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Quinteto
Latino ,
a
wind
quintet
 specializing
in
the
interpretation
of
Latin
 American
classical
and
contemporary


music,
was
founded
in
2001
by
French


hornist
Armando
Castellano.
These
 passionate
artists
and
enthu siastic
 educators
have
dedicated
themselves
to
 performing
with
world ­ class
artistry
in
 communities
not
traditionally 
served
by
 classical
musicians. 
By
championing
 young
and
lesser ­ known
composers
of
 Latin
American
and
Caribbean
heritage,
 Quinteto
Latino
se eks
to
expand
the
 boundaries
of
classical
music,
reach
new
 audiences,
and
inspire
new
generations
of


QUINTETO
LATINO 


W IND
 Q UINTET

Kyle
Bruckmann,
oboe
 
Diane
Grubbe,
flute
 

 Shawn
Jones,
bassoon
 
Leslie
Tagorda,
clarinet


A rmando
Castellano,
Founder
and
Director,
French
horn


“Every
country
has
its
own
sounds,
rhythms,
instruments,
songs
and
danc e.
 Music
helps
us
understand
the
people
who
make
it,
even
if
they
live
far
away.” ‐ 
Aliki

Join
Quinteto
Latino 
for
a
very
special
trip
 around
the
world
through
the
joyful
and
 colorful
music
of
Latin
America
and
beyond.
 Quinteto
Latino
share
their
musical ‐ cultural
 roots
and
stories
through
the
works
of
folkloric
 and
contemporary
masters,
connecting
 students
with
themselves,
one
another
and
the
 world
community.
Through
movement,
gesture
 and
focused
listening
strategies,
students
gain
 an
understanding
of
musical
ideas
and
 concepts
while
learning
about
building
 community
out
of
rich
diversity…
and
have
lots
 of
fun
along
the
way!
Students
will
enjoy
music ‐ making
as
the
“percussion
section”
in
this
 highly
interactive
presentation
of
Nuestras Raíces
de
Música .
 


RE PERTOIRE Györgi
Ligeti
 – 
Bagatelle
 (short,
fun
piece
of
music)

 b.
Romania,
(1923
 – 
2006)
 José
Luis
Hurtado 
 (Arr.)– 
 Son
de
la
Bruja 
 (Song
of
the
Witch), 
 Traditional
folk
song ,
Me xico,
 contemporary
composer
and
pianist
 Astor
Piazzolla
 – 
Libertango
 (Freedom
Tango)
 Calambre
 (Spasm)
Argentina ,
composer
and
bandoneon
player
 
 (1921
– 
1992)
 Carmen
Melendez
Romero 
 (Arr.)
– 

Sones
de
Betaza
 (Songs
 from
Betaza)
Mexico,
contemporary
composer
and
flutist
 George
Friedrich
Händel
 ‐ 
 Hornpipe 
from
Water
Music , 



 b.
 Germany
worked
in
England 
 
 (1685‐ 1759)
 Billy
Strayhorn

 – 

Take
the
A
Train ,
USA ;
American
jazz
 composer,
arranger
and
pianist
(1915
– 
1967)
 Queen
Lili’uokalani
 ­
 Aloha
‘Oe 
(Farewell
to
Thee)
 Hawaii ;
last
 reigning
Hawaiian
monarch;
(1838
– 
1917)
 Siyahamba 
(Marching
Song),
 Traditional,
Africa
 Wolfgang
Amadeus
Mozart 
 ‐ 
 Turkish
March ,
Austria
 
 (1756‐ 1791)
 Jarabe
Tapat í o
 – 

 Traditional
folk
song (Mexican
Hat
Dance) 
 


California
Instructional
Standards
Alignment
and
 Connections
for
Grades
K ­6: 

California
Instructional
Standards
Alignment
and

Connections
for
Grades
K ­6: 

A
NOTE
TO
TEACHERS
AND
PARENTS:

VISUAL
AND
PERFORMING
ARTS 
 – 
MUSIC 

Artistic
Perception

• Gr.
K
 ‐ 
1.2
Identify
and
describe
basic

elements
in
music

(high/low;
fast/slow;
loud/soft;
beat). 

• Gr.
3
‐ 
1.4
Identify
visually
and
aurally
the
4
families
of

orchestral
instruments.

• Gr.
3
‐ 
1.5

Describe
the
way
in
which
sound
is
made
on

various
instruments.

Aesthetic
Valuing 

• *Gr.
1
‐ 
 4.1
‐ 
Create
movements
to
music
that
reflect
focused

listening. 

• *Gr.
3
‐ 
4.3
Describe
how
specific
musical
elements

communicate
particular
ideas
or
moods
in
music.

The
Quinteto
Latino
performance,

accompanying
activities
and
materials
in
this

guide
have
been
developed
in
alignment
wit h

the
California
instructional
standards

identified
in
the
opposite
column.
Activities
as

well
as
instructional
materials
may
be
readily

adapted
for
various
grade
and/or
student

ability
levels,
K ‐ 6.
Activities
may
be
done

before
or
after
the
performance
as

appropriate. 

Historical/Cultural
Context 

Gr.
1
‐ 
 3.4

Use
developmentally
appropriate
 movements
in

responding

to
music
from
various
genres,
periods
and

styles
(rhythm,
melody,
form).

HISTORY/SOCIAL
SCIEN CE

Gr.

1
‐ 
 1.5.1
Students
describe
the
human
characteristics
of

familiar
places
and
the
varied
backgrounds
of
American

citizens
and
residents
in
those
places

Gr.
2
‐ 
 2.2
Students
demonstrate
map
skills
by
describing

the
absolute
and
relative
locations
of
people,
places
and

environments.


• Gr.
6

‐ 
2.0
Students
construct
various
time
lines
of
key

events,
people
and
periods
of
the
historical
 era
they
are

INSIDE
THIS
GUIDE:

California
Instructional
Standards
and
Connections
Gr.
K ‐ 6


 p.
2
Vocabulary 
 


 p.
3
Before
the
Performance


p.

4

• Audience
behavior

• Mini ‐ lesson:
Introducing
the
 wind
instruments
 

• Focused
listening
skills
and
strategies 

After
the
Performance



 p.

7

More
explorations
of
timbre/tone
color 
 


 p.


7 ‐ 9

Other
connections:

Visual 
Art 


 p.

10

Social
Science/Geography
 


 p.

11

Resources


 p.

13

Activties
S heets

Supplement 




 Wind
instruments,
community
music
map,
world/country
maps
 


2


Vocabulary 


 
 

Music

Spanish
language

 

wind
quintet 


¡Buenas
tardes! 
 – 
Good
afternoon


w

oodwind
Family


¡

Buenos
Dias !
 – 
 Good
morning

b

rass
Family

 








 


Quinteto
Latino
 – 
5
m usicians
(Quintet) 


 
 

flute 


Latino
 – 
People
or
things
that
come
from
Latin
America


oboe


¡Bienvenidos! 
 – 
Welcome 


 

clarinet 


quinteto
(cinco
músicos) 
 – 
quintet:
five
musicians
 


French
horn


la
flauta
 – 
flute 


b

assoon


el
flautín
 – 
 piccolo

timbre


el
oboe
 – 
oboe


rhythm


el
fagot
 – 
bassoon


t

ango 


el
clarinete
 – 
clarinet 


folk
songs 


el
corno
 fancés 
 – 
French
horn


Latin
America


 

community 


Words
for
“music”
in
other
languages

 

Romania 


muziki
(Swahili)

Me xico


Muzik
 (German)


Hawaii 


mele;
pilaho’okani
 (Hawaiian)

A

frica


música
 (Spanish)

Argentina 


 

Germany


 
   
 

BEFORE
THE
PERFORMANCE


A
friendly
word
about
 audience behavior …


Quinteto
Latino
assemblies
are
highly
accessible, 
friendly
and
offer
young
concert‐ goers
ample
 participation
 opportunities.
Nevertheless,
it’s
useful
to
observe
certain
rules
and
behaviors
during
the
performance.
This
 will
contribute
to
a
more
gratifying
and
enjoyable
experience
for
everyone
involved — stu dents,
teachers,
 and
musicians
alike! 


Make
behavior
expectations
and
consequences
clear.
For
example,
students
are
not
allowed
to
run
in
the
 theatre,
chew
gum
or
talk
to
each
other
during
the
performance.
 M ake
these
rules
explicit
to
students.
Role ‐ playin g
how
to
behave,
especially
how
to
use
appropriate
audience
etiquette
is
worthwhile. 


Sit
quietly
and
LISTEN
during
a
performance.
Do
not
talk
or
fidget
with
the
programs
or
other
items.
 


Turn
off
cell
phones,
pagers
and
other
things
that
beep
or
otherwise
make
noise.


Do
not
get
up
and
leave
during
a
piece
unless
it's
an
emergency
or
to
remove
an
unruly
child.
Wait
until
the


piece
being
performed
has
been
finished.
Doing
otherwise
is
disrespectful
to
the
performers.



Cameras
with
flash
bulbs
should
not
 be
used
as
the
flash
can
temporarily
blind
those
on
stage.
 


Cat ‐ calls
and
booing
are
rude
and
strictly
not
allowed.
 


Warm
applause
at
the
end
of
performing
a
piece
is
always
welcomed! 

 
 


Adapted
from
Tips
on
Audience
Etiquette
by
Kim
J.
Teal 
 http://kjt.glis.net/tealflutestudio/Etiquette.html

Focused
Listening
Skills
 ­
Strategies 
 


We
have
a
tendency
to
disdain
the
strange
or
the
unfamiliar.
Music
is
a
powerful
tool
to
stretch
the
conce pt
 of
the
familiar
and
serve
as
a
vehicle
for
teaching
tolerance,
flexibility,
and
respect
for
diversity.
This
can
 begin
with
students
discussing
how
music
is
an
expression
of
our
humanity
and
culture
and
a
way
of
 expressing
and
understanding
ourselves.



A
simple
but
powerful
strategy
for
cultivating
openness,
expanding
musical
taste,
as
well
as
strengthening
 capacity
for
artistic
perception
includes
guiding
students
to 


Listen
with
a
purpose,
e.g.,
to
identify
instruments
they
hear,
voices,
the
beat,
musi cal
elements,
style,
 genre
etc.


Describe
what
they
hear
without
evaluating
it
for
preferences


Listen
to
pieces
several
times
(at
least
three,
with
different
purposes)
to
familiarize
themselves
with
 it 


Experience
the
piece,
(or
selected
excerpt)
as
a
whole
to
be
enjoyed
and
not
solely
as
an
object
of
 study


Using
this
approach,
students
can
be
guided
to
cultivate
their
 capacity
to
sustain
attention,
 focus
and
 concentration.
Following
are
activities
that
elaborate
on
the
approach. 


Listening with a purpose

Listening
goes
beyond
hearing;
listening
is
about
 understanding .
The
richness
of
music
offers
much
to
 be
 understood.
Deeper
listening
can
be
developed
through
discussions
that
focus
on
important
details.



Providing
students
with
a
purpose
to
guide
their
l istening
goes
a
long
way
toward
addressing
any
potential
 problems
with
audience
etiquette;
more
importantly , 
it
deepens
student
access
to
the
learning
experience
 offered
by
the
presentation.


Introducing
the
wind
quintet
instruments
 – 
Mini ‐ lesson
outline

Students
examine
pictures
of
instruments
and
listen
to
recordings
of
each. 


Focus
on
the
instrument
voices
to
see
what
you
notice.
 


Students
share
out:
 


- How
does
the
sound
of
these
instrument
voices
make
you
feel?


- What
does
the
sound
of
these
instruments
make
you
think
of? 


Generate
vocabulary
using
the
questions
above
and
capture
words
on
a
word
wall
 – 
for
students
who


are
ready
to
generate
a
richer
or
more
advanced
descriptive
vocabulary,
assign
overused
or
 minimally
descriptive
words,
 such
as
happy,
sad,
f ast
slow , 
to
the
“Graveyard”
 


Hold
students
accountable
for
evidence
for
their
ideas
with
follow‐ up
questions
such
as:



-

What
makes
you
think
that?
Why
do
you
think
so? 


EXTENSION 


Develop
the
concept
of
how
sounds
express
emotions.
Ask
students
to
make
sounds
that
are
tired,
 happy,
fearful,
surprised
or
mysterious.
They
can
listen
to
an
instrument
of
their
choice
to
hear
how
 that
instrument
expresses
those
and
other
emotions
in
the
music.


To
hear
the
individual
voices
of
the
instruments
(in
an
electronic
version),
you
can
visit
the
website,
 
 SFS
Kids
Fun
with
Music. 
Click
on
Instruments
of
the
orchestra
– 
woodwinds
(for
the
French
horn
click
on


brass).

http://www.sfskids.org/templates/home.asp ?pageid=1

You
can
also
listen
to
recordings
of
wind
quintet
music,
such
as
the
 Imani
Winds 
recording
entitled
The
 Classical
Underground,
featuring
original
compositions
and
works
by
Latin
American
composers.

Students
can
work
with
the
 Instruments
of 
the
Wind
Quintet
 activity
sheet 
(found
in
the
 Activities
 Sheets
section
of
the
study
guide)
as
they
prepare
for
the
performance.
 


Wind Quintet = TIMBRE!

The
voices
of
the
woodwind
quintet
are
particularly
distinctive
and
convey
character,
emotion
and
mood
 through
their
rich
palette
of
tone
color.
Listening
to
music
made
by
the
woodwind
quintet
offers
an
 opportunity
for
a
rich
exploration
of
color
or
timbre .

Timbre
(pronounced
“TAM‐ ber”)
is
the
basic
element
 of
music
that
describes
“the
aspects
of
a
musical 
sound
that
do
not
have
anything
to
do
with
the
sound’s
 pitch,
loudness
or
length.
If
a
flute
plays
a
note,
and
then
an
oboe
plays
the
same
note,
for
the
same
length
of
 time,
at
the
same
loudness,
you
can
tell
the
difference
between
the
sounds,
because
a
f lute
sounds
different
 from
an
oboe.
The
difference
is
in
the
timbre 
of
the
sounds.
You
can
think
of
it
as
the
general
sound
one
 would
expect
of
a
type
of
instrument.”
(Catherine
Schmidt
Jones ,
 Timbre:
the
Color
of
Music )


The
following
prompts
may
be
used 
for
purposeful
listening
of
a
recording
before
the
performance,
or
they
 can
be
assigned
to
students
to
provide
a
purpose
for
listening
as
they
go
into
the
Quinteto
Latino
 performance.



Scaffolding
explorations
of
timbre 
 


Each
instrument
chosen
to
be
in
 a
piece
has
a
reason
for
being
there
that
adds
to
what
the
composer
is
 trying
to
 communicate 
within
the
work. 


Students
can
choose
to
pay
spec ial
attention
to
the
timbre
of
one 
 particular
instrument 
of
the
wind
 quintet.
 
Ask
the
students
to
note
as
they
li sten:


- When
does
the
instrument
get
a
chance
to
“show
off”?
 


- What
happens
to
the
music
when
the
voice
of
that
instrument
comes
into
the
music?
 


- What
happens
when
that
voice
is
missing
from
the
music?
 


What
happens
when
the
different
instruments
play
the
sam e
musical
phrase?
How
does
the
 character
of
the
phrase
change?
* 


*
Listen
for
this
in
Astor
PIazzolla’s
 Calambre,
which
is
composed
as
a
fugue . 

A
fugue
is
a
special
type
of
 music
where
each
individual
musical
voice
has
a
chance
to
add
its
voice
to
the
gr oup
one
at
a
time .
E ach
 instrument
adds
its
voice
by
taking
turns
playing
the
subject
phrase
or
tune
(melody). 


Preparing to meet the musicians - generating questions

Students 
can
take
a
moment
to
reflect
upon
and
note
their
responses
to
the
following
qu estions:


Do
you
play
or
would
you
like
to
play
an
instrument?
If
so,
which?
 


What
musician
(or
other
artist)
would
you
like
to
meet?
What
three
questions
would
you
ask
this
 person?


What
would
you
like
to
know
more
about
or
be
able
to
do
in
music
(or
in
an other
art
form)?


Encourage
students
to
bring
at
least
one
question
to
the
performance
that
they
might
be
willing
to
ask
the


musicians.


EXTENSION 
AND
FURTHER
DISCUSSION
 Quinteto
Latino
is
a
woodwind
quintet.
The
woodwind
quintet
is
a
small
chamber
ensembl e.
Often,
chamber
 ensembles
do
not
have
conductors
standing
in
front
of
the
group,
as
orchestras
do.

How
do
the
musicians
 know
when
to
play?
How
does
the
group
of
musicians
decide
when
to
play?
What
is
your
hypothesis?
See
if


your
hypothesis
is
correct
when
you
experience
the
performance.
After
the
performance,
ask
the
musicians


questions
to
see
if
your
hypothesis
is
correct.


What
skills
are
needed
to
be
a
successful
member
of
a
musical
ensemble?
(leading,
following,
 listening
and
responding,
taking
turns) 
How
are
these
skills
like
the
skills
you
need
to
be
a
good
 member
of
a
sports
team?
Your
class?
Your
school?
Your
community? 


AFTER
THE
PERFORMANCE
 


Debrief
Discussion 


• What
did
you
notice
about
the
instruments? 
 •
What
did
you
notice
about
the
instruments? 

What
did
you
notice
about
the
music
in
the 
 live 
performance?

How
did
the
music
make
you
feel? 

What
feelings
were
expressed
in
the
music?

Where
you
surprised
at
any
point
during
the
performance?

What
got
you
curious? 

What
is
one
thing
you
could
find
out
more
about? 

What
was
the
high
point
of
the
per formance?

What
have
you
learned
about
in
listening
to
this
music? 

SAMPLE SENTENCE STEMS
I
heard
the

(instrument)

express
 (feeling/emotion)

during
the
performance.


It
was
in
the
piece
called (title
of
the
piece)

.

The

(instrument)

makes
a
_(adjective)

sound.

The
sound
of
the

(instrument)

makes
me
think
of


.
 

Following
are
additional
activities
for
the
exploration
of
the

concept
of
timbre
in
music
and
in
other
areas
as
well,

including
connecti ons
with
 visual
art. 

 Unless
otherwise

indicated,
these
and
the
aforementioned
activities
are

adapted
from
music
seed
strategies
found
in
Claudia
E.

Cornett’s
Creating
Meaning
through
Literature
and
the
Arts ,

Fourth
Edition.

MORE TIMBRE ACTIVITIES
A. Sound Mini-field trip
1. Students
go
to
classroom
windows
and
listen
closely

to
the
sounds
outside, 
OR 

2. Students
listen
to
school
and
body
sounds
and

rhythms;
give
students
a
set
amount
of
time
for
this

focused
listening . 

3. Ask
students
to
identify
the
sounds
they
heard. 
 

4. Students
can
label
the
sounds
as
fast
or
slow,
 

high
or
low. 

7


MORE TIMBRE ACTIVITIES…

B. Guess who?

1. A
panel
of
5
stud ents
comes
to
the
front.
All
students
close
their
eyes. 


2. “Leader”
taps
one
panel
member
on
the
shoulder.
Tap ped
person
says,
 “Who
did
that? “
loud
enough
for
the
entire
class
to
hear. 


3. Students
open
their
eyes
and
guess
who
spoke.


4. Each
time
a
name
is
guessed, 
ask,
“How
did
you
know?” 


5. Coach
for
answers
to
describe
the
uniqueness
of
voices.


6. You
can
repeat
the
activity
and
have
students
sing,
“Who
did
that?”
Stress
 that
each
speaking
and
singing
voice
is
unique. 


C. Name that Instrument (Using a variety of hand percussion/rhythm instruments)

1. Label
each
instrument
(e.g.
tambourine,
shaker,
etc.) 


2. Students
experiment
with
rhythm
instruments
to
become
familiar
with


their
sound
qualities.


3. A
student
volunteers
to
be
IT.
Students
close
their
eyes
as
IT
plays
an


instrument. 


4. Students
guess
which
instrument
was
played
and
give
reasons
for
their


choice.


5. Stress
that
each
instrument
has
a
unique
sound,
even
though
some
sound


similar.


VARIATION:
Use
a
CD
or
selection
from
your
Ipod
featuring
orchestral


instruments
or
other
musical
instruments
(guitar,
banjo,
 etc.)
Older
students
or


more
experienced
students
who
can
recognize
the
timbre
of
most
instruments


might
enjoy
playing
 Name
that
Instrument 
with
a 
 piece
of
music
that
features


many
different
instruments
in
quick
succession.



Pieces
to
try:


Danzón 
 – 
Arturo
Marquez

(See
Fiesta
 CD
in
Resource
Section)


Rodeo
 – 
Aaron
Copland 


Rite
of
Spring 
 –
Igor
Stravinsky 


D. Instrument cards (Using a CD or selection from your Ipod)

1. Distribute
cards
with
pictures
of
instruments
featured
in
the
recordings.


2. Ask
children
to
hold
up
the
card
that
corresponds
with
the
instrument


when
they
hear
its
timbre. 
 EXTENSION:
Have
students
come
up
with
a
gesture
or
body
shape
that
expresses

 the
timbre
of
the
selected
instruments.
You
can
have
a
discussion
abou t
how
that
 gesture
or
shape
expresses
the
timbre
of
the
instrument.
Students
then
perform
 the
gesture
or
shape
when
they
hear
its
timbre
in
the
music
selection.

 


8


STILL MORE TIMBRE ACTIVITIES… 
 


E. ADJECTIVE BLITZ - Language Development/Academic Language Adapted
from (Catherine
Schmidt
Jones,
 Timbre
Activities )


1.

Students
listen
to
excerpts
from
music
selections
featuring
individual
instruments. 


2.

Brainstorm
adjectives
that
describe
the
timbre
of
the
individual
instruments.
Some
words
that
 musicians
often
use
to
describe
timbre
are



 

bright
/
dark 


warm 


scratchy


full
/
thin 


rich


intense


heavy
/
light 


mellow 


piercing



rounded
/
edgy


reedy


strident



 

brassy


harsh


breathy 


If
students
have
trouble
coming
up
with
adjectives,
you
can
suggest
some
of
the
above,
but
encourage
 them
to
come
up
with
their
own.
If
students
on
their
own
come
up
with
a
timbre
word
that
musicians
 often
use,
point
this
out;
also
stress
that
coming
up
with 
their
own
words
is
fine,
especially
if
they
are
 good
descriptions
of
sound.
One
approach
would
be
to
substitute
touch,
smell
or
taste
sensations
for
 color.
A
specific
timbre
might
remind
a
student
of
a
smooth
or
rough
surface;
of
a
sour
or
sweet
 flavor;
or
of
a
flowery
or
musky
scent:
silky,
smooth,
chocolaty,
shimmery,
muted.


Pieces
to
try


Orchestral
works
by
Latin
American
composers
from
Mexico,
Venezuela,
Argentina
and
Cuba:

Imani
Winds 
 ‐ 
 The
Classical
Underground

Gustavo
Dudamel 
conducts
the
 Simón 
Bolívar
Youth
Orchestra
of
Venezuela 
 ‐ 
 Fiesta
 


Orchestral
works
 ‐ 
 for
listening
for
individual
instruments
as
well
as
instrument
families :



For
younger
students:
Lemony
Snicket.
 
 The
Composer
Is
Dead .
 Children’s
picture
book

ages
5
and
 up;
 includes
CD
with
original 
music
by
Nathaniel
Stookey . 


Benjamin
Britten 
 ‐ 
 Children’s
Guide
to
the
Orchestra 
 


Sergei
Prokofiev 
 ‐ 
 Peter
and
the
Wolf 

In
this
work
a
particular
instrument
is 
associated
with
a
 particular
character
in
the
story .
Before
listening
to
the
pi ece,
students
can
assign
an
instrument
to
 each
character.
Then
they
listen
to
the
piece
and
discover
the
composer’s
choice
of
instrument.

 DISCUSSION:
How
do
your
instrument
choices
compare
with 
the
composer’s
choice
of
instruments
to
 represent
the
characters
in
the
story?
What
do
you
think
of
Prokofiev’s
choices? 


Music and Visual Art = Timbre and Color

Adapted
 from (Catherine
Schmidt
Jones,
Timbre
Activities )

CLASS
DISCUSSION:
ask
the
students
if
they
prefer
black
and
white
or
color
pictures;
what
are 
their
reasons
 for
their
choice?
Do
they
prefer
pictures
with
just
one
color
or
with
many
colors?
Why?
Tell
them
that
one
of
 the
things
that
makes
music
more
interesting
and
exciting
is
sometimes
called
“color.”
Explain
that
the
color
 of
the
sound
is
what
 makes
one
instrument
sound
different
from
another.
In
music,
the
word
color
refers
to
 the
timbre
of
the
instrument
or
music.
 


Materials:
 


Recordings
of
a
variety
of
instrumental
music;
music
can
feature
individual
instruments
(e.g.
wind
 quintet
or
other
instruments).
You
can
also
work
with
recordings
featuring
non ‐ western
 music/instruments
such
as
steel
drums,
South
American
panpipes,
native
American
flute,
Indian
 sitar)


Drawing
paper
and
implements
(good
quality
offering
rich,
vibrant
colors)
in
a
variety 
of
colors;
you
 can
use
pastels,
crayons,
markers,
color
pencils 


1. Students
listen
to
excerpts
of
pieces
featuring
individual
instruments.
Ask
them
to
imagine
that
they
 can
 see
t he
sounds.

Ask
them
what
color
each
instrument
sound
would
be
if
they
could
se e
it.
 Encourage
naming
specific
hues.
Does
a
bassoon
sound
like
sea
green
or
lilac?
Is
a
flute
bright
green
 or
shimmery
blue?
These
are
exercises
for
the
imagination.
Different
sounds
affect
people
differently;
 there
are
no
right
or
wrong
answers.


2. Have
the
students
listen
to
longer
excerpts
of
instrumental
music.
While
listening,
they
 
 can
make
a
drawing
of
anything
that
the
music
makes
them
think
of.
The
drawing
can
be
abstract — perhaps
circles
of
yellow
connected
with
red
squiggles— or
representational:
a
mysterious
garden
or
 forest.



3. Students
present
their
picture
and
explain
why
the
music
made
them
think
of
those
colors,
shapes
or
 objects.

Encourage
explanations
that
link
specific
colors,
shapes
or
objects
to
specific
timbres
in
the
 music.


EXTENSION:
stu dents
can
create
artwork
that
reflects
other
aspects
of
the
music
(for
example,
emotional
 content,
historical
or
cultural
context )
as
well
as
timbre.
Provide
high ‐ quality
art
materials
for
students
 to
work
with;
students
can
display
or
present
their
work
w ith
a
paragraph
they
generate
explaining
the


musical
inspiration
for
specific
aspects
of
the
art
work.





Music and Social Science

Music’s
role
and
purpose
as
an
expression
of
culture


 Community
Music
Map
 – 
Group
Activity 

Community
Music
Map
 – 
Group
Activity 

When
is
music
used
in
our
lives?
What
celebrations,
ceremonies
or
traditions
have
special
music?
Music

shows
up
in
our
most
important
ceremonies
and
traditions,
from
birthdays
to
New
Orleans‐ style
funerals. 

Students
can
consider
the
role
and
purpose
of
music
in
their
lives
and
their
community
through
creating
a

community
music
map. 

Students
 brainstorm
where
music
happens
in
their
community
– 
they
can
get
specific
in
naming
the
places . 

They
then
identify
the
purpose
of
the
music
in
that
particular
setting.

Students
can
create
a
table
as
f ollows

to
help
organize
their
thoughts
and
ideas:


Places in the community where music happens

Purpose of music in these settings

Home

 

with my family

Entertainment – enjoyment

in my room

Celebration: sing “happy birthday”

radio

Relaxation - background music when I do homework

internet

TV

 

School

Learning

Music class

Playing and having fun

Circle time

Special clean-up song

Football games

Team spirit

Church, synagogue, mosque

 

Prayer

Express happiness or sadness with others

Special ceremonies: weddings, bar mitvahs, Sunday services

Brings people together

Funerals

Public spaces

 

Free outdoor concerts

Brings people of a whole city or town together

Music at festivals

The airport

Enjoy performances

Create an atmosphere

Restaurants

 

Live music

Entertainment

Juke box

Relaxing background

Recorded background music

Particular ambience – create a mood to go with the food

Express culture

Indoor concert venues

 

Large scale arenas

Entertainment / enjoyment

Performing arts halls

Recreation and play

Theatres

Gathering with friends

Dance halls / discos

Gyms

 

Fitness machines

Pace exercise

Fitness classes

Super markets

Background

Express culture

Students
then
draw
a
map
of
the
various
places
in
their
community
where
music
happens.
 The
map
can
 reflect
relative
loca tions
of
the
various
sites
where
music
is
found
in
their
communities,
including
streets
 and
landmarks

 – 
or
the
map
can
simply
be
a
more
generalized
visual
representation
of
the
sites
found
in
 their
particular
community.
See
 the
 Activities
Sheets 
supplemen t
of
the
study
guide
 for
an
example . 


DISCUSSION:


What
kind
of
music
is
played
in
these
settings?
 


- What
does
it
sound
like? 


- What
is
the
music
for?
What
is
the
purpose
of
the
music
in
this
setting? 


Who
plays
the
music? 


What
instruments
are
used? 


When
was
th e
music
composed?



CRITICAL
THINKING:



Why
would
a
culture
create
this
kind
of
music? 


How
has
the
music
changed
over
time?


How
does
music
express
who
you
are?


How
does
music
express
the
culture
that
made
it? 


How
might
the
community
music
map
look
differen t
for
a
student
of
another
culture?
 For
a
child


from
colonial
America?
 For
a
slave
from
the
southern
states?


Geography through Music

See
the
 Activities
Sheets
 supplement
of
the
study
guide
for 
additional
materials
including
continent,
world
maps
and
 maps
of
individual
countries
for
the
following
activities:
 


Map
/
Research
skills

A.
Using
an
atlas,
 globe ,
or
other
tool
in
the
classroom
or
online 


Students
identify
the
continents,
countries,
and
cultural
regions
from
which
the
music
featured
in
the


performance
originates
(See
repertoire
listed
on
p.
1).
Students
also
locate
themselves
and
their
family’s


country
of
origin
on
the
maps.



Students
can
write
in
and
match
the
various
words
for
music
(See
Vocabulary
on
p.
3
of
the
Study
Guide)
with


the
corresponding
countries
on
the
World
Map
OR
on
the
sheet
featuring
the
Individual
Countries. 


B.
 Using
a
single
country
map
[ Outline
 m aps
of
 Mexico
and
Argentina 
included
OR 
students
can
trace
the
 shape
of


other
countries
for
this
activity. ] 


Students
choose
one
of
the
featured
composers
in
the
performance.


On
the
map,
students
display
the
composer’s
birthplace,
cities
where
the
composer
lived
and
worked
(e.g.,
 where
the
composer
studied)
and
the
composer’s
burial
place,
if
deceased.
The
dates
for
each
item
can
be
 included.


C.
Composer
Timeline


Students
create
a
timeline
of
the
composer’s
life,
most
important
works
and
other
milestones.
Include
visual
 images
(pictures,
drawings)
along
the
line.
For
imaginative
timeline
designs
ideas,
see

 the
 DK
Children’ s
Book
of
Art.

Create
an
interactive
 timeline
online
using
VUVOX.
Vuvox
allows
users 
to
create
 collages
that
allow 
embedding
 of
media,
including
video,
music
as
well
as
images
that
can
be
gathered
online
(or
upload
your
own).
Free
user
 accounts.

 http://www.vuvox.com/collage 

See
a
sample
timeline
at
 http://www.vuvox.com/collage/detail/01b43aa0b0 


Resources

Children’s
Books

Brandenburg,
Aliki.
(2003).
 Ah,
Music! .
New
York:
HarperCollins
Publishers.



Snicket,
Lemony.
(2009).
The
Composer
Is
Dead .
 New
York:
HarperCollins
Publishers.


DK
Children’ s
Book
of
Art.
 (2009).
Dorling
Kindersley™
Limited.
New
York:
DK
Publishing

Teacher’s
Books

Cornett,
Claudia
E.
(2011).
Creating
Meaning
through
Literature
and
the
Arts 
 – 
Arts
Integration
for
Classroom
Teachers
 


Fourth
edition.
Boston:
Pearson
Publishing.
 


Copland,
Aaron.
(1985).
What
to
Listen
for
in
Music .
 New
York:
New
American
Library,
a
division
of
Penguin
Group.


Recordings

Imani
Winds 
 ‐ 
 The
Classical
Underground. 
(2005)Koch
International
Classics 
 “Imani
Winds
has
established
itself
as
one
of
the
most
successful
c hamber
music
ensembles
in
the
United
States.
The
Grammy
 nominated
quintet
has
taken
a
unique
path.
With
two
member
composers
and
a
deep
commitment
to
commissioning
new
work,
 the
group
is
enriching
the
traditional
wind
quintet
repertoire
while
meaningfully
 bridging
European,
American,
African
and
Latin
 American
traditions.”
 http://www.imaniwinds.com/index.php

Gustavo
Dudamel 
conducts
the
 Simón
Bolívar
Youth
Orchestra
of
Venezuela
 – 
 Fiesta.
 (2008)
Deutsche
Grammaphon
GmbH 
 “Gustavo
Dudamel
and
the
Simón
Bolívar
Youth
Orchestra
of
Venezuela
celebrate
the
best
in
Latin
American
music,
which
‘is
all
 about
da nce,
about
rhythm’
(Dudamel).

 ‘ They
set
the
concert
hall
afire
with
an
enthusiastic
fervor
the
likes
of
 which
none
of
us
 had
ever
witnessed
from
a
symphony
orchestra’ 
(Los
Angeles
Times).” 
 http://www.gustavodudamel.com/ http://www.fesnojiv.gob.ve/en/the ‐ simon‐ bolivar ‐ youth ‐ orchestra‐ of‐ venezuela.html

Internet
Sites

Connexions
 isa
place
to
view
and
share
educational
material
made
of
small
knowledge
chunks
called
modules
that
can
be
 organized
as
courses,
books,
reports,
etc .
Anyone
may
view
or
contribute.
Articles
on
numerous
topics
including
visual
and
 performing
arts;
music
modules
include
Sound
and
Music
Activities;
Classifying
Musical
Instruments;
and
Timbre:
the
Color
of
Music. http://cnx.org/

Presentation
Magazine 
offers
free
and
downloadable
PowerPoint
templates
featuring
a
variety
of
styles
and
images,
including
 world
maps
and
maps
of
individual
countries. 


www.presentationma gazine.com

SFS
Kids
Fun
with
Music 
A
project
of
the
the 
San
Francisco
Symphony
(SFS)
“This
website,
in
conjunction
with
live
 performances,
provides
a
great
way
for
people
of
all
ages
to
hear,
learn,
and
have
fun
with
music.” 
 Click
on
Instruments
of
the
O rchestra
to
learn
about
instrument
families. 
 http://www.sfskids.org/templates/home.asp?pageid=1

Tips
on
A udience
Etiquette 
by
Kim
J.
Teal 
 http://kjt.glis.net/tealflutestudio/Etiquette.html

VUVOX 
allows
users
to
create
 interactive
collages
that
allow 
embedding
of
media,
including
video,
music
and
images
that
can
be
 gathered
online
(or
upload
your
own).
Useful
a n d
engagi ng
tool
to
create
interactive
timelines.
Free
user
accounts.

 
 
 http://www.vuvox.com/collage

See
a
sample
timeline
at
 http://www.vuvox.com/collage /detail/01b43aa0b0

Name: " """! Grade:" """! – Our Musical Roots ! Instruments of the Wind Quintet
Name: "
"""!
Grade:"
"""!
– Our Musical Roots !
Instruments of the Wind Quintet !

Nuestras Raíces de Música !

of the Wind Quintet ! Nuestras Raíces de Música ! 1.   On the line closest

1.On the line closest to each instrument, write the corresponding letter with the instrument name. Four of these instruments belong to the woodwind family. Which does

not?

" What instrument family does it belong to?

"

"

2. Complete the table.!

"

"

"

!

it belong to? " " 2.   Complete the table. ! " " " ! ©Copyright:
Quinteto
La3no
2010


©Copyright:
Quinteto
La3no
2010


Music in My Community !

What is the music for?!

AT SCHOOL: !  Working! •  Having fun ! •  Learning lessons ! •
AT SCHOOL: !
 Working!
•  Having fun !
•  Learning lessons !
•  Having fun ! •  Learning lessons ! • AT HOME: ! •   Having fun

AT HOME: ! Having fun !

Celebration ! Relaxation!

Having fun ! •   Celebration ! •   Relaxation ! AT SPORTS EVENTS ! •
Having fun ! •   Celebration ! •   Relaxation ! AT SPORTS EVENTS ! •

AT SPORTS EVENTS ! Team spirit ! Fans rally team !

! •   Team spirit ! •   Fans rally team ! AT PLACES ! OF
! •   Team spirit ! •   Fans rally team ! AT PLACES ! OF

AT PLACES ! OF WORSHIP !

Celebrations !

Funerals !

Reflection !

•  Prayer !
 Prayer !

AT THE GYM! Pace exercise !

! •  Prayer ! AT THE GYM ! •   Pace exercise ! AT A RESTAURANT
! •  Prayer ! AT THE GYM ! •   Pace exercise ! AT A RESTAURANT

AT A RESTAURANT ! Set a mood ! Express culture !

! •   Set a mood ! •   Express culture ! AT A CONCERT HALL

AT A CONCERT HALL! Listening pleasure !

  Express culture ! AT A CONCERT HALL ! •   Listening pleasure ! ©
Copyright

Quinteto
Latino
2010


©
Copyright

Quinteto
Latino
2010


Name:

Name:

Grade:

Nuestras Raíces de Música – Our Musical Roots !

YOU ARE HERE

YOU ARE HERE

Continent Map

Música – Our Musical Roots ! YOU ARE HERE Continent Map DIRECTIONS 1. Write the names

DIRECTIONS

1. Write the names of the continents on the lines as shown on the map. You can use an atlas to find the continent names. ! 2. Draw an arrow from the “YOU ARE HERE” sign to the location of your school on the map. !

Name:

sign to the location of your school on the map. ! Name:
sign to the location of your school on the map. ! Name:

Adapted
from
editable
vector
map
of
the
world
by

 Presentation
Magazine
 
www.presentationmagazine.com


©
Copyright
Quinteto
Latino
2010


Name:

Grade:

Nuestras Raíces de Música – Our Musical Roots !

World Map IndivudualIndividualCountriesCountries !

! World Map Indivudual Individual Countries Countries ! I
live
here.
 My
family
comes
 from
here.


I
live
here.


Individual Countries Countries ! I
live
here.
 My
family
comes
 from
here.


My
family
comes


from
here.


The

group
of
countries
south
of


the
United
States
is
known
as




 

 t 

 
 
 

 m 

 

 
 

 
 







t






m










Circle
the
countries
included
in


this
group.


Adapted
from
editable
vector
map
of
the
world
by

 Presentation
Magazine
 
www.presentationmagazine.com


©
Copyright
Quinteto
Latino
2010


DIRECTIONS:
1.
Draw
an
arrow
from
the
“I
live
here”
sign
to
the


location
of
your
home
on
the
map.

2.
Draw
an
arrow
from
the
“My


family
comes
from
here”
sign
to
your
family’s
country
of
origin.



3.
Write
the
missing
letters
which
spell
the
name
of
the
region
south
of


the
United
States.
4.
What
continent
lies
north
of
Africa?


Draw
a
box
around
the
countries
found
on
this
continent.



Name:

Grade:

Nuestras Raíces de Música !

1

– Our Musical Roots

Individual countries !

(Not to scale) !

DIRECTIONS !

1. Write the name of the country on the line below the country’s shape. !

2. Draw a ring around the countries found in Latin America. What language is

spoken in these countries?

3. Put a check mark next to the countries found on the continent of Europe.!

4. Draw a line from the composer or song to his/her country of origin. One

composer can be matched to two countries. !

5. Which country is your family from?

!

!

COUNTRIES "

" COMPOSERS!

Argentina

" Billy Strayhorn !

Austria

" Carmen Melendez Romero !

England

" Györgi Ligeti!

Germany

" Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart !

México

" George Friedrich Händel !

Romania

" United States of America (USA)!

South Africa"

" Astor Piazzolla! " Siyahamba (Marching Song) Traditional!

©
Copyright

Quinteto
Latino
2010


Name:

Grade:

COMPOSER’S NAME: !

1

DIRECTIONS " Display on the map the composer’s "

Cities where the composer lived and worked " Burial place, if deceased " Include the year(s) for each item" The pin locates the capital of Mexico; write this city’s name on the map."

Birthplace "

Adapted from editable world map by " Presentation Magazine | www.presentationmagazine.com"

MEXICO

map by " Presentation Magazine | www.presentationmagazine.com " MEXICO ©Copyright: Quinteto Latino 2010 "

©Copyright: Quinteto Latino 2010 "

Name:

Grade:

1

World Map

DIRECTIONS "

Display on the map the

composer’s " Birthplace" Cities where the composer lived and worked" Burial place, if deceased " Include the year(s) for each item " The pin locates the capital of Argentina; write this city’s name on the map. "

of Argentina; write this city’s name on the map. " Adapted from editable world map by

Adapted from editable world map by "

Presentation Magazine |

www.presentationmagazine.com"

COMPOSER’S NAME: !

!

!

"

©Copyright: Quinteto Latino 2010 "