T2.

45 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

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The influence of climate change on the erosion of beaches and cliffs
Sea level rise, more extreme weather, higher rainfall and greater wave energy will accelerate erosion of beaches and coastal cliffs. The coast of east and southeast Britain is particularly vulnerable due to its open ocean setting and soft cliffs. The nature and speed of these changes, and consequent management responses to these, will have major implications for society, habitats, industry and infrastructure and thus need to be understood. In particular, more needs to be known about which parts of the coast are most vulnerable to coastal erosion, where sediment liberated by erosion is transported, and how long it remains on the foreshore. Dr John Rees, from the British Geological Survey, and colleagues will model shoreline changes and sediment sources and sinks to provide new information about the mobility of sediment on East Anglian beaches. They will simulate sediment transport to predict annual drift rates under a range of climatic, sea-level and management scenarios, and develop a profile evolution model to predict changes in foreshore shape. The focus is on a stretch of coastline between Weybourne and Happisburgh in East Anglia characterised by mixed sediment and soft rocks, so the results and generic modelling techniques will be able to be applied to any soft-cliff coastline. The researchers will predict shoreline evolution using scenarios of future climate change and storylines of socio-economic trends. They will also explore novel ways of communicating the results, making use of computer visualisations. The results will allow specific coastal changes and their implications and costs to be explored with scientists and decision-makers such as those at DEFRA and the Environment Agency. Better models of coastal profile evolution and sediment transportation will lead to a more accurate evaluation of different coastal management strategies. The models will also contribute important descriptions of coastal changes to the Tyndall Centre's Regional Coastal Simulator.

Contrasting beach sediment over a very short distance of coast either side of a landslide at Sidestrand, North Norfolk, looking north-west (top) and southeast. A new Tyndall project is simulating the effect of sea level rise, changing wave patterns and increases in rainfall on East Anglian coastal cliffs and beaches to develop sustainable solutions to climate change.

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T2.45 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

Credit: © NERC 2002 More information Contact the lead investigator of Project T2.45 (An integrated coastal-sediment dynamics and shoreline response simulator): Dr John Rees British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK Phone: +44 (0) 115 936 3296; Fax: +44 (0) 115 936 3460 Email: jgre@bgs.ac.uk Other researchers involved in this project are: Mr Bernard Humphreys and Dr Steve Pearson, British Geological Survey Dr Jim Hall and Dr Mike Walkden, Department of Civil Engineering, Bristol University Dr Robert Nicholls, Flood Hazard Research Centre, Middlesex University Dr Simon Shackley, Manchester School of Management, UMIST Dr Tom Spencer, Cambridge Coastal Research Unit, Cambridge University Dr Chris Vincent, Dr Larissa Naylor, Dr Tim O'Riordan and Dr Andrew Jordan, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia Project duration: September 2002 to May 2004 Useful web sites: The Tyndall Centre: www.tyndall.ac.uk British Geological Survey: www.bgs.ac.uk Bristol University's cliffSCAPE model: www.cen.bris.ac.uk/civil/staff/jwh/Cliffs/index.html Middlesex University's Flood Hazard Research Centre: www.fhrc.mdx.ac.uk/contents.html

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