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Located in the continent of Asia, Kazakhstan covers 2,699,700 square kilometers of land and 25,200 square kilometers

of water, making it the 9th largest nation in the world with a total area of 2,724,900 square kilometers.
Kazakhstan became an independent state in 1991, after gaining its sovereignty from Russia. The population of
Kazakhstan is 17,522,010 (2012) and the nation has a density of 6 people per square kilometer.
The currency of Kazakhstan is the Tenge (KZT). As well, the people of Kazakhstan are refered to as Kazakhstani.
The dialing code for the country is 7 and the top level internet domain for Kazakhstani sites is .kz.
Kazakhstan shares land borders with 5 countries: Russia, Turkmenistan, China, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan.

Kazakhstan is the 9th largest country in the world, and (at one time) was the second largest republic in the former
Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.).
The earliest peoples were a confederation of Turkic tribes, known as the Qarluqs, who had established themselves in
eastern Kazakhstan in 766 AD.
Arabs conquered the land during the 8th and 9th centuries, followed by the Oghuz Turks, Kimak and Kipchak, and
Huns and Saka peoples.

Kazakhstan is believed to have been inhabited as early as the Stone Age, a prehistoric period characterized by the use of stone
tools. It was only in the beginning of the 15th century when Kazakh identity came into being and was consolidated into the culture
and language of the Kazakhs in the 16th century. After becoming stronger as a people, the Kazakhs fought off a federation of armed
Western Mongol tribes in the 17th century, and went on to win major victories invading forces in the following century.
During the 19th century, however, the vast Russian empire started to expand in Central Asia, ruling most of the countries in the
region, including most parts of Kazakhstan which the Russians finally colonized. Following the colonization, some 400,000 Russians
immigrated to the country and were followed by one million Slavs, Germans and Jews to establish their residency in the country.
This resulted in direct competition between the Kazakhs and the newcomers and in a series of clashes between the natives and the
Russians. Superior in strength, Russians prevailed, driving away 300,000 Kazakhs. The famine which started in 1922 worsened the
conditions in the country when one million Kazakhs died from starvation. By 1939 the country’s population had dropped by 22%
because of starvation and emigration. At that time, the Russians had also slaughtered a number of renowned local writers, poets,
thinkers, and historians in an attempt to suppress Kazakh culture and identity, and had made the territory as the Kazakh Soviet
Socialist Republic. Many years later or in October 1991, Kazakhstan declared its sovereignty as a member of the Union of Socialist
Republics, and its independence from Russia on December 16, 1991. The rest is now part of its modern and current history.

Kazakhstan has a culture that is largely influenced by the nomadic ways of the Turkic tribes. Such culture is now blended with the
lifestyles of the West, the Chinese and most especially the Russians. The Kazakh people were nomadic themselves and this
nomadic life continues to be reflected in both cultural symbols and ways of living. Some Kazakhs, especially in the villages, still use
the yurt, a traditional movable house, which is a remnant of the main architecture of the Kazakh nomads. In this dwelling unit, the
Kazakhs would offer their guests in a dastarkhan, a low table made of wood. Although the yurt is no longer widely used, except in
national celebrations, it serves as a reminder that the Kazakh people were a nomadic group in a certain part of their history. A
mixture of influences on the Kazakh culture is evident in wall carpets and rugs whose striking color combinations and geometric
patterns seem to be unmatched anywhere in its neighbor countries. Carpets were originally made to decorate the yurt, but are now
found sold with various handicrafts in a number of marketplaces and souvenir shops.
The Kazakhs are also skillful in making beautifully embroidered headdresses, dresses, bags and saddle cloths. They also make the
country’s national dress or costume, which varies by regions, for both men and women. The men’s national costume is called
chapan while the women’s national dress is white cotton with silk dress and an embroidered velvet waistcoat.
Already, the country owns the biggest name in its cultural history in the person of Abag Kunanbaev, a 19th century poet, who
translated major Russian literature to the Kazakh language. He is also said to have launched or initiated efforts to make Kazakh as
a literary language of the country.

Kazakhstan is believed to have been inhabited as early as the Stone Age, a prehistoric period characterized by the use of stone
tools. It was only in the beginning of the 15th century when Kazakh identity came into being and was consolidated into the culture
and language of the Kazakhs in the 16th century. After becoming stronger as a people, the Kazakhs fought off a federation of armed
Western Mongol tribes in the 17th century, and went on to win major victories invading forces in the following century.
During the 19th century, however, the vast Russian empire started to expand in Central Asia, ruling most of the countries in the
region, including most parts of Kazakhstan which the Russians finally colonized. Following the colonization, some 400,000 Russians
immigrated to the country and were followed by one million Slavs, Germans and Jews to establish their residency in the country.
This resulted in direct competition between the Kazakhs and the newcomers and in a series of clashes between the natives and the
Russians. Superior in strength, Russians prevailed, driving away 300,000 Kazakhs. The famine which started in 1922 worsened the
conditions in the country when one million Kazakhs died from starvation. By 1939 the country’s population had dropped by 22%
because of starvation and emigration. At that time, the Russians had also slaughtered a number of renowned local writers, poets,
thinkers, and historians in an attempt to suppress Kazakh culture and identity, and had made the territory as the Kazakh Soviet
Socialist Republic. Many years later or in October 1991, Kazakhstan declared its sovereignty as a member of the Union of Socialist
Republics, and its independence from Russia on December 16, 1991. The rest is now part of its modern and current history.

Kurmangazy Sagyrbayuly-Qurmangazy Sagyrbaiuly was a Qazaq composer, instrumentalist, and folk


artist. He was born in 1823 in the Bukey Horde. He is buried in the Astrakhan region of Lower Volga in today's Russian Federation.

 An instrumental is a musical composition or recording without lyrics, or singing, although it might include some
inarticulate vocals, such as shouted backup vocals in a Big Band setting. The music is primarily or exclusively produced
by musical instruments. An instrumental can exist in music notation, after it is written by a composer; in the mind of
the composer (especially in cases where the composer herself will perform the piece, as in the case of a blues solo
guitarist or a folk music fiddle player); as a piece that is performed live by a single instrumentalist or a musical ensemble,
which could range in size from a duo or trio to a large Big Band, concert band or orchestra.
In a song that is otherwise sung, a section that is not sung but which is played by instruments can be called an instrumental
interlude, or, if it occurs at the beginning of the song, before the singer starts to sing, an instrumental introduction. If the
instrumental section highlights the skill, musicality, and often the virtuosity of a particular performer (or group of performers), the
section may be called a "solo" (e.g., the guitar solo that is a key section of heavy metal music and hard rock songs). If the
instruments are percussion instruments, the interlude can be called a percussion interlude or "percussion break". These interludes
are a form of break in the song.

Abai Qunanbaiuli-Abay Qunanbayuli was a Kazakh poet, composer and philosopher. He was also a cultural reformer
toward European and Russian cultures on the basis of enlightened Islam.

10 August 1845, Abay District, East Kazakhstan,


Born:

Kazakhstan
Died: 6 July 1904, Abay District, East Kazakhstan,
Kazakhstan
Burried: Abay-Shakarim Mausoleum

Shamshi Kaldayakov-Shamshi Kaldayakov was a Kazakhstani composer. He was born Shamshi Donbaiev, but
ran away from school and changed his name to avoid the police.

Born: 15 August 1930


Died: 29 February 1992, Almaty, Kazakhstan

Batyrkhan Shukenov -Batyrkhan Kamalovich Shukenov was a Soviet Kazakhstan and Russian singer, musician, saxophonist,
composer, poet. Honored Worker of Arts of Kazakhstan. Goodwill ambassador UNICEF of Kazakhstan.

Born: 18 May 1962, Kyzylorda, Kazakhstan


Died: 28 April 2015, Moscow, Russia
Ulytau-Ulytau, literally meaning "the great mountain", is a popular Turkic neopagan instrumental folk metal trio from Kazakhstan.
heir music combines the sound of the violin and electric guitar with the dombra, a traditional two stringed instrument from their
country.

Genres: Folk metal, Neoclassical metal

Zhanar Dugalova-Zhanar Dugalova is a Kazakh singer, who won the Türkvizyon Song Contest 2014 with the song
"Izin korem". She was also a former member of the Kazakh pop group KeshYou. Since August 2014 she continued her career independently.

Genre: Folk

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Urker is a Kazakh pop-folk group established in 1994. They have toured internationally in Germany, France, Turkey, Turkmenistan,
and the United States.

Genre: Folk rock