ∆ϕ p L dB ( f m ) = 20 ⋅ log   2    ∆ ϕ rms   = 20 ⋅ log    2    :∆ ϕ rms = ∆ϕ p 2 Next we consider a single tone frequency modulated carrier vFM(t) .Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 127 6. and equals: v PM (t ) = Ac ⋅ sin 2πf c t + K p ⋅ Am ⋅ sin (2πf m t + ϕ m ) [ ] (6. The phase modulated carrier is named vPM(t). J n (β) ≈ 0 . The example of a single tone modulation is detailed below. approach: J 0 (β ) ≈ 1 . PM and FM are two types of angular modulation.3) where v m (t ) = Am ⋅ sin (2π ⋅ f m ⋅ t + ϕ m ) and Kp is the phase deviation sensibility in rad/V. for n > 1 and n ∈N In this case of small phase deviations vPM is simplified to: ∆ϕ p ∆ϕ p   v PM (t ) = Ac ⋅ sin (2πf c t ) + ⋅ sin[2π ( f c + f m )t + ϕ m ] − ⋅ sin [2π ( f c − f m )t − ϕ m ] 2 2   (6. in the form: 2π ⋅ K f ⋅ Am   ⋅ sin (2π f m t + ϕ m ) v FM (t ) = Ac ⋅ sin 2π f c t + 2π ∫ v mf (t )dt = Ac ⋅ sin  2π f c t + 2π ⋅ f m   [ ] (6. and a single modulating tone vm(t). We may also define ∆ϕp the peak phase deviation and rewrite vPM as: v PM (t ) = Ac ⋅ {sin (2πf c t ) ⋅ cos ∆ϕ p ⋅ sin (2πf m t + ϕ m ) + cos(2πf c t ) ⋅ sin ∆ϕ p ⋅ sin (2πf m t + ϕ m ) } [ ] [ ] and or ∆ϕ p = K p ⋅ Am v PM (t ) = Ac ⋅ n = −∞ ∑ J (∆ϕ ) ⋅ sin[2πf t + n( f n p c +∞ m t + ϕ m )] where the coefficients Jn(β) are the values of the Bessel function of the nth order with argument β. J 1 (β ) ≈ β 2 . and an out-of-loop zone that is frequency modulated by the intrinsic noise of the VCO and by the loop filter noise.1. Furthermore noise contributions that are represented by a power density.

The combination of two SSB noise contributions at opposite frequency offsets (±foffset) is also considered and compared to the sidebands produced by angular modulation. In figure 6. We start looking at the deviations caused by a single tone noise at a certain frequency offset from the carrier. 6.2 shows these differences in the spectrum of a carrier that is modulated by a band-limited white noise. v In the FM example the modulating tone is assumed as a cosinus function just to end with the same form as in the PM example.2 Phasor Notations In this section we consider the phase and amplitude deviations caused by a superposed noise. . This case is called the single side band superposed noise.128 where v PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops v mf (t) = Am ⋅ cos(2 ⋅ f m ⋅ t + ϕ m ) and Kf is the frequency deviation sensibility in Hz/V. Figure 6.2 this limit is indicated by the dotted lines and by the reduction of the power at ±fc ( J0(∆ϕp)<1). If we define the peak phase deviation as ∆ϕ p = K f ⋅ A mf fm = ∆f p fm equation (6.3) for the phase modulated carrier.5) becomes equivalent to equation (6. the approximation of small phase deviations is no longer valid. Therefore for fm tending to zero. |Sn(f)| Noise No/2 -bwn -fm +fm bwn -fc-bwn for bwn < fc/2 -fc fc f PM |Sosc(f)| 2 Ac 4 |Sosc(f)| Pc ≤ Ac2 4 |Sc(f)| Carrier 2 Ac 4 -fc-bwn fc f -fc fc f -fc FM Figure 6. An important difference between frequency and phase modulation is that the phase deviation caused by FM has an amplitude which depends on the frequency of the modulating signal.2 FM & PM carriers In the frequency modulated carrier the phase deviation is proportional to 1/fm.2.

v c + n (t ) = Ac ⋅ sin (2π f c t ) + n (t ) = Ac ⋅ (1 + a n (t ) ) ⋅ sin [2πf c t + θ n (t )] (6. It follows: . The phase of the carrier is taken as a reference for the diagram. The superposed noise is a narrow band portion of n(t). Let us consider the addition of our sinousoidal carrier. ϕn(t). Figure 6. ϕn fno PM +fno An/2 An/2 AM An An/2 -An/2 -fno -fno +fno Ac Ac /2 Ac /2 Figure 6. vc(t).7) where fno is the frequency offset between the noise contribution and the carrier. an(t).3 shows two pairs of sidebands that explain the amplitude and phase deviations caused by the superposed noise.6) For values of: vc+n(t) ∈ [-Ac . with some broadband noise.sin[2π ( f c + f no )t + ϕ n ] (6. Ac] we could model every deviation as a phase error.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 129 The concepts developed in this section are based on references [Robi91] and [Boon89]. can model every value of: vc+n(t) ∈ [-[Ac+max{n(t)}] . However it would not be possible to include the values exceeding the envelope of the sinusoidal carrier. On the other hand an amplitude error. [Ac+max{n(t)}] ] but it would not be able to represent the noise in the time instants that correspond to zero crossings of the carrier. Therefore the added noise has to be decomposed into amplitude and phase deviations.3 SSB superposed noise: AM + PM decomposition (phasor) The right side of Fig. 6. and developing the corresponding time functions an(t) and θn(t) that express the amplitude and phase modulation. and equals: vn (t ) = An . sin (2πf nt + ϕ n ) = An .6). We may also express the amplitude and phase deviation. by substituting n(t) by vn(t) in equation (6.3 shows the phasor diagram of vc(t) plus a single tone noise vn(t).

4. It is in fact a liberty of notation to indicate the sign of the voltage signals that are associated with these sidebands. We take two single tone components at frequency offsets of ±fno .6): vc + n (t ) = Ac ⋅ (1 + a n (t ) ) ⋅ sin[2πf c t + θ n (t )] = = sin (2πf c t )⋅ [ Ac (1 + a n (t ) ) ⋅ cos[θ n (t )]] + cos(2πf c t )⋅ [ Ac (1 + a n (t ) ) ⋅ sin [θ n (t )]] Finally assuming An<<Ac and An/Ac << 1 rad. When a broadband noise is added to a signal it is very likely that for certain offsets the noise density at both sides of the carrier has a similar level.130 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops vc + n (t ) = vc (t ) + v n (t ) = Ac ⋅ sin (2πf c t ) + An ⋅ sin[2π ( f c + f no )t + ϕ n ] = = sin (2πf c t )⋅ [ Ac + An ⋅ cos(2πf no t + ϕ n )] + cos(2πf c t )⋅ [ An ⋅ sin (2πf no t + ϕ n )] Then we compare it to the 2nd form of vc+n in equation (6. .4 Superposed Noise: AM + PM decomposition (spectrum) We may now consider a 2nd SSB noise contribution.8) and a n (t ) ≈ An ⋅ cos(2πf no t + ϕ n ) Ac (6. we find: θ n (t )≈ An ⋅ sin (2πf no t + ϕ n ) Ac (6. 2 Ac |Sc(f)| + |Sn(f)| 4 2 An 4 -fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f PM AM 2 Ac 8 2 Ac 8 2 An 8 An2 8 -fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f -fc-fno -fc +fc fc+fno f Figure 6.9) This result is represented in a spectrum diagram in figure 6. The plot showing the PM contribution has sidebands with “negative” power. that are named vnu(t) and vnl(t) for upper and lower sidebands respectively.

The peak phase deviation caused by these A max{ n (t )} = 2 ⋅ n two sidebands equals: θ (6. because of the uniformly distributed phase difference ϕnu-ϕnl. is also a random phase with a similar flat distribution. v nu (t ) = An .5 Phase modulated carrier by DSB superposed noise . in opposition to the DSB sidebands caused by angular or phase modulation of a base band noise contribution. Figure 6. This non-linear behaviour attenuates much of the power of the sidebands that cause amplitude deviations.3 shows us that sidebands that cause exclusively phase modulation. and opposite frequency offsets with respect to the carrier frequency. Actually. Therefore statistically. The two superposed sidebands . sin [2π ( f c − f no )t + ϕ nl ] (6. Inversely the amplitude modulating sidebands “cross” in positions that are in phase with the carrier. We can represent this statistical result by two sidebands that “cross” each other at positions with a phase offset of ±(π/4 + π) with respect to the carrier. most of the added noise is propagated through stages that work with strong amplitude limitation. 2π] Therefore the phase difference between the two sidebands for t=0. have an equal probability of “crossing” either in phase or in quadrature. |Sosc(f)| 2 Ac 4 Two sidebands Superposed noise + ideal limiter ⇒ +fc fc+fno f -fc-fno -fc 2 An carrier only phase modulated (4 2 ) Figure 6. The type of modulation that causes the frequency translation of the noise power determines whether this disturbance generates phase or amplitude deviations. vnu and vnl. sin[2π ( f c + f no )t + ϕ nu ] and v nl (t ) = An . “cross” each other in a phasor diagram in phases that are in quadrature to the carrier phase.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 131 They represent DSB superposed noise: they have equal amplitudes. the combined power of these two sidebands is divided into two equal parts: one causing phase modulation and the other causing amplitude modulation.11) Ac which corresponds to an increase of 3dB in the phase deviation when compared to the SSB superposed noise. The superposed DSB sidebands are called uncorrelated in reference to their random distributed phase difference.10) The phases ϕnu and ϕnl are random variables uniformly distributed in the range: [0. we are particularly interested in the phase deviations caused by added noise and angular modulated noise. The modulated DSB sidebands have frequency offsets and phases that are equal in module and with opposite signs. We may also see this increase in 3dB as a power addition of the phase disturbances caused by two independent or uncorrelated noise sidebands. In the case of the PLL synthesizer. Therefore it is common to refer to the total sideband noise power as a phase noise power.

5 shows the spectrum of a carrier plus a DSB superposed noise after it has been transmitted by a stage that eliminates the amplitude modulating sidebands.6 Phase deviation from DSB sidebands I) Superposed DSB sidebands  2 ⋅ An  ≈ ∆ϕ p = arctg   A  c   2 ⋅ An Ac     II) Ang. fc +fno Am fc -fno Am An An An An Ac Maximum Phase deviation ∆ϕp ∆ϕp fc Ac Ac Angular Modulated DSB Superposed DSB Figure 6.11): A ∆ϕ p = max{ n (t )} = 2 ⋅ n θ Ac Next we compare the phase deviations caused by two types of sideband: superposed and angular modulated. or as defined in equation (6. sin [2π ( f c + f no )t + ϕ n ] K p Ac where Kp is the phase deviation sensibility in rad/V. In order to compare sidebands that have equal frequency offsets and amplitude.132 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Figure 6. modulated DSB sidebands  2 ⋅ An  2 ⋅ An ∆ϕ p = arctg    A ≈ A c  c  A L( f no ) = L(− f no ) = 20 ⋅ log n A  c      An L( f no ) = L(− f no ) = 20 ⋅ log  2⋅A c  Table 6-2 L(foffset) from modulated and superposed noise .DSB = 20 ⋅ log  2   2⋅A    c   where ∆ϕp is the peak phase deviation. The SSB phase noise in this case equals:  Am   ∆ϕ p    = 20 ⋅ log L( f no ) superposed. we suppose that the angular modulated sidebands are due to a band base signal vbb(t) that equals: v bb (t ) = 2 An ⋅ .

In section 6.3 Slope approach The results of noise simulations in analog circuits is usually given as a voltage noise density at a specific node. The result is usually presented as a voltage noise density δvn-rms(f) in [ V Hz ] . and we start looking at a single tone portion of Vn(t) that we call vn(t). and ultimately it will modulate the frequency of the VCO output. . It is important to notice that this comparison has considered a DSB superposed noise with both AM and PM portions. The interval between two successive zero-crossings is the period of the signal driving the stage. We name vs(t) the output signal and tc the zero-crossing time instant.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 133 The phase noise caused by two superposed sidebands is 3dB smaller than the one caused by angular modulated sidebands with the same amplitude. The relationship between the voltage and time deviations is given by the voltage slope of the large signal driving the stage. The rms amplitude equals the square root of the power spectral density for the unitary impedance.3 we discuss the transfer of stages that cause amplitude limitation. low and high. Therefore if we are able to express voltage noise densities as phase deviations. whose output is represented by a single ended output (with an amplitude that is twice the amplitude of each side of the differential output) and a threshold. and their action over the AM portion of the superposed noise. and determines the tuning voltage vtune. If this node is part of one of the PLL blocks this noise power may be propagated to the VCO tuning input. These stages may work with differential or single ended inputs and outputs. The time deviation is represented by similar functions in the time and frequency domain: ∆tn(t) and δtn-rms(f) in [s Hz ] .7 we consider a differential stage. and this current charges the impedance of the loop filter.7 Slope approach: voltage & time deviations The noise voltage Vn(t) is calculated by a small signal noise simulation around a zero-crossing instant. we may calculate the phase noise in the VCO output that is caused by a certain contribution of voltage noise.7). This single tone portion is equal to the SSB superposed noise defined by equation (6. The phase detector and charge pump transform phase deviations in current. The instants where the signal crosses the threshold are called zero-crossings. The variations of this period that are due to additional voltage noise are called time jitter. Vn(t) dvs/dt tc Ts 2A differential signal + treshold ∆tn(t) Figure 6. Let us consider a logical or switching stage that has two output values. 6. and it may also be written as a frequency function: v n (t ) ↔ δv n −rms ( f n ) . In figure 6.2.

Furthermore in section 6.1 we saw that phase deviations can be expressed as equivalent time deviations. It also shows that the phase noise is inversely proportional to the period of the signal. it follows that: δt n −rms ( f no ) = δv n −rms ( f no + f c ) dv s (t c ) dt (6.8) shows us the value of the phase error caused by the SSB superposed noise.13) Finally the phase deviation due to a time deviation is: δϕ n− rms ( f offset ) = 2π ⋅ δt n −rms ( f offset ) Ts  rad     Hz  (6. it becomes:  δϕ n − rms ( f offset L dB ( f offset ) = 20 ⋅ log   2  )   2 ⋅ π ⋅ δ t n − rms ( f offset = 20 ⋅ log    Ts   )    (6.2. If the voltage noise density δvn-rms(f) has the same amplitude for the frequencies fc+fno and fc-fno the time deviation due to a DSB superposed noise becomes: 2 2 δv n − rms ( f no + f c ) + δv n − rms ( f no − f c ) = δt n − rms ( f no ) = dv s (t c ) dt 2 ⋅ δv n − rms ( f no + f c ) dv s (t c ) dt (6. and we indicate the independent parameter as the frequency offset to remember that the voltage noise that originates this time deviation is found at fc±foffset.15) Equation (6. and it specifies that the phase deviation is a sinus with frequency equals to the offset frequency between the superposed sideband and the carrier.134 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The error caused by this superposed sideband at the zero-crossing instants is necessarily a phase error.14) where Ts is the period of the signal.15) shows the degradation of a periodic signal due to a time deviation. Equation (6. The phase deviation relates the time jitter to the SSB phase noise of the output signal. It follows that:  ∆ ϕ p ( f offset L dB ( f offset ) = 20 ⋅ log   2  )   ∆ ϕ rms ( f offset   = 20 ⋅ log  2   )    :∆ ϕ rms = ∆ϕ p 2 So for a rms phase deviation given by equation (6.12) This is the time deviation due to a SSB superposed noise at a frequency offset fno from the carrier.14). . Thus the time deviation that is caused by the single tone component δvn-rms(fn) becomes: δv (f )  s  δt n −rms ( f n − f c ) = n −rms n   dv s (t c )  Hz  dt or remembering that f n = f no + f c .

1 Time and Frequency representation Let us consider the transfer function of a voltage amplifier that has an ideal limiting output. and the transfer causes vi amplitude limitations of the output. and we use it to define the transfer of the small signal when it is represented in the frequency domain. It presents a constant voltage gain for input voltages below a certain threshold and for amplitudes above this threshold the voltage gain equals zero. v n (t ) ↔ δv n −rms ( f n ) for hPLS (t ) ↔ H PLS ( f ) v n (t ) ⋅ hPLS (t ) ↔ δv n− rms ( f n ) ⊗ H PLS ( f ) (6. but it also has higher harmonics that are generated by the non-linear clipping of the limiter.16) where hPLS(t) is the transfer function for a small signal that is added to the large input signal. If the small signal is represented by a noise component vn(t). We call it the periodic large signal (PLS) transfer. The transfer function vso(t) / vsi(t) is time variable. The Fourier transform of this time transfer is denoted as HPLS(f).8 shows the transfer of a sinusoidal input signal vsi(t) that overdrives the ideal limiting amplifier. The periodic transfer for a small signal that is defined by equation (6. The resulting time variable transfer function may be used to explain the frequency translation of the noise contributions that are found around the harmonics of the frequency of the signal. and it may be represented in both time and frequency domains. it becomes: vsi(t) h(x) vn(t) h[vsi(t)+vn(t)] h[v si (t ) + v n (t )] ≈ h[v si (t )] + dh( x ) ⋅ v n (t ) = v so (t ) + hPLS (t ) ⋅ v n (t ) dx x =vsi (t ) (6. The large signal is considered as periodic.3. The transfer of a small signal that is added to vsi(t) may be calculated making a 1st order development of the periodic transfer around the steady-state that is driven by vsi(t). A similar discussion focused on oscillators noise can be found in [Haji98]. The previous section started discussing the phase noise induced by a voltage noise that is sampled at the zero crossing moments. 6. which appears as a time variable transfer function.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 135 6.3 Large Signal Linearization The term large signal linearization refers to a transfer function that is calculated around a periodic steady state of a block with a large signal input.17) is linear. since the output of These ideas are based on the convolution transfer discussed in reference [Boon89]. Figure 6. Here we search the transfer function for a small signal that is transmitted by a block which is driven by a large signal input. The output signal vso(t) has a fundamental harmonic at the same frequency as the input.17) where the frequency domain transfer function is convoluted with the small signal input. vi .

The output of the ideal limiter is called v so-ideal and the output of the hyperbolic tangent limiter is called vso-tanh .Tw /Ts Time variable transfer function: hPLS(s) HPLS(f) t input large signal: vsi(t) -fw fw Τs/2 =2.136 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops the sum of two small signals equals the sum of their separate outputs. The figure is divided in 6 parts: A) The input and output signals have a unitary amplitude. The supposition of a linear transfer holds for small signals whose amplitude does not disturb significantly the periodic large signal transfer hPLS(t). ideal. amplifier + ideal amplitude limiter output large signal: vso(t) Vout dVout = Gc dVin (0) Vin t Τw =1/fw Gc t Τs=1/fs Gc.8 Periodic transfer determined by a large signal 6.3. These effects are further discussed in chapter 7. . tanh. The input signal vsi(t) is a sinus curve with a frequency equal to 0. The gain at the zero crossing is equal for both limiters.5 Hz.2 Linear Time Variable transfer Figure 6.9 shows the periodic transfer functions hPLS(t) and HPLS(f) that are calculated for two types of limiting amplifiers: an ideal limiter and a hyperbolic tangent (tanh) limiter. It is important to notice that the time variable characteristic of this transfer causes frequency translation of the input signals. For broadband noise contributions the frequency translation also causes aliasing or folding. Gc=2. We choose the hyperbolic tangent because it represents the transfer of a block that appears very often in ICs: the differential stage composed of bipolar transistors.fs f (Hz) Figure 6. The curves are indicated by the labels: si.

that has a very steep attenuation slope. E) The periodic transfer functions HPLS-ideal(f) and HPLS-tanh(f) are plotted in a larger range of frequencies. it is a LPF to the order of 24. The dark gray dashed curve shows an approximation of the black curve. The curves of figure 6. In this plot the frequency axis is single sided (only positive frequencies). Recently software implementations have appeared (see reference [Wiel97]) which allow one to calculate a periodic transfer that is associated with a large driving signal. to compare practical and theoretical aspects of the periodic transfer function.9 are calculated with a mathematical model. the amplitude value equals: 20. This is the slew rate. Together they determine the maximum slope of the output signal.log( HPLS(f) ) F) The curve in solid line shows the difference between the two transfers: HPLS-ideal(f) and HPLStanh(f) . the periodic transfer hPLS(t) approaches a comb sampler. The y-axis is in dB. The periodic transfer function is very useful to evaluate the noise at the output of strongly non-linear stages. A simulation example is given in chapter 7. The labels are the same as used in part A). The light gray dashed curve shows a first order LPF that fits the difference curve for frequencies below 2Hz.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 137 B) The time derivatives of the 3 signals are: dvsi/dt . The functions are dv so (t ) dv so (t ) dt calculated using the approximation: ≈ ⋅ dv si (t ) dt dv si (t ) D) The periodic transfer functions HPLS-ideal(f) and HPLS-tanh(f) are presented. The y-axis is also in dB. C) The periodic transfer functions hPLS-ideal(t) and hPLS-tanh(t) are plotted. Particularly for circuits working with high signal frequencies and/or very steep signals there is another low-pass-filtering behaviour that appears to limit the slope of the output signals. and it correctly fits the difference curve for frequencies above 5Hz. The actual transfer of a block of a circuit may be calculated with software for analogic simulations. It can be seen that it is the low-pass filtering behaviour that differentiates the ideal and the tanh limiters. The amplitude limitation of the tanh transfer is smoother than the ideal limiter. which is related to the biasing of the stage and to the load impedance. The difference may be represented as a LPF. This ideal sampler would completely suppress the AM component of a superposed noise. Finally we can observe that for Tw →0. . dvso-ideal/dt and dvso-tanh/dt .

9 Large Signal Transfer: ideal and hyperbolic-tangent limitations .138 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops A) B) si tanh si tanh ideal ideal C) D) tanh tanh ideal ideal E) F) tanh ideal Figure 6.

that may be used to calculate the noise at the output of non-linear blocks. The representation of random electrical noise was briefly commented. or to noise that causes modulation of a signal.Chapter 6 / Phase Noise: theoretical to practical approach 139 This chapter discussed the generation of phase noise due to noise power that is added to a signal. . The periodic transfer of switching stages was modeled as a time variable transfer function. Different notations were presented and related to the mechanisms of phase noise generation.

140 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops .

......5.......................................5......................................2............................ 143 7........................... 159 7.......................... Charge Pump ..................................... 151 7.............................................. to analyze the noise contribution of different blocks................................................................................. Time domain.......13 PLL block diagram with signal+noise inputs.... 145 The influence of fcp change for narrow band noise ......1................................2....................... 158 7................................................................... 149 7......... 159 7.................4. .... Phase Noise in the PLL context 141 Translating the SNF into phase.............3 Figure 7.................low noise PLL........ 152 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: time domain signals.8 Figure 7.........................................6 Figure 7......... Detailing noise sources in different PLL blocks ................. are combined......................9 Figure 7.....................................................................5....4........................................................................................................................................................................ 7................7 Figure 7................ 153 Implementation Loss X Phase deviations .......................................................... 144 Sampled Loop Model ............................................................. 148 Large bandwidth noise folding ..1....5 Figure 7..................... Frequency domain ..................................................................... .....................................................11 Figure 7..................... 142 Noise Transfer Slopes.....3....................... 162 Noise Power added by the LO sidebands.............. 166 7 Phase Noise in the PLL context In this chapter we continue our top-down analysis of the PLL circuit................................................................................ The results from the preceding chapters....................... 167 Tables: Table 7-1 Table 7-2 Table 7-3 Table 7-4 Data sheet points from: TSA5059 ..............4 Figure 7........................... 155 Charge Pump current noise levels within one period...... Narrow bandwidth noise sources.................................................... voltage and current noise ....................................................................................12 Figure 7............................................................................2... 151 The influence of fcp change for large band noise.................................. Simulations and measurement possibilities that are used to guide the design and the evaluation of a PLL IC are also discussed..................................... Digital Demodulator: clock and carrier recovery loops......................... about the transfer functions of the phase model and about the mechanisms of phase noise generation................................................................ 161 Digital Demodulator and Decoder ................ D-flip flop................10 Figure 7......1..................................................................................................................... Implementation Loss due to Phase Deviations ...2. Large bandwidth noise sources................. time.................. 163 7......................................................................1............................................ 158 Behavioural model of the PLL for AC and noise simulations .......2..3.................3...... 147 7................2...... 160 Behavioural model of the PLL for transient simulations........................ Signal to noise ratio and implementation loss . Behavioural Models ................ 162 7...........................................Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 141 Contents: 7........................................2...................... 160 7.......................................... 167 Figures: Figure 7...........................1................... 143 Synthesizer Noise Floor............1 Figure 7................................4..................................... 154 7......................... 164 Behavioural Model of the Carrier Recovery loop........................................... Sampling effects: SNF x fcp .............................................. 155 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: frequency domain signals ............................. 154 7............2 Figure 7.........

. Both vnvco and vnf are voltage noise densities given in ( V/sqrt(Hz) ). Xosc (ϕxosc) Npll Zfilter vnf Ph. and. the main divider and the comparator (phase detector and charge pump).142 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops This chapter combines the results of the previous chapters to develop a numerical analysis of the phase noise of a PLL synthesizer. In figure 7. to illustrate the concept of the periodic transfer. for a D-flip fop and charge pump design. current and voltage magnitudes. Finally we present behavioural models that enable one to combine circuit and system level descriptions in AC and TR simulations. and therefore it is practical to split these two contributions. we saw that the noise contributions from a loop-filter (from the filter impedance and the amplifier) are attenuated by the post-filter. These densities can be compared with the simulation of the different constituent blocks. In chapter 4 . Later in chapter 8. This influence is examined. It is measured in rad/sqrt(Hz). Two examples of simulation are presented. The input vnvco represents the intrinsic noise of the VCO. time. and it is composed of the noise contributions from: the reference chain (crystal oscillator and reference divider). The sketches and expressions below summarize the results from chapters 2 and 3 that are used in the following sections. It starts with the translation of the SNF requirement for noise densities in phase. The following block diagram with signal and noise inputs is used in this chapter. Npll is a phase degradation that was introduced in chapter 3 as the synthesizer noise floor (SNF). These top level models can be used to examine the total implementation loss that is caused by the phase deviations in the LO signal.1 PLL block diagram with signal+noise inputs The noise inputs are indicated by grey rectangles. Det.2 the noise transfer slopes are indicated for inputs with a white spectral density. & Ch. i See table 4-3 : transfer functions of the disturbances that are related to the active loop filter. The behavioural model of a digital demodulator is also presented. The noise densities are affected by the sampling effects of the edge triggered blocks. vnf accounts for the noise sources i of the loop filter. Pump ( Kϕ ) vnvco ÷R PostFilter VCO ( Ko ) ÷N ϕosc Figure 7. The possibilities to distinguish the dominant noise sources are also discussed. these tools are illustrated by simulations and comparison to measurements. considering the bandwidth of the noise sources. The relationship between the phase deviations and the implementation loss are presented with a short numerical evaluation.

time. the amplitude deviations are strongly attenuated. Hence we treat the sidebands of the output of the VCO as angular modulated sidebands. . The superposed contributions cause both amplitude and phase deviations. referring to the noise performance of the in-loop zone of the output spectrum. voltage and current noise The requirement of phase noise for PLL synthesizers is often specified as a maximum phase noise density at the input of the phase detector. time and current deviations. translating the phase deviation in voltage.1 Translating the SNF into phase. Part of the intrinsic noise of the VCO is not frequency modulated. Nevertheless this part of the noise is usually not significant.3 is the combination of two effects: .the mismatch of the closed loop bandwidth with respect to fi (the intersection frequency for the asymptotes of the noise performances of the PLL and the VCO).Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 143 ϕ osc = B ( s ) ≈ B 3 LPF (s ) = N pll N  (1 + s ⋅ T )⋅  s  p3 2 2  wn ϕosc/Npll +  2 ⋅ξ ⋅ s + 1  wn  0 dB/dec ϕosc/vnf ϕosc/vnvco ϕ osc = B vco (s ) ≈ B vco v nvco _ BPF (s ) = K o ⋅ s ⋅ C1  s2  2 ⋅ξ ⋅ s + 1 α ⋅ 2 + w  wn  n  +20 dB/dec -20 dB/dec -40 dB/dec -60 dB/dec and B vco − BPF ϕ osc = v nf (1 + s ⋅ T p 3 ) Figure 7. . N pll _ dB = min {LdB ( f offset _ in loop )}− 20 ⋅ log( N ) [ ] dBc Hz (7. It is a single sideband measurement in dBc/Hz.2 Noise Transfer Slopes In chapter 6 we discussed the deviations that are caused by noise contributions which are superposed to the signal or which modulate the signal. This resonant overshoot is related to the stability of the loop. These translations are used to reflect the requirement of phase noise into magnitudes that are comparable to the outputs of the different PLL blocks. 7. Our analysis starts with Npll .and the overshoot associated to the closed loop transfer function B(s). Therefore the noise from switching blocks of the PLL (Npll) is expressed as a phase deviation. that is measured by the open loop phase margin. The sidebands that are found in the output of the VCO are mostly caused by the frequency modulation of noise power at the input of the VCO.1) The peaking that is indicated in figure 7. but just superposed or amplitude modulated. When the disturbed signal is propagated through stages that have a periodic transfer with high gain around the zero-crossing instants and low gain elsewhere.

Loop filters with a large bandwidth (that assures a closed bandwidth equal or greater than fi ) and an elevated phase margin are indicated to perform the measurements of Npll. ii A similar analysis for a GSM synthesizer can be found in [Gree95]. as presented in section 6. and we derive δvpll using the slope approach (see section 6. We would like to express Npll as the equivalent phase and time deviations that would cause the same LdB(foffset). Finally the sensitivity of the charge pump Kϕ is used to transform δϕpll into a current noise density δiChP .log(N) fosc Npll_dB : Synthesizer Phase Noise floor Figure 7.3).1.2. out-loop LdB(ffoffset) in-loop LdB(foffset) peaking foffset 20. TSA5059 for satellite ii frontend applications. Let us picture these ideas through a numerical example.144 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops It is important to notice that excessive peaking masks the measurement of the in-loop SSB noise (L(foffset) ).2. . we relate δtpll to the slope and the period of a carrier signal. The deviations are base band components that modulate the VCO output. The values in the table below are taken from the data sheet of the Low Phase Noise Frequency Synthesizer. and the latter is related to the peak phase deviation that is caused by the PLL noise.3 Synthesizer Noise Floor The value of Npll is derived from the SSB phase noise. We calculate the deviations as noise densities that are denoted as δϕpll and δtpll . Later on.

998 ⋅ 10 −8 rad Hz In table 7-1 the value of the synthesizer noise floor is referenced to certain conditions of fcp and Icp.2 discusses the sampling effects for the noise transfer.795 f s Hz 4 MHz 2π The values of the time noise densities that are calculated above do not take into account any possible aliasing effects.2700 MHz Table 7-1 Data sheet points from: TSA5059 .: 128 … 262142 2MHz / 1MHz … / 15. Section 7.625kHz .2 mA 2 / 4 / 8 / … / 128 / 256 . taking iii From here on the notations δxrms are shortened to δx .2k2 ] 17 programmable bits + optional prescaler (/2) Typical value -157 dBc/Hz 120 µA / 260 µA 555 µA / 1. 166. • Time noise density at the phase detector input equals: Tcp 1 δ t pll = δϕ pll − rms ⋅ L so for Tcp = = 4 µs 2π 250kHz iii and δ t pll = 12.67kHz. 24. we find a more strict specification for the time density: T 1 δt Xosc = δϕ pll − rms ⋅ Xosc L for T Xosc = = 250ns and δt Xosc = 0. 800kHz / 400kHz … / 12. The relationship between Npll and the comparison period appears as we look for the equivalent time noise density at the phase detector input. but the noise density variables continue to be given in rms values.72 f s Hz When we compare the same δϕpll to the period of the crystal oscillator. Icp=1.Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 145 Symbol Npll-dB Parameter Equivalent phase noise at the phase detector input Charge pump current (absolute value) Conditions measured with: fcp = 250 KHz.2 mA 4 programmable values (2 bits) 16 programmable values [indicated as series in the form: (a+2k1).low noise PLL • The phase noise density at the phase detector input becomes:  δϕ pll −rms N pll _ dB = 20 ⋅ log  2     = −157  dBc Hz ⇒ δϕ pll − rms = 1. 5 / 10 / 20 / … / 160 / 320 w/o presc. .5kHz Icp R Reference divider ratio N Main divider ratio fcp Comparison frequency for a 4MHz crystal directly related to R values Input sensibility + related to N and fcp values frf RF input frequency (main divider input ⇒ frf = fvco ) 64 MHz .: 64 … (217-1)=131071 or w presc.

then: for I cp = 120 µA for I cp = 1. The intermediate frequency equals 470MHz. and the frequency of the local oscillator equals fRF + fIF . . and large values of Icp.82 pArms / Hz δ iChP = δϕ pll ⋅ K ϕ L • Noise performance of the free-running oscillator: Finally we may estimate the minimum noise performance of the VCO that enables us to assure a smooth transition between the in-loop and the out-of-loop zones of the output spectrum.146 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops into account the noise bandwidth and the sampling frequency.2 mA ⇒ δ i ChP = 0. The maximum closed loop bandwidth occurs for the largest open loop gain: α = αmax. The output of the dividers and the phase detector itself are polarized with elevated biasing currents in order to increase their voltage slopes and decrease their sensibility to voltage disturbances. 10480] Next we consider the level of the in-loop sidebands for the maximum closed loop bandwidth. The smooth transition is related to the optimization of the phase jitter σϕ in the output spectrum.72 µVrms / Hz The voltage density is referenced to a time noise.382 pArms / Hz ⇒ δ iChP = 3. with a cut-off frequency smaller than fcp/2 . 2620] MHz K for f cp = 250kHz → N ∈ [5680 . The maximum voltage slope of the output of a block is called slew rate. or 109 V/s. This iv situation corresponds to small values of N. Under these conditions the voltage noise becomes: δv pll = δ t pll for f cp = 250 kHz ⋅ dv dt L zero − crossing for dv ≈ 10 9 dt V s ⇒ δv pll = 12. • The current noise density at the charge pump output: The specification of phase noise may be translated into a current noise value that is related to the sensitivity of the charge pump Kϕ . • The voltage noise density at the phase detector: The time noise may be translated into a voltage noise for any logical or switching stage that is driven by a large periodic signal with a defined voltage slope (dv/dt) at the zero crossings. We suppose a comparison frequency of 250kHz. Let us consider the minimum and maximum values of Icp in table 7-1. so we combine this data with the minimum value of N. to obtain the PLL in-loop contribution: iv Remembering α = I cp ⋅ K vco N . Usual values of slew rate for PLL stages with strong biasing are to the order of 1V/ns. The synthesizer noise floor in table 7-1 is indicated for the maximum Icp value. For the moment we may consider that our phase and time deviations are white band-limited noise densities. and consequently it is related to the period of the large signal driving the blocks under analysis. Let us consider the tuner of a satellite receiver. The range of the LO frequency and the counting ratios of the main divider follow: f vco ∈ [1420 . that down-converts the RF input signals from the L-band (950 MHz to 2150MHz) to an IF stage.

4. The sampling accounts for the discrete outputs of the dividers and for the discrete input of the phase detector.Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 147 L pll ( f in −loop ) = −157 + 20 ⋅ log(5680 ) ≅ −82 dBc Hz Chapter 5 discussed the limitation of the maximum closed loop bandwidth for a given fcp value. f3dB . If we take some practical margin to cope with gain variations (up to αmax/αn =3 ).63 = 40 . Otherwise if there is no restriction to increase the minimum tuning step. The limit of Lvco that is indicated above would be just enough to obtain a smooth spectrum for α=αmax. we should consider using a VCO with a better noise performance. It is a phase model with an ideal sampler and a zero-order holder.8 kHz ) < − 82 dBc Hz ↔ L vco (100 kHz ) < − 90 dBc Hz where Lvco is the SSB phase noise of the free-running oscillator. and that the open loop bandwidth. They are mostly useful in two circumstances: while translating the specifications of phase noise of the LO to specific blocks within the PLL. 63 ± 0 . We will also treat the folding effects due to sampling of the switching stages. or when choosing adequate VCO and PLL circuits to compose a low-noise synthesizer. When we introduce the sampling operation in the phase model of the PLL. we saw that the optimum closed loop bandwidth equals fi .8 kHz ⇒ L vco (40 . The numerical examples developed in this section are a starting point for the analysis of the noise performance of a PLL circuit. ≈ 1. . with a continuous current output.2 Sampling effects: SNF x fcp We start recalling the discrete model for the PLL that was discussed in chapter 5. We continue our analysis looking for parameters that allow us to differentiate the noise contributions that compose Npll . Nevertheless if we want to optimize the phase jitter over a range of gain. It follows that: fi < f cp 10 ⋅ 1 . 7. the following boundary may be suggested: f ol ≤ f cp . fol . The holder represents the charge pump. we may increase fcp and work with higher closed loop bandwidths. is related to the closed loop bandwidth. 28 f ol Therefore we may estimate the maximum closed loop bandwidth and the corresponding noise performance of the VCO in order to match f3dB with fi . by the following expression: f 3 dB . we obtain the diagram in figure 7. 10 Earlier in chapter 3. The sampling rate equals the comparison frequency of the phase detector. fcp .

The Fourier transform of ∆ϕn(n. that outputs the charge pump for a given phase deviation input. Here we are interested in the transfer of the noise that appears in the output spectrum of a locked LO. and it is analogous to the Laplace transform of ∆ϕn defined in equation (5. In chapter 5 we used this discrete model to discuss the constraints of stability during an interval of lock acquisition. and consequently the charge pump transfer can be simplified to: I o (w ) ≈ K ϕ ⋅ T cp ∆Ψ n (w ) for w< π τ rst The noise contributions that come from the sinking and sourcing side are added in power.18). equation (5. hence their sum does not equal to zero during the reset interval. τrst .16). Most of the synthesizers work with a reset interval much smaller than Tcp . as: − jw I o (w ) = K ϕ ⋅ Tcp ⋅ e ∆Ψ n (w ) Tw 2  w ⋅ Tw  ⋅ sinc    2  where Tw is the width of the current pulse.Tcp) is named ∆ψn(w) . and there is also the noise of the charge pump itself. ∆Ψ n (w ) = +∞ 1 ⋅ ∑ ∆Ψ (w + n ⋅ w cp ) T cp n = −∞ with w cp = 2π T cp The transfer of the ChP as a zero-order holder was defined in chapter 5. For an ideally matched and leakless case we may consider that the signal output of the charge pump for a locked loop is null. The instantaneous value of the phase noise at the input of the phase detector is not null.4 Sampled Loop Model The discrete input of the phase detector ∆ϕn is the same as defined in equation (5. It is the output of an ideal sampler with a comb shaped spectrum. Thus we may consider a minimum Tw=τrst for the locked condition. In what concerns the noise there is a difference. The noise of the charge pump is related to the reset interval.148 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Xosc 1/R [V ∆ϕ(t) ∆ϕn(n. during which both current v sources are activated in order to prevent dead-zone problems. For this analysis we used the worst case of the delay for the stability constraint: Tw = Tcp .Tcp) Tcp Hz ] vnvco [rad Npll Hz ∆Ψ (w) ∆Ψn (w) ZOH ChP io (t) ZF (w) Ko/jw θosc(t) I o (w ) ] 1/N Θ osc (w) Figure 7. Therefore the output of the charge pump corresponds to the small pulses that are generated to compensate the leakage currents and the residual transient currents. v .17).

Therefore in the context of low phase noise synthesizer. However the time noise densities are a translation of voltage densities that are transmitted by edge driven blocks.2. Therefore the sequence of coherent samplers can be replaced by a single discretization with period Tcp . and that we consider the same frequency f for all the noise contributions. We may distinguish two extreme behaviours for the voltage slopes with respect to the input signal frequency: • Transition slope limited by the slew rate: We recall that in lock mode the output of the two dividers. In equation (7. δtdiv and δtphse represent the time noise densities from the reference chain.2) is used to describe the transmission of large bandwidth noise sources. We call the switching blocks.1 Narrow bandwidth noise sources In section 7.2) Equation (7. The current noise from the charge pump is denoted as δichp . In fact. decreases the resulting time and phase disturbances.3) where δtref .Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 149 This simplified transfer holds for frequency values that are within the first lobe of the sinc term in equation (5. Next we examine the influence of the comparison frequency for the noise contributions that compose Npll . we translated the SNF in time. is composed of the following noise contributions: (δϕ ) pll 2  2π =  δ t ref ⋅  T cp     +  δ t div ⋅ 2π   T cp   2    +  δ t phde ⋅ 2π   T cp   2  δi  +  chp   K   ϕ 2     2 (7. The combined transfer for the phase detector plus charge pump becomes: I o (w ) = K ϕ ⋅ n = −∞ ∑ ∆Ψ (w + n ⋅ w ) cp +∞ (7. In chapter 6.3) we see just one noise contribution that is independent of Tcp : the charge pump noise. The noise densities are a function of frequency. increasing the slope of the edges for a fixed voltage disturbance. vi . with transfers approaching the ideal Dirac comb sampler.1. and discuss the total phase deviation that is caused by the voltage and current noises from the dividers. we saw that the transfer of the digital blocks approached this representation of an ideal sampler as their gain and/or the slope of the input signals increased. We also look for the parameters that may influence the noise contributions of each block. from the main divider and from the phase detector respectively. and the phase detector work at the same frequency. We start considering narrow band noise contributions that are not aliased by discretization.2. by supposing that they have white band limited spectra. from δϕ(f) to δϕ.18). and we simplify their notation. Here we take the inverse path. voltage and current noise densities. 7. δϕpll . which are driven by the edges of the input signals: edge driven stages. The total phase deviation of the PLL blocks. the phase detector and the charge pump. which are vi eventually aliased by the sampling action of the dividers and the phase detector. so that comparative measurements can be used to identify the dominant noise source in Npll .2. and we continue with large bandwidth noise in section 7. we find logical blocks with rather steep edges. and the slope of the edges may be a function of Tcp .

δv n ( f ) = Vno [ V Hz ] . (the input slopes are already close to the slew rate). in order to keep a fixed oscillator frequency. The change of the comparison frequency is compensated by changes in the divider ratios. vii We may illustrate this case by a sinus input. The output slope equals the input slope times the gain around the zero crossing. • Transition slope proportional to the frequency of the driving signal: The slope of the output signal is proportional to the frequency of the input signal. with only positive frequencies. for the phase deviation that is caused by δvn . It is a band base noise that modulates the phase of the signal that drives the switching stage. or a series of harmonic sinus with the fundamental and the harmonics nearly in phase. for f ≤ f cp 2 (7.4) describes a voltage noise density in a single sided frequency spectrum. In the table we observe the influence of a change of fcp .  dv (t )  dv (t ) = cst = max   = v′ max dt zero − crossing  dt  t=t0 This situation happens for stages that are driven by signals with very steep slopes. dv/dt is independent of the frequency of the input signal.150 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The slope of the output is fixed by the slew rate of the block transmitting the signal. dv (t ) = A ⋅ w in dt zero − crossing t=t 0 This case appears for stages that are driven by rather smooth inputs.4) Equation (7. and/or for stages that have a very high gain around the zero crossings. Table 7-2 examines the case of a voltage noise contribution that is transmitted by two edge driven stages with the slope characteristics described above. The time and frequency noise densities are valid for frequency offsets below fcp/2 . R and N. and it is band limited. Around the zero crossings the slope of the input is amplified to an output slope which is not limited by the vii slew rate. then: +∞ and ϕ n ≈ ϕ1 v in (t ) = A1 sin (w in t + ϕ 1 ) + ∑ A n sin (n ⋅ w in t + ϕ n ) n=2 so dv in (t ) zero dt t=t − crossing 0  ≈ w in ⋅  A 1 +  ∑ +∞ n=2  n ⋅ An   . The voltage noise δvn(f) is independent of fcp . The phase deviation at the input of the phase detector and also at the output of the VCO are indicated.

The noise of the charge pump is added in the loop after the phase detector sampling. 2. Nevertheless these two sources can be differentiated by another parameter: the charge pump sensitivity Kϕ . that is proportional to Icp .δϕ2/2 Table 7-2 The influence of fcp change for narrow band noise For the first type of transition with a slew rate slope.wcp1 0dB/oct. we find a constant phase noise density with respect to fcp . the output of the counter is triggered by a zero crossing of the input signal. The contribution of this phase noise to the in-loop L(f) is directly scaled by N.wcp1 wcp1 δϕ 2 = Vno A N1 N1. since it is determined by the slope of the input signal. which treats large bandwidth noises. We know that for stability reasons the bandwidth of the loop-filter is well below fcp/2 . It corresponds to a constant time noise density with respect to fcp . The output of a resynchronization stage has a constant slope with respect to the dividing ratio. 2.A.δϕ2 6dB/oct.Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 151 Transition type dv(t o ) dt [V/s] wcp [rad/s] | δt | [s/sqrt(Hz)] | δϕpll | [rad/sqrt(Hz)] N | δϕosc | (in . This resynchronization means that the output signal is in fact a transition of the input signal that is copied to the output. This operation aims to conserve the phase quality of the input and to transmit it directly to the output. Or in other words. for the case of proportional slopes.wcp1 Proportional slope 2. avoiding the additional phase deviations of the counting-cells. We verify that besides the charge pump noise there is a second noise contribution that is independent of Tcp . . 7. Furthermore these slopes are usually limited by the slew rate of the stage. we will only look at the time noise densities of the logical blocks (dividers and phase detector).wcp1 N1/2 Ν1.δt1.loop) [rad/sqrt(Hz)] L(f) x fcp [dB/fcp_octave] Slew rate slope ′ vmax wcp1 δ t1 = Vno v′ max δt1. it is common to resynchronize the output of the reference and the main divider to their input signals.2 Large bandwidth noise sources Particularly in low noise PLLs.wcp1 N1 Ν1. On the other hand.2. and the in-loop phase noise remains unchanged as the comparison frequency is doubled. thus we may consider that the charge pump noise is a narrow band contribution suffering from no aliasing effect. So in the next section.wcp1 Vno δ t2 = 2 2 ⋅ A ⋅ wcp δϕ 2 N1/2 N1.wcp1 A. and it is low-pass filtered by ZF before it attains an edge driven stage.wcp1 δ t1 δ t2 = Vno A ⋅ wcp 2. a change in fcp does not influence the time noise.δt1.δt1.

5 illustrates the aliasing of δvn as it passes the ideal sampler. the power of δvn-cp equals 2 nlim ⋅ Vno for f ≤ . we restrict our analysis to the time noise densities that are related to stages with a constant output slope. δvn . The multiplying factor between the power levels of δvn and δvn-cp is named nlim . We call δvn-cp the voltage noise density that is equivalent to a sampled version of δvn . The noise bandwidth equals bwn . a signal that has been sampled at a ratio fcp. as we consider the sampling effects for large bandwidth noises. Mathematically the sampling is represented by a convolution product. The power density of δvn-cp is increased by the aliasing effect. however. It is derived by observing the number of frequency translated spectra that superpose each other.5) . with bwn much larger than fcp .152 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops So next. Therefore δvn-cp becomes: Approximately. This limit equals half the sample frequency and it is also called the Nyquist frequency. can not contain power in frequencies above fcp/2. δv n ( f ) = Vno [ V Hz ] . with nlim ∈ N f cp (7.5 Large bandwidth noise folding The sampling is represented by a convolution product with a comb of rays that are spaced by fcp intervals. We take the case of a broad band white noise. It follows that: nlim ⋅ f cp − bwn ≥ bwn ⇒ nlim ≥ 2 ⋅ bwn f cp . for f ≤ bwn Pvn(f) δvn(f ) bandlimited white noise -bwn [V2/Hz] 2 Vno 2 bwn f 1 δvn(f ) Tcp δvn-cp(f ) … fcp … Pvn-cp(f) [V2/Hz] 2 nlim ⋅ Vno 2 … … -bwn -fcp/2 bwn f Figure 7. Physically. at the input of the phase detector. Figure 7. This frequency 2 boundary is related to a physical limitation.

Table 7-3 The influence of fcp change for large band noise We observe that a broad band noise at the input of the phase detector causes a phase deviation that depends on the sqrt(fcp). explaining the factor 2 with respect to the double sided (positive and negative frequencies) power spectrum. Transition type wcp [rad/s] δvn-cp [V/sqrt(Hz)] | δt | [s/sqrt(Hz)] | δϕpll | [rad/sqrt(Hz)] N | δϕosc | (in . remembering that the SNF or Npll is directly related to δϕpll in the table 7-3. This behaviour results in a change of the synthesizer noise floor of 3dB/oct-of-fcp . Let us now compare the transfer of the ideal sampler with the periodic large signal transfer (HPLS(f)_equation (6.fcp1 vn ⋅ 2 ⋅ bwn f cp1 δ t1 = Vno 2 ⋅ bwn . .loop) [rad/sqrt(Hz)] L(f) x fcp [dB/fcp_octave ] Slew rate slope dv (t o ) = v′ max dt [V/s] wcp1 = 2π.17) ) that was discussed in chapter 6: • HPLS(f) tends to a comb as Tw tends to zero. for f ≤ f cp 2 (7. The SNF change of 3dB/oct-of-fcp is commonly observed in low noise PLL synthesizers.wcp1 vn ⋅ bwn f cp1 δ t1 Vno bwn = . which relatively increases the width of the first lobe of the sinc envelope of HPLS(f) . It is represented as a low-pass-filter that follows HPLS(f) .6) viii Table 7-3 examines the influence of fcp for the phase deviation that is caused by δvn-cp . The comb transfer is a reasonable approximation 1 for noise bandwidths such as: > 2 ⋅ bw n . ′ vmax fcp1 δ t1 ⋅ wcp1 N1 N 1 ⋅ δ t1 ⋅ wcp1 2. 2 LPF ⊗ H PLS ( f ) Slew rate viii The voltage noise density refers to a spectrum representation with only positive frequencies. and this post-filtering does not limit the folding effects.Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 153 δv n −cp ( f ) = Vno ⋅ nlim = Vno ⋅ 2 ⋅ bwn f cp [ V Hz ] . Tw Furthermore the output of the dividers often have a duty cycle that is smaller than 50%. • The slew rate of the switching stages is usually determined by the loading of the output impedance and the biasing level. ′ 2 vmax fcp1 2 ⋅δ t1 ⋅ wcp1 N1/2 N1 ⋅ δ t1 ⋅ wcp1 2 3dB/oct.

The tail current in this differential pair is deviated during the intervals where the reset impulse is high. The time domain signals are shown in figure 7.VT(“/rstn”)): reset input. On one side of the input we add a series voltage source with a small sinus output. and the relationships of these contributions to the parameters Icp and Tcp . with a fundamental frequency equals: fclk=2MHz. The superposed tone in the clock input causes phase deviations in the collector currents of the transistors Q10 and Q11. It is the current at the collectors of a pair of transistors that receive the clock input. In the example the reset input alternates with the clock. These currents are converted into voltage signals that command the rising edge of the output signal. The two examples use circuit blocks that are integrated in the testchips discussed in chapter 8. It represents a superposed noise. We choose two blocks that have a different type of noise output: a D-flip flop (DFF) and a charge pump.4MHz . It is a periodic voltage pulse with no added noise. we perform a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of the time domain signals. .VT(“/cponn”)): Q output of the DFF. The names cpon and cponn refer to the destination of these outputs.154 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 7. • (VT(“/cpon”). • (IT(“/Q10/C”).1 D-flip flop The simulation uses a DFF that is implemented in emitter-coupled logic (ECL). The falling edge of the Q output is determined by the reset input. The first is a basic cell that appears in the three logical blocks: the reference divider.7. It is also a voltage signal. The D input is hard set to a logical “1” and we add a small signal deviation at the periodic clock input. The spectra are shown in figure 7. The DFF also has an asynchronous reset input. In order to observe the sidebands that result from the phase deviations. the main divider and the phase detector.3.6. • (VT(“/rst”). The second has a particular noise contribution that is not quantified as a time deviation but as a current deviation. It is a voltage signal. Here we will look at two simulations of different PLL blocks to examples the issues discussed above. The frequency of the superposed tone equals: fn=11. so that we obtain a periodic output with the same frequency as the clock frequency. This sequence of clock and reset signals represents the inputs of one DFF of the phase detector for a locked loop. which command the inputs of the charge pump. They are differential signals that refer to the following voltages and currents: • (VT(“/ck”).3 Detailing noise sources in different PLL blocks The preceding sections discussed the noise contributions that compose the SNF.IT(“/Q11/C”): differential current signal.VT(“/ckn”)): differential clock input. 7.

6 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: time domain signals frequency [Hz] Figure 7.7 DFF plus superposed noise in the clock input: frequency domain signals .Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 155 [seconds] Figure 7.

− 7 . 4 . 14 …MHz.fclk= 4MHz.4MHz will present the same amplitude as the ray at 11. Finally we can calculate the expected L(f) of these sidebands and compare it to the level found in the simulation. 63 m rad So the L(f) of the sidebands in the current signal are estimated as:  ∆ ϕ n − peak ( f offset ) L dB ( f offset ) = 20 ⋅ log   = − 40 . There are also rays at the frequencies n. we can represent the transfer function of this transconductor as a periodic large signal transfer: HPLS(f).156 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops The settings of the time simulation and of the DFT are carefully chosen to improve the accuracy of the frequency domain plots. 4 ± n ⋅ 4 + 11 . The spectrum of the clock input is composed of a sequence of odd harmonics of the fundamental frequency: 2. Therefore the Q output samples this current signal every 1/fclk . 6 K + 11 . 4 . 6 . The slope of the dv (t c ) 2 ⋅ 200 mV differential clock input equals: . + 7 . − 3 . If we recall the results of section 6. . 4 . with rays at 4MHz and its multiples. So the output will present rays at: ±fn ± n. The rays due to the input noise tone may also be seen as time or phase modulated sidebands.4MHz . 6 .12).16 dBc 2   ix (7. so with respect to figure 7. + 4 .3. Therefore we make an analogy with equation (6. The sidebands appear at a frequency offset of ± 1.4MHz. with tc a zero crossing = = 16 M V s dt 25 ns instant. 6 K MHz K MHz ix This is indeed the result we observe in the spectrum of the current signal.4MHz.7) We remark that figure 7.fclk with n ∈ N. − 4 . the rays that are frequency translated at fclk±1. + 8 .4MHz. as discussed in section 6. There is also a ray that corresponds to the added tone at 11. + 3 . 10.2. 5625 n s 16 M V s Next we use the relationships between time and phase deviations to find ∆ϕn-peak : ∆ ϕ n − peak ( f offset ) = (2π ⋅ f clk ) ⋅ ∆ t n − peak ( f offset ) = 19 .IT(“/Q11/C”). The differential Q signal has rising edges that are determined by the current signal (IT(“/Q10/C”).6MHz and ±1. 4 MHz ) = 25 mV = 1 . The differential current signal is the output of a transconductor (the differential pair) that samples the input clock signal at every zero-crossing. 4 ± n ⋅ 4 MHz MHz ⇒ ⇒ K − 11 . The convolution product of the input with HPLS(f) should then present rays at the frequencies: ±fn ± n.5 the “negative” frequencies are folded in the positive side of the frequency axis. − 0 . We start with the sidebands of the current signal. or 2.3.7 is a single sided frequency representation. This expectation is once more verified by the simulation. If we suppose that HPLS(f) is close enough to a comb sampler. or in other words it will present sidebands at ±0. 6. So the sample frequency equals twice the clock frequency. We indicate this ray with an ellipse.2. and we find the time deviation: ∆ t n − peak ( f offset ) = ∆ t n − peak (1 . These even rays of the fundamental appear because of the pulses that are caused by the reset input. 4 . or numerically: − 11 . 6 . 6 .4MHz around the odd harmonics of fclk . The peak amplitude of the added noise tone in the clock input equals 25mV. 4 . + 0 . − 8 .fclk with n ∈ N. 4 .

5) can be used to define a folding factor nlim for the noise coming from the Xosc. we can try to find the one that represents the critical path with respect to the noise performance. The level of these sidebands should be reduced by 3dB with respect to the sidebands in the current signal.6 MHz ) = − 43 . due to the broad band noise floor that outputs the crystal oscillator (Xosc).16 dBc The output of the simulations shows a L(f) of –44. This result is reconfirmed by the fact that the rays at fn±2.4 MHz ) = L dB (± 0 . Later on it is down-sampled by the resynchronization stage. which means that our periodic transfer HPLS(f) in this simulation is indeed close to a comb sampler.9) The noise contribution of this broad band noise has a 3dB/oct-of-fcp behaviour as discussed in table 7-3.6).fclk all have similar amplitudes within the frequency range that is plotted.7) is quite accurate. we expect to find sidebands with an equal amplitude at the frequency offsets of ±0. It is often the reference chain.51dB below the amplitude of the fundamental. which causes a new folding to a Nyquist bandwidth of fcp/2 . If we continue to suppose a comb transfer from the signal current to the Q output.4dBc. for f ≤ f cp 2 (7. So the expected L(f) equals: L dB (± 1 .Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 157 In the simulation result the sidebands at ±1. The noise of the Xosc that is transmitted to the phase detector input is then estimated using equation (7. we may concentrate our attention on a few nodes to determine the total time noise density that is transmitted to the phase detector input by the logical blocks. the broadband noise is then sampled to a Nyquist bandwidth equal to fxosc . the reference and the main divider. The numerical application holds even for rather large perturbations such as the superposed tone used in this simulation. Equation (7. It equals: nlim = bwn − Xosc 2 ⋅ bwn − Xosc 2 ⋅ f xosc = = = 2⋅R f Nyquist −cp f sample −cp f cp (7.6MHz and ±1. with steep edges and Tw tending to zero. . It becomes: δv n − Xosc ( f ) at the phase = Vno ⋅ nlim = Vno ⋅ 2 ⋅ R detector input [ V Hz ] .8) where R is the dividing ratio of the reference divider. because only the rising edges are transmitting the phase disturbances. Once more the logical blocks are the phase detector. If the resynchronization stages and the phase detector are composed of DFFs that have similar biasing levels.4MHz.n. This example shows that the periodic transfer of added noise sources can be accurately estimated by the large signal linearization (transfer represented by HPLS(f)). which is still reasonably accurate. In a PLL that has resynchronized dividers. If we consider that the output of the Xosc has a buffering stage that is rather non-linear. So the estimation of L(f) in equation (7.4MHz around fclk . The value of Vno can be obtained by noise simulations using software that calculate a periodic transfer for the noise. have an amplitude that is 40.

2 Charge Pump The simulation concerns a phase detector and a charge pump blocks that were designed to work with very high comparison frequencies. It is part of a multi-loop PLL structure that is discussed in chapter 8. Tcp Tcp ≈ (8 p ) ⋅ 2 2 2.. Therefore the noise contribution of the charge pump block can become very significant for the total phase noise performance. as follows: . We indicated it as: δiChP-instant(1MHz) .150n + (140 p ) ⋅ = 9.2n The current density is transformed into a phase density using Kϕ . Here the ratio τrst/Tcp approaches 1/3 and consequently the current sources are never completely switched off.8.2n 2 ⋅ 3. It corresponds to an instantaneous value calculated for a given time instant in a period. A series of noise simulations is realized around different points of a time domain simulation. The points are chosen within an interval of one period.158 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 7.8 the peak of noise level occurs during the zero crossing of the inputs that command the charge pumps. The level of the current noise density at a frequency of 1MHz is sketched in figure 7. Due to the elevated comparison frequency the charge pump that has slow pnp current sources. 9 n 2 0.Tcp (n+1).1 ⋅ T1 T 2 + δiChP −inst . The output currents sinking and sourcing are a filtered copy of the input impulses of the phase detector. and.2ns Icp=182uA 300ps 140p 30M δiChP-instant(f) 8p A/sqrt(Hz) δiChP-instant(1MHz) A/sqrt(Hz) f [Hz] 8p n. Tcp=3. acts like a low-pass filter. and finally expressed as a SSB phase noise. this corresponds to the locked-loop condition. The total noise contribution of the charge pump is a time average of the instantaneous noise power levels. We know that the minimum width of these impulses equals τrst .Tcp t [s] Figure 7. The current noise densities that were calculated for the different transient points had roughly a white band-limited shape with a cut-off frequency around 30MHz. to the order of 310MHz..8 Charge Pump current noise levels within one period In figure 7.768.3.2 ⋅ 2 + . after the transient signals have attained a periodic steady state.10 − 22 A Hz 3. The inputs of the phase detector are adjusted to correspond to a locked loop situation with an average current output equal to zero. Here it becomes: 2 2 δiChP −total (1MHz ) = δiChP −inst .

It is used to simulate an ensemble of blocks that interact among each other.R) is also included through the gain block that follows the noise source. The amplifier is represented by a transconductor with a capacitive input impedance. In an analog simulator the phase signals have to be transformed in either voltage or current magnitudes. 25 p = ⋅ 2π = 1 . The integration of the phase model of the VCO is represented by measuring the ddp of a capacitor that integrates a current. For a noise simulation we introduce two noise sources that represent Npll and vnvco . Numerical examples are presented in chapter 8 while discussing the results of the testchips. 35 dBc Hz 2   This calculation is useful to estimate the limitation of the noise performance that is imposed by such a charge pump working with a high fcp . The dividers are replaced by voltage controlled sources that have an output equal to 1/N or 1/R times their input. for simulations in the time and in the frequency domains. The aliasing factor sqrt(2. is very close to a behavioural model that may be used for AC and noise simulations. This model may also be used for AC simulations that verify the open and closed loop transfers. The loop filter is an active one.4 Behavioural Models The behavioural model is a synthetic form to represent different blocks of a circuit.9 the noise input of Npll is replaced by a source that represents the noise of the crystal oscillator. The following sections present briefly some points about a behavioural representation of the PLL synthesizer. 7. This phase model greatly simplifies the representation of the dividers that may directly divide the phase values instead of identifying and counting zero-crossing moments.1. Often they become interesting when a simulation using the full circuit description would demand too much memory and/or time .Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 159 δϕ ChP − total (1MHz ) = δ i ChP − total 31 . In figure 7.1 Frequency domain A behavioural description of the PLL may represent the output of the VCO and the Xosc by their respective phases. . 079 µ rad 182 µ Kϕ Hz  δϕ ChP − total (1MHz )  L dB _ ChP − total (1MHz ) = 20 log   = − 122 . 7. and the output impedance equals the pull-up resistor.4. The calculation is compared to measurement results in chapter 8. The PLL phase model that was presented in figure 2. We may model all the circuit blocks in behavioural descriptions or combine behavioural and circuit level descriptions. We choose to represent the phase signals as voltages.

In fact ϕvco equals the mean square phase fluctuation Sϕ(f) (equation (3.21) ). The boundaries of the integral are related to the bandwidth of the channel that is being downconverted. However it is interesting to represent the phase detector and charge pump in a form that is compatible with their circuit description.9 Behavioural model of the PLL for AC and noise simulations The output PHIvco (ϕvco) in this behavioural model may be used to calculate the total phase jitter of the LO signal. 7.2 Time domain The behavioural representation in the time domain also uses phase models for the dividers. In section 7. σϕ . . is then derived by integrating Sϕ (equation (3.4. The total phase deviation or phase jitter.5) ).160 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops Figure 7.5 we continue to discuss these integration boundaries as we consider the implementation losses that are caused by σϕ . so that we may combine behavioural and circuit blocks.

10 shows a combined model that contain behavioural descriptions for the dividers and phase detector. Figure 7. we should consider the smallest period.Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 161 Figure 7. Therefore we may simply divide Kvco and N by a common factor. In an ensemble of blocks that work with different frequencies. In fact the VCO is represented by its phase and this phase is divided before it is re-transformed into a sinusoidal signal. and a circuit level charge pump and loop-filter amplifier. . The time step is the space between two consecutive points that are calculated in the transient simulation.10 Behavioural model of the PLL for transient simulations The accuracy of simulations in the time domain is closely related to the ratio time-step/signalperiod. The difficulty to simulate the full PLL circuit is connected to the large difference between the period of the signals at different points of the loop. and reduce significantly the difference between the comparison frequency and the frequency of the VCO. This schematic is used to observe the transient residual currents that are due to mismatches between the sourcing and sinking sides. In this transient model we reduce this difference of periods changing the parameters Kvco and N.

The SNR is often indicated as a power density ratio: energy per bit over noise. and it contains the stages of forward error correction. as represented in figure 1. demodulator. It measures the amount of errors encountered in the reception of a bit stream. The decoder is the second part. Here. is composed of the following blocks: ADC. for phase noise contributions that present a Gaussian distribution and a mean square value or variance of σϕ . MPEG standards for video coding impose BER to the order of 10 -11 at the output of the decoder. The first part. the phase jitter of the LO adds noise to the RF data being down-converted. Usually these results are presented in graphs of SNR versus BER. this implies a BER to the order of 2.5 Implementation Loss due to Phase Deviations Implementation loss is the difference between the theoretical limits that are calculated for the correct functioning of a system and the limits that are measured in a physical implementation. The numerical values are related to the reception of a QPSK modulated channel in a satellite receiver. Eb/No . that normalizes the signal power with respect to the bit rate.11 Digital Demodulator and Decoder For digital modulations. .11). clock recovery loop and carrier recovery loop. The decoder can correct a certain number of bit errors depending on the redundancy and the robustness of the coding. the final consequence of phase jitter is measured as a bit-error rate x (BER) . The circuit that receives the BB output from the frontend is a digital demodulator and decoder (see figure 7.10-4 at the input of the Reed Solomon The BER is a common unit used in the context of digital decoders. In the frontend or more specifically in the frequency conversion stage. In the case of QPSK signals the bit error rate reflects the probability that the additional xi phase noise exceeds a value of π/4 . For the satellite DVB-S that has an inner Reed-Solomon coding and an outer Viterbi coding. RF input ADC Clock & Carrier Recovery Loops Viterbi Decoder Reed-Solomon Decoder Demodulator LO PLL Forward Error Correction SDD: satellite demodulator and decoder Frontend Figure 7. Thus. we can calculate the BER using the distribution curves of a Gaussian variable. we discuss the implementation loss that is caused by the phase deviations in the LO signal.162 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops 7. They show the theoretical and minimum signal quality that is required to decode the input signal with a certain amount of bit-errors.7 . xi x Referring to a constellation diagram.

Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context

163

decoder, and a BER to the order of 6.10-3 at the input of the Viterbi decoder. The BER in the input of the decoder is also called raw BER. Using the theoretical curves of SNR x BER for QPSK signals we find that the raw BER of 6.10-3 is equivalent to a theoretical Eb/No of 5dB. We may also express the SNR as an energy per symbol instead of an energy per bit, which gives us a Es/No of 8dB. The implementation loss is measured as the increase in the ratio Es/No which is required to obtain a raw BER of 6.10-3 . 7.5.1 Signal to noise ratio and implementation loss

The following treatment of the implementation loss and phase noise power is based on the reference [Sinde98b]. Let us consider the signal and noise powers indicated in the schematic below: Ps

S
PNin PNϕ

SNRmin

where Ps : signal power measured within the bandwidth bwch ; PNin : noise power before the mixing stage, also measured within bwch ; PNϕ : noise power added by the phase noise of the LO, measured within bwch . For an ideal receiver working with a noiseless local oscillator, SNRin and SNRmin are equal, and they become: P SNRmin = SNRin1 = s PNin1 where PNin1 is the maximum noise power that can be handled by the receiver. When we consider a noisy LO the SNRmin equals: Ps 1 1 SNRmin = = = Pϕ 1 1 PNin 2 + PNϕ PNin 2 + + SNRin 2 SNRϕ Ps Ps where PNin2 is the maximum noise power at the input, in the presence of the phase noise PNϕ ; and SNRϕ is the signal to noise ratio for the phase noise contribution. The implementation loss (IL) due to PNϕ is defined by the ratio of the input SNR for the noisy and noiseless cases: SNRin 2 PNin1 1 IL = = = SNRmin SNRin1 PNin 2 1− SNRϕ It may also be expressed in dB as:  SNRmin − dB − SNRϕ − dB       10  1 − 10  ILdB = −10 ⋅ log (7.10)     where SNRmin-dB and SNRϕ-dB are the same ratios defined above, but expressed in dB. We can also calculate the SNRϕ which corresponds to a given IL and SNRmin. It equals:

164

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

SNRϕ = SNRmin ⋅

IL IL − 1

or expressed in dB:

SNRϕ −dB = SNRmin −dB

  ILdB     + ILdB − 10 ⋅ log 10  10  − 1    

(7.11)

Let us now consider the relationship between SNRϕ and the phase noise parameter Sϕ(f) which was introduced in chapter 3. The latter is a noise to signal ratio, that considers the noise contribution of a 1 Hz bandwidth in a certain offset from the carrier. The first one is a signal to noise ratio that considers the noise within the bandwidth of the selected channel (bwch). So, we expect the integral of Sϕ(f) to be related to SNRϕ-1 . Indeed, if we consider the phase noise sidebands as narrow band noise contributions that are also down-converting the input channel, we find that:
bwch 2  bwch    bwch − f offset  + f offset      2   2    1  ∫ Sϕ ( f ) df + 2 ⋅  bw ∫ Sϕ ( f ) df  df offset 0    ch − f offset   2   

− SNRϕ 1 =

PNϕ Ps

=

2 ⋅ bwch


0

(7.12)
−1 SNRϕ − foffset

where the noise being added corresponds to the frequency-shifted copies of the input channel. We should remember that Sϕ(f) is the double side band phase noise, which explains that the boundaries of the integral are limited to positive offsets. Figure 7.12 gives a physical idea of the integral above. It shows the noise contribution that is brought by two narrow sidebands around the oscillator frequency.
Ss(f)
[W/Hz]

bwch

foffset
Sosc(f)
[W/Hz]

f [Hz]

f [Hz]

∆f1
SBBoutput(f)
[W/Hz]

SBBoutput(f)
[W/Hz]

 bw ch  + ∆ f1    2 

∆f1
Figure 7.12

foffset

f [Hz]
 bwch  − ∆f1    2 

f [Hz]

Noise Power added by the LO sidebands

Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context

165

The outermost integral in expression (7.12) sweeps the channel bandwidth from its center to one of the extremities. The inner integral evaluates the noise power that is projected over each narrow bandwidth portion of the channel spectrum. The noise amount that is projected on two sidebands that are equally spaced with respect to the center of the channel bandwidth, is equal. Therefore the outermost integral just needs to sweep a range of one half channel. However, depending on the position of the narrow bandwidth within the channel spectrum, it is a different range of the DSB phase noise, Sϕ(f), that down-converts or projects noise. For offsets close to the center of the channel, or for foffset << bwch , it is basically Sϕ(f) in the range [0, bwch/2], where the DSB phase noise accounts for the left and right sided offsets from the center of the channel. For offsets close to the extremities of the channel, or for foffset ~ bwch/2 , it is Sϕ(f)/2 in the range [0, bwch]. In expression (7.12), the total noise, PNϕ , is the sum of the noise contributions that are down converted by the sidebands around the LO. In the present case, where we consider a single channel at the RF input, the maximum frequency offset for these sidebands equals bwch . Next, two particular cases, concerning random and spurious sidebands, are discussed. 7.5.1.1 Spurious Sidebands Discrete spurious sidebands are also contributing to PNϕ . If we consider a pair of sidebands at a frequency offset f1, the DSB phase noise can be expressed as:

Sϕ 1 ( f ) = Ps1 ⋅ δ ( f − f 1 )

[rad ]
2

for

0 < f 1 < bwch

where Ps1 is the DSB spurious amplitude. It may also be expressed in dB, Ps1-dB , and compared to As , the SSB spurious amplitude defined in equation (3.2). Ps1−dB = As + 3 dB

[dBc]

(7.13)

Then, replacing Sϕ1 in expression (7.12) results in:

 f  −1 SNRϕ 1 = Ps1 ⋅ 1 − 1   bw  ch  
−1 max SNRϕ 1 < Ps1

[rad ]
2

for

0 < f 1 < bwch

{

}

[rad ]
2

(7.14)

Therefore Ps1 is an overestimation of the SNR related to these single tone sidebands. 7.5.1.2 Random Phase Noise The random noise sources that modulate the tunable oscillator cause sidebands that are measured by a phase noise density, Sϕ(f). These sidebands may be divided into two zones. The first, inloop, is mostly flat with some peaking close to the intersection of the out-of-loop zone. In the second one, the power of the sidebands decreases with a 1/f slope. The PLL closed bandwidth (fcl) determines the size of the in-loop zone. Most of the phase deviation power is due to the sidebands that are found in frequency offsets in the range [0 , fcl ] .

166

PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops

In most of the tuner applications, the PLL bandwidth is considerably smaller than the channel −1 bandwidth (bwch) . Thus the parameter SNRϕ − foffset in expression (7.12) is bounded by:
bwch

SNR

−1 ϕ _ foffset

≤ SNR

−1 ϕ _0

=

∫ Sϕ ( f ) df
0

2

[rad ]
2

−1 − Furthermore the value of SNRϕ − foffset is rather close to SNRϕ 1 0 for all the frequency offsets that − are in the range: [0 , bwch-fcl ] . −1 − − If we replace SNRϕ − foffset by SNRϕ 1 0 in equation (7.12), we obtain a simplified form of SNRϕ 1 − that equals:

− SNRϕ 1 ≈

2 ⋅ bwch

bwch 2

∫ SNRϕ
0

−1 _0

− df offset = SNRϕ 1 0 = _

bwch 2

∫ Sϕ ( f ) df
0

2 = σϕ

(7.15)

− Expression (7.15) is an overestimation of SNRϕ 1 for the random noise sidebands; and it equals the square of the phase jitter, for an integration within half of the channel bandwidth.

7.5.1.3 Numerical Example The specifications of a receiver system define allocations of implementation losses for the different parameters causing signal degradations. In TV and satellite tuners the implementation loss due to phase deviation of the LO are specified by a maximum value of 0.2dB. We can use expressions (7.10) and (7.11) to calculate some numerical examples for the satellite QPSK receiver. Table 7-4 relates SNRϕ and IL for a Es/No of 8dB, corresponding to the raw BER of 6.10-3 .

ILdB
[dB] 1.6 0.8 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.05 0.025

SNRϕ-dB
[dB] 13.112 15.741 18.556 21.467 24.428 27.413 30.411

− SNRϕ 1

− SNRϕ 1

[rad] 2.210E-01 1.633E-01 1.181E-01 8.446E-02 6.006E-02 4.259E-02 3.016E-02

[°] 12.662 9.356 6.766 4.839 3.441 2.440 1.728

Table 7-4

Implementation Loss X Phase deviations

We may also use expressions (7.13), (7.14) and (7.15) to relate the values of SNRϕ with the spurious level (As) and the phase jitter (σϕ) . For instance the implementation loss of 0.2 dB is equivalent to a phase jitter of 4.84°, or to a single pair of spurious sidebands at – 24.5 dBc.

There are different configurations of carrier and clock recovery loops. which works with the smaller closed loop bandwidth.2 dB.13. .with a margin of 6. Hence we should seek a practical boundary that compromises the phase deviation of the random and spurious noises and also preserves a margin for variations in the parameters that xii determine As and σϕ . xii The spurious level. depends on the noise performance of the PLL and the VCO ( Npll . The behavioural model for the phase transfer of the clock and carrier recovery loops is shown in figure 7.13 Behavioural Model of the Carrier Recovery loop The two loops are based on PLLs of the 2nd order. The phase jitter. slow loop. The clock recovery loop is the external. As . 7.7 dB for the variation of the total phase deviation. and on the suppression of the loop filter. our model is based on the architecture of the circuit TDA8043.Chapter 7 / Phase Noise in the PLL context 167 − In practise the maximum SNRϕ 1 has to take into account both the phase jitter and the spurious power. These stages are only represented by the delays that they cause in the signal path (block delay_2). σϕ . A phase jitter of 2° and a spurious level below –36dBc is a compromise that implies a total SNRϕ-dB of 28. vnvco ).5. on the frequency sensitivity of the oscillator (Kvco). There are three stages that are contained in the clock recovery loop: the anti-alias filtering. on the peaking of the closed loop transfer and on the closed loop bandwidth. The length of this delay depends on the symbol rate. the Nyquist filtering and the interpolator. Clock recovery loop Carrier Recovery loop Figure 7. depends on the amplitude of the modulating signal. a satellite demodulator and decoder for BPSK and QPSK signals.2 Digital Demodulator: clock and carrier recovery loops Finally we need to consider the action of the demodulator blocks (carrier and clock recovery loops) for the phase deviations that come from the frontend.

In this chapter we applied the results of the preceding parts. was discussed with numerical examples related to existing ICs. Finally. Simulation examples are presented in chapter 8. can be correctly compared to a phase jitter value. . The carrier recovery loop is the internal. The maximum symbol rate that can be decoded is 32Msps. fast loop. The combined PLL+demodulator model is used to calculate the phase jitter that appears at the input of the digital signal decoder. was also introduced. the two loops should be connected in series. A model for a QPSK demodulator. A systematic approach to investigate the dominant noise sources was presented.168 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops There are other delay elements that account for the phase detectors functioning. behavioural models for transient and AC simulations were briefly described. and it works with a clock at 65MHz. about the PLL model and the related transfer functions. and. The output of the demodulator is a high-pass filtered portion of ϕosc. These delays are independent of the symbol rate. For symbol rates below 10Msps. For symbol rates above 10Msps. The bandwidth and damping parameters of each loop are programmable. used in the analysis of chapter 8. with suggestions for simulations and measurements. The TDA8043 can decode channels with variable symbol rates. the series connection just changes the feedback return for the clock recovery loop. The demodulator input (PHIdemin) receives the phase noise density that outputs the PLL. As we increase the bandwidth of either loop. For the phase model. about the generation of phase noise. in a top-down approach. Therefore the delays may be normalized as an entier number of periods of the reference clock. the effect of the delays will become visible. The ensemble of the demodulator blocks is synchronous. The analysis of a PLL design. which would be taken from the node at the input of the carrier loop. the IL that is measured at the input of the decoder. causing some overshoot in the transfer.13. In the behavioural model these settings are translated to the loop filter parameters that correspond to a 2nd order closed loop transfer with a natural oscillating frequency wn and a damping ξ . with a cutting frequency that equals the natural frequency of the fast loop. the loops should be interlaced (an external clock loop containing the carrier loop) as represented in figure 7. In this manner. The overall transfer of the demodulator is very close to a high pass filter of 2 nd order. The phase model of the demodulator is used in noise simulations in combination with the PLL phase model.

....... 187 Figures: Figure 8.........4.... TC2 : Mixer-Oscillator-PLL circuit for satellite direct conversion ....7 Figure 8........................... 184 Settings of the demodulator block........................................10 Gm-C integrated oscillator .................................................................. 186 Phase noise simulation for DL+QCCO with and without demodulator .................. 179 TC2 _out-of-loop spectrum for N1=6 and fcp1=300MHz . 172 Double Loop: minimum step and comparison frequencies..................... 189 8 Testchips Realized This chapter presents two synthesizer testchips which contain a fully integrated Gm-C oscillator covering the satellite band-L.......................................... 182 Spectra for ∆fstep =125kHz and flo =900MHz .................. ............. Structure ................................1........................................................................9 Figure 8.....................................................................................................................................................2 Figure 8................Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 169 Contents: 8................................... 173 8............... 181 Simulation result for the SSB phase noise _ linear scale ............................. 183 8.............................................................................................................................................................. 177 TC2 _ in-loop spectrum for N1=7 and fcp1=300Mhz .....................................................................4..... 183 8................................................................... 175 Parameters of the two zero-IF configurations being compared .................................................................... Conditions for the simulations............... 175 8.........................1............... 173 8... Results .................................5 Figure 8... 177 8.................................... 172 8..................................... The performance of the double loop synthesizer..................................... 171 Double loop MOPLL: block diagram ........ TC2 structure .................................................. Testchips Realized 169 8..................................................... The structures of the Gm-C oscillator and a double loop PLL synthesizer are exposed in tables and block diagrams..... with an integrated satellite band oscillator....8 Figure 8. Configurations compared .......2..............2.......................1..........................................3...............................1................................... 170 8.................................... 184 8.................. 185 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for rs=30Msps and fLO = 2......1........................................ 179 TC3 _ single low noise PLL plus QCCO...... .........................................................6 Figure 8............. Gm-C oscillator...........4................................1.................................................................. The synthesizers are designed for a monodyne or zero-IF receiver................................................................... 176 Photo of a testchip TC2 ........................................................... Comparative analysis: phase jitter and implementation loss................................................ 170 8....1 Figure 8...... Results and conclusions.............................. and they present a multi-loop architecture..2GHz......3.. 188 Margin for degradations in the oscillators phase noise performance . 188 Phase Jitter and implementation loss for rs=3Msps and ∆fstep = 125kHz....2.....................2.... Double Loop Synthesizer ... 183 Parameters and outputs for comparative analysis ................................2................................................... 180 8...........4.... 186 Tables: Table 8-1 Table 8-2 Table 8-3 Table 8-4 Table 8-5 Table 8-6 Table 8-7 Table 8-8 Measurements of the frequency coverage of the QCCO ................................................................................2............................. is compared to a classical single loop and external LC oscillator.............. 174 Block diagram of TC2 .........3.......4 Figure 8............................... Finally measurement results of phase noise and implementation losses are compared to simulations..........2............................. TC3 : single PLL plus QCCO circuit .........................................3 Figure 8........................................................................................................................................ TC2: results ..........................

which is a common block in the two testchips. This enables us to compose a native PMOS.1. 8. which gives us a bipolar+PMOS process. The first loop drives an oscillator in the VHF band. The testchips were realized in a bipolar process that is derived from a BiCMOS process.1 Structure Let us consider the block schematic of figure 8. which is used as the input reference for the second loop which drives the Gm-C oscillator. The first testchip that is discussed. This high voltage supply can be suppressed if the LO can be tuned under a 5V range.1. Hence the oscillator is also called a QCCO: quadrature current controlled oscillator. A fuller description of the double loop structure and the Gm-C oscillator can be found in references [Vauc98] . The solution. The peak value of the ft of the NPN transistors equals 13GHz. to cope with the degradation of the phase noise. . We start describing the results of the Gm-C oscillator. The maximum ft of the lateral PNP equals 200MHz. with a pitch of 2. [Tang97] and [Kokk92].4µm. 8. In terrestrial and satellite tuners the usual range of the tuning voltage is 30V.1. TC3. so that the demodulator can distinguish the channel from its mirror image. The input reference in this case is a crystal oscillator. which is also converted to base band. A monodyne receiver needs to provide two outputs. There are three levels of metallization. The two oscillators are tuned in a 5V range. The two stages have outputs with an equal frequency. It shows the basic parts of the QCCO. Its phase noise is on average 20dB worse than a LC oscillator covering the same range with a 30V tuning range. exploits the possibility of a single loop.Lab. The transconductance gma compensates the current i These quadrature outputs are very convenient for a receiver with a monodyne structure.a presents a single ended integrator stage. is an implementation developed in collaboration with Nat.170 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops A fully integrated oscillator becomes quite interesting in monodyne receivers where the radiation of the input RF signal may significantly deviate a LC externally-coupled oscillator. or having a LO oscillator with quadrature outputs. instead of a large bandwidth shifter. Therefore the quadrature outputs may be directly sampled and demodulated to retrieve the I and Q streams of data. Basically there are two possibilities to provide the two outputs in quadrature: either phase shifting the input RF channel. and phases that are shifted by 90° with respect i to each other. In a zero-IF architecture the mirror image is a flipped version of the selected channel. to drive the same Gm-C oscillator. It is a double-loop PLL synthesizer. Furthermore the digital standards of satellite broadcasting use QPSK modulation. The frequency tuning is made by varying the biasing current of the transconductance stages. The second testchip. In order to respond to both the specifications of a maximum tuning step and a minimum closed loop bandwidth. in quadrature to each other. The stripped bipolar process kept the gate oxide of the CMOS components for the capacitors. with a wide closed bandwidth. The second solution is often chosen because it demands a phase shifter for a single tone signal.1 Gm-C oscillator The Gm-C oscillator is a ring structure with two integrator stages and an inverting feedback. TC2. is to increase the closed loop bandwidth. The oscillating frequency depends on the value of the capacitors and on the transconductance Gm. The integrated Gm-C oscillator has a range divided into 4 bands that are tuned in a 5V range. the research laboratory of Philips. Part 8. a multi-loop structure is needed.

This situation is identified as the linear mode of the QCCO.b. If the transconductance gma compensates exactly the losses of each integrator stage .Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 171 losses in the resistor R. Implementation in the testchips uses differential transconductances gmt and gma as drafted in figure 8. which implies an increase in some noise sources that are proportional to the biasing currents. On the other hand.1) where the transfer of a single integrator is : Vout (s ) gmt = = wn Vin (s ) s ⋅ C . a unitary feedback with a phase shift of 360° . we will need a higher Igmt to cover the frequency range.8. gma Igma gmt C vin Igmt R vout gmt (tune) gma (amp) vI gmt (tune) gma (amp) vQ Igmt Igma Igma Igmt Fig. The phase noise performance of the QCCO depends: on the inherent noise sources. If we decrease Kcco by increasing the capacitors C.b Differential cascaded integrators Gm-C integrated oscillator The condition of oscillation. We can define a frequency sensitivity Kcco in Hz/A . In the differential scheme the inversion is simply a crossover between the feedback signals. that acts on gma .1 Single ended Gm-C integrator Fig. which is also equal to the natural oscillating frequency wn . as we increase the amplitude of the oscillating signal the transconductors gmt will no longer work in a linear mode.8. is needed to assure a minimum negative impedance during the start up of the oscillator and later on to fix the value of the amplitude.1. In practice an amplitude control. is met by cascading two integrator stages and an inversion.1. and the losses due to this non-linear function have to be compensated by the negative resistance. the closed loop transfer function for a voltage input becomes: gm a = − 1 ( R ) BQCCO (s ) = 1  s ⋅C  1+   gm   t   2 (8.a Figure 8. . on the frequency sensitivity of the oscillator and on the amplitude of the signals VI and VQ . or in other words by increasing Igma . keeping the quadrature between the input and output voltages vin and vout .1.

Therefore the design of the QCCO is a tricky compromise between the requirements of phase noise. The overlap for the limits of each band is chosen as 100MHz. tunable range and consumption budget. The frequency range covers the entire band-L from 950MHz to 2150MHz. The ensemble of the biasing and transconductance blocks consume 26mA under a 5V bias. The outputs VI and VQ have a peak value to the order of 200mV to 300mV. for oscillators working in a non-linear mode the amplitude control is also influencing the frequency. . The measurement results are presented in table 8-1. This amplitude represents the result of the compromise between consumption and phase noise performance. with some overlap in the extremities and in between each band. The first design was reworked to improve the band coverage and the uniformity of the Kcco and ii the L(f) throughout the 4 bands.1. and output Igmt ii The bands have an equal frequency range.6V Vtune ∈ [0. that enables a simple programming mode for the QCCO.172 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops In fact Igma is already the parameter that controls the amplitude.6] Table 8-1 Measurements of the frequency coverage of the QCCO The frequency sensibility Kv-cco is equivalent to the Kvco of the LC tuned oscillator.1 . 3. and. in comparison to the ideal band partition shown below. 8. and assures a low Kcco variation throughout the band.2 Results The QCCO implemented in TC2 and TC3 has a frequency range divided into 4 bands. The bands are selected by programmable inputs. Ideal band partition: 950M 1275M 1600M 850M 1175M 1500M 1925M 2150M ∆ f band 2250 − 850 + 300 = MHz = 425 MHz 4 1825M 2250M Measurements: Band 1 815 | 1230 415 119 Band 2 1190 | 1640 450 129 Band 3 1520 | 1950 430 123 Band 4 1850 | 2310 460 131 measurement conditions: Frequency Ranges [MHz] ∆fband [MHz] Kv-cco [MHz/V] constant Vamp =2. The tuning input of the QCCO is a voltage/current (V/I) converter that receives Vtune as input.

. The same uniformity was also aimed at for the SSB phase noise performance. The synthesizer chip is combined with mixer-oscillator blocks to compose a MOPLL circuit. 4 ) = − 91 . The noise from the biasing stages is minimized by using a large voltage interval for the degeneration of the current sources. 8.2 TC2 : Mixer-Oscillator-PLL circuit for satellite direct conversion The testchip TC2 contains several blocks of a double loop PLL synthesizer. and its input is called Vamp .Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 173 . 8 ) = − 75 . This VHF-oscillator has a strict requirement for phase noise. so that this input can be used to compensate the process spread. Loop #2 drives an oscillator that works in the VHF range. one is programmed with the same count (N1) as the divider of loop #1. and the other (R2) determines the minimum tuning step. and the following values are measured in the two extremes of the tunable range: f QCCO = 1 .2. Table 8-2 shows the relationships among the comparison frequencies and the oscillator frequencies. The first one (loop #1) locks the QCCO to the reference delivered by the second loop. and at the end of the band the L(f) is limited by the shot noise of the transistor of gmt . The reference divider is composed of two counters. The tuning system is composed of two cascaded PLLs. 1 GHz ⇒ ⇒ L (600 KHz L (600 KHz ) = − 92 .1 Double Loop Synthesizer Figure 8. The circuit is dimensioned for a monodyne receiver. which means that the input RF channels are directly down-converted to band base. since its spectrum is “copied” to the LO output. The input range for Vtune is limited by the working range of the V/I converter. A second V/I input is used for the amplitude control. 2 GHz f QCCO = 2 . 8.2 is a block schematic of the double loop architecture. The present design was improved to work with a fixed Vamp value. Loop #1 works with small divider ratios (N1) which allows one to obtain a quite low phase noise for part of the in-loop spectrum (to the order of -108 dBc/Hz). The reference of loop#2 is a traditional 4MHz quartz oscillator (Xosc). The parameter Kv-cco is the overall sensitivity that includes the gain of the V/I converter plus the Kcco of the Gm-C oscillator. 5 dBc Hz ↔ ↔ L (100 KHz L (100 KHz ) = − 76 . 9 dBc Hz dBc Hz dBc Hz At the beginning of the band the main noise source is the thermal noise of the resistors loading the transconductors.

Det. reference divider ratio in loop #2.P. output frequency of loop #1. .I RF input I QCCO . comparison frequency in phase detector #1. main divider ratio in loop #1.Det.Q RF AGC-Loop V/I converter Zfilter #1 Ph.2 Parameters: Double loop MOPLL: block diagram ∆fstep : fcco1 : N1: fcp1: fvco2 : N2: R2: fcp2: fXosc: minimum tuning step. main divider ratio in loop #2. QCCO frequency. #2 /N1 /R2 Xosc (4 MHz) Figure 8.P. VCO-VHF frequency. + Ch. #1 Loop #1 / N1 Zfilter #2 VCO2 VHF band Loop #2 /N2 Ph. output frequency of loop #2.LO Q BB output .+Ch. comparison frequency in phase detector #2.174 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops double-loop MOPLL circuit BB output . Xosc frequency.

The frequency range of VCO2 is then determined with respect to the limits of the QCCO band.2 TC2 structure The blocks that are colored in grey in figure 8. The LO signal can be monitored through a test output. since the transfer characteristics Iaverage / ∆ϕin should cover a minimum input range of ±180° . Thus VCO2 works in the range of a VHF-III oscillator. If we consider a margin of 20MHz and a tuning range of 4 V. This condition assures that the comparator can retrieve frequency and phase differences (see chapter 5). 8.4MHz/V.1 MHz 7 Actually the range of VCO2 should also include some margin at the extremities. which means a maximum fcp1 to the order of 330MHz. The design of the charge pump and the phase detector are mostly determined by this constraint. 5.2 were implemented in the testchip TC2. the average Kvco of VCO2 equals 27. The main divider of loop#1 is composed of two swallow counters and N1 belongs to the set: [4. It follows that: max{ f vco 2 } = 950 M = 237. The analog part has symmetrical inputs for the RF signal and asymmetrical outputs for the BB signals: I and Q. 6. 7].Chapter 8 / Testchips Realized 175 oscillators frequency wrt fcp fvco2 = fcp1 fcp2*N2 fcco1 fcp1*N1 It is important to notice that the comparison frequency of loop #2 becomes: f cp 2 = ∆f step N1 wrt N and R wrt ∆fstep with: ∆fstep = f Xosc * N 2 R 2 * N1 f Xosc * N 2 R2 f Xosc R2 ∆f step * N 2 N1 ∆f step * N 2 Table 8-2 Double Loop: minimum step and comparison frequencies. with a frequency sensitivity that is close to the Kvco of UHF oscillators. The comparison frequency of loop #1 equals the VCO2 frequency. that interact through interface blocks.3. A more detailed schematic diagram is included in figure 8. These parameters serve as references for the design and the application of loop #2. analog and digital. The bus has an additional acknowledge block that indicates the . The ensemble of blocks is programmed by a 3-wire bus. The testchip is basically divided into two parts. There are external control inputs for the amplitude and frequency of the QCCO.2.5 MHZ 4 min{ f vco 2 } = 2150 M = 307. The frequency input is bound to the charge pump output and to an external LPF impedance.

sourcing and high-impedance outputs.3 Block diagram of TC2 There are 4 supply pins. On the left side there are the digital blocks (bus. It is measured as perturbations in the output spectrum when the synthesizer is continuously receiving a repetitive programming word.1mm2 .1 (4. The charge pump has 2 programmable values of Icp ( 20µA and 190µA) and it can also be set to test modes with sinking.2mm 2 . In reality this block is included to test the sensibility to bus cross-talk. + Ch. main divider and phase-detector /charge pump. regulator.5. and on the right side. and the active layout area equals 1. The total layout area is 2. The total consumption is 60mA under 5V. a pair for the analog part and another for the digital one. input and output buffers). mixer.176 PLL Frequency Synthesizers: Phase Noise Issues and Wide Band Loops reception of a full programming word. which includes the 20 input/output pins. Pump #1 2 Div.4 shows a photo of a testchip TC2.7) Bus data load synchronization QCCO 3 Test Bus SDA SCL ENB ACK DIV456 2 PhDetChP 4 2 Ref 2 VCC GND Biasref DIGITAL PART Figure 8. ANALOG PART Vamp V/I Bandgap regulator Vreg QCCO Rfin 2 VCCO GNDO Dual Mixer I Q 4 4 4 Sym--> Assym Output stage BBI BBQ V/I 2 BN--ISOLATION Plus block combine I &Q Pin for external Loop Filter 2 CCOout output for Z=50Ω INTERFACE LAYER Phase Det. The output of the acknowledge block is equivalent to an iii I2C bus output. . The symmetry of the layout of the analog part is stressed to guarantee the quadrature characteristics of the I and Q branches. the analog part (QCCO.6. iii Bus cross-talk denotes the interference of the bus activity in the others blocks of the synthesizer. from the higher to the lower corner). Figure 8.

3 TC2: results The blocks are all functional and the loop locks correctly.2. with no loss in its sensibility Kϕ (no dead zone).3.4 Photo of a testchip TC2 TC2 was measured