T2.

33 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

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Adapting to changing water availability in agriculture and leisure
Climate change is expected to cause higher summer temperatures, less summer rainfall and more evaporation in England. Farmers will consequently need to increase their water use to irrigate crops. In addition, rural water resources are facing pressure from increased irrigation of sports grounds and golf courses. Water resource managers need to develop sustainable strategies to meet the demand for water from agriculture and leisure activities while ensuring the environment is protected. Dr Keith Weatherhead, from Cranfield University at Silsoe, and colleagues are examining how the agriculture and leisure sectors can adapt under a range of possible future climates. The hydrological studies will focus on two contrasting catchments in East Anglia: one supplied mainly by underground water and one supplied mainly by surface runoff. The researchers will use computer models to simulate future availability of surface and ground water considering gradual climate change, year-to-year climate variability and extreme weather events. They will then model land use and crop yields on a range of typical farms to see how farmers are likely to respond. They will explore the potential of agent-based simulation and bargaining modelling to simulate decisions and negotiations under varying conditions. The integrated framework will allow them to assess different adaptation options, such as storage reservoirs, changing crops, or water conservation incentives. The results will provide scenarios of water availability over the next 50 years, and information about how agriculture and leisure industries might respond, the range of adaptation options available, the sensitivity of rural businesses and environments to these options, and the time required for adaptation. The results will be presented at different scales to inform individual farmers, catchment managers, regional legislators and national policy-makers. Through reports, workshops and technical meetings the researchers will recommend policies that help regulate water demand, enhance adaptation and minimise environmental impacts of climate change.

Rural water resources are under pressure from climate change and increased demand. A new Tyndall project is investigating ways that irrigation-dependent agricultural and leisure activities can adapt to reduced water availability. Credit: © Trudie Dockerty More information Contact the lead investigator of Project T2.33 (Sustainable water resources: a framework for assessing adaptation options in the rural sector): Dr Keith Weatherhead Institute of Water and Environment, Cranfield University, Silsoe Campus, Bedford, MK45 4DT, UK Phone: +44 (0) 1525 86 3336; Fax: +44 (0) 1525 86 3334 Email: k.weatherhead@cranfield.ac.uk Other researchers involved in this project are: Dr Jerry Knox, Dr Robin Matthews and Dr Peter Robbins, Institute of Water and Environment, Cranfield University, Silsoe Dr Tom Downing and Ms Cindy Warwick, Stockholm Environment Institute, Oxford

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T2.33 - fact sheet

http://tyndall.e-collaboration.co.uk/publications/fact_sheets/untitled/t2_...

Professor Nigel Arnell, Department of Geography, University of Southampton Dr Stephen Ramsden and Dr James Gibbons, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nottingham Dr Kevin Hiscock and Dr Declan Conway, University of East Anglia Dr Jo Hossell, ADAS Research Foundation Project duration: October 2002 to September 2005 Useful web sites: The Tyndall Centre: www.tyndall.ac.uk Cranfield University's Institute of Water and Environment: www.silsoe.cranfield.ac.uk/iwe Sustainable Water Resources project Website: www.silsoe.cranfield.ac.uk/iwe/projects/tyndall-T2-33 Environment Agency Catchment Abstraction Management Strategies: www.environment-agency.gov.uk/subjects/waterres Climate change and demand for water: www.eci.ox.ac.uk/ccdew

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