The Sherando Times

Stephens City • Middletown • Kernstown
Nov. 17 – Nov. 21, 2010 Volume II, Issue 45
The Sherando Times
FREE FREE
8
FREE
8
6
Fiesta time at Del Rio!
SHS
football
statistics
4
Honoring the vets
8
Not your
everyday
nursery
10
open house!
Te Miller House
Page • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Stephens City
“It’s still the same zoning, same developments of residential units and the same portion
of commercial,” said Wyatt.
“Jump Start Project” moves ahead
Public hearing will be held November 30th on development project
By Lorie Showalter
Te Sherando Times
Te Stephens City Planning
Commission will hold a public
hearing at its November 30th
meeting at 7:30 p.m. to consider
a move forward for the develop-
ment of properties in the town.
According to Town Planner Bri-
an Henshaw, the original profer
called for the majority of the Ste-
phens City Western Bypass to be
constructed prior to issuing the
frst building permit.
“Essentially we are phasing out
the construction of the bypass in
order to allow them to start con-
struction on some of the houses,
prior to beginning construc-
tion of the bypass,” Henshaw ex-
plained. Te construction of the
bypass will be phased into the
development at various timing
sequences.
Te issue that will be considered
at the public hearing in Novem-
ber as well as at the December 7th
town council meeting is allowing
the developer, Greenway Engi-
neering, to move forward with
the development utilizing exist-
ing roads to a certain extent. As
the construction process moves
ahead they would be required to
construct a portion of the bypass
as the work expands.
Henshaw said, “Te develop-
ment is remaining as it was ap-
proved and the only process that
we’re going through is amending
the timings of the original profer
statement.”
Te West Wynd Profer State-
ment has been in the works for
quite some time and updates
and amendments have been dis-
cussed at the regular Planning
Commission and Town Council
meetings.
Evan Wyatt of Greenway Engi-
neering presented the amended
profer statement at the town’s
last council meeting with the
Planning Commission deciding
on a public hearing of the amend-
ments to the profer statements
at their next scheduled meeting
in November.
Wyatt is working with the town’s
attorney, David Grifn and Hen-
shaw on the legal language of the
amendments.
Wyatt called this project a “jump
start project” explaining that in
006 the town was bombarded
with development proposals and
the collective wisdom was that a
full bypass road would be neces-
sary, however with the slump in
the economy over the past three
years the need for a quickly built
bypass has become less of an is-
sue.
“VDOT (Virginia Department
of Transportation) concludes
they’re not interested in main-
taining a four lane section of a
boulevard road until the warrants
are there for the trafc volumes,”
said Wyatt.
Wyatt assured council that
proper amendments have been
prepared and do not change the
intent or the content of the origi-
nal plan. “It’s still the same zoning,
same developments of residential
units and the same portion of
commercial,” said Wyatt.
A phasing program is being es-
tablished for beginning the resi-
dential development and then for
building the bypass road bringing
the originally adopted profer up
to the present time. Wyatt said
where the profers used to refer
to the generalized development
plan, which was more of a con-
cept plan, there is now more of a
specifc rezoning exhibit.
Greenway is still committed to
building the commercial devel-
opment at the same threshold as
they were at during the original
rezoning, keeping the same de-
sign standards for the commer-
cial center to ensure consistency
and continuity.
“Te main change is the phas-
ing of the development of the
bypass road,” Wyatt continued.
What has been taken out of the
profers are those steps that have
already been performed such as
right of way dedications, land
dedications, water and sewer dol-
lars, providing connectivity from
Grove Street and from Raven-
wood Road to Crooked Lane as
well as the habitat lots that have
since been developed.
Te current plan is to utilize the
existing road systems in place in
order to “jump start” a portion of
the 67 residential lots and prior
to any additional lot development
the proposal would require a two
lane section of the bypass road be
built from Fairfax Street, back to
the entrance which would serve
the townhouses.
Tere was concern during
September’s planning commis-
sion meeting over the ability of
Crooked Lane to withstand the
additional trafc of the subdivi-
sion and what impact this would
have on the intersection of Main
and Fairfax Streets. However,
since the West Wynd Subdivision
had already been approved and if
construction was to proceed of
Stephens City town council members from left Town
Planner Brian Henshaw, Town Manager Mike Kehoe,
Attorney David Griffn and Councilwoman Martha
www.alltuneandlubewinchester.com
*Most Vehicles. With coupon. Expires 12/4/10.
• Radiator Drain & Fill
(Up to 1 gal. antifreeze, dexcool and extended)
• Oil Change, Lube & Filter (Up To 5 Qts)
• Check All Fluids • New Wiper Blades
• Tire Rotation • Inspect Battery &Connections
• Examine All Belts & Hoses
• FREE Vehicle Maintenance Inspection
• FREE Brake inspection
INCLUDES:
• Change oil (up to 5 qts. 5W30)
• Replace oil flter, cartridge flter add’l
• Lubricate chassis
• FREE vehicle maint. inspection
• Hazardous waste fuel add’l
With coupon. Expires 12/4/10.
6 & 8 CYL. Higher *Most Cars
12,000 Mile, 12 Month Warranty
Whichever Comes First
• Check fuel & emissions system
• Install new spark plugs (platinum plugs additional)
• Inspect flters, belts & hoses
• Other engine performance items additional
With coupon. Expires 12/4/10.
• Install new disc brake
pads or shoes
• Inspect rotors & drums,
turning additional
• Free brake inspection
• Inspect master cylinder
& brake hoses
• Inspect brake fuid for
contamination With coupon. Expires 12/4/10.
*Most vehicles. Some vans, pick-ups, transverse & hard to tune engines additional.
Platinum plugs additional. Environmental fees may apply to some services.
• Add fuid as needed
• Test drive vehicle
• Shoes/semi-metallic pads
included
• Calipers, wheel cylinders,
grease wheel bearings,
seals, rotors or drums
additional
KERNSTOWN
238 Prosperity Drive Ste. 2
540-868-4106
HOURS: Mon - Fri 8-6 • Sat. 8-2
free thinkEr
skateboards
214 east jackson street
540 636 4974
freethinkerskateboards.com
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page 3 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
the Western Bypass, construc-
tion of the homes could begin
regardless of the impact to the
intersection in question.
Tere was also concern, during
September’s meeting that plac-
ing a building permit number as
a trigger for construction would
result in the developer only
building to a certain threshold
and not beyond thereby leaving
the bypass construction in limbo.
However, as Henshaw pointed
out, the town holds a 3.6 million
dollar bond on the construction
of the bypass and that could be
the catalyst used to begin and
complete the construction of the
bypass.
Two months later, Greenway
Engineering, Henshaw, Grifn
and the rest of the town council
and planning commission con-
tinue to modify the profer to the
betterment of the town’s growth
and order.
As Wyatt continued his pre-
sentation to council he said, “Te
original rezoning was profered as
a write-in only and so what we’ve
done is provided a profered ex-
hibit which allows for this to be a
full access point, two way trafc
through the development. Once
this is done Blackheath Drive is
then extended up and this con-
nectivity is made and converted
back to a write-in only.”
In so doing, this commits a two
lane section of the road to the
northern property limits in con-
junction with the permit that is
required to start the commercial
aspect of the development. Tere
are three mechanisms in place to
complete the four lane section.
First, honor before the issuance
of the 01st permit, the old prof-
fer required the entire four lane
segment built which will stay the
same; secondly, in the event its
determined that it is warranted
before that time based on trafc
volumes that would be a “trigger”
requiring the four lane improve-
ment; and third, as a cautionary
measure and two protections for
the town are the bonding cur-
rently in place and once the sec-
ond lane section is completed
and if the other two triggers are
not met yet and ten years go by,
then that is the third trigger and
it would be built.
Tere is a permitting trigger
in place and a timing trigger or
an outside of the project trafc
trigger in order to give everyone
a certain comfort level that the
four lanes would eventually be
performed. Te remainder of the
profer is identical and according
to Wyatt, “one thing that was re-
ally sought after back when there
was a lot of development activity
was the need for a comprehen-
sive study that would be funded
by developers and when that hap-
pened, we stepped up to the plate
when others didn’t.”
He further explained that Gre-
enway left that profer intact in
the event that opportunity would
come back around and clarifed
that this is not a zoning request
but a “proper amendment which
is a rephrasing re-development
program,” said Wyatt.
Stephens City
Henshaw pointed out in September, the town holds a 3.6 million dollar bond on the con-
struction of the bypass.
The
Sherando
Times
Stephens City
Kernstown
Middletown
Press releases should be
emailed to:
news@sherandotimes.com
Publisher
Daniel P. McDermott
(540) 305-3000
dan@sherandotimes.com
News Editor:
Laura Biondi
editor@sherandotimes.com
News Reporters:
Sue Golden
Rachel Hamman
Lorie Showalter
lories@sherandotimes.com
Advertising Sales Representatives:
Angie Buterakos
(540) 683-9197
angie@sherandotimes.com
Alison Duvall
(540) 551-2072
alisond@sherandotimes.com
Sandy Larrick
sandy@sherandotimes.com
Production Manager:
Jeff Richmond
Ad Design:
Terri Schuyler
Paul Speary
Billing Coordinator:
billing@warrencountyreport.com
Cartoonist:
Ryan Koch
If you are interested in contributing
articles to our paper, please e-mail:
dan@sherandotimes.com
This publication is proudly
printed on 100% recycled paper
with soy-based ink.
By Samantha Mazzotta
Holiday Safety
Thanksgiving is upon us again
(unless you’re in Canada, in which
case it’s safely past) and the holiday
season is about to go full swing. Your
family is probably similar to mine,
with relatives traveling from all over
to catch up on things, and most of all,
eat. You might not have a nephew’s
wedding to attend in the same time
frame, but I just look at it as another
opportunity to hang out with family
and friends we might not otherwise
get a chance to see.
If your home is host to this year’s
get-together, add a few of these items
to your to-do list. They’ll help make
everyone more comfortable and safe
amid all the bustle of activity.
• Plan to sequester your housepets
during the height of holiday activity.
Place them in a room with food, litter
box, toys, and bed or blanket. Check
on them frequently.
• Put away ongoing household proj-
ects, like painting or repairs, or close
off rooms that are undergoing repair
or renovation. Put a “do not enter”
sign on the door if necessary.
• Remove chemicals, sharp tools,
pesticides and other dangerous items
from parts of the home that might be
easily accessed by children. Don’t
store them near laundry, food or
drink.
• Rearrange the garage a bit, even if
you think no one will go into it. Place
chemicals out of reach and store tools
securely, in a closed toolbox or hang-
ing high on your workshop pegboard.
• Shut off the heat to rooms you
don’t want guests to enter. You can
do this by closing the registers. If they
don’t see the “do not enter” signs,
they’ll probably get the hint if it’s
dark and cold.
• When guests start arriving, make
sure your car’s safety brake is set and
lock the doors to reduce the chance of
curious kids climbing into it.
• Once the festivities are done, do a
walkaround of the house and yard to
make sure nothing dangerous is lying
around — spilled liquids, lighted can-
dles or unextinguished cigarettes, for
example.
Send your questions or home tips
to ask@thisisahammer.com, or write
This Is a Hammer, c/o King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475. When in
doubt as to whether you can safely or
effectively complete a project, consult
a professional contractor.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—33—
Brush up on
fire safety
around the
kitchen and
home for the
holiday: The
American Red
Cross and other safety organiza-
tions have plenty of tips on their
websites.
Keep the Home
Fires Burning
The holidays can be tough on the
families of service members who are
deployed. Here are some ways you
can help make their holidays a little
brighter:
If you live near a military base, call
its family support services. Tell them
you’d like to help with toys, food
boxes or anything else. You can help
financially by donating a Walmart
gift card so the at-home parent can
buy what the family needs, paying a
utility bill, donating a phone card and
more. If you’re so inclined (and have
the right equipment), volunteer to
play Santa for a group of little kids.
Volunteer at any location where
they collect, pack and deliver toys for
military kids. Most of these programs
also include a food box.
If you’re in a veterans service orga-
nization, perhaps the best thing you
can do for the parents left behind is to
host a party for the kids and give the
parent a few free hours.
If you know a parent who is strug-
gling with the absence of the family’s
service member, make sure she (and
it usually is a she) has access to infor-
mation she needs. Ask family support
services at the nearest base what help
is available, and make sure she knows
about it. Programs are called by vari-
ous names depending on the military
branch, but they all involve help with
a wide variety of services, such as
financial help for mortgage, car pay-
ment, phone bill, support groups and
more.
Prefer to have your efforts remain
anonymous? Go to www.aafes.com,
click Support Troops and click on
Help Our Troops Call Home. Scroll
down and look for various ways
your purchase of a phone card can
help. Also check out phone cards for
Injured Soldiers and Their Families.
Write to Freddy Groves in care of
King Features Weekly Service, P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to columnre-
ply@gmail.com.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

W
e
e
k
l
y

S
e
r
v
i
c
e
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

1
5
,

2
0
1
0
Lookin’ Good Salon
& Beauty School
$12 Haircuts w/ our stylists
$7 Haircuts w/ our students
122-A Agape Way, Stephens City • 540-868-1616
Next to the water tower on Tasker Rd.
The Sherando Times
Alison Duvall
Advertising Sales
Cell: (540) 551-2072
alisond@sherandotimes.com
The Sherando Times
Angie Buterakos
Advertising Sales
Cell: (540) 683-9197
angie@sherandotimes.com
Page • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Schools
“I thought they (the veterans) were more than people.” - Kyle Landis, 6th grader from
Aylor Middle School
Sixth graders honor veterans
Aylor students take a special feld trip to WV hospital
By Rachel Hamman
Te Sherando Times
Last Tursday, 8 sixth graders
from Robert E. Aylor Middle School
made a special trip up to the VA Hos-
pital in Martinsburg, WV. For the
children and the veterans, it was a
Veterans Day they will remember for
a long time.
Upon arriving at the Martinsburg
Veterans Afairs Medical Center, the
students were awed by the rows of
fags at the entrance. Lucchiani said
of the adults and students who went:
“Our senses were grabbed right
away.” She said they weren’t sure
what to expect when they arrived,
but as it turned out, “every vet was
wonderful”.
Before going on the feld trip, stu-
dents had taken time to assemble gift
bags for one hundred veterans. Te
gift bags included basic toiletries,
socks and other items the veterans
could use. Puzzle books and person-
alized letters from the students were
also included in the bags. Amber
Lucchiani, a sixth grade teacher at
Aylor, was instrumental in organiz-
ing the feld trip. Lucchiani’s sister
works for 3 Phoenix, a government
contracting company in Chantilly. 3
Phoenix made a donation towards
the purchase of some of the items
that were included in the gift bags.
Some students also brought in their
own things to add to the gift bags.
Some of them drew extra pictures for
the veterans.
Taryn Gibson, a sixth grader from
Aylor, said of the veterans: “Tey
were very appreciative of the stu-
dents coming to see them. It made
them (the veterans) feel important.”
Taryn said that one veteran got teary-
eyed as he spoke of his family. He
had served in the military on a sub-
marine. She said another veteran had
been wounded in the shoulder and
one of his legs was paralyzed. Taryn
also spoke of one veteran who was
so emotionally touched by receiving
the gift bag that he wanted to fnd the
girl it was from to thank her person-
ally and give her a hug. Taryn said
that one of the veterans she met had
served in the Navy for forty years.
When Taryn was asked what Veter-
an’s Day is about, she said, “It’s a day
to honor veterans who have served
in the military”. Last Tursday, she
learned a lot about honoring veter-
ans and what they should mean to
our country. Taryn, along with other
students, were given a list of ques-
tions they could ask veterans. Most
of the questions involved how many
years the veterans had served in the
military, their rank and any special
Aylor students pose with veterans.
A vet chats with an Aylor sixth grader.
Kyle Landis was honored to receive a Yankee’s hat
from a veteran.
TAX PREPARER WANTED
COME JOIN OUR TAX SCHOOL AND BE A PART OF
THE NEW LIBERTY TAX SERVICE IN
STEPHENS CITY, VA
WE ARE LOOKING FOR PEOPLE THAT
ARE POSITIVE, SELF-MOTIVATED
AND RELIABLE.
CALL (540) 327-0093 FOR DETAILS
Hobby Hutt
RADIO CONTROL:
- CARS
- PLANES
- HELIS
- BOATS
MON - SAT 10AM - 7PM
(540) 723-HUTT (4888)
325 WEST BOSCAWEN ST.
WINCHESTER, VA 22601
SLOT CARS
PLASTIC MODEL KITS
MODEL ROCKETS
METAL DETECTORS
SCIENCE
& EDUCATION
MODEL TRAINS
MODEL TRAINS FOR AROUND YOUR TREE!
P.O. Box 789
Stephens City, VA 22655
540-869-2004
www.prosperitylandscaping.com
FALL IS HERE AND
WINTER’S AROUND
THE CORNER!
PROSPERITY LANDSCAPING
can help you with your Fall
and Winter projects.
Let us clean up those plant beds for
you. It’s time to cut back perennials,
do your end of the year pruning, and
fertilize both lawn and garden. And
don’t forget to protect your shrubs
and trees! Prosperity Landscaping
can redefne those plant beds and
apply beautiful brown dyed mulch.
Mulch will protect your plants against
another winter like last years and at
the same time beautify your property
for the upcoming holidays.
Here are some other Fall and Winter
activities Prosperity Landscaping
can help you with:
• Tree removal.
• Firewood splitting, moving or
stacking
• Garage cleaning and hauling
• Fence row or lot clearing
• Overgrown or dead shrub removal
• Plant bed prep with topsoil or
compost addition
• General hauling
• Hang Christmas lights (customer
provides)
• Winterize lawn equipment (oil &
spark plug changing, blade
sharpening)
• Many other handyman-type
services
CALL US TODAY!
540-869-2004
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
stories they might want to share.
Kyle Landis, another sixth grader
from Aylor, remembered three veter-
ans he visited with while on the feld
trip. He said one of the vets “was re-
ally nice and talked to him a lot”. Kyle
got to talk baseball with one of the
veterans. Tat veteran gave Kyle his
own personal Yankee hat before Kyle
left. Kyle said a third veteran emptied
his gift bag, said “Tank you” and
started crying. One of the veterans
told Kyle stories about when he was
in Vietnam. Twenty other boys were
drafted at the same time he was. Te
vet told Kyle that “boot camp wasn’t
fun”. Kyle was impressed by the fact
that this veteran “blew up things”
when he was in Vietnam. Kyle sober-
ly noted that Veterans Day is about
“celebrating people that fought and
giving them gratitude for what they
did.” When Kyle was asked how it
made him feel to do something spe-
cial for the veterans, he answered
that it “Made me feel really good.
People usually send cards, but we
took the time to give them stuf in
person.” Tat was the main theme
reiterated by the veterans – that the
students would take time to come
and visit them in person meant more
to them than anything else. Taryn
said it made her feel “good that they
were making them (the veterans)
feel important”. When asked what
he had learned from going to the VA
Hospital, Kyle replied that the veter-
ans are “Amazing American heroes”.
In words of wisdom that belied his
years, Kyle added, “I thought they
were more than people”.
Lucchiani is pleased with the suc-
cess of the feld trip. She said it,
“Went above and beyond expecta-
tions.” She noted, “It’s easy to teach
facts and dates, but it’s hard to instill
patriotism in students”. She feels the
trip was “good for both the students
and veterans. Sometimes people
think that kids don’t care, but they
do. Tey just need an opportunity to
show they care.” Te veterans needed
someone to listen to their stories and
let them know they are cared about.
Lucchiani, a history teacher, rec-
ognizes that the history books only
scratch the surface. Te stories of
veterans are history too, even if they
are unwritten. She said the veterans
took on a fatherly/grandfatherly role
with the students. Te vets encour-
aged the students to “Stay in school”.
Some vets could not bring themselves
to discuss topics that were emotion-
al for them. When the students got
ready to leave the Martinsburg Vet-
erans Afairs Medical Center, the
veterans applauded the students.
Later, after the feld trip, the students
asked the teachers, “Can we go back
at Christmas? Can we go back in sev-
enth grade?”
For Lucchiani, remembering and
honoring veterans is personal to her.
All of the men in her family have
served in the military. Her great-
great grandfather was in World War
II. Her grandfather died on the way
back from Korea when his ship sank.
Her father is a Vietnam veteran. All
of her four brothers have served in
the Marines. Tey have each been
to Iraq at least once and two of them
have served two tours. Lucchiani
feels that veterans are not honored
like they should be. She said, “Teir
sacrifce continues even after they
are out of the service”.
Lucchiani is thankful her “team-
mates (the other staf) were all on
board” and wanted to do the feld
trip. It was a joint efort between
teachers and the administration.
Some parents also volunteered to go
on the feld trip. Lucchiani’s contact
at the Martinsburg Veterans Afairs
Medical Center was already receiv-
ing positive feedback from the veter-
ans after the students left. She said,
“Te veterans who were recipients of
your visit/gifts spoke of the joy they
received from the visit”. One veteran
said, “I know that students are very
busy at school, but that they would
take the time to visit us, ask us ques-
tions, and give us gifts is magnif-
cent”. Another veteran said, “Seeing
the kids this morning just brightens
up the rest of our day”.
Schools
Te mayor suggested using a teaspoon of vinegar to the rinse water to get rid of the build-
up and said “It’s probably better water than you’d get elsewhere.”
ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Don’t
feel sheepish about looking to spend
more time with that special person
during the upcoming holidays. Do it
because it’s the right thing to do.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Never mind letting misunderstandings
repair themselves. Consider speaking
up while the healing process can be
shorter and sweeter and leave fewer
scars.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Romance is easily awakened in the
Geminian heart, especially around
the happy holiday season. So go ahead
and make those plans with that special
someone.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Moon
Children can glow with their own inner
light as the holiday season magic takes
hold. It’s a very special time for Can-
cers and Libras together. Enjoy.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) It’s a
good time for you fabulous Felines to
take pleasure in your special gift for,
well, taking pleasure! Look for this
holiday season to give you every rea-
son to purr.
VIRGO (August 23 to September
22) This is a good time to let others
who are in your life get a little closer to
you. You’ll both find out what you’ve
been missing for far too long.
LIBRA (September 23 to October
22) Open up your eyes and see some
welcome surprises you’ve missed or
overlooked for too long. What you find
can lead to other favorable changes.
SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem-
ber 21) What you expect to be poten-
tially troublesome might simply be
especially challenging and well worth
your efforts to check out. Good luck!
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) A friendship might not
seem as trustworthy as you’d like. OK.
Ask your questions, get your answers
and settle the matter once and for all.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) A family situation moves
into a new area because of (or, maybe,
thanks to) some decisions you might
have felt you could not avoid making.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru-
ary 18) You could be cutting it very
close if you hope to make those holi-
day plan changes in time to avoid
problems. Get a friend or family mem-
ber to help.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
Friends show how important you are
to them. Keep these precious relation-
ships thriving. They affect much that
will happen to the fabulous Fish in the
new year.
BORN THIS WEEK: Time spent at
home alone nurtures your mystic self.
Spending your time with others nur-
tures them.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—21—
• On Nov. 30, 1886, the Folies
Bergère in Paris introduces an elabo-
rate revue featuring women in sensa-
tional costumes. The theater spared no
expense, staging revues that featured
as many as 40 sets. Among other long
traditions, the show’s title always con-
tains 13 letters and includes the word
“Folie.”
• On Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution is rati-
fied, repealing the 18th Amendment
and bringing an end to the national
prohibition of alcohol. Mississippi,
the last dry state in the Union, ended
Prohibition in 1966.
• On Dec. 4, 1945, in an overwhelm-
ing vote of 65 to 7, the U.S. Senate
approves full U.S. participation in the
United Nations. Some senators pro-
posed a resolution designed to force
the president to receive congressional
consent before approving U.S. troops
for any U.N. peacekeeping forces. The
resolution was defeated.
• On Dec. 1, 1955, in Montgomery,
Ala., Rosa Parks is jailed for refusing
to give up her seat on a public bus to
a white man, a violation of the city’s
racial segregation laws. Parks’ refusal
was not merely brought on by her tired
feet, as is the popular legend. Local
civil-rights leaders had been planning
a challenge to Montgomery’s racist
bus laws for several months.
• On Dec. 3, 1967, 53-year-old Lewis
Washkansky receives the first human
heart transplant in Cape Town, South
Africa. After surgery, he was given
drugs to suppress his immune system
and keep his body from rejecting the
heart. He died 18 days later from dou-
ble pneumonia.
• On Dec. 2, 1972, the Temptations
earn the last of their four chart-top-
ping hits when “Papa Was a Rollin’
Stone” reaches No. 1 on the Billboard
Hot 100. Earlier hits by producer-
songwriter Smokey Robinson were
“The Way You Do the Things You Do”
(1964) and “My Girl” (1965).
• On Nov. 29, 1981, actress Natalie
Wood, who starred in such movies as
“Rebel Without a Cause” and “West
Side Story,” drowns in a boating acci-
dent near California’s Catalina Island.
It was believed she somehow slipped
overboard while untying a dinghy
attached to the boat.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

W
e
e
k
l
y

S
e
r
v
i
c
e
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

1
5
,

2
0
1
0
45 FEATHERBED LANE, WINCHESTER VA
MONDAY THRU SUNDAY 8:00 AM TO 8:00 PM
ANGEL’S LIGHT THE WAY
CONSIGNMENT & GIFT SHOP
NEW AND USED ITEMS • GREAT PRICES!
GIFT WRAPPING IS AVAILABLE EVEN IF GIFT WAS NOT
PURCHASED AT THE STORE.
EACH BOW IS HAND MADE TO FIT THE PERSON.
CHRISTMAS SALES ON NEW AND USED ITEMS
STARTING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH, 2010.
DROP BY AND PAY LESS!
540-686-5769
STEPHENS CITY
BARBER SHOP
Sherando Towne Center
Suite 107 • Stephens City,
VA 22655
$1.00
OFF
ANY
HAIRCUT!
Good thru 1/1/11
869-4633
“Serving The Valley with High-tech
Dentistry and Old-fashioned Service”
www.thomasfamilydentistry.com
540-465-3980
33820 Old Valley Pike (Rt. 11) • Strasburg, VA 22657
All Phases of Dentistry Including:
• Cleanings And Exams • Invisalign
• Orthodontics • Extractions
• Partials And Dentures • Implants
Patient Friendly Payment
Plans Available
Thomas Family Dentistry, PC
Dr. Stephen J. Thomas DDS
Dr. Kenneth J. Thomas DDS
Come See Our
New Ofce
Beside Denny’s
Rt. 11 North, Strasburg
General Dentistry
See Our Website for
Monthly Promotions
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!
HOURS:
Monday through Thursday
7am - 5pm
THE VERY FIRST NIGHT YOU USE IT WITHOUT
CHEMICALS OR ANYTHING ENTERING YOUR BODY!
Simply apply a LifeWave Sleep patch before bed, enjoy a full night’s sleep &
wake up refreshed, with no drug hangover or the nasty side effects of sleeping
pills. Don’t worry, if you’re listening for a baby or need to use the bathroom,
you’ll still hear and react the same as now. The difference is you’ll go right
back to sleep when you return to bed.
Call or email me now to learn more about the Sleep patch as well as patches &
homeopathic sprays to relieve pain, increase your energy, lose weight, safely
& quickly detox your body, and reverse the aging process in your cells.
Trial packs of 3 patches (9 nights of great sleep) available for $15.
Trish Wilson
Your Local Independent LifeWave Distributor
540-636-8080
TRISH22630@COMCAST.NET
LIFEWAVE’S SLEEP PATCH
CAN TAKE YOU
FROM TO
Page 6 • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
By Lorie Showalter
Te Sherando Times
Te Sherando Warriors
Varsity Football team end-
ed its 010 season last week,
compiling an 8-3 record.
During the regular season
the Warriors were unde-
feated outside of the North-
western District with one of
the highlights of the season
being a 7- victory at re-
gional powerhouse Liberty,
handing the Eagles their
only loss of the season.
On ofense, the Warriors
junior running back Joseph
Ojo, led the team with 1663
rushing yards. He was also
the teams leading scorer
with 1 touchdowns. Senior
Dominque Porter gained
11 receiving yards on 30
catches, mostly from junior
quarterback Jalen Brisco,
who had a team-leading
6 completions in 107 at-
tempts for 73 yards pass-
ing. Junior Tre Porter added
1,16 all-purpose yards and
1 touchdowns for Sheran-
do.
Te defense was lead by
senior linebacker Kevin
Vallejos, who recorded 3
solo tackles and assisted on
67 others. Defensive backs
Brady Cook and Tre Porter
had 3 and 7 solo tackles,
respectively and had 13 of
the team’s 17 interceptions
for the year.
Sports
Sherando Warriors season totals
Sherando Individual Leaders
All purpose yards
Player Rush Rec KR PR Int FR Total
#3 Ojo, Joseph 1663 18 80 0 0 0 1761
# Porter, Tre 0 18 9 13 87 0 116
#3 Porter, Dominique 0 11 8 6 0 0 01
#7 Brisco, Jalen 39 0 0 0 0 0 39
#8 Wood, Terry 0 188 0 0 0 0 188
#6 Cook, Brady 0 1 0 0 81 7 109
# Vallejos, Kevin 0 7 0 0 1 98
#7 Miller, Cody 0 78 0 0 0 0 78
#3 Williams, Isiah 8 0 0 0 0 0 8
# Tunison, Lucas 9 0 0 0 0 3
#9 Ritter, Andrew 3 1 0 0 0 0
#30 Worker, JJ 0 1 0 11 0 0 3
Scoring
Kick Rush Pass Rec
Player TD FG PAT PAT PAT PAT Saf Pts
#3 Ojo, Joseph 1 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0 16
# Porter, Tre 1 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0 7
#86 Haines, Justin 0 0 30 0-1 0-0 0 0 30
#3 Porter, Dominique 0 0 0-0 0-0 1 0 6
#7 Brisco, Jalen 0 0 1-1 1-1 0 0 6
#30 Worker, JJ 1 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0 6
# Vallejos, Kevin 1 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0 6
#9 Ritter, Andrew 1 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0 6
#3 Williams, Isiah 1 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0 6
#37 Hayes, Chris 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 0
Totals: 0 45 0 32 1-2 1-1 1 0 306
Opponents: 27 4 24 1-1 0-0 0 0 200
Defense
Player Tackles Assists Sacks
# Vallejos, Kevin 3 67 1.0
# Morris, Jack 18 66 .
# Porter, Tre 7 0.0
#10 Holland, Damian 19 7 3.0
# Newman, Trevis 9 9 1.0
#6 Cook, Brady 3 0.0
#7 Miller, Cody 0 3 0.0
# Tunison, Lucas 16 6 0.0
#1 Entsminger, Reid 1 9 0.0
#8 Markland, Scott 1 7 .0
#3 Op’tHof, Michael 8 8 .0
#67 Gum, Chris 7 1.
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
Tippy’s Taco House & Bar
175 FairIax Pike · Stephens City
Besides Arby`s
868-8667
ALL NFL GAMES
$1.00 Crunchy Beef Tacos
EVERYTHING ON
THE MENU IS UNDER
$8.00!!
KARAOKE ON WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
OPEN MON - SUN 11AM - ??
CLOSED MONDAY FOR LUNCH
PINOCCIOS
CLOCK REPAIR
www.pinocciosclockrepair.net
(540) 636-7369
■ Authorized Service
Center for Howard Miller
& Sligh
■ Licensed and Insured
■ House Calls Available
■ Antique or Modern
■ Serving the valley for
over 36 years
Shenandoah University
Earn a
Virginia Teachers License
in six months
If you have
• A bachelor’s degree
• Five years work or equivalent experience
You can qualify for the Career Switcher
Program at Shenandoah University
To schedule an appointment or
for more information contact:
Ron Say
540-287-1911
rsay@su.edu
Winchester Campus - Bowman Bldg.
1460 University Drive, Winchester, VA | www.su.edu/cs
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page 7 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Sports
1. LITERATURE: Who wrote the
novels “Northanger Abbey” and
“Emma”?
2. MATH: What is the equivalent of
the Roman numeral DXVI?
3. ANATOMY: What is the colored
part of the eye called?
4. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of
food is fusilli?
5. MEASUREMENTS: How many
acres are in 1 square mile?
6. PRESIDENTS: Which U.S. presi-
dent created the Purple Heart medal?
7. GOVERNMENT: Which amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution abol-
ished slavery?
8. HISTORY: What did American
patriot Paul Revere do for a living?
9. SCIENCE: What is the alloy steel
mostly made of?
10. GEOGRAPHY: What is the larg-
est country in South America in land
size?
Answers
1. Jane Austen
2. 516
3. Iris
4. A type of pasta
5. 640
6. George Washington
7. 13th Amendment
8. He was a silversmith
9. Iron and carbon
10. Brazil
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—12—
1
.

I
s

t
h
e

b
o
o
k

o
f

2

J
o
h
n

i
n

t
h
e

O
l
d

o
r

N
e
w

T
e
s
t
a
m
e
n
t

o
r

n
e
i
t
h
e
r
?
2
.

I
n

I
s
a
i
a
h

4
5
:
1
,

w
h
i
c
h


G
r
e
a
t


w
a
s

r
e
s
p
o
n
s
i
b
l
e

f
o
r

o
v
e
r
t
h
r
o
w
i
n
g

t
h
e

B
a
b
-
y
l
o
n
i
a
n

e
m
p
i
r
e
?

A
l
e
x
a
n
d
e
r
,

C
y
r
u
s
,

X
e
r
x
e
s
,

T
i
b
e
r
i
u
s
3
.

W
h
a
t

y
o
u
n
g

m
a
n

f
e
l
l

f
r
o
m

a

w
i
n
-
d
o
w

a
n
d

d
i
e
d

d
u
r
i
n
g

a

s
e
r
m
o
n

b
y

t
h
e

a
p
o
s
t
l
e

P
a
u
l
?

E
u
t
y
c
h
u
s
,

G
a
m
a
l
i
e
l
,

S
i
s
e
r
a
,

M
a
l
a
c
h
i
4
.

H
o
w

m
a
n
y

p
r
e
c
i
o
u
s

s
t
o
n
e
s

w
e
r
e

p
a
r
t
s

o
f

t
h
e

b
r
e
a
s
t
p
l
a
t
e

w
o
r
n

b
y

O
l
d

T
e
s
t
a
m
e
n
t

p
r
i
e
s
t
s
?

2
,

7
,

1
2
,

2
0
5
.

F
r
o
m

P
r
o
v
e
r
b
s

3
0
:
3
3
,

s
u
r
e
l
y

t
h
e

c
h
u
r
n
i
n
g

o
f

m
i
l
k

b
r
i
n
g
e
t
h

f
o
r
t
h

.
.
.
?
F
o
o
d
,

B
l
o
o
d
,

S
t
r
i
f
e
,

B
u
t
t
e
r
6
.

W
h
e
r
e

d
i
d

G
i
d
e
o
n

m
e
e
t

a
n

a
n
g
e
l
?
P
r
i
s
o
n
,

F
i
e
l
d
,

O
a
k

t
r
e
e
,

W
e
l
l
A
N
S
W
E
R
S
:

1
)

N
e
w
;

2
)

C
y
r
u
s
;

3
)

E
u
t
y
c
h
u
s
;

4
)

1
2
;

5
)

B
u
t
t
e
r
;

6
)

O
a
k

t
r
e
e
W
i
l
s
o
n

C
a
s
e
y

s


G
o
l
f

T
r
i
v
i
a


2
0
1
1

B
o
x

C
a
l
e
n
d
a
r

i
s

n
o
w

a
v
a
i
l
a
b
l
e

f
r
o
m

S
e
l
l
e
r
s

P
u
b
l
i
s
h
i
n
g
.
©

2
0
1
0

K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

S
y
n
d
.
,

I
n
c
.
1. How many times has Torii Hunter
hit .300 or better for a season during
his 14-year major-league career?
2. Name the three catchers who
have won the American League Most
Valuable Player Award since 1976.
3. Name the last fullback to be
enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of
Fame.
4. Who was the last Butler player
before Gordon Hayward to play in
the NBA?
5. Two NHL goalies have recorded
three consecutive 40-win seasons.
Name them.
6. When was the last time before
the 2010 men’s soccer World Cup
that the two finalists from the previ-
ous World Cup were eliminated in the
first round?
7. Name the person who holds the
mark for most boxing world title
fights refereed (172 in 34 years).
Answers
1. None, despite a .305 average in
the postseason.
2. Thurman Munson (1976), Ivan
Rodriguez (1999) and Joe Mauer
(2009).
3. Larry Csonka, in 1987.
4. Ralph O’Brien, in 1953.
5. San Jose’s Evgeni Nabokov
(2007-10) and New Jersey’s Martin
Brodeur (2005-08).
6. It had never occurred before
2010.
7. Richard Steele.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
1. Name the group that was original-
ly called The Poquellos. Where were
they from?
2. Who sang “Sea Cruise,” and
when?
3. Where and when did Diana Ross
& the Supremes give their last perfor-
mance before Ross went solo?
4. What was the title of George Har-
rison’s triple album?
5. Name all four bands that Grace
Slick was in. How did she get that
“Slick” name?
6. Name the working title of the
Beatles film “Help!”
Answers
1. The Shirelles. The group formed
in 1958 in New Jersey and came to the
attention of an agent with their song “I
Met Him On a Sunday.”
2. Frankie Ford, in 1958. The song
has been covered by a number of art-
ists, including Cliff Richard, John
Fogerty and Johnny Rivers.
3. In Las Vegas in 1970 at the Fron-
tier Hotel and Casino.
4. “All Things Must Pass,” released
in 1970. It included two albums of
songs and one of jams with other
musicians.
5. The Great Society, Jefferson Air-
plane, Jefferson Starship and Starship.
The “Slick” wasn’t a stage name. She
got the name when she married Ger-
ald Slick in 1961.
6. The working title was “Eight
Arms to Hold You.” The film came
out in 1965.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
F
W
S



M
i
n
d
G
y
m
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

1
5
,

2
0
1
0

Sherando Warriors – 2010 Season

All games Home Away Neutral
Overall record: 8-3 -0 3-3 0-0
League: - -0 0- 0-0
Non-league: 6-0 3-0 3-0 0-0
Playof: 0-1 0-0 0-1 0-0
Date Game type Opponent Result Record

08/7/010 Non-league Park View W 3-3 1-0
09/03/010 Non-league @ Musselman W 1-7 -0
09/10/010 Non-league Washington W 1-6 3-0
09/16/010 Non-league @ Loudoun County W 1-1 -0
09//010 Non-league Jeferson W 9-0 -0
10/08/010 League James Wood W 1-7 6-0
10/16/010 League @ Handley L -1 6-1
10//010 Non-league @ Liberty W 7- 7-1
10/9/010 League Skyline W 8-0 8-1
11/0/010 League @ Millbrook L 17-13 8-
11/1/010 Playof @ Broad Run L 9-6 8-3
Sherando Team Summary Statistics (11 games)
Team stats Sherando Opponents
SCORING 306 00
Points per game 7.8 18.
FIRST DOWNS 17 166
Rushing 16 88
Passing 70
Penalty 8
RUSHING YARDAGE 67 13
Rushing attempts 3 38
Average per rush 6.0 .
Average per game 3.1 10.3
Rushing TDs 36 13
PASSING YARDAGE 967 176
Completions - attempts 88 - 1 13 - 76
Average per attempt 6. .3
Average per completion 11.0 10.3
Average per game 87.9 13.
Passing TDs 7 1
Interceptions 3 17
TOTAL OFFENSE 361 3019
Total plays 98 6
Average per play 6.1 .8
Average per game 331.0 7.
KICKOFF RETURNS - YARDS 31 - 9 39 - 61
Average per attempt 1.8 1.9
Kickof return TDs 0 1
PUNT RETURNS - YARDS 18 - 19 16 - 18
Average per attempt 8.3 9.9
Punt return TDs 0 1
FUMBLES - FUMBLES LOST 10 - 7 0 - 13
Fumble recoveries - return yards 16 - 16 - 6
Average per recovery 3.3 1.6
Fumble recovery TDs 1 0
INTERCEPTIONS 17 3
Interception return yards 173
Average per interception 10. 1.3
Interception return TDs 1 0
PENALTIES - YARDS 7 - 633 3 - 38
Average per game 7. 3.9
PUNTS - YARDS - 107 39 - 1
Average per punt 8.7 31.3
DEFENSIVE SACKS - YARDS 19 - 98 11 - 7
FIELD GOALS MADE - 0 - -
ATTEMPTED
PAT MADE - ATTEMPTED 3 - - 7
PAT kick made - attempted 3 - - 6
PAT run made - attempted 1 - 1 - 1
PAT pass made - attempted 1 - 1 0 - 0
TIME OF POSSESSION 67:8 60:0
Average per game : 3:38
THIRD DOWN EFFICIENCY 3. 33.1
Made - attempted 1 - 118 - 17
FOURTH DOWN EFFICIENCY .0 3.1
Made - attempted 9 - 0 17 - 3
TURNOVER RATIO +0 -0
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
Page 8 • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Business
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
Not your everyday nursery
Natural Art Garden Center ofers unique landscaping and fora
By Rachel Hamman
Te Sherando Times
When you visit the Natural
Art Garden Center just north of
Toms Brook, Virginia of Route
11, expect to receive exceptional
customer service from an expe-
rienced staf. Tough they have
been open less than two years,
it is obvious that the owners and
staf of the Natural Art Garden
Center have done their time in
research and marketing to help
meet the unique needs of their
customers.
Te Natural Art Garden Center
ofcially opened in April of 009.
Tey are quickly becoming com-
petitive in the products they of-
fer and their unique approach to
landscaping. As recently as Octo-
ber 8, 010, they were one of six
landscaping businesses to receive
an award as a semifnalist at the
010 Landscaper’s Challenge,
which is organized by Lawn and
Landscape, the magazine. Te
business that won frst place in
that competition had over one
hundred employees, whereas
the Natural Art Garden Center
only has three full-time employ-
ees. Te town of Strasburg, VA
named the Natural Art Garden
Center its Business of the Year
for 009.
With a business name that in-
corporates the word “art”, one
would expect creativity to be
involved. Such is the case with
the Natural Art Garden Center.
Owner Scott Edmondson has
been doing landscaping work for
twenty-fve years. He designs and
constructs patios, outdoor kitch-
ens, walkways, retaining walls,
pergolas as well as outdoor light-
ing and water features. In short,
if a customer has an idea for an
outdoor landscaping project,
Scott will come up with a cre-
ative design that pleases the cus-
tomer and has aesthetic qualities.
According to Scott’s business
partner, Lynne Phillips, Scott’s
artistic designs have inspired
his customers to say things like,
“You’ve created a work of art in
our back yard”. Lynne believes
that what sets their business apart
from other similar businesses is
Scott’s landscaping artwork and
the fact that they “have the larg-
est selection of perennials” in
the area. A popular perennial for
Te Natural Art Garden Center
this season has been “candy store
phlox”. Also popular this year has
been coral bells, which is a variety
of the “heuchera” plant. It is a pe-
rennial in warmer climates, but
is a popular annual in this area.
Te Natural Art Garden Center
has three main varieties of these
plants: freworks, Shanghai and
electra. Te freworks variety is
a reddish color, the Shanghai is
a purplish color, and the electra
is a lime color. Tey still have
plenty of these heuchera varieties
in stock. Tey also have an orna-
mental grass called pennisetum,
which is a beautiful purplish red-
dish color. Unfortunately, this is
an annual grass, but it is so gor-
geous that planting it every year
would be worth the trouble. One
of Lynne’s favorite fowers and
also a favorite with customers
this year is the Henry Eilers sweet
black-eyed Susan. Lynne says
each petal is tubular-shaped and
nectar can be gotten from the in-
dividual tubes.
Another distinctive plant on
display at the center is the “acuba
japonica”. It has primarily green
leaves with yellow fecks in them.
One of the interesting trees
that the NAGC currently has in
their outdoor display is a Scotch
pine that is trained to look like a
“pom-pom”. Another eye-catch-
ing tree is the weeping blue atlas
cedar. Tey had forty varieties of
Japanese trees earlier in the sea-
son. Tey still have a fair amount
of boxwood plants available. Ac-
View of outdoor fall display to the left of front en-
trance of the Natural Art Garden Center.
Beautiful light purple
“Shanghai” variety of the
heuchera plant.
2004 KIA SEDONA EX
61K MILES, V6, R/AIR
WAS $11,995
NOW $8,879
540.636.2901
Great Deals at
www.shenandoahford.com
I-66 & Rt 522
North of
Front Royal
2006 TOYOTA SIENNA XLE
68K MILES, LEATHER QUAD SEATS
WAS $19,995
NOW $17,936
#2105B #R1028A
$99.50 processing fee, tags, taxes & title extra. subject to prior sale
Give us a call to schedule a visit
(540) 743-1615
Brill’s Assisted Living
Where we make our home, Your home…
Frequent well-being checks.
Nearby downtown area
with restaurants, shops
and quaint country charm!
Choice of attractive private
or semi-private accommoda-
tions. Variety of comfort-
able community areas in-
cluding porches for seasonal
enjoyment. Creative, social
and spiritual activities and
programs. Social events for
residents and families
Primary Services
Daily housekeeping
Daily personal laundry
Emergency call system
Bathing and Dressing
Medication Management
Continence Management
On-Call nurse 24 hours a day
Home health andhospice care
available through your physician
8 East Old Barn Road
Luray, VA 22835
Large TV/ Family Room! Spacious Bathroom! Three delicious
meals served daily! Beauty and barber services available! Snacks
available throughout the day!
Lowest cost in the area for a private room which includes everything except RX. We accept private pay.
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page 9 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
cording to Lynne, boxwood was
used for carving during the Vic-
torian era. She says English box-
wood has a strong smell, which
people either love or hate.
Lynne says their customer base
includes a broad range of people.
She believes that because they
try to sell natural types of things,
younger people like to buy their
products. Te Natural Art Garden
Center is currently experimenting
with selling plants in pots that are
compostable. Te pots are made
out of post-consumer and pre-
consumer waste products. An
example of a pre-consumer waste
product would be sawdust. Lynne
is constantly looking for new and
diferent materials to sell. Her vi-
sion for the business is to expand
and continue to fnd new plants
to sell. She wants the public to
know that they are never too busy
to help people. Tey are willing to
help carry customers’ purchases
to their vehicle. She also enjoys
teaching people how to take care
of their plants.
Te Natural Art Garden Cen-
ter still has some fall products in
their inventory such as mums,
pumpkins and gourds. Soon Te
Natural Art Garden Center will
change their displays from a fall
to Christmas theme. Lynne will
be teaching a class on wreath-
making at 6:00 P.M. on Nov. 30th.
Te cost of the class is $1 which
includes all greenery and ribbons
for the wreaths. Participants may
also bring their own materials if
they wish. Holiday trees will soon
be available at the Natural Art
Garden Center, including Frazier
frs.
To fnd out more about Te
Natural Art Garden Center, you
can visit their blog at naturalart-
garden.wordpress.com. Lynne
says the blog tells the story of
their business in a chronological
way. Tey are also on Facebook.
To contact the Natural Art Gar-
den Center, you may also email
Lynne at eatmoreapples@aol.
com or call her at 0-36-3130.
Business
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
Wagon display to the right of the Natural Art Garden
Center.
Springtime Garden Center
815 Warren Ave · Front Royal. VA
(Across from Wendy`s)
540-635-8765
M-F: 8-6 · Sat: 8-5 · Sun: 12:30-5
Fall is the
PERFECT
time to plant!
Landscaping Design and Installation Available
Evergreens
Arriving for Fall
Colorado Blue Spruce,
Norway Spruce,
White Pine and Hemlock
Fall Bulbs
25% of
w/coupon 1 per purchase Expires 11/30/2010
One of areas
largest selections
of Evergreen Trees
3’ to 8’ Tall
Prices starting at $19.95
Compare our Quality and Prices
Follow us on Facebook for weekly specials
214 East Jackson Street • Front Royal, VA
540-622-6900
Offering: •StudentClassroom
•Behind-the-Wheel
•Re-Examinations
WeNowOffer
36-hourClassroom
Call for more info
New Students and Re-exams
Irina’s Gift Shop
Authentic Russian/East European
Gifts & Food
Mon. - Sat. 10:30 - 6:00 • 3349 Valley Pike
Winchester, VA 22602 • www.irinagiftshop.com
540.450.8600
10% of
Any Item!
with this coupon!
Page 10 • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Stephens City
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
By Sue Golden
Te Sherando Times
Te Miller House and Valley Fur-
niture Country Interiors held their
annual holiday open house last
week-end. Both stores are ready to
get you into the holiday spirit with
holiday music and decorations ga-
lore. Of course, all of the decora-
tions are for sale, so the stores are
a never ending whirl of red and sil-
ver, wood, Christmas trees, top hats
and fgurines. One big question on
the minds of those trekking to the
annual Holiday kickof extrava-
ganza is, “What will Brenda’s man-
tels look like?” Brenda and Kevin
Miller’s store is in Brenda’s child-
hood home. Brenda is an interior
decorator, as well as the owner of
Te Miller House. By selling their
products in an actual home, Brenda
feels she can more readily showcase
her unique, high quality wares. Te
Miller House sells Tom Seeley re-
productive furniture, and a wide
variety of household items, includ-
ing lamps, prints, bedding, pillows,
swags, bathroom accessories, dips
and food mixes, and seasonal items.
Walking through Te Miller House
is like walking into a wonderfully
decorated home. In the bathroom
you can fnd soaps and lotions and
bathrobes. Te bedrooms are set
with beautiful beds, bedside tables,
lamps and samples. Te little den
is currently the home of the “Life is
Good” franchise, with t-shirts, hats
and other gifts from the popular
“Life is Good” line. Te kitchen ta-
ble is all ready for a holiday party, as
is the festive dining room. Roaming
through the store is a delight to the
senses, and a treasure trove of deco-
rating ideas. Each room has its own
style, be it country, contemporary,
traditional or shaker.
Too busy to decorate for the holi-
days? Brenda can come and help get
you ready in style. Or take one of
Brenda’s interior decorating classes.
Te next class is forming for Turs-
day, December , 010, from 6:30
until 7:30 p.m. Te class is taught in
Te Miller House. Please call to re-
serve in advance, because Brenda’s
classes sell out quickly.
Unable to fnd that perfect holiday
gift? Know someone that needs a
little help? Attend the jewelry show
at Te Miller House on Wednesday,
December 1, 010, from 6:00 p.m.
until 8:00 p.m. Holiday and cos-
tume jewelry will be on display, and
refreshments will be served. Te
store will be open during the jew-
elry show for anyone wanting extra
shopping time.
Brenda has retail in her blood;
her parents Al and Marlene Man-
gum own Valley Furniture Country
Interiors, which is right next door
to Te Miller House. Valley Furni-
ture is equally unique, although of
a tad diferent style than Te Miller
House. Valley Furniture Country
Interiors sells painted reproduction
furniture, upholstered furniture by
Johnson Benchworks, lighting fx-
tures by Lt. Moses, redware, pewter,
pot pourie, folk art, and other taste-
ful accessories for the home. Te
two stores blend nicely together
and represent a wide range of styles.
Valley Furniture Country Interiors
will be celebrating 0 years in busi-
ness in 011. By working together,
the family saves on overhead costs,
a savings that they then pass along
to their customers.
It is clear that both stores are la-
bors of love. During the holiday
open house, Brenda hides some of
her best selling items throughout
the store, so customers get to play
scavenger hunt while they shop.
Brenda carries folk art fgurines
that are changed with the season.
Te holiday fgurines already sold
out. If you missed out, you’ll have to
wait until the new line comes in the
Spring. Other top sellers from the
holiday open house were the dips,
the white resin mice dressed in red
Santa hats and scarfs, and my favor-
ite: black and red top hats to top of
your tree.
Both stores are located on the Val-
ley Pike south of Stephens City near
the drive-in theatre. Tey will be
open every day until Christmas Eve.
Stop by the stores between 9 a.m.
and p.m. Mondays through Satur-
days, or on Sunday from1 p.m. un-
til p.m. Tey are ofering 1% of
on all in stock items, and 10% of all
orders, including upholstery. Tey
can be reached by calling (0) 869-
18.
Te Miller House and Valley Furniture open holiday season
The Miller House offers plenty of table accessories
for the holiday season.
•PC&Mac
•New&UsedSales
•In-HomeRepairs
•In-ShopRepairs
510 N. Royal Ave. • Front Royal
540-622-8055
SpringfieldComputers.com
Springfield
Computers
Electric Guitar, Bass
Setup and Repair
“THE SETUP”
Guitar lessons, Band and
Equipment Consultation
0-39-61
“Don’t get fed up, Get Setup!”
Sandy Larrick
thesetup99@gmail.com
www.myspace.com/sandylarrick
Warren County Fairgrounds
Indoor Flea Market
Antiques & Collectables
OPEN Saturdays and Sundays
from 9am-5pm
Space Available and New Vendors are Welcome
Rt 522 North • Front Royal, VA
540-635-5827
www.warrencountyfair.com
Don’t pay “Mall” prices! We have something for everyone!
Xmas Layaway Available!
Check out our unique selection of
unusual gifts for the Holidays!
Newtown Antiques
& Pawn
Sterling Silver:
Jewelry • Watches • Coins • Flatware • Enamel
Candle Sticks • Salts • Holloware
Gold:
Filigree • Antique/Estate Jewelry • Fine Jewelry
Diamond Jewelry • Watches • Coins
5441 Main St. Stephens City
540-869-2669
Storewide sale 10 to 25% off
every thing in store!
On the Road Driving School, LLC
Garland T. Williams, Owner
5336 Water Street, Stephens City, VA 22655
Ph: (540) 869-6105 Cell: (540) 247-3197
www.ontheroaddrivingschool.com
Driver Improvement Clinic
Driver Education Class
December 21 - January 3
Times to be determined.
Classes at 153 Narrow Ln.
Mt. View Christian Academy
Stephens City, VA
WE HAVE ONLINE DRIVER IMPROVEMENT CLASSES
Classes at Holiday Inn Express
142 Foxridge Ln. Winchester, VA 22601
Sun. November 28, 2010
9:30 a.m.-6:15 p.m.
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page 11 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Middletown public hearing
There will be a public hearing on Novem-
ber 18, 2010 at 7:00 PM in the Middletown
Fire Department Social Hall at which repre-
sentatives from the Town and County will
present a conceptual land use for an area
east of Interstate 81 Exit 302. This infor-
mational meeting isintended to update the
community on recent Town-County planning
efforts and to solicit public comment. Ques-
tions should bedirected to the Town Office at
869-2226 extension 10 or 14.
Newcomers club being formed
A branch of the national organization of
Newcomers Club is forming in Winchester
to welcome women new to the area. There
will be many fun activities including coffees,
crafts, hiking, golf, book club, cards, dinners
with spouses, and trips to get to know the
area,(whatever the women decide they’d
like to do) and chance to meet and become
involved with other in the community.All in-
terested women are encourage to attend a
coffee on Oct. 20 at 10:30For directions or
info call or email: Susan at 540-247-0712
sr28409@gmail.com or Melanie at 540-722-
8043 melhenry2@yahoo.com
Network for aging support
Meets the 3rd Monday of every month at
Westminster Canterbury in “The Abbey” on
the 2nd floor. Social time 11:30am-noon.
Share ideas & topics on senior issues 12-1
pm . All business associated with seniors are
invited. Contact: Lisa Carper 540-722-7458.
Spay today
Local low-cost, non-profit spay and neuter
program for cats and dogs in this area. Spay
Today works with local vets to obtain lower
prices for spaying and neutering cats and
dogs + initial tests and shots at the time of
surgery. To find out more, please call: 304-
728-8330 or go on-line at www.baacs.org.

Walk in faith
“To Walk In Faith, a grassroot nonprofit
formed to provide homeless aid, support
and relief in Winchester and Frederick Co
area is currently conducting an ongoing
donation drive of aluminum cans, copper
wire (stripped or unstripped) and recyclable
metals. Pickup is available in immediate
Winchester and Frederick Co. areas. Please
contact us at: towalkinfaith@hotmail.com or
(540)550-9146 leave voicemail please.”
Toys-For-Tots Beneft Dance
Nov 20, 2010 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm at the
Elks Club, Winchester, Va.
Live music, auctioned baskets as gifts,
snacks, refreshments, possible visit from
someone special for children. All monies
raised go to Toys-For-Tots. Kim Ritenour
540-868-9505
Winter Wonderland Fashion Show
The Shenandoah Valley Christian Academy
cheerleader squads will be hosting the first
annual Winter Wonderland Fashion Show on
December 11th at 6:00pm in the school gym.
There will be door prizes, music, food, cheer-
leaders, pictures, and SPECIAL GUESTS!!
... “Wizard Girls” Kim and Suzanne from the
Washington Wizards Cheerleaders will be
there to meet and greet, sign autographs,
talk to the audience and take photographs.
Tickets are $8 in advance, $10 at the door, or
$15 for VIP seating. For more details visit the
show website at http://fashionshow.svca.net.
SVCA, 4699 Valley Pike, Stephens City.

Black Friday Pancake Breakfast
Nov 26, 2010 7:00 am - 12:00 pm.
Stephens City Moose, 357 Fairfax Pike,
Stephens City, VA. Boy Scout Troop 22
will hold its 3rd annual Black Friday Pan-
cake Breakfast at the Stephens City Moose.
Adults $5.00 and children $3.00. All pro-
ceeds will benefit Boy Scout Troop 22.
Scott Alt 540-247-2140
Apple Blossom Mall Santa
This is a special time to visit Santa, this
time is reserved just for children with Autism/
Special Needs. The Apple Blossom Mall will
make the Santa area “Sensory Friendly”
with lower lighting and quieter surroundings.
Please feel free to forward this information to
educators, social workers or medical profes-
sionals who work with children with Autism/
Special Needs. Sunday, December 12 from
9am to 10am Mall address: 1850 Apple Blos-
som Drive Winchester, VA 22601 Enter at
the mall Food Court doors.If you, or some-
one you know has a child that would enjoy
this wonderful event, please contact Mindy at
540-931-8662 or by email at mindydawson@
citlink.net for more information. Or contact
the mall directly at 540-665-0202.
Be a Santa to a senior
November 15th to December 15th, Home
Instead Senior Care is coordinating a chari-
table service project to spread holiday cheer
among lonely, needy but appreciative se-
niors in our community. You can “Be a Santa
to a Senior” by volunteering to purchase
gift(s), participate in our wrapping party,
also deliver the gifts. The code name of the
seniors will be place on an ornament that is
then placed on a Christmas tree in the fol-
lowing locations: Walgreen’s@326 Amherst
St, 645 E. Jubal Early Drive in Winchester
and 701 Fairfax Pike in Stephens City. Also,
at K-Mart @ 1675 S. Pleasant Valley Rd in
Winchester and 465 South Street in Front
Royal. For more information you can call
Cheryl Strickland or Daronda Toole at our
office 540-722-8750.
Toys-For-Tots Beneft Dance
Nov 20, 2010 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm
Elks Club, Winchester, Va.
Live music, auctioned baskets as gifts,
snacks, refreshments, possible visit from
someone special for children. All monies
raised go to Toys-For-Tots. Kim Ritenour
540-868-9505.
Fashion Show
The Shenandoah Valley Christian Acad-
emy cheerleader squads will be hosting
the first annual Winter Wonderland Fash-
ion Show on December 11th at 6:00pm in
the school gym. There will be door prizes,
music, food, cheerleaders, pictures, and
SPECIAL GUESTS!! ... “Wizard Girls” Kim
and Suzanne from the Washington Wiz-
ards Cheerleaders will be there to meet and
greet, sign autographs, talk to the audience
and take photographs. Tickets are $8 in ad-
vance, $10 at the door, or $15 for VIP seat-
ing. For more details visit the show website
at http://fashionshow.svca.net. SVCA, 4699
Valley Pike, Stephens City.
Storytime at Bowman Library
Nov 17, 2010 10:30 am
Nov 20, 2010 10:30 am
Nov 24, 2010 10:30 am
Nov 27, 2010 10:30 am
Fall is here! Come hear stories of apples,
leaves, forest animals, and harvest time that
come with the autumn season. For more
information, contact Donna Hughes at Bow-
man Library at 540-869-9000 ext. 215 and
Jennifer Sutter at Handley Library at 662-
9041 ext. 21
CHURCH BRIEFS
Thanksgiving Weekend Tours
November 20 & 21, Belle Grove.
November 26 & 27, Friday and Saturday ~
10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Closed Sunday, November
28.
Walk off all that big holiday dinner with a
stroll through Belle Grove’s historic grounds.
Guides greet you in the 1797 Manor House,
which surely hosted its fair share of fam-
ily celebrations. Bring your family & guests
to partake in a bit of history, do some great
Christmas shopping, and enjoy a fine late fall
day together at a special place.Admission
to Belle Grove: $8 Adults; $4 Children 6 to
12 & National Trust Members; Free for Belle
Grove Members.
Community Thanksgiving Dinner

November 20th from 1-4 pm at Middletown
Presbyterian Church. Worship at 12:30, din-
ner from 1-4
All in the community are welcome. Corner
of 4th and Senseney Ave. For more informa-
The news
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
By Sue Golden
Te Sherando Times
Just in time for the holidays, Artistically Framed,
LLC and Curves have moved to their new loca-
tions at Fairfax Pike. Te joint move brings
the two companies into a brand new building,
which faces the Pike, and is near the Sherwin
Williams. Both spaces were designed for the spe-
cifc company. Walter Jagiello and Marie Wible,
co-owners of Artistically Framed, are looking
forward to being moved into their new space in
time for the Holiday rush. According to Mr. Ja-
giello, the shop will be ofcially opened on Mon-
day, November nd. Mr. Jagiello says “Fear not,
although we moved later than expected, there is
plenty of time to do holiday framing. Just look for
the “Custom Framing” sign.” Susan Curtis, owner
of the Stephens City Curves, moved Curves over
the week-end and is open for business. With the
store front presence, both businesses are hoping
for new customers, in addition to their loyal fol-
lowings. A Grand Opening is being planned for
later in the season.
Artistically Framed, LLC and Curves move to a new location
Nominal Opening Bid: $25,000
542 Jonathan Rd, Linden
3BR 2BA 1,463sf +/–
Sells: 8:00AM Tue., Nov. 23 on site
Open to the Public
Open this weekend, go to williamsauction.com
or call 800-801-8003 for details.
Many properties now available for online bidding!
Williams & Williams
JOHN NICHOLLS AUCTIONEER
VA AUC LIC#1552
Real Estate Auction
Front Royal Fraternal Order of Eagles 4265

Music provided by
DIXIE BREEZE BAND
Featuring Country and Southern Rock
Come out and have a GREAT time!
OPEN House/Membership Drive
Sat. Nov. 20th ~ 8-11pm
Open to the Public!!
www.sheilapack.net
Search like the Realtors do!
Sheila Pack
540-247-1438 Cell
RE/MAX Team Realty, 440 W. Jubal Early Drive, #200
Winchester, VA 22601 • 540-667-2400 Offce
Each Offce Independently Owned And Operated
Great end unit
towhome!
Move-in ready!
2 bed, 1.5 bath.
New paint and
carpet. Spacious
yard and patio.
New washer, dry-
er and fridge.
Convenient to 81
& 66, schools & library.
$900/month
FOR
RENT!
Page 1 • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
The news
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
HVAC Commercial and Residential
Commercial Refrigeration
Kitchen Equipment Repair / Maintenance
tion call the church office at 540-869-2456.
Olde Tyme Christmas
Dec 3, 2010 Time varies
Dec 4, 2010 Time varies
Dec 5, 2010 Time varies
Dec 11, 2010 Time varies
Dec 12, 2010 Time varies
Harpers Ferry, WV. 40th Annual Harpers
Ferry Olde Tyme Christmas 2010, Dec. 3, 4,
5, 11, & 12. Join us for a Traditional Christ-
mas Celebration Set in 1860’s, a time when
quaintly decorated streets come alive for the
holiday season. Sponsored by the Harpers
Ferry Merchant Association. For a full sched-
ule of events visit www.historicharpersferry.
com . Dec. 3 6:30 to 9:30; Dec. 4 9:00 to
9:00; Dec. 5 9:00 to 6:00; Dec. 11 9:00 to
9:00; Dec. 12 9:00 to 6:00
Holiday Bazaar
Dec 11, 2010 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Unitarian Universalist Church of the Shenan-
doah Valley, Route 11, Stephens City, VA
Winter Holiday Art and Craft Bazaar. Gifts for
all will abound! Musicians will play for your
shopping pleasure. Vendors will sell pottery,
jewelry, quilts, purses, scarves, hand-made
shopping bags, wreaths and swags, orna-
ments, hand-crafted body scrubs, and many
other items. You will also find “instant soups”
and “instant cakes” in jars to gift or prepare
at home, and a variety of fresh home-baked
goods. The “Ritzy Boutique” will specialize in
high quality gently-used gifts. There will also
be hourly raffles featuring a variety of won-
derful prizes. Your purchases can be gift-
wrapped at the church by the gift wrapping
elf. Children may request an elf to help them
choose presents for special people, and will
have an opportunity to decorate their own
wrapping paper. Childcare will be available
for any little people who don¹t enjoy shop-
ping. Delectable homemade brunch, lunch
and beverages will be served in our café.
Laurie Morrison 540-869-6965.
SVCA Winter youth sports leagues

CoEd Basketball (ages 4-12) and Indoor
Soccer (ages 8-12) - Children will be broken
out into age appropriate leagues. Tryouts on
Nov. 13th. Practice Dates Dec. 4th, 11th,
and 18th. Games every Saturday in Janu-
ary and February. Awards Night, March
5th. Times, more details and registration at
www.svcasports.net (click on Files & Links).
Shenandoah Valley Christian Academy,
4699 Valley Pike, Stephens City.
St. Thomas Chapel Church
Special Thanksgiving Service Thursday,
Nov 25th 10 am. Non denominational ser-
vice. Guest Pastor William Ballance.
Open to the Public. Middletown, VA.
Send your news briefs to:
angie@sherandotimes.com
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page 13 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
Classifeds
For Sale? Yard
Sale? Wanted?
List them here for
FREE!
Send your ad to:
angie@sherandotimes.com
King size electric blanket, dual
controls, off white color. $55.00
King size comforter, cranberry
color. $30.00
Call (540) 532-5780

1987 Wedding Dress. Pro-
fessionally sealed. Long
Sleeve. White satin with
elaborate beading and
lace. V-cut back. Cathedral
length train and veil. In-
cludes train carrier. Size
6 to 8. $500. Can email
photos. Call 571-405-8350.
2007 Ford Focus SES
Black, 50K, PW/PL/PM, Sun-
roof, Leather interior, 30 MPG.
$12,000 OBO.
Call (540) 877-1217
20 ton wood splitter $900,
used once.
Rototiller $700.00, used once.
Please call 869-2452
1902 Price & Teeple Fancy
Mahogany Upright Piano.
Works, but needs to be re-
stored. $2500. OBO.
Day - 540-868-1138
Golf Cart, battery operated,
cherry red, new paint, runs
great! $2700.00.
Call 540-551-2128
2004 White Yamaha Golf
Cart. Battery operated, rear
seat, full lights, runs great, ex-
cellent condition, garage kept
since purchased. Charger and
cover included. $2,800 OBO.
Call 540-667-2735
2002 BMW 525. Automatic 4
door sedan. Gold exterior/tan
leather seats/interior. 125K
miles. Has many features and
runs well. Interior/exterior is
very good condition. Can
email picture. $8,700.
540-723-0285
2008 Chrysler Town and
Country.
Call 540-550-5380
Handyman/repair/remodeling
business assets for sale. 2002
14 foot freightliner/sprinter van
fully loaded with tools. Ready
to run business now. To much
information to list so if you are
interested please email me
$28,000 for all or willing to
split tools and van. $22,000
for van and $6,000 for tools.
Call 703-930-3438/ cjhome-
solutionswv@yahoo.com
Vending machine business for
sale. Asking $38,000. This
is an established route with
excellent clients. There are 9
locations and a total of 16 ma-
chines.
Call 540-514-9858
King size Simmons frm pil-
lowtop mattress, low profle
box springs, & low profle
frame. Excellent, practically
new condition. Can e-mail pic-
ture $999/set.
Call 540-723-0285
7 Foot Air Hockey Table - New
Can E-Mail picture $250.00.
Call 540-723-0285
1999 Dodge 1500 Ram con-
version van. 7 passenger 4
captains seats/ rear bench.
Auto, V- 6. Nice Chrome
wheels. Green in color.
109,000 miles, very sharp &
well maintained in good con-
dition. New inspection. In the
Stephens City area. $3350
OBO. Call 540-327-0811
Exercise Bike for sale $50.00
Please call (540)955-6381 or
(540)955-4860
Need someone to cut a few
trees from my property, You
keep wood for compensation.
Call 540-869-2163
“To Walk In Faith”, is conduct-
ing a donation drive of alumi-
num cans, copper wire and
recyclable metals. Pickup is
available in immediate Win-
chester and Frederick Co. ar-
eas.
Please contact us at:
(540)550-9146
FOR SALE
WANTED
Page 1 • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Diversions
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
Last-Minute Steps
to Reduce Taxes
There is still time to do the year-end
math and see if you can reduce the
amount of income taxes you’ll pay.
Here are steps you can take:
—Invest in computer tax software
now, before the end of the year, and
run your estimated numbers to see
what they look like.
—Add up your medical bills for the
year. If you can deduct them on the
Schedule A tax form, schedule last-
minute dental and medical procedures
before the end of the year.
—Make a 13th payment on your
mortgage to increase the Form 1098
interest amount the mortgage com-
pany will send you. Every little bit
helps.
—Make your donations to Goodwill
and Salvation Army before the end of
the year. Be sure to get a dated receipt
with all of your items listed. Use “It’s
Deductible” tax software to calculate
the value of your donations. Beware
noting all of your items as being in
excellent condition. “Average” will
still get you some amount of donation
value without raising any red flags.
—If you were out of work and looked
for employment, add up your expens-
es for the job hunt. You can take mile-
age, clothing for the interview, costs
of preparing and copying your resume
if you were seeking employment in
the same field. The catch is that you
can’t wait a long time to see employ-
ment if you want to claim the benefits
of the job-hunt deductions. See IRS
publication 529 for more information.
Remember that you’ll be required to
pay taxes on any unemployment bene-
fits you received on any amount more
than $2,400.
—If you are self-employed, use holi-
day sales to purchase big-ticket items
you’ll need next year, such as updated
telephones, computer, printer, office
furniture and supplies.
—If you’ll need a new appliance
soon, consider getting it before the
end of the year to take advantage of the
tax credit for buying energy-efficient
models. See www.energystar.gov. The
same applies to any fast remodeling
projects such as energy efficient storm
doors and windows that can be done
before the end of the year.
—Put as much money as you can,
up to the limit, in an IRA. Get expert
financial advice and consider making
that a Roth IRA.
David Uffington regrets that he can-
not personally answer reader ques-
tions, but will incorporate them into
his column whenever possible. Write
to him in care of King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to
columnreply@gmail.com.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—23—
K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

W
e
e
k
l
y

S
e
r
v
i
c
e
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

1
5
,

2
0
1
0
November 17 – November 1 010 • Te Sherando Times • Page 1 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
It was journalist, entrepreneur and philan-
thropist Esther Dyson who made the follow-
ing sage observation: “Te Internet is like al-
cohol in some sense. It accentuates what you
would do anyway. If you want to be a loner,
you can be more alone. If you want to con-
nect, it makes it easier to connect.”
•••
In China, the Beijing Trafc Management
Bureau, which issues license plates, has re-
cently stopped allowing the number to
appear on the tags. Evidently the number
sounds like the word for “death” and is there-
fore considered to be unlucky.
•••
Here’s a startling statistic: If your family
is average, you throw out about $600 in un-
spoiled food every year.
•••
If you’re planning a vacation sometime
in the near future, you might want to keep
in mind Travel & Leisure magazine’s most
recent city rankings. Tese rankings didn’t
involve food or culture, though. For this par-
ticular list, readers voted on the cities with
the most- and least-attractive people. If you
enjoy people-watching, head to Charleston,
S.C., which reportedly boasts the most at-
tractive populace, followed by San Diego
and Savannah, Ga., in second and third plac-
es. Te U.S. cities with the least attractive
residents? According to the survey, they’re
Memphis, Baltimore and Philadelphia.
•••
Have you ever wondered what the larg-
est irrigated crop in the United States is? It’s
not soybeans, wheat or even corn; it’s grass,
mostly in lawns, parks and golf courses.
•••
In Turkey, a traditional Muslim wedding
lasts anywhere from four to seven days.
During that time the bride’s family and the
groom’s family participate in separate cel-
ebrations, and the bride and groom are not
allowed to see each other until the ceremony
at the end.
•••
Tought for the Day: “Te secret of life is
to appreciate the pleasure of being terribly,
terribly deceived.” -- Oscar Wilde
(c) 010 King Features Synd., Inc.
Diversions
To advertise in Te Sherando Times please contact
Angie Buterakos: angie@sherandotimes.com • 0-683-9197
or Alison Duvall: alisond@sherandotimes.com • 0-1-07
ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Don’t
feel sheepish about looking to spend
more time with that special person
during the upcoming holidays. Do it
because it’s the right thing to do.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)
Never mind letting misunderstandings
repair themselves. Consider speaking
up while the healing process can be
shorter and sweeter and leave fewer
scars.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)
Romance is easily awakened in the
Geminian heart, especially around
the happy holiday season. So go ahead
and make those plans with that special
someone.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Moon
Children can glow with their own inner
light as the holiday season magic takes
hold. It’s a very special time for Can-
cers and Libras together. Enjoy.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) It’s a
good time for you fabulous Felines to
take pleasure in your special gift for,
well, taking pleasure! Look for this
holiday season to give you every rea-
son to purr.
VIRGO (August 23 to September
22) This is a good time to let others
who are in your life get a little closer to
you. You’ll both find out what you’ve
been missing for far too long.
LIBRA (September 23 to October
22) Open up your eyes and see some
welcome surprises you’ve missed or
overlooked for too long. What you find
can lead to other favorable changes.
SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem-
ber 21) What you expect to be poten-
tially troublesome might simply be
especially challenging and well worth
your efforts to check out. Good luck!
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) A friendship might not
seem as trustworthy as you’d like. OK.
Ask your questions, get your answers
and settle the matter once and for all.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) A family situation moves
into a new area because of (or, maybe,
thanks to) some decisions you might
have felt you could not avoid making.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to Febru-
ary 18) You could be cutting it very
close if you hope to make those holi-
day plan changes in time to avoid
problems. Get a friend or family mem-
ber to help.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
Friends show how important you are
to them. Keep these precious relation-
ships thriving. They affect much that
will happen to the fabulous Fish in the
new year.
BORN THIS WEEK: Time spent at
home alone nurtures your mystic self.
Spending your time with others nur-
tures them.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—21—
• On Nov. 30, 1886, the Folies
Bergère in Paris introduces an elabo-
rate revue featuring women in sensa-
tional costumes. The theater spared no
expense, staging revues that featured
as many as 40 sets. Among other long
traditions, the show’s title always con-
tains 13 letters and includes the word
“Folie.”
• On Dec. 5, 1933, the 21st Amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution is rati-
fied, repealing the 18th Amendment
and bringing an end to the national
prohibition of alcohol. Mississippi,
the last dry state in the Union, ended
Prohibition in 1966.
• On Dec. 4, 1945, in an overwhelm-
ing vote of 65 to 7, the U.S. Senate
approves full U.S. participation in the
United Nations. Some senators pro-
posed a resolution designed to force
the president to receive congressional
consent before approving U.S. troops
for any U.N. peacekeeping forces. The
resolution was defeated.
• On Dec. 1, 1955, in Montgomery,
Ala., Rosa Parks is jailed for refusing
to give up her seat on a public bus to
a white man, a violation of the city’s
racial segregation laws. Parks’ refusal
was not merely brought on by her tired
feet, as is the popular legend. Local
civil-rights leaders had been planning
a challenge to Montgomery’s racist
bus laws for several months.
• On Dec. 3, 1967, 53-year-old Lewis
Washkansky receives the first human
heart transplant in Cape Town, South
Africa. After surgery, he was given
drugs to suppress his immune system
and keep his body from rejecting the
heart. He died 18 days later from dou-
ble pneumonia.
• On Dec. 2, 1972, the Temptations
earn the last of their four chart-top-
ping hits when “Papa Was a Rollin’
Stone” reaches No. 1 on the Billboard
Hot 100. Earlier hits by producer-
songwriter Smokey Robinson were
“The Way You Do the Things You Do”
(1964) and “My Girl” (1965).
• On Nov. 29, 1981, actress Natalie
Wood, who starred in such movies as
“Rebel Without a Cause” and “West
Side Story,” drowns in a boating acci-
dent near California’s Catalina Island.
It was believed she somehow slipped
overboard while untying a dinghy
attached to the boat.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

W
e
e
k
l
y

S
e
r
v
i
c
e
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

1
5
,

2
0
1
0
1. LITERATURE: Who wrote the
novels “Northanger Abbey” and
“Emma”?
2. MATH: What is the equivalent of
the Roman numeral DXVI?
3. ANATOMY: What is the colored
part of the eye called?
4. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of
food is fusilli?
5. MEASUREMENTS: How many
acres are in 1 square mile?
6. PRESIDENTS: Which U.S. presi-
dent created the Purple Heart medal?
7. GOVERNMENT: Which amend-
ment to the U.S. Constitution abol-
ished slavery?
8. HISTORY: What did American
patriot Paul Revere do for a living?
9. SCIENCE: What is the alloy steel
mostly made of?
10. GEOGRAPHY: What is the larg-
est country in South America in land
size?
Answers
1. Jane Austen
2. 516
3. Iris
4. A type of pasta
5. 640
6. George Washington
7. 13th Amendment
8. He was a silversmith
9. Iron and carbon
10. Brazil
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—12—
1
.

I
s

t
h
e

b
o
o
k

o
f

2

J
o
h
n

i
n

t
h
e

O
l
d

o
r

N
e
w

T
e
s
t
a
m
e
n
t

o
r

n
e
i
t
h
e
r
?
2
.

I
n

I
s
a
i
a
h

4
5
:
1
,

w
h
i
c
h


G
r
e
a
t


w
a
s

r
e
s
p
o
n
s
i
b
l
e

f
o
r

o
v
e
r
t
h
r
o
w
i
n
g

t
h
e

B
a
b
-
y
l
o
n
i
a
n

e
m
p
i
r
e
?

A
l
e
x
a
n
d
e
r
,

C
y
r
u
s
,

X
e
r
x
e
s
,

T
i
b
e
r
i
u
s
3
.

W
h
a
t

y
o
u
n
g

m
a
n

f
e
l
l

f
r
o
m

a

w
i
n
-
d
o
w

a
n
d

d
i
e
d

d
u
r
i
n
g

a

s
e
r
m
o
n

b
y

t
h
e

a
p
o
s
t
l
e

P
a
u
l
?

E
u
t
y
c
h
u
s
,

G
a
m
a
l
i
e
l
,

S
i
s
e
r
a
,

M
a
l
a
c
h
i
4
.

H
o
w

m
a
n
y

p
r
e
c
i
o
u
s

s
t
o
n
e
s

w
e
r
e

p
a
r
t
s

o
f

t
h
e

b
r
e
a
s
t
p
l
a
t
e

w
o
r
n

b
y

O
l
d

T
e
s
t
a
m
e
n
t

p
r
i
e
s
t
s
?

2
,

7
,

1
2
,

2
0
5
.

F
r
o
m

P
r
o
v
e
r
b
s

3
0
:
3
3
,

s
u
r
e
l
y

t
h
e

c
h
u
r
n
i
n
g

o
f

m
i
l
k

b
r
i
n
g
e
t
h

f
o
r
t
h

.
.
.
?
F
o
o
d
,

B
l
o
o
d
,

S
t
r
i
f
e
,

B
u
t
t
e
r
6
.

W
h
e
r
e

d
i
d

G
i
d
e
o
n

m
e
e
t

a
n

a
n
g
e
l
?
P
r
i
s
o
n
,

F
i
e
l
d
,

O
a
k

t
r
e
e
,

W
e
l
l
A
N
S
W
E
R
S
:

1
)

N
e
w
;

2
)

C
y
r
u
s
;

3
)

E
u
t
y
c
h
u
s
;

4
)

1
2
;

5
)

B
u
t
t
e
r
;

6
)

O
a
k

t
r
e
e
W
i
l
s
o
n

C
a
s
e
y

s


G
o
l
f

T
r
i
v
i
a


2
0
1
1

B
o
x

C
a
l
e
n
d
a
r

i
s

n
o
w

a
v
a
i
l
a
b
l
e

f
r
o
m

S
e
l
l
e
r
s

P
u
b
l
i
s
h
i
n
g
.
©

2
0
1
0

K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

S
y
n
d
.
,

I
n
c
.
1. How many times has Torii Hunter
hit .300 or better for a season during
his 14-year major-league career?
2. Name the three catchers who
have won the American League Most
Valuable Player Award since 1976.
3. Name the last fullback to be
enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of
Fame.
4. Who was the last Butler player
before Gordon Hayward to play in
the NBA?
5. Two NHL goalies have recorded
three consecutive 40-win seasons.
Name them.
6. When was the last time before
the 2010 men’s soccer World Cup
that the two finalists from the previ-
ous World Cup were eliminated in the
first round?
7. Name the person who holds the
mark for most boxing world title
fights refereed (172 in 34 years).
Answers
1. None, despite a .305 average in
the postseason.
2. Thurman Munson (1976), Ivan
Rodriguez (1999) and Joe Mauer
(2009).
3. Larry Csonka, in 1987.
4. Ralph O’Brien, in 1953.
5. San Jose’s Evgeni Nabokov
(2007-10) and New Jersey’s Martin
Brodeur (2005-08).
6. It had never occurred before
2010.
7. Richard Steele.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
1. Name the group that was original-
ly called The Poquellos. Where were
they from?
2. Who sang “Sea Cruise,” and
when?
3. Where and when did Diana Ross
& the Supremes give their last perfor-
mance before Ross went solo?
4. What was the title of George Har-
rison’s triple album?
5. Name all four bands that Grace
Slick was in. How did she get that
“Slick” name?
6. Name the working title of the
Beatles film “Help!”
Answers
1. The Shirelles. The group formed
in 1958 in New Jersey and came to the
attention of an agent with their song “I
Met Him On a Sunday.”
2. Frankie Ford, in 1958. The song
has been covered by a number of art-
ists, including Cliff Richard, John
Fogerty and Johnny Rivers.
3. In Las Vegas in 1970 at the Fron-
tier Hotel and Casino.
4. “All Things Must Pass,” released
in 1970. It included two albums of
songs and one of jams with other
musicians.
5. The Great Society, Jefferson Air-
plane, Jefferson Starship and Starship.
The “Slick” wasn’t a stage name. She
got the name when she married Ger-
ald Slick in 1961.
6. The working title was “Eight
Arms to Hold You.” The film came
out in 1965.
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
F
W
S



M
i
n
d
G
y
m
N
o
v
e
m
b
e
r

1
5
,

2
0
1
0

—22—
• It was American cartoonist,
humorist and journalist Kin Hubbard
who made the following sage obser-
vation: “There’s no secret about suc-
cess. Did you ever know a successful
man who didn’t tell you about it?”
• Next time you’re in Iowa, you
might want to stop by the rural town
of Riverside, which touts itself as the
future birthplace of Captain James T.
Kirk. Yep, the future birthplace. It
seems that “Star Trek” creator Gene
Roddenberry asserted that the charac-
ter of James Tiberius Kirk was born in
Iowa, but he didn’t specify exactly
where. In 1985, the Riverside City
Council voted to declare their town
the future birthplace of the character,
later writing to Roddenberry and
receiving his approval. In honor of its
newfound claim to fame, the city
began hosting an annual Trek Fest,
complete with a Spockapalooza battle
of the bands.
• If you enjoy cooking, you might
have heard of some of the following
cookbooks: “Kill It and Grill It,” “The
Joy of Pickling,” “Full of Beans,”
“The Stinking Cookbook” and “I
Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat!” Then
again, maybe not.
• The term “bric-a-brac,” usually
used to refer to a collection of tawdry
trinkets, comes from the French,
where its original meaning was “at
random.”
• Most parents of small children
know that trampolines can be danger-
ous, and they are. Every year, nearly
100,000 people receive emergency-
room treatment for injuries sustained
while using trampolines. Those
injuries are hardly ever fatal, though.
Pools, on the other hand, are far more
deadly; more than 1,000 people in the
United States die in swimming pools
annually.
***
Thought for the Day: If living con-
ditions don’t stop improving in this
country, we’re going to run out of
humble beginnings for our great men.
—Russell P. Askue
© 2010 King Features Synd., Inc.
By Samantha Weaver
K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

W
e
e
k
l
y

S
e
r
v
i
c
e
J
a
n
u
a
r
y

1
1
,

2
0
1
0
Reader Mail
DEAR NASCAR THIS WEEK: I
liked your answer to Kathy Rhudy
concerning Jimmie Johnson. I say
if a person has talent they deserve
the rewards. Jimmie Johnson is a
good driver. I say hooray for him.
Some people don’t like Kyle Busch,
but I say he is a good driver. Give
him his due. -- Norma Lee, Shoals,
Ind.
DEAR NASCAR THIS WEEK:
NASCAR is concerned about the
declining attendance, and declin-
ing sales. Could the possibility of a
recession have anything to do with
it? -- John J. Johnson Jr., Liberty
Center, Ohio
DEAR JOHN: Hardly anyone has
discussed the decline without cit-
ing the recession. Tere are other
factors, as well.
DEAR NASCAR THIS WEEK:
Here are some reasons why the
NASCAR “bubble” has burst:
1. Te Chase ... silly and a waste
of time. Why run 36 races and then
have a 10-race champion crowned?
Asinine. Te most consistent driv-
er should win the championship.
2. Tirty-six races are waaaaay
too much. Run 25, crown a champ,
and leave the people with real an-
ticipation for the next year.
3.Eliminate the cookie-cutter
tracks. Boring races.
4. Go back to NASCAR’S roots.
Run two races at Darlington. Re-
vamp North Wilkesboro and run
there again. Return to the Rock --
Rockingham.
5. Qualify 40 cars per race at 1-
mile-plus tracks. Tirty-six cars
at 3/4-mile-and-under tracks. No
locked-in positions. Qualify on
speed or go home.
I grew up a NASCAR fan. My
family was going to Dover and
Richmond (old 1/2-mile track)
when they only had grandstands
on the front stretch. Ten years ago
I was sure NASCAR was going to
go down the tubes. It is not a stick-
and-ball sport. Don’t try (to) make
it that. All your yuppie fans left
after three years. -- Harold Sultz-
baugh, Hanover, Pa.
DEAR NASCAR THIS WEEK:
Two reasons (for the sport’s slump)
are that NASCAR fans like me are
tired of “NASCAR.” Two examples:
mystery cautions or cautions for
the slightest little thing, and only
enforcing the rules it wants to en-
force. (Kyle) Busch went below the
line and improved his position
(Talladega) and was not forced be-
low the line. He did not win that
truck race by the rules that NAS-
CAR itself makes.
Tose are two quick reasons why
NASCAR is less than it was. I will
add a third, but it is more of a per-
sonal one. Rick Hendricks is the
worst thing that ever happened to
NASCAR. He has my sympathy for
his personal loss, and I wouldn’t
wish that on anyone, but the fact is
he’s a convicted felon -- although
he did buy a pardon -- and should
have been thrown out of NASCAR.
When an organization allows
crooks to be team owners, it tells
you a lot about the organization.
Te same thing for (Gene) Haas
also.Owners should be limited
to two teams, and all afliations
to other teams should be tightly
scrutinized and very limited. --
Ron Bean, Pachuta, Miss.

DEAR RON: Arbitrary rules en-
forcement was a part of NASCAR
long before the slump.Monte Dut-
ton has covered motorsports for
Te Gaston (N.C.) Gazette since
1993. He was named writer of the
year by the National Motorsports
Press Association in 2008. His blog
NASCAR Tis Week (http://nascar.
rbma.com) features all of his re-
porting on racing, roots music and
life on the road.
E-mail Monte at
nascar_thisweek@yahoo.com.
(c) 010 King Features Synd., Inc.
—37—
Biffle Is Racing
as Hard as He Can
This hasn’t been the season Greg
Biffle expected, though he certainly
has time to pick up the pieces.
The 39-year-old Biffle didn’t win
during the 2008 regular season, but
after making the Chase, proceeded to
win its first two races. He wound up
third in the Sprint Cup standings.
For now, Biffle’s first priority is
making the Chase, but that doesn’t
mean he’s going to back off.
“We’re certainly not racing conserv-
atively,” he said. “We’re racing to win,
but we’re not going to do anything stu-
pid.
“We know we have to stay in (the top
12 in order to qualify for the Chase).
It’s tight ... and we’re doing all we can
do.”
Roush Fenway Racing put Biffle in
what was then still the Winston Cup
Series back in 2003. He finished sec-
ond in the Chase standings two years
later. A year ago, three Roush Fenway
drivers — Biffle, Carl Edwards and
Matt Kenseth — made the Chase.
They could do it again, but the posi-
tions of Biffle and Kenseth are hardly
secure as the regular season enters its
final four races.
“We’re just going to have to be bet-
ter,” said Biffle. “We know that. We’re
nervous about getting in (the Chase),
and anything can happen. ... There are
some races we’re concerned about
leading up to the cutoff (end of the reg-
ular season), and we know we’re on
the bubble, so it’s important to have
good finishes right now.”
Biffle, from Vancouver, Wash., is
one of only two drivers to have won
championships in both the Nation-
wide and Camping World Truck
series. (Johnny Benson is the other.)
Biffle also was rookie of the year in
both series. He came up through
NASCAR’s developmental system,
winning track championships early in
his career at Tri-City Raceway in West
Richland, Wash., and Portland (Ore.)
Speedway.
“Really, we’re working as hard as we
can every week to bring the best race
cars we can to the track,” said Biffle.
“It’s important that we have the best
possible equipment right now.
“We’re racing as hard as we can.
We’re not taking big risks, but, at the
same time, we’re racing for the win.”
Monte Dutton has covered motor-
sports for The Gaston (N.C.) Gazette
since 1993. He was named writer of
the year by the National Motorsports
Press Association in 2008. His
blog NASCAR This Week
(http://nascar.rbma.com) features all
of his reporting on racing, roots music
and life on the road. E-mail Monte at
nascar_thisweek@yahoo.com.
© 2009 King Features Synd., Inc.
Roush Fenway driver Greg Biffle says his first priority is making the Chase,
but that doesn’t mean he’s going to back off from trying to win races. (Photo:
Getty Images)
K
i
n
g

F
e
a
t
u
r
e
s

W
e
e
k
l
y

S
e
r
v
i
c
e
P
o
s
t
i
n
g

d
a
t
e

A
u
g
u
s
t

1
7
,

2
0
0
9
Race attendance is
declining. Attendance at
the 2010 Brickyard 500
was about half that of 2007.
(Associated Press photo)
Page 16 • Te Sherando Times • November 17 – November 1, 010 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.SherandoTimes.com
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
Nitro-Fill
SPECIAL
Fill All Tires with Nitrogen, Includes
12 mos. Road Side Assistance, Road
Hazard Protection, Free Pressure
Checks, Tire Replacement & Much
More. Helps Increase Fuel Economy,
Extend Tire Life, Improves Handling,
Reduces Pressure Fluctuations
39.95+ Tax
PRE-HOLIDAY TRAVEL SPECIAL!
BE ROAD READY!
10% off any service & repairs through Nov. 24th,
plus 23 pt. vehicle safety inspection.
$
ROTATE &
BALANCE &
4 WHEEL
BRAKE CHECK
39.95
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
+ Tax
$
DETAIL SPECIAL
2004 Ford Edge
Sel Model
73,531 Miles
#A818B
$17,937
WAS WOW! ONLY
$20,995
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
Mopar
®
Value Line Brake
Pad or Shoe Replacement
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
Includes: Inspection of hoses & belts • Mopar
®

antifreeze replacement (1-gal max) • Pressure test
system • Diesel engines and additional parts/labor
extra • Vehicles requiring longer-life antifreeze or 2
or more gallons are higher
54.95
$
Cooling System
Service
Drain/Replace
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
All Three Services
One Extra-Low Price
1
34.95+ Tax
$
Includes: Oil & Filter change • Wiper
Blades • 16-point Vehicle Checkup
Plus a 10% discount on any needed
repair or service
2
99.95
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
+ Tax
$
Reg. $149.99
• Hand Wash & Wax Exterior
• Vacuum & Shampoo Interior
• Clean & Protect Leather
(If equipped)
• Clean Engine • Clean Trunk
• Treat All Exterior Trim
(MOST CARS, VANS & TRUCKS SLIGHTLY HIGHER)
4-wheel
alignment
15.00 OFF
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
$
THE OLDEST CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP DEALERSHIP
SERVICING WARREN CO. PAGE CO. FREDERICK CO. & THE WINCHESTER AREA
Buy one Oil & Filter change, for $29.95
And Get the Next 3 For
FREE!!!
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
Oil change coupons expire 24 months from the date of the original lube, oil & flter purchase at participating Chrys-
ler Group LLC dealers only. (Up to 5 quarts only. Additional charges may be applied for HEMI® and fuid disposal.)
Service Contract Essential Care oil change offer is made by the dealer, who is solely responsible for it. Plan offered
on 1983 to current year vehicles (excluding Crossfre, Viper, Prowler, Diesels, SRT10® and all other vehicles that
require synthetic or semi-synthetic oils.) Competetive makes also apply.
Expires Nov. 30, 2010
FREE
battery charge
& system test
WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS!
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY TO SERVE YOU!
2006 Chrysler
300 C
24,419 Miles
#11Li10A
$21,990
$19,584
WAS WOW! ONLY
2008 Ford
Fusion SE
39,572 Miles
#A845C
$13,990
$14,995
WAS WOW! ONLY
+ Tax
1 - Includes oil replacement up to 5 qt., new Mopar oil flter, 2 front wiper blades, 16-point vehicle checkup, and dealer
parts, installation and labor. Additional charges may be applied for diesel, V10, HEMI V8, fuid disposal, synthetic oils.
Special wheels/specialty vehicles slightly higher. Price does not include repairs that might be required after inspection.
Offer valid only for Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, Plymouth & Eagle vehicles except Chrysler Crossfre. Must present
coupon when order is written. Customer is responsible for local tax.
2 - Redeemable at this dealership only. Not applicable to previous charges or old accounts. Offer valid for a single
vehicle following the 16-point Vehicle Checkup. Discount valid for Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram, Plymouth & Eagle
vehicles. Not redeemable for cash or body shop repairs. Cannot be used with any other advertised specials, rebates
or like services.
99.95+ Tax
$
Dodge Truck
Includes: Front or rear disc brake pad or shoe
replacement with Mopar® Value Line Brakes
(semimetallic) • Inspect rotor, drum and caliper
(refacing/machining extra) • Check brake fuid
level • Road test vehicle • Ram heavy Duty
4x4/2500/3500 trucks higher • Vehicles not
covered by Mopar Value Line Brakes are higher
*Limited lifetime Warranty on Value Line Brake
Pads and Shoes
2008 Jeep
Patriot Limited
49,335 Miles
# A853A
$10,928
$13,995
WAS WOW! ONLY
65 YEARS IN BUSINESS! 65 YEARS IN BUSINESS!

Related Interests