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‘Megamind’ continues box office reign with $30M, p8A T he D ELPHOS Turnovers doom ’Dawgs,
‘Megamind’ continues box office reign with $30M, p8A T he D ELPHOS Turnovers doom ’Dawgs,

‘Megamind’ continues box office reign with $30M, p8A

The

DELPHOS

Turnovers doom ’Dawgs, p6A

HERALD

T he D ELPHOS Turnovers doom ’Dawgs, p6A H E R A L D Telling The

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

50¢ daily

Monday, noveMber 15, 2010

Delphos, Ohio

1869 50¢ daily M onday , n oveMber 15, 2010 Delphos, Ohio Ohio girl found alive;

Ohio girl found alive; no word on 3 others

BY DOUG WHITEMAN The Associated Press

MOUNT VERNON — Ten miles from home, a 13-year-old girl was found bound and gagged but alive four days after disappearing with her family. The where-

abouts of her mother, brother and another woman remained a mystery, however.

A man was arrested

Sunday at the home where Sarah Maynard was found in this central Ohio city, and authorities hope he will pro- vide information leading to the others, Knox County Sheriff David Barber said. “We were hopeful that we would find more than one” of the missing people in Hoffman’s house, Barber said. “Our information was

definite that it was most like-

ly that Sarah was going to be

in that house.”

Barber did not say what led investigators to the two- story tan-sided house where they found the girl bound in the basement. Matthew J. Hoffman, 30, was arrested and charged with kidnapping. Barber said more charges are expected against Hoffman, who lives at the home about 40 miles north of Columbus. Hoffman was being held in

the county jail, where person- nel would not comment on whether he had an attorney.

had been sexually abused. Sarah, her mother, 32-year- old Tina Herrmann, her 10-year-old brother, Kody, and Herrmann’s 41-year-old friend Stephanie Sprang dis- appeared Wednesday from Herrmann’s home in nearby Howard. Barber said DNA testing on blood found in that house was expected to begin today. Authorities believe the girl

had been “under the control” of Hoffman since Wednesday, when she and her brother last attended school, the sher- iff said. He did not know if Hoffman was connected to either Herrmann or Sprang,

but said he is not the ex-boy- friend of either woman. “At this time, whether he’s connected to the family or whether he connected him-

self to the family

that remains to be seen as

the investigation continues,”

Barber said. Authorities had talked to the girl but would not release any details because the inves- tigation is ongoing, Barber said. Authorities blocked off about a half block on either side of the home as they inves- tigated early Sunday after- noon, keeping people from entering or leaving about a half dozen homes. But by late Sunday afternoon, the only sign of investigative activity was red and white evidence

a lot of

A

bond hearing was expected

tape sealing the front door of

to

be held today.

the home.

See MISSING, page 3A

Barber said the girl was hospitalized in good condi- tion, but he would give no details and did not say if she

The house with green shut- ters and front door and a large

Flags properly disposed Fort Jennings American Legion Post 715 and Ottoville Veterans of Foreign Wars

Flags properly disposed

Fort Jennings American Legion Post 715 and Ottoville Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3740 held their annual flag-burning ceremony Saturday at the Legion post. Hundreds of tattered and faded flags were prop- erly disposed of during the ceremony. Above: Legion CommanderDoyleWittler, left, VFW Commander Otto Wenzlick and VFW 1st Vice Randy Wenzlick examine flags to determine if they should be destroyed as Legion Chaplain Mike Rode and Legion 1st Vice Paul Broecker look on. Below: Otto Wenzlick adds the flag that flew at the Fort Jennings Local Schools this past year to the fire.

Nancy Spencer photos

Otto Wenzlick adds the flag that flew at the Fort Jennings Local Schools this past year

Upfront

Ticket for St. John’s game Ticket sales for Friday’s St. John’s/McComb regional final (7:30 p.m. kickoff) at Findlay’s Donnell Stadium will be held in the high school office at the follow- ing times: 7-8 p.m. Tuesday; 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday;

and 7:30 a.m. to noon Friday.

The school will receive a

percentage of all tickets pur- chased at the school. All tick- ets are $7 pre-sale and $9 at the gate. Children 6 years old and older must have a ticket.

Forecast Rain Tuesday with high in upper 40s. See page 2A.
Forecast
Rain Tuesday
with high in
upper 40s.
See page 2A.

Index

Obituaries

2A

State/Local

3A

Politics

4A

Community

5A

Sports

6-7A

Announcements

8A

Classifieds

10A

World News

1B

TV

3B

8A Classifieds 10A World News 1B TV 3B Photo submitted Local organizations receive Canal Days
Photo submitted Local organizations receive Canal Days funds More than $30,000 in 2010 Canal Days

Photo submitted

Local organizations receive Canal Days funds

More than $30,000 in 2010 Canal Days funds were distributed to local organizations. Recipients include, from left, Kevin Streets (Fire Department), Buge Grothouse (Canal Days Committee), Kyle Fetro (Delphos Police), Buzzard Wehri (Canal Days Committee), Edna Fischer (Community Christmas Project), Gary Levitt (Postal Museum), John Nomina (Stadium Club), Jeff Mohler (Boy Scouts) and Eric Fritz (Canal Days Committee). The Delphos Canal Commission also received part of the proceeds but no one was available for the photo.

part of the proceeds but no one was available for the photo. Schulte Local trailer court

Schulte

Local trailer court owner dies

The builder and owner of Schulte Mobile Home Court has died. Henry Z. “Bud” Schulte, 91, of Delphos died at 7 a.m. Saturday at his residence. Mr. Schulte also retired from Ford and was a member of St. John The Evangelist Catholic Church, Delphos Eagles, American Legion of Fort Jennings, United States Trotting Association and Ohio Harness Racing Association. He enjoyed woodworking and was a huge Blue Jay fan. He loved his horses and he enjoyed polka music and dancing. He was a veteran of the armed services during World War II. See full obit on page 2A.

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2A- The Herald

Monday, November 15, 2010

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald Monday, November 15, 2010 www.delphosherald.com For The Record W EATHER Delphos weather High temperature

For The Record

WEATHER

Delphos weather

High temperature Sunday in Delphos was 57 degrees,

low was 37. Weekend rainfall was recorded at .19 inch. High

a year ago today was 58, low

was 48. Record high for today

is 72, set in 1964. Record low

is 10, set in 1933. WeAtHer ForeCASt tri-county the Associated Press

toniGHt: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the mid 30s. Southeast winds around 5 mph. tUeSDAY: Occasional rain. Highs in the upper 40s. East winds 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 100 percent. tUeSDAY niGHt:

Cloudy. Occasional rain in the evening. Lows in the upper 30s. North winds 10 to 15 mph becoming west after midnight. Chance of rain 90 percent. eXtenDeD ForeCASt WeDneSDAY: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 50s. West winds 10 to 15 mph with gusts up to 25 mph. WeDneSDAY niGHt- tHUrSDAY: Mostly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of rain showers. Lows in the mid 30s. Highs in the lower 40s. tHUrSDAY niGHt- FriDAY niGHt: Partly cloudy. Lows around 30. Highs in the mid 40s.

CorreCtion Christa Kline Delphos Army National Guard 2008-present
CorreCtion
Christa Kline
Delphos
Army National Guard
2008-present

OBITUARIES

Verena H. Brinkman

June 5, 1913 - nov. 14, 2010 Verena H. Brinkman, 97, of Ottoville, died 8:40 a.m. Sunday at Sarah Jane Living

Center, Delphos. She was born June 5,

1913, in Jennings Township to Frank G. and Mary A. (Roof) Brinkman. Survivors include several nieces and nephews. She was also preceded in death by four brothers:, Fred Brinkman, Alphonse Brinkman, Francis Brinkman and Cletus Brinkman; and five sisters, Anna Schwaller, Leona Smith, Gertrude Brinkman, Monica Brinkman and Theresa Brinkman. Ms. Brinkman retired as

a high school math and sci-

ence teacher at Fort Jennings

Local School. She also taught

in Ottoville and Macartyville.

She was a graduate of Mary Manse College, Toledo and received her master’s degree from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., and attend- ed Case Western Reserve, Cleveland. She was a Jennings Scholar. She was a member of Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Ottoville, and its Altar Rosary Society; Putnam County Retired Teachers Assoc.; and Putnam

Society; Putnam County Retired Teachers Assoc.; and Putnam County Historical Society. She tutored area students for

County Historical Society. She tutored area students for many years. She loved spend- ing time with her family and enjoyed making homemade buns and cookies.

Mass of Christian burial will be 11 a.m. Thursday at Immaculate Conception

Catholic Church, Ottoville with Fr. Joe Przybysz offici- ating. Burial will follow in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Ottoville. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Wednesday at Love- Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson Township (at the cor- ner of St. Rts. 224 & 634). Memorials contributions may be made to the charity of donor’s choice. Condolences may be sent to:

www.lovefuneralhome.com

Collision results in failure to yield

At 2:02 p.m. on Friday, a collision occurred when the driver of one vehicle failed to yield the right of way when turning left. Carolee Krietemeyer, 68, of Delphos was travel- ing eastbound on Fifth Street when she came to Main Street and proceeded through the intersection. Toneta Bryan Meeker, 69, of Elida

approached the intersection heading west and attempted to turn left onto Main Street, failing to yield the right of way to Krietemeyer and strik- ing her vehicle’s left side. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehi- cles. Meeker was cited for a failure to yield the right of way when turning left.

Vehicles collide in parking lot

At 3:31 p.m. on Sunday, a collision occurred when two vehicles collided while round- ing the corner of a building. Bonnie Merschman, 49, of Delphos, was traveling west-

bound in the parking lot of The Point Marathon and attempted

to turn north around the build-

ing to access the driveway

to Eastown Shopping Center

when Zachary Hardesty, 19, of Delphos, turned around the corner of the building from the Eastown driveway to enter The Point Marathon parking lot. The two vehicles collided. There were no injuries

and moderate damage to the vehicles.

No one was cited.

Henry Z. Schulte

damage to the vehicles. No one was cited. Henry Z. Schulte April 12, 1919 nov. 13,

April 12, 1919 nov. 13, 2010

Henry Z. “Bud” Schulte, 91, of Delphos died at 7 a.m. Saturday at his residence. He was born April 12, 1919, in Ottoville to Bernard and Lucy Martin Schulte. On Sept. 12, 1942, he married Germaine “Gerri” Mueller, who died May 21, 1979. He then married Evelyn Ziegler in 1981, who also pre- ceded him in death. On April 21, 2007, he married Mary Lou Siefker Schulte, who sur- vives in Delphos. Survivors also include son James (Mary Jane) Schulte of Delphos; daughter Mary Kay (Dennis) Core of Lima; stepsons James (Susan) Siefker, Mike Siefker, Louie (Jan) Siefker and Tom (Julie) Siefker; stepdaughters Nancy (Rodney) Watkins and Rosie (Marshall) Gaddy, Sue (Dave) Vonderwell and Barb (Randy) Stone; sisters Dolores (Joe) VanOss of Ottoville and Lorene (Norbert) Fuerst of Columbus Grove; grand- children Brad Huysman of Columbus, Scott (Amy) Schulte of Oak Harbor, Todd (Amy) Schulte of Delphos, Emily (Ryan) Rosebeck of Lima, Jeff (Sheila) Core and Chad (Cori) Schulte of Columbus and Geri (Dr. Tim) Imler of Indianapolis; and 17 great-grandchildren and 25 step-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by stepson Fred Siefker; granddaughter Amy Schulte; and sister Loretta Smith. Mr. Schulte was retired from Ford. He was a build-

Smith. Mr. Schulte was retired from Ford. He was a build- er and owner of Schulte

er and owner of Schulte Mobile Home Court. He was

a member of St. John The

Evangelist Catholic Church, Delphos Eagles, American Legion of Fort Jennings, United States Trotting Association and Ohio Harness Racing Association. He enjoyed woodworking

and was a huge Blue Jay fan. He loved his horses and he enjoyed polka music and dancing. He was a veteran

of the armed services during

World War II. Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at St. John The Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Melvin Verhoff will officiate. Burial will be in

Resurrection Cemetery, with military rites by the Delphos Veterans Council. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Tuesday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, where

a parish wake will begin at

2 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to St. John’s Parish Foundation.

LOTTERY

These Ohio lotteries were drawn Sunday:

Mega Millions Estimated jackpot: $16 mil- lion Midday 3

CLEVELAND

(AP)

6-1-0

Midday 4

1-6-0-9

Pick 3

5-6-0

Pick 4

4-9-7-9

Powerball

Estimated jackpot: $35 mil- lion rolling Cash 5

02-10-11-33-37

Estimated jackpot: $120,000 ten oH

02-03-12-26-30-34-36-41-

45-47-52-53-54-58-59-61-64-

68-71-73

The Delphos Herald

Vol. 141 No. 131

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager, Delphos Herald Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager William Kohl, general manager/ Eagle Print

The Daily Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $2.09 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $105 per year. Outside these counties $119 per year.

Entered in the post office

in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $2.09 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

Scholars of the Day

405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833 Scholars of the Day St. John’s Scholar of the

St. John’s Scholar of the Day is Mallory MacLennan. Congratulations Mallory!

Jefferson’s Scholar of the Day is Cory Osting. Congratulations Cory!

Scholar of the Day is Cory Osting. Congratulations Cory! ten oH Midday 04-11-23-26-27-31-34-35- Students can pick
Scholar of the Day is Cory Osting. Congratulations Cory! ten oH Midday 04-11-23-26-27-31-34-35- Students can pick

ten oH Midday

04-11-23-26-27-31-34-35- Students can pick up their

39-41-47-51-59-61-62-63-64- awards in their school offices.

68-69-73

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Monday, November 15, 2010

The Herald –3A

www.delphosherald.com Monday, November 15, 2010 The Herald –3A

STATE/LOCAL

OBITUARIES

15, 2010 The Herald –3A S TATE /L OCAL O BITUARIES Frank A. Clementz, Jan. 12,

Frank A. Clementz,

Herald –3A S TATE /L OCAL O BITUARIES Frank A. Clementz, Jan. 12, 1919 Nov. 14,

Jan. 12, 1919 Nov. 14, 2010

Frank A.

Clementz, 91, of Ottoville, died at 2:07 a.m. Sunday at Sarah Jane Living Center, Delphos. He was born Jan. 12, 1919,

in Cloverdale to Anthony and

Bernadina (Perrin) Clementz. On Nov. 27, 1947, he mar- ried Josephine Madonia, who died Feb. 23, 1998. Survivors include eight children, John Clementz of Ottoville, Peter (Patricia) Clementz of Cloverdale, Andrew (Judy) Clementz and Joseph (Cherri) Clementz of Ottoville, Mary (Jim) Mox of Delphos, Helen (Dale) Calvelage and Frances Kerner

of Fort Jennings and Josephine

(Eddie) Duling of Glandorf; 18 grandchildren; and 15 great-grandchildren.

Also preceding him in death was a son-in-law, Steve Kerner;

a grandson, Steve Kerner Jr.; and a great-grandchild. Mr. Clementz was a lifelong

dairy and crop farmer and also

a Monterey Township Trustee

for more than 20 years. He was a member of Immaculate Conception Catholic Church,

Ottoville, and its Holy Name Society. He was a World War

II Army veteran; life mem-

ber of Fort Jennings American Legion; life member Ottoville VFW, where he was former commander; and a member of Ottawa Eagles. Mass of Christian buri-

al will begin at 10:30 a.m.

Wednesday at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Ottoville,theRev.JoePrzybysz

officiating. Burial will follow

in the St. Mary’s Cemetery,

Ottoville with military rites by Ft. Jennings American Legion and Ottoville VFW. Friends may call from 2

to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Love-

Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson Township (on the cor- ner of St. Rts. 224 and 634), where there will be an American

Legion service at 7:30 p.m. Memorials are to donor’s choice. Condolences may be sent to www.lovefuneralhome.com.

BIRTHS

ST. RITA’S MEDICAL

CENTER

A boy was born Nov. 12 to

Lewis and Nicole Cheney of Fort Jennings.

A girl was born Nov. 12 to

Patrick and Crystal Flanagan

Martha Robuck Morris

May 1, 1914 - Nov. 12, 2010 Martha Robuck Morris, 96,

a longtime resident of Upper Arlington and recently of

Friendship Village of Dublin, passed away Friday. She was born May 1, 1914, in Gomer to Dr. O.S. and Margaret Thomas Robuck. She was preceded in death by her husband of 57 years, Robert J. Morris in 2004. Survivors include a daugh- ter Margo (Lynn) Swan of East Lansing, Mich.; a son, William R. “Bill” (Julie) Morris of Upper Arlington; six grandchildren, Jennifer Swan Tascarella (Peter) of Okemos, Mich., Daniel Robuck (Julia) Swan of Chicago, David Robert (Marybeth) Swan of Woodbury, Minn., Rebecca

Jane Swan of East Lansing and Abigail Noelle Morris and Emma Robuck Morris of Upper Arlington. Mrs. Morris was a lov- ing daughter, wife, mother and gramma devoted to her family as well as her many friends. Martha, a gradu- ate of Denison University, Granville, was a member of Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority, Delta Omicron music hon- orary, Mortar Board Senior Honorary and former teach- er at Horace Mann Junior High in Lakewood. After marriage in 1946 and a move to Columbus, she and Robert became members of

First Community Church in 1947. She was a past mem- ber of the Governing Board, Charter member and past

President of Guild Group N, and past President of the Women’s Guild Board and Couple Circle 7. Active in community affairs, she was

a member of First Sustaining

Board of Central Community House, longtime member of Life Care Alliance Service Board (Meals on Wheels), Welsh Society of Central Ohio Board, Allen County Historical Society of Lima,

Order of Eastern Star # 26 of Delphos and a 60-plus- year member of AAUW (American Association of University Women).

Graveside service were held at 11:30 a.m. today at Gomer Cemetery, the Rev. Brian Knoderer officiating. Memorial Service will be

held 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at First Community Church, 1320 Cambridge Blvd., Columbus, the Rev. James Long officiating. The family will receive friends following the service. Those who wish may con- tribute in her memory to Gomer United Church of Christ, 7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, OH 45809 or First Community Church Foundation, 1320 Cambridge Blvd., Columbus, OH 43212. Arrangements are by

Schoedinger Northwest Chapel, 1740 Zollinger Road, Columbus, OH 43221.

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Elmer C. Looser, 95, of Delphos died at 1:50 a.m.

Sunday at Vancrest Healthcare Center. He was born Oct. 4, 1915,

in Ottoville to William Sr. and

Dorothy (Bedink) Looser. On July 6, 1935, he mar- ried Jesslyn Hummer, who died July 7, 1979. Survivors include son Kenneth (Jeanne) Looser of Delphos; sister Ann (Robert) Buchanan of Evansville, Ind.; brother William (Lillian) Looser of Delphos; grand- children Kirk (Lisa), Cindy, K.C. (Deb), Craig (Sheila) and Kevin (Leslie) Looser of Delphos; great-grand- children Dustin, Kylee and Courtney Looser, Drew, Lindsey and Logan Looser, Tiffany Sensibaugh and Brad and Cody Looser; and great- great-grandchildren Brooks and Connor Sensibaugh. He was also preceded in death by his sister, Dorothy Looser; and brother and sister-in-law Romie (Marie) Looser. Mr. Looser retired as a foreman in shipping from Continental Can/Sonoco in 1973, where he worked for more than 30 years. He served in the U.S. Army in Japan during World War II. He loved all sports, primarily

in Japan during World War II. He loved all sports, primarily baseball and horseshoes, for which

baseball and horseshoes, for which he was in two world championship tournaments. He enjoyed following all his grandchildren and great- grandchildren’s events as long as he was able. He was a life member of Veterans of Foreign Wars and St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Delphos. A Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Jacob Gordon officiating. Burial will be in Resurrection Cemetery, with military rites by the Delphos Veterans Council. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Wednesday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home. Memorial contributions may be made to hospice or donor’s choice.

Missing

(Continued from page 1A)

television antenna on the roof sits in a lower-middle-income neighborhood with two bars within a block. Holly grows through the weathered slats

of the porch. A sheet covered

one window, and blinds were pulled down on the rest. Dawna Davis, 35, who lives next door to Hoffman,

said she told her children to stay indoors when he was out. She said he moved in alone about a year ago and that

a girlfriend lived with him

temporarily with her son until about a month ago. “He would sit and listen

to us up in a tree. He had a

hammock and he would sit there and listen to us,” she said. “He was just different. He was very different.” Davis said Hoffman did

tree trimming work and had built a fire Wednesday night in his backyard, where there was a mound of ashes Sunday with tree parts on it. She said he walked to a nearby park with a lake almost every day and was a “nature person” who collected leaves. Attempts to reach relatives of Hoffman and of Sarah were unsuccessful Sunday. Herrmann was reported missing Wednesday when she did not show up for work at a local Dairy Queen.

Barber has said blood indi- cating an injury had been found in her home, where Sprang’s vehicle was in the

driveway. Herrmann’s pickup truck had been found Thursday night near the Kenyon College campus, leading to a lockdown at the school.

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(2695) 939 E. Fifth, Delphos Howard L. Metzger Feb. 13, 1920 Nov. 13, 2010 Howard L.

Feb. 13, 1920 Nov. 13, 2010

Howard L. Metzger, 90, of Vaughnsville died at 11:22 a.m. Saturday at Lima Memorial Health System. He was born Feb. 13, 1920, in Allen County to Roy and Inez Metzger. On Dec. 31, 1943, he mar- ried Helen Elaine Barnes, who survives at Vancrest Healthcare Center in Delphos. Survivors include daugh- ters Kathy (Ed) Smith of Delphos and Sue (Bob) Huth of Findlay; grandchil- dren Marc (Melisa) Smith of Delphos, Jeff (Amy) Smith of Summerlin-Las Vegas, Brandon (Cheryl) Huth of Springfield and Amy (Justin) Hill of San Diego; and great- grandchildren Trey and Trysten Smith, Colin and Addison Smith and Jacob, Mitchell and Trevor Huth. He was also preceded in death by a brother, Darrell Metzger. Howard attended Gomer and Delphos Jefferson schools. He was a proud Navy veteran serving his country as an electrician aboard the USS LST 987 dur- ing World War II. He retired in 1980 as an electrician for Clark Equipment. He was honored by being Putnam County Senior Citizen of the Year. He was a Sugar Creek Township trustee for 16 years and a former member of Putnam County EMS Board and member of the Fort Jennings American Legion. Metzger was a member of Vaughnsville

October 25, 2010 MESSAGE TO THE WORLD of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Medjugorje, Bosnia-Herzegovina) “Dear

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(Medjugorje, Bosnia-Herzegovina)

“Dear children!

May this time be a time of prayer for you. My call, little children, desires to be for you a call to decide to follow the way of conversion; therefore, pray and seek the intercession of all the saints. May they be for you an example, an incentive and a joy towards eternal life. Thank you for having responded to my call.”

eternal life. Thank you for having responded to my call.” United Methodist Church and was extremely

United Methodist Church and was extremely proud of his Vaughnsville commu- nity, where he stayed active until his death by attending senior citizen events and the “coffee walks” at the com- munity center. One of his greatest loves was watch- ing the Jefferson Wildcats basketball team play. His family and the Vaughnsville community will miss him deeply. Services will begin at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Hartman Sons Funeral Home in Columbus Grove, Mary Ellen Bogart officiating. Burial will be in Vaughnsville Cemetery, with military rites. Friends may call from 5-9 p.m. today at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to Vaughnsville United Methodist Church or Vaughnsville Community Center.

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4A — The Herald

Monday, November 15, 2010

www.delphosherald.com

4A — The Herald Monday, November 15, 2010 www.delphosherald.com

POLITICS

“My father used to say superior people never make long visits.” — Marianne Moore, American poet (1887-1972)

visits.” — Marianne Moore, American poet (1887-1972) I T WAS NEWS THEN One Year Ago •

IT WAS NEWS THEN

One Year Ago

• Knights of Columbus Hallo”wine” committee member

Shelly Kreeger presented a check for $1,800 to St. John’s Elementary Principal Nathan Stant for a Civil War re-enact- ment for elementary students. Committee member Rose Morris presented a check for $1,475 to St. John’s Business Manager Ted Hanf for tuition assistance.

25 Years Ago — 1985

• Delphos Lions Club presented Delphos City Public

Schools Cafeteria Manager Sally Kiggins and her staff at

Jefferson High School with a microwave oven in apprecia- tion for the use of their kitchen and cafeteria Nov. 2 on Lions Pancake Day. Lion John Pitsenbarger said over 2,000 people were served at the event and thanked the staff for the use of their facilities and personnel in making the day “a success.”

• Doris Markley of Delphos submitted a photo to The

Herald of students and teachers at Delphos District 5 School

around 1908. Included in the photo were Dolly Macklin, Freddie Hempfling, Harmon Thatcher, Ralph East, Loren East, Carl Scott, Oscar Hempfling, Albert Hempfling, Zelle Scott, Dolly Veacher, teacher; Rushia Thatcher, Mable Bockey, Zada Jamison and Ida Hempfling.

• David Mesker, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Mesker of Fort

Jennings, is the new sports director for WBGU and WFAL radio stations at Bowling Green State University. Mesker, a junior radio-television-film major, also worked at WDOH-FM for three years and covered sports, news, weather and music.

50 Years Ago — 1960

• Edna Jane Nolte, state vice regent of the Catholic

Daughters of America, and Mary Landwehr, financial secretary of Court Delphos, Mrs. Martin Wahmhoff, Cecelia Kaverman and Ottillia Gable have returned from spending the weekend in Washington, D. C., where Nolte and Landwehr took part in the dedication ceremonies of the five chapels in the north apse of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. The five chapels, recently completed, were a gift to the shrine from the 209,000 members of the Catholic Daughters of America throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Nolte also attended a Leadership Institute held at the Sheraton Park Hotel. This session, presided over by Margaret Buckley, Chevy Chase, Md., supreme Regent of the Order, was for all state officers and district and territorial deputies.

75 Years Ago — 1935

• Final arrangements for “The Old Fashioned Girl,” to

be presented at Jefferson Auditorium Nov. 15 are being completed by the cast and various committees. The cast is as follows: Rebecca Jeffries, Jaunita Nollan; Bess Small, Mary Jean Brittingham; Miss Mills, Mary Louise Mills; Jane Bryant, Betty Rose Evans; Fanny Shaw, Adelphia Griffith; Trix Fenway, Eunice Myers; Miss King, Dorothy Miller; Polly Milton, Aline Redd; Maud Shaw, Adelphia Griffith; Walter Stigall; Mr. Sydney, Donald May; Mr. Shaw, Jack Porrott and Will Milton, Richard Redd.

• Mrs. Syl. G. Grothause was elected president of the ladies’

branch of the C.K. of A. at the regular meeting of the group held Thursday evening. Other officers chosen are: Spiritual Director, Rev. Father H. B. Lammers; vice president, Mrs. F. R. McKowen; treasurer, Mrs. John McRedmond; finan- cial secretary, Alola Brendle; recording secretary, Mrs. J. F. Shelbley; sergeant-at-arms, Mrs. Tony Van Autreve; sentinel,

Mrs. Frank Kart; trustee for three years, Mayme Imber; trustee for two years, Agnes Bockey; trustee for one year, Mrs. C. O. McKowen and pianist, Rita Wahmhoff.

• The members of the Ladies’ Aid Society and of the Mary

Martha Bible Class of the Christian church held a meeting Wednesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Peter Backus, South Washington Street. Mrs. Backus was assisted by Mrs. Charles Gould. Three new members were received into the Aid Society. They are Mrs. Peter Fuerst, Mrs. Cleve Patton and Mrs. William Emerick.

Moderately confused

Cleve Patton and Mrs. William Emerick. Moderately confused House ethics trial opens for Charles Rangel WASHINGTON

House ethics trial opens for Charles Rangel

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Charles Rangel of New York headed the House’s tax-writing committee but acknowledged shortchanging the Internal Revenue Service on his own tax bill. Now, a House ethics panel will judge whether filing an amended tax return and belatedly paying his

taxes and other financial and fundraising practices violated the congressional rule book. A rare ethics trial begins today for the representative from Harlem. Rangel’s career peaked in 2007 when he became chair- man of the Ways and Means Committee. It took a dive last March, when he relinquished that post after his corporate- funded travel was criticized in a separate ethics case. Rangel, first elected in 1970 and now 80 years old, appar- ently is without a lawyer. He and his defense team parted company a few months after he complained in an August speech on the House floor that

he could no longer afford legal

bills that had reached nearly

$2 million.

The ethics investigation goes back to at least July 2008. Only former Rep. James Traficant, D-Ohio, who was

expelled from the House after a criminal conviction, has faced

a similar trial since current

House ethics procedures were

adopted two decades ago. Key charges portray Rangel as a veteran congressman who thought he could ignore rules on disclosing his assets, and improperly used official resources to raise money for

a college center that was a

monument to his career. But an allegation that caught the public’s eye was his failure to declare rental income to the IRS from a resort unit he owned in the Dominican Republic. The case has generated its share of political game-playing. Republicans on the House eth- ics committee demanded that the proceeding be held before the election, when the trial of the House’s fourth-most-senior member could have embar- rassed Democrats. Democratic committee chairman, Zoe Lofgren of California, rejected the request. Rangel was charged by an investigative panel of four Democrats and four Republicans with 13 counts of violating House rules. If Rangel is found to have violated rules, the ethics com- mittee would meet to decide punishment. It could end the case with a critical report, or recommend a House vote expressing displeasure with Rangel’s conduct. The charges allege viola- tions include:

—A House gift ban and restrictions on solicitations. Rangel is accused of using congressional staff, letterhead and workspace to seek dona- tions for the Charles B. Rangel Center for Public Service at the City College of New York. The requests usually went to charitable arms of businesses with issues before Congress, including Rangel’s Ways and Means Committee. —A U.S. government code of ethics. Several allegations fall under this code, among them: Accepting favors (the Rangel Center donations) that could be construed as influ- encing Rangel’s congressional duties; acceptance of a rent- subsidized New York apart- ment used as a campaign office, when the lease said it was for residential use only; and failure to report taxable income.

Obama calls latest Israeli plan promising

By BEN FELLER The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama on Sunday hailed the prospect of a new settlement freeze in the disputed West Bank as a promising step toward peace, urging Israelis and Palestinians to get back into serious negotiations quickly. An upbeat president also pledged to return to the basic principles that drove his thinking when he first came to the White House, including sticking to a more biparti- san tone and better explaining his decisions to the American people. He spoke of moving from an “obsessive focus” on policy and making changes to his approach after a humbling midterm election. “The fact that we are out of crisis — although still obvi- ously in a difficult time — I think will give me the capac- ity,” Obama told reporters aboard Air Force One at the end of long Asia trip. On the Mideast, Washington’s new propos- al for reviving peace talks includes a 90-day ban on housing starts in West Bank settlements — but not in east Jerusalem, the Palestinians’ hoped-for capital. The goal is to give the two sides a three-month period to shape

borders of side-by-side states,

a daunting, elusive mission. Obama commended Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for making a “very constructive step” toward cre- ating an environment for peace.

“I think it’s a signal that he’s serious,” Obama said. U.S. officials said Netanyahu told the administra- tion that he supports the plan and will try to win approval from his Cabinet. Obama said he hopes the Israeli leader and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas will resume negotiations soon.

A previous 10-month mor-

atorium in the West Bank expired Sept. 26, and talks have stalled, casting doubt about the notion of a peace deal within a year’s time, as Obama has sought. Just a few days ago, during a stop in Indonesia, Obama acknowl- edged he was worried about the peace process and urged both sides to show more effort. Looking rested after two legs of an all-night flight from Asia, Obama on Sunday made an unannounced visit to the press cabin of Air Force One just before the plane landed at Andrews Air Force Base in Washington. The president sound- ed optimistic about getting Senate ratification of a new

U.S.-Russia nuclear arms

treaty during the postelection session of Congress, during which lawmakers try to push through matters before a new Congress convenes. The White House is work- ing furiously to round up the votes, warning that a failure would deeply undermine U.S.-Russia relations. As

a way to rally support, the

administration is proposing extra billions of dollars to

modernize the existing nucle-

ar arsenal. That’s a priority of Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., who

is seen as the key to round-

ing up Republican support for ratification. “Actually, I feel pretty good about our prospects,” Obama said. Obama said Congress should also reach a deal on extending certain George W. Bush-era tax cuts, soon due to expire, so that the middle

class does not get a tax hike in the new year. Republicans are pushing for an extension of tax cuts for wealthier Americans, too, and Obama is probably going to have reach at least a temporary deal on that. Later this week the presi- dent will hold a strategy ses- sion with Republican and Democratic leaders in the House and Senate. He joked

of his coming week, “I’m sure

it’ll be very relaxing.”

Congress back for lame-duck session

By JIM ABRAMS The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Seven weeks ahead of the GOP House takeover, hobbled Democrats and invigorated Republicans return today to a testy tax dispute and a lengthy to-do list for a post- election session of Congress unlikely to achieve any land- mark legislation. With change clearly in the air, more than 100 mainly Republican freshmen arrive on Capitol Hill to be schooled on the jobs they’ll assume

when the next Congress convenes in January. For Democrats, it’s another sad note as one of their most ven- erable members goes on trial on ethics charges. Lame-duck sessions are usually unpopular and unpro- ductive. Nothing suggests

otherwise this year. Republicans are looking ahead to January, when they will take back control of the House; many Democratic lawmakers and staff are more focused on cleaning out their desks and looking for new jobs. That doesn’t mean they can slack off. Congress must act before year’s end on expiring Bush- era tax cuts to protect millions of people from significant tax increases. Lawmakers failed to pass even a single annual spending bill this year, and

funds are needed to keep federal agencies financed and avoid a government shutdown. Doctors, mean- while, face a crippling cut in Medicare reimbursements. Democrats still command sizable majorities in the House and Senate, and have other ambitions for the lame- duck session. Most will go unfulfilled. There are efforts to give Social Security recipients a $250 check to make up for no cost-of-living increase next year; to extend unemployment benefits; to allow gays to serve

openly in the military; to ratify

a nuclear weapons reduction

treaty with Russia; and to extend government oversight of food safety. Congress will be in ses- sion for a week, break for Thanksgiving week and return on Nov. 29. Lawmakers will continue until they complete their work or give up. Most of the attention this

week will be on activities off the House and Senate floors.

In a back room of a House

office building, the House ethics committee will open the trial today of 80-year-old Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., the former Ways and Means Committee chairman charged with multiple ethics viola- tions. Elsewhere on the Hill, more than 100 incoming House and Senate freshmen start learning

the rules of decorum, how

to run a congressional office

and how not to get lost in the Capitol basement. Two Democratic senators — Joe Manchin, who won the seat of the late Robert Byrd of West Virginia, and Chris Coons, elected to Vice President Joe Biden’s Delaware seat — will be sworn in today. On Tuesday the Senate parties elect their leaders. Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada will continue to head the reduced

Democratic majority, with Sen. Mitch McConnell of

Kentucky still guiding the Republicans.

One uncertainty is wheth-

er Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., can get fellow Republicans

to accept a freeze on the pet

spending priorities of law-

makers known as earmarks for the coming session. “Americans want Congress to shut down the earmark

favor factory, and next week

I believe House and Senate

Republicans will unite to stop pork-barrel spending,”

DeMint said. Earmarks are one sub- ject being discussed by a 22-member GOP transition team that is drawing up plans on how the House will oper- ate when Republicans take over in January. That team includes four freshmen who ran almost universally on cut- ting the size of government and reducing spending.

White House moves to break impasse on arms pact

By DESMOND BUTLER The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In a

bid to win approval of a nucle- ar arms control treaty with Russia before newly ener- gized Republicans increase their clout in the Senate, the Obama administration is offering to add billions of dollars in funding for the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

A congressional aide

briefed on the proposed deal

said White House officials

outlined it to Republican Sen. Jon Kyl, who is seen as the key to winning enough sup- port to ratify the New START treaty. The aide spoke on con- dition of anonymity because he was not authorized to com- ment.

The offer was for a boost

of $4.1 billion in funding between 2012-2016 for the nuclear weapons complex that will go to maintaining and modernizing the arsenal and the laboratories that oversee that effort. Of that, $1 billion would cover a deficit in the pension fund for the agency in charge of the stockpile and laboratories. The additional money comes on top of an additional $10 billion the administration had already agreed to over 10 years.

The administration is scrambling to get enough Republican support in the Senate to ratify the New START treaty before the Democrats’ majority shrinks by six in January. In a sign of the urgency of the admin- istration’s pitch, government officials traveled to Kyl’s home state of Arizona to brief him on the proposal, the aide said. Officials also briefed

Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee. “This is a huge increase,” said Daryl Kimball, head of the private Arms Control Association. He noted that it is not certain that Congress will approve the funding, which will in any case have to be appropriated over time for each of the years in the proposal. The aide said that the administration has also con- veyed to Republican lawmak- ers that its offer is contingent on passing the treaty before the end of the year and that Democratic support for the increased funding would likely evaporate, if the treaty stalls. Details of the proposal were made available to Senate staff, including aides on the Appropriations Committee Friday. It was not clear whether

the offer had swayed Kyl and his office declined to com- ment. In Yokohama, Japan, where President Barack Obama was attending a Pacific Rim

summit, his national secu- rity adviser, Tom Donilon, said he couldn’t confirm the report. But he told reporters the administration has tried

to address “what had been a

real shortfall in funding for maintaining and enhancing the nation’s nuclear infra- structure.” Obama was to meet on Sunday with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on the summit margins. Donilon said his message would be the administration’s commit- ment to getting New START approved. “It’s important on the mer- its in terms of the arms con- trol aspects of the treaty,” the adviser said. “It’s impor-

tant for U.S. leadership in the world on the nonproliferation agenda. And it’s important for the U.S.-Russia relationship.” The treaty would reduce the limit on strategic war- heads to 1,550 for each coun- try from the current ceiling

of 2,200. It also would set up

new procedures to allow both countries to inspect each oth- er’s arsenals to verify compli- ance.

www.delphosherald.com

Monday, November 15, 2010

The Herald – 5A

www.delphosherald.com Monday, November 15, 2010 The Herald – 5A

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

TODAY 7 p.m. — Washington Township Trustees meet at

the township house. 7:30 p.m. — Jefferson Athletic Boosters meet at the high school library. Spencerville village council meets at the mayor’s office. Delphos Eagles Auxiliary meets at the Eagles Lodge,

1600 Fifth St.

TUESDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Area Visiting Nurses offer free blood pressure checks at Delphos Discount Drugs. 6 p.m. — Weight Watchers meets at Trinity United Methodist Church, 211 E. Third St. 6:30 p.m. — Delphos Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,

1600 E. Fifth St.

7 p.m. — Delphos Area Art Guild (DAAG) will meet at their new location in the second floor gallery of the Delphos Postal Museum of History at 339 N. Main St. 7:30 p.m. — Elida School Board meets at the high school office. Alcoholics Anonymous, First Presbyterian Church, 310 W. Second St.

Please notify the Delphos Herald at 419-695-0015 if there are any corrections or additions to the Coming Events column.

Seniors receive Honda-Ohio State Math Medal Awards

Eleven high-achieving Allen County high school seniors on Nov. 4 received the Honda/OSU Partnership Math Medal Award from a partnership between Honda of America Manufacturing Inc. and The Ohio State University. The award recognizes and honors the top senior math- ematics student in each West Central Ohio high school, for their achievements in math- ematics courses throughout high school. Class of 2011 Math Medal winners from Allen County and their high schools are Cody Lovejoy, Allen East; Jared Staley, Bluffton; Dulton Moore, Jefferson; Brad Gerberick, St. John’s; Jacob Luhn, Elida; Caitlin Kiracofe, Bath; Richard Brodbeck, Lima Central Catholic; Brandon Wreede, Lima Senior; Mitchell Herold, Shawnee; Zachary Miller, Perry; and Kaley Core, Spencerville. More than 300 family members, teachers and friends attended the breakfast ceremo- ny as the Class of 2011 Math Medal winners received their awards at Honda of America in Marysville. The award is presented by the Honda-Ohio State Partnership Program. The 2010 Math Medal Awards mark the seventh anniversary of the ceremony, and 206 seniors, the high- est number yet, received the award this year. There are currently four full classes of

Math Medal Scholars enrolled

at Ohio State in engineering.

The 2011 math schol- ars have the opportunity to apply for a Honda-Ohio State Partnership scholarship at Ohio State’s College of

Engineering. Recognized as their school’s top math student in the Class of 2011, each stu- dent received a pewter math medal, plaque and $100 gift card from Honda of America Manufacturing and Ohio State University’s College of

Engineering. In addition, the math medal award comes with

a $3,000 scholarship opportu-

nity at Ohio State’s College of Engineering for the 2011- 2012 academic year. Over the past five years, 55 Math Medal recipients have received the scholarships. “We are pleased to be able to reward students who excel in math and science and show

them that engineering is an area that may suit them well,” said Gregory N. Washington, inter- im dean, Ohio State College of Engineering. “These are all outstanding students, who we hope will pursue an education in engineering at Ohio State.” All 156 high schools near Honda operations in 15 west-central Ohio counties are asked to select their best senior math scholar for the Math Medal, based on aca- demic performance at the end of the student’s junior year in

2010.

Photo submitted Metzner honored for Optimist Club service Delphos Optimist Club President Michael Friedrich, left,

Photo submitted

Metzner honored for Optimist Club service

Delphos Optimist Club President Michael Friedrich, left, and Optimist Lt. Gov. of Zone 9 Harry Tolhurst, right, present member Jay Metzner with a lifetime mem- bership award and plaque honoring him for his year of service to the Delphos club. Metzner was president from 1993-94; 2005-06; and 2009-10.

Happy Birthday NOV. 16 Gerald Cross Grace Jones Donald Hammond Norma Kemper Aleena May

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6A – The Herald

Monday, November 15, 2010

www.delphosherald.com

6A – The Herald Monday, November 15, 2010 www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

Edwards wins at Phoenix, Hamlin’s big lead wiped out

By JENNA FRYER The Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. — Nobody would have been surprised if Denny Hamlin envisioned h o i s t i n g the Sprint Cup trophy as he led lap after lap around Phoenix International Raceway. He was dominating Sunday’s race, headed to at least a top-3 finish and one more monstrous step toward ending Jimmie Johnson’s 4-year run as NASCAR cham- pion. Then it all backfired. Poor fuel mileage forced Hamlin to make a late pit stop that cost him his comfortable lead in the standings. Instead of tak- ing a lead of almost 60 points over Johnson into next week’s season finale, Hamlin finds himself clinging to a 15-point margin. “It’s tough to not be happy having the point lead going into the last race. But we were sitting pretty,” Hamlin said. Was he ever. Hamlin led a race-high 190 laps, while Johnson and third- place driver Kevin Harvick couldn’t get near him on the track. And when Harvick was penalized for a loose lug nut on a late stop, nothing seemed to be in the way of Hamlin’s first career NASCAR title. Then cautions didn’t fall as they should have and race win- ner Carl Edwards was closing fast on his bumper, forcing Hamlin to burn fuel as he tried to preserve the win. His Joe Gibbs Racing crew knew he was going to be at least a dozen laps short of making it to the finish on his last tank of gas; crew chief Mike Ford called in the No. 11 Toyota for gas with 14 laps remaining. Hamlin was in second place when he headed to pit road, with a nearly 60-point lead over Johnson. The pit stop dropped him to 19th and he had to drive like a madman through the field trying to sal- vage his day. His crew watched and wait- ed for Johnson to make his fuel stop — Harvick’s penalty had given him the opportunity to make an extra stop for gas — but Johnson never ducked onto pit road. Crew chief Chad Knaus coaxed his driver around the track, urging him to conserve every final drop. It played out perfectly for everyone but Hamlin, whose rally still left him 12th. Johnson wound up fifth, Harvick was sixth and Hamlin’s lead going into Homestead-Miami Speedway is a mere 15 points over Johnson. Harvick is a manageable 46 points out. “Everybody made it on fuel; is that what you are tell- ing me?” Hamlin asked as he crossed the finish line.

“I know. That was ugly,” Ford replied. “That’s some- thing we’ve definitely got to work on.” “What do we got to work on? I don’t understand,” the frustrated d r i v e r replied. “ F u e l mileage,” Ford responded. “That was awful.”

It couldn’t have gone any worse for Hamlin, who com- pletely outperformed the com- petition but had little to show for it at the end. “I hate that it boils down to the final race,” Hamlin said.

hate that it boils down to the final race,” Hamlin said. Not Johnson. “We have one

Not Johnson.

“We have one heck of a points race going to Miami and I’m pumped,” he said. “I

am so happy to put pressure on the No. 11 team. We’re ready

to race for this thing. I hope

the pressure of us being on his

heels really works on his mind throughout the course of the week. One race, winner-take-

all, and it’s going to be a hell

of a show.”

A week after Knaus

benched his pit crew in the middle of Hamlin’s win at

Texas, the champions were riding high after stealing one

in Phoenix. They were clearly

off their game — Johnson had won the last three Chase for the Sprint Cup Championship

races at Phoenix — and never contended Sunday.

But as Ford huddled with

car owner Joe Gibbs and crew

members packed up their equipment in silence, Knaus

reveled in the final results just

a few feet away. Harvick seemed sunk when,

after leaving pit road in fifth after a caution with 90 laps

to go, he was called back by

NASCAR for a loose lug nut.

It dropped him to 18th but gave

him the chance to make an extra stop for gas that Hamlin and Johnson didn’t get. Rallying to finish sixth was more than he could have hoped for after what seemed to be a title-crushing penalty. Lost in the commotion of the title race was Edwards’ first win since the 2008 sea-

son finale. He ended that year as the popular pick to unseat Johnson but endured a miser- able 2009 and went almost two full years without a win.

His breakthrough came on

a rare “perfect weekend” in

NASCAR — Edwards won the pole, led every practice session and won the race, snapping a 70-race losing streak. Edwards also won the Nationwide Series event on Saturday. “A win is very important to us. It’s a very big accomplish- ment for us,” he said. “I think it’s something that we needed for our confidence. We needed

it as a payoff for all the hard

work the guys have put in at the shop, the engine depart- ment.

Turnovers doom Elida in regional semis

By JIM METCALFE

jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

PIQUA — Columbus Bishop Hartley had made a living forcing turnovers, earn- ing a plus-18 turnover mar- gin during its 9-1 march to Saturday’s Region 10 semifi- nal versus Elida. The Eagles’ defense did it again, picking off five Reggie McAdams passes in pac- ing a 21-7 victory over the Bulldogs at Piqua’s Alexander Memorial Stadium. “You can’t have turnovers like that against the No. 1 team in the state. We learned

a lot about taking care of the

football tonight,” Elida head man Jason Carpenter said. “A couple of Reggie’s passes were tipped, too. They came out in man-to-man in the red zone and brought pressure. We moved the football well

all night long but weren’t efficient once we got inside the red zone. We’ll have to work on those situations next year.” Columbus Bishop

Watterson takes on Tiffin

Columbian, a 13-7 victor over Clyde, at 7 p.m. Saturday at Ohio Wesleyan University’s Selby Stadium. “Our defense has done that

all year, forcing turnovers. Our line got more pressure on McAdams as the night wore on,” Watterson coach Dan Bjelac noted. “We never felt

comfortable all night with the

way their offense can score in

a hurry. They moved the ball

well but we stepped up when we needed to in order to keep them out of the end zone.”

The Bulldogs (9-3) opened the contest behind a hot McAdams (22-of-48 passing, 359 yards), who completed

4-of-5 passes for 71 yards in marching the ’Dogs to the

Eagle 14 from 20. A holding call stymied the effort and on play 8, with Nathon Jenkins out due to the effects of a concussion from last week, lefty-kicking junior Austin Etzler’s 31-yard field-goal try got caught up in the wind, which pushed it wide right at the 8:52 mark of the first period. Watterson gained the Elida 39 before kicking the ball away. The Bulldogs marched from the 20 to the Watterson

5 in 12 plays. However, on

4th-and-4, Carpenter elect- ed to go for the first down. McAdams’ pass to the left pylon was tipped at the line and intercepted at the 1 by Michael Szaraz, who ran it 83 yards down the right sideline to the Elida 16; a facemask call put the ball at the 8. It took four plays; on 4th-and- goal from the 1, Ray Cook busted in off right guard to

get the Eagles on the board. Tim Carter added the point- after for a 7-0 lead with 11:17 left in the first half.

after for a 7-0 lead with 11:17 left in the first half. Jim Metcalfe photo The

Jim Metcalfe photo

The Elida offense breaks the huddle with head coach Jason Carpenter to take the field Saturday against Columbus Bishop Watterson. The Bulldogs saw their 2010 season come to a finish on the wrong end of a 21-7 decision at the hands of the Eagles in the Region 10 semifinals at Piqua.

proud of what this team did all year, especially my seven seniors. They were around in the 0-20 days just a couple of years ago. They bought into what we were trying to do and were true leaders on and off the field. I have no doubt they will be successful at whatever

they do in the future.” It didn’t help Elida

that junior noseman Cole Montgomery was on the side- line due to injury.

That drive was just what the doctor order for CBW. “Andy started the opener and we know what he can do, though he hadn’t played a lot since then. Patrick injured his foot earlier in the game,” Bjelac added. “We have a

lot of guys we will run the ball with and we’re confident with any of them. That’s been another key for us; we don’t feature one guy but have a lot

of kids we can go to.” Elida tried to answer by marching from the 35 to the Columbus 12 in five plays but was knocked back to the 18. On play 8, Etzler, this time with the wind, missed wide right from 35 yards to keep the deficit at 14 at 4:20 in the third. Watterson got inside Elida space before being forced to punt, pinning Elida at its 14. On the first play from scrim- mage at the 9 (after a proce- dure penalty), McAdams tried to find Le down the right sideline but instead Connor Geraghty made a leaping pick at the Bulldog 42. The Bulldog defense forced a punt and again Elida moved the ball — they outgained the Eagles 393-248 — and got to the CBW 43 — before another McAdams pass was tipped and intercepted, this time by Zach Kerschner,

He added the conversion for

Elida answered with a 5-play, 78-yard reply, keyed by a 51-yard McAdams con- nection to senior Rikki Le (5 grabs, 107 yards). At the CBW 10, McAdams threw a

quick slant to the right side to Etzler (7 catches, 106 yards), who held the ball long enough

in the end zone for the six.

a 7-7 tie with 9:37 left in the

half. Columbus responded with

a drive from its 20 to the Elida 17 in 10 plays but the Bulldogs caught a break when Patrick Rhomberg (4-of-7

passing, 45 yards) was picked off by sophomore Anthony Sumpter at the 5. The Orange and Black gave

it back on the next play. Under

pressure, McAdams threw to the left side and overthrew

his receiver, instead finding Eagle cornerback Erik Oman

at the 26. He rolled down the

right sideline to the end zone. Carter made it 14-7 with 2:54 showing in the half. That effectively ended the half. Watterson opened the second half with a 10-play, 80-yard trek. Aided by a pair of penalties against Elida (7 for 54 yards) for 20 yards, plus a big 31-yard pass from backup quarterback Andy Elberson (2-of-2 passing, 66 yards) to Brad McCurdy (4 grabs, 91 yards), the score came from the Elida 3 as Matt Redfield (15 rushes, 68 yards) scooted in off left guard. Carter made it 21-7 with 6:40 left in the third. “That was the last thing we needed to happen. They also had the big 3rd-down conver- sion; we were right there with great coverage but the quar- terback threw it perfectly,” Carpenter added. “I am so

with a 26-yard return setting Watterson up at the Elida 44. Elida’s defense held but the offense could not move the ball this time, turning the ball over on downs at its 24 with 4:12 to go. CBW also turned the ball over on downs there and Elida took over with 2:19 to go. Helped by a personal foul on CBW, they got to the Columbus 6 in nine plays but for the fifth time, Watterson got a pick, this one by Cook, with 36 ticks to go. All CBW had to do was take a knee once to finish the time and end Elida’s season.

COLUMBUS BISHOP WATTERSON 21, ELIDA 7

Elida

0

Watterson 0

7

14

0

7

0 - 7 0 - 21

FIRST QUARTER No score SECOND QUARTER CB - Ray Cook 1 run (Tim Carter kick),

11:47

EL - Austin Etzler 10 pass from Reggie McAdams (Etzler kick), 9:37 CB - Erik Oman 26 interception return (Carter kick), 2:54 THIRD QUARTER CB - Matt Redfield 3 run (Carter kick),

6:40

FOURTH QUARTER

 

No score

TEAM STATS

 

Elida

Watterson

First Downs

18

11

Total Yards

392

248

Rushes-Yards

12-33

48-137

Passing Yards

359

111

Comps.-Atts.

22-48

6-9

Intercepted by

1

5

Fumbles-Lost

1-0

1-0

Penalties-Yards

7-54

7-60

Punts-Aver.

1-43

4-37.3

INDIVIDUAL ELIDA RUSHING: Colin Blymeyer 5-21, Reggie McAdams 6-12. PASSING: McAdams 22-48-359-5-1. RECEIVING: Kevin Kraft 8-127, Austin Etzler 7-106, Rikki Le 5-107, Jeremy Newby 1-15, Blymyer 1-4. COLUMBUS BISHOP WATTERSON RUSHING: Matt Redfield 15-68, Ray Cook 9-26, Michael Szaraz 6-17, Patrick Rhomberg 3-8, Mario Dean 3-6, Tim Carter 1-2, Andy Elberson 11-0. PASSING: Rhomberg 4-7-45-1-0, Elberson 2-2-66-0-0. RECEIVING: Brad McCurdy 4-91, Jimmy Gallagher 1-12, Erik Oman 1-8.

NBA CAPSULES

The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — Matt Bonner scored 21 points and just missed the Spurs’ franchise record by hitting all seven of his 3-point shots, helping San Antonio stretch its winning streak to seven games with a 117-104 victory against the Oklahoma City Thunder on Sunday night. Bonner swished home three

of his 3s during a 21-8 run to open the fourth quarter and the NBA’s best 3-point shooting team went 6-for-8 from behind the arc to pull away in the final period. Bonner led the way, fall- ing one shy of Steve Smith’s record for 3-point accuracy. He went 8-for-8 from 3-point range against Portland on Nov. 3,

2001.

Tony Parker scored 24 points, Manu Ginobili added 21 and Richard Jefferson had 18 for the Spurs. Kevin Durant had a sea- son-low 23 points and Russell Westbrook scored 19 for the Thunder. Suns 121, Lakers 116 LOS ANGELES — Jason

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Richardson scored 34 points and the Suns hit the second-

most 3-pointers in NBA history

to hold off the Lakers. The 2-time defending league

champions lost their second in

a row and first at home this

season. Steve Nash added 21 points and 13 assists, Channing Frye had 20 points and Hedo Turkoglu had 17 points for the Suns, who beat the Lakers at Staples Center for the first time since Jan. 17, 2008. The Suns were 22-of-40 from 3-point range, just missing the league record of 23 set by Orlando against Sacramento in January 2009. Their 3s were the most by a Lakers’ opponent in

franchise history, bettering their own previous record of 19 in

2005.

Rockets 104, Knicks 96 NEW YORK — Kevin Martin scored 28 points, Luis Scola added 24 and the Rockets

climbed a little further out of the hole they dug to start the season

by beating the struggling Knicks

104-96 on Sunday night.

Courtney Lee had 12 for the Rockets, who have won 3-of-4 after opening the season with

five straight losses. Even with- out injured starters Yao Ming and Aaron Brooks, they beat the

Knicks for the 13th time in 15 meetings. Amare Stoudemire scored 25 points for the Knicks, who were loudly booed in the fourth quarter of their fifth straight loss. After blowing a 21-point lead Friday in Minnesota, when they were on the wrong end of Kevin Love’s 31-point, 31-rebound performance, they missed their first eight shots in the final period to turn this game into a rout. Pistons 100, Kings 94 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Rodney Stuckey scored 17 points and Ben Gordon hit a late 3 that sent the Pistons over Sacramento, the Kings’ fifth straight loss. The Pistons have won 4-of-5 after their 0-5 start. Gordon’s 3-pointer from the corner put the Pistons ahead 99-94 with 23.9 seconds left. He finished with 16 points.

Tayshaun Prince had 14 points for the Pistons, Richard Hamilton scored 13 and Charlie Villanueva added 11. Tyreke Evans scored 20 points and Carl Landry had 19 points and eight rebounds for the Kings. Hawks 111, Timberwolves

105

ATLANTA — Al Horford had

28 points and 10 rebounds and

the Hawks beat Love and the

Timberwolves to end a 4-game losing streak. Love had 22 points and

17 rebounds in his first game

since posting 31 points and

31 rebounds in a win over the

Knicks, the NBA’s first 30-30 game since Moses Malone in

1982.

Horford needed three stitches for a cut on the top of his head following a collision with Anthony Tolliver late in the opening quar- ter. Horford returned midway through the second. Michael Beasley led Minnesota with 25 points. Josh Smith had 23 points and 10 rebounds for Atlanta.

All American Energy Natural Gas Facility Information

Although you may not be a customer of All American Energy we have pipeline facilities that may be on or near your property. These facilities serve our current customers in the Ottoville and Ft. Jennings area. These pipeline facilities are operated and maintained to ensure safe and reliable service for these areas.

We Want To Provide You With Information To Help Keep You Safe

Leakage Recognition and Response

How to recognize a gas leak:

1. A distinctive (gas) odor – rotten egg smell.

2. A shrill blowing or hissing sound.

3. Dirt being blown or thrown into the air.

4. Water being blown into the air at a pond, creek or

river.

5. Fire apparently coming from the ground or burning above the ground.

6. Patches or brown vegetation in a green grassy area on or near the pipeline right-of-way.

7. Dry spot on moist field.

8. Bubbles appearing on the surface of water.

If you suspect a natural gas leak please call 1-877-246- 5100. This is our 24 hour a day emergency number. If you smell gas in your home leave immediately and go to a neighbor’s house to call.

Ohio Utility Protection Service (OUPS) Call Before You Dig

If you are planning to do any digging on your property (planting trees, installing a fence, etc.) you are required by law to call the Ohio Utility Protection Service (OUPS). Their number is 1-800-362-2764. You can also reach them by dialing 811. This call must be made 48 working hours (2 working days) in advance of the planned work. This call initiates contact with your local utility companies so they can mark the location of their underground facilities on your property. Those facilities can then be avoided when you dig.

Additional Information

If you have questions, would like additional information or are interested in natural gas service please call All American Energy’s office at 1-888-527-2494.

www.delphosherald.com

Monday, November 15, 2010

The Herald — 7A

www.delphosherald.com Monday, November 15, 2010 The Herald — 7A
Photo submitted St. John’s held its annual season-ending banquet at the Little Theater. Members of

Photo submitted

St. John’s held its annual season-ending banquet at the Little Theater. Members of the team and their awards are, front from left, Megan Joseph (1st-year varsity and freshman numeral; No. 1 girls runner) and Julia Dickman; and back row, Todd Rode (2nd-year varsity letter; most improved; Academic All-MAC), Chris Goodwin (3rd-year varsity letter; captain’s pin; Academic All-MAC), Aaron Hellman (freshman numeral/1st-year varsity letter; No. 2 boys runner) and Jason Michel (4th-year varsity letter; captain’s pin; number one boys runner; Coach’s Award). The junior high runners for 2010 were 8th-graders Alex Odenweller and Anthony Hale and 7th-graders Curtis Pohlman and Anna Mueller.

REGIONAL FINAL PAIRINGS

2010 OHSAA Football Tournaments - Regional Final Pairings DIVISION I - All Games at 7 p.m. Saturday Unless Otherwise Noted Region 1: 1 Solon (12-0) vs. 3 Lakewood St. Edward (12-0), Parma Byers Field Region 2: 4 Toledo St. John’s Jesuit (11-1) vs. 3 Toledo Whitmer (11-1), Bowling Green State University Doyt Perry Stadium Region 3: 1 Pickerington Central (11- 0) vs. 2 Hilliard Davidson (12-0), Upper Arlington Marv Moorehead Stadium Region 4: 8 Huber Heights Wayne (9-3) vs. 6 Cincinnati St. Xavier (7-4), Dayton Welcome Stadium DIVISION II - All Games at 7:30 p.m. Friday Unless Otherwise Noted Region 5: 4 Ashland (10-2) vs. 2 Mentor Lake Catholic (11-1), Brunswick High School Judy Kirsch Field Region 6: 5 Maple Heights (12-0) vs. 3 Olmsted Falls (9-3), Baldwin- Wallace Tressel Field at George Finnie Stadium Region 7: 5 Sunbury Big Walnut (10- 2) vs. 3 Uniontown Lake (9-3), Ashland University Jack Miller Stadium Region 8: 4 Trotwood-Madison (10-2) vs. 2 Kings Mills Kings (11-1), Princeton High School Mancuso Field DIVISION III - All Games at 7 p.m. Saturday Unless Otherwise Noted Region 9: 4 Akron Buchtel (9-3) vs. 6 Youngstown Cardinal Mooney (7-4), Ravenna Stadium Region 10: 1 Columbus Bishop Watterson (10-1) vs. 3 Tiffin Columbian (11-1), Ohio Wesleyan University Selby Field Region 11: 1 Alliance Marlington (12-0) vs. 7 Dover (10-2), Canton Fawcett Stadium Region 12: 4 Eaton (12-0) vs. 2

Cincinnati Archbishop McNicholas (10-2), Mason Dwire Field at Atrium Stadium DIVISION IV - All Games at 7:30 p.m. Friday Unless Otherwise Noted Region 13: 1 Akron Manchester (12- 0) vs. 2 Chagrin Falls (11-1), Nordonia Bill Boliantz Stadium Region 14: 4 Genoa Area (12-0) vs.

3 Orrville (9-3), Avon Lake Memorial Stadium Region 15: 1 Ironton (10-2) vs. 3 Columbus Bishop Hartley (10-2), Logan Chieftain Stadium Region 16: 5 Kenton (11-1) vs.

6 Kettering Archbishop Alter (10-2),

Wapakoneta Harmon Field DIVISION V - All Games at 7 p.m. Saturday Unless Otherwise Noted Region 17: 1 Youngstown Ursuline (12-0) vs. 2 Kirtland (12-0), Aurora Veterans Stadium Region 18: 4 Lima Central Catholic (11-1) vs. 7 Jeromesville Hillsdale (11- 1), Findlay Donnell Stadium Region 19: 1 Oak Hill (11-1) vs. 2 Fredericktown (12-0), Columbus Hamilton Township Hamilton Field Region 20: 5 Coldwater (9-3) vs. 2 West Jefferson (12-0), Northmont Good Samaritan Stadium DIVISION VI - All Games at 7:30 p.m. Friday Unless Otherwise Noted Region 21: 5 McDonald (10-2) vs.

2 Mogadore (12-0), Twinsburg Tiger Stadium Region 22: 1 Delphos St. John’s (12-0) vs. 2 McComb (12-0), Findlay Donnell Stadium Region 23: 1 Shadyside (11-1) vs.

2 Bridgeport (12-0), St. Clairsville Red Devil Stadium Region 24: 8 Minster (7-5) vs. 2 Sidney Lehman Catholic (11-1), Piqua Alexander Stadium

Bills, Cowboys, 49ers win during Week 10 in NFL

The Associated Press

Buffalo finally has a win. To get it, the Bills had to extend a record losing streak by their opponent. Dallas has its second win, the first for Jason Garrett as an NFL head coach. San Francisco got its third

victory of the season and, yes, might be climbing into con- tention in the NFC West. After three straight close calls, the Bills made sure there would be no 0-16 teams this season by beating the only franchise to manage that ignominious feat, the Lions, 14-12 on Sunday. The win at Orchard Park, N.Y., gave Detroit a 25-game road skid, snapping a league record it held with, who else, itself. “At the end of the game,

I saw a fan pull up a sign that said something about ‘the streak continues’,” Detroit receiver Nate Burleson said. “It’s definitely frustrating.” The frustration of being the NFL’s only winless club

is over for the Bills, who got

two touchdowns from Fred

Jackson: a 1-yard plunge and

a 16-yard catch in a sloppy

game played in rain-soaked conditions between two perennial losers.

Buffalo (1-8) ended what had been its worst start to a season since going 0-11 in 1984. The Lions (2-7) broke

the road losing streak they set

in dropping 24 in a row from

2001-03.

“Our fans deserve it,” Bills defensive tackle Kyle Williams said. “The guys in the locker room deserve it. To go out there and win a foot- ball game, it means a lot.”

A 33-20 victory against the New York Giants meant some- thing extra to the Cowboys, who had lost five in a row,

costing Wade Phillips his coaching job. Garrett moved up from offensive coordinator on Monday and Dallas (2-7)

made a slew of big plays to snap a 5-game winning string for New York (6-3). “The key today was we made the plays when we had to make the plays as opposed to not making the plays the first eight weeks of the season,” linebacker Keith Brooking said. “We stuck together. We fought and we did everything in our power to get the win today.” San Francisco is 3-6 after its 23-20 OT win against the Rams but that merits con- sideration as a contender to win the NFC West, where the leader is Seattle at 5-4. Joe Nedney kicked a 29-yard field goal with 9:38 left in overtime and Troy Smith passed for 356 yards against St. Louis (4-5). “When you’re part of a

team that has nothing but a winning tradition, you want to keep that going as a quar- terback,” Smith said, over- looking the 49ers’ current 7-year absence from the play- offs. “There’s too many tre-

mendous athletes here to not share, for everybody to not have the opportunity to make

a play.” Also Sunday, it was Jacksonville 31, Houston 24; the New York Jets 26, Cleveland 20 in OT; New England 39, Pittsburgh 26; Seattle 36, Arizona 18; Chicago 27, Minnesota 13; Denver 49, Kansas City 29;

Miami 29, Tennessee 17; Indianapolis 23, Cincinnati 17; and Tampa Bay 31, Carolina 16. The weekend began with Atlanta beating Baltimore 26-21 on Thursday night. Tonight’s match- up is Philadelphia (5-3) at Washington (4-4). Off this week are Green Bay, New Orleans, Oakland and San Diego.

———

Bills 16, Lions 14 Buffalo’s win wasn’t assured until Detroit’s Shaun Hill overthrew Brandon Pettigrew at the back of

the end zone on a failed 2-point conversion attempt with 14 seconds left. The Lions had pulled within two points on Hill’s 20-yard TD pass to Calvin Johnson. “It was really frustrating, especial- ly coming here and feeling we were the better team,” Johnson said. “We weren’t thinking about the streak. That should have ended it. But it didn’t.” Cowboys 33, Giants 20 Jon Kitna passed for 327 yards and three touchdowns in a game delayed twice by short power out- ages at New Meadowlands Stadium. Kitna had TD passes of 13 yards to rookie Dez Bryant, 71 to halfback Felix Jones and 24 to Miles Austin as Dallas (2-7) rolled for the QB’s first win since 2007. Rookie cornerback Bryan McCann scored on a team-record 101-yard interception return. 49ers 23, Rams 20, OT At San Francisco, Smith earned his second straight victory as a starter, throwing a go-ahead 16-yard touchdown pass to Michael Crabtree with 2:10 left in regulation. After Sam Bradford and Steven Jackson led the Rams back for Josh Brown’s 33-yard field goal on the final snap of regulation, St. Louis couldn’t get a first down after winning the overtime coin toss. Smith swiftly moved the host 49ers 55 yards to the winning field goal. Jaguars 31, Texans 24 At Jacksonville, Fla., Mike Thomas caught a 50-yard touch- down pass from David Garrard that Houston defensive back Glover Quin batted into his hands on the final play in regulation. The game looked as if it was going to overtime but Garrard heaved a pass toward the end zone with no time on the clock. Quin, who was burned all afternoon, tried to bat the ball to the ground. Instead, he knocked it right to Thomas, who was trailing behind the play and looking for a ricochet. He caught it at the 1-yard line and then stepped across the goal line for the winning score. The Jaguars (5-4) went into a frenzy and even drew a celebration penalty that couldn’t be enforced. The Texans (4-5) trudged off the field in disbelief. It was Houston’s third straight loss. Jets 26, Browns 20, OT At Cleveland, New York (7-2) won a second straight away OT game and its eighth in a row on the road. Santonio Holmes scored on a 37-yard touchdown pass from Mark Sanchez with 16 seconds left in overtime, offsetting three missed field goals by Nick Folk, including a 47-yarder in OT. The Browns (3-6) had rallied to force OT on rookie quarterback Colt McCoy’s 3-yard TD pass to Mohamed Massaquoi with 44 sec- onds left in regulation. Patriots 39, Steelers 26 At Pittsburgh, Tom Brady main- tained his mastery of the Steelers, throwing three touchdown passes to Rob Gronkowski and scoring once himself as the Patriots tied the Jets for the AFC’s best record. No NFL team wins more on its home field than Pittsburgh but no opposing player wins there like Brady, who has won 6-of-7 overall against the Steelers and four out of five at Heinz Field. He was 30-of- 43 for 350 yards with no sacks or interceptions and now has 14 career TD throws and three interceptions against the Steelers (6-3). Pittsburgh (6-3) played most of the game without wide receiver Hines Ward (neck), whose streak of 186 consecutive games with a reception ended. Seahawks 36, Cardinals 18 At Glendale, Ariz., Matt Hasselbeck returned from a 1-game

absence to throw for 333 yards, Mike Williams caught 11 passes for 145 yards and Olindo Mare kicked five goals. Williams, out of the NFL the past two seasons after flopping in Detroit, had career highs for catches and yards as the visiting Seahawks (5-4) swept the Cardinals (3-6). Arizona lost its fourth straight, its longest skid since dropping eight in a row in 2006. Bears 27, Vikings 13 At Chicago, Jay Cutler threw for three touchdowns, Devin Hester had two big returns and Chicago (6-3) moved into a tie with Green Bay for the NFC North lead. It was a rough day for Brett Favre and the Vikings (3-6), who needed to win and beat the Packers next week to jump back into the division race. Favre had 170 yards passing after getting a career-best 446 last week against Arizona. Favre threw three interceptions — all in the second half — and Chicago held Adrian Peterson to 51 yards rushing. Broncos 49, Chiefs 29 At Denver, Kyle Orton threw a career-high four touchdown pass- es, Tim Tebow had two TDs and Knowshon Moreno topped 100 yards for the first time. The Broncos (3-6) snapped a 4-game losing streak and handed the Chiefs (5-4) their second straight loss. The only time the Broncos scored more points was in 1963, when they put up 50 against the San Diego Chargers. Dolphins 29, Titans 17 At Miami, the Dolphins (5-4) achieved a season-high points total. It took three quarterbacks, a flea- flicker and the revival of the wildcat. Defense helped, too. Randy Moss managed only one catch in his first game with the Titans and Miami takeaways led to two touchdowns. After Miami quarterbacks Chad Pennington (shoulder) and Chad Henne (knee) departed with injuries, third-stringer Tyler Thigpen led an 85-yard drive in the fourth quarter to seal the bizarre victory. The Dolphins snapped a 5-game home losing streak, including three losses this season. Tennessee (5-4) lost coming off a bye for the first time in five years. Kerry Collins started at quarter- back for the Titans and struggled through the first half before depart- ing with a calf injury. Vince Young replaced him despite a sprained left ankle and threw for only 92 yards with two turnovers. Colts 23, Bengals 17 At Indianapolis, Peyton Manning didn’t throw a TD pass for the second game this season but Kelvin Hayden returned an interception for a touch- down and Javarris James ran for a TD. The banged-up Colts (6-3) didn’t need Manning’s arm. They scored 17 points off five turnovers and stopped the Bengals twice in the final 2:40. The Bengals (2-7) have lost six straight and dropped to 0-7 against Manning. Buccaneers 31, Panthers 16 At Tampa, Fla., Josh Freeman threw two touchdown passes and rookie LeGarrette Blount ran for a score. Freeman threw TD passes of 8 yards to Arrelious Benn and 20 yards to Kellen Winslow for the NFL’s youngest team. Blount scored on a 17-yard run that finished a long second-quarter drive as the Bucs (6-3) rebound- ed from a 6-point loss to Atlanta. Cadillac Williams put the game out of reach with a 45-yard TD burst late in the fourth quarter. Rookie quarterback Jimmy Clausen made his fourth start for injury-riddled Carolina (1-8), which got 100 yards rushing from fourth-string running back Mike Goodson.

NBA

The Associated Press

 

W

L

Pct

GB

EASTERN CONFERENCE

New Orleans

8

0

1.000

Atlantic Division

San Antonio

8

1

.889

1/2

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Dallas

6

2

.750

2

Boston

8

2

.800

Memphis

4

6

.400

5

New Jersey

3

6

.333

4 1/2

Houston

3

6

.333

5 1/2

New York

3

7

.300

5

Northwest Division

Philadelphia

2

8

.200

6

W

L

Pct

GB

Toronto

2

8

.200

6

Utah

7

3

.700

Southeast Division

 

Denver

5

4

.556

1 1/2

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Oklahoma City 5

4

.556

1 1/2

Orlando

6

3

.667

Portland

6

5

.545

1 1/2

Atlanta

7

4

.636

Minnesota

3

8

.273

4 1/2

Miami

6

4

.600

1/2

Pacific Division

Charlotte

3

7

.300

3 1/2

W

L

Pct

GB

Washington

2

6

.250

3 1/2

L.A. Lakers

8

2

.800

Central Division

 

Golden State

6

4

.600

2

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Phoenix

5

4

.556

2 1/2

Chicago

5

3

.625

Sacramento

3

6

.333

4 1/2

Milwaukee

5

5

.500

1

L.A. Clippers

1

9

.100

7

Indiana

4

4

.500

1

Cleveland

4

5

.444

1 1/2

Detroit

4

6

.400

2

——— Saturday’s Results

 

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Utah 96, Charlotte 95 Orlando 91, New Jersey 90

Indiana 99, Cleveland 85 Miami 109, Toronto 100 Chicago 103, Washington 96 Boston 116, Memphis 110, OT New Orleans 107, Portland 87 Milwaukee 79, Golden State 72 San Antonio 116, Philadelphia 93

Sunday’s Results Atlanta 111, Minnesota 105 Detroit 100, Sacramento 94 San Antonio 117, Oklahoma City 104 Houston 104, New York 96 Phoenix 121, L.A. Lakers 116

Today’s Games Minnesota at Charlotte, 7 p.m.

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Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Chicago at Houston, 8:30 p.m. New York at Denver, 9 p.m.

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w w . d e l p h o s h e r a l d

Anniversary

Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bockey Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bockey of Delphos, will celebrate 30

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bockey

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bockey of Delphos, will celebrate 30 years of marriage on Nov. 15. Joseph Bockey and Doris Bonifas were united in marriage on Nov. 15, 1980, at Ottoville Immaculate Conception Catholic Church the Rev. Roger Bonifas offi- ciating. They have three children, Jason (Jen) Bockey, Julie (Ryan) Moenter and Jeanne Bockey. Doris is employed by the City of Delphos. Joe is employed by Eaton Corp. and is a self-employed farmer.

Engagement

Engagement Elling/Drerup Michael and Nancy Elling of Delphos announce the engagement of their daughter, Lisa Catherine,

Elling/Drerup

Michael and Nancy Elling of Delphos announce the engagement of their daughter, Lisa Catherine, to Mark David Drerup, son of David and Martha Drerup of Delphos. The couple will exchange vows on Dec. 31 at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church in Delphos. The bride-elect is a 2006 graduate of The Ohio State University. Her fiance is a 2008 graduate of The Ohio State University and is employed by WHEMCO Ohio Foundry.

Engagement

Engagement Ocker/Warnecke Larry and Mary Jane Ocker announce the engagement of their daughter, Elaine, to Craig

Ocker/Warnecke

Larry and Mary Jane Ocker announce the engagement of their daughter, Elaine, to Craig Warnecke, son of Steve and Amy Warnecke of Delphos. The couple will be united in marriage on Nov. 27. The bride-elect is a 2002 graduate of Bellevue Senior High School. She earned her bachelor’s degree at Tiffin University in 2007 and her MBA in 2009. She is employed by Sequoia Real Estate Management and Tiffin University. Her fiance is a 2001 graduate of St. John’s High School and a 2005 graduate of Bowling Green State University. He is employed by Capital One.

‘Megamind’ continues box office reign

BY CHRISTY LEMIRE The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Will Ferrell’s dastardly schemes continue to succeed, with the animated “Megamind” staying at the top of the box office. The DreamWorks Animation 3-D comedy, fea- turing Ferrell as the voice of a super villain, made just over $30 million in its second week in theaters, according to Sunday studio estimates. It’s now made nearly $90 million total. “Megamind” also fea- tures the voices of Brad Pitt, Tina Fey and Jonah Hill. Opening in second place is the 20th Century Fox action thriller “Unstoppable,” starring Denzel Washington and Chris Pine as railroad workers try- ing to stop a massive runaway train. It made $23.5 million. The movie is based on a 2001 Ohio incident in which a train carrying hazardous cargo trav- eled 66 miles without a crew.

Last week’s No. 2 film, “Due Date,” fell to the third spot with $15.5 million. The Warner Bros. comedy features Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis as opposites stuck together on a cross-country road trip. It’s now made $59 million in two weeks. Among the weekend’s other new releases, “Skyline” opened in fourth place with $11.7 million. The Universal Pictures sci-fi thriller depicts aliens invading and destroying Los Angeles. And “Morning Glory,” a Paramount comedy set in a network morning show starring Rachel McAdams, Harrison Ford and Diane Keaton, opened at No. 5 with about $9.6 million. Anne Globe, head of worldwide marketing for DreamWorks Animation, said positive word of mouth helped “Megamind” remain on top. “It’s exciting because audi- ences are clearly responding very well to the movie,” said

Globe. “This was a decided No. 1 again. We were only down 35 percent, which is a pretty terrific hold for the movie.” But “Megamind” is the rare family movie in theaters these days, which also helps, said Hollywood.com analyst Paul Dergarabedian. Next week, the

feverishly anticipated first half of the “Harry Potter” finale, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1,” debuts. “Up until ‘Megamind’ the marketplace was virtually devoid of any family films,” Dergarabedian said. “The R-rated films were dominat- ing: You had ‘Paranormal Activity 2,’ ‘Saw 3-D,’ ‘Jackass 3D.’ Then there was

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dramas: ‘Secretariat,’ ‘The

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movies for older audiences like ‘Red.’” The fact that “Megamind”

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younger audiences, he said:

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Palin’s TV series a stage for political future?

By RACHEL D’ORO The Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — “Sarah Palin’s Alaska” por- trays the show’s heroine as an adventure-loving wife and mother enjoying a whirlwind of activities amid spectacu- lar settings in her home state. There are no overt clues to her future political ambitions. However, throughout the first episode of the eight- part TLC documentary series beginning Sunday, Palin’s outdoorsy image against the stunning scenery often plays nicely with her familiar politi- cal message. One telling scene shows Palin and members of her family fishing near a bear and two frolicking cubs. Cut to the Tea Party darling and her self-sufficiency speech. For months, Palin has referred to strong Republican female can- didates as “mama grizzlies.” “I love watching these mama bears,” Palin tells the

TLC camera. “They’ve got a nature, yeah, that humankind could learn from. She’s trying to show her cubs, ‘Nobody’s gonna do it for ya. You get out there and do it yourself, guys’.” Translation: Stop relying on government. That scene and others are sure to suggest to some view- ers that the former Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee is positioning herself for a 2012 presidential run. There are other messag- es that seem to conflict with those ambitions, though. Palin talks about her love of wild Alaska, offering in one well- known homily, “A poor day of fishing beats even a great day at work.” In a promo for the show with a montage of outdoor scenes, she says, “I’d rather be doing this than in some stuffy old political office” and “I’d rather be out here being free.”

“Kids love 3-D. Kids love the gimmicky thing.” “Unstoppable,” the fifth film Washington has made with director Tony Scott, debuted slightly better than the $21.4 million average open- ing of their collaborations. Previously, they’d worked on “Crimson Tide,” “Man on Fire,” “Deja Vu” and “The Taking of Pelham 123.” The movie had surprisingly good reviews for an action pic- ture — 86 percent positive on Rotten Tomatoes — and the audience was evenly divided between men and women, said Bert Livingston, general sales manager for 20th Century Fox “It doesn’t happen very

often, but when you get reviews like that and people like the movie so much, and they come out and tell their friends, it’s the first weekend but it’s just a beginning,” Livingston said. Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, accord- ing to Hollywood.com. Final figures will be released today.

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The Herald — 9A

www.delphosherald.com Monday, November 15, 2010 The Herald — 9A

SARA NOEL

Frugal

Living

15, 2010 The Herald — 9A SARA NOEL Frugal Living Use ice cube trays for leftovers

Use ice cube trays for leftovers

Ice cube trays are perfect little organizers. They can be used to freeze herbs, coffee/ tea and baby food. They stack easily, so use them to organize jewelry, loose change, tacks, paper clips, small screws and bolts or buttons. They’re great to hold different-colored paints for kids or candies, a variety of dips, to grow seeds or as a candy mold. The first tip has one more way to use them. ICE CUBE TRAY USE:

Even when I have only just a

bit, I like to freeze leftover(s) in ice cube trays then transfer to a Ziploc bag(s). I write down what

I put into these bags on a running list on my fridge or otherwise.

I incorporate the frozen cubes

into new recipes that I’m already making. For example, if I am making spaghetti, and I have 4 cubes of leftover Goulash in the freezer, I could add this to the sauce. Or if I am making chili or vegetable soup, I could add the cubes. By having cubes, you are separating the leftovers so

everything doesn’t get dumped into a pile in a container in the refrigerator or freezer. Instead of one frozen chunk, you have all these small little individual cubes that thaw quicker and are more versatile to incorporate into many recipes you already have on your menu plan. I also use the ice cube idea to freeze vegetable and beef broth and yogurt starters. Each cube is approximately 2 tablespoons, too. -- herbsgirl, e-mail CAMP TIPS: I usually go camping with a group -- at least

a few other friends and family --

so we can share resources. We’ll plan out the main meals and split up who brings what, and do the same with games, equipment, etc. Not only is it more fun with more people, but you can also save money by not having to provide everything you’ll need on your own. For instance, while each person needs to have their own sleeping bag, you only need one Coleman stove for the group, so if one person has that, you don’t need to go buy one. -- Suzanne, e-mail CLEAN OVEN RACKS:

Sandwich your racks between sections of newspaper until they are all covered in paper. Slip the whole thing into a garbage bag. Add about 2 cups of ammonia to the bag and close it. Let it sit overnight, and when you take the racks out, they will wipe clean like magic. If you have any

black chunks from spills, they will flick off with a butter knife.

It stinks but it sure works. I have

been a landlord for 40 years, and have used this tip hundreds of times. I even forgot the bag on one job and it all became dried out. I added hot water and let it sit 30 minutes, and everything wiped off. -- Sandee S., Iowa

Ask Mr. Know-It-All

The comedian and his consorts

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS

1

Information

5

“Sheila” singer Tommy

8

Impend

12

Enjoy a novel

13

Samovar

14

Fete

15

Lacking moisture

16

Irresistible

18

Double agents

20

— kwon do

21

Garden implement

22

Backed out

25

TV band

28

Clever ploy

29

“Iliad,” e.g.

33

Bad-mouth

35

Tolkien hero

36

Make a call

37

Horseshoes throw

38

Weakens gradually

39

Lower jaw

41

Acorn maker

42

Ticket giver

45

“— Miserables”

48

“Star Wars” rogue

49

Football plays

53

Got the best of

56

— & the Gang

57

Let loose

58

Vane dir.

59

Proof word

60

Hefty book

61

Depot (abbr.)

62

Take a load off

DOWN

1

Tot of whiskey

2

Space preceder

3

Comet feature

4

Viper

5

Daiquiri ingredient

6

Spouts rhetoric

7

Hold rapt

8

Size above med.

9

Firm promise

10

Potpourri

11

Medieval weapon

17

Before marriage

19

Suit material

23

Habit wearer

24

Bruce or Laura

25

Foul-ball callers

26

Joke response (hyph.)

27

Failure

30

Kelly’s possum

31

“Good —!”

32

Wine stopper

34

Technical sch.

35

Penalized

37

Criticize

39

Persuades

40

Up front

43

Letter after pi

44

Weatherman Al

45

Art studio, maybe

46

Drachma successor

47

Flower part

50

Had on

51

Seasonal libations

52

Coin receiver

54

Retainer

55

Gov’t narcs

 

1234

       

567

     

891

0

1

1

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By Gary Clothier

either

to Samantha the character or Elizabeth Montgomery

herself? -- B.W., e-mail

A: Elizabeth Montgomery received the necklace, a puffed pave diamond heart pendant, from her husband, director- producer William Asher,around

some significance to it

Jack, Mo., is a suburb of St. Louis with a population of less than 7,000? Its name comes from a grove of blackjack oak trees that once grew by the riverbank where the town is now located. Q: I just watched a show on PBS about unusual buildings.

It featured a giant shoe house

in Pennsylvania, a drugstore in the shape of a mortar and pestle in Kentucky and a clam- box house in Massachusetts. The narrator had a great voice for the show. His first name is

Rick, but I missed his surname. It seems to me that he has

several other similar programs. What can you tell me about Rick? -- O.H., Belleville, Ill. A: Rick Sebak hosted the show, titled “A Program About Unusual Buildings & Other Roadside Stuff” (2004). Born in 1953, Sebak now lives and works in Pittsburgh, Pa. In 1984, he created his first scrapbook documentary called “Shag,” about a popular dance in the Carolinas. He has since been the creative force behind nearly three-dozen films. Some of his other nostalgic projects include “Things That Aren’t There Anymore” (1990), “Stuff That’s Gone” (1994), “An Ice Cream Show” (1996), “Things That Are Still Here” (1999), “Great Old Amusement Parks” (1999) and “To Market to Market to Buy

a Fat Pig” (2007). Popular on

Q: W.C. Fields had a wife

who died in a barroom brawl. I

think she was also the mother of his son. Who was she? -- B.K.W., Gallup, N.M. A: W.C. Fields had only

one wife. He married Harriet

“Hattie” Hughes, a fellow vaudevillian in 1900. In 1904, they had a son named William Claude Fields Jr.

His wife wanted him to leave

show business and find a

“respectable” job. He said no,

so

goodbye. But

they

divorced.

In

job. He said no, so goodbye. But they divorced. In Elizabeth Montgomery 1963. Made white gold

Elizabeth

Montgomery

1963.

Made

white gold

of

or

the

measured nearly an inch and it became

a prominent

part of her on-

air wardrobe

until around episode 100, when she wore it

less and less. Some say that is around the time her marriage began to fall apart. The TV

series ran from 1964 to 1972, the marriage from 1963 to

platinum,

heart

she

said

to 1972, the marriage from 1963 to platinum, heart she said W.C. Fields never another August

W.C. Fields

never

another

August

1917, Fields

had

son with his

girlfriend,

Bessie Poole.

A Ziegfeld

Follies

performer, Poole had met Fields at the

Amsterdam Theater in New

York City. She was killed in a bar fight, and their son grew up in foster care. In 1932, Fields began a relationship with actress Carlotta Monti that lasted until his death in 1946. Monti appeared in small roles in several movies with Fields. She also wrote a biography, “W.C. Fields and Me” (1971),

that was made into a movie in

1973.

Q: George Burns and Gracie Allen had two children.

Whatever happened to them? -- Y.L.D., Odessa, Texas A: When George Burns and Gracie Allen realized they were unable to conceive,

they adopted two children. In 1934, Sandra Jean joined the family. A shy child, she made only occasional appearances

on the show with her mother

and father. She quit acting to

become a schoolteacher. Born

1976.

Q: I have been watching

in 1935, Ronald (Ronnie)

PBS, the documentaries often

reruns of the TV series

became a member of the family

air during pledge drives.

“Bewitched” with my granddaughter. We were wondering about the heart

at 3 months old. He later joined the cast of “The Burns and Allen Show,” playing the role

Send your questions to Mr. Know-It-All at AskMrKIA@

necklace that Samantha wore.

of

the son. He gave up acting

gmail.com or c/o United

We think she wore it in every

in

the early 1960s and passed

Feature Syndicate, 200

episode, or almost every one.

away in November 2007.

Madison Ave., New York, NY

Do you know if there was

Did you know

Black

10016.

Reader asks for more information on sickle-cell anemia

DEAR DR. GOTT: I would like

to express my opinion about your recent article on growing pains. The lady stated that her grandson would awaken crying with severe pain in his wrists, ankles, knees and hands. These could be the result of growing pains or of sickle-cell disease. I was the mother of a child with sickle cell for 30 years. I remember, as a 24-year-old parent, my 6-month-old baby waking up crying in pain. The doctors could not find anything wrong until I asked them to test him for sickle cell. They found that he was in a sickle-cell crisis. Since this is a hereditary disease found mostly in African-Americans and some Latinos, you should have asked the grandmother about her nationality. I lost my child at the age of 30. I hope this can help save the lives of children who may be affected. DEAR READER: Sickle-cell anemia is an inherited condition that causes abnormal red blood cells (RBCs). Those with the disorder produce inadequate amounts of healthy RBCs, which are round,

flexible and move easily through the vessels. They also produce RBCs that are rigid, sticky and shaped like crescent moons or sickles (hence the name). These abnormal cells do not flow easily through the body and often get stuck in small vessels, which can slow or block blood flow and

DR. PETER J. GOTT

On

Health

can slow or block blood flow and DR. PETER J. GOTT On Health oxygen to parts

oxygen to parts of the body. In order to have a child with sickle-cell anemia, both parents need to have the abnormal gene that causes it to develop. The child must then inherit this gene from both parents. Each parent is a carrier and produces both normal and sickle-cell types of hemoglobin and may even produce some sickle cells in their own blood but do not typically develop symptoms. Carriers of the gene have a 50 percent chance of having a child who is a carrier and a 25 percent chance of having a child who is either totally unaffected or who has sickle- cell anemia. There are several other variations of these statistics based on genetics; therefore, it is important for those who may be carriers to undergo genetic testing in order to weigh the risks to any unborn child. The condition most commonly occurs in those of African, Spanish, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Indian ancestry. Symptoms of sickle cell include

anemia (low levels of RBCs and hemoglobin), jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), delayed growth, frequent infection, hand-foot syndrome (swelling of the hands and feet), visual problems and episodes of pain, also known as sickle-cell crises. Complications include gallstones, pulmonary hypertension, acute chest syndrome, stroke, organ damage, skin ulcers and priapism. There is no certain cure, but there is a potential for one with bone- marrow transplant; however, finding a matching donor is difficult, and the procedure itself carries serious, even life-threatening, risks. Treatment options include

antibiotics for children, pain relievers during crises and hydroxyurea, a cancer-treatment drug that may be beneficial to those with severe disease. Some people also benefit from red-blood-cell transfusions and supplemental oxygen therapy. It is also important to assess and monitor stroke risk. Several experimental treatments currently being studied may bring new hope. These include gene therapy, nitric oxide, butyric acid, Nicosan and clotrimazole.

lanced diet, supplemental folic acid, avoiding extreme temperatures and high altitudes and more. The only sure way for carriers to prevent having a child with sickle-cell anemia is not to have children. There is a type of in-vitro fertilization that can prevent it; however, it is expensive and not guaranteed.

2010, United Feature

Syndicate, Inc.

Copyright

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