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NOVEMBER 7, 2010

NOVEMBER 7, 2010 Since May 2005 Volume 6 Issue 13 FREE November 12, 2010 Sullivan’s Island
NOVEMBER 7, 2010 Since May 2005 Volume 6 Issue 13 FREE November 12, 2010 Sullivan’s Island
NOVEMBER 7, 2010 Since May 2005 Volume 6 Issue 13 FREE November 12, 2010 Sullivan’s Island

Since May 2005

NOVEMBER 7, 2010 Since May 2005 Volume 6 Issue 13 FREE November 12, 2010 Sullivan’s Island

Volume 6 Issue 13

FREE

November 12, 2010

2010 Since May 2005 Volume 6 Issue 13 FREE November 12, 2010 Sullivan’s Island • Isle

Sullivan’s

Island

Isle

of

Palms

Goat

Island

Dewees

Island

Island • Isle of Palms • Goat Island • Dewees Island PRESORT STANDARD US POSTAGE PAID

PRESORT STANDARD US POSTAGE PAID CHARLESTON, SC PERMIT NO 437

Summer taze

COULD TAZERS BE AN OPTION FOR SI POLICE?

BY BLAKE BUNCH

F act: Police officers carry a sidearm (typically a 9mm), pepper spray, a baton,

handcuffs and, in some cases, shotguns or other heavy firearms. It may slip in the consciousness of island residents, probably due to the very low crime rate

on the island, that police officers of the Sullivan’s Island Police Department carry several of these tools. It would be an astonishing and most likely frightening thing

if one of these well-trained officers

is ever forced to discharge their firearms, fire off some pepper spray, or strike an offender with

their baton, but it always remains

a possibility. During the regular meeting of Sullivan’s Island Town Council on September 21, Chief Danny Howard stated in his police report that officers in his department recently went through training with the Charleston County Sheriff’s Department to learn how to properly handle, use and discharge Electronic Control Devices (ECD), commonly known as “tazers.” Chief Howard also gave an update on the officers’

Tazers continued on page 4

an update on the officers’ Tazers continued on page 4 See more pictures on pages 22
an update on the officers’ Tazers continued on page 4 See more pictures on pages 22

See more pictures on pages 22 & 23

continued on page 4 See more pictures on pages 22 & 23 Inside Island Eye Running
continued on page 4 See more pictures on pages 22 & 23 Inside Island Eye Running

Inside Island Eye

4 See more pictures on pages 22 & 23 Inside Island Eye Running with spirits PAGE

Running with spirits PAGE 5

on pages 22 & 23 Inside Island Eye Running with spirits PAGE 5 Winged visitors PAGE

Winged visitors PAGE 6

on pages 22 & 23 Inside Island Eye Running with spirits PAGE 5 Winged visitors PAGE

SPROUTS Cinderella PAGE 20

2

2 Civic November 12, 2010 Isle of Palms Council - October 26, 2010 BY BLAKE BUNCH

Civic

November 12, 2010

2 Civic November 12, 2010 Isle of Palms Council - October 26, 2010 BY BLAKE BUNCH

Isle of Palms Council - October 26, 2010

BY BLAKE BUNCH

Citizen’s Comments Lt. Col. David Schimsa explained that, during this past summer, his unit came to the island for training in rebuilding infrastructure; a process which they do in similar communities throughout the state. “One thing we couldn’t tell everybody in May when we were down here, was that we have recently been mobilized, and, in fact, we are going to Ft. Dix, New Jersey where we will be deploying to Iraq sometime before Christmas. The training value that we got out of our visit here has been greatly appreciated." Lt. Col. Schimsa then presented Police Chief Buchannon and Fire Chief Graham with certificates expressing, “Appreciation for providing exceptional support during the 360 th Civil Affairs Brigade and Civil Liaison Team’s annual training.” Lt. Col. Schimsa thanked them for their support in objectively accomplishing their trades and objectives. Lt. Col. Schimsa then presented Mayor Cronin with

a plaque from the 360 th Civil

Brigade Airborne recognizing the

town’s support and, “for allowing four Humvees to run around for

a couple days, as well as parking

with no charge. The VFW took care of us, and everyone on the island was fantastic.” Mayor Cronin and both Chiefs graciously accepted the plaques of recognition. David Phillips, auditor for the City of Isle of Palms, stated

that the 2010 audit year-end financials are “really good.” The general fund increased $52,000, and the city’s net assets increased by about $377,000.

The town has received a rating of “unqualified,” which is the best rating achievable. In regards to revenues, Phillips said that property taxes have increased by about $61,000, but there was a $207,000 decrease in business licenses and permits. He further informed council that there was a $13,000 decrease in local- option sales taxes, but a $32,000 increase in other revenues. The Capital Projects Fund spent approximately $450,000 on the completion of the Public Safety building whereas last year, nearly $6.2 million was spent on “punch list” items. The remaining balance is near $2.6 million, but there are a lot of projects that the town is looking at: the City Hall renovation, drainage improvements, and general capital needs. Looking into Government wide financials, the town has total assets of $39.4 million, where 65% are capital assets and 32% are in cash and investments. The net assets are $19.4 million, and total expenses are $10.4 million. (The full report is available at City Hall.) Council member Mike Loftus expressed his gratitude to Phillips for his hard work, as well as City Administrator Linda Luvvom Tucker and Debbie, because they have been “fabulous.” Mayor Cronin informed Council that, as a city, FEMA will continue their community- rating system as class 7 status. This means there will be a continued 15% discount on flood insurance. Resident John Palms of Waterway Island stated that he has been involved with fundraising for Spoleto Festival, USA, and in

particular, dealing with venues. Furthermore, Julia Forrester (Director of Development for Spoleto) said that Jeff Nuthall, their chamber music director, spent ten days on Isle of Palms after the festival ended, and now their producer would like to find a house beach-front for one of the conductors for a six week period. Essentially, the money which they are requesting from the City’s available ATAX funds ($15,000) for the support of Spoleto 2011 would go right back into the Isle of Palms.

Ways and Means Report Mayor Cronin reported for Ways and Means, stating that expenditures are trending well, and general fund expenditures are now at 21% of the budget. Tourism funds, accommodations tax, and municipal accommodations tax have increased 19.1% since last year, and the hospitality tax increased by 12%. Mayor Cronin said that they did question the county as to when they were going to increase the redistribution of their accommodations tax, and their response was, “It’s too early to call yet for an increase.” In the city’s case, they are short $114,000 from last year. Mayor Cronin and the City Administrator testified in Columbia before the TRAC (Tax Re-Alignment Committee) dealing with tourism tax dollars. The result is that they are not going to recommend changing the use of funds and pulling money away from the Isle of Palms and other municipalities. In Columbia, however, they are still discussing handling the collection of municipal taxes and holding 1% for the state. Mayor Cronin said they did pass

a recommendation from the ATAX committee for $15,000 for the support of Spoleto Festival USA, 2011, and the motion was approved by Council. Council member Loftus expressed that this is “money well spent as an internal investment for the city.” However, Council member Brian Duffy objected, stating that,“Spoleto is wonderful, but with our budget, $15,000 is too much, so I vote against the

$15,000.”

Public Safety Report Council member Martin Bettelli stated that the Public Safety Committee had a request from the VFW to hold a turkey shoot with BB guns. “Even a BB gun is a firearm on Isle of Palms, so we asked them to re-send their request, work with the Police and Fire Chiefs, then come before Council,” said Bettelli. They also had a request to close Cross Lane on Saturday, October 30, from 1-7 p.m., and a request by the Charleston County running club for permission for a run to be held next fall. However, this run would conflict with the IOP Beach Run, and they denied the request. In terms of the radio tower discussion, Administrator Linda Luvvom Tucker sent a request to Charleston County for some alternative other than the proposed radio tower. The Public Safety Building has the department and city working with engineers to complete work on the air conditioner, as well as work on further specifications. Bettelli said he talked to several people about the speed limit between 41 st Ave. and the “back gate” at Wild Dunes on Palm

IOP Council continued on page 3

41 s t Ave. and the “back gate” at Wild Dunes on Palm IOP Council continued

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

November 12, 2010 Civic IOP Council from page 2 Boulevard. He asked the Police Chief to

Civic

November 12, 2010 Civic IOP Council from page 2 Boulevard. He asked the Police Chief to

IOP Council from page 2

Boulevard. He asked the Police Chief to go to the highway department and get their recommendation on a proper speed limit. Departmental reports show that the IOPFD had a total of

86

calls in September, and

50

were EMS-involved. The

Fire Inspector conducted 120 inspections, and found 271 violations. 53 pre-incident reports were filed using new instruments which the town purchased. Bettelli stated that a $2300 bicycle was stolen from a resident and was found for sale on Craigslist. This ultimately resulted in an arrest by the IOPPD. IOP telecommunication received 3,489 calls, of which 2,505 were Police, and 1,025 were service calls. 125 traffic stops produced 71 tickets and five noise violations.

Public Works report Council member Brian Duffy reported that resident Tony van Buren, a commercial shell fisherman, expressed some concern because the state has been closing shellfish grounds behind the island. These closures have been increasing over the past two years, so he is very concerned. He has requested to come speak before Council, and should be present at the next meeting. The committee also discussed recycling, and how IOP has met the 40% goal that the county has set. Duffy also said that they have discussed the drainage project and it is ongoing, but currently they are slipping behind because they are waiting to hear back from the resort.

Recreation Report Council member Ryan Buckhannon said that Saturday’s Halloween Carnival would be held from 5 to 7 p.m., and that basketball try-outs are coming up, as well.

Personnel Report Council member Ralph Piening said that they have begun the process of making recommendations for members of boards and committees. They will complete the interview process in the next day or so, but would meet again the following week in the Public Safety building to finish up the entire process. Winners of the September Safety Sweepstakes are: General Government - Laura McLellan; Public Works - Kim Tapley; Fire Department - Eric Bolan; and Police Department - Frank Fitzpatrick.

Real Property Report Under citizen’s comments for the Real Property meeting, Council member Mike Loftus stated that resident Jim Rye suggested that the City consider work around 41 st Ave., as well as putting a gateway to the marina. In the marina report, business has definitely turned around. The laundry facility is replacing the sauna, and they have looked into an aluminum gate, which was voted on and unanimously supported. Electric lines are being reviewed on the dock in order to get estimates. In regards to beach restoration, the application was submitted on October 6 to begin collecting permits for the project. Loftus said that they are waiting to hear back about an energy grant next Thursday. There was some discussion in regards to

the extension of Tidal Wave’s lease. Dianne Oltorik made a recommendation to the City in that they should look into holding a farmer’s market, and Loftus made a motion that Council should look into the feasibility of this idea. The motion was approved. “How do we go forward [with a farmers’ market]?” asked Mayor Cronin. “This is going to take a lot of discipline, involve vendor licenses, and be rather difficult to regulate.” He stated that he would like to speak with a subgroup of citizens with knowledge of these matters. “Maybe those individuals would like to come forward and help Council. This is a great site, but parking is still an issue,” said Cronin.

Ordinances:

1. First reading, Ordinance 2010-13, An Ordinance to Amend Title 7 Ch. 3, Prohibiting the Abandonment of Personal Property on the Beach. First Reading granted.

2. First Reading, Ordinance 2010-14, an Ordinance to Amend Title 7 Ch. 3B, Providing to New Article C Pertained to Abandoned Watercraft. First Reading granted. Council member Mike Loftus then motioned that this amendment be hashed-out more directly under the realm of the public safety committee. The motion was approved.

The next Isle of Palms Council meeting will be held on November 16, 2010, at 7 p.m. at City Hall, located at 1207 Palm Boulevard. For more info, visit www.iop.net.

Civic Calendar

Recycle - Wednesday, November 17 - Recycle

Isle of Palms

886-6428

www.iop.net

Tuesday, November 16

Ways and Means Committee Meeting 5:45 p.m.

1207 Palm Boulevard

City Council Meeting 7 p.m.

1207 Palm Boulevard

Wednesday, November 17

Municipal Court 10 a.m.

1207 Palm Boulevard

Thanksgiving, November 25 & 26

City Offices CLOSED for Holiday

Sullivan's Island

883-3198

www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Monday, November 15

Special Council Meeting

6 p.m.

1610 Middle Street

Tuesday, November 16

Regular Council Meeting

6 p.m.

1610 Middle Street

Wednesday, November 17

DRB Meeting

6 p.m.

1610 Middle Street

Thursday, November 17

No BZA Meeting

6 p.m.

1610 Middle Street

Monday , November 22

Tree Commission Special Meeting

7 p.m.

1610 Middle Street

Thanksgiving, November 25 & 26

City Offices CLOSED for Holiday

www.islandeyenews .com

3

 

Lucky Dog PubLishing

of sc, LLc

Publisher of the Island Eye News, The Island Connection and The Folly Current.

 

Lynn Pierotti publisher lynn@luckydognews.com

Kristin Hackler managing editor kristin@luckydognews.com

Swan Richards senior graphic designer swan@luckydognews.com

Lori Dalton sales manager

614-0901

lori@luckydognews.com

Ellie Smith

graphic designer

Blake Bunch reporter blake@luckydognews.com

Meredith Powell reporter meredith@luckydognews.com

Contributors Bailey Abedon Karen Coste Creative Sparks Dr. Bill Cromer Connie Darling Sarah Diaz Eric Horan Catherine Malloy Dimi Matouchev Dr. John Nelson Sullivan's Islanders Group

Published by Lucky Dog Publishing of South Carolina, LLC P.O. Box 837 Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482

843-886-NEWS

Submit your letters to the editor to:

info@luckydognews.com Future deadlines:

November 17 for all submissions

The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsid- iary of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free, independent newspaper published every two weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Goat Island and De- wees Island. Copies are mailed free of charge to every active mailbox in our coverage area and are also available at area businesses and

by subscription to non-islanders. Subscriptions

are $39/year for non-residents

Contributions

of information, pictures and articles are wel- comed and are used according to space limita- tions and news value and cannot be returned except by special request. Op-ed articles and letters to the editor do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Lucky Dog News, or its writers.

All advertising rates are listed at:

www.islandeyenews.com

under “advertising”.

 
   
 

4

November 12, 2010

Bridge from cover

training during the past Town Council meeting on October 19, and circulated a revised “use of force” policy for SIPD for the committee and administrator to further review. “What we’re trying to do is present a revised copy of our current ‘use of force’ policy to Town Council,” said Town Administrator Andy Benke, who also noted that Sullivan’s Island has not purchased, nor do any of its officers carry, tazers. “So, despite the officers being trained in the matter, we must await the Council’s decision [before any action can be taken].” Benke stated that Chief Howard and his department were basically following suit with other departments, going through and getting the necessary training to remain current with today’s police enforcement regulations. The main reason the Police Department is looking in to ECDs is that their use, the department believes, would involve the least use of force when compared to other alternatives. “If an officer were to discharge pepper spray in a crowded room, aiming for an individual,” said Benke, “then there is the possibility in which other innocent individuals may feel the residual effects. If an officer is to wield his baton and strike an offender, then that offender could have some permanent or semi- permanent damage to the area.”

Administrator Benke further stated that Chief Howard and he are going to take the same courses and training as other officers in the SIPD. The bottom line is, Town Council must approve this, and Chief Howard and Benke are doing their best to present this alternative as a clear option.

their best to present this alternative as a clear option. Island Information Sullivan’s Island Town Hall
their best to present this alternative as a clear option. Island Information Sullivan’s Island Town Hall

Island Information

Sullivan’s Island Town Hall

Isle of Palms Town Hall

843-883-3198

843-886-6428

1610 Middle St. Hours: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mon-Fri www.sullivansisland-sc.com Police: 883-3931 (non-emergency: 883-9636) Fire: 883-9944

1207 Palm Boulevard Hours: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mon-Fri www.iop.net Police: 886-6522 Fire: 886-4410 Livability Officer: 886-8282

Dog Laws

Dog Laws

May 1 – September 30:

April 1 – September 14:

5 a.m. – 10 a.m. off leash 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. no dogs

6 p.m. – 5 a.m. on leash

October 1 – April 30:

5 a.m. – noon, off leash; noon – 5 p.m. on leash

Beach Laws Permits needed for bonfires, parties and boats on beach. No alcohol, fireworks, glass containers, golf carts or vehicles allowed on beach. Litter fines up to $500.

5 a.m. – 8 a.m.

September 15 – March 31:

4 p.m. – 10 a.m.

Dog owners must have leash in hand, have their dog under

voice command and must clean up excrement. At all other times, dogs must be on leash and under complete control, even in the water.

Beach laws No professional photography, fireworks, vehicles, bonfires, glass, or alcohol.

Police Blotter

The following is a synopsis of some of the activities of the Isle of Palms Police Department during the month of October 2010.

PATROL:

October 3, 2010: A concerned citizen reported a vehicle weaving all over Palm Boulevard, then turn onto 14 th Avenue toward the Front Beach area. The citizen was able to provide

a tag number and description

of the vehicle. Officers located

the vehicle a short time later in

a Front Beach parking space,

occupied by an unconscious female subject. The officer attempted to awaken the subject several times by tapping on the window. The subject eventually awakened and when she opened the door, the officers immediately detected a strong odor of alcohol. The subject exited the vehicle and had a hard time maintaining her balance. The subject was taken into custody and charged with Public Intoxication and Illegal Transport of Legal Liquor due to an open bottle of liquor that was discovered behind the driver’s seat.

of liquor that was discovered behind the driver’s seat. October 4, 2010: An officer on patrol
of liquor that was discovered behind the driver’s seat. October 4, 2010: An officer on patrol

October 4, 2010: An officer on patrol of the Connector observed a speeding vehicle and turned around to observe the vehicle weaving from side to side and stopped it. The driver had slurred speech, fumbled with paperwork, and was unable to produce proof of insurance. The driver submitted to several Field Sobriety Tests and performed poorly. He was taken into custody and administered a Datamaster Test which resulted in a sample of .13% level of alcohol. The driver was charged with DUI and No Proof of Insurance.

October 5, 2010: An officer responded to a Carolina Boulevard residence to assist Fire Department personnel who were treating a female subject for a possible heart attack. Since the female subject needed to be transported to the hospital, the officer made arrangements for care for the eight-year-old daughter of the subject.

October 5, 2010: Officers

Blotter continued on page 25

daughter of the subject. October 5, 2010: Officers Blotter continued on page 25 www . islandeyenews

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

5

Noise management on Isle of Palms

BY BLAKE BUNCH

out that there was a 64.5% increase in noise complaints from short-term rentals through private owners. “People tend to think this only happens at night,” said Lt. Ray Wright of the Isle of Palms Police Department in regards to the noise complaints. “However, I see it as a seasonal issue. During the fall/winter/ spring months, people aren’t hiding inside in their air conditioning, and dogs are out in the yard barking.” Of short-term rentals through agencies, he said, “I feel like they place a great deal of emphasis on signage in regards to the ordinances, trash pick-up, and general rules that come with island life.” The Isle of Palms had 80 founded noise complaints, which means that a ticket was issued, and 101 unfounded complaints so far in 2010. If a specific property is visited with several noise complaints it is deemed as a “nuisance.” The police department then notifies Douglas Kerr, the Building Director of Isle of Palms, and the case is brought before City Council. Council can then revoke the rental license, typically for a period of six months. Although this may sound a bit astounding, there was only one case this past year in which a commercial rental license was revoked. Lt. Wright said that in his ten years with the IOPPD, that this is only the second case of a business license revocation. According to Meekins’ report, the trend over the past two years is that noise violations are slowly declining.

S ince its earliest form of development,

Isle of Palms has been a destination

Running with spirits

BY CATHERINE MALLOY

IOP Council members Brian Duffy and Ralph Piening, along with Ralph’s wife, Coby, spent this past Halloween outrunning ghosts and goblins by completing in the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C.

and goblins by completing in the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. Ralph Piening, Coby Piening

Ralph Piening, Coby Piening and Brian Duffy

for summer-seeking vacationers.

Although a predominantly residential island, a fair amount of rental properties sprinkle the island beginning on Front Beach, running along Palm Blvd., through Forest Trail and onward into Wild Dunes. Many of these are run by rental agencies, but quite a few are managed by individual owners, and over the past couple of years, the City’s new Livability Court and Officer have been working to keep a happy balance between renters and permanent residents; particularly in regards to the enforcement of the City’s noise ordinance. Ordinance 9-2-5 of the Town of Isle of Palms states: “It shall be unlawful for any person to create, or assist in creating, permit, continue, or permit the continuance of any unreasonably loud or disturbing noise in the City.” Livability Officer Sgt. Jamey Meekins recently presented the differences in noise violations between short-term rentals, both through agencies and private owners, of the years 2009-10. In his presentation, he pointed out that in 2009 there were 196 total complaints, as opposed to the 181 recorded complaints as of September 30 of this year. Sgt. Meekins also pointed out that, as of the same date, there has been a 34.6% decrease in noise complaints from home managed by rental agencies. On the same note, he pointed

there has been a 34.6% decrease in noise complaints from home managed by rental agencies. On
there has been a 34.6% decrease in noise complaints from home managed by rental agencies. On

6

November 12, 2010

Winged visitors land in The Dump

ISLANDERS

WELCOMED

TO

BIRDS

OF

BY KAREN COSTE

PREY

DEMONSTRATION

T he Sullivan’s Islanders

Group cordially invites

all islanders, young and

old, to The Dump at Station 19 on Sunday, November 21, for

a Birds of Prey education and

flight demonstration by the South Carolina Center for Birds

of Prey. Starting at 2 p.m., the

program will allow attendees to discover which birds of prey inhabit our island, learn how important these avian raptors are to our ecosystem, and see how their new knowledge about these magnificent birds will make a difference in protecting them now and in the future. The Center for the Birds of Prey is located in Awendaw, just

north of Mount Pleasant, and is a one-of-a-kind avian conservation facility designed and equipped to provide the highest quality medical care available for injured and/or orphaned birds of prey. The demonstration will include information about local birds such as eagles, hawks, owls, falcons, kites, and vultures, as well as flight and natural skill demonstrations from several of the Center’s residents. After the presentation, attendees will have the opportunity to talk with the handlers and ask questions. As The Dump is located on the marsh end of Station 19, please plan to arrive by bike or golf cart since car parking will

Islander wins surf competition

Islander wins surf competition Sullivan’s Island resident Gene Harris accepts his 1 s t Place trophy.

Sullivan’s Island resident Gene Harris accepts his 1 st Place trophy.

Gene Harris, former owner of the Green Heron and Sullivan’s Island resident, won 1 st place in the Dominical Surf Contest in Costa Rica this past October 30. Congrats, Gene!

Contest in Costa Rica this past October 30. Congrats, Gene! First place winners from each age

First place winners from each age group in the Dominical Surf Contest.

winners from each age group in the Dominical Surf Contest. be very limited. Don’t forget your
winners from each age group in the Dominical Surf Contest. be very limited. Don’t forget your

be very limited. Don’t forget your hat, sunglasses, binoculars, and bug spray, and please leave pets at home as they may scare the

birds. Join us and learn more about this beautiful and unique environment which we call home. See you there!

and unique environment which we call home. See you there! The Center for BIrds of Prey

The Center for BIrds of Prey will give raptor demonstrations at The Dump on Sullivan's Island on Sunday, November 21, starting at 2 p.m.

demonstrations at The Dump on Sullivan's Island on Sunday, November 21, starting at 2 p.m. www

www.islandeyenews .sc

November 12, 2010

7

Fun Run through the Old Village

PROVIDED BY THE TOWN OF MOUNT PLEASANT

M ount Pleasant Recreation Department presents the 11 annual

Old Village Harbor 5K Run & Walk on Saturday, November

13, at 8:30 a.m. The race will begin and end at Alhambra

Hall, 131 Middle Street in the Old Village of Mount Pleasant. Late registration will be held at Alhambra Hall from 7:30-8:15 a.m., and entry fees are $25 with a t-shirt. Awards will be given to the top overall male and female competitors, as well as the top three males and females in each age group. Stick around at the end for a raffle give-away after the results are in! For more information, visit www. townofmountpleasant.com

PHOTOS BY KARI MOSS

visit www. townofmountpleasant.com PHOTOS BY KARI MOSS Runners take off from Alhambra Hall during the 2009

Runners take off from Alhambra Hall during the 2009 race.

Runners take off from Alhambra Hall during the 2009 race. Why don’t you sing the blues?

Why don’t you sing the blues?

BLUES

LESSONS

AT

HOME

TEAM

BBQ

F iery Ron’s Home Team

BBQ introduces a Down

Mississippi Delta. Steve plays 1920s - 1930s-style acoustic blues and has the classic, raw- cut voice to match. Home Team BBQ provides southern comfort food, a fun bar, rustic atmosphere and great entertainment including the best sports and music with up-and- coming blues, bluegrass, rock, country, and alternative country artists weekly.

Home Blues Open

Mic and Guitar Clinic with bluesman Steve Cheseborough on Tuesdays, November 23, 30, and December 7, at 2209 Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island. At 6 p.m., guests are invited to meet and greet with Steve and receive a brief blues lesson before hopping on stage at 7 p.m. to listen and participate in singing the blues until 8 p.m. The evenings will wind up with a set from the master himself from 9 to 10 p.m. Bluesman, author, and professor Steve Cheseborough is steeped in the music of Memphis Minnie, Muddy Waters, Charley Jordan, Bo Carter, Mississippi John Hurt, and other great blues artists of the infamous

To find out more about the event, contact Steve Cheseborough at chezztone@gmail.com. For more information
To find out more about the event,
contact Steve Cheseborough at
chezztone@gmail.com. For more
information about Home
Team
BBQ,
visit
www.
hometeambbq.com.
For more information about Home Team BBQ, visit www. hometeambbq.com. www . islandeyenews . com

www.islandeyenews .com

8

8 OP-ED November 12, 2010 Rotational pruning provides balance in accreted land PROVIDED BY THE SULLIVAN’S

OP-ED

November 12, 2010

8 OP-ED November 12, 2010 Rotational pruning provides balance in accreted land PROVIDED BY THE SULLIVAN’S

Rotational pruning provides balance in accreted land

PROVIDED BY THE SULLIVAN’S ISLANDERS GROUP

T he Sullivan’s Island Town Council is

currently considering the Accreted

Land Management Plan (ALMP) recently

submitted by consultants, the goal of which

is to improve management of the 170+ acres

of oceanfront land owned by the Town. The

Town’s current management plan for this area allows no cutting of hardwood trees, but does allow annual pruning of wax myrtles, Eastern Baccharis and popcorn trees to a height of five feet in order to provide ocean views. Unfortunately, repeated pruning to

a single level has produced extensive areas

of flat-topped myrtle hedges overgrown with vines that seriously degrade the ecosystem and our scenic vistas. The consultants offer two methods for correcting this problem. We propose a third alternative:

Method 1: Stop pruning and let the Maritime Shrubland recover on its own. In a relatively short period of time – between one and three years - myrtles and other shrubs grow through the vines to restore a natural balance and aesthetically pleasing landscape. The advantage of this option is that it is inexpensive and natural, but the disadvantage is that myrtles can grow up to 25 feet in height and partially obscure ocean views.

PHOTOS BY SUSAN MIDDAUGH

and partially obscure ocean views. PHOTOS BY SUSAN MIDDAUGH Maritime shrub land shows off its fall

Maritime shrub land shows off its fall colors at Station 25.

Method 2: Remove both myrtles and vines and convert these areas to grassland. If used sparingly to introduce small areas of grassland in dense maritime shrubland produced by excessive pruning, this method can add habitat diversity and improve vistas. However, if used to provide extensive ocean views for beach-front homes, there are serious disadvantages:

Removal of large areas of maritime shrubland requires heavy equipment that will damage the root mats that stabilize our sandy soil.

• Maintenance will be difficult and costly since the root systems of vines and shrubs will need to be repeatedly removed or poisoned to prevent regrowth and recolonization by new shrubs and vines.

Grassland corridors designed to provide ocean views for beachfront homes will also provide an open channel for salt spray, wind and storm surge.

Extensive conversion of maritime shrubland to grassland will decrease diversity and destroy habitat that has its own beauty and plays a vital role in our barrier island ecosystem. It serves as a buffer from salt spray, wind and storm surge, and provides a habitat and food source for birds and other wildlife.

A land management plan that focuses only on these two methods promotes an unnecessary conflict between the two goals of preserving natural habitats (Method 1) and preserving ocean views (Method 2). This is a recipe for a political tug-of-war rather than thoughtful land management planning, which is why we propose adding a third method that can be flexibly combined with the first two methods to effectively achieve both goals:

Method 3: Rotational Pruning on a three year cycle. For the areas where annual pruning to

a single height has degraded our maritime

shrubland, we propose the following method

to convert these areas to a mixture of grassland

and maritime shrubs with varying heights by:

Introducing patches of grassland to cover a quarter of the area.

• Year 1: Prune myrtles to five feet in a second quarter of the area.

• Year 2: Prune myrtles to five feet in a third quarter of the area.

• Year 3: Prune myrtles to five feet in the fourth quarter of the area.

Year 4: Repeat Year 1 pruning.

Pruning is carried out in multiple small patches with a random distribution, not in a single chunk or row. Grassland is distributed in patches throughout the thicket. Since myrtles grow three feet per year, this pruning schedule produces a range of heights between five and 14 feet. Method 3 has many advantages. It opens up myrtle thickets, eliminates hedge effects and allows shrubs to out-compete vines. Because our beach-front homes are elevated, Method 3 is completely compatible with ocean views and at the same time, this method preserves the maritime shrubland that adds scenic beauty and plays a vital role in our barrier island ecosystem. As a disadvantage, it will be more costly than Method 1; however, it will be less costly than Method 2 and far less costly than the current practice of pruning 100% of extensive areas. We ask the Sullivan’s Island Town Council to give serious consideration to Method 3, rotational pruning, as a useful complement to the two methods proposed by the consultants.

www.

information,

sullivansislanders.net or contact Susan Middaugh at 883-3034.

For

more

visit

www. information, sullivansislanders.net or contact Susan Middaugh at 883-3034. For more visit www . islandeyenews .

www.islandeyenews .sc

November 12, 2010

9

Halloween was sweet!

BY BAILEY ABEDON

Y ou hear the laughter of children, smell the mouthwatering scent

of candy and sweets, and see ghosts, goblins, and witches. What other holiday could it be than Halloween? October 31 on Sullivan’s Island seemed like the biggest holiday of the year. Many islanders started off the night with a pizza party, jump castle, and a soccer game; but when the sun set, gypsies, pirates, ghosts, zombies, and even a walking bathtub, went out in search of

candy. They found lots of it, too! That night the streets were swamped with everyone on the hunt for candy, candy, and lots more candy. A haunted driveway, “The Driveway of Doom,” had pop-out zombies, king-sized Kit-Kat bars, and a clown on a swing that moved when you came back through the way you entered. “The clown on the swing creeped me out the most,” said local Island Halloween trick-or- treater, Tess Abedon. ”It just moved all of a sudden.”

treater, Tess Abedon. ”It just moved all of a sudden.” Island kids celebrate Halloween with traditional

Island kids celebrate Halloween with traditional trick-or-treating.

The most popular island costumes this year for girls must have been gypsies, with all ages, from seven to thirteen, wearing that costume. There seemed to be a lot of boys dressed up as girls. That was the style for this year’s Halloween. Many kids look forward to going to the house of local artist Julia Khoury every Halloween to see her fantastic pumpkin- carving skills. This year, Julia made a beautiful pumpkin with three little pumpkins in its mouth, which represented Peter, Peter, the Pumpkin Eater. It

was a wonderful design that everyone wished they could do. Kids can’t wait to see what her pumpkin will be for the next Halloween. At another house, some very nice people were giving out gigantic, king-sized Hershey’s chocolate bars. It must have been very popular, too, because by seven o’clock they were out of the candy. To end the night, most went home and ate at least twenty pieces of candy. Yes, they may have a stomachache, but it was all worth it!

A Herlong Halloween

E very year, the team

members of Herlong and

Associates get together

for lunch at Poe’s Tavern and have their picture taken in their favorite Halloween garb. Although the costume themes may not have a common thread, this annual tradition always brings Herlong and Associates’ employees closer together.

may not have a common thread, this annual tradition always brings Herlong and Associates’ employees closer
thread, this annual tradition always brings Herlong and Associates’ employees closer together. www . islandeyenews .
thread, this annual tradition always brings Herlong and Associates’ employees closer together. www . islandeyenews .

www.islandeyenews .sc

10

November 12, 2010

Events at the IOP Rec

Isle of Palms Recreation Center www.iop.net

843-886-8294

Middle School Dance Friday, November 12

7 p.m. – 10 p.m.

Beach Bash Theme! Cost: $5 at the door

Youth Basketball Registration Last day to Register is Friday, November 12!

Dodgeball Pick Up Games Wednesday, November 17 3:45 p.m. – 7 p.m. FREE

Friday Night Hoops November 19 & December 3

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

$10 per person

Adult CO-ED Volleyball Registration November 8 - December 3 $250 per team Ages 18 and up Captain’s Meeting: Wednesday, December 8, at 5:30 p.m.

up Captain’s Meeting: Wednesday, December 8, at 5:30 p.m. Crabpot Players presents: Miracle on 34th Street

Crabpot Players presents:

Miracle on 34th Street Tickets on sale now! Tickets: $5 Children 6 & under free Production dates:

December 8 - December 11 Show starts at 7 p.m. Space is limited, please purchase tickets in advance

Isle of Palms Tree Lighting Ceremony Thursday, December 2 6 p.m. Front Beach, Isle of Palms Visit Santa! Performances by Sullivan’s Island Elementary Chorus and Jef Wilson. Jump castles, face painter, balloon artist and SNOW!

Wilson. Jump castles, face painter, balloon artist and SNOW! Wild weather welcomes cooler temperatures B right

Wild weather welcomes cooler temperatures

B right electrical storms and spots of heavy rain finally welcomed in some cooler weather for the Charleston area over the past couple of weeks. While the storms certainly buffeted the coast with strong winds and rain, the lightning storm which both preceded and followed the storms

were quite spectacular. In the photo below, Mount Pleasant resident and professional photographer, Jerry Cahalan, was able to capture one of the breath-taking bursts of energy as it exploded over East Bay Street in Downtown Charleston.

of energy as it exploded over East Bay Street in Downtown Charleston. PHOTO BY JERRY CAHALAN,

PHOTO BY JERRY CAHALAN, WWW.JERRYCAHALAN.COM .

over East Bay Street in Downtown Charleston. PHOTO BY JERRY CAHALAN, WWW.JERRYCAHALAN.COM . www . islandeyenews
over East Bay Street in Downtown Charleston. PHOTO BY JERRY CAHALAN, WWW.JERRYCAHALAN.COM . www . islandeyenews

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

11

Are you getting credit?

WIND

AND

HAIL

EXCESS

INSURANCE

CREDIT AVAILABLE

“I actually learned about it by accident,”

said John Dubois, Seabrook resident

and former Seabrook Island Town

Council member, as he described a little- known tax credit for excess insurance premiums which is listed as form SC SCH.

TC-44.

Basically, by calculating your premiums paid for one tax year on all hazards for your primary household – including fire, flood, wind and hail, etc. - along with your federal adjusted gross income, you can claim up to $1,250 in credits per year. Dubois, for example, was able to go back and claim credits for both 2008 and 2009, and as the credit program was enacted in 2007, tax payers should be able to claim for 2007, as well.

2007, tax payers should be able to claim for 2007, as well. BY KRISTIN HACKLER “With

BY KRISTIN HACKLER

“With the insurance increases a few years ago, every little bit helps,” said Dubois, noting that he knew of a couple former island residents who had to move off of Seabrook Island because of the hike in insurance premiums. Even his insurance company, with whom he had been a customer since 1953, dropped his Wind and Hail coverage, as well as his Homeowner’s insurance, due to the cost. To file for the tax credit, one simply needs

to fill out both forms SC SCH. TC-44, as well as an Amended Individual Income Tax form (SC 1040X) for the year of their claim. For a copy of form SC SCH. TC-44, visit www. sctax.org and click on “tax credits” in the blue tool bar on the left side of the screen. Please note that this article is for information purposes only. Please consult with a qualified professional if you have questions about the above information and/ or before applying for credits.

Painted Bunting

BY SARAH DARGAN DIAZ

T he Painted Bunting is a strikingly beautiful songbird found in the Lowcountry during the summer and

fall (until temperatures drop sufficiently). They begin fall migration in mid- to late- fall and winter in Cuba and Central America. Females are a light green with some shades of light brown. The Painted Bunting is in the family Cardinalidae, along with cardinals and grosbeaks. They eat mostly seeds, but will also feed on insects. Their preferred habitat is low brush, fields with tall grass, and other open, scrub-like areas. They can also be

attracted to backyard feeders. Populations have been declining due to development and the US government now classifies them as Near Threatened.

PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ
PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ
and the US government now classifies them as Near Threatened. PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ www .
and the US government now classifies them as Near Threatened. PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ www .

www.islandeyenews .com

12

November 12, 2010

T he Beach Lover’s Book Club to discuss Juliet Book Club at the Poe Library
T he Beach Lover’s
Book Club
to discuss Juliet
Book Club at the
Poe Library will
BY CONNIE DARLING
be meeting Saturday,
November 20, at 10
a.m. to discuss the
book Juliet, by Anne
Fortier. Last month,
everyone had a great
time discussing the
Mark Twain work, The
Innocents Abroad. We
had a nice group with
lots of snacks and
conversation, along
with sassafras tea and
coffee. Attending last
month’s meeting were
Elaine Lavender, Judy
Reese, Louse Rossell,
Joan Whitbeck, Mary
Bobo, Elizabeth Abel,
Lisa Bistis, Betty
Driemeyer, Mary
Ann Frye, Kathi
McGregor-Ouzts, and
Connie Darling. I
would just like to thank
everyone for coming
and participating in
our discussion.
The Poe Library is
located at 1921 I’On
Avenue on Sullivan’s
Island. For more info,
call 883-3914.
Fire prevention on the islands
Fire prevention on
the islands

O n Wednesday, October 6,

Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s

Island Fire Departments

combined forces and held an amazing parade and festival in recognition of Fire Prevention Awareness Week. Starting at 4:30 p.m., fire trucks from both islands and surrounding municipalities – including St. Johns – slowly wound their way from Isle of Palms to Sullivan’s Island, where the parade ended at the Sullivan’s Island Fire Department. The festivities didn’t end there, however, as the fire departments took the opportunity to share information about fire prevention with kids and adults, as well as offer several fun activities such as a jump castle, rescue equipment demonstrations, inflatable slide,

free pizza and refreshments.

a jump castle, rescue equipment demonstrations, inflatable slide, free pizza and refreshments. www . islandeyenews .
a jump castle, rescue equipment demonstrations, inflatable slide, free pizza and refreshments. www . islandeyenews .

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

13

The color of mystery in the Lowcountry

BY KRISTIN HACKLER

C arl Linke, former resident of Chicago and current resident of Chapel Hill,

North Carolina, dreams of one day moving to the Lowcountry and Beaufort, in particular. The idea of shaking off snow days and long, cruel winters has already formed summer- tinged images in his mind of feet dangling in brackish creeks; warm breezes speckled with salt; and a mysterious story of hoodoo, rundown factories, and the slow death of a community. Even though Carl had never written more than a family Christmas newsletter while living in Chicago, the idea for a mystery novel based in Beaufort, South Carolina, came to him as quickly as his sudden desire to fish for his supper and watch sunsets from a dock in Lucy Creek. While visiting family on Lady Island, Carl happened to drive past a row of old factories and found an area that appeared oddly empty. Some quick

research showed that an old oyster factory used to stand on the small spit of land and just like that, a story blossomed in Carl’s mind. Incorporating the history of Beaufort, the Gullah culture and the growing trend of multi-million dollar waterfront developments in this once- quaint community, Carl weaves a story of magic and preservation in his first novel, Haint Blue. When the main character, Kip Drummond, rescues the Lady Island Oyster Factory from demolition and keeps the business running with the help of its many long-time employees, his preservation practices are challenged when executives from Philadelphia want to tear it down and build a new high- end community in its place. Kip must not only wrestle with the powers-that-be, he also needs to fight off a particularly powerful hex placed against him and the possible revelation of a horrible

placed against him and the possible revelation of a horrible secret. The story weaves together the
placed against him and the possible revelation of a horrible secret. The story weaves together the

secret. The story weaves together the Gullah culture, its ties to the magic of Hoodoo and the deep history of Beaufort itself

in a tale both dark and wistfully

longing. A graduate of the United States Military Academy and twenty- year veteran of the U.S. Army, Carl has spent the last several years working as a developer of startup companies both in Chicago and North Carolina. “I just focused on those companies, never on myself and

what I really wanted to do,” said Carl, until one day, he just sat down at his computer and began

to write. “Sometimes I would stare at

a blank screen for hours, and

other times it would just pour out,” he smiled. And while he originally worked from an outline, the concept grew as the story took on a life of its own. Utilizing as much historical literature on Beaufort as he could get his hands on, along with whatever he was able to recall from his many visits to the small city, Carl not only worked his passion for preserving the beauty of the Lowcountry into his novel, he also incorporated several aspects of the Gullah culture; a culture which, he feels, is slowly vanishing. “The Gullah language

isn’t spoken nearly as much anymore,” said Carl. “It’s one of the lost arts of the Lowcountry and it will be sad when it’s gone.” His appreciation for Gullah can be seen almost immediately in the title of his book. Haint blue, or “ghost blue”, is a common color around the Lowcountry. Often seen painted on the ceilings of porches, the same ocean blue is painted around doorways and windows to keep spirits from entering the home. The idea, said Carl, is that ghosts will not cross water, and haint blue is the same hue as the ocean on a summer day. “In this book, I tried to paint a colorful word picture of setting; of Beaufort, of nature and of the Lowcountry,” said Carl. “I want people to feel like they’re sitting on a dock, watching the sunset and feeling the warm breeze roll past them. And I wanted to convey the beauty of this place to those still living up north,” he smiled.

Copies of Haint Blue are available at both Indigo Books in Freshfields Village, and at Blue Bicycle Books in Downtown Charleston, as well as through Amazon.com. For more info, visit www.carllinke.com.

14

November 12, 2010

November 12, 2010

15

Island Eye Calendar

November 12 - December 2

For more info, visit www. charlestoncommunityband.com

moNday, November 15

Q&A with the Pro’s II: Winter Inshore Fishing With Captains Ben Floyd, John Irwin and Mark Phelps. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Call 884-2095 or email jj@thecharlestonangler.com to register. Charleston Angler, 1113 Market Center Blvd., Mount Pleasant.

thurSday, November 18

The Heart of the Caregiver small group meeting A small group for women caring for family members who are affected by disabilities, chronic illness or age related issues. Every Thursday from 12 - 2 p.m. at Seacoast Church on Long Point Road in Mount Pleasant. For more info, visit www. theheartofthecaregiver.com or e-mail the.caregiver@comcast.net.

Sons of Confederate Veterans meeting Moultrie Camp #27 SCV meets every third Thursday of the month at The Point Grill, Patriots Point Blvd. in Mount Pleasant. Menu dinner starts at 6 p.m. followed by speaker and business meeting. For more info, called Richard Steadman at 442-8670.

Friday, November 19

I Love the Lowcountry Gallery opening IOP resident and artist Gayle Gilford will “stretch” from miniature paintings to 8x10 and a few larger Lowcountry works for this exhibit. Gallery opening from

3 to 5 p.m. at Somerby of Mount Pleasant, 1300 Tradition Circle. To RSVP, please contact Somerby at

849-3096.

Saturday, November 20

Bike maintenance and repair Need a tune-up? Join us as we learn some general bicycle maintenance techniques and tips. Bring your own bike or use one of ours for this session of bike repairs. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Course # 23619. James Island County Park. Fee: $24. For more info, call 795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.com.

Beginners Fly Fishing Class With Captain John Irwin of Fly Right Charters. $75 registration fee includes class materials, use of demo rods and reels, and lunch. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Class size limited, registration required. Call 884-2095 or email jj@thecharlestonangler.com to register. Charleston Angler, 1113 Market Center Blvd., Mount Pleasant.

Southern Seacoast Forts on the Eve of Secession Join Park Ranger Gary Alexander at the Forth Moultrie Visitor Center for a discussion on the construction of coastal forts during the mid-nineteenth century and their individual statuses in late 1860. Free and open to the public. Presentation begins at 2 p.m. 1214 Middle Street, Sullivan’s Island. For more info, call 883- 3123 or visit www.nps.gov/fosu.

Jane Austen Society meeting The Jane Austen Society will have a discussion of “Persuasion” led by JoAnne Jones. Please join us at 1:30 at the Berkeley Electric Bldg., 3351 Maybank Hwy., Johns Island. All welcome. Call 768-6453.

Friday, November 12

Holiday Festival of Lights at James Island County Park November 12 – January 2, 2011

Saturday, November 13

11th annual Old Village Harbor Run 8:30 a.m. in front of Alhambra Hall, Old Village, Mount Pleasant. For more info, email kmoss@ townofmountpleasant.com

8th Annual Blessing of the Vines 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. $5 per car and guests are encouraged to bring

chairs/blankets as well. Enjoy live music, official Blessing of the Vines, a burger-making contest, and lots of wine and vendors. Irvin-House Vineyards: 6775 Bears Bluff Rd. Wadmalaw Island. For more info, call 559-6867 or visit www.charlestonwine.com.

All Saints Lutheran Church Annual BBQ and Bake Sale The All Saints Lutheran Church Men and Women will present their annual Barbecue and Bake Sale at the church, 2107 Highway 17 North, Mt. Pleasant, (next door to the Crab House), from 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. Tommy Hanson’s

Championship Barbecue, accompanied by Baked Beans, Coleslaw and Cornbread, along with music by Wood & Steel. $9 per person. Tickets available at the at the door.

Angel Tree Craft Fair The Angel Tree Craft Fair will be held at Blessed Sacrament Church, 5 Saint Teresa Dr. just off of Savannah Highway. The craft fair will feature a large variety of crafts and gifts made by local crafters. Lunch will be served consisting of Homemade Soup, Chili, Hot Dogs, Cornbread and Desserts. For more info or to reserve a booth, call Donna Poyer at 571-5941.

SuNday, November 14

Feline Fixing Frenzy Join Pet Helpers for a one-day male and female cat sterilization extravaganza! Fee is $15 for one male and $25 for one female, but with the more cats you bring, the more of a discount you receive! Call 302-0556 to make an appointment. Pet Helpers Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Clinic is located at 1447 Folly Road on James Island.

Deep Down premiere and talk Starting at 4:30 p.m. at the Charleston Library Society on King Street. As the world's population soars, humankind must dig Deep Down into the earth's natural resources to feed our voracious appetite for energy. The one-hour documentary to be followed by a Q&A with Ryan Black, Energy Projects Manager for the CCL.

Community Band fall concert at Christ Episcopal The Charleston Community Band will perform their fall concert at Christ Episcopal Church (2304 Highway 17 N, Mount Pleasant) at 6 p.m. Concert will last about an hour. Admission is free. A donation of a non perishable food item will be accepted.

CFAF members. For more info, visit www.charlestonfaf.org.

thurSday, december 2

Hanukkah/Chanukah

Isle of Palms Tree Lighting Come visit Santa and celebrate the festive season! The city will light the tree and the forecast is calling for snow. Local businesses and restaurants will feature specials. Live entertainment. Free event. 6 p.m. at Isle of Palms Front Beach. For more info, call 886-8294.

Ocean Planning in SC: Living Marine Resources and Habitats workshop Held at the SC DNR Marine Resources Research Institute on Fort Johnson on James Island, this workshop will explore the status of South Carolina’s living marine resources and how the state should plan and help protect key resources, and reduce use conflicts. This forum will allow for an open exchange of experiences, perspectives, and recommendations from resource agencies, NGOs, and private industry. 9 a.m. - 3:15 p.m. For more info, email radams@dhec.

Town Centre Tree Lighting

The Charleston Community Band will play for the Mount Pleasant Town Centre Tree Lighting at 6 p.m. For more info, visit www. charlestoncommunityband.com.

Map and Compass Basics Join us as we explore map features and symbols, focusing on parts of the compass, map reading, taking bearings, and triangulation. Compasses and maps will be provided. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Course # 23270. CCPRC Headquarters (James Island). Fee: $20. For more info, call 795-4386 or visit www. ccprc.com.

thurSday, November 25

Happy Thanksgiving!

Sullivan’s Island Town Hall and Isle of Palms City Hall will be closed November 25 and 26.

Friday, November 26

Black Friday

East Copper Crafters Guild 27th Annual Holiday Show 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. at the Omar Shine

Convention Center on Patriots Point Blvd, Mt. Pleasant. Benefiting East Cooper Community Outreach. Donations for non-perishable foods will be accepted at the show. Free admission and door prizes. For more info, call 813-4141 or 559-

1105.

moNday, November 29

Charleston Foreign Affairs Forum presents Linda Gradstein Linda Gradstein, a 20 year NPR correspondent in Jerusalem, will be speaking on the Israeli- Palestinian process. Social hour begins at 5:15 p.m. and the speaker will start at 6 p.m. Charleston Marriott, 170 Lockwood Blvd. $15 per person or free for

Marriott, 170 Lockwood Blvd. $15 per person or free for Wherever you are in life, whatever
Marriott, 170 Lockwood Blvd. $15 per person or free for Wherever you are in life, whatever
Marriott, 170 Lockwood Blvd. $15 per person or free for Wherever you are in life, whatever
Wherever you are in life, whatever your goals happen to be, a disciplined financial plan
Wherever you are in life, whatever your goals happen to be, a disciplined financial plan
can help you pursue your most important personal and financial goals.
We can help you:
• Articulate and prioritize your financial planning goals
• Increase your understanding of your overall financial position
• Create a plan that you can follow now and in the future
For information, contact
The Coleman Dunleavy Group
Dennis V. Coleman
First Vice President-Investments
Wealth Advisor
dennis.coleman@ubs.com
Thomas D. Dunleavy, CRPS ®
Account Vice President
Advisory and Brokerage Services
thomas.dunleavy@ubs.com
Lisa C. Layne
Registered Client Service Associate
lisa.layne@ubs.com
158 Meeting Street, 2 nd Floor
Charleston, SC 29401
843-577-9700 colemandunleavygroup@ubs.com
Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-9700 colemandunleavygroup@ubs.com www . islandeyenews . com www . islandeyenews . com

www.islandeyenews .com

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16

16 Health November 12, 2010 Adjusting the perception of Chiropractic: part 2 BY DR. BILL CROMER

Health

November 12, 2010

16 Health November 12, 2010 Adjusting the perception of Chiropractic: part 2 BY DR. BILL CROMER

Adjusting the perception of Chiropractic: part 2

BY DR. BILL CROMER

“O nce you go to a

chiropractor, you

of my patients contact me with some complaint of physical pain. A few (usually long-time chiropractic patients) come in for regular biomechanical maintenance … hence the myth. The best thing about the chiropractic model is when the offending problem is caused by a structural misalignment and biomechanics is improved, then the pain goes away. And if alignment is maintained, then the body works better and you attain a level of health you haven’t seen in years.

sports

probably be in the office more than someone who doesn’t. One element of a misalignment in any

you’ll

frequently,

then

dog. On another occasion, it happened when I yawned. Did it go out every time I yawned? No, of course not. That’s my point. It can be something simple or usually harmless. That’s why we ask you to come back and get your spine and other joints checked before they cause pain and affect your health. If getting my spine checked once a month means I don’t go through severe pain and my body works better so I am healthier, then sign me up. If being healthier without drugs or surgery is addictive, then call me an addict.

always have to go.

It’s addictive.” I hear this statement more than any other from people who have never been to a doctor of chiropractic. Let’s examine this quasi-faux declaration from two points of view: those who have actually talked to a chiropractor and those who have gotten their information second hand. The medical model is usually one trip, get a scrip, don’t return unless you’re sick(er). While that may be a cute oversimplification, it does have a heavy dose of truth in it. Let’s face it, most people wait until they are at death’s door before they go see their M.D., and they generally only go once for that particular malady. People using this medical model aren’t used to multiple trips to the doctor and they are naturally resistant to a change in that doctrine. Health care should be about the prevention of diseases and the maintenance of good health, not the crisis management system of only treating symptoms. The funny thing about symptoms is that, when you are ill, they are the last thing to show up and the first to leave. You have whatever problem is making you feel bad long before you feel sick, and that problem is still there after you start feeling better. The chiropractic model usually starts with crisis management, but encourages maintenance to keep the pain/problem from coming back. Ninety per cent

joint is it will never be as strong and stable as it was before the

but that’s the

what

is going to make you go out of

misalignment,

thing;

you

never

know

alignment. on me one when I over to my My back went out time bent
alignment.
on me one
when I
over to
my
My back went out
time
bent
pet
Dr. Bill Cromer is a chiropractor
and co-owner of Health Quest,
a lifestyle healthcare practice
which offers chiropractic services
in your home, office or on the
go. For more information, call
971-1000 or 437-1619.
Doctors of
chiropractic
call that “the
big picture.”
Getting rid of pain
caused by a misalignment is
usually the easiest thing we
do. Keeping you out of pain
and healthier depends on you.
But here’s the rub; you gotta
come back. Multiple times.
Chiropractic works because of
repetition.
How much repetition? Sorry,
no pat answer there. Everyone
responds differently. It really
boils down to what you do
outside the chiropractor’s office.
If you are bungee jumping every
weekend or playing contact
the chiropractor’s office. If you are bungee jumping every weekend or playing contact www . islandeyenews

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

17

Pottery with Mary Nicholson

BY MEREDITH POWELL

M ary Nicholson, a Johns Island resident, was recently recognized for

her amazing porcelain pottery work when one of her pieces was selected to travel around South Carolina as part of the South Carolina Palmetto Hands Traveling Exhibition. The piece was available for a short time at the Johns Island Regional Library, but at the end of October it joined the exhibition and continued its tour across the state. After establishing a name for herself in New York, Mary and her husband James relocated to Charleston in 1998. Mary wanted to create a foundation here, so the retired teacher began teaching pottery classes at the Gibbes Museum of Art School, as well as community classes, workshops and demonstrations. Porcelain pottery is more than just Mary’s job or hobby, though; it is her passion. She thoroughly enjoys working in her large home studio, and the layers of dust and clay give the space plenty of character. Mary pointed out that she loves creating white on white pieces, and focusing more on the

shape and form of her piece of art. This is especially evident in her studio, as the pieces which line the shelves are mostly neutral in color and follow a unique thematic design. Certainly this does not mean that her work adheres to too much of a pattern, because she is always developing a variety of new ideas. She has come a long way since showing at the wonderful Artisan Center in Walterboro. The Ellis Nicholson Gallery on Broad Street, Sandpiper Gallery on Sullivan’s Island and Clay Gallery on Kiawah Island now all carry her line of limited edition pieces. For those who are interested in an example of her art, do not worry that you missed her selected piece from the South Carolina Palmetto Hands Traveling Exhibition. Hopefully, Mary will be bringing in some more of her one-of-a- kind pieces into the Johns Island Regional Library which are also not to be missed!

For more information, contact Mary Nicholson at 559-6626 or artpottery1@aol.com. The Johns Island Regional Library is located at 3531 Maybank Highway.

The Johns Island Regional Library is located at 3531 Maybank Highway. Mary Nicholson creating one of

Mary Nicholson creating one of her porcelain pieces.

The Johns Island Regional Library is located at 3531 Maybank Highway. Mary Nicholson creating one of

18

November 12, 2010

Events at the Poe Library

Poe LibRaRy

1921 I’On Avenue Sullivan’s Island, 883-3914

HouRs:

Monday & Friday:

2pm – 6pm Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday:

10am – 2pm Wednesday & Sunday: closed

Saturday: 10am – 2pm Wednesday & Sunday: closed Kids gather at the Poe for a pumpkin

Kids gather at the Poe for a pumpkin painting just before Halloween.

at the Poe for a pumpkin painting just before Halloween. Everyone is welcome to come and

Everyone is welcome to come and take part in story time, games, and crafts with Ms. Kathi McGregor-Ouzts every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Joining Mac today was Colin, Claire, Sanna, Sophia, Olivia, Andrew, and Gray, and our house Sock Puppets, Anna Lee, Edgar and family.

and our house Sock Puppets, Anna Lee, Edgar and family. PHOTOS BY CONNIE DARLING Saturday Programs

PHOTOS BY CONNIE DARLING

Saturday Programs Arts & Crafts with Grace Dunbar (all ages) Saturday, November 13, at 10:30 a.m. Spend a fun-filled morning designing holiday crafts at the Poe.

Beach Lovers Book Club (teens to adults) Saturday, November 20, at 10:30 a.m. Juliet by Ann Fortier

Day by Day Family Gatherings Saturday, November 20, at 11 a.m. Design your own harvest family decoration.

Daddy & Me: Scrapbook and Holiday Cards (all ages)

Saturday, November 27, at 11 a.m. Bring in favorite family pictures and create

a Scrapbook and/or Holiday Cards.

RecuRRing events:

Story Time Every Tuesday from 10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. and every Thursday from 10:15 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Story time is open to all.

Saturday Activities Every Saturday, drop by the Poe Library for

a fun children’s activity! Call 883-3914 for more information.

One clean island

BY CATHERINE MALLOY

Isle of Palms Council members Michael Loftus, Ralph Piening and Brian Duffy demonstrated their service to the community by participating in the IOP Neighborhood Association Adopt a Highway cleanup on Saturday, November 6, 2010. IOPNA President Joanna Harper made the assignments and provided the cleanup equipment.

made the assignments and provided the cleanup equipment. PHOTOS BY CATHERINE MALLOY Isle of Palms Council

PHOTOS BY CATHERINE MALLOY

Isle of Palms Council member Michael Loftus does his part for a clean community.

Island resident and rising artist Kennedy Goodman enjoys herself with color pages!

community. Island resident and rising artist Kennedy Goodman enjoys herself with color pages! www . islandeyenews

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

19

My art is in the Lowcounty

GILFORD

OPENS

ART

EXHIBIT AT

SOMERBY,

MOUNT

PLEASANT

“I Love the Lowcountry” will be the theme of a one woman art exhibit of

realistic acrylic paintings by Isle of Palms artist Gayle Gilford, now on display at Somerby of Mount

Pleasant, 1300 Tradition Circle. Gayle is an internationally

acclaimed miniature artist who has exhibited in group shows in Westminster Gallery in London and in the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C., where she demonstrated the art of miniature painting. In her Somerby show, which runs through November 30,

In her Somerby show, which runs through November 30, the artist will “stretch” from miniature paintings

the artist will “stretch” from miniature paintings to 8x10 and a few larger Lowcountry landscapes, seascapes,

animals

more. Gayle won First Place in the Charleston Area Recycling Art Competition in 2005 and 2009, and will have her winning creations, as well as several of her award-winning miniature paintings, on display during her reception on November 19 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Somerby of Mount Pleasant. To RSVP,

please contact Somerby at 849-3096.

and

Pleasant. To RSVP, please contact Somerby at 849-3096. and (Above) Artist Gayle Gilford stands in front
Pleasant. To RSVP, please contact Somerby at 849-3096. and (Above) Artist Gayle Gilford stands in front

(Above) Artist Gayle Gilford stands in front of her award-winning piece, "Charlie on the Cat Quilt". (left) Another of Gayle's Lowcountry works on display at Somerby.

IOP Tree lighting ceremony I S L E O F P A L M S
IOP Tree lighting ceremony
I S L E
O F
P A L M S
R E C R E A T I O N
D E P A R T M E N T,
DECEMBER
2,
2010
The Isle of Palms Recreation Department will host their Annual
Tree Lighting Ceremony on Thursday, December 2, 2010, from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Everyone is invited to celebrate the Isle of Palms Tree
Lighting Ceremony on Front Beach, as well as enjoy Jump Castles,
Face Painting, Santa Clause and it might even SNOW!. This is a
free event. For more information please contact Will McElheny at
886-8294 or visit www.iop.net.

www.islandeyenews .com

20

November 12, 2010

SPROUTS Theatre presents Cinderella S PROUTS, a professional children’s performance group based out of Creative
SPROUTS Theatre
presents Cinderella
S PROUTS, a professional children’s performance group based
out of Creative Sparks on Long Point Road, will be presenting
an engaging, 45 – 60 minute rendition of the classic fairy tale,
Cinderella, for the first two weeks of December. Designed for audiences
ages four and up, attendees are invited to sit right at the edge of the
stage and experience this live performance in a way they cannot do
with movies or videos. The show will contain several musical numbers,
as well as lively audience-participation sequences and high-energy
chase scenes, both of which are SPROUTS hallmarks.

Cinderella performanCe dates:

Friday, December 3, at 7 p.m. Saturday, December 4, at 1 p.m. Sunday, December 5, at 3 p.m.

Friday, December 10, at 7 p.m. Saturday, December 11, at 1 p.m. Sunday, December 12, at 3 p.m.

For the young and young at heart, SPROUTS Theater is designed with families in mind. Tickets are $10 per person or $12 at the door, and are available by calling 881-3780, at www.creativespark.org and at the door. All performances are held at Creative Sparks, located at 757 Long Point Road in Mt Pleasant.

Do you know what this is?

Eye

Do you know what this is? Eye Spy No one guessed last week's Eye Spy! It

Spy

No one guessed last week's Eye Spy! It was the South Carolina sign off of the IOP Connector. The first one to send in the correct answer for the Eye Spy will receive a coupon for a free ice cream at Café Medley on Sullivan's Island.

Kids, send your guess for this week’s Eye Spy to: info@luckydognews.com or call 886-NEWS. Please include your mailing address with your submission.

Eye Spy to: info@luckydognews.com or call 886-NEWS . Please include your mailing address with your submission.
Eye Spy to: info@luckydognews.com or call 886-NEWS . Please include your mailing address with your submission.

November 12, 2010

21

A little spice is always nice

CAN

YOU

GUESS

THIS

WEEK’S

MYSTERY

BY DR. JOHN NELSON

PLANT?

N o, it’s not a holly, although it does look like one. This is one of the most

common woodland understory shrubs in eastern North America, occurring from Quebec and Ontario down to Texas. It is present in a wide array of habitats from low ground to the

mountains, and it seems to prefer damp places. It is a shrub that does very well in considerable shade. Sometimes it’s hard to distinguish a large “shrub” from

a small “tree,” and this plant is

sometimes in between as it can grow up to seven feet tall. Its leaves are smooth and dark green, and shape-wise, they are fairly boring. In the autumn, though, the leaves put on a terrific show, becoming bright yellow. Its small,

yellowish flowers appear early in the spring before its leaves, and they grow in small clusters up and down the stems. This species is dioecious; that is, individual plants are either male or female, and the flowers are unisexual. The flowers of “male” plants produce only pollen, while “female” plants produce ovules and, ultimately, a one-seeded, fleshy fruit. The

fruits are brilliant red and quite conspicuous. Various birds like

to eat the fruits, and so scatter the

plants throughout their habitat. This plant is also a favorite food source for the caterpillars of one of

our most spectacular swallowtail butterflies. That being said, you might want to investigate this plant as a resident for your garden. (Remember that it is the female plants that make the red berries.) This species is related to a number of other aromatic plants, including sassafras, camphor tree and red bay. All of these plants are placed into the laurel family or “Lauraceae,” which also includes the true laurel and avocado. One of the old-timey common names for this shrub is “Benjamin-bush.” I’ve tried to figure out how it got that name, and here’s my idea: the whole plant is aromatic and pleasantly fragrant. One of the compounds producing this fragrance is an organic substance referred to as “benzoin,” which is found in a number of different plant groups. The name “benzoin” was also applied to a fragrant gum used medicinally. Now, since our Mystery Plant has a long history of folk use as a medicinal plant, and is in fact a source of the compound benzoin, many people began calling this plant “Benzoin bush.” But that gradually corrupted into the name “Benjamin bush,” which was perhaps a bit less clinical than using the chemical name. However that name became

PHOTO BY DR. JOHN NELSON
PHOTO BY DR. JOHN NELSON

benzoinLinderabush,”“SpiceANSWER:

established, the plant has been used as a source of tea and for medicinal tonics, as well as for flavorful toothpicks. John Nelson is the curator of the A. C. Moore Herbarium at the University of South Carolina,

in the Department of Biological Sciences. As a public service, the Herbarium offers free plant identifications. For more information on this service, visit www.herbarium.org or call 803-

777-8196.

Pet Helpers Pets of the Week

Cordelia is a spunky little six-year-old wire haired terrier mix. She is black and tan with cute, scruffy little whiskers. She has the energy of a dog ten times her size, and is extremely cuddly! She gets along well with other dogs, and can certainly hold her own. She deserves a family - with or without another dog - that will play and play with her! She is spayed, up to date on vaccines, and microchipped. All she needs is a forever home!

Cordelia

and microchipped. All she needs is a forever home! C ordelia T iger T iger is
and microchipped. All she needs is a forever home! C ordelia T iger T iger is

T iger

T iger is a 5-year-old medium- haired orange tabby. While Pet Helpers does not declaw its cats, Tiger did come to us already declawed. He is considered a special needs cat because he is blind, though that in no way inhibits his curiosity or playfulness. He hangs out in our Rainbow Row, greeting each person who walks through the door. Please come meet this special guy!

Adoption fees include spay, neuter, vaccinations, testing, and microchip ID Pet Helpers Low Cost Spay- Neuter Clinic 302-0556, call for appointment.

Pet Helpers is located at 1447 Folly Rd Hours: Mon. – Fri. from 11am – 6pm Sat from 11am - 5pm. Closed: Sundays and Holidays. For more information, call 795-1110 or go to www. pethelpers.org.

Closed: Sundays and Holidays. For more information, call 795-1110 or go to www. pethelpers.org. www .

www.islandeyenews .com

22

November 12, 2010

Art on the Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen

continued from front cover

Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen continued from front cover (left) This year's poster artist, Robin

(left) This year's poster artist, Robin Anne Cooper, stands next to the original poster art. (right) Giddy Goat cheesemaker Farrah Hoffmire at the home of Rita and Milton Langley. (below) The home of Kaye and Scott Smith featured Breathe Soy Candles and SCRAPS jewelry.

(below) The home of Kaye and Scott Smith featured Breathe Soy Candles and SCRAPS jewelry. www
(below) The home of Kaye and Scott Smith featured Breathe Soy Candles and SCRAPS jewelry. www
(below) The home of Kaye and Scott Smith featured Breathe Soy Candles and SCRAPS jewelry. www

www.islandeyenews .com

November 12, 2010

23

November 12, 2010 23 (left) Author Jan DiRuzzo holds up a copy of her book, The

(left) Author Jan DiRuzzo holds up a copy of her book, The Lost Mermaid, at the Island Gallery. (right) Artist Alice Botts on the porch of 1856 Central Avenue, home of Michelle and Cyrus Sinor. (below) Sheila Perry's "How Now Brown Cow" on display at the Sinor's home. Art on the Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen was presented by Creative Sparks Center for the Arts/

on the Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen was presented by Creative Sparks Center for the
on the Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen was presented by Creative Sparks Center for the
on the Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen was presented by Creative Sparks Center for the
on the Beach & Chefs in the Kitchen was presented by Creative Sparks Center for the

www.islandeyenews .com

24

November 12, 2010

Photo of the Month: November

BY ERIC HORAN

I photographed this pair while shooting at Widgeon Point on Lemon Island. My drive to the island included a beautiful span of intracoastal water alongside marshy wetlands, often busy with wading bird action. This could have easily distracted me from my planned destination - a cramped plastic photo blind I had

set up the night before - but these are the dues I pay for capturing unencumbered wildlife behavior.

I found this couple en route to

their fishing grounds. Hooded Mergansers are known for their expert diving, which allows them to feed on small fish, crayfish and other crustaceans and aquatic insects. This pair exemplifies the dashing plumage of the male, and the almost drab brown feathers of the female. Both sexes have a

bushy crest of head feathers which form a distinctive ‘hood,’ which can also be flattened or fanned out depending on their mood. The male’s dense black crest displays

a white spot and yellow eye, while

the female’s crest is smaller, looser and all brown, including the eye.

It is reported that pair bonds will

last from winter to incubation, but it is unclear whether the

bonds reform the following year or

if pairing begins anew. Widgeon

Point is owned and managed by Lowcountry Open Land Trust. For more information on the Open Land Trust, visit www.lolt.org.

more information on the Open Land Trust, visit www.lolt.org. Hooded Merganser Pair is the featured photograph

Hooded Merganser Pair is the featured photograph for November in Horan’s 2010 Lowcountry Calendar. For more images, visit www. southernlight.biz.

PHOTO TIP:

Working in a photo blind can be cold, wet, buggy, lonely and a challenge to access in pitch black, as I did on the morning I took this picture. By entering in the pre-dawn, I could sneak in with the least impact on natural behavior. A photo blind can also be used similarly during daylight hours, but it takes a lot more time sitting in the blind before the wildlife will relax and forget you’re there. Depending on where and when you access your blind, you may want to invest in rubber boots, chest waders or insulated clothing, and you will want to dress in layers. A cold, wet morning turns steamy hot once the sun takes hold of your small space. A sturdy tripod is a must when using 200 mm lens or larger. Since it is technically challenging to change lenses on the tripod, my solution is to attach the longest lens to the tripod and bring along a second camera body with a shorter focal length ready for hand-held shooting.

longest lens to the tripod and bring along a second camera body with a shorter focal
longest lens to the tripod and bring along a second camera body with a shorter focal

November 12, 2010

25

Police Blotter continued from page 4

responded to the Front Beach in reference to a fight in progress. When the officers arrived, they observed a couple in a heated discussion. Officers separated the two subjects, identified them and determined that the female subject was the primary aggressor, but the male subject declined to press charges. Both subjects were advised accordingly and allowed to leave the area with friends.

October 5, 2010: Officers responded to a possible domestic dispute at a Cameron Boulevard residence. Officers met with both parties present, who both stated that they had only been arguing and their neighbor must have overheard them. The wife was escorted to a Front Beach hotel for the rest of the evening in order to avoid further confrontation.

October 6, 2010: Officers provided an escort to the annual parade of fire trucks from the Public Safety Building to the Sullivan’s Island Fire Department for Fire Prevention Week.

October 7, 2010: An officer on patrol on Palm Boulevard stopped a vehicle for speeding and while speaking to the driver determined that he did not have his wallet in his possession. A computer check of the driver’s license confirmed that the driver’s license was suspended. The driver was charged with Speeding and DUS 1st offense.

October 14, 2010: Just before midnight, officers responded to a business on JC Long Boulevard where a fight in progress was reported. Upon their arrival, they were advised that the suspect just left in a vehicle, which was located and stopped approximately a block away. A passenger in that vehicle was identified, taken into custody and charged with Disorderly Conduct and Open Container. He was in possession of a container of alcohol when stopped.

October 16, 2010: Just before 7 a.m., officers responded to a residence on 27 th Avenue where the occupant reported a male subject on her front porch banging on the door. The officers encountered the suspect, still on the porch, who appeared to be under the influence of alcohol. The suspect stated he was visiting from Tennessee and was looking for a friend. After

the occupant of the residence confirmed that she did not know the subject, he was taken into custody and charged with Public Intoxication.

October 17, 2010: Just after 1 a.m., an officer on patrol stopped

a vehicle on Palm Boulevard for

speeding. After citing the driver

for Speeding, the passenger was found to have a suspended license for failure to pay two tickets and was charged with two counts of NRVC.

October 17, 2010: After stopping a vehicle on Palm Boulevard for speeding, the officer detected a distinct odor of alcohol from within the vehicle while speaking to the driver. The driver provided insurance and registration information, but stated that he did not have his license with him. After providing the officer with a false name, he was taken into custody where he was positively identified. He had a revoked Virginia driver’s license, an active Arrest Warrant from Dare County, North Carolina, and an active Order of Protection Pick-up through Charleston County. The Order of Protection was lodged against him by a female passenger in the vehicle with him. He was charged with Speeding, Hindering, Driving Under Suspension, and arrested for the active Violation of the Order of Protection. The female passenger was allowed to leave, but refused after several requests to contact alternate transportation. She then became argumentative, which resulted in her being taken into custody and charged with Public Intoxication. The male subject had a hold placed on him for the outstanding North Carolina Arrest Warrant to await extradition.

October 17, 2010: An officer responded to a Front Beach condominium complex where

a citizen reported a female

subject unconscious in the bushes on the property. The officer awakened the subject, who was extremely intoxicated to a point where she was unable to provide any coherent information as to where she was staying. As a precaution, she was treated by Fire Department First Responders and was uncooperative with them. The subject was taken into custody and charged with Public Intoxication.

October 22, 2010: Officers responded to a restaurant at

the Marina on 41 st Avenue where a fight in progress had been reported. The male victim reported that he and a friend were eating dinner when a female subject walked up to

their table and asked if she could have her photo taken with them. The victim stated that he took a photo with her camera, when all of a sudden the female’s boyfriend appeared, wanting to know why they had taken photos of his girlfriend. The boyfriend then grabbed the camera, threw

it against the wall and assaulted

the victim who had been holding the camera. The boyfriend and the female subject were located in the parking lot, where they confirmed the information that had been reported. Since the victim did not wish to prosecute, no further action was taken.

October 27, 2010: An officer on patrol on the Connector stopped

a vehicle for speeding and ran a computer check of the driver’s license and determined that it was suspended. The driver was charged with DUS and Speeding.

October 28, 2010: Officers responded to a JC Long establishment where management reported that a male subject had destroyed a wooden fence while leaving the premises. A description of the vehicle and driver was broadcast and several minutes later, the suspect was seen walking from the area of the previously described vehicle. The subject appeared to be impaired by alcohol and denied driving the vehicle. Since the officer did not see the subject operating the vehicle, he was charged with Malicious Damage to Property and transported to the Detention Center.

October 29, 2010: Officers responded to a Cameron

Boulevard residence regarding

a guest whom the occupants

wished to leave and requested that she be placed on Trespass Notice. There had been an assault, but the victim did not want to prosecute. The Trespass Notice was given to the guest and she departed without further incident.

October 29, 2010: Five Bench Warrants were served on a

male subject at the Detention Center for failure to appear at

a September Municipal Court

date where he was found guilty in his absence. The subject’s bail bondsman took custody of the subject and turned him over

www.islandeyenews .com

to the officer at the Detention Center.

October 29, 2010: Officers

responded to a Palm Boulevard residence where a subject reported that he found his roommate unconscious with

a needle in his arm in the

bathroom. The officer observed evidence of past intravenous

drug use that was confirmed when Fire Department personnel

arrived and revived the subject. He admitted to heroin use and had intended to commit suicide. He was transported by EMS to

a local hospital for psychiatric evaluation.

PERSONNEL/COMMUNITY

RELATIONS:

October 1, 2010: At the request of Rear Admiral James Flatley III, USN Retired, Sgt. Ryan played the Great Highland Bagpipe for the USS Yorktown Association Memorial Service aboard the USS Yorktown.

October 21, 2010: Sgt. Meekins and Sgt. Caldwell presented a Power Point Presentation to approximately thirty Real Estate Rental Company representatives regarding how to assist the property owners and rental companies in making the properties less vulnerable to crime and livability violations.

October 26, 2010: Chief Buckhannon accepted a Certificate of Appreciation from LTC David Schimsa of the 360 th Civil Affairs Brigade (Airborne) at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, for the support they received from the Police Department while they conducted training on the Isle of Palms this past May.

October 28, 2010: Officers attended a meeting of the Exchange Club where they honored Public Safety personnel for Public Safety Month. Detective Sgt. Caldwell gave a presentation on Crime Prevention in the home and business to approximately 100 persons in attendance.

October 31, 2010: For the month of October, officers discovered three businesses and three homes with open or unsecured doors. A total of seventy-eight Victim of Crime Forms or Property Security Check Forms were issued to business or homeowners for various violations noted, or to advise them that an officer checked their property during the night while on patrol.

26

26 Financial November 12, 2010 Be prepared for the return of the estate tax BY DIMI

Financial

November 12, 2010

26 Financial November 12, 2010 Be prepared for the return of the estate tax BY DIMI

Be prepared for the return of the estate tax

BY DIMI MATOUCHEV

T here’s never really a bad time to do

estate planning, but in the months

ahead you may have an extra incentive

to look at your estate plans. Why? Because changes are coming to estate tax laws — so you’ll want to be ready. Change is nothing new in the world of estate taxes, which have been in a state of flux for years. As the law now stands, there is no federal estate tax in 2010. Then, in 2011, the estate tax is scheduled to return, with an exemption amount of $1 million and a top rate of 55 percent, but these figures are highly likely to change. Ultimately, we may see a return to what existed in 2009: a $3.5 million or $5 million exemption and a top rate of 45 percent. Of course, your susceptibility to the estate tax will depend on the size of your estate, but no matter what your level of assets, you’ll want to have your estate plans in order. First of all, you almost certainly need a will. You’ll also need to make sure you’ve named the proper beneficiaries in all your legal documents. Now, let’s return to the estate tax issue. Specifically, how can you help reduce any potential estate tax burden your heirs may face? Here are some ideas to consider:

Take advantage of your exemptions. You and your spouse each receive an exemption from the federal estate tax. As mentioned above, this exemption could be anywhere from $1 million to $5 million, starting in 2011. To maximize these exemptions, you may

want to create a credit shelter trust. In

a nutshell, here’s how it works: When

you die, you fund a credit shelter trust with assets equal in value to your available exemption; if you have other assets, you can leave them to your spouse, free of estate taxes. Your surviving spouse can draw income from the trust’s assets while he or she is alive. Upon his or her death, the trust disperses the assets to your children or other beneficiaries, taking advantage of your original estate tax exemption. Your spouse’s estate will also disperse assets to beneficiaries, using his or her exemption to reduce or avoid estate taxes.

Use Life Insurance. If you owned a $1

million dollar life insurance policy and

it was subject to an estate tax rate of

and distribute the proceeds to the beneficiaries you’ve chosen. By using an ILIT, you’d keep the life insurance out of your taxable estate.

Give generously. You can give up to $13,000 per year to as many individuals as you like without incurring gift taxes, and the more you give, the lower your taxable estate. You can also reduce your estate by making gifts to charitable organizations. Keep in mind that estate planning can be complex. You will need to work with your legal and tax advisors before establishing any type of trust or other estate-planning mechanism. And with the looming return of the estate tax, there’s no time like the present to get started.

This article was written by Edward Jones, located at 1505 Palm Blvd., Isle of Palms, SC 29451. For more information, please call the Edward Jones offices at 886-9229 or visit their website at www.edwardjones.com.

at 886-9229 or visit their website at www.edwardjones.com. 55 percent, your beneficiaries would receive a death

55 percent, your beneficiaries would receive a death benefit of just $450,000.

But if you established an irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) with a new insurance policy, the trust would own the policy

with a new insurance policy, the trust would own the policy Breach Inlet Tide Chart Date
Breach Inlet Tide Chart Date High Tide Low Tide Nov 12 12:26pm 5:44am/6:32pm Nov 13
Breach Inlet Tide Chart
Date
High Tide
Low Tide
Nov 12
12:26pm
5:44am/6:32pm
Nov 13
12:39am/1:18pm
Nov 14
1:35 am/2:10pm
6:40am/ 7:23pm
7:39 am/8:13pm
Nov 15
2:31am/3:00pm
8:38am/9:01pm
Nov 16
3:23am/3:49pm
9:33am/9:46pm
Nov 17
4:12am/4:36pm
10:25am/10:30pm
Nov 18
4:59am/5:21pm
11:12am/11:12pm
Nov 19
5:42am/6:05pm
11:57am/11:54pm
Nov 20
6:24am/6:46pm
12:39pm
Nov 21
7:05am/7:27pm
12:35am/1:21pm
Nov 22
7:45am/8:07pm
1:17am/2:04pm
Nov 23
8:26am/8:48pm
2:00am/2:47pm
Nov 24
9:10am/9:33pm
2:44am/3:32pm
Nov 25
9:56 am/10:23pm
3:32am/4:19pm
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com

www.islandeyenews .com

28

November 12, 2010

Sol Driven Train heads for the mountains

LOCAL

BAND

SIGNS

WITH

WORLDWIDE

BOOKING

AGENCY

BLUE

J oel Timmons, singer and

songwriter with the group

Sol Driven Driven, laughs

when he talks about the band’s 1000th show and their new association with Charlotte-based worldwide booking agency, Blue Mountain Artists. “We are honored to be a part of Blue Mountain Artists,” said Joel.

“2010 has been a great year for us. We’ve toured from the Virgin Islands to Lake Tahoe, released a new album, and partnered with a stellar booking agency.” Like so many groups, Sol Driven Train relies on a small support team (their manager is Brian Asplin with Harmonized Records and their publicist

is Brian Asplin with Harmonized Records and their publicist Sol Driven Train rocks out on the

Sol Driven Train rocks out on the beach.

is Tammy Brackett with Moonstruck Promotions) to help with day-to-day business, but fill their calendar and plan tours themselves. “It’s tedious to book tours, but we honestly have gotten very good at it,” says Joel. “Rusty Cole takes the booking reigns most of the time, but we all pitch in. It will be really nice to have Blue Mountain take care of us so we can take care of making the best music possible.” Micah Davidson, manager of the Double Door and booking agent with Blue Mountain Artists, first met Sol Driven Train when he booked them for his establishment. “These guys became one of the acts we booked on a regular basis,” said Micah. “I was always impressed with the personalities in the band and their attention and dedication to

MOUNTAIN

ARTISTS

work. And then there’s the music! Astounding players, total pros. We’re really looking forward to working with them.” Timmons summed up Sol Driven Train’s future plans by stating, “If the remainder of 2010 is anything like the first part of the year, we could be performing at the Giza Pyramids, Buckingham Palace, and possibly the International Space Station.” Sol Driven Train will be performing at The Windjammer, 1008 Ocean Blvd, Front Beach on the Isle of Palms, on Saturday, November 27. Tickets are $10 Advance/$12 on the day of the show. Doors open at 9 p.m. and the show starts at 10 p.m. For more information, visit www. the-windjammer.com. For more information about Sol Driven Train, visit www.SolDrivenTrain.com.

information, visit www. the-windjammer.com. For more information about Sol Driven Train, visit www.SolDrivenTrain.com.