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One Message from the chief executive November 2010 Our values The Tooting connection Dear colleague,
One Message from the chief executive November 2010 Our values The Tooting connection Dear colleague,

One Message

from the chief executive

November 2010

One Message from the chief executive November 2010 Our values The Tooting connection Dear colleague, This
Our values
Our values

The Tooting connection

Dear colleague,

This month marks the 30th anniversary of St George’s moving to Tooting and an official opening by the Queen. Although the history of St George’s stretches back over 270 years; the last three decades have seen both the trust and university become very much part of the fabric of life in southwest London.The hospital site has developed significantly since 1980.The Jenner Wing was added in 1984, St James Wing in 1988 and in 2003 the Atkinson Morley Wing was opened.

The trust’s specialist services have also expanded in that time to include neurosciences and trauma, stroke, cancer, renal, paediatrics and cardiothoracic care. At the same time our community services, providing vital care to local patients, have continued to develop most recently through integration with Community Services Wandsworth.

1980 was also the year when the popular BBC sitcom Citizen Smith came to an end. The show was written by John Sullivan, who went on to write Only Fools and Horses. It starred a young Robert Lindsay as “Wolfie” Smith, an urban revolutionary living in Tooting and self-proclaimed leader of the Tooting Popular Front, the goals of which were “Power to the People” and “Freedom for Tooting”.

Revolutionising care

Many colleagues will already know that at St George’s Healthcare we have our own goals which are designed to revolutionise the care that we deliver to our patients. Our stated mission is to improve the health of our patients and our local community by achieving excellence in clinical care, research, education and employment.

Our values of excellent, kind, responsible

and respectful have been designed to help staff work to achieve this mission. Eagle- eyed readers may have noticed that in this issue of One Message we have added special logos to help reinforce our values. These values logos first appeared in the October issue of the gazette and colleagues will be seeing more of them around the trust in the months to come.

I know that many of you already live our values each and every day that you come in to work. This dedication was reflected at the annual Staff Achievement and Long Service Awards dinner which I attended recently; it is one event of the year that I always look forward to and provides a chance to celebrate the contribution of our staff.

There are examples across the organisation of where we are delivering against our values so let me give you just a few:

Excellent – a national audit has rated our stroke services the best in the country. Over 200 trusts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland were assessed across eight categories and the stroke service at St George’s achieved the highest overall score.

Kind – we are very fortunate to have a team of dedicated volunteers who, under the leadership of Susan Taleghany, give of their own free time to help staff and patients across the trust.

Responsible – the trust has signed up to the ’10:10 Climate Change Campaign’ and is committed to cutting its carbon emissions by at least 10% during 2010. This builds on work we have previously done under the Think Green banner and has reinvigorated our environmental aims under the banner of Saving Carbon, Saving Lives.

Respectful – The One Team, a joint

Our Our values values partnership project between the trust and Staff Side, is an innovative
Our Our values values partnership project between the trust and Staff Side, is an innovative
Our Our values values
Our Our values values

partnership project between the trust and Staff Side, is an innovative programme of activity aimed at developing a culture of improvement among staff in bands one to four.

It’s time for everyone to play their part

History will show that 2010/11 were the years that set the future course for St George’s Healthcare. The recent integration with Community Services Wandsworth together with our plans to become a foundation trust have the potential to ensure an exciting long-term future of the trust.

However, we cannot afford to take our future for granted given the current economic environment. The coalition government’s spending review, unveiled last month, shows that the NHS budget in England will rise year-on-year by 0.4 per cent in real terms to 2014-15. To put this into perspective the average rise in NHS spending each year since 1948 has been five per cent.

Against this financial background it is vital we work to meet the trust’s cost reduction programme (CRP) of £42 million. Some of the CRPs that we had set out at the start of the 2010/11 financial year have already slipped behind their original start date and we are a long way from hitting our targets.

If we fail to deliver on our CRPs then our

plans to become a FT in 2011 will become almost impossible to sustain.

Therefore, it is imperative that in the second half of this financial year that we all focus our efforts to ensure that the trust’s CRPs are achieved.This will be important for all our projects from the large-scale electronic rostering programme to those smaller schemes which are being managed within individual directorates.

I cannot stress strongly enough how

important our financial stability is to the future of St George’s. Failure to become

a FT will almost certainly result in St

George’s Healthcare being integrated into another trust, putting services and jobs at risk. I know that these comments will

cause unease among many of you but they should not come as a surprise. The importance of our financial position has been a consistent theme of my messages to staff throughout 2010. However, I am confident that colleagues across the trust will play their full part in helping to ensure that we achieve our objectives.

With this spirit of togetherness in mind I would like to reflect on the recent passing of Theodore C Sorensen, the former aide to President John F Kennedy. His death came close to the 50th anniversary of the election of Kennedy as president of the United States and a speech that remains famous for its call for self-sacrifice and civic engagement. I am sure that colleagues will all be familiar with one famous line from this speech. I have adapted this for the trust in these challenging times and feel it is an appropriate note on which to end. The message is a simple one: Ask not what St George’s can do for you, ask what you can do for St George’s.

Regards

Ask not what St George’s can do for you, ask what you can do for St

David Astley

Chief executive