Foreword bY Paul GoDa

( The Complete 30 Stack

DefensivePlavbook

~

A Complete Guide to Designing and Installing an Attacking,

Pressure Defense from Stacked Linebackers

( .

Multi-me.dia Instructional Guides

. .

The Complete 30 Stack

'D'efensivePlaybook

. . .

A Complete Guide to Designing and Installing an ...

. . ARacking, Pressure Defense from Staclled linebackers· .

:." c

Jerry Campbell .... Lyle Lansdell

First Edition, February 2004 ISBN: 1-59205-049-2

Copyright © 2Q04 by Jerry Campbell Sports

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in 'any form or by any means; electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including

· photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval. system; without permission in writing. from Jerry Campbell Sports.

· jerry Campbell Sports books are available at special discounts for bulk purchase, including educational uses for faculty, staffs and schools. Special editions or book excerpts can also be created to meet specific needs, For details, contact Jerry Campbell Sports.

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The authors, Jerry Campbell and Lyle Lansdell, graciously accept your. questions arid comments about The Complete 30 .Stack Defensive Playbook. . They are available for' consultation and clinics with coaches and players. You can contact them through Jerry'

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u

Coach Lyle

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:. : ~ . ; .

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I have worked on the offensive side of the ball for most of my career. I prepared myself each year by researching, reading and listening to every defensive concept, scheme and technique being taught. In this quest for defensive knowledge I have come' across three coaches that have had a profound impact on my defensive philosophy: Coach Paul Golla, Coach Dick Freeman and Coach Jerry Campbell.

I had the privilege of working with Coach Golla in the production of his Defensive Line Play Video series. His enthusiasm and high energy, combined with his defensive 'knowledge made him my firstcall when it came time' to designing. a defense. He has always been available, and given me tremendous help. H~ has . had a significant hand in designing our defense.

Coach Dick Freeman was my head coach for many years when I Was an offensive 'coordinator at Corona del Mar High School (Southern California). Every offseason,' and each week during the season was spent in discussing offensive concepts, and how' he would defend them. The infoimation and approaches that he communicated made me a better offensive coach, but more importantly gave. me

insight to defensive approaches. . . . i .

Finally, my partner and co-author of this book, Coach CAmpbell is one of the

. finest football coaches in America. I have watched him not only work with

. players, but teach coaches in all aspects of the game. I have benefited from the thousands of hours that we have spent together, either listening to or discussing . football. His "ask me a. .football question" is always an invitation to gain soine additional knowledge. His patience and guidance with me is seen throughout this book, as Coach CAmpbell's Multiple 40 Defense book included the "30 Stack", He has allowed me to use his concepts and teaching, while giving me the flexibility to develop my own defensive personality.

Thank you guys.

v,

. . .. When installing any defense, build it around .. putting 'pressureon your opponent. . ..':

" - Coach Campbell

" "

Run to the ball with violence on themind; bend

" .

" "

at the knees, and dub-up, seeing what you hitl

-Coach"Lyle" "

iv

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FOREWORD

If there is one thing that I have learned about the 30 Stack Defense as I have traveled around the country, is that nobody likes to give out any information on it. It is the best kept secret in football until now. Coach Campbell and Coach Lansdell have created a book that goes over every detail ofthe 30 Stack Schemes. They hold nothing back, covering the many different fronts and blitzes used versus a variety of formations and offenses. They have done their homework. You will obtain more information from this book than if you traveled to ten different schools. '

This.past year in running the 3-3-5, our kids at Silverado High School (California) , broke every defensive record inschool history. They had fun with this defense,

and loved playing in it, while our opponents feared it. .

, -

If you are interested in learning about this defense, whether to completely install it

or fme tune some of the things you're currently doing, then this book.will help you. , I highly recommend this book to any' program that wants to implement themost , secretive, yet most talked about defense in football.

Paul Golla

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vi

CONTENTS

. :..

Acknowledgements............................................ III

·_foreword ;.~ . ..'. .' v

Introduction "ix

CHAPTER!

DEFENSIVE STRATEGY ,.· .11

Philosophy ~ '.' . . . . . . . . . 11

.Scheme '.' ~ .. ~ . . . . . . . . 13

Plan ~ ; ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14

16 18

Player Recognition : .. ~ ' .

Strategy .. ' ' '.' ~ : .

. CHAPTER II

DEFENSIVE ALIGNEMENTS ~.~ .

Defensive Basics' ~ ' : .

Huddle· : ~ .

Strength Call ~ .

System ~ .

. Personnel ' ....•...............

Alignments : .

CHAPTER III DEFENSIVE TECHNIQUES ~ .

. 'Stimulus Response ~ : .

Defending the Run '.' ~ . : .

Keys to Success .

21 21

'24

26 27 . 31 35

. 49 49

57 .'~

64

CHAPTER IV PRESSURE PACKAGES 69

Dogs ~ ' ' ' : '. . . . . 72

Stunts ; ~ '~ ' ;'.. .. 77

Blitzes :.. . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . 87

Garnes ,........... 89

,.

CHAPTER V DEFENDING THE PASS ·.············· 93

. Techniques ~ .. ~ ~ :... 93·

. Coverages ~ ~ ~ ' .. ?8

APPENDIX

. Glossary of Terms '.:. ~...... . 108

. Installation Checklist ~ ' '. . . . . . 115

viii

INTRODUC.TION

Want to stay young at heart? Then be a football coach. First and foremost, it requires the coach to be a teacher. The sport is in a constant state of change. You must not only work at staying abreast of new ideas and concepts, but it allows for individual creativity. Itdemands vision, and the 30 Stack Defense is a perfect example of this.

The original .defensive schemes, 7-1 evolved into the Wide tackle six, which evolved into the 4-3,.then the 4-4 and now the 4-2-5. The old "Okie" was part of this evolutionary process itself. The 5-2 gave way to the "double eagle", then the "bear". As offenses have evolved, defenses have changed to defend them. 'these defensive concepts have given way to the "multiple schemes". Coach Campbell's book, . The Multiple 40 Defense. was at' the forefront of these . schemes ... His terminology, techniques and schemes can give an offense" over 100 different looks, . not to mention the' various stunt packages. The two examples below show how the

multiple 40 and 50 fronts can evolve into the 30 Stack. "

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This book, The Complete 30 Stack Defensive Playbook is different" from many of our previous manuals. This book is designed as a playbook, and as such contains a number of X & 0 diagrams.

i.

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ix

The first chapter, Defensive Strategy will be thought provoking as coaches think about and answer a series of questions. The answers will help each.coach develop

· his own defensive philosophy, plan and strategy. The chapter includes our

perspective of how the 30 Stack fits into each of these areas. .

· .' Once 'the strategy has been developed, the defensive schemes can be designed.

Chapter II will include the base 30 Stack scheme, and five variations off of the '30

· Stack. The chapter includes a discussion of the personnel, alignments and huddle techniques, specifically the defensive call sequence.

As: mentioned previously, this book was written in a playbook style.' As such it . . does. not include many technique topics. . However, we have included a brief chapter to . discuss the' stimulus responses for .all of the position players ... The

"stimulus response" is used through Coach Campbell's defensive. bookaand in Coach Golla's Defensive Line Play Video Series. The stimulus response isa

, defensive player's reaction (response) to every potential movement that the · opponent may make.

,The heart of the 30 Stack is the' pressure packages. . These pressure packages, . . whether dogs, stunts, blitzes or games, will give the defensive coordinator a lot of flexibility in creating a defensive personality that will fit his personneL We have' · . included over 100 "stunts" in the book. These can be run at strength, openside (opposite strength), the field or the boundary, which allows thisdefense to meet all

· " offensive tendencies.

The 30 Stack has the reputation of having limited secondary packages. We hope that we can dispel this myth. We have-included a variety of coverage packages '.

that can be mixed with andlor matched with the pressure packages. .

.. Finally, Coach Campbell and I have collaborated on this book. I am very grateful

for the opportunity to 'work on our third book together. As Coach Campbell says,

· "develop as· base, . and adjust from there". This playbook is exactly that. .Tbe "30 . Stack" is our base defense, and we adjust from there. As such, the readers of . Coach Campbell's defensive books (''Multiple 40 Defense", "Multiple 50

· ... Defense" and the "Multiple 3-4 Defense") will find an occasional difference in " terminology. The overall philosophy and approach of multiplicity remains the

· same, but Coach Campbell has been gracious enough, to allow me to use our

· terminology throughout the book.

11·

CHAPTER· I DEFENSIVE STRATEGY

. .

Our program philosophy is based upon "controlling the football" and "controlling field position". As such, we must play "GREAT DEFENSE". We can do this when we stop the run. and pressure the quarterback. Regardless of your system, you must believe in it and develop an attitude of always giving a great effort, regardless of the opponent, score or time on the clock.

PHILOSOPHY

The primary objective of the Defensive team is to score points, but ataminimum set up a score. It is not enough to stop or hold opponents; pressure them mentally and physically with speed and relentless play.. This will lead. to a physical dominance that Will lead to take-aways. It is then that a defense begins to: rally and

. score. As such, defensive football is all about discipline, both in physical. and mental preparation -.

. .

Wha{are you going to force the offense to do - run or pass? ..

Are you going to stop the run? Most defenses are designed to stop the run, always with a gap-controlled approach; i.e., at least one defender assigned to each of the seven run gaps. The alignment of the defensive personnel will provide additional definition to this gap-control, either in the. form of pressure or "bend but don't break". · ... This later approach is designed to stop the long' run or pass first. This decision becomes the cornerstone of your Defensive philosophy.

What is.your risk factor?

There are some inherent risks in defensive football because the defense is forced to cover down all potential receivers, while maintaining a sound front (scheme) to control the run gaps as well as cover the nine pass zones. As a coach, yOU. must decide how to deploy your personnel. There ~e three constants though: .

. ..... . . .

1. Defense is a team effort - each member must .do his job because if one

member goes off on his own, the entire defense fails.

2. Defense. is pursuit - execute the primary assignment, pursuit and play football.

. .

3. Defense is hitting - emphasize daily; gain a reputation for physical play.

30 STACKPIDLOSOPHY

This defense is designed to attack the offense and make things happen on their side of the line.· The offense will NOT RUN the football and will be forced into pass situations, -While there are some schemes that create a six-man box from tackle to tight end, this defense· puts six defenders in the tackle-to-tackle box .. The scheme , . . will prevent the long run or pass with team play and great pursuit. This attacking

. approach . will allow players to read their keys, execute techniques and run to the ball with violence on the mind. This relentless play will-frustrate 'opponents and lead to turnovers, either fumbles or interceptions. When his happens, the defense

. will rally to the ball and score. '.

Thecriticalcomponents to success include:

• . Discipline>- perform as coached

.• . Alignment - key to success

• . Stance - the ability to perform assignments begins with the stance

• Key ., gives you the quickest read to perform your assignment

• Tackle - most important, overemphasize the "club-tip" and wrap

Discipline - means that athletes will do it the way they have been coached. They (

must be prepared both physically and mentally because this will give .a team the strength to overcome adversity. Physical preparation for a season requires an incredible . amount of discipline ·because the athletes are training nine months to

play three. - This takes a. special person to understand the short-term efforts.have long-term benefits. Also, a' well-conditioned athlete is less likely to make . mental mistakes. You cannot have mental mistakes. One mental mistake by one player -can mean a touchdown or as in most cases, keep a drive going that results in a

. touchdown. . .

Alignment - means that the players know how to align and adjust, if necessary, to the offensive formations. "This will help them eliminate all wasted movement, allowing them to play with speed. The 30 Stack is designed to defend virtually any offensive formation with a minimum of movement or adjustments, This will allow

. for a better recognition of offensive schemes, provide a maximum of repetitions so that assignments and techniques will be automatic.

Stance - each player must know their stance for their position. These must be drilled daily because the . stance is the foundation for perfbnnance.. The stance

12

Outside 113

Middle 1/3

Outside 113 .

r . Flat

,

must be perfected in order for the player to execute great technique. The players must be able to defeat-the-block.

. Keys - players must know their keys on every play and concentrate on them. This . is the only way that they will be able to read their keys, understand the type of play that is developing. When players understand their keys, they make plays" or get into pursuit. Always talk quickness to the football, because. quickness is, of utmost importance.

_ Tackling :- regardless of scheme, if you do not tackle, defense is pointless. When . players are prepared, and conditioned to perform, they can execute their assignments,

. run to the ball and tackle. Proper tackling technique, as well as players arriving after the first hit, will create turnovers. When turnovers occur, the players must ral1y to score, because all eleven players should be in the proximity of the ball carrier.

. SCHEME

. A defense must be designed to control the seven. (7) run gaps and cover the ~e . (9) pass zones, (see chart below). The scheme 'design. must build off of a simple

communication process to. get your players properly aligned. Your players must know where to align and what technique(s) to use.

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The 30 Stack is designed to stop the run. The scheme is built off of the "30 Front", which includes two tackles. and a nose. It is an 8~man front, in its base form; and includes a 6-man tackle-to-tackle box. This is an excellent scheme versus two-back

13

offenses, and very simple to adjust to multi-formation offenses. This front will take away the cutback and forces the hall to the perimeter, which allows the edge defenders to run to the ball. The scheme has unlimited approaches to pressure the quarterback and stop underneath throws on early downs.· It has simple cover down responsibilities against a variety of formations. The coverage package is built off·· .

. of 3-deep or man-free, but is easily adaptable to robber, rolls and 2-deep packages.

. :. . .

(" -0

This scheme accommodates "stemming" and lor "disguises" to the base, ·The base defense is very adaptable to a quick stem to a different look as the quarterback begins . his cadence. . Also, movements by the linebackers. (second level defenders) 'and defensive backs (secondary) up and back, or sideto side will create some questions in the offense's mind as to where the defenders will be at the snap of the ball.

··PLAN

It is not enough to have a great philosophy and scheme. The key to .a winning program is. executing the. plan. Execution requires organization, rnasteriri.g the basics and work ethic ... Organization Will help prepare your team. The off-season: is a terrific time to prepare because you can go .through all of the components, in the smallest of detail to. assure that you will not miss anything. These details include teaching progressions and techniques. If you feel inadequate in certain areas," you can . find the resources to strengthen your knowledge and teaching abilities. The game is still based upon blocking and tackling. . You must teach these skills and all of their nuances everyday, with variety and enthusiasm. Finally, do not let your opponent out. work you or your players. If you set the example, your players will follow. Show them your passion for the game! .

Does you philosophy and scheme work in the worst-case scenario?

You must ask yourself, can lout coach or maneuver my opponent every· week to guarantee success? That is an awful lot of pressure! Technology has allowed

. coaches to gather" categorize and analyze defensive tendencies. Therefore, as you develop your plan, make sure that your scheme will work in the worst-case scenario. Does your base defense stop your opponent's five favorite runs and passes? How does your goal line defense match-up with your opponent's favorite : goal line or two-point plays? Cari you adjust to changing game situations with stunts or blitzes?

14

• Pursuit • . Tackle

• Force Turnovers

15

Do you have a systematic way to communicate your philosophy, teach your scheme and install the plan? .

Strategies and tactics may change from game-to-game, and certainly season-toseason, however the ability to teach is the most important characteristic a coach

· can have. Your scheme will come crashing down if your second and third team players cannot execute the proper fundamental techniques. Therefore, only add when your players have demonstrated an ability to execute what is in .. The speed. at .which your players will comprehend and .. execute is directly related to. your organization. Make .sure that you have developed a systematic way to develop your players. The approach should include teaching in the classroom, coaching on

the field and correcting with film. . . .

THE 30 STACK PLAN.

We emphasize that our first objective is to control our opponent' s running game. If we.are successful, we can force them into long-yardage situations. A high risk, . low percentage situation; is a defensive advantage down, which puts the defense in control, and can lead to a take-away. The 30 Stack. scheme allowsU:S. (the

· defense) to determine where we want to align, not the offense dictating. This

keeps the defense in advantageous match-ups. .

. Regardless of the scheme, you must be able to tackle. As such, the plan is:

Pursuit

Team pursuit is a burning desire to have all eleven players to the football. You can evaluate team pursuit by freezing a video frame and counting 'the number of

'players. around the. football onany given play. You cannot be a turnover-

· producing defense without great team pursuit. Also, pursuit will force the opponent to go the distance in order to score. Develop a reputation of punishing

· :gang tackling from the front and backside by demanding team pursuit. .

Tackle

· A tackle is a desired collision between the defensive man and the ball carrier. The defensive man must win - end up on top with the ball carrier; making him go . backwards! Tackling is 50% determination and 50% technique. It takes both aggressiveness and good technique to be a great tackler. Also, all defensive

players must work for the assist (with pursuit) because it is just as important 'as the tackle. The second, third and fourth players to the ball carrier can deliver

: punishing blows, which can free the football. If the defensive players out-number . the offensive players you have a good chance of coming up with the football; :: .'

/" .

f.~ .. ~·"·~··

Force'Tumovers

Turnovers will allow you to play for 48 minutes, because in a game of momentum, like a pendulum, it will always come back and a turnover is a great start.v-The defense must take the ball from your opponent's offense. This has a demoralizing effect on. them, as well as giving the defense a chance to score, but at a minimum

· providing the offense with field position. ".

Since the 30 Stack Defense 'is designed to stop the run, and force everything east and west, the first tackler, 'and subsequent defenders running to the ballhave 'the . opportunity to create a turnover, scoop and score. Also,' opponents will be forced into defensive advantage downs,. which put them in throwing situations. This is when the' 30 Stack Defense's attack packages can pressure the quarterback causing

· a fumble in the pocket, or hurrying a throw that creates an interceptiori. Coverage

'. personnel must "break" on thrown balls at 100%. Finally; a stop on 4th down is- a . · turnover, because it creates field position arid has a demoralizing effect on our

.. opponents.

(

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'PLA YER RECOGNITION

. . The goals for our football 'program include: PLAY HARD - PLAY.' SMARr -

. BE A CHAMPION. The "Play SMART" is directly related to a player's desire due to motivation. As such, a system of rewards has been established to recognize .-~

· a player's contribution and effort. We recognize two players each week, a "player

· of the week", and the "Special Teams Player of the Game" (Kamikaze Award).

The "Player of the Week" is awarded to a playerthat has given the greatesteffort . during the week to prepare, or help prepare the team for the current weeks game.

The "Kamikaze A ward" is given to the special teams' player that made the biggest

· impact in .specialteams play during the game. It is the ONLY game award issued.

· Production Points

Like most programs, the position coaches will grade each, player's game performance, However, we do not use a plus or minus system. Instead, we grade

· based upon a "PRODUCTION POINT' system. A player will' earn Production Points for Special Teams, Defense and Offense based upon specific criteria. The

16

Production Points will be posted in the Locker Room. The Defensive Production

, Points are based-upon the following: -

Tackle for Loss ("TFL") Extra Effort

Cause a FUmble Recover a Fumble

. I

Ignorant Penalty

One Point

Minus One Point .'

Tackle or Assist QB.Pressure

. Bi Hit

Loaf

Mental Error

Two Points

Minus Two Points

Deflection'

Three Points

Sack

In addition to earning . Production Points individually, a defensive player can. earn

. .

them as part of a team effort. Team effort Production Points will be awarded to the'

players either on the field or played as follows: . ' . . .

. . .

Two Points: .' . .... : _ Minus One Point . .

Three Points

: . No score after a Sudden Change (players on' Total Offense of 250 yards

field). . - r:

Keep opponent under 500/0' on 3m down conversions .

. . No more than two Explosive Plays; 15+ yards on a run, or 20+ ards on a ass

No more. than two consecutive first downs (700/0 of the offensive drives)

. Shut-out (players who played Defense) A Defensive Score (players on field) Goal line Stand la ers on field .

,.

17

The players are given "helmet decal awards" based upon their Production Points. They receive one helmet decal award for every ten production points. Finally, they attain a special status ("Golden Eagle") when they have earned. fifty . production points. This. elite' status is recognized With a: patch for their letterman' s jacket... .

· .. ....

STRATEGY'

The following is an outline of the 30 Stack's Defensive Strategy: .

a Score; but at a minimum set up a score

• Create three or more turnovers

o . Fumbles - pursuit, effort, hitting, awareness " ..

· 0 Interceptions - pass rush, under cover, position, communication, break,

. catch . " ..

· . 0'. Ball on Downs - stop the 4th down play or goal line stand ..

• Pressure the offense into mistakes

. .

• .Wear outball carriers

• Demoralize the offense .• Scoop and score

,', "

o Control Field Position'

" .• ' Stop the offense inside their40

• Limit Explosive Play to 1 every 30 plays .0 . Runs. over .15 yards

· : 0 ' Passes over 20" yards' .

• 'NOmore than 2 consecutive first downs

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CJ Team Effort

• Each defender executes his assignments - trust one another

• pursuit - the ultimate team effort . . .

• Assist - just as important as the first hit

. ,'0

CJ Pressure - stress the offense

• Make the offense react to the defense

• .·Mentally

. 0 Stem & disguise -"Prowl"

o Indecision slows down the offense ,

o Make the offense change or at least read atthe,LOS

• Physically - finish all tackles

r.

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o Front will mirror step

.0 Linebackers will move forward

• Blitz .

·0· Run blitz with gap responsibilities

o Pass blitz, with all receivers covered down

ri . Physical Dominance

.• . Out HIT our opponent - consistent poundi~g .

• Attack - the LOS

• Don't just survive the punishment - deliver it!

o . Off season preparation

o . In season effort

. • .: Speed and strength .

• . Utilize proper tackling technique o . Club-up and grab cloth .

o. See what you hit

. 0 ·Speed

• . Pursuit ., all eleven players must get to the ball carrier·

• . Swann the offense with numbers • . Productive·speed

o . Execute assignment with proper technique 0. Readkeys

Q Be Relentless

• ·Pursuit - do not follow a teammate

• First player secures the tackle

• All additional players are stripping the ball .

•. b~moralize ball carriers when surrounded by more .defenders than offensi~e

players ..

a .The Basics

. -",

•. Discipline - perfonn as coached

• Alignment - key to' SUccess . .

• Stance - the ability to perform assignments begins with the stance

• Key - gives you the quickest read to perform your assignment

• Tackle - most important, overemphasize the wrap

19

Q Defensive Packages - sound schemes

• Stop the.run

• Force the 'ball to the perimeter

• ' Defend the cutback

. : ~ - - ._ .... ~. ,- ,- ~ - -

":' .~: ~.

Game Plan

• Front

o Gap control with two-gap defenders

o Use proper technique

• Second Level'

,0 Communicate

o Readkeys

o Run to the ball

o HIT!

, '

• Secondary

o Communicate

, 0 Use proper technique

• 'Zone

• Man

• Read

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'Win the Down & Distance Battles

• 1 st down -stop theopponent under 2 yards+ 75%

• 3 rd down - force the punt -, 600/0

o Conquer long yardage situations

o Short yardage - win the battle

Special Situations '

,. Red Zone -:- turn.the offense away with no points

• Goal line - turn the offense away with no points

• Two-minute - preserving a victory '. Four~minute - get the ball back

,,'

".: .

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CHAPTER II

. .

DEFENSIVE ALIGNMENTS

. .

The 30 Stack Defense .is designed to attack the offense and make things happen on'

the offense's side of the line. It is occasionally referred to as .. a '3-5-3 or a-3-3-S. The 3-5-3 references an 8-man front, with three defensive linemen;· five

. .linebackers and three secondary .defenders, whereas. the J:-3-5 has three linebackers

': and five secondary defenders. The 3-3-5.'will use nickel or' dime package type players.

the 30 'Stack Defensive scheme is built off of the "30' Front'tand includes.~ 6-m~ tackle-to-tackle box .. Th~statked linebackers are the identifying trademark for tlri~ defense,' and what makes it so . adaptable to different types of personnel. . Smaller, quicker type players will have equal success to bigger athletes. A critical C01p.P9~~t to either type player is strength.' .The players, especially the defensive line mustbe strong, witha minimum 250 pound bench press.

. , . ..

· This is an excellent scheme versus two-back offenses, .and .very simple to adjust: to . '. multi-formation. offenses. It is fundamental sound versus Wing-T, . Option.and .

Spread. type offenses. 'Ihe stacked linebackers create problems for . zone blocking schemes, and the movement actions ("prowling") confuse man blocking schemes. This 8-man front will stop the run,' take away the cutback and forces the ball to.' the perimeter, which allows the edge defenders to run to the ball. However, one of the'

· most underrated aspects oftbe defense is the coverage packages. Sincethe scheme' . builds - in stems and I or disguises, the secondary contours can easily confuse quarterback-pre-snap reads. .This forces the quarterbacks to read. on . the' move after --~

the ball is snapped - advantage defense. .

· DEFENSIVE BASICS .

The defense must defend the. whole field; 'width (fifty-three and one-third [53 l/~]

- yards' sideline to sideline) and depth (line of scrimmage ["LOS"] to. goal line) to the extent that the 'offense threatens it. The defensive side of the' football includes: nine (9) pass zones (six [6] underneath and three (3) deep) and seven (7) or eight' (8) (in a double tight end set), run gaps (spaces between offensive lineman), A sounddefense must defend (assign a player to) every gap and be able to. cover 'alL

· the_ pass zones. . Therefore, a defense' must defend sixteen (16) areas With eleven

· (11) players, It is the use of these eleven (11) defenders that define a defense; i.e., the use of defensive lineman (primarily run-gap responsible), linebackers (run and

21

pass responsible), and defensive backs (typically pass responsible). For example, if a defense employs three (3) linemen, three (3}linebackerS and five (5) defensive backs, it is referred to as a ("33").

DEFENSIVE TERMINOLOGY

The deployment of defenders to stop the run is referred to as the "Front". ··The Front has primary run responsibility. It is typically the down defensive linemen or ends, but can be linebackers or defensive backs. The "Undercover" refers tothose .

-. defenders in the Front that also have pass responsibilities. These are typically linebackers, but with a zone blitz can be down defensive lineman, Of" even defensive backs in some coverages. The "Secondary" defenders have primary pass responsibilities and are referred to as defensive backs.' However, 'they can line-up in the front and have primary run responsibility, or even be part o.f the Undercover.

: -,:

• > .",

Gaps· .

. Every space between offensive players on the LOS is ? gap. A solid defense 'must have a defender assigned to every gap on the offensive line. The assigned "gap· responsibility"· can be. to any defensive player, though either a lineman or . linebacker typically controls them. A defensive lineman is responsible for the run

· because they are the closest defenders to the gaps; however with the growing use .. ,.

AI

of the "zone blitz" they could have an occasional pass responsibility. Theyare

most effective when lined-up directly in front of an offensive lineman (''head-up'') ··because they can be assigned to the gap on either side of the offensive lineman.

. When a: defender is lined-up in the gap, the defenderis typically responsible .for .

. that gap, though a stuntIa move right or left) can . change a defender's 'gap ..... responsibility. A linebacker (occasionally a defensive back who is blitzing)" also . .:

. has gap responsibilities but is lined-up off the ball because they must also ·defend . -

against the pass. The Gap spaces are. -

, .: lettered A through D on both the right and left side of the offensive line: "A" is the center/guard gap, "B". is. the guard/tackle

gap, "C" is the tackle/end gap, and ''D'' is I..-.. --J

. outside the tight end ("TE~').

Ccntaln . . ~on.ta .. i ..

Force .. Force . .." ..

COBOAI8J AO B .. ..

. . . " ~) . . .

· Force and Contain.. .

The outside gaps,whether it is a "C" or "D" is controlled. with either a Force or Contain technique .. ·When a defender is assigned to Force, they must make the ball carrier commit wide or inside as soon as possible. . The defender will attack the ball

· on an angle using his inside shoulder .. The ball carrier may escape outside as long as they are "forced" to commit before crossing the "C" gap. The exception to this

22.

. is that a defense will attempt to keep a Quarterback. ("QB") inside; i.e., if the pall . carrier is the QB, the QB is not allowed outside the Force. A Contain approach is . when the defender does not allow the ball to escape outside C'leverage" the ball). The defense will attempt to tum the ball carrier inside as soon as possible.

ALIGNMENT TERMINOLOGY

. ,

. The .following information will provide you with alignment and responsibilities for defensive . fronts. A. number designates defensive personnel alignments; any . HEAD-UP alignment is assigned an EVEN number and all SHADED alignments

. with ODD numbers, . .' .'

·:':0. O,··O.~ 0 0: 0

.~. 9' 7 5' 4i :3 . 2i .1 1 2i 3' 4i 5 7 9

.. 6 4 2 0 . 2 4 6

~~r:':~.::r-~- I~ ~"%..-:: .... ':,l'~~:' ~ .. ~_... -v.-'- ,.,..."..,.!"I;,. ... .,r~"':""-:..:- .rr:'''''''L''---';-'"'1l~~~p:f ... r.~~~~~..?~ .. -''''' ""-t:;.:-'I'-; ........ ~........_...-"~~ .. -";"-..,.... .•• "7'?
"L"i,....,w:'·:~1~F·~"V .. l" ... " ,"',.\._, ' .... -c ,. ,;~~ .. ~~ ~ il~~'" ,'," ,' .. ' ,. , . ,"
C ... :X~~~~~I" ~_k~ ;::rt.: _ z .: •. : .: f ~ ~!..:~ . r~ ~.:.' ~,,~, ._,,-.'~ .. ~:r:o~~ -~~.~~~~!~ ., ...... ~ ~iJ~ ~ --= ... :.~' A'~~_,: ,,_ "0 • .:: .~~~,._~.~ ._~
0': - · Head-up' alignment on the . center .. Both A~gaps; i.e., . 2. ., gap
defender .. . . .' .
~ '1 Shaded defender splitting the crouch of the center with his wide
foot. Aligned as a shaded nose on the center. A-gap. ' .
. .
2 Head-up alignment on the offensive' guard. ·A &B gaps, i.e.,: 2-
gap defender.
2i' Shaded defender aligned on the inside eye of the offensive guard.
· .The defender will align. his outside foot on the inside eve; A-gap.'
· Shaded defender aligned on the outside eye of an offensive' guard,
3 aligned with his inside foot on the outside eye of the guard .. B-
gap.
4i Inside shade. alignments on an offensive tackle. Defender aligns
his outside foot on the inside eye of the tackle. B-gap.
4 Head-up alignment on the tackle. B &C gaps, i.e., 2-gap
defender. ,
5· : Outside shade alignment on an offensive tackles. Defender will
align his inside foot on the outside eye of the tackle. C-gap.
.. 6 Head-up alignment on the tight end. C & Dsgaps; i.e., 2-gap
defender.
. ) Inside. shade alignment on the tight end'. Defender will align his .
7 outside foot on the inside eye of the, tight end. C-gap.
.9 - Outside shade alignment on the tight end. Defender will align. his
. inside foot to the outside eye of the tight end. Dsgan, or outside. 23

HUDDLE.

The huddle is our first priority because it establishes team discipline.' It takes all eleven players acting as one when it comes to setting the huddle. Huddle discipline' starts from' when the defense takes the field. The attitude is the first message you

· get to. send to the offense. Don't allow the offense the opportunity to sense that you

. . (.... ··00. '.

might be tired or that you 'are confused when lining up. . .' . .

When the defense takes the field or at the completion of a play, the. "Nose" ('~') will set the huddle. The N will position himself approximately three .yards from the . anticipated spot of the ball with both hands raised yelling "huddle II "huddle", this alerts the rest of the defense to rally back towards him so that the next play can get'

. called. It is important. to get-in and out of the huddle as quickly as. possible. The.:

· defense must have their huddle calls completed and be in their post huddle

alignment before the offense breaks theirs. . .

The huddle has rwo captains' one being the "MIKEll linebacker' '("M';) 'who: is

'responsible for getting the call from the sideline and the ~fSAM" linebacker ("S") .. who makes. sure that the huddle is tight and everyone is in their proper huddle. position. In: addition,". SAM will be responsible for 'providing situational . communication. This is done prior to the MIKE giving the Defensive Sequence "', .( calL

.SAM will be responsible for communication specific situational information, including field situation and opponent situation. The first communication, part of field situation, is to identify the wide' side of the field ("field"); "rip" is to the right; and "liz" is to the left. Additional communication is shown in the table below: .

Field Call (Rip or Liz) Down and Distance Red Zone

Field Situation

.Opponent Situation

Alerts and· Tendencies Pass or Run Down Screen and Draw

]rd DownY Needed

MIKE is responsible. for' getting the sideline call as such, always aligns to the

· bench, and SAM must align opposite him. The front row will have their hands on

· their knees and eyes looking straight ahead. Don't allow the offense to think you

24

ro..T 11' t h ddl "Mike" aligns to bench',

1'40Se se sue •

3 yards from ball. ,gets call from the sideline.

,"Sam" aligns away from bench' ,S M

makes situational calls. 8 TN' T W

CF RC

2S

, might be tired; this gives them a psychological advantage. The back, row will position themselves between the players in the front row with their hands on their hips, backs 'erect and the eyes focused on MIKE for the call.

The following is an example on how the huddle should look: '

DEFENSIVE' CALL SEQUENCE "

"As soon as the previous play is blown .dead, MIKE should look to the signal caller , " on the sideline as soon as possible to get his next defensive call, If MIKE fails to : get his, call from the sideline, he can tap his hand on the top .of his helmet to alert ," for the call to be repeated. MIKE must keep his composure at ,all times.. :,','" .:

. . . .' . .' . ~ . -~. _\ • , ,:. " -. L':~ -.:' . :; '~.' . •

, '

"Once the call from the sideline has been received WK.E will-step into the huddle

, 'and give an' "EYES" call. When the deferi.sive huddle hears the ,"EYES" call, all eyes' and attention should be focused on the signal caller. Under no circumstances will. .there be· any talking beyond this point. MIKE must have' complete concentration', and cooperation from everyone. Talking in' the huddle will .not ,be, tolerated. If anyone 'm the huddle doesn't get the. call, they can yell "CHECK" arid

the call will be repeated.' ,. , '

Thebasic defensive calls will consist of two to five parts:

, 1 .. Movements: These arestems and disguises. 2. Front; Identifies the alignment of the, tackles. , 3. Variation: Modifies the base fronts.

4. Attack: These are the pressure packages.

5. Coverage: Secondary coverage.

The call from the sideline should be made in this order:

44

Tuff

Base

s

Cover 1

Cover 42

After making the huddle call, MIKE will give a verbal command of "READY." Once the defense hears the "READY" command they in turn will yell, "HIT", with a single clap. Upon breaking from thehuddlethe defense should get into their. post .

· huddle alignment and keep their eyes on the offense. The secondary personnel should be looking for the receivers leaving the huddle and the linebackers looking for the tight end. The first call that should be alerted is the strength call.

STRENGTH CALL

. The defensive scheme is based upon a "balance" look. . However, certain movements and stunts will be based upon the strength call ("Caliside'~). As. the offense breaks the huddle the MIKE will make a directional ·calI-uReno" (to the right) or "Vegas" (to the· left), depending upon the alignment" of the tight end. the other . inside linebackers. (SAM & WILL) will echo the call. The "Reno" . and "Vegas ". call indicates the direction of the tight end. This call mu~t be. made as

· quickly as possible because it will set certain movements and stunts for 'the . . defense.

. .' . .' .:. . ..

There are certain defensive calls that are dependent upon -the declaration of the

.. offense's strength - to the tight end. The direction call made by the MIKE willbe . given twice; it should be loud, clear, and concise. If there is no .tight end, then MIKE will make his call to the two-receiver side. If the offense comesout with. a

· balanced formation, his call then will be to the field, unless in the middle in which . case the call is "Vegas".

In the huddle, SAM will make a field call - R1P (to the right) or LIZ (to the left),

· This sets the alignment of WILL and ROVER because they set to the field.· -SAM & BANDIT will set to the boundary, or opposite of the field call. Also, stunts, blitzes, . dogs or games can be run based upon the field ("wide") or the boundary ("short"), so as SAN!" & WlLL echo the strength call, they will add a field call. This is accomplished by indicating the wide side. of the field with a "Rip" (right) or

26

"Liz" (left) call. An example would be: . "RENO, LIZ", which would put the strength of the formation to the right, into the boundary; i.e., the. field is to the left. The boundary (short side) is opposite the "Rip" or "Liz" call.

The following is a chart for the field and strength calls.

.. ' '.. . l

p

~.

Strength - Vegas·· Open /Short· . Field": Liz

Open I.Short Strength - Reno Field - Rip

' ... --~

SYSTEM

. ..

The 30 Stack Defensive scheme is a multiple pressure package, designed to, put

. eight or nine in the: box by moving the front and creating mismatches with varying alignments that can disrupt. blocking assignments causing a negative play for the . offense. The system is modular, creating multiple looks while simple to learn.· This allows the players more time to focus on formations and plays that come off .ofthem, using hit technique, pursuit and tackling skills.

. .

The system is built off of two to five possible calls: Movements, Front, Variations, . Attack, and Coverage. The following is a brief summary of these components.

27

Movements - These are alerts to help the defenders coordinate their "prowl", If there is no movement identified in the huddle, then the defenders will 'align in "Base" and execute their . assignments from this position.v'Fhe calls can be: ' . '

o Cheat - Technique used to disguise coverage base upon initial alignments .

. 0 Prowl =Pre-snap movements' designed ·to confuse the offense, blocking

schemes and/or the quarterback. '

o Scalp ., This is a half-man slant technique.

,. ...

o Show .; This is the opposite of "cheat". The defenders willalign or "show'

their intentions'.

[] Stack -, This is an alignment that ~'stacks" the inside linebackers behind' one another prior to the snap.

o Sugar - The defenders will "show" hi 'an, attempt to 'bait the offense, and

. move or ''bail'' to their proper alignment. ,," , ,

o Up - The defenderswill "shown, and execute the, stunt, blitz or dog, from

, this "up" alignment. • ' '

( i

See, Chapter IV, 'Pressure Packages for a more detailed description of. these movements.

Front - Identified by two numbers alerting the defensive tackles where to align. , The first number aligns the tackle to the callside, and the second number' aligns the ',openside tackle. This allows the defense to' get into just about any front, however

, the base front in the 30 Stack isa "44" with both tackles aligned in 4-techniques.·'

Here are a few examples:

28

Front: "44"

.' . . .

·o~e 0 II 0_

T N . T

·s

M

w

. Front: "33" .

o O· () IIClO

T'N T

s

M

w

Front: "45"

:0 e 0.110· ()

.;r....~: T

S MW

Front: "55"

.: () OIl:O()

T .. '··N '.T·'

S .' M W

.. Variations - These are adjustments to .th~ base stack alignment by the linebackers .

. The calls can also set the defensive linemen, or be used in conjunction with a front . .

, ~ call.j'Thevariation calls, "tilt" and "flex" are used to' set the nose's techniques. .

. .: '. . T~.:~ . I . _\~ • ~ ':..." ,.' '.. • ". '.

Front: ."45"

. () 0'11 0.:_ '0·

T;' N:"·' .::'T

W M .. S

. Front: "75" .

() ·0 11'0"0' () .....

T ··N ,T

..

M "'S

w

• Tilt - the nose will align at a45° angle to the center, This alignment is used ·'10. facilitate the nose either shooting the A-gap to the tilt, orthe opposite A.: gap with a cross' face. technique. The tilt changesthe nose from a two-gap

. player to a single gap defender.' .-

.,;.:- ", . .

• . Flex - this call moves the nose to 'I V2 yards off the center in a two-poirit' stance. The nose will flow to the ball.

' ..

-. . The following variations' are . additional variations, and are diagramed with a . . strengthcall .0f"Vegas", anda field call of "Rip".

29

This moves both outside inverts to a , 9-technique, 1?t1 off of the EMOL.

o.'olloe'

B TN, T"R

S M W

.Variation: "Load" " ' ,

Tight

"Load" moves one' of the outside, inverts to a 9-technique, Ix l off of the EMOL based upon callside ("Load"), openside ("Open Load"), boundary ('~Short Load") or field, ("Wide Load"). Also, always' ~'Load" a tight end.when there is no 0_ 0 II 0 e

receiver aligned, outside (referred to "B T ' ~",' T ," ,

as "nub").' ,,', ' . ' ',., ,

',S"rvf ' .<W ' R

The ,inside linebackers' will slide, giving 'tne 30 Stack an "Arizona Flex" type', look. The callside linebacker will move to, a, 7- technique, Mike in the callside A- , B gap, and openside linebacker Will

flex at 1 Yz in a 2

Tuff

'/() _:"'0 11,'0 _'

S T ,N:, w T,

M ':',

, Double eagle front with the callside invert and linebacker bracketing the tight end with a 9 and 7 -technique. The .inside linebackers will-stack , behind the tackles. This is typically used vin conjunction 'with' a,' "33" front.

, , () 0 () II (J:(),"

B S 'T ·NT R

, .

M

w.

This slides the linebackers into 'a traditional 50 look, aligned directly

.' in over the guards. : The inside. .linebacker (to the callside) alignsin B a

··Okie .:

o e 0110._

,'S T . N. ··:·T

'M W"

Creates a' 40 .Ioek, using a 31

scheme. The inside linebacker' (to .'. (t' 0 () [J .0 ().'

Even" the .openside) . moves to a 5- N T W

technique, and the . defensive T . '" .

S'M'. R

linemen slide' to the . callside B

in 7 3 and 1

R

~.

." ,.

30

Attack - These are coordinated pressure packages either by a single defender, or two or more defenders .. They can be either to strength ("callside") or weakside,

, .. also known as the openside ("Op~n"),.or the wide side of the field ("Wide") or into the boundary ("Short"). These pressure packages include Dogs, Stunts,Blitzes or Games, or commonly referred to as "attack" or "stunts". See Chapter IV, Pressure

Packagesfor a more detailed description of these stunts. . . ('

..

j .. Dogs - These (lf~ coordiDated run through action by the inside linebackerS .. 2. Stunts +. These ate coordinated' movements by defensive linemen and

.'. linebackers; ..' . . . . .' .

3. Blitzes- These are' coordinatedrun through action by the secondary or

outside inverts; and . . ..

4: . Games - These are coordinated movements by the defensive line. They are typically a full man slant; using a hit technique on the offensive linemen one man over from their original alignments. However these also. include twist .

. between defensive linemen. . .

Coverage - The pass defense calls. The base coverage is a .3-deep zone. ("Cover.

: 3"), however many of the package calls will require man or man-free behind the " . front's action. The 30 Stack is surprisingly flexible in the . coverage packages, .. including zone and man combinations, as well as different contour looks; . i.e., diamond (single safety look), umbrella (two safety look) anda four. across Iook .

. . . ' Chapter V,: Defending the Pass includes a .. mpre detailedIookat the coverage'

. . '. packages. . . .

. .

. PERSONNEL

As noted above, the 30 Stack is based upon a balanced look. However, we align

.. our linebackers (invert and .' inside) basedupori field .(':wid~~') and boundary ("short"). In. general, we want our best eleven' football players on def~e.: 'regardless of size because it is not the scheme that willdetermine our success.but the players. Here is a brief list of what our players must do to be successful: .

. 0 Attitude - be positive, with a relentless approach on every play, regardless of the situation;

.0 . Alignments - align correctly on every play and use the proper technique to take care of their responsibility on every snap;

o Pursuit -- 100% effort on every down, get to the ball;" ... ,

c Tackling =outstanding form, "club-up" and "see what . you hit", no missed

. tackles; and,' .

31

.0 Turnovers - make them happen!

(_. -_ "

\.. -." .

~.-': ..

The following is a brief outline. of the defensivepositions ..

TACKLES

"The tackles ("T") will align head-up on 'the offensive tackles in' 4-techniques. ~eir 3-point stance should be balanced, placing them approximately twelve inches off . the ball. . They will use a "hit technique" (3-p6int punch,": see Chapter Ill,

· Defensive Techniques)' that has their first step attacking the line of scrimmage

· (ULOS") .mirroring their opponents step;' i.e., maintaining . their : 4::'technique

positioning after the first step. The tackles must have: . " ".

I -,

[J Good speed, quickness and strength (minimum 250+ bench press) c Excellent size

[J Ability too play one-on-one

o Ability to rush the passer

o Ability to contain and / or force

o Ability to com€! up with the big play .

.. ~ .

+ •• _ .-_

-NOSE . (

The' nose (''N'~)will 'align head-up on the center "in' O-technqiue.· - Their 3-point stance 'should be balanced, placing them approximately twelve inches off the ball. They will use a "hit technique". that has their first step attacking -the' LOS' mirroring

their opponents step;' i.e., maintaining their O~technique positioning after .the first

· step. The nose can be "tilted" or "flexed" based upon a variation call. A strong nose is important, with minimum 250+ bench press. The Nose must have:

- ,-

. [J Enough size to be able to play one-on-one and also defeat" a double team

a: The speed, quickness and strength to rush the passer -. . . -

[J . The reactions to enable him to counter offensive blocking patterns _.

[J Extra toughness and aggressiveness . - c· •

".

SAM & WILL . . ".

Sam and Will ("sn & "W") are inside linebackers (also referred. to as "STUD" linebackers) .that will stack 4Y2 yards (versus zone .schemes Of' 311. versus man

. schemes) behind' the defensive tackles, ·with SAM·. aligned, to the boundary ("short") and WILL aligned to the." field ("wide"). Their 2-point. stance should allow them to execute their read steps (toe to heel shuffle - step & replace) to, the feet of the defensive linemen. They are keying the guard - tailback - quarterback

" triangle for flow. The linebackers must have the following characteristics:

32

o . Size and strength to enable him to take on runs directly ~t him'

D . Speed enough to get to the comer on wide runs .

D .. Range, to enable him to get width and depth in the .wide curl area 20. yards . . wide 18 to 20 yards deep .'

Q -Ability to pursue on action away from him

MIKE

Mike ("11") IS the- middle linebacker, and. will stack 4Yz. yards (versus zone schemes .or 3 Y2 versus man schemes). behind the "N". Their 2:"point. stance should

. allow them to execute their read steps (toe-to heel shuffle) 'to the feet .ofthe . defensive linemen. 'MIKE is- keying the fullback - guard>- - quarterback triangle for flow. The middle linebacker must have the following characteristics:

,D . Extra special strength, must be able to -defeat more than one-blocker .' " -.

0', . Blind side attack ~ must learn to roll with. the block or fight through 'at\er the

collision '. . .' " -.. ' .

a Must be an excellent run defender first"

a Must be super aggressive .

o Have range to play pass defense at certain times'

IJ" Quickness' to carry out stunts and dogs . , .

BANDIT & ROVER .

. Bandit and Rover ("B" & ''R'') are outside inverts or linebackers (also referred to . as "EAGLE") that will 'align 3 yards outside .the end man on the line ("EMOL") - and 6 yards deep, with BANDIT aligned' to' the boundary ("short') and ROVER aligned to the field ("wide"). Their 2-point stance should allow them to execute their read step (inside foot steps .at the EMOL). They are keying the EMOL and

. attacking the LOS-. On flow away, they have "cutback", known' as '.'COLLAPSE'; ... . The outside linebackers must have the following characteristics;

. [J Excellent range both on pass defense and versus run . .

c Ability, to filter through blocking patterns. and tackle cutback runs on flow

. a,way

D Speed to cover the field from one bash mark to the opposite sideline . c Ability to make. open-field tackles

CORNERS

... Comers ("en) will align on the number one receiver to their side 7% yards off, '. aligned outside of the receiver, i.e., inside foot aligned to- receivers' outside foot.

33

Their 2-point stance should be a narrow heel to toe stagger, with the outside foot i/·.··

up, shoulders over the toes and weight on the toes. This aligrunent will allow the i\

. CORNER to key (look at) the quarterback because the shoulders are opened to the inside. . The CORNER will use' a" 3-step slide back technique reading . the quarterback .for on or off the' LOS. The comers must have the following

. characteristics:

o Quick feet (ability to break: on thrown ball) capacity to play man-to .. man· '.'

a Speed (ability to run with wideout on. an up pattern) .

o Aggressiveness (open-field tackling ability) ..

Q 'Size (ability totake on fullback or pulling guards, and sometimes both) .,'

".", "'. ;. "

FREE SAFETY'

Free Safety ("F") will align at 9 yards, favoring the Callside A-gap versus a 2-back set. .Their 2~poinrstance .shculdbe a narrow heel to toestagger, with the 'shoulders

. . over the toes and weight on the toes: The FREE uses a 3-step slide back technique .' reading the quarterback for on or off theLo'S. They will fill the alley on iun from an inside but position. The free safety should have the followingcharacteristics:

-, ..," ..

. a Strength for run Support and enough athletic' ability to play pass defense .

. . 0 Good football sense . . , .

a Excellent open-field tackling ability

," ... a Create big collisions .

Q Ability to playa tight end man-to-man

(

34

. . ~ .

ALIGNMENTS

The defensive players must get off blocks, run to the ball and make the tackle . . This.can onlyoccur when they play with confidence+ in alignment arid technique . . The defense is designed to bring' pressure from virtually every' . position, so alignment andtechnique used to execute the assigned responsibility are critical to

success. Therefore, the scheme is simple enough to allow the players to focus on recognition of formations and plays' that come off of them because the alignments do not have to change versus most formations that offenses typically use.

The 30 Stack is the "base" .which we call "44 Base". As indicated above, we have .'. additional variations. .Theresponsibility charts are on the next pages, with X & 0 diagrams of the alignment versus formations following each of the charts.

35

Call: 44 BASE'

o

o o o o eo a o e

T NT

S M W

4\4 Stack 4111 Stack . 4Y.! Stack.

R .. '

3 x 6 offEMOL. to WideC

Boundary = Short ' Callside =. Strength

Field = Wide

Away from Call = Open

.0

c·'

B

3 x 6 off EMOL to Short

7112-0; inside foot to outside foot

. 7 112-0; insid . foot to eutsid

foot .

9 - shade callside

6-man box; stop the run and force it to perimeter; DL 2~ gap defenders using a "bit .. lockout" technique

Adjust LB based upon man (3Y1 yards) or zone (4;4) blocking' schemes; When outsized, move DL off the ball and use more. "games"; treat unbalanced as a double tight end; a "nub" tight. end alignment (no outside receiver) check "Load"

T 4-techriique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to'

maintain original technique; pass rush outside shoulder of theguarterback .

NO-technique; balanced '3-point stance' with 2-gap responsibility; will use .a mirror step to

maintain original technique; pass rush straight to the quarterback .

T ·4-technique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to

. maintain original technique; pass rush outside shoulder of the quarterback ' '.

M Stack directly behind "nose" 4~ yards; balanced 2-point stance reading fullback through

theguard; shuffle to feet of defensive line . ....

S Stack directly behind "boundary tackle"; 4~ yards; balanced 2-point stance reading guard

to tailback_;_ shuffle to feet of defensive line ' .

- Stack directly behind "field tackle", 4Yz yards; balanced 2-point stance reading guard to

W tailback; shuffle to feet of defensive line . .

B Align to the boundary at 6 & 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-pOint stance reading the .

EMOL; step with inside foot and react to EMOL' .

Align to the field at 6,& 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL; ,R . step with inside foot and react to EMOL

C Align to the boundary at 7~ yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver, 3' slide steps.

readinz QB for on or offLOS;iump_pr~:Qlant technique .'

Align shading A-gap to the callside, at 9 yards; 3 slide steps reading QB for on or off .. "

F LOS; fill alley frominside out position .

Align.to the boundary at 7Y1 yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver; 3 slide steps C reading QB for on or off LOS; jump pro-plant technique

36

r

,

I - "Vegas"

. >~----~----~----------~----------------------~~

Queen -"Vegas" 0 . King- "Vegas':'

o o

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37

Call: 44 Tight

Note: ''Tight'' is an alert to load the both edges.

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7"112-0· inside . foot to ~utside foot

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7 112-0; insid foot to oo1$i&

r , _ 'foot

. 9 - shade eallside

. 1~pktf:!~'d%lili?::Stiategy:~\:i~;~i'£~;'!;;;J~{s:;: ··V:;,~~;/~i'~··,;:}+i~~~~:~~i~~!pt· 'CQacliliig .. po·mtS:~;!!,~\~;,f,j:~'t~S!.~~'fi~~~~~~f.::·~I .

. 6-man box; stop the run and Adjust.LB based upon man (311 yards) or zone (4Yz) blocking

. force it to perimeter; D L 2- . schemes; Move "OLB" up if they are late to force; "Load" is . gap defenders using a "hit.: . an alert for one of the "OLB" to align tight to Callside .unless

lockout" technique ·~~QQen". ~'Wide". or "Short" added to call . . .

". . ". 5.~~~}:lJ~~~~~t~~i~r~~SZ21~i~~~t§;-!f~~~~~:~~:=~~.~;~~~~~r%~~~;:~~~,;-~';,lttU.~~~-~~~~!~it~~+'~~~%~:i·_-f~~l~':;::~:~~~~~~*~~~r~~~*:~ "... .. '~~'·~~~~~j~i;~~·~~·

T' 4-tecbnique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap' responsibility; ·.will use\1l mirror step to

maintain originahechnique;}!ass rush outside shoulder of the quarterback. .. .

'N O-tecbnique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to

maintain original technique;}!ass rush strai~t to the Quarterback '. '.:..' .

. ' T . 4-technique; balanced 3-point stance With 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to maintain original technique; pass rush outside shoulder of the quarterback .' .

M. Stack directly behind "nose" 4~~~; ~a1anced 2-point stance re¢in~ fWlb~~k.ili,roUgh

the guard; shuffle to feet of defensive line , '. . ". . . . . ".

S Stack directly behind "boundary tackle", 4~ yards; balanced 2:-point stance reading guard

to tailback; shuffle to feet of defensive line .'

W Stack directly behind "field tackle", 4~ yards; balanced 2-point stance reading guard to .

tailback; shuffle to feet of defensive line .

B Align in. 9-technique lxl on EMOL; balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL; step

With inside foot and react to EMOL' .

. R' Align in 9-technique.lxl on EMOL; ·balanced 2-point.stance reading the EMOL; step

with inside foot and react to EMOL '... '. '.

,c . Align to the boundary at 7~ yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver; 3 slide steps reading OB for on or off LOS

F Align shading A-gap to the callside, at9 yards; 3 slide steps reading QB for on or off ..

LOS; fill alley from inside out position . -- .

. C Align to the boundary at 7~ yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver; 3 slide steps reading QB for on or off LOS

"r-

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38

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39

Call: 44 Tuff

Note: "Tuff" isan alert to align in 7~ technique to thecallside, and flexed at 1\4 in a 2-technique to the openside.

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7-tech W

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7 In-o; insic ·foot to outsid foot

7 112-0; inside . foot to outside foot

F

9 - middle

6~inari box; Stop run; Adjust LB based upon man (3Yl yards) or zone (4'l'2) blocking

force it to perimeter; flex & schemes; "Tuff" is an adjustment to control the running game .. slide "studs" approx one man to the tight end, while keeping excellent backside positioning, . ...

to the Callside Consider a 35 front with this call.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~==~~~~~~

T

4-tecbnique; balanced 3~point stance with 2-gap responsibility; willuse amirror step to maintain ori . a1 techni ue; ass rush outside shoulder of the· uarterback .

O-tecbnique off LOS· at 2 yards; balanced 2-point stance. with 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirrorst to maintain ori . aI techni ue; ass rush strai t to the uarterback

.. N
T
·M
S . 4-technique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to ..

maintain orizi techni ue: ass rush outside shoulder of tbe uarterback

Slide one man to callside over guard, 4~; balanced 2~point stance reading .fullback

throu the ; shuftle to feet of defensive line

Callside: 7 -tech; balanced 2-point stance reading guard to tailback; Openside: Slide one man toca11side over guard.flexed at 1~; balanced 2~point stance reading-fullback through

the d: shuffle to feet of defensive line .

W Callside: 7-tech; balanced 2-point stance reading guard to tailback; Openside: Slide one . man to ca1lside over guard, flexed at·1 Yl; balanced 2-Point stance reading fullback through .

the d; shuffle to feet of defensive line ..

B Align. to. the boundary at 6 & 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-point stance reading the .

-EMOL; st with inside foot and react to EMOL . .. ... .

···R

Align to the field at 6.& 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL;.· st with inside foot and react to EMOL . .

C· . Align to. the boundary at 7~ yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver, 3 slide steps

. readin . B for on or off LOS; ium . Iant techni ue . .. ... .. .

F Align splitting the Cs, at 9 yards; 3 slide steps reading QB. for on or off LOS; fill alley

from inside out position . .. .

C . Align to the boundary at 7Y1 yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver; 3 slide steps

reading QS for on or oifLOS; jump pro-plant technique .

!-".'-:'

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Call: 33 Bear .

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. Align splitting C ~9 yards; 3 slide steps reading QB for on or otfLOS; fill aIley from

inside out position- " , .;.:..... . . .' .',. . ;:,..' ' .

. " I-----:I--~---:----:--------------~---_:__-------__i

C Align to the boundary at 7Yl yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver; 3 slide steps

. reading QB for on or off LOS '.'

'B S

1 x 1 - EMOL 2p. 7-tech

to eallside M

4~ Stack

T· R

1 x 1- EMOL W to openside

4Y: Stack·

T. N

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'. 7 112-0; inside . . foot to outside foOt

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9 - middle

.7 112-0; insid. . foot to outside: . foot .. '

6-man box; stop. the run;. force it to perimeter, Double

Ea e look .

Pressure package, can be zone behind front, but typically man; versus l-back sets "M"stack behind' "N", and both' inside

lineback~ will be u .... .' :.'

T . 3-technique; balanced ~:-point stance with: B-gap responsibility; will usea mirror step to

maintain ori . nal' technii ue; ass rush outside shoulder of the uarterback .

T

Align to the boundary at7Vi yards With inside foot splitting outside receiver, 3 slide steps

readin B for onor off LOS . . .. .

O-technique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap responsibility; Will Use a mirror step' to .

maintain ori . al techni ue; ass rush strai t tothe uarterback' .'

3-technique; balanced 3~point stance with B-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to

maintain ori . al techni ue; ass rush outside shoulder of the uarterback ..

M . Versus 2-backs, .. stack behind callside tackle, 4~;or "N"verSus J~p'~~k s~i.2-poiilt '.' stance readin fullback: throu . the . ard: shuffle to feet of defensive line '. ';'" ",

S

Callside: 7-techor Openside; stack behind 'T' or 5-tech on LOS; balanced 2-point

stance readin d to tailback; hit lock out and read feet .' . .

Callside: 7 -tech or Openside:: stack behind "T" or 5-tech on LOS; balanced 2-point

, stance readin . d to tailback; bit lock out and read feet ... ' . .

CaIlside - align in 9:-tecbnique on LOS balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL or

"de: 5-tech; read to tailb ssibi adiust to 2x4 versus #2 receiver

B

R

Callside - align in 9-technique on LOS balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL or .

'de: 5-tec . read to tailbac ssibl adiust to 2x4 versus #2 receiver'

c.

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.LB ST. N T W,~· . . 'LB S . TNT. WR-I . .

2)[4 M' 2x4 2x4' M: . ;2x4

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43

(: ....

Call: 44 Qkie

o

o

O.O~O.

S T

2p.6-tech

o

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N

T

M W

4Y1 Head-up 4Y1 Head-up R

3 x 6 off E¥OL

B

3 x6 of{EMOL

c

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7 112-0; insid '. . foot to outsidt' '. foot.

7 In-o; inside foot to outside foot'

F

9 - midd1e

6-man· box; stop . the run; . 50 look with the inside. Lbers aligned head-up on the' guards,

force it to perimeter. . .' with the Openside OLB~ dropped off. Open Load would create

the typical 50 front. Consider "tilt" and "flex" from this look,

T

4-technique; balanced 3-point stance with Bsgapresponsibility; willuse a mirror stepto maintain ori~al technique; pass rush outside shoulder ofthe_quarterback': .

N

O-technique; balanced 3-point stance with 2-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to

maintain original techni_que; pass rush straight to the _g_uarterback .. .

T ' ·.4-technique; balanced 3-point stance with B-gap responsibility; will use a mirror step to

maintain original technique; pass rush outside shoulder of the quarterback .

M Slide one' man to' callside over guard, at 4Yl; balanced 2-point stance reading fullback

through the, gtlaI'di shuffle to feci of defensive line . . ,.,..

·S·

Callside: 6-:,tech; balanced 2-point. stance reading guard to tailback; Openside: Slide one. _'_ man to' callside over guard, at 4~; balanced 2-point stance readingfullback through the

guard; shuffle to feet of defensive line . .:" . . . . _ . . .

Ca11side: 6-tech; balanced '2-point stance reading guard to tailback; Openside: Slide one W man to callside over guard, at4~ balanced 2-point stance reading fullback through the .:

guard; shuffle to feet of defensive line . . .

B

Align.to the boundary at 6 & 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-Point stance reading the ... ' EMOL; step with inside foot and react to EMOL

Align to the field at 6 & 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL;

step with inside foot and react to EMOL' .

Align: to the boundary at 7% yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver, 3 slide steps reading·QB foronor off LOS; jump pro-plant tecbnique : . ": ... : .' ...

c

. F Align splitting' the.Cs, at 9 yards; 3 slide steps reading QB for on or off LOS; fill alley .

: from inside out position - . <. • ••

Align to the boundary at 7% yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver; 3 slide steps c

'reading QB for on or off-LOS; jump pro-plant technique· .. '.'

44

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45

Call: 31 Even

B

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TN . T W

S M 2p,.5-tech

4Yt, A-gap 41A, B-gap R

. 3 x 6offEMOL

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o

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3 ",.6 offEMOL .:

c

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F

9 - middle

.~=-~~~~~~~~~-.-~----=--~~---=~~--~~==~~~=-~~

. . ~:;~~t~~~~1:~g'r;~~:;' StTate~J.~* :;~~y'~~3~~;:i~~ ~\. ;;:i':~'f[~~~~~Ti~~~?~;:;~'~;;)i~~;~~ i~5;,.Coa6hiiig.PoinfS·:;;f.;i~11~0;~if~~f,,~~~~;;~~~~

: .. ' 6-man box; stop the run; 40 look by sliding the defensive line to the callside, . and

force it to perimeter" . moving the, Lber's to the Openside. Consider "tilt" and "flex"

from this look. . . .' .

1~' ~.,'" .. ::,'J,";;';'" ::i,::~~: .. ";;t~;f;:'i~;:S~~~I~~~;Hi';~~tt~;-RU1es~4:1';;~J~s;:Br'r~"~\;;~~J':J~:;:~~·t'::~;·!~?;'i'~fi~~J,';

. . Balanced 3-point stance, using technique called with gap responsibility; will use a mirror .

· : T· step to maintain original technique; pass rush outside shoulder of the quarteroack .:'.'

Balanced 3-point stance, using technique called with gap respo~ibility; will use a mirror

. N. step to maintain original technique; _pass rush straight to the quarterback . .

Balanced 3-point stance, using technique called with gap responsibility; will use a mirror.

T. st~to maintain original technique; pass rush outside shoulder of the quarternack .'

M Slide 1 Yz techniques opposite callside, with B-gap responsibility. at 4Yz; balanced 2-point

Stance reading fullback through the guard; shuftle to feet of defensive line' ' . . :

Callside: Slide 1 Yl techniques opposite callside, with A-gap responsibility reading guard

S. to tailback, . shuffle to feet of defensive line; Openside: Move to S-t~bnique in a balanced

2 -point stance .' . . .' . .... :;'.<.. .. '" "

.' . Callside: Slide 1 y" techniques opposite callside, with A-gap responsibility reading guard

. " W. to tailback, shuffle to feet of defensive line; Openside: Move to S~tecbnique ina balanced

. - . 2-point stance . . . .

B Align to the boundary at 6 & 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-point stance-reading the .

. EMOL; st_g) with inside foot and react to EMOL . . .

Align to the field at 6 & 3 off of the EMOL; balanced 2-point stance reading the EMOL;

. ; R step with inside foot and react to EMOL. .

· G. Align to the boundary at 7Yz yards With inside foot splitting outside receiver, 3 slide steps

: reading_QB for on or off LOS; jump pro-plant techmque; . . ;',' . ". -: . . .' .. '

· F' Align splitting the Cs, at 9 yards; 3 slide steps reading QB for on or off LOS; fill alley'

. from inside out. position .' . . ,

Align to the boundary at 7Yl yards with inside foot splitting outside receiver, 3 slide. steps

C. reading QB fOT on or off LOS; jump pro-plant technique . .

/-:". .

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S , M· I .'
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- I C C C
C F
·2x 8 F
F Q Trips - "Reno ft· Deuce - "Vegas".
. . 0 .. .. 0
0 , .. , 0 ?
9 .. s cry
0 () o [I 0 <t-r .0 0 () () o-() 0
T·N T. WI _j I N T W aJ
S _M I R LB. T
.B 2x4 ·2x4 S M 2x4
I. .. . .
C , •• c.
.. C I C .. ···C
, F ..
.2Jt8 F
nush - "Vegas" .. Spread - "Vegas"
, 0
? O· .. .9 0 9 ~·O() 0
0 o . () [10 () 0 (J 0 () I 0
LB T N T w ~J LB T· ·N T· W R.J
2x4 s M 2x4 2x4 S M 2x4
C F C C C
F ;...

_ _. ..

i

48

CHAPTER III' DEFENSIVE. TECHNIQUES

. As we' discussed in. the introduction, this playbook is. predominantly scheme oriented .. The. 30 Stack Defense is about pressuring the opponent, getting your

· players to 'the football and score, or get it back in the offense's hands. Remember, .

. " the. game. is all about the football: When your 'opponent has it, get it back, and '. · when you have it keep it until you score. As' such, each coach Will add his own

· personality to his. defensive approach, whichis reflected in the techniques that are ..

·taught. The. scope. cif this playbook is not.intended·to cover these techniques; ". however we have included a couple short sections, . covering Stimulus Response,

· Defending the Run and Keys to Success.' . .

STIMULUS RESPONSE

· The following. information should' be . used. 'to help reinforce' leaming and. assignment understanding. The technique, read key.. and reaction being taught

· should be a stimulus that triggers a response. The stimulus responseis used as a descriptive termbythe coach that should trigger an aleit word from the.player; i.e.; coach calls out an offensive' player's action,.the defensive player should give the appropriateresponse .. It is the player's response that should trigger the.appropriate technique to defeat his opponent. " .

DEFENSIVE LINEMEN

. This defense is designed to bring pressure, but each 'player must be' disciplined ill

· readinghiskeys.using his hit or jet technique and get to the footb~I.·.A system of "stimulus".' and "response" has been developed to help players recognize what is

· happening, and how they should respond - the technique they' should use. . For

. example, when a coach says Base (stimulus) he should hear Squeeze from his player, (response). . This .,. technique .aidS· in helping. to master' learning and understanding what is required on' anygivensituation~A good time to use this. type. of learning and rein;forcement is during team and in warm-ups when the coach

.' has 'tune to walk around and talk with his position players..' . . . .

DEFENSIVE LINEMEN.'

. The following.' are the "Stimulus Responses" for' the defensive linemen, . They can · be broken down into three categories:

49

"" ::"

As you develop your verbal. stimulus and responses, me .objective is to reiIlf'orce . and to confirm that your players understand what you are teaching ... The following

. tables includeX &. 0 Diagrams for the three categories of blocks that deferisive

linemen' will face, , ,. . .

'. ,

. '. The defensive linemen will always start off playing "Hit Technique", unless a "Jet" . (go get the passer) is alerted, The defensive linemen must get off the' ball and lead

: . with the hands and hips getting into the "Dominant ·Position". .The Hit Technique .. . creates a dominant lean, using a 3~point punch to. stay square to the LOS; arid only ..... corning off: when they see . ball. The' 3~point punch: (dominantIean). puts'. the ' . . defensive linemen in a Dominant Position' that allows them to defeat the blocker. :

The 3-point punch (dominant lean) is: ..

""" "

'. L Hands -,Thrust' both hands to the breastplate just outside thejersey niunber,.·

'striking With the palms, and thumbs 'up - grabbing cloth. . There is a natural . . grabbing place. or handle bars on the' shoulder pads, so "get. the palms with . thumbs up, grabbingjersey on the offensive lineman's. pads. This' hand

placement is critical to defeating a blocker. ....

. . .

2 .. Hips .; The hips must explode forward or up .. The hips must be aligned with : the defensive lineman's shoulders, not back>' If ,the butt is behind the shoulders the defensive lineman is not in balance; Le., weight is forward

putting the defensive lineman out of balance. .

50

51

;. ' .. - ,,'

3. Eyes '-. The eyes to the "V of the neck". The eyes should never be higher ' .. than the "V of the neck". _ .'

. .The defensive lin~men will always stay square to the LOS until they see ball. .' They can then rip off to make the play. The rip technique is:

. _)

• Grab the back pocket - the defensive lineman reaches the ann back. as

. . though pulling something out of their back pocket; .

• Rub the body.":_ as the defensive lineman swings the ann through, it should rub the body because this action forces the shoulders to reduce; i.e. the .near

. shoulder points' to the ground; and; .. . . . , . . ,;. '.'

•. Kiss the bicep ~the ann must come violently all the way through.the

. blockers front surface,' clearing the blocker. This clubbing .action is executed . properly if the defensive lineman can kiss th~ bicep as they clear the blocker.

COolmOn Blocks .

· The Common Blocks arethose most often faced by the defensive linemen:

. '"

.. Base - Squeeie: The blocker steps directly at the defensive' lineman, then: use-Hit

Technique staying square to squeeze the gap down (inside) Of maintain your initial.

-. alignment position; i.e., start in a 4-technique, stay in a: 4-technique.·· '. .

· Down - Trap: Theblocker steps down (or crosses theface) without making.contact

· . with the defensive lineman, then 'mirror step . to take the down block '. away protecting the linebackers'. This allows thedefensive lineman to hide' behind' the . down block and "trap' the trapper". The eyes' should' go .. inside looking from the

fullback to guard, coming underneath the down block with an outside rip. . .

Reach - Push/Pull: -The blocker is trying to attack the outside shoulder, then. the .

· defensive lineman will push' the. outside 'shoulder (offensive lineman's) to' lock ... their. ann· out, pulling the inside shoulder {offensive lineman's) to them. .: This , technique will open the offensive lineman to allow thedefensiveIinemantorip , . through when they See ball. The defensive lineman will stay square,' stretching the

block until they see ball, then lip off. '.

Pass - Bull:'The blocker pass sets, then the defensive .lineman will use their 'Hit

.. Technique pushing the blocker back toward the quarterback ("bull rushing"). The

." defensive lineman' wilI'usetheir dominant lean, keeping the eyes to' the quarterback, maintaining their' rush lane. They may add a pass rush move once' .

· they have determined pass; Le., eliminated screen or draw possibilities. . .

Common Blocks
Stimulus Base . Down Reach Pass
Q ~ .~ .C5
T N T
. Response Squeeze Trap PusblPull Bull Combination Blocks

Combination Blocks ire typically when. two offensive linemen are working together. Technique is critical to the success of-defeating these typesofblocks,

· Double - Hip: There are two . blockers ·'working together to 'move ·the defensive lineman, then use Hit TechnIque on the near blocker, .butdrive the hipfo the

· ground using the cloth (grabbed) to pull between the blockers .. This is .referred to as "skinny in the hole'Lbecause you do not give the blockers any surface toblock, The defensive lineman must fight to get through, and will keep fighting as long as. '. they are getting penetration .. However, when penetration stops. (or the momentum. is moving backwards) then thedefensive lineman will drop to the ground, and push . . themselves backup, under the blockers; i.e., similar to diving underneath a' wave.

. . . ~ . ". . ." . , ,'.

full- Collision: The, blocker. pulls behind the LOS, in either' direction, then be . prepared for some type of down block coming fromthe opposite direction. The

" eyes. must go inside, as the defensive lineman must anchor down (with the outside . · leg) arid blow up ("collision") the blocker with the forearm, staying square until

· they see ball. " . . .. :'

Scoop - Rip: The block starts' off as a reach, but a second blocker gets to the defensive lineman's inside shoulder, then use the "push/pull" technique .described

· under thereach, rip off as soon as you see ball.' the defensive Iinemanisgoing .. '. through either the. "front 'door" (playside) or-the "back door". (behind the.play).

The difference between a double and scoop is that a scoop. starts off as a reach. .' .

. .".. . .

. . . ,

· Wash - Spin: . There are blockers pushing the defensive lineman down the LOS as

· they step with. the down ·block (feeling pressure from the backside); then the. · . defensive lineman must spin ("ice pick'.') to get back into the play. The "ice pick"

· entails throwing yourself at the 'backside of the offensive. lineman, using your ...

· weight to lean. against the pressure of being w.ashed. down, . . .

52

Combination Blocks
.. Wash
.". . Stimulus Double Pull . Scoop
·WJ c5J5 NO 9P
N .T . T ·T· . "
Response Hip Follow Rip Spin ~
Skinny in the hole Eyes inside - Collision Front or back door Ice Pick Coward Blocks

.: .. Coward blocks or' secondary blocks are those blocks used leaSt' often by your '. opponentsr This third. phase deals with. blocks.that our linemen will faceand how

. they willhave to react .·to . each particular situation, . . .

. Influence - Back: This is typically used to counteract-a pass' set, 'with ~verY little effort (quick' strike and release) to pass protect and deep dropping quarterback; i.e., : '. deeper than 7 yards .. · The. defensive lineman must stop and retrace their steps. '. .' .looking for a running back. This Stimulus Response Ca11 also he used versus' influence trapping teams; i.e., pull occurs with no' down block, then the eyes must

. 'go ''back'' ready to collision the trap from the "backside", . . .

. . Cut Block -. Hands: . This is when the blocker attacks the knees (offensive Iineman's head is down)" of the defensive Iineman,then throw the hands. at the ." offensive lineman's shoulders driving them.into the-ground, with the eyes' up looking for the play. If the quarterback has a short drop, then get at least one hand

. up.

. ..

Cut-off ~ COBRA: This.is an inside release by. the blocker with the offensive flow .~.-

away,' then the defensive lineman must look for' cutback, boot: .or reverse. ·This is'

used in conjunctionwithour=chase or collapse" technique.' ..

. Secondary Blocks . ' -
...
. Stimulus . Influence Cut Cut-off
'D .. 0-. 'Q 19·.
Q;T
'T' T'
Response . Back Back Haruis . Cobra
E)'csbacbide C1mse or Collaps 53'

.[;-

INSIDE LINEBACKERS

.' .. This section will focus on the different run reactions that insideIinebackers.must . key and understand, and when we talk inside linebackers . for the 30 Stack, we are

· . talking about" the SAM," MIKE and WILL. The run stimulus provided in this' section should carry right into pur drill'work at practice; . Depending upon the area the offense is attempting to run the ball the linebackers should know what type of .. play they are defending. As you execute drills and verbal commands SAM, :MIKE and. WILL should always give a verbal response. The following will illustrate the'

. different run reactions. the linebackers 'should' focus on' when the running back to .

. ' their side receives th~ b~l1. Th~ stimulus response is diagramedbelow. . . .' .'

Backs Path "
p p
0 D D 0 T
w- I i i I .·w· .0
e. s V :V S e .3.
r· o· e e. 0 r- 3 Stimulus

T

Q'

'. s'

Outside S

-C B.. A. ABC . Outside

O» .O.S o , f8}sOsOS' 0 =s

, c .1 t i I'e." ,,', P.·

'.- ."

Gap

. p.

Response.

·e

r 0 Q 'Q 0 r .. . e:". .'
Q W Y Y 'w Q' e
p W [E1 ~~ d
e
TB-G . FB~G lB-G
Flow Away: . Flow Away:
. Check Counter q,eck Counter' . e· d

.

,Key

The inside linebackers read a triangle. SAM and WILL key the. tailba~k - guard -' quarterback, and rvmcEkeys the fullback- guard+ quarterback. On the snap of the football, the linebackers will take shuffle (step - replace) 'to the heels of the

. .

. " .' defensive lineman, and react to the backs initial movement when run comes to

.. ,them. When initial movement is away from the linebackers, they. will freeze step · to secure counter action, and then react toback's movement.

. " .

. A running back's movement is determined by the angle of his running lane and by .

the way he receives the ball. A running back's flowis broken down into 5 types of

. movement as 'shown above: dive, iso, power, toss and counter. The different angles

· and the way they- receive the. 'ball will effect a linebacker's. reaction. The', information below . makes . up the run reaction situations based upon' backfield

. movement..

54'

Stay ~ A Gap=-Dive .

Slow _ B Gap _. ISO.

. . .

Scrape - C Gap - Power

Speed -Dutside -'Toss .

Counter· .

..... 0

~O~

Counter

. OO~~O

~·gdJ.

COUIlter

.. ": 0 )r.

Counter '

. As .noted above, . the insjde linebackers key a triangle, ~hich includes: the' guard.' .

The inside linebackers will take an inside track: -The following are the basic guard .

'. .

movements ..

. Blocks·. Base,··Reach Double. Zone Fold, Combo .. Deep & Quick Sc .
TraP,lnfluence Pull Draw,lnfluence
'.' -; ',
Stimulus Direct Down/Pull : OUtside Pass' .
.. ~. .. ~ <fl n
s. M [!l G .0 .~. El :~
Response Collision Fill /Follow Serape Back
-: t_i'

55·

OUTSIDE INVERTS

The outside inverts or, linebackers are BANDIT . (''B'') and RovER ("R")~ BANDIT aligns to the boundary ("short") and ROVER aligns to the field ("Wide").·As such, either BANDIT or ROVER can be aligned to the strength call ("callside'.')· or the side away from the call (openside or "open") .. These linebackers will typically align 3 yards outside the EMOL, and 6 yards deep. However, they

. ·will "prowl" (moving back and forth) to disguise their alignments, or can have ·-different alignments based upon ''Variation'' calls. However, on the snap-they will 'step with the inside foot reading the :EMOL to the ·quarterback. Their stimulus

respopses areyery simple. .

. Down - Anchor: When the EMOL down blocks? the linebacker must close hard, at ...

· full speed and anchor down.. Anchor requires the linebacker's backside leg stretched at an angle to provide a brace and to get their pad level down to use: the ': ( hips .and.forearm to blow-up the blocker .. The linebacker must keep the outside .

ann free ~ make a play! . . . ... . .

Reach - Outside: When the EMOL reaches, or arch releases, the linebacker must.· close hard one gap outside. However, if the quarterback. is off," the linebacker must

be aware of pass and ready to handle their coverage responsibilities, if any. . '. . . .--

Seal - Collapse: When the EMOL inside releases to seal, with flow away, the ... linebacker has ."collapse".The Collapse defender will then begin to collapse dOWIl· .

· the LOS looking cutback. Once· he reaches opposite A-gap he willtake his. proper " .

pursuit angle to-the ball carrier. .. . .

. ,

• c." •

Release - Pass: When the ·EMOL. uses a release technique (swim, rip through) to . escape off of the LOS withthe quarterback "off', then the linebacker must execute

· bis pass coverage responsibilities.

'Pass Set - Back When the EMOL pass sets ("high hat'~), thell the lineb~~ker must · execute his pass coverage responsibilities.

56

SECONDARY .'

'Th~ secondary defenders include the Corners. and Free Safety. , These secondary

. players can be .aligned in different "techniques", however in zone coverage situations they. will key. the quarterback. for moving down the line of scrimmage

. .

("on") or away from the line of scrimmage ("off'). The following are the stimulus

responses: .

:,j~ii~:::~~~;stl1V1ULuS'(W:~~J~'it1 !~;~f·:€,.;1fRESP(JNSE:~j:~r~;i¥j\FS~s;'RESpbNSE~;~ii!,

. OB On ' ... Hands Alle_y. .

oa Off Coverage' Coverage

.....

,.' .

. On- :lfa~ds: When the Comer reads the quarterback moving down the line of .. scrimmage, he' must get his "hands" on the nearest receiver. The comer must work

. into . position to attack the' ball carrier once he has passed the line of scrimmage.

The corner away" from flow will use. "last rnan in pursuit" technique. See the next'

section on "Defending the Run" for a' detailed explanation. . . . . ,'.

On ., Alley: When the Free Safety reads the quarterback 'moving down the line of

. scrimmage, they must run the alley. The alley is lane just" outside the end man on . the line of scrimmage. The Free Safety has the. quarterback on option. .:

. -~ .

. Off-Coverage:' . When the secondary players read the quarterback moving. away

from the line of scrimmage, they must execute the "Coverage". . .

.. . .'. .

DEFENDINGTHE·RUN

The. 30 Stack Defense is' designed to stop the run _. cold. This can 'only:be

' .: accomplished when each defender uses proper technique that will allow them to' react quickly to. the ball carrier. The following are, the techniques used. in

'defending the' run. . .

. .

. ...

. . CHASE AND COLLAPSE· ,

. In order to play sound' football from the backside, you must be aware of pursuit '. techniques. Three of the most important factors in this phase 'of football' are

. '. defending the. cutback zone, reverse,' and . backside leverage (bootleg).' These' ... responsibilities fallon the backside tackle and the. backside invert Of. outside .. ·lin,ebacker. However, certain pressure packages will require an inside linebacker

. . to use one or more of these techniques. . . '. ,

57

Chase and Collapse techniques are backside gap or area control, which does not go into effect until' the ball is run 'away or the read, is pass. .The outer 'most rush defender is usually considered the Chasedefender, Thus.Took 'at the defensive scheme being used and always talk Chase, and Collapse with your defenders. ", The defender who is assigned to the cutback will have "Collapse" responsibility and the defender who has reverse arid bootleg will have "Chase" responsibility." 'These

responsibilities will be defined as follows: '

I ,

Chase Technique: Thisis automatically built into the defense and is dete:rminedby

, the type of defensive scheme called.The last down defender on the.LOStypkally , has the responsibility for backside reverse or' bootleg and will' incorporate' chase

technique. ' "" , : ' '

I .r .. ".

Once' 'a chase' defender reads pass he is responsible for outside' contain of the ' quarterback. When a Chase defendet reads ball away, he· Will pursue as deep as the , ball, keeping the ball carrier or quarterback on his inside shoulder. Againwhen the, ' ball is run away keep ball on .defenders inside shoulder arid gaining, depth by

chasing as deep as the ball. ' ' ' , ,

A Chase defender continues to chase ball away: until he reaches the'opposi'teB'-

• 'gap. It is usually decided that' if the Chase defender reaches opposite B-gap the ball will truly be committed to running in that direction.' Once the Chase defender ' '"reaches opposite B-gap he will then take his proper pursuit angle on the ball carrier 'or quarterback, looking to make the tackle down: field, As Chase technique is '

, 'worked at practice have the running backs change direction' on occasion .to -see .if " Chase defender is there, waiting for change of direction of ball. Also, you can

never work on the boot enough! ' , ' , '"

Collapse Technique: The outside invert will typically have collapse. When the outside invert pursues the, football on' or 'behind the LOS he has "Collapse'; responsibility.". Collapse technique by a defender, puts' him .looking 'for any

, : potential cutback by the running back or quarterback scramble. , ""

. A Collapse defender is, responsible for any type of cutback zone plays, when ball is run away. When Collapse defender reads ball away he will then begin tocollapse . down the LOS looking to see if ban cutbacks. Once the Collapse defender reaches ' opposite' A-gap, he will take his proper pursuit angle to the ball carrier. Work .this on a daily basis because, it is,' extremely important for the Collapse defender to

• understand his responsibility. " "

58

(

Whenever defenders are changing their "chase and collapse" responsibilities, they make a "you / me" alert. The· "me-me" alert is called by the defender who has

. . . .

.' collapse responsibilities, .. whereas. the defender with the chase responsibilities

· signals "you-you", basically signaling the defender that has collapse. responsibility.

This is very important in the 30 Stack because of the pressure packages. Do not allow 'your defense to become vulnerable because your players forgot to handle the collapse responsibilities.

FORCE

The force player typically has pitch responsibility ·versus the option, and no pass

· responsibilities with a run at him. The force. defender must .make the play on any

- perimeter runs at him. His aiming point is the outside jersey number of the ball' carrier. . If the force defenderis "crack-blocked", the secondary force ort'contain" .: . defender will become the primary force.

.. '

. CONTAIN

· The contain defender, .alscreferred' to as secondary force, becomes the primary·: force defender on a crack block. They.are responsible for halfback pass, stop & go

· routes, and should not support the rununtil there is no longer a threat of pass; .i.e., -

the ball has crossed the.line.of scrimmage, ". . - -

··ALLEY

. The alley defender checks #2 on a tight end type dump pass in. the seam as h~ runs the alley. The alley defender has quarterback on the option, and his aiming point is the inside jersey: number of the ball carrier. The alley course is from. an inside to··

outside track - similar to a banana.·· -

- . LAST MAN IN 'PURSUIT ("LMP") . . _

. The LMP is typically the backside Comer; .i.e., play run ·awaY from the. Comer. ' .. · . The L11P is responsible for securing the backside #1 receiver. Hispursuit angle is

to save·a touchdown, and not to allow the ball carrier to cut back, reverse or cross their face .. The Corner does. not cross the far hash unless it is to save a touchdown;

The following .diagrams will provide an overview of 30 Stack DefenseIncluding ...

· . the variations versus the run. .

S9

i .

! .

OJ

-u

I ~

. i

. ;

. 44 Base.

. Contain .

.'

44 Open Load

, ,

'0

..

Contain

35 Tuff·

. .

. Make "you/me" .

. ' ,.

<, ." .

. ' - ' :

lVI

.. ' . Make "you/me" I

1'0

I

I

I .

.\r

T Chase

·s

Force .

Collapse .:

-,

. .

c ~ .' •

Alley

.. ~ . ~ . :

.. 0.

M

Chase .... Collapse ..............

. Make . "you/me"

.' Force

Alley

Boundary

Field

o ~ Full Flow. . \--,OC-'- ..... , QB' Off ".

. ,',,-

0'·

. Contain

Alley

60

: .... --_ ..

" .....

..(

.. B~u.n'!P-o

Full Flow : .

QB Off'_~~r----;

!et

B· S

Force

...

33 Bear

Contain

Field

. ":" ..

._

Alley·

.44 Okie .

°

. Contain

Field

B

Force

o •• o. Make "YOulme"O .

N ~ /

1d' Case \ ¥

W R

Collapse

Alley

31 Even .

Contain

. B

Force

o [J o W Make "YOulme"O T . CfuiSe \. ¥ /

M. R

Collapse.· .

, Alley

'.' .. .- ,

61

,

, '

,

;, ,

"

l-

,

! .

I ;

DEFENDING THE OPTION

The 30 Stack is outstanding versus the' option' because it creates. a defensive triangle' on the perimeter. As such,' the veer option is' defended (see diagram 'belowj.aswell asthe gun option, which keys the backside tackle .. The midline option can be run, but the read is wide (4-technique) and the nose in a Oetechnique

. creates additional scheme problems .". The load option, whether from the Center or gun has the best opportunity for success, however the offensive tackle must be able . to reach block the tackle, 'and the tight end.must be able to block. a linebacker that

. is only one position removed, " ' ' . . .

"44 Base"

0·.

. /

"":.- -r-

O~O~

Dive

.0

B····:

Pitch'

......

R

Pitch

c

F QB

o

o

011 0,_

T·:, .. : NT"

QB

·S·,MW.

• Pitch . QB • Pitch .

.0

R

c

c

F QB

. DEFENDING THE: WING-T.

The basic. components to' defending the' wing- T' include understanding . the . . formations and the impact of motion. We have found that covering the guards. and creating a ''triarigle'' of defenders on the perimeter have yielded terrific results. As, .

1;

62

),

, .such, the Bear variation will play asignificant role in the game plan versus a wingo .T team.

When defending the Wing- T from the so Stack" recognizing motion and using the correct stimulus responses are very important. For example, when the opponent 'motions to the right, (from the alignment shown below) they can run belly option,

"po~er, and sweep to the motion. Plays away from the motion include counter, , reverse and trap. Here is a brief recap of the keys:

'C

'1. Defenders will yell "reno" indicating motionto the right. Thiswillalert the players. as to what potentialplaysmay be coming' at thein, aswellas the

,,', blocking $chemes., : , ;: "

2~Tackles, flow keying fullback.

• If fullback is downthe midline. and the guard .. pulls 'away, think' trap,

.sweep o~ quarterback boot, '"

• If fullback is down the midline, and the guard pulls to~ think bootor

, waggle pass. ' ' " ',' ' :,,'

. '. . .

• , If fullback goes away, check opposite wing for the no pull reverse.

• If fullback 'goes away, with pull to, then think counteror reverse.,

Defending plays versus a "reno" motion: ~

• Nose is on an automatic slant to the right working to two yards from, where

the fullback was, and two yards deep to stop the sweep.' ,',

• Left tackle slants on an automatic slant to the guard. If guard pulls right tackle the fullback on the trap.

• Right tackle slants outside 'the offensive tackle looking to stop power and , ,sweep.'

~'

c

W R'

o

, It44 Base"

o a

, 0 ,0.0.0.

R T' N T

S M

F

63'

i .

.u

KEYS TO SUCCESS

It is not the scheme that will ultimately determine our success; it is the players _ what they know and their ability to execute. In the enddefense.is about effort-

. team effort' and regardless of the scheme, the three things that every player can do if they are giving 1000/D effort is: pursuit - tackle= cause turnovers.' These three

things are about desire, commitment and effort.· . . .

. PURSUIT .

. As we have discussed' through this playbook, pursuit is a bumingdesire to get to the football, and team pursuit is all eleven players to the. football. The 30 Stack, a pressure and attacking defense will create opportunities; however you cannot be a . turnover-producing defense 'unless a defender is in position to . capitalize. . The following are some important points regarding pursuit:

What it takes to pursue: .. , .

.,. Pursuit is a mental process ..

• Visualize, pursuing and making great plays.

• 'NEVER assume a teammate is going to, make the play. .

• Physical conditiolung is necessary in order to have great pursuit on every. play.

• Speed .- react quickly and pursuit with speed .

,.

.(

, .

. How to Pursue: .

... .'

. .PhlY technique and gap responsibility first, .

. .• ' Take correct course (pursuit angle) to. the balL'

• Never follow the same colored jersey:

• You have to want to be first to the ball.

• Whoever is responsible for contain' inust keep the ball carrier inside into the

. pursuit. Everyone else works inside out to the ball. . .

.Once you arrive at theball:

• Come to balance (come under control). . ,

• Good bent knee-striking position. .

• Step to and through the ball carrier' (take one extra step).

• Club and wrap up, driving your numbers up through their numbers.

64

, .

• Promotes consistent team performance.

. ..... . .

e " Creates turnovers allover the field.

What pursuit does:

• . Eliminates the long touchdown.

.• Discciurages opponents during the course of a game.

TACKLE ,

. You have to be willing to hit 'a moving target in order to be a great tackle and ·a great tackler will always end up on top with the ball carrier going backwards! It

, '. takes both aggressiveness and good technique to bea great tackler:, . Here is an ..

.outline to 'develop great tacklers.' . . . . . .

. TECHNIQUE/FUNDAMENTALS:··

.' ... ' •... Meet the ball carrier in a good hitting position ..

. • . Eyes should be focused on the ball carrier's . numbers .. . ..•. . :-Don't give the ball carrier a two way cut.

• Keep butt low, keep head up, first contact should be made with the chest or numbers, As the chest or numbers' makes contact, roll the hips. .. ..

• Do not leave your feet, wide base, short choppy steps, . drive through ball'

carrier and take him backwards. . . .' .' ' . . .

-,On contact work arms from high to low, wrap viciously and pull the ball .

. . . carrier toward you, squeeze and grab cloth. .

• If you are caught in a poor hitting position, somehow make the tackle by grabbing arms, legs, or anything you can get hold of exceptthe facemask. .

I

65 I

OPEN FIELD TACKLE:

• Gather yourself and come under control 3 to 4' yards from the ball carrier,

feet chopping - move toward ball carrier..' '. .

• Keep eyes on the belt buckle and get into a good hittingposition. Make the

Tackle.' ..

.'. Give the ball carrier only one-way to go, and then take it away.

• Leave your feet only as a last resort. .'

.U: se the sideline whenever possible .. '

., Force: the ball carrier back into pursuit when possible.

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TACKLING TECHNIQUE:

A correct tackle Incorporates the fundamentals of the approach, contact, and finish. '

The tackling progression is: " :

!' .".

.....

, .

1. Approach - Place yourself in the ideal tackling position (knees bent, back 'flat, head-up). ' " ,

'. The teaching progression is "contact", "finish" and the "approach;'. Once the contact and the, finish have been mastered, the approach must be . mastered. As you approach the ball carrier breakdown - assume a good, hitting position feet chopping, 'close the distance between you and the

. ball' carrier, concentrate-on his 'belt buckle .: Do not 'absorb ',the,

punishment; deliver a blow when you tackle. ' ' '",., .. ",: .

2. Contact - The pop is the coordinated skill of making contact in the' correct , position while rolling the 'hips, thrusting theanns, and utilizing the power of

the legs andlower back. ' , '

• As conta~t is' made thrust hips in' an upward motion through the-ball ' earner.

• 'Club-up, because the action helps bring the hips forward . • ' Squeeze arid' grab cloth.

• ,Pull the ball carrier toward you.

3. ,Finish - The combination of the contact and the. leg drive allows .the tackler

'. ,to finish, the action by placing the ball carrier on his back. ' Run through. the " , ball carrier. MAKE HIM GO BACKW ARnS! Always end up on top!

.; .

The following "Do's". are critical to proper tackling:

, '

, , " " :, ' .,' Keep your head up ~. you must "see what you hit"

• Club-up - squeeze and grab cloth. ,

• , ' Keep a wide base. '

,. Keep your eyes open.

,. , Keep your feet, only leavethem in desperation. '

, 'TURNOVERS

A.' defense cannot afford to let an offense get away with mistakes. Pressure, , constantly attacking and moving in a disciplined manner will put our defenders in a position to take advantage of any offensive mistake. Also, it adds the burden to the

66

. offense of having to play completely mistake free. The 30 Stack Defense isnot . designed to wait for a mistake; instead it can pressurethe offense Into making one.

, • : • • = • .••• ••.•• . ',' ~ -

. The following is a list of ways to create turnovers: .

~ ,Put the facemask across the ball as the tackler "clubs-up";' even if a fumble

, '

is not created, the defender is still in a good position to bring the runner'

down ...

. ~ The second or third' man in on a tackle goesfor the.football. This.ap·pli~s·. when the first tackler has stopped the. ball carriers momentum.: 1Jse a .. '

. "tomahawk" swing ora "punch" to dislodge the footbalL .

» If you are being contained by a blocker and cannot get a good, shot at the . . 'nmner, reach out for the football with both hands. Actually tackle the ball . with both hands.

. . ~ . If you' are approaching the runner from behind and tackling him' high you . 'can . sometimes club the ball loose by bring the. ann Closest to the football . 'over the top .. '

» If you are approaching' the runner from behind' and you are the seco~d' or . third man, go for the elbow. A lifting action on the elbow will sometimes. force the runner to fumble. The ball carrier cannot·maintain control of the. football with a lifting motion on the elbow.. . .

.' .

. ~·.When rushing the quarterback, force fumbles by stripping and hard tackling;

this is effective when he is backpedaling. Linebackers who' get in quickly . . . are in good position to force fumbles in this manner.

'» Keep in mind the ball carriers and receivers who are more prone to fumble'. . . .... Try to know the characteristics of each. By way of illustration, a runner who is thetype that spins, pivots, and twists. a lot is the type who leaves them , .. open to allow you to force a fumble. .

» .'. The best method of all to force fumbles is to gang tackle. Hitting a runner . from different angles will often dislodge the football. In addition, it will take

something out of the runner. .

67 .

,

! ••..

.•.. t .

. » There are .hmes when deep backs can force fumbles due to the type of pass

thrown. A technique. that is very effective is to club the catch. hand of the ... receiver after the catch has been made.

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CHAPTER IV PRESSURE PACKAGES' .

. .

• • r·

Pressure can cause big football plays ("BFP") because it disrupts the blocking

schemes (sacks and tackles for loss), the ball carrier (taking multiple hits), and the . passing game (hurries and interceptions). Pressure is' not only .running through •.. gaps, but it is quickness in execution and 'arriving at the ball.' Whenopposing coaches look at the 30 StackDefense, the word pressure should come to mind. 'Not . pressure by blitzing on every down, or with a 9-mari. front; but by execution on the

field. Pressure is defined by a style of play: . . .

. . • ·:How· we look - ready.prepared, confident .physically dominant '. , .

... . How we get lined up - quickly, deliberately; eager, physically dominant "'.·.··'How.wepurS~e .; relentless, disciplined, passionate, physically dominant ' •. .1-Iow we tackle - violent, in a pack, physically dominant

• How we show emotion - positive, constructive, optimistic, consistent.

• ' How wereactto negatives - come back strong, confident, disciplined

Wewili attack the LOS on every play, however we have the .ability to .chID1g~ or

'exchange defender responsibilities: .. '. .. .'..'

r." .

. '

1 .. Dogs ~ These are coordinated run through action by the inside linebackers;

SAN.{, MIKE.and W1LL. Also, the SM1 &.WILL are referred to as "Stud"

linebackers. . . . .

2. Stunts + • These 'are coordinated movements by defensive Iinemen and . linebackers,· and Will typically require two instructions; . .

3. Blitzes - These are 'coordinated run through action by the secondary or' outside inverts (Rover and Bandit, also referred to as' "Eagles"); and

4. Games- These are coordinated movements by the defensive line. Theyare typicallya full man slant, 'using a hit technique on the offensive linemen one man over from their originalalignments, However these also include twist between defensive linemen.

The attack packages are very flexible as you can. attack; (1) the 'strength call of

.: "Reno" (right) or "Vegas" '(left), referred to as the' "call side"; (2) away from strength referred to as the openside or "open"; (3) the field call of "Rip" (right) .or "LiZ'~Qeft), also called "wide"; or (4) to the boundary, called "short". . The' pressure packages include the ability to send one defender to a specific gap, Or two

•. ;.:u .. , ,"

(c '1
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or more defenders executing a coordinated attack. you can always attack at any

time, because you will avoid tendencies (either by field position or down) if your

. approach is based upon each opponent. .. '., .

BASICS

'There are some basic concepts' that apply to. all of the attacks and pressure schemes, They include:

•. Callside 7"- stunts are typically run to '~e strength cal'! either right ("reno") or

left (''vegas'') unless otherwise designated .. .... .

. I .

• Open- the attack will occ~r away from or opposite the strength call.

. •. Wide - the. action will occur to the wide side or field, as designated by the '.

SA)vf call of "Rip" (right) or. "Liz" (left) ..

.•. Short - the action will occur to the short side or boundary, 'opposite the field .

. .call. ,'. '.' . '. . . ..' . .... ." ... ' :: .: " .; . :..' .

• 'Pull'--:'the action thathas similar defenders working together; i.e., both sides . of the defense, since the 30 Stack is a.balanced defensive' alignment."

The gaps' are designated by words. This allows you to designate any defender to

run through any gap, to his aligned side.' .' .;

.•. Ant-A-gap .···Bat-B-gap •. Cat - Csgap . • :-. Dog - D-gap

Boundary - Short

. Strength (Callside) :- Vegas

Field - Rip - Wide -, Open

0 a a II n a a
g t t t t t t
[~] ~ ~:. o

. 'g

'. MOVEMENTS

'Movements are designed to disguise the defensive intentions. . These are alerts to . .' helpthe defenders coordinate their "movements". . If there is no movement

10

• . Create uncertainty in the offensive linemen's .mind, TIlls, will reduce their .

. effectiveness. . .' .

•. Force theoffensive linemen to change their blocking schemes' atthe line .of ':

scrunmage.

-Causes recognition problems for the offensive line..

- 'F orce's the offensive linemen to think.

- . To disguise secondary coverages.

<-"_

identified in the huddle, then the defenders will align in "Base',' and execute their.

assignments (Dogs, Stunts; Blitzes and Games) from this. position. .' .

'. He~e is a brief recap of the reasons for movements: ..

. .

There .is always some question as to when or how often' to stem .. We believe that

. some' form of a stem should be done on every play.All the linebackers or outside' . inverts can be stemming orjust one. Stemming is also a term that alerts defensive backs to possible movement. The advantage goes to thedefense when they' can

. hide their true alignments as long as possible; however, make sure you're in the .' .' proper defensive coverage called when the ball is snapped ..

. .

The movement calls can be:

. 0 Cheat - Technique of' disguising coverage orelignments initially, .but

moving towards true alignment prior to snap of the football.

o .Prowl« This is au up and back movement bythedefenders inan.attempt to

' .. confuse the offensive blocking schemes and/or the quarterback .. ' . , ..

o Scalp - The defensive linemen will execute a .half-manslanttechnique to

. execute their technique; i.e., Scalp 44, the defensive linemen could Iine up in

a 5, and use a half man slant to a 4-techniqueon the snap. '" .

o . Show - The defenders will move 'to within one yard of the LOS prior to the .snap.

P Stack - This is a movement 'that "stacks" the inside linebackers behind one ' ... another prior to the snap.: The linebackers will execute their techniques.from

. this stacked position~, . . ..

o Sugar - The defenders will "Show' in an attempt to bait the offensive line

. .. and/or quarterback into making incorrect calls. They' will .move. back ("bair~) to their proper alignment prior to the 'snap of the ball. This is also referred to as "bluff'.

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o Up - The defenders will "Show", and wait for a call identifying the stunt, ,

blitz or dog to be executed. ',If there' is nocal1, the defenders will execute

their assignments from this positipn.' ,

, , '" , ' i "

Finally, the defensive players must use the proper technique, whether it is a run (hit

technique) or pass Get technique). The second level defenders must know which gap they are to hit, and recognize that ~t can change based upon the defensive line movements ('~games"r The 30 Stackwill have one penetration (player) per gap, and each player must understand their .responsibilities ,if flow is to .or away from them.

DOGS

. The reference "DQGS" means penetration of the LOS ',by an inside linebacker .or a

combination of linebackers. We will use Dogs.to: ',.

',., To create a big, play. "

• Get to the, passer,' - sack him or pressure him into throwing an •

, , interception.

• ' Cause confusion in opponent's pass protection assignments

• Break up blocking combinations on running plays.

• 'Keep passing game of balance.

• 'Make opponents use maximum protection .

. A "Dog" will typically 'change adefensive lineman' from a-two gap player to (one gap player. Most "Dogs" have automatic "scalp" slant for the defensive linemen.

~' However, the linebackers can "tap" the defensive linemen to let them' know which .gap they (the DL).will control. ' Do not forget to change up the tap. Donotalways

go the same way youtap, or opposite the way you tap.rChange it up - often, even '

',du~g the game., . ' ..

, ,...

,j

, ,

. 0 Tap'- a secondlev~l defender will "tap" a defensive lineman on the, hip' to ' the side' (gap) that. the" defensive lineman must' now, defend. The . second '

'level defender has the gap opposite the ''tap''. ' ,

The basicsystem of "DOGS" is classified as:

• Single Dog - Any single linebacker rushing.

.• Double Dog - Combination of any two linebackers rushing. • : Triple Dogs - Combination of any three linebackers rushing.

t,:-

;:~,~;:SiDgle:BackCi+~,~ i~~~~:~;j:;;iTW():nat~rs""~::;,~;i*~~~~1, ;~X~-~:~Thie~'Backets:;tii/~

Sam' '.' Full Stud (S & W)_..' Heat

Mike Smash / Mash (S & M) . S_gueeze

wni \\'ham / Maw (Jj_ & M) Stamp

Stud· Storm Sting

. "

-. The following are theX& 0 diagrams for the "Dogs":

, ':Sfugle Backer Dogs . , . .-

··Thesmgle ''backer dogs are run through a specific gap,' to .tbe linebackers aligned

. side.Yl'he defensive linemen will use a half-man ~slcint techriique ("scalp") opposite the gap that the linebacker is' running through.' . The MIKE dogs' are run through the . . :'callside' (strength), unless designed by an "open", "wide" or "short" tag. The. linebackers can use a' ''tap'' however make sure that you are constantly changing'

the directions when using a tap. .. ". . . . . . .'

Ca1:I: "Sam"

Sam (boundary). linebacker runs through the gap identified. It can be a "Tap" allowing the. linebacker to choose his run through gap.

Call: -wur'

Will (field) linebacker, runs through the gap identified. .' . it can' be . a "Tap" allowing 'the linebacker to choose his run through gap.

,Sam-Bat

Sam-Ant" ,: ..

.~·.O.··O. .rs [~r=.·

Will-Bat'·· '. ">

Will-Ant

·0.·~l

Call: "Mike" . .

Will (field) linebacker runs through the gap . identified. It. ~an be a "Tap" allowing the

linebacker to choose his run through gap. .

. Mike-Open Bat .-

Mike-Ant·· . '. '"

Mike-Ba

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Call: "Stud" .

Callside linebacker runs through the B~gap or . gap identified. It can .be a "Tap" allowing the linebacker to choose his run through gJp. . '.

. . . I

Call: "Open Stud". .

In a single backer dog, an "open stud" can be . called, in which case the inside linebacker

. opposite the strength call will run through the ... Begap or gap identified. Itcan be a "Tap"

, allowing the linebacker to choose his run .

· through gap..:-·· , .

.' .' Two Backer Dogs ..

. The two backer dogs are coordinated run through action by the linebackers. "The defensive linemen may have an automatic "scalp" slant to a gap, or can be tapped .

.. into a specific gap. The linebackers must know who is going first whenever there ...

isa twisting or crossing type action. . ....-

Call: "Full Stud"

Both inside linebackers ("studs") rim through the Bgap or gap identified.· It can be a "Tap" allowing the

· linebacker to choose his run through gap.

Call: "Smash" . I

this is SAM and M]K£ dog. In a "Smash" dog, Sam .

· goes through the A-gap, then Mike through the Bgap; however it can be a ''Tap'" or. used in conjunction with a Game or, Movement _:

Call: "Mash"

This is a SAM· and lvflK.E dog. In a "Mash" dog, -Mike goes through the Bsgap, then Samthrough the. : A-gap; however it can be . a "Tap" or used in

conjunction with a Game or Movement.

·~~OC)

- . ·T

..

1st . 2nd ..

2nd 1st

74

· Call: "Open Storm' This is a weakside blitz, with straight ahead action to the- openside, Mike is in the A-gap, and the openside

"stud" .is in the B-gap. The openside tackle, and the . G

nose are usin a "Seal "slant into the 0 o site

. _

Call: "Wham" This is a WILL .and MIKE dog .. Ina "Wham" Will . goes through the A-gap, then Mike though the Bvgap; . however it" can. be a "Tap'; or used in· conjunction

· with a Game or Movement. . .

csu "Maw"

This is a WILL and MIKE dog. ill a "Maw" Mike goes through the B-gap, then Will though the A-gap;

: however it can be a - ''Tap'' or used in. conjunction

with a Game or Movement.· .. . . .

Call: "Storm" ...

· Thisis a callside .blitz, with straight ahead actionto

· . the. callside. Mike is in the A -gap, and the callside . "stud" is. in theBvgap. The callside tackle, and the .r nose are using.a "scalp" slant into the opposite gaps.

. Three Backer Dogs

. These dogs will have all three inside 'backers running through gaps, with . 'coordinated action, either between backers, and/or defensive linemen .. The . defensive linemen may have an automatic "scalp" slant to gap, or. can be. tapped into a specific gap. The linebackers must know who is goingfirstwhenever there is a twistingor crossing type action.

. I I I

f~:';~~:~~1~~;i~~~~~i:t~tfi~~;f~';~~J\M~:~"j])ES:€R.IPTtON';;~j·~~i:\~t:'~,~~fl;~~;~.i~~~~~.t~::·~f~s~~;f:/";:··:~~l:{~lf,;::::'j."'~"J'DI:A GRAN1'i:~f{~~,~:~~1~~~~:' .

Call: . "Heat"· . .' .! ". .

All three inside linebackers run through the nearest strong side gap ("callside"). The defensive line is on

· I

· .a "weak" game. It can be a "Tap" with. the defensive .

linemen .

Call:~'Open Squeeze" The inside 'linebackers will twist ropposite the. OPENSQUEEZE,. strength call ("openside"), with the "Stu. ds". in the B- . cb' . gap, and Mike scraping to outside. The defensive . line is' on a "strong" game, .except the openside

tackle works to the A-gap. .. . .

. Call: "Open Heat"

· . The "Open Heat" dog call is run to the "Openside".

The defensive line is on a "strong" game. It can be a "Tap" with the defensive linemen.'

Call: "Squeeze" ..

The inside linebackers will twist strong. ("callside"), . with the "Studs" in. theB-gap, and Mike scrapingto

.. the C-gap. The defensive. line is: on a ''weak'' game, except that the callside tackle works to. the ~-gap.

Call: "Stamp"

The inside linebackers will twist strong ("callside"),' .

o • with the callside "Stud" in the A-gap, and Mike

scraping to the C-gap, and the openside "Stud" in the . Bsgap. The defensive line is on a "weak" game. .'

, 0

Call: "Open Stamp"

. The inside linebackers will twist opposite the . . strength call ("openside"), with the callside "Stud" in . the A-gap, and Mike scraping to the C-gap, and the

o openside "Stud" in the B-gap. The defensive line is on a "weak" arne.

.-

..... ~ '. : .. ..

o .

. .

'000

76.

l st

2nd .: "'"

1st

2nd .

. Call: "Sting"

The inside linebackers will twist strong ("callside"),

. .! with the cal1side "Stud". in the A-gap,. and Mike to

'. the 1?~ gap, '. and the. openside "Stud" in. the B~gap.· -. "The defensive line is on an "open tab" game.

. lst 2nd

'.' -Call: "Open Sting" . .

The inside .• linebackers will twist opposite the strength call ("openside"), with the openside "Stud" in the A-gap, and Mike to the B-gap, andthe callside "Stud" in the Bsgap, The defensive line is on a "tab" g~e.·

. ~ "

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,STUNTS

.' These are coordinated movements by the defensive line and linebackers. Stunts are used to disrupt blocking responsibilities and. used primarily. in' passing situations in . . '. an attempt to create a big play -. Stunts can also change the rhythm ·of the defense.' ... Some' additional benefits included increasing the opponent' s preparation.as well as

'. getting defensive players moving in the direction of. the play based .upon the' '.

· offensive tendencies.' Stunts can be combinations of two,' three.rand four man ..

games. Here is a table with the 30 Stack stunts: . . ..

. "~~'IO EZB;~'&t~tI2B::,fj:t- ~~J;!:::QEB~:'&;~MiKe~;1~;~~ ~~ir:jjg:~;&'J) Lur

Shoot S ike

. -Hawk

Twist

Zarro

:. The following are the X & O· diagrams for the '$tunts'~: .

Call: "Shoot"

:. This is a combination; straight-ahead blitz to the callside by the outside •... linebacker ("OLB" or "Eagle") and inside linebacker ("ILB"). The Eagle attacks . · outside the end man on the line ("EMOL"), and the ILB attacks the B-gap .. The . . Tackle will use a "scalp" slant to the callside. However, it can be a "Tap" blitz between the ILB and Tackle. This can be run into tbeboundary with a "Short · · . Shoot" call.

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I

H I

..

.[

Coverages: ., '. '. Cover 0 . • Cover 1

I

Boundary .

Field

"0

o

B, BaU I Collapsc Ball f Ball Ball f Ball

Fon:e I CI\ase

. I

R

Collapse f Fon:e. C

. LMP I ConIaiJ

C'·

Comainl LMP

F

Alley

Call: "Open Shootn .' . . .

This is a combination, straight-ahead blitz to the callside by the OLB or Eagle' and ILB e . The Eagle attacks outside the EMOL, and the ILB attacks the Bsgap. The Tackle will use a "scalp" slant to the openside. However, it can be a "Tap" blitz. between the !LB and Tackle. This can be run to the field or wide side-with a "Wide Shoot" call.

Coverages:

• CoverO

• Cover 1

• Cover 121 • . Cover 21' • Cover 211

Boundary '. . 0 Field

o.o~o~·.

. TN. I?"

Ballla- Sa IBaIl

S M W'

Balli Ball

Collapse I Ball R Chaso! I Fon:e

.C

. LMP I CorttaU

B Ball 1&11

Fon:e I Collapse

··.C

COI1Iain f LMP

. i

F Allcy

Call: "Full Shoot" .

.. This is a combination, straight-ahead blitz to both 'sides by the OLBs or Eagles

. and ILBs. The Eagles attacks outside the EMOt and the ILBs attack the B-gap. The Tackles will use a "scalp" slant out. However, it. can be. a "Tap" blitz '.

between the ILB and' Tackle. . .'

s-

r .

,L __ • '-r. ~.

• r ;.: .- ,. ~ ...

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o

C

Coutaill / LMP

B BaU / BaD BaH / Ball CoUapse / Ball R

Force / Collapse Chase I Force' " C

LMPJ Conrail '

Coverages:

• .Cover 0

• Cover l

Boundary

,0

, Call: "Spike" . '

This _ is a combination blitz to ,the callside by the OLB and Mike. The Eagle attacks outside the EMOL and Mike blitzes in the Asgap strong. The Nose will "scalp" to tbeopenside A-gap. It can "Tap" blitz between Mike and the Nose .

• , This can be' run into the bound with a "Short S ike" call. " -

- "

F

Alley

o

':' - '~o-'

0.'0 O.

T - T'

IMII / Ball Chase I Ball -

S M W

,', . Coverages: .:' Cover 0

• Cover 1

Boundary ,

Field

0-.,

LMPJComaD '

C.

Call: "Open Spike'" ,

This is a combination blitz to the openside by the aLB and Mike. The Eagle, attacks outside the EMOL and Mike blitzes in the A-gap weak. The Nose will "scalp" to the strong side A-gap. It can ''Tap'' blitz between Mike and the Nose. This can be run to the wide side or field with a "Wide S ike" call.

o

BallI Ball

R

Collapse I Fcm:e

• Cover 3 . '

• Cover 21

., -Cover 24

B BallI Collapse BallI Ball

C

Conttin / LMP

Fo=/Chasc

\

F

Alley .

, -

0-

C

LMP/Conrair

'0 o.o~8 oe

'T 'T:

Ball I a- Ball I BaH

S' M 'W

Coverages: .

• Cover 0 , ""

.BOWldary

Field,

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. :'

• Cover 1,

.' ,Cover3,' ,_ • Cover 121

• Cover 21

• -Cover 211

C

Con1ain ILMP

B Ban/Ball

F=e I CollapaD

BallI Ball

Collapse I Ball R - _ Chase I Fcm:e

F Alley

: .

, ,

Call: "Full Spike"

This is a combination' blitz' to both sides by the Eagles and Mike. The Eagle

. '. I. . .

attacks outside the EMOL and Mike.blitzes in the A-gap base upon a "Tap". The

Nose will ,"scalp" to' 'an A-gap basedupon the "Tap" blitz between Mike and the

Nose. . . . .: .

Bobdary O .

. !

~.O~~I~.

, T. I T

Ball {BaU . I " Ball I Ball

'8;M w .'.

. Coverages: ._ Cover 0 .

• .Cover 1

• Cover 21 .

Field

o.

o

'.'

.B . BallI COllapse· BallI Ball COl. I Ball R

Fcm:e I o.se : 0-1 Fcm:e

c· '.

CoIIIain I I.M:P.

c

. LMP I 0mIaiI: .'.

.. . . .

· .. F .

. Alley' .

Call: 'urango". . .

This stunt. should not be run to a tight end. This is a combination stunt' to the callside by the OLB and callside Tackle. The' Eagle. attacks the. B-gap . and the. Tackle executes a "scalp" slant outside, This can be run into the boundary with a ,

. "Short Tan o" call.

. Coverages: • CoverO

•. Cover 1, .

• . Cover 3

• Cover 21

' .. Boundary .. 0, . FIeld

·0·

o O~O·.'.

·N· T.

OIase/BaIl

·0

Call: "Open Tango" , , ,

This stunt should not be run to a tight end. This is a combination stunt 10 the . openside by the OLB and openside Tackle. The Eagle attacks the Bsgap and the

, _. i Tackle executes a "scalp" slant outside, This can be run to the wide side, or field

. with a "Wide Tan 0" call. .

o.

. -.

R" . 'C

'Co~(Fofce

M

. S".

BallI Collapse BallI Ball _ Ball/Ball

c

ConIain I LMP

. Balli Ball

LMP/eouam' .

80

. Call: "Full Tango" . '.~;. . . '.~. . .

. ", This 'stunt should not be run to a tight end. This is a combination stunt ,by the . Eagles and' Tackles. The Eagles: attacks the a' .. gap. and the Tackles, execute a

"seal "slant outside. ..'

Coverages: ." Cover 0: • Cover l

.• Cover.3·

• Cover 121 ~

• Cover 21 ., Cover 211

·c

LMP I ContaiI " .

Boundary

Field

~o

, .'

··0··

M

Ball I BaD

S

B Balli BatJ

Fo= I CoIiapsa .

r .

C

Ololtainl LMP .

'F

Alley

Coverages: Boundary

• CoverO

• 'Cover 1

• .Cover 3 •. Cover 21

c···· .

..

.. Field

o

a

.

. ,

Call: "Hawk"

This is a .combination stunt to the' calls ide ·by·. the OLB~' callside ILB and ·the defensive line. The Eaglewill "creep" and attacks the A-gap; the'ILB.·will scrape

. outside and is the force defender. The. defensive . line executes a strong "scalp" slant.. This can 'be run into the boundary with a "Short Hawk" call, in which case .

the "seal ., slant is to the "short" eall. .

Coverages: . Boundary , . 0 . Field' . .

• Cover 0 -, 0

~o~o~

f '...' Cbuo /Baa

M W

. '. BallI Bail BaD I Ball

R

. CoII8p4se / Fon:e C .

• 'Cover 1

o.

.8' .

Belli Coliapsa Balli Ball

.. _"' .. }-" ';

81

C

Contain r LMP

BaD/Bali

. LMP I ConIZIiI

.F

Alley

o

o

c

Comain/LMP

LMP I Conrail'

'F Alley

: .

,

, .

Call: "Open Hawk" .! .'

. This is a combination stunt to the openside by the OLB, openside ILB· and the .. , defensive line: The Eagle willvcreep+and attacks the Asgap; the ILB will scrape '. outside and is' the force defender .: The defensive line executes a strong "scalp" . slant. '. This can be run to the' wide side, or field with a "Wide Hawk" call, in

I .

which case the "seal "slant is to the "wide" call. r-

· Coverages: . Boundary .'. 0 . Field -. ~.

• CoverO ~. . 0 .

. o~,o~

._, - ·&i1I 0wIe

: ~ I

.' .... S

• Cover l

• Cover 121 .

.' O.

,,0

82

(

• Cover 21. '.

• Cover 211

M.·

. B '. Balli Ball

C .' ' Fort:e J CollaPse

Contain I LMP' .

'cal~/BaU' ,C'.

LMP I ConIaiI' .

F· Alley

Call: ''FullHawk''

· This is a combinationstunt "by the;jEagh!s, Studs and the. defensive line.'. The Eagles will "creep" and attack the 'A~gap; the Studs will scrape outside and are the force defenders. The defensive line executes a stron "seal "slant.

. Coverages:' . Bo~~ ; ~ 0 '. Field

: g::~ 0 ~·t8

O.'O~

. '. U.'

R

CoIIapsI! I Ball

C" .

LMP I CoaIaiI .

C

CoDIIIin I LMP

F, A1Iey

Call: "Twist"

· This is a combination-twisting blitz to Hie callside by the OLB 'or Eagle and ILB'~' . . The linebackers will exchange responsibilities; i.e., OLB runs through the B-gap,

. i and the. ILB scrapes outsidej.becomingthe force defender. The Tackle will

. .

.. execute a "scalp" slant outside. This can be run into the boundary with a "Short ..

Twist" call.

Coverages: •. Cover 0

Boundary .. 0 . Field

'·0

.0' . 0.'0.

N· T

Chase I Ball

··M 'W

·0

.'.

• Coverl

0,

Ban I Ball

F~ I Collapse Ball / Ball

R

c

B

C

ConIain ( LMP

. Balli Chase

Collapse I Foree LMP I Coolaii .

F AIIcy .

Call: "Open Twist" .'. " ..

. This is' a 'combination-twisting blitz to.' the .openside by the OLB. or Eagle and ,ILB. The.linebackers will 'exchange responsibilities; i.e.; OLB runs through the Bvgap, and. the ILB scrapes·outsideJ·becoming the force defender; The' Tackle . Will execute. a "scalp" slant outside. This can be run' to the. wide side, or field With'a ''Wide TwiSt" call. . . .... . '., .. :., " . '. . .

. Boundary '.' 0 Field

o '0

0'.0.0

.,. N T

. Ban fCbase.Balf1

S', .. M

Coverages: • CoverO ' •. Cover 1

.• Cover 121

• Cover 21"

• Cover 211

o

Ball/Ball

Balli Ball Collapse J Force

. Cbasc / Ball . .

c '.

IMP I Coman

.1;1

·c

Conrain/LMP

Force I Collapse

.C

F AIIcy

can. "Fun Twist"

This is a combination-twisting blitz-to both sides by.theEagle~ 'and Studs. :'The linebackers will exchange responsibilities; i.e., Eagies .will run throughthe Bgap, and the Studs scrape outside, becoming theforce defender. .The.Tackle will

execute "seal "slants outside.' .' ..' . .

83

· Coverages:

• Cover 0

• Cover 1

0 .. '

C

Contain I LMP

r .0

C

Contain/LMP

B .' t Balli Ball . Ball f Ball ColJapse I Force . R

Foree I ColLapse Chase f Ban

I

i

( ::,".

\ .":

. . -. ~.' .

(

. I

F

Alley

C~:'~~~ ~ .

. This is a straight-ahead blip: by the front eight.' TheEaglefsjmustpulloff of their" blitz if ·the running' backs 'swing' to their side, otherwise they are blitzing from the outside.vTheIl.Bs are blitzingthrough one . gap over to the' callside ..

The defensive line is usin . a weak "seal "stunt. ..' . , .

. . Coverages: . Field

• Cover 0

•. Cover 1

. " "

. ,,':' .' --

·0

. R Balli Collapse Baill BaU Collapsc I BaU B

Foree I ~ 'Cba5a I Fon:e

C.

LMP/Contau

F

Alley

· Call: "Open Sack" . .. .

This is a straight-ahead blitz by. the fronteight. The Eagle(s) mustpull off' of their blitz if the running backs. swing: to their side, otherwise they are blitzing from the outside .. The" ILBs' are blitzing through one' gap over to' the openside. The defensive line is usin a stron "seal " stunt, . : '. .

Coverages: . Field' ' .. Boundary

• Cover 0

· •. Cover 1

W ··M

. R Balli Collapse BallI Ball Collapse I BaD. B

C Foree I CID 0-1 Force C.

Contain f LMP LMP f CmIair

o

o

84

Alley

:.; '. The concept of zone blitzes is becoming more and more popular .. The technique is · for the defensivelineman to . engage.' to the blocker, distracting .. them, while a .' second level defender blitzes past them. The defensive lineman will then drop into

· coverage. The following are the zone blitz packages within the 30 Stack. . .

· ~~~~"~~;PES~~FlPjtI()N... ;';~],~]~j~~f{·b IA:GMM'·~~~~~;~{~~B;~f~~~~!j~ifui[:;".·

Call: '.'Zig" .. '

This is a zone blitz With the callside Tackle .. ' The tackle engages the. offensive' . '. line, and then drops-into. coverage. The inside linebacker to the Callside Will

. blitz throughtheBegapcor the gap specified. This can be run into the' boundary

with a "Short Zi "calL' .

Call:. "Open Zig" This is a zone blitz With the openside Tackle. The tackle engages the offensive . line, . and then ""drops into' coverage. The inside . linebacker to the openside Will blitz through the Bsgap,' or the gap specified. This. can be run to the Wide. side or

field with a "Wide Zi "call. . .

Coverages: . . e All

Coverages: -.' e' All

.--.:-

. Boundary . 0 Field

o

'0 0.'0·.'

N T'

ChaM: I Ball

o

w

• ",J

M

BiIIlf&l1

Balli Ball. R

. c·

CoIlapsc I Force .

·B·

Ball/Chase

c

. F~ I Collapse

LMP I Concab

F

Alley

Boundary 0 . Field

o.o~. o~·~·· ....

T" N .

BaO/a-. .. I

SM W

..

0-'

,0

BallI BaU . BallI Bal.- 0-1 Ball

B

: Fon:cl~.

R

Collapee I Fon:t

C

CoaIainI LMP

.C

LMPfCoulaU

F Alley

85

Call: "Full Zig" . I '. .

This is a zone. blitz by both Taqkles.·. Jhe tackles engage the offensive linemen, . and then drops into coverage. :. Thet'Studs'twillblitz through the B-gap,or the'

. a ecified. . ; .. ".,

Coverages: fBotindary· .' O· Field

.- All. I 0

o 0··

O~I~?:O~~'O.

C Cootairi/ 1.MP

. B: BaillCbase' e.U/Bau.ClJ-/Ban:· R

Force/Collapse' . CoIIap=/FOICe' .:' C ".

• j , ·~I.~h

. I

'F

Alley .

Call: "Zag" . .: ., . .

Thisisa zone.blitzwith the.Mike blitzing' to "the call side. The nose Will drop]

into covera e~ '. .>: ."

Coverage . '.. . . .. ' ._Boundary Field.

, '.

-:

o

·,0'

,·0.·0

T

Ball/Ball

S B . BallI Qmsc Fon:c I CoIIajIst

.BalL I BaD R . '" Collal* IForce .' C·' LMP/O-U.·

w

BanI Sau

c

ConIain I LMP

", F:' Alley

.~. • ',I

Call:. "Open Zag" .. .' .... This is a zone blitz 'with the Mike blitzing to the openside .. The: Nosewill drop into covera e.

Coverages: . •. All

Field

. Boundary

<~.:: .

.' ..

. -. . ~. -;

.0

0 •. 0

. Ball' Chase

.. ':. s·

B: . Ball/Ball

Fon:e / Collapse

O. '.0

T

BaLI/BaD

W

ChasaIBaIl R

CoIJapse-I Forco C

LMP I Coor:aiJ

c

. Contain I LMP

F AIlcy

I· !

86

'0

Call: "Zorro"

This is a full zone blitz 'by all three of the inside linebackers; with the .three

defensive linemen dro into covera e.

Coverages: BOundary,

• All "

, These are coordinated run; through action, by secondary" or+outside inverts', ("Eagles"). ,Coaches must be aware that when you are blitzing, you are taking a 'coverage player out of thecoverage 'schemes. Therefore; your players must be, ' , aware of the voids being created by the blitzes,

The concepts of "siu~ts" and "blitzes" are often blurred, so we do not' want to get ' 'bogged .down 'with semantics'., Therefore,' within this section, we 'have only

.. included blitz packages that do not require' coordinated movement by the defensive

, line. 'We have included all of. those' "blitzes" that require coordinated defensive

line "games" within the "stunt" section above. Also" coverage will be either .cover

,'BLITZ:'"

"0" or "1 ". "

" . -'~

Field

,~

o

B ' ,Balli C-'ba= , Balli Ball, 0-1 Ball, "R '

Force I aJlIapse Coi1apc I FQrco ' 'C " '

C'

, Cootainl LMP '

, LMP I COOtaiJ

I'

F

Alley

r .

c

, ,

This is 'an outside

. . " - , .

,blitz by the boundary ,

comer - only. The

,"F" or, "Eagle" will

, need to replace, the Comer's "coverage,'

responsibility. '

Field :0'

'0

, 0,,'

0,. oa o e

T' N" T

BaD I Chase BallI Ball

W M S

BoundarY

87

0',

B,'

R BaD I Ball ' Ball J Ball BallI BaD

F= I CoI1ap3c

Collapse I Bai1 ,

c

COIWIin I LMP

Chase I Force

F

Alley

Call: "Falcon"

This is a Free Safety. blitz through .the offensive line to the callside. The Free

: ,.Safety will pick the

pa.tb~f least: '

resistance. An

. "Open " ',Falcon" , : would be called if the blitz is through to 'the 0 enside.

Call: "Bandit" '

" , This: is an outside blitz by the "Bandit", or ' 'boundary , 'OLB. This • blitz : to ,the

, callside . .is. called ] "Eagle", which puts the callside OLB on the' blitz, ,", '

Call: ,'''Rover'',: .

TIlls is an; outside blitz by the "Rover", or field OLB. 'This blitz to the openside is ' . called ""<;:>pen Eagle'\ . which puts theopenside OLB, on'

"the blitz.

0'

R

Force! Ball

C

Alley I ,LMP:

,0'"

'0

C

CoriIaiD I LMP

'i Field '0, Boundary

,0,

!O.O~O.

'; T"· N T

, ; BallI Chase Chase I Ball

i W S

BallI CollaPse' Bal I BalL Collapse I Ball

c

" LMP I Alley ,

'F

Ball "

I

,Boundary

I

I' I

o o

'0

'.,0.0.,'

"T' , N, ,T..,

. BallI BaIl ' Cbue I Ball " ,

o ',:

Field

w

.' ".

" B' ,Ban/Collapse Ball I Ball , ' Ball' BaD R' , " ' .: '"" ,

Force I Chase Coilapsc I Fon:e ' C

LMP/ContaiJ

......

Boundary 0 ' ,Field

, ,0

·:0. ()~().

TNT

Balli Chase ' Ban I BaD , '

S ,M ,'W', '

,,0

, : B: Ball/Ball Foo::c I Couapae:

Balli Ball , Collapse I Ball R

, , a.a.e I Fwc:e '

C'

LMP/c-i%

F

, AI1ey

.' .

/

I

. ~. . . ~. -.

.\ '.

.. . ~ .

, "

88

I

Call: "Full. Eagle" This .' is an outside blitz' by both of the outside linebackers.

'0

Field 0 Boundary .

o o . .• O~O.

TN' T

BallI Ball Ball / Ball

W.· M· . S··

o

R BalI/ Co[]apsc Balli B!lU Collapse I Ball B

C

Contain i LMP .

Forcc/q-:

.~IFo~ C.

:- 00 (COOl.ail .

F A1Iey

. GAMES' ,

The, defensive linemen in the' 30 .Stack are two-gap defenders unless they- are ·stu.liting· or executinga game. Games are "stunts" and movements by the defensive' . . . line.. The following isa brief recap of some of the' defensive linemen techniques

. used in conjunctionwiththeir games." . '. .:

.. .

':~~" Hit f~hnique>~ The. defensive linemen win use 3-point punch and mirror

step when they are not executing a "game". .'

•. Jet technique ._ This is used in a passing situation. 1t is a technique that lets

'. the defensive' linemen loose, giving them the freedom to go getthe _ quarte~back.A "jet" call gives the defensive linemen the freedom to use

. ' their bestmoveto get to the quarterback, without worrying about the run .. ~,'

.. ··.·Full man slant technique: When executing a full man slant, the' defensive

. linemen will take a six inch banana step working to the "v" of the .neckof the next offensivelinemen .. They will use a 3-point punch, and then execute

.. their . stimulus respo~e reaction based' upon the' offensive. lineman's

inov~~ents...< ". ". . . ... .... .

•. Halfman slanttechnique: . The half man slant is typically to a' gap.v.When executing a half man slant (or "Scalp" move), the defensive linemen will . step the' slant side' foot, executing i;l·."club and rip"..This technique 'is' designed to penetrate to' a point six: inches behind the heels of the offensive . linemen. If the blocker moves into the slant, then use stimulus response to

' .. react to the blocker's movement. If the blocker moves away from the-slant,' - the-tackle will-flatten his' angle.' If the blocker pulls, away, then vertically

redirect the angle topursue the ball carrier.: .: . . . . ' ..

• . Twist technique: .. A twisting style game is when one defensive lineman' crosses behind another. The technique used is for the first defensive lineman to engage the offensive blocker, and the . other . defensive linemen will cut

I I

·1

I I

89

'Call: ."Tom" " . " .' , . .

, .. This is a . full' man . slant outside by both tackles. '1~" .' .. '.' ': .. : ~"~' A

.•. ...• However, a "Scalp" can be added which would put . <Ii .0110 .: .

'" : ,the slant to. the ·outside gap, or. back to it base· T N· .

. . . '. Balli cbasi: " . Cbase 1 Bali

. , i?_osidon in a "Scalp 44i".

1

behind the first. defensive linemen. This crossing action should be close to

oneanother, not a wide looping a?tion. .

I I

Coaching' Point: Use a broom 'stick ito help teach reducing the shoulder.

. .' I· . .

I

Call: "Open Ned" . I' il' .' '. ; .. : ' .

Tbis.is.a full man slant opposite strength (openside) o. • " .

by the Nose. ". However, a."Scalp"; can be added. .' TO '. '.:.,:."~.'

. which would put the slant to the openside A-gap.·' BaIl/Chase' 'Chase/Sal

Call: ''Tim'' '" . . .... " . .:--

" This is a full man slant inside by both tacld~s~ ~ ~ 1 . 1·~· .. · .:

. '. '. However, a "ScalP." c.an be added which would put] 0 e ~ II C£L e·

. the slant to the inside gap,' or back' to a' base T N·· . T .

,BallI Chase . . Chase I Sal

. position hi a "Scalp 55".

. . Call: "Strong" or "Lou'~ .

. This is a full man slant to strength (callside) with a ~.' .~ ", ' <6" "

.... "strong'Icall; or to the left with a ''Lou'' call. The .... ..• .••. . .•

" slant in. essence moves the front from a 44 to a 62. .,.. ' , .' '. . l'

'. : . '. Th~ . defensive iinemen may b~' "chase", so listen Balli Chase 'Chase I Bal'

. ' .r for the "me/you" call by the outside inverts. . '

, Call: "Weak" or "Ron" .: "'. .

I This. is ~ full man' slant to opposite strength] . . d .~.. ~.. :

'(openSide) with a "weak" call, 'or to .the right with a :'. .

' .•...•. "~onn .call, .: The slant inesse~ce ~oves th~. front 0 e . II . e

, '. ' from a 44 to a 62. . The defensive linemen 'may be . . , . .

.. "chase", soIisten for. the "me/you" call by. the Ball I Chase Chase/Ball

outside inverts. . " '

90

.,

~ ;~~~~~on ~e to the openside by the '0, '0 ~~R

end' man, typically one of the Eagles, and the Ball/Chase ' .. Cha3c:/Force

· Tackle. The Tackle will execute a "scalp" slant ' · . 'outside, . and' the Eagle win .dropstep with his. inside

: foot, reducing his shoulder (dip. & rip) behind the

Tackle's movement, . This game can only be executed from a 'Variation call; i.e., Tight, Load,

Bear, etc. ..

-, -: '.

Call: "Tab"

· This puts all of the defensive linemen ina full man

slant. . The callside tackle and nose will executea ~. . 4_ .' ~ ..

fuli man . slant to the callside, and' the .openside . . . -T' . '. ". liN' '0 .. eT •.....

· tackle (backside) will execute a full man slant

outside. However, a "Scalp" can be added which Ball/Chase. . . .... Chase/Ball

'would put. the slant to the gaps, or back to· a base

· position in a "Scalp 44i" 0

Call: "Open' Tab" . .' . ..' .

This puts. all of~e defensive linemen i? a full man : t· .' .. :' ":'::"'9'" ... :.~ .... '.

· slant. The openside tackle :~d nose WIll execut~ a' . _.' 0 II·. _... ..

full man slant. to. the openside, and the callside . . . . T . r:: T' . ,

tackle' (backside) will execute a .full man slant . BalJ/ChI!se. .' ,. Cbase/Bal.t

. outside. However, a "Scalp" can be added which'. . ., "

would put the slant to the gaps, or back to a base. .. '.

position in a "Scalp 44i" o.

Call: ''T ex"

This is combination game to the callside by. the end man, typically one of the Eagles, . and the 'Tackle. nieTackle will' execute a "scalp" slant outside, and'

· the Eagle will dropstep with his inside' foot, reducing' his shoulder (dip & rip) behind the Tackle's . movement. This game can only: be executed from a Variation call; i.e., Tight,. Load, Bear.etc.

o.L :./.' 0 .• ·. ' .• 0 •. .: .. ~I'N"'T"

F~ I Chase Chase/ Ball

91

"

" " Call: "Psycho"" ' , '

The openside tackle is going to loop to the callside " , 'm' , ' " , '.

(strength) Bsgap. ·The callsidetackle 'and nose are ,<Is 0, TV II 'T'()R·.: going to execute full ~an slant to the openside.

This stunt is used in a "33" front. BalI IChase " Chase IBai

Ca]i:~'Open Psycho" " , , ,', () 0 J - t..t ()

The callside tackle is 'going toloop to theopenside S' ~'R

, , ' _ ' , Ball/Chase Chase I BaI '

, (away from strength) Bsgap.: The 'openslde' tackle ., , ,

'and nose are going to execute full man slant to the

ca11side. This stunt is used in a "33" front.

Call: ''Nut'' ~

I "

This is a twist; with the nose slanting or looping

(depending upon alignment) to the ci1lside B-gap,

, ' ' , • "I ' '

, and " thenithe callside tackle, cutting behind' the

Nose's movement into the A-gap. i

I

o.\~t.o. ' :X-IN' 'T

Ball I Ball BallI Chase Chase I ~a[

Call: "Open Nut" :, I - .', .. t rJ ~ ,

, , This IS a twist, with the nose slanting or looping o. 0 ~.: ' (depending upon alignment) to the openside Bsgap, '," B~TCbase,Cbase'BaI( ~r;BaIJ 'and then the openside tackle. cutting behind the

Nose's movement into the A-gap. ;

Call: ''Ton'' .." ',i I , ,

, " This is a twist, with, the callside tackle slanting 'or ' ,.", '~' .. ':.. '" .' .' ', .

looping (depending 'upon alignment)' to the 'A-gap;' '0, ! ,", liN": 0,' >.e"'T ~"::,'.','

and' then the Nose' cutting behind': the Tackle's J.~

movement into the Bvgap. " '" , ' Ball/Ball ,BaIllChase Chase/Bar

Call: "Open Ton", I.

This is a twist,' with the openside tackle .slanting or looping (depending.upon alignment) to the Avgap, and then the' ,Nose', cutting behind the,' Tackle's'

'movement into the B-gap. ',: '

.- ..

O.O.trJ., 'T' ~T

&U I ~ 'Chase / Ball Bal0Ban

,I

tr

,

92

, . '

CHAPTER V DEFENDING THE pASS

, , The 30Sta~kD.ef~~e,has fi~e base coverages. Additional looks can be ~ted with "tags", whether' by number or ,: words. , There are two man-to-man coverages, and ' .threezone coverages. However, ability to stem arid disguise coverages behind the 30 stack is overly discounted. We have included three additional zones coverages.and-. three combination coverages (man / zone) that will create advantageous match ... ups

, for the defense.i.without compromising 'the fundamentals of the, '30 Stack.', the," ':

coverages include: ,

, ",'." ,,' 'Cover 0 - no hel . , .. : Cover 'I - free safe

". -. , ::"

,;~~r~oIDliitUlti~f:, : :",;,,~, .. ',',

Covet 12i· ... , ,;",. ',' Cover 21, "

. Cover 211 .. · ... ,' ,', .'. ,<'

Cover3 ' Covers 4 24 42

, T' ECHNIQUE" S, .: \",': "

. '.. ~ ~ ','". ,

As we have mentioned throughout, the scope of this 'playbook i~ directed to~ard ' , scheme rather than technique. However, we have 'included a brief overview of some ' . of the techniques required to play either zone coverage~ or man coverage.:' ,,' ':' ' ,',

'" STANCE AND ALIGNMENT" '

, , The" stance 'of a defensive back' will vary depending on 'th~ coverage call, (manor .

, : zone) and thetypeofassignment, ,In general, 'the defensive back stands in a, two . point ready position at a point of alignment defined by the type of coverage called," '-~~ The stance should be with pis knees dropped, knees slightly flexed and weight' over', '. " the forward, foot or thighs. The feet should be narrower than the width of the

.'. shouldersapproximatelyIZ inches. Weight should be placed on the bans of the teet,' . 'never' on the peels; i.e., the heel should be, slightly raised' off of the ground. The feet .. ' 'should bepositioned to a toe-instep stagger (no more than a four inch staggerjwith the inside foot back, when in a "base", alignment, This allows the defensive back to' get the total. picture, the quarterback, receiver and backfield without losing a squared

,position onthe receiver, .. ,", ..• ' '

" , , ,

. Coaching Point, We teach a: 3-slide step prior to backpedaling. The dejensil'e, , back should always push off the front joot, dragging the front cleats for three . quick shuffles. During this time, the defensive back is reading his keys and will

either get his hands on the receiver, or backpedal. ' '

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The hands, anus, and shoulders' shoul~ ... be . relaxed' and hanging free in a natural position. Bend -slightly at - the' waist With the ':head .relaxed and focused on the . quarterback,' with the receiver in the peripheral vision. Don't. force the body to 'coil

. .' down into an unnaturally low stance, unl~ss aligned in ''bump & run" .:

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Finally, an incorrect initial stance will lead to inefficient technique. Since, fractions

of time mean so much in coverage, getting into 'and out of a stance cannot be' .

' .. practiced enough.' ,

Outside Alignment. . . .

· This outside leverage position is generally used in zone coverage, or man with an ..

· . inside bracket; or help over the top. -The 'alignment point .is determined by ability and . . " assignment, However, the base is an alignment at TYJ yard off of the receiver, with

.' . the Comers inside foot aligned to the receivers outside foot.· Again, the depth may .. . depend on the coverage and ability of the defensive back. For example, a' cover.Z

, alignment may be at two, four, five' or seven yards off of a receiver or even. on the" . . . L.O.S. in a press look. In man, a Comer. will align at a depth he feelscomfortable

with. . . ., ..... ' -'"

· A defensive back should aJ.~ays· disguise his coverageby alignment or stemtohls ( ..

· aligninent, tinting his movement with the quarterback's cadence. A defensive back

· may show press and then bail to his coverage. The strategy of tAe game becomes a

· part of the alignment bluff. Therefore, keep this· in mind whendeterminingyour

. . . ..' ...' . . .. (

drills. . - .. - . '. .

, Inside Alignment " .' .

The' inside: leverage. position is generally used in man.. whether ofr C'soft")·or·up· ... '. ("bump & run"). The alignment point is determined by the ability and assignment."

.: However, there are acouple of reasons toestablishInside leverage; (1) used fu'.man·· coverage with. no help over the top, or (~) into a boundary with restricted horizontal '.

yardage. '. '. . ". . .' . .' _....:.. . .

.. A comer should key a . receiver' s . splits .: If a receiver is aligned 6 yards or closer 't~ . the boundary" always align on the inside. Also, if a receiver aligns wide anticipate, .

· then inside release because he is making room for his roUte.· Finally, if a receiver

" aligns tight then look for the outside release, ' ..

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. ZONE TECHNIQUES

. When playing zone coverage your players must know their coverage responsibility

· and where. their help is coming from, if any .. The secondary defenders must

· recognize the field . position, specifically receivers alignments because pass zones are .. . .. stretch andcontracted based upon whether the cover.is to the boundary or field. This 'recognition is assisted by the field call by the SAM, and echoing by the inside

: linebackers. Finally, the secondary defenders must recognize formations, including

. strength, which is assisted by the MIKE call, and echoedbythe SAM .and WILL.

.. The formation; combined with field alignments can give the Comer a pre-snap read

.. to the types of routes to anticipate. . .

. :. 'Pass drops should always be controlled by the-secondary personnel, so that they can

· read patterns, This allows them to be ready to break and drive on the ·balL·,secohdly,

. ... when the quarterback sets up and is "ready to throw, the 'secondary player should be in ... a position to react. The secondary player must always beunder controlso that he .

. .. can break on the ball when it is thrown. Defenders should try and work to keep their . . ·shoulders square when reading the quarterback's eyes, shoulders and armmotion.. In

-. general; if you see the front elbow, .the quarterback is throwing 'a longer pass, - .. :.

whereas if you only see the Shoulder it is a short pass. . . r-

Reaction to the ball is the' ability to. move atthe proper angle in order to-break up the

. ..

· pass .. Don't round comers and angles: Secondary drills must emphasize the ability to .

go to the ball and intercept it. Make the interception. at the balls highest point, After . making the interception return the ball to the nearest sideline .and if in traffic cover up . .. the football .. If a teammateintercepts the football, block the intended receivet, if-you

are close enough. . ..

. .

.. If a secondary player has underneath zone coverage,. then they must get a piece of the .:

receiver as he travels through his zone, While redirecting the receiver, if thedefender .. . '.·.·gets turned around he must be quick to get his. eye's back on the quarterback and

· squared up to play the football, Keep shoulders square to the. line of scrimmage. .. .

. .)

. Here is a list of some additional points and considerations in zone coverage. . ..

• On the snap of the ball key quarterback, receiver and backfield action ..

• Never allow a receiver to get behind a defender when . he has deep zone

coverage.. .

• A defender in zone coverage should go only as wide and as deep as he has to .: . in order to cover his responsibility.

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• See the ball - the defenders attention should be directed towards the passer and

. . . . ! . .

he should see the receivers. Keep head on a swivel and be able to shift your

I . . .

. eyes. .: .

'-' .• '''Ball'' ._;·"Score" are calls used iri the passing game. The sidelineshould be

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. .' active yelling "ball" when the I quarterback throws the football, and the

· .' defender intercepting, as well ~ the sideline should be yelling "bingo" to

· indicate an interception has been made. . .' .' .

.• Most interceptions are made as th~' defender moves forward for the balL

· .' A tipped 'baIl should be an interception if defender is hustling ($O%'of ail

. tipped baIls are intercepted- .' . . . .'

• Intercept all pass~s at· their high~st. point Do not.wait for the. pall to come. •

. down. 00 get it! r •. '.. .•.... .." . . .... .: " •••. ".

. . . t _,.,- . . '".'

• Ball reaction is paramount to successful zone pass defense.'.': . . . .. '

.: ~ ~,' Instill the importance of communication, Talk to your teammates;' help .' each

.. other. ,Calls' Such as ."in-in-in~in", "out-out-out-out", "cross-cross-cross",

" .. "delay-delay-delay" and "crack-crack". are very helpful to the team defensive

approach. . -: ..... . '. . .

... ~ .. .When responsible fora short zone, gamblefor the interception." ' .. '

• When' responsible for deep zone, defender should never go in front of the

... ' ". intended receiver Unless he can get bothhands on the ball. .,. . .

'. •. .Be aware of the red zone (20 Yards and in), as the short defenders should be no

. closer than 6 yards to the sideline untilthe.ballis thrown inthat area'· .

.• Interference results when a defender' plays the receiver rather than the ball. .

. • . The free safety in cover 3 and both safeties .in cover 2 should keep all receivers .'

in front Of them. . .' .' ",'.. .

• Comer's responsible for the outside 113 should never take an inside fake, because you will always have help on the post route from the deep 113 safety .. • ". Always remember when working drills that break on- the. ball to drive on a Straight line. not a circular one .

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. MAN TECHNIQUES . . ' .

. 'There are two man coverage techniques, one used when the defender is aligned' off in . a safe cushion with the receiver and the other when aligned close ("bump & rim")

Using aggressive, hard-nosed play.' . In either case, when playing. man' coverage the .

. '.' defender-must play the ball aggressively, . '. .

. '. .' Ccaching. Point: Don't chastise if your players get their early .

. Here is a brief recap of some of the advantages to man' coverage:

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• Possible to get more men rushing the quarterback

• Get the most advantageous match-ups

'1 " • Assignments are clear and specific ,

• , Keeps the defenders from, being fooled by play-action

• . Don't 'have defenders guarding grass ,

._' You can bracket or get help in 'covering a specific receiver ~ • Permits aggressive play' on the goal line

" ., Easy to stem and disguise

, 'The defender must 'watch the receiver untilhe is' sure that the receiver is on hlsJast cut =then "snug up" and watch the quarterback. The defenderwill.still use his' 3- , " slide steps reading the key, and then get intothe action. ~Never jump an initial outside' , .: fake, "always take the initial ,inside fake. This can be accomplished when the defender , " maintains-a separation, or is on top of the receivercWhen the receiverstraightens up, ,he is getting ready to fake, when the annsgo up break on the ball.": ' , ' ,',:- " '

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, ' .Here is a list of some additional points and considerations in man coverage.":

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• Total concentrationmust be on the receiver.' <.,' -:

• 'Always keep the receiver in front .

• ' , Never align or be driven to a head up position, " ,', ' ',>

• "Route recognition '_' A receiver who is going tcrun an outside 'route will

generally reduce his split. A receiver who isgoingto run 'a route inside will

" -:' widen his Split. ' , , ' ' '_, " ,".

'. Whenworking drills that talk about stancealways ~eD.tion butt upand ~mn: in

line with the toes.v'The best possible situation is for-the defendertostay inhis ' .-. , , backpedal as long as possible or until the receiver breaks' the 'cushion which - ' puts him within 3 yards of the defender, when this happens' tum, and run with

receiver:' ., ' ,. ,. .', " ,.,' ,

• A receiver who is bent 'over and running with his head .downcannotmakea

, '" . sharp cut, until he raises his shoulders arid " gathershimself under control. " Therefore the 'defender should focus his attention on the receiver's belt buckle and his shoulders.

• Playing bump and 'run _ Never allow an inside release bythe receiver, make the quarterback make the long throw .:Don't get your feet .crossed over: ' " , ,,', - '

• If a pass' is thrown to your receiver in front of you make all drills attack the up field shoulder. Never- go in front of a receiver unless you think you can, get '

both hands on the ball. .

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• If the defender gets beat deep, tell him to put his head down and sprint to catch

the receiver. Do not look back at the' quarterback until you have caught the

receIver. : '.' . . . ."

.• As long as . the ball is behind /the' line of scrimmage and' recervers are· downfield, always maintain tight coverage.

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ATTACKING THE CATCH HAND I . .

· The "Catch Hand"is the hand that will stopthe ball with the only exception being the

. I .

. curl route. The catch .hand will always be' the hand that will stop the ball's

.. :' momentum to catch the football. If the: receiver is going' to catch the. ball and the .

. ~ defender cannot intercept or knock .the ball doVID., then attack the catch hand with a .

· dosed fist and punch the ball, to.the ground. .. When a receiver is running away.from the quarterback (i.e., out, 'post, dig, goj always attack the catch band and punch the ' . ba11ou~. : When a receiver is moving back to the ball, towards the quarterback, then. . attack the side. the receiver, is going to catch the ball .on, .Attack that side (of his '. " body) by punching through the area between the elbow and his body or by punching' .. . .

: from the top down ... Finally, the defensive back should always, while punching the' .' ".'

. ball, lock one ann around the receiver's shoulders to maintain contact and so you will. .... '. : . · have the ability to tackle the receiver if you do not knock the ball loose. . . .' . .

.... . THE BOUNDARY CONCEPT ..

In order to assist. the coverage for ~1 zones.the defender must' attempt to squeeze .

. ". his zones so that they overlap. The most practical areas to eliminateare those close to the boundary where time is on' the defenses side. In order for the' ,hall to

. enter these areas, the football must be in .the air for a long periodof time. This time should enable .the .defender .to . react to the ball and get to. it. Therefore, a ~_ defender should never enter the boundary area until the ball is thrown In. that area.

. '. . . , .... ..

r '. ':" . .' - . . .' . ", . '... .

'. If a .defender is' covering a deep zone, they should not be closer than 9 yards from

the sideline unless. the ball is thrown in that area .. If they are covering an .. 'unciemeath zone, they should not be closer than 6 yards to the boundary unless the .

ballis thrown there. .' . . '. .' . .' ,

. COVERAGES'

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.. The following are the X & O: diagrams for the basic man-to-man, zone and ..

'. combination coverages.used in the 30 Stack Defense ..

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